[Federal Register Volume 83, Number 227 (Monday, November 26, 2018)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 60696-60728]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2018-25080]



[[Page 60695]]

Vol. 83

Monday,

No. 227

November 26, 2018

Part III





Environmental Protection Agency





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40 CFR Parts 60 and 63





National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants and New Source 
Performance Standards: Petroleum Refinery Sector Amendments; Final Rule

Federal Register / Vol. 83 , No. 227 / Monday, November 26, 2018 / 
Rules and Regulations

[[Page 60696]]


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ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

40 CFR Parts 60 and 63

[EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0682; FRL-9986-68-OAR]
RIN 2060-AT50


National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants and New 
Source Performance Standards: Petroleum Refinery Sector Amendments

AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

ACTION: Final rule.

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SUMMARY: This action finalizes amendments to the petroleum refinery 
National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) 
(referred to as Refinery MACT 1 and Refinery MACT 2) and to the New 
Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for Petroleum Refineries to clarify 
the requirements of these rules and to make technical corrections and 
minor revisions to requirements for work practice standards, 
recordkeeping, and reporting which were proposed in the Federal 
Register on April 10, 2018. This action also finalizes amendments to 
the compliance date of the requirements for existing maintenance vents 
from August 1, 2017, to December 26, 2018, which were proposed in the 
Federal Register on July 10, 2018.

DATES: This final rule is effective on November 26, 2018. The 
incorporation by reference of certain publications listed in the rule 
was approved by the Director of the Federal Register as of June 24, 
2008.

ADDRESSES: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established a 
docket for this action under Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0682. All 
documents in the docket are listed on the https://www.regulations.gov 
website. Although listed, some information is not publicly available, 
e.g., confidential business information (CBI) or other information 
whose disclosure is restricted by statute. Certain other material, such 
as copyrighted material, is not placed on the internet and will be 
publicly available only in hard copy form. Publicly available docket 
materials are available either electronically through https://www.regulations.gov, or in hard copy at the EPA Docket Center, EPA WJC 
West Building, Room Number 3334, 1301 Constitution Ave. NW, Washington, 
DC. The Public Reading Room hours of operation are 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 
p.m. Eastern Standard Time (EST), Monday through Friday. The telephone 
number for the Public Reading Room is (202) 566-1744, and the telephone 
number for the Docket Center is (202) 566-1742.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For questions about this final action, 
contact Ms. Brenda Shine, Sector Policies and Programs Division (E143-
01), Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards, U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27711; 
telephone number: (919) 541-3608; fax number: (919) 541-0516; and email 
address: shine.brenda@epa.gov. For information about the applicability 
of the NESHAP to a particular entity, contact Ms. Maria Malave, Office 
of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance, U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency, EPA WJC South Building, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, Washington, 
DC 20460; telephone number: (202) 564-7027; and email address: 
malave.maria@epa.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:
    Preamble acronyms and abbreviations. We use multiple acronyms and 
terms in this preamble. While this list may not be exhaustive, to ease 
the reading of this preamble and for reference purposes, the EPA 
defines the following terms and acronyms here.

AFPM American Fuel and Petrochemical Manufacturers
API American Petroleum Institute
AWP Alternative Work Practice
CAA Clean Air Act
CBI confidential business information
CFR Code of Federal Regulations
CEDRI Compliance and Emissions Data Reporting Interface
CDX Central Data Exchange
CRA Congressional Review Act
CRU catalytic reforming unit
DCU delayed coking unit
EPA Environmental Protection Agency
FCCU fluid catalytic cracking unit
FR Federal Register
HAP hazardous air pollutant(s)
lbs pounds
LEL lower explosive limit
MACT maximum achievable control technology
MPV miscellaneous process vent
NAAQS National Ambient Air Quality Standards
NESHAP National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants
NOCS Notice of Compliance Status
NSPS New Source Performance Standard
NTTAA National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act
OEL open-ended line
OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration
PM particulate matter
ppb parts per billion
ppm parts per million
PRA Paperwork Reduction Act
PRD pressure relief device
psi pounds per square inch
psia pounds per square inch absolute
RFA Regulatory Flexibility Act
RIN Regulatory Information Number
RSR Refinery Sector Rule
SMR steam-methane reforming
TTN Technology Transfer Network
UMRA Unfunded Mandates Reform Act
VOC volatile organic compounds

    Background information. On April 10, 2018, and July 10, 2018, the 
EPA proposed revisions to the Petroleum Refineries NESHAP and NSPS, 
(April 2018 Proposal and July 2018 Proposal), respectively (83 FR 
15458, April 10, 2018; 83 FR 31939, July 10, 2018). After consideration 
of the public comments we received on these proposed rules, in this 
action, we are finalizing revisions to the NESHAP and NSPS rules. We 
summarize the significant comments we received regarding the April 2018 
Proposal and the July 2018 Proposal and provide our responses in this 
preamble. In addition, a Response to Comments document, which is in the 
docket for this rulemaking, summarizes and responds to additional 
comments which were received regarding the April 2018 Proposal. A 
``track changes'' version of the regulatory language that incorporates 
the changes in this action is also available in the docket.
    Organization of this document. The information in this preamble is 
organized as follows:

I. General Information
    A. Does this action apply to me?
    B. Where can I get a copy of this document and other related 
information?
    C. Judicial Review and Administrative Reconsideration
II. Background
III. What is included in this final rule?
    A. Clarifications and Technical Corrections to Refinery MACT 1
    B. Clarifications and Technical Corrections to Refinery MACT 2
    C. Clarifications and Technical Corrections to NSPS Ja
IV. Summary of Cost, Environmental, and Economic Impacts and 
Additional Analyses Conducted
V. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews
    A. Executive Orders 12866: Regulatory Planning and Review and 
Executive Order 13563: Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review
    B. Executive Order 13771: Reducing Regulations and Controlling 
Regulatory Costs
    C. Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA)
    D. Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA)
    E. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA)
    F. Executive Order 13132: Federalism
    G. Executive Order 13175: Consultation and Coordination With 
Indian Tribal Governments
    H. Executive Order 13045: Protection of Children From 
Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks
    I. Executive Order 13211: Actions Concerning Regulations That

[[Page 60697]]

Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use
    J. National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act (NTTAA) and 
1 CFR part 51
    K. Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions To Address 
Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income 
Populations
    L. Congressional Review Act (CRA)

I. General Information

A. Does this action apply to me?

    Regulated entities. Categories and entities potentially regulated 
by this action are shown in Table 1 of this preamble.

 Table 1--NESHAP and Industrial Source Categories Affected by This Final
                                 Action
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                                                               NAICS \1\
                 NESHAP and source category                      code
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40 CFR part 63, subpart CC Petroleum Refineries.............     324110
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\1\ North American Industry Classification System.

    Table 1 of this preamble is not intended to be exhaustive, but 
rather to provide a guide for readers regarding entities likely to be 
affected by the final action for the source category listed. To 
determine whether your facility is affected, you should examine the 
applicability criteria in the appropriate NESHAP. If you have any 
questions regarding the applicability of any aspect of this NESHAP, 
please contact the appropriate person listed in the preceding FOR 
FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section of this preamble.

B. Where can I get a copy of this document and other related 
information?

    In addition to being available in the docket, an electronic copy of 
this final action will also be available on the internet. Following 
signature by the EPA Administrator, the EPA will post a copy of this 
final action at: https://www.epa.gov/stationary-sources-air-pollution/petroleum-refinery-sector-risk-and-technology-review-and-new-source. 
Following publication in the Federal Register, the EPA will post the 
Federal Register version and key technical documents at this same 
website.

C. Judicial Review and Administrative Reconsideration

    Under Clean Air Act (CAA) section 307(b)(1), judicial review of 
this final action is available only by filing a petition for review in 
the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit 
by January 25, 2019. Under CAA section 307(b)(2), the requirements 
established by this final rule may not be challenged separately in any 
civil or criminal proceedings brought by the EPA to enforce the 
requirements.
    Section 307(d)(7)(B) of the CAA further provides that only an 
objection to a rule or procedure which was raised with reasonable 
specificity during the period for public comment (including any public 
hearing) may be raised during judicial review. This section also 
provides a mechanism for the EPA to reconsider the rule if the person 
raising an objection can demonstrate to the Administrator that it was 
impracticable to raise such objection within the period for public 
comment or if the grounds for such objection arose after the period for 
public comment (but within the time specified for judicial review) and 
if such objection is of central relevance to the outcome of the rule. 
Any person seeking to make such a demonstration should submit a 
Petition for Reconsideration to the Office of the Administrator, U.S. 
EPA, Room 3000, EPA WJC South Building, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, 
Washington, DC 20460, with a copy to both the person(s) listed in the 
preceding FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT section, and the Associate 
General Counsel for the Air and Radiation Law Office, Office of General 
Counsel (Mail Code 2344A), U.S. EPA, 1200 Pennsylvania Ave. NW, 
Washington, DC 20460.

II. Background

    On December 1, 2015, the EPA finalized amendments to the Petroleum 
Refinery NESHAP in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part 63, 
subparts CC and UUU, referred to as Refinery MACT 1 and 2, 
respectively, and the NSPS for petroleum refineries in 40 CFR part 60, 
subparts J and Ja (80 FR 75178) (December 2015 Rule). The final 
amendments to Refinery MACT 1 include a number of new requirements for 
``maintenance vents,'' pressure relief devices (PRDs), delayed coking 
units (DCUs), and flares, and also establishes a fenceline monitoring 
requirement.
    The December 2015 Rule included revisions to the continuous 
compliance alternatives for catalytic cracking units and provisions 
specific to startup and shutdown of catalytic cracking units and sulfur 
recovery plants. The December 2015 Rule also finalized technical 
corrections and clarifications to Refinery NSPS subparts J and Ja to 
address issues raised by the American Petroleum Institute (API) in 
their 2008 and 2012 petitions for reconsideration of the final NSPS Ja 
rule that had not been previously addressed. These include corrections 
and clarifications to provisions for sulfur recovery plants, 
performance testing, and control device operating parameters.
    In the process of implementing these new requirements, numerous 
questions and issues have been identified and we proposed 
clarifications and technical amendments to address these questions and 
issues on April 10, 2018 (April 2018 Proposal) (83 FR 15458; April 10, 
2018). These issues were raised in petitions for reconsideration and in 
separately issued letters from industry and in meetings with industry 
groups.
    The EPA received three separate petitions for reconsideration. Two 
petitions were jointly filed by API and American Fuel and Petrochemical 
Manufacturers (AFPM). The first of these petitions was filed on January 
19, 2016 and requested an administrative reconsideration under section 
307(d)(7)(B) of the CAA of certain provisions of Refinery MACT 1 and 2, 
as promulgated in the December 2015 Rule. Specifically, API and AFPM 
requested that the EPA reconsider the maintenance vent provisions in 
Refinery MACT 1; the alternate startup, shutdown, or hot standby 
standards for fluid catalytic cracking units (FCCUs) in Refinery MACT 
2; the alternate startup and shutdown for sulfur recovery units in 
Refinery MACT 2; and the new catalytic reforming units (CRUs) purging 
limitations in Refinery MACT 2. The request pertained to providing and/
or clarifying the compliance time for these requirements. Based on this 
request and additional information received, the EPA issued a proposal 
on February 9, 2016 (81 FR 6814), and a final rule on July 13, 2016 (81 
FR 45232), fully responding to the January 19, 2016, petition for 
reconsideration. The second petition from API and AFPM was filed on 
February 1, 2016 and outlined a number of specific issues related to 
the work practice standards for PRDs and flares, and the alternative 
water overflow provisions for DCUs, as well as a number of other 
specific issues on other aspects of the rule. The third petition was 
filed on February 1, 2016, by Earthjustice on behalf of Air Alliance 
Houston, California Communities Against Toxics, the Clean Air Council, 
the Coalition for a Safe Environment, the Community In-Power and 
Development Association, the Del Amo Action Committee, the 
Environmental Integrity Project, the Louisiana Bucket Brigade, the 
Sierra Club, the Texas Environmental Justice Advocacy Services, and 
Utah Physicians for a Healthy Environment. The Earthjustice petition 
claimed that several aspects of the revisions to Refinery MACT 1 were

[[Page 60698]]

not addressed in the proposed rule, and, thus, the public was precluded 
from commenting on them during the public comment period, including: 
(1) Work practice standards for PRDs and flares; (2) alternative water 
overflow provisions for DCUs; (3) reduced monitoring provisions for 
fenceline monitoring; and (4) adjustments to the risk assessment to 
account for these changes from what was proposed. On June 16, 2016, the 
EPA sent letters to petitioners granting reconsideration on issues 
where petitioners claimed they had not been provided an opportunity to 
comment. These petitions and letters granting reconsideration are 
available for review in the rulemaking docket (see Docket ID Nos. EPA-
HQ-OAR-2010-0682-0860, EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0682-0891 and EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-
0682-0892).
    On October 18, 2016 (81 FR 71661), the EPA proposed for public 
comment the issues for which reconsideration was granted in the June 
16, 2016, letters. The EPA identified five issues for which it was 
seeking public comment: (1) The work practice standards for PRDs; (2) 
the work practice standards for emergency flaring events; (3) the 
assessment of risk as modified based on implementation of these PRD and 
emergency flaring work practice standards; (4) the alternative work 
practice (AWP) standards for DCUs employing the water overflow design; 
and (5) the provision allowing refineries to reduce the frequency of 
fenceline monitoring at sampling locations that consistently record 
benzene concentrations below 0.9 micrograms per cubic meter. In that 
notice, the EPA also proposed two minor clarifying amendments to 
correct a cross referencing error and to clarify that facilities 
complying with overlapping equipment leak provisions must still comply 
with the PRD work practice standards in the December 2015 Rule.
    The February 1, 2016, API and AFPM petition for reconsideration 
included a number of recommendations for technical amendments and 
clarifications that were not specifically addressed in the October 18, 
2016, proposal.\1\ In addition, API and AFPM asked for clarification on 
various requirements of the final amendments in a July 12, 2016, 
letter.\2\ The EPA addressed many of the clarification requests from 
the July 2016 letter and the petition for reconsideration in a letter 
issued on April 7, 2017.\3\ API and AFPM also raised additional issues 
associated with the implementation of the final rule amendments in a 
March 28, 2017, letter to the EPA \4\ and provided a list of 
typographical errors in the rule in a January 27, 2017, meeting \5\ 
with the EPA. On January 10, 2018, AFPM submitted a letter containing a 
comparison of the electronic CFR, the Federal Register documents, and 
the redline versions of the December 2015 Rule and October 2016 
amendments to the Refinery Sector Rule noting differences and providing 
suggestions as to how these discrepancies should be resolved.\6\ These 
items are located in Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2016-0682. On April 10, 
2018 (83 FR 15848), the EPA published proposed additional revisions to 
the December 2015 Rule addressing many of the issues and clarifications 
identified by API and AFPM in their February 2016 petition for 
reconsideration and their subsequent communications with the EPA.
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    \1\ Supplemental Request for Administrative Reconsideration of 
Targeted Elements of EPA's Final Rule ``Petroleum Refinery Sector 
Risk and Technology Review and New Source Performance Standards; 
Final Rule,'' Howard Feldman, API, and David Friedman, AFPM. 
February 1, 2016. Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0682-0892.
    \2\ Letter from Matt Todd, API, and David Friedman, AFPM, to 
Penny Lassiter, EPA. July 12, 2016. Available in Docket ID No. EPA-
HQ-OAR-2010-0682.
    \3\ Letter from Peter Tsirigotis, EPA, to Matt Todd, API, and 
David Friedman, AFPM. April 7, 2017. Available at: https://www.epa.gov/stationarysources-air-pollution/december-2015-refinerysector-rule-response-letters-qa.
    \4\ Letter from Matt Todd, API, and David Friedman, AFPM, to 
Penny Lassiter, EPA. March 28, 2017. Available in Docket ID No. EPA-
HQ-OAR-2010-0682.
    \5\ Meeting minutes for January 27, 2017, EPA meeting with API. 
Available in Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0682.
    \6\ David Friedman, ``Comparison of Official CFR and e-CFR 
Postings Regarding MACT CC/UUU and NSPS Ja Postings.'' Message to 
Penny Lassiter and Brenda Shine. January 10, 2018. Email.
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    On July 10, 2018, the EPA published a proposed rule (July 2018 
Proposal) to revise the compliance date for maintenance vents located 
at sources constructed on or before June 30, 2014, from August 1, 2017, 
to January 30, 2019, (83 FR 31939; July 10, 2018). We proposed to 
change the compliance date to address challenges petroleum refinery 
owners or operators are experiencing in attempting to comply with the 
December 2015 Rule maintenance vent requirements, notwithstanding the 
additional compliance time provided by our revision of the compliance 
date to August 1, 2017, plus an additional 1-year (i.e., August 1, 
2018) compliance extension granted by the relevant permitting 
authorities for each source pursuant to the requirements set forth in 
the General Provisions at 40 CFR 63.6(i). The requirements for 
maintenance vents promulgated in the December 2015 Rule resulted in the 
need for completing the ``management of change process'' for affected 
sources (81 FR 45232, 45237, July 13, 2016). We also recognized that 
the Agency had proposed technical revisions and clarifications to the 
maintenance vent provisions in the April 2018 Proposal and that an 
extension would also allow the EPA to take final action on that 
proposal prior to the extended compliance date. Technical revisions and 
clarifications are being finalized in today's rule.
    The April 2018 Proposal provided a 45-day comment period ending on 
May 25, 2018. The EPA received 16 comments on the proposed amendments 
from refiners, equipment manufacturers, trade associations, 
environmental groups, and private citizens. The July 2018 Proposal 
provided a 30-day comment period ending on August 9, 2018. The EPA 
received comments on the proposed revisions from refiners, trade 
associations, environmental groups, and private citizens. This preamble 
to the final rule provides a discussion of the final revisions, 
including changes in response to comments on the proposal, as well as a 
summary of the significant comments received and responses.

III. What is included in this final rule?

A. Clarifications and Technical Corrections to Refinery MACT 1

1. Definitions
What is the history of the definitions addressed in the April 2018 
Proposal?
    In the April 2018 Proposal, we proposed to amend four definitions: 
Flare purge gas, supplemental natural gas, relief valve, and reference 
control technology for storage vessel and to define an additional term. 
Specific to flare purge gas, we proposed for the term to include gas 
needed for other safety reasons. For flare supplemental gas, we 
proposed to amend the definition to specifically exclude assist air or 
assist steam. For relief valves we narrowed the definition to include 
PRDs that are designed to re-close after the pressure relief. As a 
complementary amendment, we proposed to add a definition for PRD. 
Finally, we proposed to revise the definition of reference control 
technology for storage vessels to be consistent with the storage vessel 
rule requirements in section 63.660.
What key comments were received on definitions?
    We did not receive public comments on the proposed addition and 
revisions of these definitions.

[[Page 60699]]

What is the EPA's final decision on the definitions?
    We are finalizing the addition and revisions of these definitions 
as proposed.
2. Miscellaneous Process Vent Provisions
    In the April 2018 Proposal, we proposed several amendments to 
address petitioners' requests for revisions and clarifications to the 
requirements identifying and managing the subset of miscellaneous 
process vents (MPV) that result from maintenance activities. In the 
July 2018 Proposal, we proposed to change the compliance date of the 
requirements for existing maintenance vents. We describe each of these 
proposals in the following subparagraphs.
a. Notice of Compliance Status (NOCS) Report
What is the history of the NOCS report for MPV addressed in the April 
2018 Proposal?
    In their March 28, 2017, letter (Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-
0682-0915), API and AFPM noted that the MPV provisions at section 
63.643(c) do not require an owner or operator to designate a 
maintenance vent as Group 1 or Group 2 MPV. However, they stated that 
the reporting requirements at section 63.655(f)(1)(ii) are unclear as 
to whether a NOCS report is needed for some or all maintenance vents. 
We did not intend for maintenance vents to be included in the NOCS 
report. The rule has separate requirements for characterizing, 
recording, and reporting maintenance vents in section 63.655(g)(13) and 
(h)(12); therefore, it is not necessary to identify each place where 
equipment may be opened for maintenance in a NOCS report. To clarify 
this, we proposed to add language to section 63.643(c) to explicitly 
state that maintenance vents need not be identified in the NOCS report.
What key comments were received on the NOCS report for MPV provisions?
    We did not receive comments on the proposed amendment in section 
63.643(c) to explicitly state that maintenance vents need not be 
identified in the NOCS report.
What is the EPA's final decision on the NOCS report for MPV provisions?
    We are finalizing the amendment in section 63.643(c) as proposed.
b. Maintenance Vents Associated With Equipment Containing Pyrophoric 
Catalysts
What is the history of regulatory text for maintenance vents associated 
with equipment containing pyrophoric catalyst addressed in the April 
2018 Proposal?
    Under 40 CFR 63.643(c) an owner or operator may designate a process 
vent as a maintenance vent if the vent is only used as a result of 
startup, shutdown, maintenance, or inspection of equipment where 
equipment is emptied, depressurized, degassed, or placed into service. 
Facilities generally must comply with one of three conditions prior to 
venting maintenance vents to the atmosphere (section 63.643(c)(1)(i)-
(iii)). However, section 63.643(c)(1)(iv) of the December 2015 Rule 
provides flexibility for maintenance vents associated with equipment 
containing pyrophoric catalyst (or simply ``pyrophoric units''), such 
as hydrotreaters and hydrocrackers, at refineries that do not have pure 
hydrogen supply. At many refineries, pure hydrogen is generated by 
steam-methane reforming (SMR), with hydrogen concentrations of 98 
volume percent or higher. The other source of hydrogen available at 
refineries is from the CRU. This catalytic reformer hydrogen may have 
hydrogen concentrations of 50 percent or more and may contain 
appreciable concentrations of light hydrocarbons which limit the 
ability of vents associated with this source of hydrogen to meet the 
lower explosive limit (LEL) of 10 percent or less. The December 2015 
Rule limits the flexibility to maintenance vents associated with 
pyrophoric units at refineries without a pure hydrogen supply. For 
pyrophoric units at a refinery without a pure hydrogen supply, the 
December 2015 Rule provides that the LEL of the vapor in the equipment 
must be less than 20 percent, except for one event per year not to 
exceed 35 percent.
    API and AFPM took issue with the regulatory language that drew a 
distinction based on whether there is a pure hydrogen supply located at 
the refinery. As described in the preamble to the April 2018 Proposal 
(83 FR 15462), we reviewed comments from API and AFPM as well as 
additional information contained in an August 1, 2017, letter (Docket 
ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0682-0916) which provided evidence that a single 
refinery may have many pyrophoric units, some that have a pure hydrogen 
supply and some that do not have a pure hydrogen supply. Thus, our 
assumption at the time we issued the December 2015 Rule that all 
pyrophoric units at a single refinery either would or would not have a 
pure hydrogen supply was incorrect. Therefore, we proposed to modify 
the portion of the regulatory text that distinguished units based on 
whether there was a pure hydrogen supply ``at the refinery'' and 
instead base the regulation on whether a pure hydrogen supply was 
available for the pyrophoric unit.
What key comments were received on the regulatory text for maintenance 
vents associated with equipment containing pyrophoric catalyst?
    Comment b.1: One commenter (-0953) stated that the proposed 
language is inadequately defined, and allows the refiner to opt in to 
the provision providing flexibility by, for example, shutting down the 
source of the pure hydrogen supply.
    Response b.1: In most cases, the pyrophoric unit will be supplied 
by either pure SMR hydrogen or catalytic reforming hydrogen. As purging 
with hydrogen is one of the steps used to de-inventory this equipment, 
the refiner cannot shutdown the hydrogen supply prior to de-
inventorying the equipment. If a pyrophoric unit can be supplied with 
either SMR and catalytic reformer hydrogen, and the SMR hydrogen is 
being used during normal operations of the pyrophoric unit prior to de-
inventorying the unit, we consider it a violation of the good air 
pollution control practices requirement in section 63.643(n) to switch 
the hydrogen supply only for de-inventorying the equipment. We also 
note that the refiner must keep records of the lack of a pure hydrogen 
supply as required at section 63.655(i)(12)(v).
    Comment b.2: One commenter stated that the EPA has not provided any 
assessment of the potential increase of uncontrolled emissions to the 
atmosphere, or an analysis of the increase in health risks or the 
environmental impact of the proposed exemption, or an assessment of the 
industry-provided cost data.
    Response b.2: The docket for the rulemaking includes the 
information upon which we based our decisions, including costs and 
environmental impact estimates of the provision providing flexibility 
to maintenance vents associated with pyrophoric units without a pure 
hydrogen supply. We had reviewed this information and determined that 
it was a reasonable estimate of the impacts (see Docket ID Nos. EPA-HQ-
OAR-2010-0682-0733 and -0909). This information supports our statement 
in the April 2018

[[Page 60700]]

Proposal that this amendment is not projected to appreciably impact 
emission reductions associated with the standard. In fact, considering 
secondary emissions from the flare or other control system needed to 
comply with the 10 percent LEL limit, this provision providing 
flexibility to maintenance vents associated with pyrophoric units 
without a pure hydrogen supply is expected to result in a net 
environmental benefit.
    Comment b.3: One commenter stated that the exemption does not 
comport with the requirements of CAA section 112(d)(2)-(3), which 
requires the standards to be no less stringent than the maximum 
achievable control technology (MACT) floor. The commenter points to the 
voluntary survey of hydrogen production units as submitted by API and 
notes that 12 of 62 units not connected to a pure hydrogen supply 
reported being able to comply with the 10 percent LEL standard. As 
such, the commenter contends that the MACT floor should be 10 percent 
LEL for equipment containing pyrophoric catalysts regardless of whether 
or not they are connected to a pure hydrogen supply and, thus, there 
should be no alternative based on whether or not a pure hydrogen supply 
is available. Furthermore, the commenter stated that costs cannot be 
used as justification for providing a higher emission limit alternative 
to MACT standards, particularly those based on the MACT floor.
    Response b.3: As an initial matter, the EPA did not intend to re-
open the issue of what is the MACT floor for pyrophoric units through 
the proposal. Rather, the issue raised was whether the flexibility 
provided should only be for pyrophoric units located at a refinery 
without a pure hydrogen supply or should also apply to pyrophoric units 
located at a facility that has a pure hydrogen supply but for which 
pure hydrogen is not available at the unit. Regardless, we disagree 
with the commenter that the survey results submitted by API support a 
conclusion that 10 percent LEL is the MACT floor for all pyrophoric 
units. The survey provided by API was not the type of rigorous survey 
that could provide a basis for establishing the MACT floor. As an 
initial matter, the API survey did not include the universe of 
pyrophoric units and there is no information to suggest whether the 
best performers for the subset of units addressed in the survey 
represents the top performing 12 percent of sources across the 
industry. Also, because the exact questions and definitions of terms 
were not provided, there may be some misinterpretation of the results. 
For example, it is unclear from the summary provided if the question 
was whether the facility owners or operators could meet 10 percent LEL 
for all events (i.e., a never-to-be-exceeded limit) or if this was more 
of an operational average.
    We agree with the commenter that costs cannot be considered in 
establishing a MACT standard. We based this provision on an assessment 
of the overall environmental impacts associated with the emission 
limitations and concluded that the best performing pyrophoric units 
without a pure hydrogen supply, when considering secondary impacts, was 
to meet a 20 percent LEL with one exception not to exceed 35 percent 
LEL per year. The API survey does not provide support to change our 
analysis of the MACT floor in the December 2015 Rule.
    Comment b.4: One commenter (-0958) pointed out that the proposed 
amendment to section 63.643(c)(1)(iv) is inconsistent with the 
description of the amendment included in the preamble to the April 2018 
Proposal. Specifically, the description of the amendment in the 
preamble of the April 2018 Proposal does not contain the additional 
phrase, ``considering all such maintenance vents at the refinery,'' 
which was included in the amendatory text. The commenter suggested that 
the EPA delete this phrase as it could be interpreted to limit the use 
of the 35 percent allowance to once per year per refinery rather than 
to once per year per piece of equipment.
    Response b.4: We agree that the preamble discussion and the rule 
language regarding these revisions are not consistent. We did not 
intend to limit the one time per year 35 percent LEL to the refinery; 
rather, we intended it to apply to each pyrophoric unit without a pure 
hydrogen supply. Consistent with our intent as expressed in the 
preamble discussion of the April 2018 Proposal, 83 FR at 15462, we are 
removing the phrase, ``considering all such maintenance vents at the 
refinery'' from the regulatory text at section 63.643(c)(1)(iv) for the 
final amendments promulgated by this rulemaking.
What is the EPA's final decision on the regulatory text for maintenance 
vents associated with equipment containing pyrophoric catalyst?
    We are finalizing the proposed amendment with one change. In 
response to the public comments received, we are not including the 
phrase ``considering all such maintenance vents at the refinery'' in 
the final regulatory text at section 63.643(c)(1)(iv), as revised by 
this rulemaking.
c. Control Requirements for Maintenance Vents
What is the history of the provisions for the control requirements for 
maintenance vents addressed in the April 2018 Proposal?
    Paragraph 63.643(a) specifies that Group 1 miscellaneous process 
vents must be controlled by 98 percent or to 20 parts per million by 
volume or to a flare meeting the requirements in section 63.670. This 
paragraph also states in the second sentence that requirements for 
maintenance vents are specified in section 63.643(c), ``and the owner 
or operator is only required to comply with the requirements in section 
63.643(c).'' Paragraphs (c)(1) through (3) then specify requirements 
for maintenance vents. Paragraph (c)(1) requires that equipment must be 
depressured to a control device, fuel gas system, or back to the 
process until one of the conditions in paragraph (c)(1)(i) through (iv) 
is met. In reviewing these rule requirements, the EPA noted that we did 
not specify that the control device in (c)(1) must also meet the Group 
1 miscellaneous process vent control device requirements in paragraph 
(a). The second sentence in section 63.643(a) could be misinterpreted 
to mean that a facility complying with the maintenance vent provisions 
in section 63.643(c) must only comply with the requirements in 
paragraph (c) and not the control requirements in paragraph (a) for the 
control device referenced by paragraph (c)(1). In omitting these 
requirements, we did not intend that the control requirement for 
maintenance vents prior to atmospheric release would not be compliant 
with Group 1 controls as specified in section 63.643(a). In order to 
clarify this intent, we proposed to amend paragraph section 
63.643(c)(1) to include control device specifications equivalent to 
those in section 63.643(a).
What key comments were received on the provisions for the control 
requirements for maintenance vents?
    We received one comment in support of this revision.
What is the EPA's final decision on the provisions for the control 
requirements for maintenance vents?
    We are finalizing the amendment to Sec.  63.643(c)(1) to include 
control device specifications equivalent to those in Sec.  63.643(a), 
as proposed.

[[Page 60701]]

d. Additional Maintenance Vent Alternative for Equipment Blinding
What is the history of the maintenance vent alternative for equipment 
blinding addressed in the April 2018 Proposal?
    We proposed a new alternative compliance option for the subset of 
maintenance vents subject to the provisions addressed at Sec.  
63.643(c)(v). The proposed alternative compliance option would apply to 
equipment that must be blinded to seal off hydrocarbon-containing 
streams prior to conducting maintenance activities.
What key comments were received on the maintenance vent alternative for 
equipment blinding?
    We received two comments on the proposed amendment. One commenter 
expressed concern regarding the burden of the recordkeeping associated 
with this alternative compliance option. The second commenter asserted 
that the use of work practice standards for maintenance vents is 
illegal. As detailed in the comment summaries and responses included in 
the response to comment document for this final rule (Docket ID No. 
EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0682), we were not persuaded to make changes to the 
proposed amendments.
What is the EPA's final decision on the maintenance vent alternative 
for equipment blinding?
    We are finalizing the new alternative compliance option for the 
subset of maintenance vents subject to the requirements of Sec.  
63.643(c)(v) for which equipment blinding is necessary, as proposed.
e. Recordkeeping for Maintenance Vents on Equipment Containing Less 
Than 72 Pounds per Day (lbs/day) of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC)
What is the history of the provisions regarding recordkeeping for 
maintenance vents on equipment containing less than 72 lbs/day of VOC 
provisions addressed in the April 2018 Proposal?
    Under section 63.643(c) an owner or operator may designate a 
process vent as a maintenance vent if the vent is only used as a result 
of startup, shutdown, maintenance, or inspection of equipment where 
equipment is emptied, depressurized, degassed, or placed into service. 
The rule specifies that prior to venting a maintenance vent to the 
atmosphere, process liquids must be removed from the equipment as much 
as practical and the equipment must be depressured to a control device, 
fuel gas system, or back to the process until one of several 
conditions, as applicable, is met. One condition specifies that 
equipment containing less than 72 lbs/day of VOC can be depressured 
directly to the atmosphere provided that the mass of VOC in the 
equipment is determined and provided that refiners keep records of the 
process units or equipment associated with the maintenance vent and the 
date of each maintenance vent opening, and the estimate of the total 
quantity of VOC in the equipment at the time of vent opening. 
Therefore, each maintenance vent opening would be documented on an 
event-basis.
    Industry petitioners noted that there are numerous routine 
maintenance activities, such as replacing sampling line tubing or 
replacing a pressure gauge, that involve potential releases of very 
small amounts of VOC, often less than 1 lb/day, that are well below the 
72 lbs/day of VOC threshold provided in section 63.643(c)(1)(iii). They 
claimed that documenting each individual event is burdensome and 
unnecessary. As stated in the preamble to the April 2018 Proposal (83 
FR 15463), the EPA agrees that documentation of each release from 
maintenance vents which serve equipment containing less than 72 lbs/day 
of VOC is not necessary provided there is a demonstration that the 
event is compliant with the requirement that the equipment contains 
less than 72 lbs/day of VOC. Therefore, we proposed to revise the 
event-specific recordkeeping requirements specific to maintenance vent 
openings in equipment containing less than 72 lbs/day of VOC to only 
require a record demonstrating that the total quantity of VOC in the 
equipment based on the type, size, and contents is less than 72 lbs/day 
of VOC at the time of the maintenance vent opening.
What key comments were received on the recordkeeping for maintenance 
vents on equipment containing less than 72 lbs/day of VOC provisions?
    We received two comments on this proposed amendment. One commenter 
maintained that the event-specific recordkeeping requirements are too 
burdensome, while the other commenter maintained that the recordkeeping 
requirements are not adequate to assure compliance with the rule. As 
detailed in the comment summaries and responses included in the 
response to comment document for this final rule (Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-
OAR-2010-0682), we concluded that the proposed amendment struck the 
right balance between requiring the necessary information needed to 
demonstrate and enforce compliance with the 72 lbs/day of VOC 
maintenance vent provision while reducing the recordkeeping and 
reporting burden with more detailed records.
What is the EPA's final decision on the recordkeeping for maintenance 
vents on equipment containing less than 72 lbs/day of VOC provisions?
    We are finalizing these amendments as proposed.
f. Bypass Monitoring for Open-Ended Lines (OEL)
What is the history of the bypass monitoring provisions for OELs 
addressed in the April 2018 Proposal?
    API and AFPM requested clarification of the bypass monitoring 
provisions in section 63.644(c) for OEL (Docket ID Nos. EPA-HQ-OAR-
2010-0682-0892 and -0915). This provision excludes components subject 
to the Refinery MACT 1 equipment leak provisions in section 63.648 from 
the bypass monitoring requirement. Noting that the provisions in 
section 63.648 only apply to components in organic hazardous air 
pollutants (HAP) service (i.e., greater than 5-weight percent HAP), API 
and AFPM asked whether the EPA also intended to exclude open-ended 
valves or lines that are in VOC service (less than 5-weight percent 
HAP) and are capped and plugged in compliance with the standards in 
NSPS subpart VV or VVa or the Hazardous Organic NESHAP (HON; 40 CFR 
part 63, subpart H) that are substantively equivalent to the Refinery 
MACT 1 equipment leak provisions in section 63.648. Commenters noted 
that OELs in conveyances carrying a Group 1 MPV could be in less than 
5-weight percent HAP service, but could still be capped and plugged in 
accordance with another rule, such as NSPS subpart VV or VVa or the 
HON. As stated in the preamble to the proposed rule (83 FR 15464), the 
EPA agrees that, because the use of a cap, blind flange, plug, or 
second valve for an open-ended valve or line is sufficient to prevent a 
bypass, the Refinery MACT 1 bypass monitoring requirements in section 
63.644(c) are redundant with NSPS subpart VV in these cases. Therefore, 
we proposed to amend section 63.644(c) to make clear that open-ended 
valves or lines that are capped and plugged sufficient to meet the 
standards in NSPS subpart VV at Sec.  60.482-6(a)(2), (b), and (c), are 
not subject to the bypass monitoring in section 63.644(c).
What key comments were received on the bypass monitoring provisions for 
OELs?
    Comment f.1: One commenter (-0958) expressed support for the 
addition of

[[Page 60702]]

the bypass monitoring option for capped or plugged OELs in section 
63.644(c)(3). The commenter suggested that the EPA similarly amend 
section 63.660(i)(2) to provide this new monitoring alternative for 
vent systems handling Group 1 storage vessel vents. A different 
commenter (-0953) opposed this revision, stating that the EPA did not 
show or provide any evidence to support the statement that the 
monitoring requirements are ``redundant with NSPS subpart VV.'' The 
commenter recommended that the EPA require a compliance demonstration 
or otherwise demonstrate that the provisions are equivalent.
    Response f.1: The December 2015 Rule bypass provisions require 
either a flow indicator or the use of a valve locked in a non-diverting 
position using a car-seal or lock and key. The general equipment leak 
provisions for OELs are installation of a plug, cap or secondary valve. 
Based on the effectiveness of this equipment work practice standard, 
continuous or periodic monitoring of these secondarily-sealed lines are 
not generally required. With the elimination of the exemption for 
discharges associated with maintenance activities and process upsets 
under the definition of ``periodically discharged'' in the December 
2015 Rule, there are a number of process lines that are not traditional 
bypass lines and that were not previously considered an MPV or an MPV 
bypass, but now are. Many of these lines are small and not conducive to 
the installation of a car-seal or lock and key so they cannot comply 
with the current bypass provisions. Most of these small lines have been 
previously regulated via Refinery MACT 1's requirement to comply with 
the NSPS open-ended line provisions, which are an effective means to 
control emissions from these smaller lines. Because the existing 
equipment leak provisions for these types of OELs serve the same 
purpose and are more appropriate for these smaller lines, we determined 
that it is reasonable to provide for this method of compliance for 
these OELs.
What is the EPA's final decision on the bypass monitoring provisions 
for OELs?
    We are finalizing this amendment as proposed. In response to 
comments received on the proposed rule, we are providing this new 
monitoring alternative for vent systems handling Group 1 storage vessel 
vents at section 63.660(i)(2) in the final rule.
g. Compliance Date Extension for Existing Maintenance Vents
What is the history of the compliance date extension for existing 
maintenance vents addressed in the July 2018 Proposal?
    In the July 2018 Proposal, we proposed to amend the compliance date 
for maintenance vent provisions applicable to existing sources (i.e., 
those constructed or reconstructed on or before June 30, 2014) 
promulgated at 40 CFR 63.643(c). The basis for this proposal was that 
sources needed additional time to follow the ``management of change'' 
process. We also noted that we had proposed substantive revisions to 
the maintenance vent requirements as part of the April 2018 Proposal.
What significant comments were received on the compliance date 
extension for existing maintenance vents?
    Comment g.1: One commenter (-0968) stated that the proposed 
compliance extension is arbitrary and capricious because the EPA has 
not provided any evidence as to why refineries could not comply with 
the August 1, 2017, compliance date and why a revised compliance date 
of January 30, 2019, is as expeditious as practicable, as required by 
CAA section 112(i)(3)(A). The commenter noted that the EPA referred to 
the fact that some number of refinery owners and operators have applied 
for and received compliance extensions of up to one year from their 
permitting authorities pursuant to 40 CFR 63.6(i), but does not provide 
any evidence of these applications or subsequent state agency 
determinations in the rulemaking record. The commenter further noted 
that the EPA's failure to provide this information in the record for 
the rulemaking has inhibited the public's ability to provide fully 
informed comments, and as such, the EPA is in violation of the notice-
and-comment and public participation requirements of CAA section 
307(d). The commenter also disagreed with the EPA's statement in the 
preamble of the July 2018 Proposal that the source requests for an 
extension from the permitting authorities is demonstrative of refinery 
owners and operators acting on ``good faith efforts.'' Rather, the 
commenter asserted that the filing of these requests shows an avoidance 
of compliance with the rule.
    The commenter stated that the proposed compliance extension is 
particularly harmful since the EPA has acknowledged that there are 
significant disproportionate impacts of refinery pollution to 
communities of color and low-income people. The commenter noted that 
the EPA has not supported the conclusion in the July 2018 Proposal that 
the extension of compliance would have an insignificant effect on 
emissions reductions. A separate commenter (-0971) concurred with the 
EPA's conclusions that the proposed compliance extension would have an 
insignificant effect on emissions reductions.
    The commenter also stated that the EPA's reliance on regulatory 
uncertainty due to the April 2018 Proposal as part of the justification 
for the need for a compliance extension is at odds with the CAA's 
explicit prohibition on any delay or postponement of a final rule based 
on reconsideration (see CAA section 307(d)(7)(B)). The commenter 
further added that this provision only allows the EPA to stay a rule's 
effective date during reconsideration, not to postpone compliance, and 
only enables the EPA to do so for up to three months. Another commenter 
(-0971) expressed support for the proposed compliance extension for 
maintenance vents because of regulatory uncertainty since the EPA 
proposed amendments in April 2018 Proposal, but has not yet finalized 
those proposed amendments. The commenter stated that these revisions 
are critical to providing certainty as to what is required and to 
assure equipment may be isolated for maintenance under all expected 
maintenance situations. The commenter noted that maintenance vents are 
located across the refinery, and time will be needed to review 
procedures that would implement those revisions under refinery 
management of change processes, incorporate the changes into refinery 
compliance procedures and recordkeeping and reporting systems, and 
provide training to employees.
    Response g.1: The EPA is not finalizing the extension of the 
compliance date as proposed in July 2018. However, in order to provide 
sources with time to understand the amended maintenance requirements, 
to determine which maintenance compliance option best meets their 
needs, and to come into compliance we are modifying the compliance date 
so that it is 30 days following the effective date of the final rule. 
Due to the variety of different types of maintenance vents and their 
ubiquitous nature, there has been some uncertainty as to how the 
maintenance vent requirements apply; whether the provisions, as 
promulgated, are appropriate for all types of vents; and the time 
needed to make the requisite modifications to ensure

[[Page 60703]]

compliance. The maintenance vent provisions in their current form were 
promulgated in the December 2015 Rule in order to replace a start-up, 
shutdown and malfunction (SSM) provision that was included in the 
original MACT standard. The EPA was replacing the SSM provisions 
because in Sierra Club v. EPA, [551 F.3d 1019 (D.C. Cir. 2008)], the 
D.C. Circuit determined that SSM provisions, similar to those included 
in the Refinery MACT were inconsistent with the requirements of the 
CAA. The EPA originally provided a compliance date as of the effective 
date of the December 2015 Rule (January 30, 2016), but subsequently 
extended that date to August 2017 based on information from refineries 
that they needed more time to comply. As previously noted, many 
refineries sought a further extension until August 2018 from state 
permitting authorities. Establishing a compliance date 30 days 
following promulgation of these revisions will allow refineries a 
modest amount of time to ensure any remaining maintenance vents not yet 
in compliance with the MACT, as modified through this final action, are 
in compliance.
    With respect to the comments on the effect of emissions reductions 
relative to the July 2018 Proposal, we reached this conclusion based on 
several factors. First, maintenance events typically occur about once 
per year or less frequently for major equipment. Thus, during the 
proposed period of the compliance extension (approximately 6 months 
from the August 2018 compliance date that applied to most refineries 
due to extensions granted by state permitting authorities), some 
equipment would have no major events and other equipment, at most, 
should experience only one event. Second, facilities would still be 
required to comply with the general requirements to use good air 
pollution control practices during maintenance events. Many facility 
owners or operators already have standard procedures for emptying and 
degassing equipment. While these procedures are not as stringent as the 
MACT requirements for maintenance vents as adopted in the December 2015 
Rule and as we had proposed in April 2018, they would provide some 
limit on emissions to the atmosphere. In a meeting with industry 
representatives, an example of the type of emissions occurring from 
maintenance vents was provided to the Agency (Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-
2010-0682-0909). Based on that example, the Agency estimates that 
approximately 200 lbs of VOC would be released from purging 6 pieces of 
equipment containing pyrophoric catalyst when venting at 35 percent LEL 
rather than 10 percent LEL. Based on our previous analysis of impacts 
for risk and technology review revisions to Refinery MACT 1, we 
estimate approximately 10 percent of VOC emissions are HAP, so that we 
estimate on the order of approximately 3 pounds of HAP emissions (0.1 x 
200/6) would occur per major equipment venting event. The maintenance 
vent provisions as adopted in the December 2015 Rule were projected to 
reduce emissions of HAP by 5,200 tons per year (80 FR 75178, December 
1, 2015). Therefore, based on the low expected emissions from each 
major equipment venting event, the expected limited occurrence of 
maintenance venting events, and the likelihood that many types of 
maintenance venting events are in compliance with the MACT, the 
compliance extension would have an insignificant effect on emissions.
What is the EPA's final decision on the compliance date extension for 
existing maintenance vents?
    The EPA is not finalizing the compliance extension as proposed in 
the July 2018 Proposal. However, in order to provide sources with time 
to understand the amended maintenance requirements, to determine which 
maintenance compliance option best meets their needs, and to come into 
compliance, we are modifying the compliance date so that it is 30 days 
following the effective date of the final rule.\7\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    \7\ Cf. 5 U.S.C. 553(d) providing a 30-day period prior to a 
rule taking effect.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

3. Pressure Relief Device Provisions
a. Clarification of Requirements for PRD ``in organic HAP service''
What is the history of the requirements for PRD ``in organic HAP 
service'' addressed in the April 2018 Proposal?
    The introductory text for the equipment leak provisions for PRD in 
section 63.648(j) requires compliance with no detectable emission 
provisions for PRD ``in organic HAP gas or vapor service'' and the 
pressure release management requirements for PRD ``for all pressure 
relief devices.'' However, the pressure release management requirements 
for PRD in section 63.648(j)(3) are applicable only to PRD ``in organic 
HAP service.'' There are five specific provisions within the pressure 
release management requirements for PRD listed in paragraphs 
63.648(j)(3)(i) through (v). In the first four paragraphs, the phrase 
``each [or any] affected pressure relief device'' is used, but this 
phrase is missing in the fifth paragraph. API and AFPM requested that 
we clarify whether releases listed in section 63.648(j)(3)(v) are 
limited to PRDs ``in organic HAP service.'' Consistent with the 
requirements in section 63.648(j)(3)(i) through (iv) and the Agency's 
intent when promulgating the provisions in section 63.648(j)(3), we 
proposed to add the phrase, ``affected pressure relief device'' to 
section 63.648(j)(3)(v). We also proposed to amend the introductory 
text in paragraph (j) to add the phrase, ``in organic HAP service'' at 
the end of the last sentence to further clarify that the pressure 
release management requirements for PRD in section 63.648(j)(3) are 
applicable to ``all pressure relief devices in organic HAP service.''
What key comments were received on the requirements for PRD ``in 
organic HAP service''?
    We did not receive any public comments on these proposed 
amendments.
What is the EPA's final decision on the requirements for PRD ``in 
organic HAP service''?
    We are finalizing these amendments as proposed.
b. Redundant Release Prevention Measures in 40 CFR 63.648(j)(3)(ii)
What is the history of the requirements for redundant release 
prevention measures addressed in the April 2018 Proposal?
    Section 63.648(j)(3)(ii) lists options for three redundant release 
prevention measures that must be applied to affected PRDs. The 
prevention measures in paragraph (j)(3)(ii) include: (A) Flow, 
temperature, level, and pressure indicators with deadman switches, 
monitors, or automatic actuators; (B) documented routine inspection and 
maintenance programs and/or operator training (maintenance programs and 
operator training may count as only one redundant prevention measure); 
(C) inherently safer designs or safety instrumentation systems; (D) 
deluge systems; and (E) staged relief system where initial pressure 
relief valves (with lower set release pressure) discharges to a flare 
or other closed vent system and control device. In their petition for 
reconsideration (Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0682-0892), API and AFPM 
requested clarification as to whether two prevention measures can be 
selected from the list in Sec.  63.648(j)(3)(ii)(A). API and AFPM noted 
that the rule does not state that the measures in paragraph 
(j)(3)(ii)(A)

[[Page 60704]]

are to be considered a single prevention measure. The Agency grouped 
the measures listed in subparagraph A together because of similarities 
they have; however, they can be separate measures. Therefore, as the 
EPA explains in the preamble to the April 2018 Proposal (83 FR 15464), 
if these measures operate independently, they are considered two 
separate redundant prevention measures.
What key comments were received on the requirements for redundant 
release prevention measures?
    We did not receive any public comments on this proposed amendment.
What is the EPA's final decision on the requirements for redundant 
release prevention measures?
    We are finalizing the amendment to Sec.  63.648(j)(3)(ii)(A), which 
clarifies that independent, non-duplicative systems count as separate 
redundant prevention measures, as proposed.
c. Pilot-Operated PRD and Balanced Bellows PRD
What is the history of the provisions for pilot-operated PRD and 
balanced bellows PRD addressed in the April 2018 Proposal?
    In a letter dated March 28, 2017, API and AFPM requested 
clarification on whether pilot-operated PRDs are required to comply 
with the pressure release management provisions of section 63.648(j)(1) 
through (3). Based on our understanding of pilot-operated PRD (see 
memorandum, ``Pilot- operated PRD,'' in Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-
0682) and balanced bellows PRD, we proposed that pilot-operated and 
balanced bellows PRD are subject to the requirements in section 
63.648(j)(1) and (2), but are not subject to the requirements in 
section 63.648(j)(3) because the primary releases from these PRD are 
vented to a control device. We also proposed to amend the reporting 
requirements in section 63.655(g)(10) and the recordkeeping 
requirements in section 63.655(i)(11) to retain the requirements to 
report and keep records of each release to the atmosphere through the 
pilot vent that exceeds 72 lbs/day of VOC, including the duration of 
the pressure release through the pilot vent and the estimate of the 
mass quantity of each organic HAP release.
What key comments were received on the provisions for pilot-operated 
PRD and balanced bellows PRD?
    We received one public comment on this proposed amendment. The 
commenter was generally opposed to the addition of balanced bellows and 
pilot-operated PRD to the work practice standard requirements for PRD. 
The comment and the EPA's response are available in the response to 
comments document for this rulemaking (Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-
0682).
What is the EPA's final decision on the provisions for pilot-operated 
PRD and balanced bellows PRD?
    We are finalizing these amendments as proposed.
4. Delayed Coking Unit Decoking Operation Provisions
    What is the history of the delayed coking unit decoking operation 
provisions addressed in the April 2018 Proposal?
    The provisions in 40 CFR 63.657(a) require owners or operators of 
DCU to depressure each coke drum to a closed blowdown system until the 
coke drum vessel pressure or temperature meets the applicable limits 
specified in the rule (2 psig or 220 degrees Fahrenheit for existing 
sources). Special provisions are provided in 40 CFR 63.657(e) and (f) 
for DCU using ``water overflow'' or ``double-quench'' method of 
cooling, respectively. According to 40 CFR 63.657(e), the owner or 
operator of a DCU using the ``water overflow'' method of coke cooling 
must hardpipe the overflow water (i.e., via an overhead line) or 
otherwise prevent exposure of the overflow water to the atmosphere when 
transferring the overflow water to the overflow water storage tank 
whenever the coke drum vessel temperature exceeds 220 degrees 
Fahrenheit. The provision in 40 CFR 63.657(e) also provides that the 
overflow water storage tank may be an open or fixed-roof tank provided 
that a submerged fill pipe (pipe outlet below existing liquid level in 
the tank) is used to transfer overflow water to the tank.
    In the October 18, 2016, reconsideration proposal, we opened the 
provisions in 40 CFR 63.657(e) for public comment, but we did not 
propose to amend the requirements. In response to the October 18, 2016, 
reconsideration proposal, we received several comments regarding the 
provisions in 40 CFR 63.657(e) for DCU using the water overflow method 
of coke cooling. Based on these comments, in the April 2018 Proposal we 
proposed amendments to the water overflow requirements in 40 CFR 
63.657(e) to clarify that an owner or operator of a DCU with a water 
overflow design does not need to comply with the provisions in 40 CFR 
63.657(e) if they comply with the primary pressure or temperature 
limits in 40 CFR 63.657(a) prior to overflowing any water. We also 
proposed to add a requirement to use a separator or disengaging device 
when using the water overflow method of cooling to prevent entrainment 
of gases from the coke drum vessel to the overflow water storage tank 
and we proposed that gases from the separator must be routed to a 
closed vent blowdown system or otherwise controlled following the 
requirements for a Group 1 miscellaneous process vent. As separators 
appear to be an integral part of the water overflow system design, we 
did not project any capital investment or additional operating costs 
associated with this proposed amendment.
What key comments were received on the delayed coking unit decoking 
operation provisions?
    The following is a summary of the key comments received in response 
to our April 2018 Proposal and our responses to these comments. 
Detailed public comments and the EPA responses are included in the 
response to comments document for this final action (Docket ID EPA-HQ-
OAR-2010-0682).
    Comment 1: Industry commenters (-0955, -0958) stated that the 
proposed amendment to require DCU using the water overflow compliance 
option to have a disengaging device is unsupported by the record for 
the proposed rule and was not included in the Information Collection 
Request (ICR) or MACT floor analysis supporting the December 2015 Rule. 
The commenters noted that the EPA has not determined how many DCU use 
the water overflow method of coke cooling or how many will require the 
installation of a disengaging device, instead basing the provisions on 
a report by one facility using such a device. The same commenters 
stated that the EPA has not quantified the expected emission reductions 
associated with the proposed amendment to require DCU using the water 
overflow compliance option to have a disengaging device. One of the 
commenters (-0955) maintained that the emissions from the overflow 
water are small and sufficiently controlled via the submerged fill 
requirement. This commenter provided various analyses to support their 
contention that the emissions from their overflow water are small, 
including results of facility-specific industrial hygiene monitoring 
programs, which the commenter claims have shown that operators 
exposures to benzene are ``orders of magnitude below the Occupational 
Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) exposure limit of 1.0 parts per 
million (ppm), at 0.003 ppm (300 parts per billion (ppb)) and

[[Page 60705]]

less.'' Both of these commenters also asserted that the EPA should not 
finalize the proposed amendment to require DCU using the water overflow 
compliance option to have a disengaging device.
    Another commenter (-0953) asserted that the EPA did not provide any 
quantitative assessment of emissions from water overflow DCU compared 
to the primary MACT standard in order to demonstrate that the water 
overflow is at least as stringent as the MACT floor requirement (no 
draining or venting until the pressure in the drum is at or below 2 
psig). According to the commenter, without this direct supporting 
analysis, the EPA's inclusion of the water overflow provision is 
arbitrary and capricious. The commenter recommended that the water 
overflow provisions not be finalized or that additional control 
requirements be placed on the storage tank receiving the water 
overflow. Specifically, the commenter recommended that the rule require 
these tanks to be vented to a control device that achieves 98-percent 
destruction efficiency or better. Alternatively, the commenter 
recommended that the EPA develop minimum requirements for the liquid 
height and volume of water in the receiving tank and a maximum limit on 
the temperature of the water in the tank. The commenter also 
recommended that the EPA set restrictions on the re-use of the overflow 
water without prior additional treatment to remove organic 
contaminants.
    Two commenters (-0955, -0958) stated that, if the requirement to 
use a disengaging device is finalized, the EPA should provide a 
compliance date 3 years after the effective date of the rule, as 
provided under CAA section 112(i)(3)(A), due to the expected expense 
and timing needed for equipment installation to comply with this 
requirement. One commenter (-0955) described the specific steps 
required for a DCU system not equipped with a disengaging device to 
comply with the proposed rule including: Design, engineering, permit 
application submission and permit receipt, and installation, estimating 
it will take between 24-36 months to complete.
    Response 1: We agree that we did not include the water overflow 
provisions in the MACT floor analysis supporting the December 2015 
Rule. The MACT floor analysis resulted in a determination that 
emissions from the DCU must be controlled (no atmospheric venting, 
draining or deheading of the coke drum) until the coke drum vessel 
pressure is at or below 2 psig is the MACT floor. In developing an 
alternative compliance method, such as the DCU water overflow 
provisions, we are only required to ensure that the alternative being 
provided is at least as stringent (achieves the same or lower 
emissions) as the established MACT floor.
    We disagree that the record does not support the proposal. In 
comments received on the June 30, 2014, proposed risk and technology 
review ``Sector Rule,'' Phillips 66 requested special provisions for 
water overflow (see Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-0682-0614). Further, we 
understood from background meetings that there are two main suppliers 
of DCU technology, one of which took over the ConocoPhillips technology 
licenses (see Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0682-0216). As Phillips 66 
was an initial developer of the technology, we surmised that the DCU 
designed for water overflow were likely all based on the Phillips 66 
design. They also noted in their comments that they operated two units 
with water overflow design. While the ICR supporting the December 2015 
Rule did not specifically ask about the water overflow method of 
cooling, we did ask the height of the drum and the height of the water 
in the drum prior to first draining. Three DCU were reported to have 
water height when first draining equal to the drum height and two DCU 
were reported to have water height greater than the drum height. From 
these data, we estimated that 2 to 5 DCU used the water overflow method 
of cooling. We understood that Phillips 66 likely operated most of the 
DCU designed to use the water overflow method of cooling. Therefore, 
when Phillips 66 provided a water overflow DCU design that included a 
water-vapor disengaging drum, we expected all water overflow DCU had 
this design. In subsequent meetings with API and AFPM, we discussed our 
findings and our intention to add a requirement for a vapor disengaging 
drum (see Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0682-0910 and -0911). These 
records clearly show we carefully considered this proposed requirement 
and we informed industry representatives from API, AFPM, and some 
individual refinery representatives of our conclusions prior to the 
proposal.
    We agree that the EPA has not provided a quantitative assessment of 
the emissions from the DCU when using water overflow. Rather, for the 
December 2015 Rule, we relied on a qualitative assessment because the 
precise mechanism of the emissions from the DCU is not well understood. 
This qualitative analysis did not consider the entrainment of gases in 
the overflow water or the need for the use of a disengaging drum. To 
support this final action, we estimated, to the best of our ability, 
the emissions from a typical DCU using water overflow method of cooling 
for units using a vapor disengaging device and one with no vapor 
disengaging device and compared them with the emissions projected for a 
DCU using conventional method of cooling complying with the 2 psig MACT 
standard. We found that the emissions from a DCU using water overflow 
method of cooling and a vapor disengaging device had emissions 
significantly less than a conventional DCU complying with the 2 psig 
standard. We also found that the emissions from a DCU using the water 
overflow method of cooling without a vapor disengaging device could 
have emissions exceeding those for a conventional DCU complying with 
the 2 psig pressure limit (see memorandum entitled ``Estimating 
Emissions from Delayed Coking Units Using the Water Overflow Method of 
Cooling'' in Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0682). Our emission 
estimates are higher than the emissions estimated by the commenter 
because their analyses did not consider entrained gases in the overflow 
water. In a follow-up meeting with this commenter, we learned that the 
concentration monitored near the overflow water tank was 0.3 ppm 
benzene (consistent with the value of 300 ppb). This concentration, 
while below the OSHA exposure limit of 1 ppm, is not ``orders of 
magnitude below'' the OSHA exposure limit and provides strong evidence 
that emissions near the water overflow tank are higher than would be 
projected based on their analysis submitted during the comment period.
    Based on our analysis, we find that the water overflow method of 
cooling alternative achieves greater emission reductions than the 
primary 2 psig pressure limit when a vapor disengaging device is used 
for the overflow water prior to the water storage tank. Because 
emissions without the disengaging device in the case where the 
receiving tank is not vented to a control device can exceed that of a 
conventional DCU complying with the 2 psig pressure limit, we conclude 
that it is necessary for the alternative compliance method to require 
use of a disengaging device unless the receiving tank is vented to a 
control device.
    Although cost consideration is not relevant for determining MACT, 
we disagree that the EPA did not consider the expense of installing a 
disengaging device. As part of the cost estimates for the DCU MACT 
requirements established in the December 2015 Rule,

[[Page 60706]]

80 FR 75226, we considered compliance costs for every DCU that did not 
already meet the 2 psig pressure limit. Because we already considered 
compliance costs in our burden estimates for the December 2015 Rule, 
there was no basis for assuming that compliance with the alternative 
standard proposed here would result in additional or otherwise 
different compliance costs and to do so would result in double-counting 
the compliance costs.
    With respect to the commenter requesting additional controls on the 
tank receiving the water overflow, our analysis supports the conclusion 
that the main source of emissions from the water overflow systems is 
entrained vapors in the overflow water. We agree that venting the 
receiving tank to a control device is a reasonable alternative to using 
a disengaging device and we have added this as an alternative 
compliance option for DCU using the water overflow method of cooling. 
However, venting the receiving tank to a control device when a vapor 
disengaging device is already used is unnecessary and redundant. We 
agree that adding certain limitations on overflow water temperature, 
receiving tank water volume and temperature can help to reduce 
emissions when a vapor disengaging device is not used, but we do not 
believe adding these limitations will make water overflow without a 
vapor disengaging device equivalent to the primary 2 psig emission 
limitation. Based on our analysis, we find that the use of a 
disengaging device with submerged fill requirement is as stringent as 
the MACT floor and that additional restrictions on the receiving 
storage vessel for these DCU are not necessary to comply with MACT.
    Finally, regarding the compliance date, we agree that it will take 
time to design, procure, and install a disengaging drum for those DCU 
using water overflow and that do not currently have a disengaging drum. 
Similarly, venting the receiving tank to a control device as an 
alternative to using a disengaging device will also require time to 
design and retrofit the tank with a fixed roof and closed vent system 
to control. We originally provided a 3-year compliance schedule due to 
the design, engineering, and equipment installation that could be 
required to meet the emission limitations for DCU in the December 2015 
Rule. As the December 2015 Rule did not require a vapor disengaging 
drum or controlled tank and similar enhancements in the enclosed 
blowdown system will be needed for facilities to comply with the April 
2018 Proposal, we are providing a limited compliance extension, of 2 
years from the effective date of this final rule that alters the work 
practice standard by establishing the vapor disengaging drum 
requirement. This extension will only be afforded for DCU that use the 
water overflow method of cooling without adequate systems for a vapor 
disengaging device or controlled tank, which we consider to be as 
expeditious as practicable based on comments received on the April 2018 
Proposal. We are also including operational requirements on the water 
overflow system for these DCU in the interim to minimize emissions to 
the greatest extent possible as requested by one of the commenters. 
These operational limits will not require any additional equipment, so 
implementation can occur immediately. We do not expect that these 
operational limits are sufficient to ensure that emissions from these 
units will be less than conventional DCU complying with the 2 psig 
standard at all times, but they will help to ensure emissions are not 
unrestricted in this interim period. We also note that pursuant to the 
provisions in Sec.  63.6(i), which are generally applicable, refinery 
owners or operators may seek compliance extensions on a case-by-case 
basis if necessary.
What is the EPA's final decision on the delayed coking unit decoking 
operation provisions?
    We are finalizing the requirement for DCU using the water overflow 
provisions in section 63.657(e) to use a separator or disengaging 
device to prevent entrainment of gases in the cooling water. In 
response to comments, we are providing a limited compliance extension, 
of 2 years from the effective date of this final rule, only for DCU 
that use the water overflow method of cooling that document the need to 
design, procure, and install a disengaging device, which we consider to 
be as expeditious as practicable based on comments received on the 
April 2018 Proposal. We are providing operational restrictions on these 
DCU in the interim to minimize emissions to the greatest extent 
possible. Finally, in response to comments, we are including, as an 
alternative to the use of a vapor disengaging drum, requirements to 
discharge the overflow water to a storage vessel vented to a control 
device (i.e., a vessel meeting the requirements for storage vessels in 
40 CFR part 63, subpart SS).
5. Fenceline Monitoring Provisions
What is the history of the fenceline monitoring provisions addressed in 
the April 2018 Proposal?
    We proposed several amendments to the fenceline monitoring 
provisions in Refinery MACT 1. Many of the proposed revisions to the 
fenceline monitoring provisions are related to requirements for 
reporting monitoring data.
    The December 2015 Rule included new EPA Methods 325A and B 
specifying monitor siting and quantitative sample analysis procedures. 
Method 325A requires an additional monitor be placed near known VOC 
emission sources if the VOC emissions source is located within 50 
meters of the monitoring perimeter and the source is between two 
monitors. In the April 2018 Proposal, we proposed an alternative to the 
additional monitor siting requirements if the only known VOC emission 
sources within 50 meters of the monitoring perimeter between two 
monitors are pumps, valves, connectors, sampling connections, and open-
ended line sources. The proposed alternative requires that these 
sources be actively monitored monthly using audio, visual, or olfactory 
means and quarterly using Method 21 or the AWP for equipment leaks.
    In addition, we proposed to revise the quarterly reporting 
requirements in section 63.655(h)(8) to specify that it means calendar 
year quarters (i.e., Quarter 1 is from January 1 to March 31; Quarter 2 
is from April 1 through June 30; Quarter 3 is from July 1 through 
September 30; and Quarter 4 is from October 1 through December 31) 
rather than being tied to the date compliance monitoring began.
    We also proposed to require one field blank per sampling period 
rather than two as currently required. Similarly, we proposed to 
decrease the number of duplicate samples that must be collected each 
sampling period. Instead of requiring a duplicate sample for every 10 
monitoring locations, we proposed that facilities with 19 or fewer 
monitoring locations be required to collect one duplicate sample per 
sampling period and facilities with 20 or more sampling locations be 
required to collect two duplicate samples per sampling period. We also 
proposed to require that duplicate samples be averaged together to 
determine the sampling location's benzene concentration for the 
purposes of calculating the benzene concentration difference 
([Delta]c).
    Consistent with the requirements in section 63.658(k) for 
requesting an alternative test method for collecting

[[Page 60707]]

and/or analyzing samples, we also proposed to revise the Table 6 entry 
for section 63.7(f) to indicate that section 63.7(f) applies except 
that alternatives directly specified in 40 CFR part 63, subpart CC, do 
not require additional notification to the Administrator or the 
approval of the Administrator.
What key comments were received on the fenceline monitoring provisions?
    We received minor comments on these proposed revisions. The comment 
summaries and the EPA responses are available in the response to 
comments document for this final rule (Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-
0682).
What is the EPA's final decision on the fenceline monitoring 
provisions?
    The proposed revisions to the fenceline monitoring requirements, as 
described above, are being finalized as proposed with one minor change. 
In the April 2018 proposal, Sec.  63.655(h)(8)(viii) specified that 
CEDRI would calculate the biweekly concentration difference ([Delta]c) 
for benzene for each sampling period and the annual average [Delta]c 
for benzene for each sampling period. However, in order to accurately 
reflect CEDRI's current configuration, we are finalizing Sec.  
63.655(h)(8)(viii) to require the reporter to calculate and report the 
values of the biweekly and annual average [Delta]c for benzene.
6. Storage Vessel Provisions
What is the history of the storage vessel provisions addressed in the 
April 2018 Proposal?
    We received comments from API and AFPM in their February 1, 2016, 
petition for reconsideration regarding the incorporation of 40 CFR part 
63, subpart WW, storage vessel provisions and 40 CFR part 63, subpart 
SS, closed vent systems and control device provisions into Refinery 
MACT 1 requirements for Group 1 storage vessels at 40 CFR 63.660. The 
pre-amended version of the Refinery MACT 1 rule specified (by cross 
reference at 40 CFR 63.646) that storage vessels containing liquids 
with a vapor pressure of 76.6 kilopascals (approximately 11 pounds per 
square inch (psi)) or greater must be vented to a closed vent system or 
to a control device consistent with the requirements in section 63.119 
of the HON. API and AFPM pointed out that the EPA did not retain this 
provision at 40 CFR 63.660 in the December 2015 Rule. We agree that the 
language was inadvertently omitted. We did not intend to deviate from 
the longstanding requirement limiting the vapor pressure of material 
that can be stored in a floating roof tank. Therefore, we proposed to 
revise the introductory text in 40 CFR 63.660 to clarify that owners or 
operators of affected Group 1 storage vessels storing liquids with a 
maximum true vapor pressure less than 76.6 kilopascals (11.0 psi) can 
comply with either the requirements in 40 CFR part 63, subpart WW or 
SS, and that owners or operators storing liquids with a maximum true 
vapor pressure greater than or equal to 76.6 kilopascals (11.0 psi) 
must comply with the requirements in 40 CFR part 63, subpart SS.
    We also received comments from API and AFPM in their February 1, 
2016, petition for reconsideration regarding provisions in section 
63.660(b). Section 63.660(b)(1) allows Group 1 storage vessels to 
comply with alternatives to those specified in section 63.1063(a)(2) of 
subpart WW. Section 63.660(b)(2) specifies additional controls for 
ladders having at least one slotted leg. The petitioners explained that 
section 63.1063(a)(2)(ix) provides extended compliance time for these 
controls, but that it is unclear whether this additional compliance 
time extends to the use of the alternatives to comply with section 
63.660(b). We proposed language to clarify that the additional 
compliance time specified in the alternative included at section 
63.1063(a)(2) applies to the implementation of controls in section 
63.660(b).
    We also proposed language to clarify at section 63.660(e) that the 
initial inspection requirements that apply with initial filling of the 
storage vessels are not required again if a vessel transitions from the 
existing source requirements in section 63.646 to new source 
requirements in section 63.660.
    The following is a summary of the comment received in response to 
our April 2018 Proposal and our response to this comment. We did not 
receive any other comments related to the proposed amendments for 
storage vessels.
What comment was received on the storage vessel provisions?
    Comment 1: One commenter (-0958) claims that the EPA proposed 
revisions to the introductory paragraph of section 63.660 to allow 
certain storage vessels to comply with alternative requirements is not 
an acceptable control measure. The commenter states that the proposed 
revisions included 11.0 psia as parenthetical equivalent to the 76.6 
kPa threshold. The commenter recommended that the EPA revise the 11.0 
psia to 11.1 psia as this represents a more accurate conversion and 
consistency with historical regulations.
    Response 1: Upon reviewing this issue, we agree with the commenter 
that 11.1 psia is the correct value to use when converting 76.6 
kilopascals to psia and we are revising the proposed language to use 
11.1 psia rather than 11.0 psia in this introductory paragraph.
What is the EPA's final decision on the storage vessel provisions?
    After considering public comments on the proposed amendments, the 
EPA is finalizing the amendment to the introductory text in 40 CFR 
63.660 with a change from 11.0 psia to 11.1 psia. We are finalizing the 
amendments to section 63.660(b) and section 63.660(e) as proposed.
7. Flare Control Device Provisions
What is the history of the flare control device provisions addressed in 
the April 2018 Proposal?
    API and AFPM requested clarification in a December 1, 2016, letter 
to the EPA (Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0682-0913) regarding assist 
steam line designs that entrain air into the lower or upper steam at 
the flare tip. The industry representatives noted that many of the 
steam-assisted flare lines have this type of air entrainment and likely 
were part of the dataset analyzed to develop the standards established 
in the December 2015 Rule for steam-assisted flares. API and AFPM, 
therefore, maintain that these flares should not be considered to have 
assist air, and that they are appropriately and adequately regulated 
under the final standards in the December 2015 Rule for steam-assisted 
flares. Because flares with assist air are required to comply with both 
a combustion zone net heating value (NHVcz) and a net 
heating value dilution parameter (NHVdil), there is 
increased burden in having to comply with two operating parameters, and 
API and AFPM contend that this burden is unnecessary.
    In the preamble to the April 2018 Proposal, we stated that air 
intentionally entrained through steam nozzles meets the definition of 
assist air. However, we also noted that if this is the only assist air 
introduced prior to or at the flare tip, it is reasonable in most cases 
for the owner or operator to only need to comply with the 
NHVcz operating limit. We also noted that, for flare tips 
with an effective tip diameter of 9 inches or more, there are no flare 
tip steam induction designs that can entrain enough assist air to cause 
a flare operator to have a deviation of the NHVdil operating 
limit without first deviating from the NHVcz operating 
limit. Therefore, we proposed in section 63.670(f)(1) to allow owners 
or operators of flares whose only assist air is from perimeter assist 
air entrained in lower

[[Page 60708]]

and upper steam at the flare tip and with a flare tip diameter of 9 
inches or greater to comply only with the NHVcz operating 
limit. Steam-assisted flares with perimeter assist air and an effective 
tip diameter of less than 9 inches would remain subject to the 
requirement to account for the amount of assist air intentionally 
entrained within the calculation of NHVdil. We further 
proposed to add provisions to section 63.670(i)(6) specifying that 
owners or operators of these smaller diameter steam-assisted flares use 
the steam flow rate and the maximum design air-to-steam ratio of the 
steam tube's air entrainment system for determining the flow rate of 
this assist air.
    We also proposed several clarifying amendments for flares in 
response to API and AFPM's February 1, 2016, petition for 
reconsideration (Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0682-0892) as outlined 
below.
     For air assisted flares, we proposed to amend section 
63.670(i)(5) to include provisions for continuously monitoring fan 
speed or power and using fan curves for determining assist air flow 
rates to clarify that this is an acceptable method of determining air 
flow rates.
     We proposed two amendments relative to the visible 
emissions monitoring requirements in section 63.670(h) and (h)(1). We 
proposed to clarify that the initial 2-hour visible emission 
demonstration should be conducted the first time regulated materials 
are routed to the flare. We also proposed to amend section 63.670(h)(1) 
to clarify that the daily 5-minute observations must only be conducted 
on days the flare receives regulated materials and that the additional 
visible emissions monitoring is specific to cases when visible 
emissions are observed while regulated material is routed to the flare.
     We proposed to amend section 63.670(o)(1)(iii)(B) to 
clarify that the owner or operator must establish the smokeless 
capacity of the flare in a 15-minute block average and to amend section 
63.670(o)(3)(i) to clarify that the exceedance of the smokeless 
capacity of the flare is based on a 15-minute block average.
What comments were received on the flare control device provisions?
    The following is a summary of one comment received in response to 
our April 2018 Proposal and our response to this comment. All other 
comments related to the proposed amendments for the flare provisions 
are included in the response to comments document for this final action 
(Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-2010-0682).
    Comment 1: One commenter (-0958) explained that assist air may only 
be entrained in upper steam. Thus, they requested that the proposed 
revision to section 63.670(f)(1) and section 63.670(i)(6) be changed 
from ``lower and upper'' to ``lower and/or upper.'' The commenter also 
requested that the EPA clarify that the tip diameter referenced in 
section 63.670(i)(6) is the effective diameter as defined in section 
63.670(n)(1) and section 63.670(k)(1). Finally, the commenter requested 
that the EPA clarify that section 63.670(i)(6) applies to flares with 
an effective diameter less than 9 inches and stated that perimeter air 
monitoring for a steam-assisted flare with an effective diameter equal 
to or greater than 9 inches is not required.
    Response 1: We did not mean to limit the air entrainment provisions 
to only instances where air is entrained in both lower and upper steam 
at the flare tip. We agree that the language ``lower and/or upper 
steam'' is more accurate and consistent with our intent. We also agree 
that we should refer to the ``effective diameter'' of the flare tip as 
defined in the equation for NHVdil in section 63.670(n)(1). 
This clarification was made in section 63.670(f)(1); this term is not 
used in section 63.670(i)(6).
What is the EPA's final decision on the flare control device 
provisions?
    After considering the comments, we are finalizing the proposed 
amendment in section 63.670(f)(1) and section 63.670(i)(6) with a 
change in language from ``lower and upper'' to ``lower and/or upper.'' 
We are also finalizing the proposed amendment in section 63.670(f)(1) 
with a change in language from ``flare tip diameter'' to ``effective 
diameter,'' a term that is defined in section 63.670(n)(1) and section 
63.670(k)(1). The proposed clarifying amendments related to air 
assisted flares, visible emissions monitoring requirements, and 
smokeless capacity of the flare are being finalized as proposed.
8. Recordkeeping and Reporting Provisions
What is the history of the recordkeeping and reporting provisions 
addressed in the April 2018 Proposal?
    We proposed several clarifying amendments for recordkeeping and 
reporting requirements in response to questions received from API and 
AFPM as well as in response to API and AFPM's March 28, 2017, letter 
(Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0682-0915).
    Refinery owners or operators must submit a NOCS with 150 days of 
the compliance date associated with the provisions in the December 2015 
Rule. We proposed to amend sections 63.655(f) and (f)(6) to provide 
that sources having a compliance date on or after February 1, 2016, may 
submit the NOCS in the periodic report rather than as a separate 
submission.
    We proposed several amendments for electronic reporting 
requirements at sections 63.655(f)(1)(i)(B)(3) and (C)(2), (f)(1)(iii), 
(f)(2), and (f)(4) to clarify that when the results of performance 
tests or evaluations are reported in the NOCS, the results are due by 
the date the NOCS is due, whether the results are reported via 
Compliance and Emissions Data Reporting Interface (CEDRI) or in hard 
copy as part of the NOCS report. If the results are reported via CEDRI, 
we also proposed to specify that sources need not resubmit those 
results in the NOCS, but may instead submit specified information 
identifying that a performance test or evaluation was conducted and the 
units and pollutants that were tested. We also proposed to add the 
phrase ``Unless otherwise specified by this subpart'' to sections 
63.655(h)(9)(i) and (ii) to make clear that test results associated 
with a NOCS report are due at the time the NOCS is due and not within 
60 days of completing the performance test or evaluation. We also 
proposed to amend several references in Table 6--General Provisions 
Applicability to Subpart CC that discuss reporting requirements for 
performance tests or performance evaluations.
    We proposed to revise the provision in section 63.655(h)(10) to 
include processes to assert claims of EPA system outage or force 
majeure events as a basis for extending the electronic reporting 
deadlines.
    We also proposed to revise section 63.655(i)(5) to restore the 
subparagraphs which were inadvertently not included in the published 
CFR due to a clerical error.
    The amendments to section 63.655(h)(5)(iii) included in the 
December 2015 Rule (80 FR 75247) were not included in the regulations 
as published by the CFR. As reflected in the instructions to the 
amendments, we intended for the option to use an automated data 
compression recording system to be an approved monitoring alternative. 
In addition, in reviewing this amendment, the EPA noted that 40 CFR 
63.655(h)(5) specifically addresses mechanisms for owners or operators 
to request approval for alternatives to the continuous operating 
parameter monitoring and recordkeeping provisions, while the provisions 
in 40 CFR 63.655(i)(3) specifically include

[[Page 60709]]

options already approved for continuous parameter monitoring system 
(CPMS). Consistent with our intent for the use of an automated data 
compression recording system to be an approved monitoring alternative, 
we proposed to move paragraph 63.655(h)(5)(iii) to 63.655(i)(3)(ii)(C).
    Finally, we proposed a number of editorial and other corrections in 
Table 2 of the April 2018 Proposal (83 FR 15470).
What significant comments were received on the recordkeeping and 
reporting provisions?
    The following is a summary of the significant comments received in 
response to our April 2018 Proposal and our response to these comments. 
All other comments related to the proposed amendments for the 
recordkeeping and reporting provisions are included in the response to 
comments document for this final action (Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-2010-
0682).
    Comment 1: One commenter (-0958) objected to the proposed revisions 
to section 63.655(f) and section 63.655(f)(6) which require facilities 
to include their NOCS in the periodic report following the compliance 
activity. The commenter suggested that the EPA revert to the 150-day 
NOCS submission requirements as was included in the December 2015 Rule 
amendments for the sources listed in Table 11 of 40 CFR part 63, 
subpart CC, which have a compliance date on or after February 1, 2016. 
The commenter explained that for petroleum refinery owners and 
operators completing compliance activities requiring an NOCS in the 
latter half of the periodic reporting period, as little as 60 days 
could be provided to perform the test and generate the submission in 
order to include it in the periodic report.
    Response 1: The proposed revisions were specifically included to 
address the commenter's original request to align the new compliance 
notifications with the semiannual periodic reports to reduce burden. As 
the commenter has withdrawn the request for these revisions, we are not 
finalizing these proposed revisions.
    Comment 2: One commenter (-0958) supported the proposed revision 
allowing petroleum refinery owners and operators to request an 
extension for reporting under specified circumstances. One such 
circumstance is if the EPA's electronic reporting systems is out-of-
service in the five business days prior to the report due date. 
Proposed revisions in section 63.655(h)(10)(i) and section 
63.1575(l)(1) require the extension request to include the date, time, 
and length of the electronic reporting system outage. The commenter 
requested that the EPA remove these details from the requirements for 
the extension request as this is information the EPA, rather than the 
reporter, keeps. The commenter suggested that the EPA could require 
reporters to identify the dates on which they attempted to access the 
system in the 5-day period preceding the reporting due date.
    Response 2: We agree with the commenter. While users may know the 
length of time for a planned outage, as this information is provided to 
users, it is unlikely that a user will know the length of time for an 
unplanned outage. However, users will know the dates and times that 
they attempted but were unable to access the system. Therefore, we have 
revised the language in section 63.655(h)(10)(i) and section 
63.1575(l)(1) to state that owner or operators must provide information 
on the date(s) and time(s) the Central Data Exchange (CDX) or the CEDRI 
was unavailable when the user attempted to access it in the 5 business 
days prior to the submission deadline.
What is the EPA's final decision on the recordkeeping and reporting 
provisions?
    In response to the public comments received, we are not finalizing 
the proposed amendments to section 63.655(f) and section 63.655(f)(6) 
which require facilities to include their NOCS in the periodic report 
following the compliance activity.
    Also in response to the public comments received, we are finalizing 
the proposed amendment to section 63.655(h)(10) with changes. In the 
final rule, a refinery owner or operator's request for an extension 
must include information on the date(s) and time(s) the CDX or the 
CEDRI was unavailable when the user attempted to access it in the 5 
business days prior to the submission deadline, rather than requiring 
information regarding the length of the outage.
    We are finalizing the amendments to the electric reporting 
requirements in sections 63.655(f)(1)(i)(B)(3) and (C)(2), (f)(1)(iii), 
(f)(2), and (f)(4), sections 63.655(h)(9)(i) and (ii), and Table 6--
General Provisions Applicability to 40 CFR part 63, subpart CC, as 
proposed.
    We are finalizing the restoration of paragraph 63.655(i)(5), as 
proposed. We are also finalizing moving paragraph 63.655(h)(5)(iii) to 
63.655(i)(3)(ii)(C), as proposed. We are also finalizing the editorial 
and other corrections in Table 2 of the April 2018 Proposal (83 FR 
15470), as proposed.

B. Clarifications and Technical Corrections to Refinery MACT 2

1. FCCU Provisions
What is the history of the FCCU provisions addressed in the April 2018 
Proposal?
    In order to demonstrate compliance with the alternative particulate 
matter (PM) standard for FCCU as provided at section 63.1564(a)(5)(ii), 
the outlet (exhaust) gas flow rate of the catalyst regenerator must be 
determined. As provided in section 63.1573(a), owners or operators may 
determine this flow rate using a flow CPMS or an alternative. 
Currently, the language in section 63.1573(a) restricts the use of the 
alternative to occasions when ``the unit does not introduce any other 
gas streams into the catalyst regenerator vent.'' API and AFPM (Docket 
ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0682-0915) claim that while this restriction is 
appropriate for determining the flow rate for applying emissions 
limitations downstream of the regenerator because additional gases 
introduced to the vent would not be measured using this method, it is 
not a necessary constraint for determining compliance with the 
alternative PM limit. This is because the alternative PM standard 
applies at the outlet of the regenerator prior to the primary cyclone 
inlet and this is the flow measured by the alternative in section 
63.1573(a). As described in the preamble of the April 2018 Proposal (83 
FR 15471). We proposed to amend section 63.1573(a) to remove that 
restriction.
    Additionally, API and AFPM noted in their February 1, 2016, 
petition (EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0682-0892) for reconsideration that the FCCU 
alternative organic HAP standard for startup, shutdown, and hot standby 
in section 63.1565(a)(5)(ii) requires maintaining the oxygen 
concentration in the regenerator exhaust gas at or above 1 volume 
percent (dry) (i.e., greater than or equal to 1-percent oxygen 
(O2) measured on a dry basis); however, they claim process 
O2 analyzers measure O2 on a wet basis. As 
described in the preamble of the April 2018 Proposal (83 FR 15471), 
meeting the 1-percent O2 standard on a wet basis measurement 
will always mean that there is more O2 than if the 
concentration value is corrected to a dry basis. As such, we proposed 
to amend section 63.1565(a)(5)(ii) and Table 10 to allow for the use of 
a wet O2 measurement for demonstrating compliance with the 
standard so long as it is used directly with no correction for moisture 
content.

[[Page 60710]]

    The following is a summary of the one comment received in response 
to our April 2018 Proposal and our response to this comment on the 
proposed amendments to the FCCU provisions.
What comment was received on the FCCU provisions?
    Comment 1: One commenter (-0958) supported the EPA's proposed 
revisions to section 63.1573(a)(1), which allows the use of the inlet 
velocity requirement during periods of startup, shutdown, and 
malfunction (SSM) for an FCCU as an alternative to the PM standard 
regardless of the configuration of the catalytic regenerator exhaust 
vent stream. The same commenter suggested additional clarifications 
relative to the alternative PM standard. These clarifications include:
    (1) Amending the last sentence in section 63.1573(a)(1) to clarify 
that the requirement to use the same procedure for performance tests 
and subsequent monitoring does not apply to the use of the alternative 
in section 63.1564(c)(5), since the alternative only applies during 
SSM.
    (2) Revising the first sentence of section 63.1573(a)(2) to 
specifically allow use for demonstrating compliance with section 
63.1564(c)(5).
    (3) Amending the footnote to Item 12 in Table 3 to make it clear 
that either alternative in (a)(1) or (a)(2) is acceptable for 
demonstrating compliance. The commenter also recommended providing a 
separate footnote as other items reference footnote 1.
    (4) Adding the footnote from Item 12 in Table 3 to Item 10 in Table 
7.
    Response 1: We agree with the commenter that the last sentence in 
section 63.1573(a)(1) is provided to ensure that the operating limits 
are established using the same monitoring techniques as the on-going 
monitoring. As no site-specific operating limit is required for 
compliance with section 63.1564(c)(5), that requirement is not 
applicable to this additional allowance of this alternative. We are 
revising the language in the final rule to clarify.
    We disagree that it is appropriate to revise the first sentence in 
section 63.1573(a)(2), as requested by the commenter, because the flow 
rate must be determined based on actual flow conditions, not standard 
conditions; therefore, Equation 2 in section 63.1573 is not applicable 
to demonstrate compliance with section 63.1564(c)(5).
What is the EPA's final decision on the FCCU provisions?
    In consideration of public comments, we are finalizing the 
amendments to the FCCU provisions, as proposed with one change to 
section 63.1573(a) to clarify that the provision does not apply to the 
use of the alternative in section 63.1564(c)(5).
2. Other Provisions
What is the history of the other Refinery MACT 2 provisions addressed 
in the April 2018 Proposal?
    We proposed several clarifying amendments for other Refinery MACT 2 
requirements in response to API and AFPM's petition for reconsideration 
(Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0682-0892) as well as in response to the 
API and AFPM's March 28, 2017, letter (Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-
0682-0915).
    We proposed to amend section 63.1572(d)(1) to be consistent with 
the analogous language in section 63.671(a)(4).
    We proposed to amend the recordkeeping requirements in section 
63.1576(a)(2)(i) to apply only when facilities elect to comply with the 
alternative startup and shutdown standards provided in section 
63.1564(a)(5)(ii), section 63.1565(a)(5)(ii), or sections 
63.1568(a)(4)(ii) or (iii).
    We proposed several amendments for electronic reporting including 
at section 63.1574(a)(3) to clarify that the results of performance 
tests conducted to demonstrate initial compliance are to be reported by 
the due date of the NOCS whether the results are reported via CEDRI or 
in hard copy as part of the NOCS report. If the results are reported 
via CEDRI, we also proposed to specify that sources need not resubmit 
those results in the NOCS, but may instead submit information 
identifying that a performance test or evaluation was conducted and the 
units and pollutants that were tested. We also proposed to amend the 
submission of the results of periodic performance tests and the 1-time 
hydrogen cyanide (HCN) test required in sections 63.1571(a)(5) and (6) 
to require inclusion with the semiannual compliance reports as 
specified in section 63.1575(f) instead of within 60 days of completing 
the performance evaluation. Similarly, we proposed to streamline 
reporting of the results of performance evaluations and continuous 
monitoring systems (as provided in item 2 to Table 43) to align with 
the semiannual compliance reports as specified in section 63.1575(f) 
rather than requiring a separate submission. We also proposed to add 
the phrase ``Unless otherwise specified by this subpart'' to sections 
63.1575(k)(1) and (2) to make clear that performance tests or 
performance evaluations required to be reported in a NOCS report or a 
semiannual compliance report are not subject to the 60-day deadline 
specified in the paragraphs. We also proposed to add section 63.1575(l) 
to address extensions to electronic reporting deadlines. We also 
proposed clarifying amendments to several references in Table 44--
Applicability of NESHAP General Provisions to 40 CFR part 63, subpart 
UUU.
    Finally, we proposed a number of editorial and other corrections in 
Table 3 of the April 2018 Proposal (83 FR 15472).
    The following is a summary of the significant comments received in 
response to our April 2018 Proposal and our response to these comments. 
It should be noted that the comment summary and response for the 
reporting extension in section 63.655(h)(10)(i) and section 
63.1575(l)(1) is addressed in section III.A.8 of this preamble. All 
other comments related to the proposed amendments for the other 
Refinery MACT 2 provisions are included in the response to comments 
document for this final action (Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-2010-0682).
What significant comment was received on the other Refinery MACT 2 
provisions?
    Comment 1: One commenter (-0958) recommended that the EPA revise 
the proposed requirement in section 63.1571(a), (a)(5), (a)(6), and 
Table 6 Item 1.ii to complete initial PM (or nickel) performance test 
within 60 days of startup for new units to instead allow for completion 
and reporting of the performance test by the 150-day notice of 
compliance status date since a new unit may not be up to full 
production rates within the first 60 days.
    Response 1: In reviewing the existing provisions regarding 
performance tests in Refinery MACT 2 (40 CFR part 63, subpart UUU), we 
agree that the initial performance tests are required to be completed 
and reported no later than 150 days after the compliance date (see 
section 63.1574(a)(3)(ii)). To better align the proposed revisions with 
the existing requirements, we are revising the proposed requirement to 
complete and report these tests no later than 150 days after the 
compliance date (see section 63.1574(a)(3)(ii)).
What is the EPA's final decision on the other Refinery MACT 2 
provisions?
    After considering public comment, we are finalizing these 
amendments with some revisions to the due dates for initial performance 
tests in sections 63.1571(a), (a)(5), (a)(6), and Table 6

[[Page 60711]]

Item 1.ii as well as edits to the proposed language in the extensions 
to electronic reporting provisions in section 63.1575(l) (as described 
in section III.A.8 of this preamble). We are finalizing the amendments 
at section 63.1572(d)(1), section 63.1576(a)(2)(i), and Table 3 of the 
April 2018 Proposal (83 FR 15472), as proposed.

C. Clarifications and Technical Corrections to NSPS Ja

    We proposed three revisions in NSPS Ja to improve consistency, 
remove redundancy, and correct grammar at section 60.105a(b)(2)(ii), 
section 60.106a(a)(1)(vi), and section 60.106a(a)(1)(iii), 
respectively. We did not receive public comments on these proposed 
amendments. We are finalizing these amendments as proposed.

IV. Summary of Cost, Environmental, and Economic Impacts and Additional 
Analyses Conducted

    As described in the April 2018 Proposal and associated memorandum 
titled, ``Projected Cost and Burden Reduction for the Proposed 
Amendments of the 2015 Risk and Technology Review: Petroleum 
Refineries,'' (Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-OAR-2010-0682-0925), the technical 
corrections and clarifications included in this final rule are expected 
to result in overall cost and burden reductions. Consistent with the 
April 2018 Proposal, the final amendments expected to reduce burden 
are: Revisions of the maintenance vent provisions related to the 
availability of a pure hydrogen supply for equipment containing 
pyrophoric catalyst, revisions of recordkeeping requirements for 
maintenance vents associated with equipment containing less than 72 
lbs/day VOC, inclusion of specific provisions for pilot-operated and 
balanced bellows PRDs, and inclusion of specific provisions related to 
steam tube air entrainment for flares. The other final amendments 
included in this rulemaking will have an insignificant effect on the 
costs or burdens associated with the standards. Additionally, none of 
the final amendments are projected to appreciably impact the emissions 
reductions associated with these standards.
    We are finalizing the provisions for maintenance vent recordkeeping 
and PRD as proposed, and, thus, the cost and burden reductions 
estimated in the April 2018 Proposal and supporting memorandum are 
still accurate. The final revisions to the recordkeeping requirements 
for maintenance vents associated with equipment containing less than 72 
lbs/day VOC are estimated to yield savings of approximately $677,000 
per year considering the actual estimated annualized burden of the 
December 2015 Rule. The final provisions for pilot-operated and 
balanced bellows PRDs included in this final rulemaking yield a 
reduction in capital investment of $1.1 million and a reduction in 
annualized costs of $330,000 per year considering the actual estimated 
annualized burden of the December 2015 Rule.
    It should be noted that we are finalizing amendments to the 
proposed provisions for maintenance vent provisions related to the 
availability of a pure hydrogen supply for equipment containing 
pyrophoric catalyst and provisions related to steam tube air 
entrainment for flares with revisions as described in sections III.A.2 
and III.A.7 of this preamble. The revisions described in sections 
III.A.2 and III.A.7 are not expected to impact the cost and burden 
reductions estimated in the referenced April 2018 Proposal and 
memorandum for these provisions, as they are clarifying in nature.
    As explained in the April 2018 Proposal, there were no capital 
costs estimated for the maintenance vent provisions in the December 
2015 Rule and only limited recordkeeping and reporting costs. Capital 
investment estimates provided by industry stakeholders for the 
maintenance vent provisions included in the December 2015 Rule was 
approximately $76 million. The inclusion of the capital costs for the 
maintenance vent provisions would have increased the previously 
estimated annualized cost included in the December 2015 Rule by 
$7,174,400 per year. Through the revisions being finalized in this 
rule, these costs will not be incurred by refinery owners and 
operators. Similarly, while significant capital and operating costs 
were projected for flares, we may have underestimated the number of 
steam-assisted flares that would also have to demonstrate compliance 
with the NHVdil operating limit in the December 2015 Rule 
impacts analysis. Considering such flares, the annualized cost of the 
December 2015 Rule for steam-assisted flares would have increased the 
previously estimated annualized cost included in the December 2015 Rule 
by $3,300,000 per year. Through the revisions being finalized in this 
rulemaking which allows owners or operators of certain steam-assisted 
flares with air entrainment at the flare tip to comply only with the 
NHVcz operating limits, these costs will not be incurred by 
refinery owners and operators.

V. Statutory and Executive Order Reviews

    Additional information about these statutes and Executive Orders 
can be found at https://www.epa.gov/laws-regulations/laws-and-executive-orders.

A. Executive Order 12866: Regulatory Planning and Review and Executive 
Order 13563: Improving Regulation and Regulatory Review

    This action is not a significant regulatory action and was, 
therefore, not submitted to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) 
for review.

B. Executive Order 13771: Reducing Regulations and Controlling 
Regulatory Costs

    This action is considered an Executive Order 13771 deregulatory 
action. Details on the estimated cost savings of this final rule can be 
found in the EPA's analysis of the present value and annualized value 
estimates associated with this action located in Docket ID No. EPA-HQ-
OAR-2010-0682.

C. Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA)

    The information collection activities in this rule have been 
submitted for approval to OMB under the PRA. The ICR document that the 
EPA prepared has been assigned EPA ICR number 1692.12. You can find a 
copy of the ICR in the docket for this rule, and it is briefly 
summarized here. The information collection requirements are not 
enforceable until OMB approves them.
    One of the final technical amendments included in this rule impacts 
the recordkeeping requirements in 40 CFR part 63, subpart CC for 
certain maintenance vents associated with equipment containing less 
than 72 lbs/day VOC as found at 40 CFR 63.655(i)(12)(iv). The new 
recordkeeping requirement specifies records used to estimate the total 
quantity of VOC in the equipment and the type and size limits of 
equipment that contain less than 72 lbs/day of VOC at the time of the 
maintenance vent opening be maintained. As specified in 40 CFR 
63.655(i)(12)(iv), additional records are required if the inventory 
procedures were not followed for each maintenance vent opening or if 
the equipment opened exceeded the type and size limits (i.e., 72 lbs/
day VOC). These additional records include identification of the 
maintenance vent, the process units or equipment associated with the 
maintenance vent, the date of maintenance vent opening, and records 
used to estimate the total quantity of VOC in the equipment at the

[[Page 60712]]

time the maintenance vent was opened to the atmosphere. These records 
will assist the EPA with determining compliance with the standards set 
forth in 40 CFR 63.643(c)(iv).
    Respondents/affected entities: Owners or operators of existing or 
new major source petroleum refineries that are major sources of HAP 
emissions. The NAICS code is 324110 for petroleum refineries.
    Respondent's obligation to respond: All data in the ICR that are 
recorded are required by the amendments to 40 CFR part 63, subpart CC, 
National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants for Petroleum 
Refineries.
    Estimated number of respondents: 142.
    Frequency of response: Once per year per respondent.
    Total estimated burden: 16 hours (per year). Burden is defined at 5 
CFR 1320.3(b).
    Total estimated cost: $1,640 (per year), includes $0 annualized 
capital or operation and maintenance costs.
    An agency may not conduct or sponsor, and a person is not required 
to respond to, a collection of information unless it displays a 
currently valid OMB control number. The OMB control numbers for the 
EPA's regulations in 40 CFR are listed in 40 CFR part 9. When OMB 
approves this ICR, the Agency will announce that approval in the 
Federal Register and publish a technical amendment to 40 CFR part 9 to 
display the OMB control number for the approved information collection 
activities contained in this final rule.

D. Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA)

    I certify that this action will not have a significant economic 
impact on a substantial number of small entities under the RFA. In 
making this determination, the impact of concern is any significant 
adverse economic impact on small entities. An agency may certify that a 
rule will not have a significant economic impact on a substantial 
number of small entities if the rule relieves regulatory burden, has no 
net burden, or otherwise has a positive economic effect on the small 
entities subject to the rule. The action consists of amendments, 
clarifications, and technical corrections which are expected to reduce 
regulatory burden. As described in section IV of this preamble, we 
expect burden reduction for: (1) Revisions of the maintenance vent 
provisions related to the availability of a pure hydrogen supply for 
equipment containing pyrophoric catalyst, (2) revisions of 
recordkeeping requirements for maintenance vents associated with 
equipment containing less than 72 lbs/day VOC, (3) inclusion of 
specific provisions for pilot-operated and balanced bellows PRDs, and 
(4) inclusion of specific provisions related to steam tube air 
entrainment for flares. Furthermore, as noted in section IV of this 
preamble, we do not expect the final amendments to change the expected 
economic impact analysis performed for the existing rule. We have, 
therefore, concluded that this action will relieve regulatory burden 
for all directly regulated small entities.

E. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA)

    This action does not contain any unfunded mandate as described in 
UMRA, 2 U.S.C. 1531-1538, and does not significantly or uniquely affect 
small governments. The action imposes no enforceable duty on any state, 
local, or tribal governments or the private sector.

F. Executive Order 13132: Federalism

    This action does not have federalism implications. It will not have 
substantial direct effects on the states, the relationship between the 
national government and the states, or on the distribution of power and 
responsibilities among the various levels of government.

G. Executive Order 13175: Consultation and Coordination With Indian 
Tribal Governments

    This action does not have tribal implications as specified in 
Executive Order 13175. It will not have substantial direct effect on 
tribal governments, on the relationship between the federal government 
and Indian tribes, or on the distribution of power and responsibilities 
between the federal government and Indian tribes, as specified in 
Executive Order 13175. Thus, Executive Order 13175 does not apply to 
this action.

H. Executive Order 13045: Protection of Children From Environmental 
Health Risks and Safety Risks

    This action is not subject to Executive Order 13045 because it is 
not economically significant as defined in Executive Order 12866, and 
because the EPA does not believe the environmental health or safety 
risks addressed by this action present a disproportionate risk to 
children. The final amendments serve to make technical clarifications 
and corrections, as well as revise compliance dates. We expect the 
final revisions will have an insignificant effect on emission 
reductions. Therefore, the final amendments should not appreciably 
increase risk for any populations.

I. Executive Order 13211: Actions Concerning Regulations That 
Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use

    This action is not subject to Executive Order 13211 because it is 
not a significant regulatory action under Executive Order 12866.

J. National Technology Transfer and Advancement Act (NTTAA) and 1 CFR 
Part 51

    This rulemaking involves technical standards. As described in 
section III.C of this preamble, the EPA has decided to use the 
voluntary consensus standard ANSI/ASME PTC 19.10-1981, ``Flue and 
Exhaust Gas Analyses,'' as an acceptable alternative to EPA Methods 3A 
and 3B for the manual procedures only and not the instrumental 
procedures. This method is available at the American National Standards 
Institute (ANSI), 1899 L Street NW, 11th Floor, Washington, DC 20036 
and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), Three Park 
Avenue, New York, NY 10016-5990. See https://wwww.ansi.org and https://www.asme.org.

K. Executive Order 12898: Federal Actions To Address Environmental 
Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations

    The EPA believes that this action does not have disproportionately 
high and adverse human health or environmental effects on minority 
populations, low income populations, and/or indigenous peoples, as 
specified in Executive Order 12898 (59 FR 7629, February 16, 1994). The 
final amendments serve to make technical clarifications and 
corrections, as well as revise compliance dates. We expect the final 
technical clarifications and corrections will have an insignificant 
effect on emission reductions. The additional compliance time provided 
for existing maintenance vents is expected to have an insignificant 
effect on emission reductions as many refiners already have measures in 
place due to state and other federal requirements to minimize emissions 
during these periods. Further, the maintenance vent opening periods are 
relatively infrequent and are usually of short duration. Additionally, 
the final compliance date only provides approximately 6 months beyond 
the August 1, 2018, compliance date for most facilities, which are 
operating under 1-year compliance extensions (from the previous 
deadline of August 1, 2017) they received from states based on the 
procedure in 40 CFR 63.6(i). Therefore, the final amendments should

[[Page 60713]]

not appreciably increase risk for any populations.

L. Congressional Review Act (CRA)

    This action is subject to the CRA, and the EPA will submit a rule 
report to each House of Congress and to the Comptroller General of the 
United States. This is not a ``major rule'' as defined by 5 U.S.C. 
804(2).

List of Subjects

40 CFR Part 60

    Environmental protection, Administrative practice and procedures, 
Air pollution control, Hazardous substances, Incorporation by 
reference, Intergovernmental relations, Reporting and recordkeeping 
requirements.

40 CFR Part 63

    Environmental protection, Administrative practice and procedures, 
Air pollution control, Hazardous substances, Incorporation by 
reference, Intergovernmental relations, Reporting and recordkeeping 
requirements.

    Dated: November 8, 2018.
Andrew R. Wheeler,
Acting Administrator.

    For the reasons stated in the preamble, title 40, chapter I, of the 
Code of Federal Regulations is amended as follows:

PART 60--STANDARDS OF PERFORMANCE FOR NEW STATIONARY SOURCES

0
1. The authority citation for part 60 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401, et seq.

Subpart A--General Provisions

0
2. Section 60.17 is amended by revising paragraph (g)(14) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  60.17  Incorporations by reference.

* * * * *
    (g) * * *
    (14) ASME/ANSI PTC 19.10-1981, Flue and Exhaust Gas Analyses [Part 
10, Instruments and Apparatus], (Issued August 31, 1981), IBR approved 
for Sec. Sec.  60.56c(b), 60.63(f), 60.106(e), 60.104a(d), (h), (i), 
and (j), 60.105a(b), (d), (f), and (g), 60.106a(a), 60.107a(a), (c), 
and (d), tables 1 and 3 to subpart EEEE, tables 2 and 4 to subpart 
FFFF, table 2 to subpart JJJJ, Sec. Sec.  60.285a(f), 60.4415(a), 
60.2145(s) and (t), 60.2710(s), (t), and (w), 60.2730(q), 60.4900(b), 
60.5220(b), tables 1 and 2 to subpart LLLL, tables 2 and 3 to subpart 
MMMM, Sec. Sec.  60.5406(c), 60.5406a(c), 60.5407a(g), 60.5413(b), 
60.5413a(b), and 60.5413a(d).
* * * * *

Subpart Ja--Standards of Performance for Petroleum Refineries for 
Which Construction, Reconstruction, or Modification Commenced After 
May 14, 2007

0
3. Section 60.105a is amended by revising paragraph (b)(2)(ii) to read 
as follows:


Sec.  60.105a  Monitoring of emissions and operations for fluid 
catalytic cracking units (FCCU) and fluid coking units (FCU).

* * * * *
    (b) * * *
    (2) * * *
    (ii) The owner or operator shall conduct performance evaluations of 
each CO2 and O2 monitor according to the 
requirements in Sec.  60.13(c) and Performance Specification 3 of 
appendix B to this part. The owner or operator shall use Method 3, 3A 
or 3B of appendix A-2 to this part for conducting the relative accuracy 
evaluations. The method ANSI/ASME PTC 19.10-1981, ``Flue and Exhaust 
Gas Analyses,'' (incorporated by reference--see Sec.  60.17) is an 
acceptable alternative to EPA Method 3B of appendix A-2 to part 60.
* * * * *

0
4. Section 60.106a is amended by revising paragraph (a)(1)(iii) to read 
as follows:


Sec.  60.106a  Monitoring of emissions and operations for sulfur 
recovery plants.

    (a) * * *
    (1) * * *
    (iii) The owner or operator shall conduct performance evaluations 
of each SO2 monitor according to the requirements in Sec.  
60.13(c) and Performance Specification 2 of appendix B to part 60. The 
owner or operator shall use Method 6 or 6C of appendix A-4 to part 60. 
The method ANSI/ASME PTC 19.10-1981, ``Flue and Exhaust Gas Analyses,'' 
(incorporated by reference--see Sec.  60.17) is an acceptable 
alternative to EPA Method 6.
* * * * *

PART 63--NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS 
FOR SOURCE CATEGORIES

0
5. The authority citation for part 63 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 42 U.S.C. 7401 et seq.

Subpart CC--National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air 
Pollutants From Petroleum Refineries

0
6. Section 63.641 is amended by:
0
a. Revising the definitions of ``Flare purge gas'' and ``Flare 
supplemental gas'';
0
b. Adding a definition of ``Pressure relief device'' in alphabetical 
order;
0
c. Revising the introductory text and adding paragraphs (1)(i) and (ii) 
to the definition of ``Reference control technology for storage 
vessels''; and
0
d. Revising the definition of ``Relief valve''.
    The revisions and addition read as follows:


Sec.  63.641  Definitions.

* * * * *
    Flare purge gas means gas introduced between a flare header's water 
seal and the flare tip to prevent oxygen infiltration (backflow) into 
the flare tip or for other safety reasons. For a flare with no water 
seal, the function of flare purge gas is performed by flare sweep gas 
and, therefore, by definition, such a flare has no flare purge gas.
    Flare supplemental gas means all gas introduced to the flare to 
improve the heat content of combustion zone gas. Flare supplemental gas 
does not include assist air or assist steam.
* * * * *
    Pressure relief device means a valve, rupture disk, or similar 
device used only to release an unplanned, nonroutine discharge of gas 
from process equipment in order to avoid safety hazards or equipment 
damage. A pressure relief device discharge can result from an operator 
error, a malfunction such as a power failure or equipment failure, or 
other unexpected cause. Such devices include conventional, spring-
actuated relief valves, balanced bellows relief valves, pilot-operated 
relief valves, rupture disks, and breaking, buckling, or shearing pin 
devices.
* * * * *
    Reference control technology for storage vessels means either:
    (1) * * *
    (i) An internal floating roof, including an external floating roof 
converted to an internal floating roof, meeting the specifications of 
Sec.  63.1063(a)(1)(i), (a)(2), and (b) and Sec.  63.660(b)(2);
    (ii) An external floating roof meeting the specifications of Sec.  
63.1063(a)(1)(ii), (a)(2), and (b) and Sec.  63.660(b)(2); or
* * * * *
    Relief valve means a type of pressure relief device that is 
designed to re-close after the pressure relief.
* * * * *

[[Page 60714]]


0
7. Section 63.643 is amended by:
0
a. Revising paragraphs (c) introductory text, (c)(1) introductory text, 
and (c)(1)(ii) through (iv); and
0
b. Adding a new paragraph (c)(1)(v).
    The revisions and addition read as follows:


Sec.  63.643  Miscellaneous process vent provisions.

* * * * *
    (c) An owner or operator may designate a process vent as a 
maintenance vent if the vent is only used as a result of startup, 
shutdown, maintenance, or inspection of equipment where equipment is 
emptied, depressurized, degassed or placed into service. The owner or 
operator does not need to designate a maintenance vent as a Group 1 or 
Group 2 miscellaneous process vent nor identify maintenance vents in a 
Notification of Compliance Status report. The owner or operator must 
comply with the applicable requirements in paragraphs (c)(1) through 
(3) of this section for each maintenance vent according to the 
compliance dates specified in table 11 of this subpart, unless an 
extension is requested in accordance with the provisions in Sec.  
63.6(i).
    (1) Prior to venting to the atmosphere, process liquids are removed 
from the equipment as much as practical and the equipment is 
depressured to a control device meeting requirements in paragraphs 
(a)(1) or (2) of this section, a fuel gas system, or back to the 
process until one of the following conditions, as applicable, is met.
* * * * *
    (ii) If there is no ability to measure the LEL of the vapor in the 
equipment based on the design of the equipment, the pressure in the 
equipment served by the maintenance vent is reduced to 5 pounds per 
square inch gauge (psig) or less. Upon opening the maintenance vent, 
active purging of the equipment cannot be used until the LEL of the 
vapors in the maintenance vent (or inside the equipment if the 
maintenance is a hatch or similar type of opening) is less than 10 
percent.
    (iii) The equipment served by the maintenance vent contains less 
than 72 pounds of total volatile organic compounds (VOC).
    (iv) If the maintenance vent is associated with equipment 
containing pyrophoric catalyst (e.g., hydrotreaters and hydrocrackers) 
and a pure hydrogen supply is not available at the equipment at the 
time of the startup, shutdown, maintenance, or inspection activity, the 
LEL of the vapor in the equipment must be less than 20 percent, except 
for one event per year not to exceed 35 percent.
    (v) If, after applying best practices to isolate and purge 
equipment served by a maintenance vent, none of the applicable 
criterion in paragraphs (c)(1)(i) through (iv) can be met prior to 
installing or removing a blind flange or similar equipment blind, the 
pressure in the equipment served by the maintenance vent is reduced to 
2 psig or less, Active purging of the equipment may be used provided 
the equipment pressure at the location where purge gas is introduced 
remains at 2 psig or less.
* * * * *

0
8. Section 63.644 is amended by:
0
a. Revising paragraph (c) introductory text;
0
b. Removing the period at the end of paragraph (c)(2) and adding ``; 
or'' in its place; and
0
c. Adding paragraph (c)(3).
    The revision and addition read as follows:


Sec.  63.644  Monitoring provisions for miscellaneous process vents.

* * * * *
    (c) The owner or operator of a Group 1 miscellaneous process vent 
using a vent system that contains bypass lines that could divert a vent 
stream away from the control device used to comply with paragraph (a) 
of this section either directly to the atmosphere or to a control 
device that does not comply with the requirements in Sec.  63.643(a) 
shall comply with either paragraph (c)(1), (2), or (3) of this section. 
Use of the bypass at any time to divert a Group 1 miscellaneous process 
vent stream to the atmosphere or to a control device that does not 
comply with the requirements in Sec.  63.643(a) is an emissions 
standards violation. Equipment such as low leg drains and equipment 
subject to Sec.  63.648 are not subject to this paragraph (c).
* * * * *
    (3) Use a cap, blind flange, plug, or a second valve for an open-
ended valve or line following the requirements specified in Sec.  
60.482-6(a)(2), (b) and (c).
* * * * *

0
9. Section 63.648 is amended by:
0
a. Revising the introductory text of paragraphs (a), (c), and (j); and
0
b. Revising paragraphs (j)(3)(ii)(A) and (E), (j)(3)(iv), (j)(3)(v) 
introductory text, and (j)(4).
    The revisions read as follows:


Sec.  63.648  Equipment leak standards.

    (a) Each owner or operator of an existing source subject to the 
provisions of this subpart shall comply with the provisions of 40 CFR 
part 60, subpart VV, and paragraph (b) of this section except as 
provided in paragraphs (a)(1) through (3), and (c) through (j) of this 
section. Each owner or operator of a new source subject to the 
provisions of this subpart shall comply with subpart H of this part 
except as provided in paragraphs (c) through (j) of this section.
* * * * *
    (c) In lieu of complying with the existing source provisions of 
paragraph (a) in this section, an owner or operator may elect to comply 
with the requirements of Sec. Sec.  63.161 through 63.169, 63.171, 
63.172, 63.175, 63.176, 63.177, 63.179, and 63.180 except as provided 
in paragraphs (c)(1) through (12) and (e) through (j) of this section.
* * * * *
    (j) Except as specified in paragraph (j)(4) of this section, the 
owner or operator must comply with the requirements specified in 
paragraphs (j)(1) and (2) of this section for pressure relief devices, 
such as relief valves or rupture disks, in organic HAP gas or vapor 
service instead of the pressure relief device requirements of Sec.  
60.482-4 or Sec.  63.165, as applicable. Except as specified in 
paragraphs (j)(4) and (5) of this section, the owner or operator must 
also comply with the requirements specified in paragraph (j)(3) of this 
section for all pressure relief devices in organic HAP service.
* * * * *
    (3) * * *
    (ii) * * *
    (A) Flow, temperature, liquid level and pressure indicators with 
deadman switches, monitors, or automatic actuators. Independent, non-
duplicative systems within this category count as separate redundant 
prevention measures.
* * * * *
    (E) Staged relief system where initial pressure relief device (with 
lower set release pressure) discharges to a flare or other closed vent 
system and control device.
* * * * *
    (iv) The owner or operator shall determine the total number of 
release events occurred during the calendar year for each affected 
pressure relief device separately. The owner or operator shall also 
determine the total number of release events for each pressure relief 
device for which the root cause analysis concluded that the root cause 
was a force majeure event, as defined in this subpart.
    (v) Except for pressure relief devices described in paragraphs 
(j)(4) and (5) of this section, the following release events from an 
affected pressure relief device are a violation of the pressure release 
management work practice standards:
* * * * *

[[Page 60715]]

    (4) Pressure relief devices routed to a control device. (i) If all 
releases and potential leaks from a pressure relief device are routed 
through a closed vent system to a control device, back into the process 
or to the fuel gas system, the owner or operator is not required to 
comply with paragraph (j)(1), (2), or (3) (if applicable) of this 
section.
    (ii) If a pilot-operated pressure relief device is used and the 
primary release valve is routed through a closed vent system to a 
control device, back into the process or to the fuel gas system, the 
owner or operator is required to comply only with paragraphs (j)(1) and 
(2) of this section for the pilot discharge vent and is not required to 
comply with paragraph (j)(3) of this section for the pilot-operated 
pressure relief device.
    (iii) If a balanced bellows pressure relief device is used and the 
primary release valve is routed through a closed vent system to a 
control device, back into the process or to the fuel gas system, the 
owner or operator is required to comply only with paragraphs (j)(1) and 
(2) of this section for the bonnet vent and is not required to comply 
with paragraph (j)(3) of this section for the balanced bellows pressure 
relief device.
    (iv) Both the closed vent system and control device (if applicable) 
referenced in paragraphs (j)(4)(i) through (iii) of this section must 
meet the requirements of Sec.  63.644. When complying with this 
paragraph (j)(4), all references to ``Group 1 miscellaneous process 
vent'' in Sec.  63.644 mean ``pressure relief device.''
    (v) If a pressure relief device complying with this paragraph 
(j)(4) is routed to the fuel gas system, then on and after January 30, 
2019, any flares receiving gas from that fuel gas system must be in 
compliance with Sec.  63.670.
* * * * *

0
10. Section 63.655 is amended by:
0
a. Revising paragraphs (f)(1)(i)(A)(1) through (3), (f)(1)(i)(B)(3), 
(f)(1)(i)(C)(2), (f)(1)(iii), (f)(2), (f)(4), (g)(2)(i)(B)(1) and 
(g)(10) introductory text;
0
b. Redesignating paragraph (g)(10)(iii) as (g)(10)(iv);
0
c. Adding new paragraph (g)(10)(iii);
0
d. Revising paragraph (g)(13) introductory text and paragraph 
(h)(2)(ii);
0
e. Removing and reserving paragraph (h)(5)(iii);
0
f. Revising paragraph (h)(8)
0
g. Revising paragraph (h)(9)(i) introductory text and paragraph 
(h)(9)(ii) introductory text;
0
h. Adding paragraph (h)(10);
0
i. Revising paragraph (i)(3)(ii)(B);
0
j. Adding paragraphs (i)(3)(ii)(C) and (i)(5)(i) through (v);
0
k. Revising paragraphs (i)(7)(iii)(B) and (i)(11) introductory text;
0
l. Adding paragraph (i)(11)(iv);
0
m. Revising paragraph (i)(12) introductory text and paragraph 
(i)(12)(iv); and
0
n. Adding paragraph (i)(12)(vi).
    The revisions and additions read as follows:


Sec.  63.655  Reporting and recordkeeping requirements.

* * * * *
    (f) * * *
    (1) * * *
    (i) * * *
    (A) * * *
    (1) For each Group 1 storage vessel complying with either Sec.  
63.646 or Sec.  63.660 that is not included in an emissions average, 
the method of compliance (i.e., internal floating roof, external 
floating roof, or closed vent system and control device).
    (2) For storage vessels subject to the compliance schedule 
specified in Sec.  63.640(h)(2) that are not complying with Sec.  
63.646 or Sec.  63.660 as applicable, the anticipated compliance date.
    (3) For storage vessels subject to the compliance schedule 
specified in Sec.  63.640(h)(2) that are complying with Sec.  63.646 or 
Sec.  63.660, as applicable, and the Group 1 storage vessels described 
in Sec.  63.640(l), the actual compliance date.
    (B) * * *
    (3) If the owner or operator elects to submit the results of a 
performance test, identification of the storage vessel and control 
device for which the performance test will be submitted, and 
identification of the emission point(s) that share the control device 
with the storage vessel and for which the performance test will be 
conducted. If the performance test is submitted electronically through 
the EPA's Compliance and Emissions Data Reporting Interface (CEDRI) in 
accordance with Sec.  63.655(h)(9), the process unit(s) tested, the 
pollutant(s) tested, and the date that such performance test was 
conducted may be submitted in the Notification of Compliance Status in 
lieu of the performance test results. The performance test results must 
be submitted to CEDRI by the date the Notification of Compliance Status 
is submitted.
    (C) * * *
    (2) If a performance test is conducted instead of a design 
evaluation, results of the performance test demonstrating that the 
control device achieves greater than or equal to the required control 
efficiency. A performance test conducted prior to the compliance date 
of this subpart can be used to comply with this requirement, provided 
that the test was conducted using EPA methods and that the test 
conditions are representative of current operating practices. If the 
performance test is submitted electronically through the EPA's 
Compliance and Emissions Data Reporting Interface in accordance with 
Sec.  63.655(h)(9), the process unit(s) tested, the pollutant(s) 
tested, and the date that such performance test was conducted may be 
submitted in the Notification of Compliance Status in lieu of the 
performance test results. The performance test results must be 
submitted to CEDRI by the date the Notification of Compliance Status is 
submitted.
* * * * *
    (iii) For miscellaneous process vents controlled by control devices 
required to be tested under Sec.  63.645 and Sec.  63.116(c), 
performance test results including the information in paragraphs 
(f)(1)(iii)(A) and (B) of this section. Results of a performance test 
conducted prior to the compliance date of this subpart can be used 
provided that the test was conducted using the methods specified in 
Sec.  63.645 and that the test conditions are representative of current 
operating conditions. If the performance test is submitted 
electronically through the EPA's Compliance and Emissions Data 
Reporting Interface in accordance with Sec.  63.655(h)(9), the process 
unit(s) tested, the pollutant(s) tested, and the date that such 
performance test was conducted may be submitted in the Notification of 
Compliance Status in lieu of the performance test results. The 
performance test results must be submitted to CEDRI by the date the 
Notification of Compliance Status is submitted.
* * * * *
    (2) If initial performance tests are required by Sec. Sec.  63.643 
through 63.653, the Notification of Compliance Status report shall 
include one complete test report for each test method used for a 
particular source. On and after February 1, 2016, for data collected 
using test methods supported by the EPA's Electronic Reporting Tool 
(ERT) as listed on the EPA's ERT website (https://www.epa.gov/electronic-reporting-air-emissions/electronic-reporting-tool-ert) at 
the time of the test, you must submit the results in accordance with 
Sec.  63.655(h)(9) by the date that you submit the Notification of 
Compliance Status, and you must include the process unit(s) tested, the 
pollutant(s) tested, and the date that such performance test was 
conducted in the Notification of Compliance Status. All other 
performance test results must

[[Page 60716]]

be reported in the Notification of Compliance Status.
* * * * *
    (4) Results of any continuous monitoring system performance 
evaluations shall be included in the Notification of Compliance Status 
report, unless the results are required to be submitted electronically 
by Sec.  63.655(h)(9). For performance evaluation results required to 
be submitted through CEDRI, submit the results in accordance with Sec.  
63.655(h)(9) by the date that you submit the Notification of Compliance 
Status and include the process unit where the CMS is installed, the 
parameter measured by the CMS, and the date that the performance 
evaluation was conducted in the Notification of Compliance Status.
* * * * *
    (g) * * *
    (2) * * *
    (i) * * *
    (B) * * *
    (1) A failure is defined as any time in which the internal floating 
roof has defects; or the primary seal has holes, tears, or other 
openings in the seal or the seal fabric; or the secondary seal (if one 
has been installed) has holes, tears, or other openings in the seal or 
the seal fabric; or, for a storage vessel that is part of a new source, 
the gaskets no longer close off the liquid surface from the atmosphere; 
or, for a storage vessel that is part of a new source, the slotted 
membrane has more than a 10 percent open area.
* * * * *
    (10) For pressure relief devices subject to the requirements Sec.  
63.648(j), Periodic Reports must include the information specified in 
paragraphs (g)(10)(i) through (iv) of this section.
* * * * *
    (iii) For pilot-operated pressure relief devices in organic HAP 
service, report each pressure release to the atmosphere through the 
pilot vent that equals or exceeds 72 pounds of VOC per day, including 
duration of the pressure release through the pilot vent and estimate of 
the mass quantity of each organic HAP released.
* * * * *
    (13) For maintenance vents subject to the requirements in Sec.  
63.643(c), Periodic Reports must include the information specified in 
paragraphs (g)(13)(i) through (iv) of this section for any release 
exceeding the applicable limits in Sec.  63.643(c)(1). For the purposes 
of this reporting requirement, owners or operators complying with Sec.  
63.643(c)(1)(iv) must report each venting event for which the lower 
explosive limit is 20 percent or greater; owners or operators complying 
with Sec.  63.643(c)(1)(v) must report each venting event conducted 
under those provisions and include an explanation for each event as to 
why utilization of this alternative was required.
* * * * *
    (h) * * *
    (2) * * *
    (ii) In order to afford the Administrator the opportunity to have 
an observer present, the owner or operator of a storage vessel equipped 
with an external floating roof shall notify the Administrator of any 
seal gap measurements. The notification shall be made in writing at 
least 30 calendar days in advance of any gap measurements required by 
Sec.  63.120(b)(1) or (2) or Sec.  63.1063(d)(3). The State or local 
permitting authority can waive this notification requirement for all or 
some storage vessels subject to the rule or can allow less than 30 
calendar days' notice.
* * * * *
    (8) For fenceline monitoring systems subject to Sec.  63.658, each 
owner or operator shall submit the following information to the EPA's 
Compliance and Emissions Data Reporting Interface (CEDRI) on a 
quarterly basis. (CEDRI can be accessed through the EPA's Central Data 
Exchange (CDX) (https://cdx.epa.gov/). The first quarterly report must 
be submitted once the owner or operator has obtained 12 months of data. 
The first quarterly report must cover the period beginning on the 
compliance date that is specified in Table 11 of this subpart and 
ending on March 31, June 30, September 30 or December 31, whichever 
date is the first date that occurs after the owner or operator has 
obtained 12 months of data (i.e., the first quarterly report will 
contain between 12 and 15 months of data). Each subsequent quarterly 
report must cover one of the following reporting periods: Quarter 1 
from January 1 through March 31; Quarter 2 from April 1 through June 
30; Quarter 3 from July 1 through September 30; and Quarter 4 from 
October 1 through December 31. Each quarterly report must be 
electronically submitted no later than 45 calendar days following the 
end of the reporting period.
    (i) Facility name and address.
    (ii) Year and reporting quarter (i.e., Quarter 1, Quarter 2, 
Quarter 3, or Quarter 4).
    (iii) For the first reporting period and for any reporting period 
in which a passive monitor is added or moved, for each passive monitor: 
The latitude and longitude location coordinates; the sampler name; and 
identification of the type of sampler (i.e., regular monitor, extra 
monitor, duplicate, field blank, inactive). The owner or operator shall 
determine the coordinates using an instrument with an accuracy of at 
least 3 meters. Coordinates shall be in decimal degrees with at least 
five decimal places.
    (iv) The beginning and ending dates for each sampling period.
    (v) Individual sample results for benzene reported in units of 
[micro]g/m\3\ for each monitor for each sampling period that ends 
during the reporting period. Results below the method detection limit 
shall be flagged as below the detection limit and reported at the 
method detection limit.
    (vi) Data flags that indicate each monitor that was skipped for the 
sampling period, if the owner or operator uses an alternative sampling 
frequency under Sec.  63.658(e)(3).
    (vii) Data flags for each outlier determined in accordance with 
Section 9.2 of Method 325A of appendix A of this part. For each 
outlier, the owner or operator must submit the individual sample result 
of the outlier, as well as the evidence used to conclude that the 
result is an outlier.
    (viii) The biweekly concentration difference ([Delta]c) for benzene 
for each sampling period and the annual average [Delta]c for benzene 
for each sampling period.
    (9) * * *
    (i) Unless otherwise specified by this subpart, within 60 days 
after the date of completing each performance test as required by this 
subpart, the owner or operator shall submit the results of the 
performance tests following the procedure specified in either paragraph 
(h)(9)(i)(A) or (B) of this section.
* * * * *
    (ii) Unless otherwise specified by this subpart, within 60 days 
after the date of completing each CEMS performance evaluation as 
required by this subpart, the owner or operator must submit the results 
of the performance evaluation following the procedure specified in 
either paragraph (h)(9)(ii)(A) or (B) of this section.
* * * * *
    (10)(i) If you are required to electronically submit a report 
through the Compliance and Emissions Data Reporting Interface (CEDRI) 
in the EPA's Central Data Exchange (CDX), and due to a planned or 
actual outage of either the EPA's CEDRI or CDX systems within the 
period of time beginning 5 business days prior to the date that the 
submission is due, you will be or are precluded from accessing CEDRI or 
CDX

[[Page 60717]]

and submitting a required report within the time prescribed, you may 
assert a claim of EPA system outage for failure to timely comply with 
the reporting requirement. You must submit notification to the 
Administrator in writing as soon as possible following the date you 
first knew, or through due diligence should have known, that the event 
may cause or caused a delay in reporting. You must provide to the 
Administrator a written description identifying the date(s) and time(s) 
the CDX or CEDRI were unavailable when you attempted to access it in 
the 5 business days prior to the submission deadline; a rationale for 
attributing the delay in reporting beyond the regulatory deadline to 
the EPA system outage; describe the measures taken or to be taken to 
minimize the delay in reporting; and identify a date by which you 
propose to report, or if you have already met the reporting requirement 
at the time of the notification, the date you reported. In any 
circumstance, the report must be submitted electronically as soon as 
possible after the outage is resolved. The decision to accept the claim 
of EPA system outage and allow an extension to the reporting deadline 
is solely within the discretion of the Administrator.
    (ii) If you are required to electronically submit a report through 
CEDRI in the EPA's CDX and a force majeure event is about to occur, 
occurs, or has occurred or there are lingering effects from such an 
event within the period of time beginning 5 business days prior to the 
date the submission is due, the owner or operator may assert a claim of 
force majeure for failure to timely comply with the reporting 
requirement. For the purposes of this paragraph, a force majeure event 
is defined as an event that will be or has been caused by circumstances 
beyond the control of the affected facility, its contractors, or any 
entity controlled by the affected facility that prevents you from 
complying with the requirement to submit a report electronically within 
the time period prescribed. Examples of such events are acts of nature 
(e.g., hurricanes, earthquakes, or floods), acts of war or terrorism, 
or equipment failure or safety hazard beyond the control of the 
affected facility (e.g., large scale power outage). If you intend to 
assert a claim of force majeure, you must submit notification to the 
Administrator in writing as soon as possible following the date you 
first knew, or through due diligence should have known, that the event 
may cause or caused a delay in reporting. You must provide to the 
Administrator a written description of the force majeure event and a 
rationale for attributing the delay in reporting beyond the regulatory 
deadline to the force majeure event; describe the measures taken or to 
be taken to minimize the delay in reporting; and identify a date by 
which you propose to report, or if you have already met the reporting 
requirement at the time of the notification, the date you reported. In 
any circumstance, the reporting must occur as soon as possible after 
the force majeure event occurs. The decision to accept the claim of 
force majeure and allow an extension to the reporting deadline is 
solely within the discretion of the Administrator.
    (i) * * *
    (3) * * *
    (ii) * * *
    (B) Block average values for 1 hour or shorter periods calculated 
from all measured data values during each period. If values are 
measured more frequently than once per minute, a single value for each 
minute may be used to calculate the hourly (or shorter period) block 
average instead of all measured values; or
    (C) All values that meet the set criteria for variation from 
previously recorded values using an automated data compression 
recording system.
    (1) The automated data compression recording system shall be 
designed to:
    (i) Measure the operating parameter value at least once every hour.
    (ii) Record at least 24 values each day during periods of 
operation.
    (iii) Record the date and time when monitors are turned off or on.
    (iv) Recognize unchanging data that may indicate the monitor is not 
functioning properly, alert the operator, and record the incident.
    (v) Compute daily average values of the monitored operating 
parameter based on recorded data.
    (2) You must maintain a record of the description of the monitoring 
system and data compression recording system including the criteria 
used to determine which monitored values are recorded and retained, the 
method for calculating daily averages, and a demonstration that the 
system meets all criteria of paragraph (i)(3)(ii)(C)(1) of this 
section.
* * * * *
    (5) * * *
    (i) Identification of all petroleum refinery process unit heat 
exchangers at the facility and the average annual HAP concentration of 
process fluid or intervening cooling fluid estimated when developing 
the Notification of Compliance Status report.
    (ii) Identification of all heat exchange systems subject to the 
monitoring requirements in Sec.  63.654 and identification of all heat 
exchange systems that are exempt from the monitoring requirements 
according to the provisions in Sec.  63.654(b). For each heat exchange 
system that is subject to the monitoring requirements in Sec.  63.654, 
this must include identification of all heat exchangers within each 
heat exchange system, and, for closed-loop recirculation systems, the 
cooling tower included in each heat exchange system.
    (iii) Results of the following monitoring data for each required 
monitoring event:
    (A) Date/time of event.
    (B) Barometric pressure.
    (C) El Paso air stripping apparatus water flow milliliter/minute 
(ml/min) and air flow, ml/min, and air temperature, [deg]Celsius.
    (D) FID reading (ppmv).
    (E) Length of sampling period.
    (F) Sample volume.
    (G) Calibration information identified in Section 5.4.2 of the 
``Air Stripping Method (Modified El Paso Method) for Determination of 
Volatile Organic Compound Emissions from Water Sources'' Revision 
Number One, dated January 2003, Sampling Procedures Manual, Appendix P: 
Cooling Tower Monitoring, prepared by Texas Commission on Environmental 
Quality, January 31, 2003 (incorporated by reference--see Sec.  63.14).
    (iv) The date when a leak was identified, the date the source of 
the leak was identified, and the date when the heat exchanger was 
repaired or taken out of service.
    (v) If a repair is delayed, the reason for the delay, the schedule 
for completing the repair, the heat exchange exit line flow or cooling 
tower return line average flow rate at the monitoring location (in 
gallons/minute), and the estimate of potential strippable hydrocarbon 
emissions for each required monitoring interval during the delay of 
repair.
* * * * *
    (7) * * *
    (iii) * * *
    (B) The pressure or temperature of the coke drum vessel, as 
applicable, for the 5-minute period prior to the pre-vent draining.
* * * * *
    (11) For each pressure relief device subject to the pressure 
release management work practice standards in Sec.  63.648(j)(3), the 
owner or operator shall keep the records specified in paragraphs 
(i)(11)(i) through (iii) of this section. For each pilot-operated 
pressure relief device subject to the

[[Page 60718]]

requirements at Sec.  63.648(j)(4)(ii) or (iii), the owner or operator 
shall keep the records specified in paragraph (i)(11)(iv) of this 
section.
* * * * *
    (iv) For pilot-operated pressure relief devices, general or 
release-specific records for estimating the quantity of VOC released 
from the pilot vent during a release event, and records of calculations 
used to determine the quantity of specific HAP released for any event 
or series of events in which 72 or more pounds of VOC are released in a 
day.
    (12) For each maintenance vent opening subject to the requirements 
in Sec.  63.643(c), the owner or operator shall keep the applicable 
records specified in paragraphs (i)(12)(i) through (vi) of this 
section.
* * * * *
    (iv) If complying with the requirements of Sec.  63.643(c)(1)(iii), 
records used to estimate the total quantity of VOC in the equipment and 
the type and size limits of equipment that contain less than 72 pounds 
of VOC at the time of maintenance vent opening. For each maintenance 
vent opening for which the deinventory procedures specified in 
paragraph (i)(12)(i) of this section are not followed or for which the 
equipment opened exceeds the type and size limits established in the 
records specified in this paragraph, identification of the maintenance 
vent, the process units or equipment associated with the maintenance 
vent, the date of maintenance vent opening, and records used to 
estimate the total quantity of VOC in the equipment at the time the 
maintenance vent was opened to the atmosphere.
* * * * *
    (vi) If complying with the requirements of Sec.  63.643(c)(1)(v), 
identification of the maintenance vent, the process units or equipment 
associated with the maintenance vent, records documenting actions taken 
to comply with other applicable alternatives and why utilization of 
this alternative was required, the date of maintenance vent opening, 
the equipment pressure and lower explosive limit of the vapors in the 
equipment at the time of discharge, an indication of whether active 
purging was performed and the pressure of the equipment during the 
installation or removal of the blind if active purging was used, the 
duration the maintenance vent was open during the blind installation or 
removal process, and records used to estimate the total quantity of VOC 
in the equipment at the time the maintenance vent was opened to the 
atmosphere for each applicable maintenance vent opening.
* * * * *

0
11. Section 63.657 is amended by revising paragraphs (a)(1)(i) and 
(ii), (a)(2)(i) and (ii), (b)(5), and (e) to read as follows:


Sec.  63.657  Delayed coking unit decoking operation standards.

    (a) * * *
    (1) * * *
    (i) An average vessel pressure of 2 psig or less determined on a 
rolling 60-event average; or
    (ii) An average vessel temperature of 220 degrees Fahrenheit or 
less determined on a rolling 60-event average.
    (2) * * *
    (i) A vessel pressure of 2.0 psig or less for each decoking event; 
or
    (ii) A vessel temperature of 218 degrees Fahrenheit or less for 
each decoking event.
* * * * *
    (b) * * *
    (5) The output of the pressure monitoring system must be reviewed 
each day the unit is operated to ensure that the pressure readings 
fluctuate as expected between operating and cooling/decoking cycles to 
verify the pressure taps are not plugged. Plugged pressure taps must be 
unplugged or otherwise repaired prior to the next operating cycle.
* * * * *
    (e) The owner or operator of a delayed coking unit using the 
``water overflow'' method of coke cooling prior to complying with the 
applicable requirements in paragraph (a) of this section must meet the 
requirements in either paragraph (e)(1) or (e)(2) of this section or, 
if applicable, the requirements in paragraph (e)(3) of this section. 
The owner or operator of a delayed coking unit using the ``water 
overflow'' method of coke cooling subject to this paragraph shall 
determine the coke drum vessel temperature as specified in paragraphs 
(c) and (d) of this section and shall not otherwise drain or vent the 
coke drum until the coke drum vessel temperature is at or below the 
applicable limits in paragraph (a)(1)(ii) or (a)(2)(ii) of this 
section.
    (1) The overflow water must be directed to a separator or similar 
disengaging device that is operated in a manner to prevent entrainment 
of gases from the coke drum vessel to the overflow water storage tank. 
Gases from the separator or disengaging device must be routed to a 
closed blowdown system or otherwise controlled following the 
requirements for a Group 1 miscellaneous process vent. The liquid from 
the separator or disengaging device must be hardpiped to the overflow 
water storage tank or similarly transported to prevent exposure of the 
overflow water to the atmosphere. The overflow water storage tank may 
be an open or uncontrolled fixed-roof tank provided that a submerged 
fill pipe (pipe outlet below existing liquid level in the tank) is used 
to transfer overflow water to the tank.
    (2) The overflow water must be directed to a storage vessel meeting 
the requirements for storage vessels in subpart SS of this part.
    (3) Prior to November 26, 2020, if the equipment needed to comply 
with paragraphs (e)(1) or (2) of this section are not installed and 
operational, you must comply with all of the requirements in paragraphs 
(e)(3)(i) through (iv) of this section.
    (i) The temperature of the coke drum, measured according to 
paragraph (c) of this section, must be 250 degrees Fahrenheit or less 
prior to initiation of water overflow and at all times during the water 
overflow.
    (ii) The overflow water must be hardpiped to the overflow water 
storage tank or similarly transported to prevent exposure of the 
overflow water to the atmosphere.
    (iii) The overflow water storage tank may be an open or 
uncontrolled fixed-roof tank provided that all of the following 
requirements are met.
    (A) A submerged fill pipe (pipe outlet below existing liquid level 
in the tank) is used to transfer overflow water to the tank.
    (B) The liquid level in the storage tank is at least 6 feet above 
the submerged fill pipe outlet at all times during water overflow.
    (C) The temperature of the contents in the storage tank remain 
below 150 degrees Fahrenheit at all times during water overflow.
* * * * *

0
12. Section 63.658 is amended by revising paragraphs (c)(1), (2) and 
(3), (d)(1) introductory text and (d)(2), (e) introductory text, 
(e)(3)(iv), (f)(1)(i) introductory text, and (f)(1)(i)(B) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  63.658  Fenceline monitoring provisions.

* * * * *
    (c) * * *
    (1) As it pertains to this subpart, known sources of VOCs, as used 
in Section 8.2.1.3 in Method 325A of appendix A of this part for siting 
passive monitors, means a wastewater

[[Page 60719]]

treatment unit, process unit, or any emission source requiring control 
according to the requirements of this subpart, including marine vessel 
loading operations. For marine vessel loading operations, one passive 
monitor should be sited on the shoreline adjacent to the dock. For this 
subpart, an additional monitor is not required if the only emission 
sources within 50 meters of the monitoring boundary are equipment leak 
sources satisfying all of the conditions in paragraphs (c)(1)(i) 
through (iv) of this section.
    (i) The equipment leak sources in organic HAP service within 50 
meters of the monitoring boundary are limited to valves, pumps, 
connectors, sampling connections, and open-ended lines. If compressors, 
pressure relief devices, or agitators in organic HAP service are 
present within 50 meters of the monitoring boundary, the additional 
passive monitoring location specified in Section 8.2.1.3 in Method 325A 
of appendix A of this part must be used.
    (ii) All equipment leak sources in gas or light liquid service (and 
in organic HAP service), including valves, pumps, connectors, sampling 
connections and open-ended lines, must be monitored using EPA Method 21 
of 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-7 no less frequently than quarterly with 
no provisions for skip period monitoring, or according to the 
provisions of Sec.  63.11(c) Alternative Work practice for monitoring 
equipment for leaks. For the purpose of this provision, a leak is 
detected if the instrument reading equals or exceeds the applicable 
limits in paragraphs (c)(1)(ii)(A) through (E) of this section:
    (A) For valves, pumps or connectors at an existing source, an 
instrument reading of 10,000 ppmv.
    (B) For valves or connectors at a new source, an instrument reading 
of 500 ppmv.
    (C) For pumps at a new source, an instrument reading of 2,000 ppmv.
    (D) For sampling connections or open-ended lines, an instrument 
reading of 500 ppmv above background.
    (E) For equipment monitored according to the Alternative Work 
practice for monitoring equipment for leaks, the leak definitions 
contained in Sec.  63.11 (c)(6)(i) through (iii).
    (iii) All equipment leak sources in organic HAP service, including 
sources in gas, light liquid and heavy liquid service, must be 
inspected using visual, audible, olfactory, or any other detection 
method at least monthly. A leak is detected if the inspection 
identifies a potential leak to the atmosphere or if there are 
indications of liquids dripping.
    (iv) All leaks identified by the monitoring or inspections 
specified in paragraphs (c)(1)(ii) or (iii) of this section must be 
repaired no later than 15 calendar days after it is detected with no 
provisions for delay of repair. If a repair is not completed within 15 
calendar days, the additional passive monitor specified in Section 
8.2.1.3 in Method 325A of appendix A of this part must be used.
    (2) The owner or operator may collect one or more background 
samples if the owner or operator believes that an offsite upwind source 
or an onsite source excluded under Sec.  63.640(g) may influence the 
sampler measurements. If the owner or operator elects to collect one or 
more background samples, the owner or operator must develop and submit 
a site-specific monitoring plan for approval according to the 
requirements in paragraph (i) of this section. Upon approval of the 
site-specific monitoring plan, the background sampler(s) should be 
operated co-currently with the routine samplers.
    (3) If there are 19 or fewer monitoring locations, the owner or 
operator shall collect at least one co-located duplicate sample per 
sampling period and at least one field blank per sampling period. If 
there are 20 or more monitoring locations, the owner or operator shall 
collect at least two co-located duplicate samples per sampling period 
and at least one field blank per sampling period. The co-located 
duplicates may be collected at any of the perimeter sampling locations.
* * * * *
    (d) * * *
    (1) If a near-field source correction is used as provided in 
paragraph (i)(2) of this section or if an alternative test method is 
used that provides time-resolved measurements, the owner or operator 
shall:
* * * * *
    (2) For cases other than those specified in paragraph (d)(1) of 
this section, the owner or operator shall collect and record sampling 
period average temperature and barometric pressure using either an on-
site meteorological station in accordance with Section 8.3.1 through 
8.3.3 of Method 325A of appendix A of this part or, alternatively, 
using data from a United States Weather Service (USWS) meteorological 
station provided the USWS meteorological station is within 40 
kilometers (25 miles) of the refinery.
* * * * *
    (e) The owner or operator shall use a sampling period and sampling 
frequency as specified in paragraphs (e)(1) through (3) of this 
section.
* * * * *
    (3) * * *
    (iv) If every sample at a monitoring site that is monitored at the 
frequency specified in paragraph (e)(3)(iii) of this section is at or 
below 0.9 [micro]g/m\3\ for 2 years (i.e., 4 consecutive semiannual 
samples), only one sample per year is required for that monitoring 
site. For yearly sampling, samples shall occur at least 10 months but 
no more than 14 months apart.
* * * * *
    (f) * * *
    (1) * * *
    (i) Except when near-field source correction is used as provided in 
paragraph (i) of this section, the owner or operator shall determine 
the highest and lowest sample results for benzene concentrations from 
the sample pool and calculate [Delta]c as the difference in these 
concentrations. Co-located samples must be averaged together for the 
purposes of determining the benzene concentration for that sampling 
location, and, if applicable, for determining [Delta]c. The owner or 
operator shall adhere to the following procedures when one or more 
samples for the sampling period are below the method detection limit 
for benzene:
* * * * *
    (B) If all sample results are below the method detection limit, the 
owner or operator shall use the method detection limit as the highest 
sample result and zero as the lowest sample result when calculating 
[Delta]c.
* * * * *

0
13. Section 63.660 is amended by revising the introductory text, 
paragraph (b) introductory text, paragraphs (b)(1) and (e), and 
paragraph (i)(2) introductory text, and adding paragraph (i)(2)(iii) to 
read as follows:


Sec.  63.660  Storage vessel provisions.

    On and after the applicable compliance date for a Group 1 storage 
vessel located at a new or existing source as specified in Sec.  
63.640(h), the owner or operator of a Group 1 storage vessel storing 
liquid with a maximum true vapor pressure less than 76.6 kilopascals 
(11.1 pounds per square inch) that is part of a new or existing source 
shall comply with either the requirements in subpart WW or SS of this 
part according to the requirements in paragraphs (a) through (i) of 
this section and the owner or operator of a Group 1 storage vessel 
storing liquid with a maximum true vapor pressure greater than or equal 
to 76.6 kilopascals (11.1 pounds per square inch) that is

[[Page 60720]]

part of a new or existing source shall comply with the requirements in 
subpart SS of this part according to the requirements in paragraphs (a) 
through (i) of this section.
* * * * *
    (b) A floating roof storage vessel complying with the requirements 
of subpart WW of this part may comply with the control option specified 
in paragraph (b)(1) of this section and, if equipped with a ladder 
having at least one slotted leg, shall comply with one of the control 
options as described in paragraph (b)(2) of this section. If the 
floating roof storage vessel does not meet the requirements of Sec.  
63.1063(a)(2)(i) through (a)(2)(viii) as of June 30, 2014, these 
requirements do not apply until the next time the vessel is completely 
emptied and degassed, or January 30, 2026, whichever occurs first.
    (1) In addition to the options presented in Sec. Sec.  
63.1063(a)(2)(viii)(A) and (B) and 63.1064, a floating roof storage 
vessel may comply with Sec.  63.1063(a)(2)(viii) using a flexible 
enclosure device and either a gasketed or welded cap on the top of the 
guidepole.
* * * * *
    (e) For storage vessels previously subject to requirements in Sec.  
63.646, initial inspection requirements in Sec.  63.1063(c)(1) and 
(c)(2)(i) (i.e., those related to the initial filling of the storage 
vessel) or in Sec.  63.983(b)(1)(i)(A), as applicable, are not 
required. Failure to perform other inspections and monitoring required 
by this section shall constitute a violation of the applicable standard 
of this subpart.
* * * * *
    (i) * * *
    (2) If a closed vent system contains a bypass line, the owner or 
operator shall comply with the provisions of either Sec.  
63.983(a)(3)(i) or (ii) or paragraph (iii) of this section for each 
closed vent system that contains bypass lines that could divert a vent 
stream either directly to the atmosphere or to a control device that 
does not comply with the requirements in subpart SS of this part. 
Except as provided in paragraphs (i)(2)(i) and (ii) of this section, 
use of the bypass at any time to divert a Group 1 storage vessel either 
directly to the atmosphere or to a control device that does not comply 
with the requirements in subpart SS of this part is an emissions 
standards violation. Equipment such as low leg drains and equipment 
subject to Sec.  63.648 are not subject to this paragraph (i)(2).
* * * * *
    (iii) Use a cap, blind flange, plug, or a second valve for an open-
ended valves or line following the requirements specified in Sec.  
60.482-6(a)(2), (b) and (c).
* * * * *

0
14. Section 63.670 is amended by:
0
a. Revising paragraph (f);
0
b. Revising paragraphs (h) introductory text, (h)(1), and (i) 
introductory text;
0
c. Adding paragraphs (i)(5) and (6);
0
d. Revising paragraph (j)(6) introductory text;
0
e. Revising the definition of the Qcum term in the equation 
in paragraph (k)(3);
0
f. Revising paragraph (m)(2) introductory text;
0
g. Revising the definitions of the QNG2, QNG1, 
and NHVNG terms in the equation in paragraph (m)(2);
0
h. Revising paragraph (n)(2) introductory text;
0
i. Revising the definitions of the QNG2, QNG1, 
and NHVNG terms in the equation in paragraph (n)(2); and
0
j. Revising paragraphs (o) introductory text, (o)(1)(ii)(B), 
(o)(1)(iii)(B), and (o)(3)(i).
    The revisions and additions read as follows:


Sec.  63.670  Requirements for flare control devices.

* * * * *
    (f) Dilution operating limits for flares with perimeter assist air. 
Except as provided in paragraph (f)(1) of this section, for each flare 
actively receiving perimeter assist air, the owner or operator shall 
operate the flare to maintain the net heating value dilution parameter 
(NHVdil) at or above 22 British thermal units per square foot (Btu/
ft\2\) determined on a 15-minute block period basis when regulated 
material is being routed to the flare for at least 15-minutes. The 
owner or operator shall monitor and calculate NHVdil as 
specified in paragraph (n) of this section.
    (1) If the only assist air provided to a specific flare is 
perimeter assist air intentionally entrained in lower and/or upper 
steam at the flare tip and the effective diameter is 9 inches or 
greater, the owner or operator shall comply only with the 
NHVcz operating limit in paragraph (e) of this section for 
that flare.
    (2) [Reserved]
* * * * *
    (h) Visible emissions monitoring. The owner or operator shall 
conduct an initial visible emissions demonstration using an observation 
period of 2 hours using Method 22 at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-7. The 
initial visible emissions demonstration should be conducted the first 
time regulated materials are routed to the flare. Subsequent visible 
emissions observations must be conducted using either the methods in 
paragraph (h)(1) of this section or, alternatively, the methods in 
paragraph (h)(2) of this section. The owner or operator must record and 
report any instances where visible emissions are observed for more than 
5 minutes during any 2 consecutive hours as specified in Sec.  
63.655(g)(11)(ii).
    (1) At least once per day for each day regulated material is routed 
to the flare, conduct visible emissions observations using an 
observation period of 5 minutes using Method 22 at 40 CFR part 60, 
appendix A-7. If at any time the owner or operator sees visible 
emissions while regulated material is routed to the flare, even if the 
minimum required daily visible emission monitoring has already been 
performed, the owner or operator shall immediately begin an observation 
period of 5 minutes using Method 22 at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-7. If 
visible emissions are observed for more than one continuous minute 
during any 5-minute observation period, the observation period using 
Method 22 at 40 CFR part 60, appendix A-7 must be extended to 2 hours 
or until 5-minutes of visible emissions are observed. Daily 5-minute 
Method 22 observations are not required to be conducted for days the 
flare does not receive any regulated material.
* * * * *
    (i) Flare vent gas, steam assist and air assist flow rate 
monitoring. The owner or operator shall install, operate, calibrate, 
and maintain a monitoring system capable of continuously measuring, 
calculating, and recording the volumetric flow rate in the flare header 
or headers that feed the flare as well as any flare supplemental gas 
used. Different flow monitoring methods may be used to measure 
different gaseous streams that make up the flare vent gas provided that 
the flow rates of all gas streams that contribute to the flare vent gas 
are determined. If assist air or assist steam is used, the owner or 
operator shall install, operate, calibrate, and maintain a monitoring 
system capable of continuously measuring, calculating, and recording 
the volumetric flow rate of assist air and/or assist steam used with 
the flare. If pre-mix assist air and perimeter assist are both used, 
the owner or operator shall install, operate, calibrate, and maintain a 
monitoring system capable of separately measuring, calculating, and 
recording the volumetric flow rate of premix assist air and perimeter 
assist air used with the

[[Page 60721]]

flare. Flow monitoring system requirements and acceptable alternatives 
are provided in paragraphs (i)(1) through (6) of this section.
* * * * *
    (5) Continuously monitoring fan speed or power and using fan curves 
is an acceptable method for continuously monitoring assist air flow 
rates.
    (6) For perimeter assist air intentionally entrained in lower and/
or upper steam, the monitored steam flow rate and the maximum design 
air-to-steam volumetric flow ratio of the entrainment system may be 
used to determine the assist air flow rate.
    (j) * * *
    (6) Direct compositional or net heating value monitoring is not 
required for gas streams that have been demonstrated to have consistent 
composition (or a fixed minimum net heating value) according to the 
methods in paragraphs (j)(6)(i) through (iii) of this section.
* * * * *
    (k) * * *
    (3) * * *
* * * * *
Qcum = Cumulative volumetric flow over 15-minute block 
average period, standard cubic feet.

* * * * *
    (m) * * *
    (2) Owners or operators of flares that use the feed-forward 
calculation methodology in paragraph (l)(5)(i) of this section and that 
monitor gas composition or net heating value in a location 
representative of the cumulative vent gas stream and that directly 
monitor flare supplemental gas flow additions to the flare must 
determine the 15-minute block average NHVcz using the 
following equation.
* * * * *
QNG2 = Cumulative volumetric flow of flare supplemental 
gas during the 15-minute block period, scf.
QNG1 = Cumulative volumetric flow of flare supplemental 
gas during the previous 15-minute block period, scf. For the first 
15-minute block period of an event, use the volumetric flow value 
for the current 15-minute block period, i.e., QNG1 = 
QNG2.
NHVNG = Net heating value of flare supplemental gas for 
the 15-minute block period determined according to the requirements 
in paragraph (j)(5) of this section, Btu/scf.

* * * * *
    (n) * * *
    (2) Owners or operators of flares that use the feed-forward 
calculation methodology in paragraph (l)(5)(i) of this section and that 
monitor gas composition or net heating value in a location 
representative of the cumulative vent gas stream and that directly 
monitor flare supplemental gas flow additions to the flare must 
determine the 15-minute block average NHVdil using the 
following equation only during periods when perimeter assist air is 
used. For 15-minute block periods when there is no cumulative 
volumetric flow of perimeter assist air, the 15-minute block average 
NHVdil parameter does not need to be calculated.
* * * * *
QNG2 = Cumulative volumetric flow of flare supplemental 
gas during the 15-minute block period, scf.
QNG1 = Cumulative volumetric flow of flare supplemental 
gas during the previous 15-minute block period, scf. For the first 
15-minute block period of an event, use the volumetric flow value 
for the current 15-minute block period, i.e., QNG1 = 
QNG2.
NHVNG = Net heating value of flare supplemental gas for 
the 15-minute block period determined according to the requirements 
in paragraph (j)(5) of this section, Btu/scf.

* * * * *
    (o) Emergency flaring provisions. The owner or operator of a flare 
that has the potential to operate above its smokeless capacity under 
any circumstance shall comply with the provisions in paragraphs (o)(1) 
through (7) of this section.
    (1) * * *
    (ii) * * *
    (B) Implementation of prevention measures listed for pressure 
relief devices in Sec.  63.648(j)(3)(ii)(A) through (E) for each 
pressure relief device that can discharge to the flare.
* * * * *
    (iii) * * *
    (B) The smokeless capacity of the flare based on a 15-minute block 
average and design conditions. Note: A single value must be provided 
for the smokeless capacity of the flare.
* * * * *
    (3) * * *
    (i) The vent gas flow rate exceeds the smokeless capacity of the 
flare based on a 15-minute block average and visible emissions are 
present from the flare for more than 5 minutes during any 2 consecutive 
hours during the release event.
* * * * *

0
15. Table 6 to Subpart CC is amended by revising the entries 
``63.6(f)(3)'', ``63.6(h)(8)'', 63.7(a)(2)'', ``63.7(f)'', 
``63.7(h)(3)'', and ``63.8(e)'' to read as follows:

                            Table 6--General Provisions Applicability to Subpart CC a
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
           Reference                Applies  to subpart CC                          Comment
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
63.6(f)(3)....................  Yes..........................  Except the cross-references to Sec.   63.6(f)(1)
                                                                and (e)(1)(i) are changed to Sec.   63.642(n)
                                                                and performance test results may be written or
                                                                electronic.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
63.6(h)(8)....................  Yes..........................  Except performance test results may be written or
                                                                electronic.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
63.7(a)(2)....................  Yes..........................  Except test results must be submitted in the
                                                                Notification of Compliance Status report due 150
                                                                days after compliance date, as specified in Sec.
                                                                  63.655(f), unless they are required to be
                                                                submitted electronically in accordance with Sec.
                                                                  63.655(h)(9). Test results required to be
                                                                submitted electronically must be submitted by
                                                                the date the Notification of Compliance Status
                                                                report is submitted.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
63.7(f).......................  Yes..........................  Except that additional notification or approval
                                                                is not required for alternatives directly
                                                                specified in Subpart CC.
 

[[Page 60722]]

 
                                                  * * * * * * *
63.7(h)(3)....................  Yes..........................  Yes, except site-specific test plans shall not be
                                                                required, and where Sec.   63.7(h)(3)(i)
                                                                specifies waiver submittal date, the date shall
                                                                be 90 days prior to the Notification of
                                                                Compliance Status report in Sec.   63.655(f).
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
63.8(e).......................  Yes..........................  Except that results are to be submitted
                                                                electronically if required by Sec.
                                                                63.655(h)(9).
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


0
16. Table 11 to subpart CC is amended by revising items (2)(iv), 
(3)(iv) and (4)(v) to read as follows:

                                   Table 11--Compliance Dates and Requirements
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                         Then the owner or         And the owner or
If the construction/ reconstruction    operator must  comply     operator must achieve   Except as provided in .
           date is . . .                    with . . .             compliance . . .                . .
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
(2) * * *..........................  (iv) Requirements for     On or before December     Sec.  Sec.   63.640(k),
                                      existing sources in       26, 2018.                 (l) and (m) and
                                      Sec.   63.643(c).                                   63.643(d).
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
(3) * * *..........................  (iv) Requirements for     On or before December     Sec.  Sec.   63.640(k),
                                      existing sources in       26, 2018.                 (l) and (m) and
                                      Sec.   63.643(c).                                   63.643(d).
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
(4) * * *..........................  (v) Requirements for      On or before December     Sec.  Sec.   63.640(k),
                                      existing sources in       26, 2018.                 (l) and (m) and
                                      Sec.   63.643(c).                                   63.643(d).
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


0
17. Table 13 to Subpart CC is amended by revising the entry ``Hydrogen 
analyzer'' to read as follows:

                         Table 13--Calibration and Quality Control Requirements for CPMS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                               Minimum accuracy
               Parameter                         requirements                  Calibration requirements
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Hydrogen analyzer......................  2 percent over   Specify calibration requirements in your
                                          the concentration measured   site specific CPMS monitoring plan.
                                          or 0.1 volume percent,       Calibration requirements should follow
                                          whichever is greater.        manufacturer's recommendations at a
                                                                       minimum.
                                                                      Where feasible, select the sampling
                                                                       location at least two equivalent duct
                                                                       diameters from the nearest control
                                                                       device, point of pollutant generation,
                                                                       air in-leakages, or other point at which
                                                                       a change in the pollutant concentration
                                                                       occurs.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Subpart UUU--National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air 
Pollutants for Petroleum Refineries: Catalytic Cracking Units, 
Catalytic Reforming Units, and Sulfur Recovery Units

0
18. Section 63.1564 is amended by revising the introductory text of 
paragraphs (b)(4)(iii), (c)(3), and (c)(4) and revising paragraph 
(c)(5)(iii) to read as follows:


Sec.  63.1564  What are my requirements for metal HAP emissions from 
catalytic cracking units?

* * * * *
    (b) * * *
    (4) * * *
    (iii) If you elect Option 3 in paragraph (a)(1)(v) of this section, 
the Ni lb/hr emission limit, compute your Ni emission rate using 
Equation 5 of this section and your site-specific Ni operating limit 
(if you use a continuous opacity monitoring system) using Equations 6 
and 7 of this section as follows:
* * * * *
    (c) * * *
    (3) If you use a continuous opacity monitoring system and elect to 
comply with Option 3 in paragraph (a)(1)(v) of this section, determine 
continuous compliance with your site-specific Ni

[[Page 60723]]

operating limit by using Equation 11 of this section as follows:
* * * * *
    (4) If you use a continuous opacity monitoring system and elect to 
comply with Option 4 in paragraph (a)(1)(vi) of this section, determine 
continuous compliance with your site-specific Ni operating limit by 
using Equation 12 of this section as follows:
* * * * *
    (5) * * *
    (iii) Calculating the inlet velocity to the primary internal 
cyclones in feet per second (ft/sec) by dividing the average volumetric 
flow rate (acfm) by the cumulative cross-sectional area of the primary 
internal cyclone inlets (ft\2\) and by 60 seconds/minute (for unit 
conversion).
* * * * *

0
19. Section 63.1565 is amended by revising paragraph (a)(5)(ii) to read 
as follows:


Sec.  63.1565  What are my requirements for organic HAP emissions from 
catalytic cracking units?

    (a) * * *
    (5) * * *
    (ii) You can elect to maintain the oxygen (O2) 
concentration in the exhaust gas from your catalyst regenerator at or 
above 1 volume percent (dry basis) or 1 volume percent (wet basis with 
no moisture correction).
* * * * *

0
20. Section 63.1569 is amended by revising paragraph (c)(2) to read as 
follows:


Sec.  63.1569  What are my requirements for HAP emissions from bypass 
lines?

* * * * *
    (c) * * *
    (2) Demonstrate continuous compliance with the work practice 
standard in paragraph (a)(3) of this section by complying with the 
procedures in your operation, maintenance, and monitoring plan.

0
21. Section 63.1571 is amended by revising the introductory text of 
paragraphs (a), (a)(5) and (a)(6), and by revising the introductory 
text of paragraphs (d)(1) and (d)(2) to read as follows:


Sec.  63.1571  How and when do I conduct a performance test or other 
initial compliance demonstration?

    (a) When must I conduct a performance test? You must conduct 
initial performance tests and report the results by no later than 150 
days after the compliance date specified for your source in Sec.  
63.1563 and according to the provisions in Sec.  63.7(a)(2) and Sec.  
63.1574(a)(3). If you are required to do a performance evaluation or 
test for a semi-regenerative catalytic reforming unit catalyst 
regenerator vent, you may do them at the first regeneration cycle after 
your compliance date and report the results in a followup Notification 
of Compliance Status report due no later than 150 days after the test. 
You must conduct additional performance tests as specified in 
paragraphs (a)(5) and (6) of this section and report the results of 
these performance tests according to the provisions in Sec.  
63.1575(f).
* * * * *
    (5) Periodic performance testing for PM or Ni. Except as provided 
in paragraphs (a)(5)(i) and (ii) of this section, conduct a periodic 
performance test for PM or Ni for each catalytic cracking unit at least 
once every 5 years according to the requirements in Table 4 of this 
subpart. You must conduct the first periodic performance test no later 
than August 1, 2017 or within 150 days of startup of a new unit.
* * * * *
    (6) One-time performance testing for Hydrogen Cyanide (HCN). 
Conduct a performance test for HCN from each catalytic cracking unit no 
later than August 1, 2017 or within 150 days of startup of a new unit 
according to the applicable requirements in paragraphs (a)(6)(i) and 
(ii) of this section.
* * * * *
    (d) * * *
    (1) If you must meet the HAP metal emission limitations in Sec.  
63.1564, you elect the option in paragraph (a)(1)(v) in Sec.  63.1564 
(Ni lb/hr), and you use continuous parameter monitoring systems, you 
must establish an operating limit for the equilibrium catalyst Ni 
concentration based on the laboratory analysis of the equilibrium 
catalyst Ni concentration from the initial performance test. Section 
63.1564(b)(2) allows you to adjust the laboratory measurements of the 
equilibrium catalyst Ni concentration to the maximum level. You must 
make this adjustment using Equation 1 of this section as follows:
* * * * *
    (2) If you must meet the HAP metal emission limitations in Sec.  
63.1564, you elect the option in paragraph (a)(1)(vi) in Sec.  63.1564 
(Ni per coke burn-off), and you use continuous parameter monitoring 
systems, you must establish an operating limit for the equilibrium 
catalyst Ni concentration based on the laboratory analysis of the 
equilibrium catalyst Ni concentration from the initial performance 
test. Section 63.1564(b)(2) allows you to adjust the laboratory 
measurements of the equilibrium catalyst Ni concentration to the 
maximum level. You must make this adjustment using Equation 2 of this 
section as follows:
* * * * *

0
22. Section 63.1572 is amended by revising paragraphs (c)(1) and (d)(1) 
to read as follows:


Sec.  63.1572  What are my monitoring installation, operation, and 
maintenance requirements?

* * * * *
    (c) * * *
    (1) You must install, operate, and maintain each continuous 
parameter monitoring system according to the requirements in Table 41 
of this subpart. You must also meet the equipment specifications in 
Table 41 of this subpart if pH strips or colormetric tube sampling 
systems are used. You must meet the requirements in Table 41 of this 
subpart for BLD systems. Alternatively, before August 1, 2017, you may 
install, operate, and maintain each continuous parameter monitoring 
system in a manner consistent with the manufacturer's specifications or 
other written procedures that provide adequate assurance that the 
equipment will monitor accurately.
* * * * *
    (d) * * *
    (1) Except for monitoring malfunctions, associated repairs, and 
required quality assurance or control activities (including as 
applicable, calibration checks and required zero and span adjustments), 
you must conduct all monitoring in continuous operation (or collect 
data at all required intervals) at all times the affected source is 
operating.
* * * * *

0
23. Section 63.1573 is amended by revising paragraph (a)(1) 
introductory text to read as follows:


Sec.  63.1573  What are my monitoring alternatives?

    (a) * * * (1) You may use this alternative to a continuous 
parameter monitoring system for the catalytic regenerator exhaust gas 
flow rate for your catalytic cracking unit if the unit does not 
introduce any other gas streams into the catalyst regeneration vent 
(i.e., complete combustion units with no additional combustion 
devices). You may also use this alternative to a continuous parameter 
monitoring system for the catalytic regenerator atmospheric exhaust gas 
flow rate for your catalytic reforming unit during the coke burn and 
rejuvenation cycles if the unit operates as a constant pressure system 
during these cycles. You may

[[Page 60724]]

also use this alternative to a continuous parameter monitoring system 
for the gas flow rate exiting the catalyst regenerator to determine 
inlet velocity to the primary internal cyclones as required in Sec.  
63.1564(c)(5) regardless of the configuration of the catalytic 
regenerator exhaust vent downstream of the regenerator (i.e., 
regardless of whether or not any other gas streams are introduced into 
the catalyst regeneration vent). Except, if you only use this 
alternative to demonstrate compliance with Sec.  63.1564(c)(5), you 
shall use this procedure for the performance test and for monitoring 
after the performance test. You shall:
* * * * *

0
24. Section 63.1574 is amended by revising paragraph (a)(3)(ii) to read 
as follows:


Sec.  63.1574  What notifications must I submit and when?

    (a) * * *
    (3) * * *
    (ii) For each initial compliance demonstration that includes a 
performance test, you must submit the notification of compliance status 
no later than 150 calendar days after the compliance date specified for 
your affected source in Sec.  63.1563. For data collected using test 
methods supported by the EPA's Electronic Reporting Tool (ERT) as 
listed on the EPA's ERT website (https://www.epa.gov/electronic-reporting-air-emissions/electronic-reporting-tool-ert) at the time of 
the test, you must submit the results in accordance with Sec.  
63.1575(k)(1)(i) by the date that you submit the Notification of 
Compliance Status, and you must include the process unit(s) tested, the 
pollutant(s) tested, and the date that such performance test was 
conducted in the Notification of Compliance Status. For performance 
evaluations of continuous monitoring systems (CMS) measuring relative 
accuracy test audit (RATA) pollutants that are supported by the EPA's 
ERT as listed on the EPA's ERT website at the time of the evaluation, 
you must submit the results in accordance with Sec.  63.1575(k)(2)(i) 
by the date that you submit the Notification of Compliance Status, and 
you must include the process unit where the CMS is installed, the 
parameter measured by the CMS, and the date that the performance 
evaluation was conducted in the Notification of Compliance Status. All 
other performance test and performance evaluation results (i.e., those 
not supported by EPA's ERT) must be reported in the Notification of 
Compliance Status.
* * * * *

0
25. Section 63.1575 is amended by:
0
a. Revising paragraphs (f)(1), (k)(1) introductory text and (k)(2) 
introductory text; and
0
b. Adding paragraph (l).
    The revisions and additions read as follows:


Sec.  63.1575  What reports must I submit and when?

* * * * *
    (f) * * *
    (1) A copy of any performance test or performance evaluation of a 
CMS done during the reporting period on any affected unit, if 
applicable. The report must be included in the next semiannual 
compliance report. The copy must include a complete report for each 
test method used for a particular kind of emission point tested. For 
additional tests performed for a similar emission point using the same 
method, you must submit the results and any other information required, 
but a complete test report is not required. A complete test report 
contains a brief process description; a simplified flow diagram showing 
affected processes, control equipment, and sampling point locations; 
sampling site data; description of sampling and analysis procedures and 
any modifications to standard procedures; quality assurance procedures; 
record of operating conditions during the test; record of preparation 
of standards; record of calibrations; raw data sheets for field 
sampling; raw data sheets for field and laboratory analyses; 
documentation of calculations; and any other information required by 
the test method. For data collected using test methods supported by the 
EPA's Electronic Reporting Tool (ERT) as listed on the EPA's ERT 
website (https://www.epa.gov/electronic-reporting-air-emissions/electronic-reporting-tool-ert) at the time of the test, you must submit 
the results in accordance with paragraph (k)(1)(i) of this section by 
the date that you submit the compliance report, and instead of 
including a copy of the test report in the compliance report, you must 
include the process unit(s) tested, the pollutant(s) tested, and the 
date that such performance test was conducted in the compliance report. 
For performance evaluations of CMS measuring relative accuracy test 
audit (RATA) pollutants that are supported by the EPA's ERT as listed 
on the EPA's ERT website at the time of the evaluation, you must submit 
the results in accordance with paragraph (k)(2)(i) of this section by 
the date that you submit the compliance report, and you must include 
the process unit where the CMS is installed, the parameter measured by 
the CMS, and the date that the performance evaluation was conducted in 
the compliance report. All other performance test and performance 
evaluation results (i.e., those not supported by EPA's ERT) must be 
reported in the compliance report.
* * * * *
    (k) * * *
    (1) Unless otherwise specified by this subpart, within 60 days 
after the date of completing each performance test as required by this 
subpart, you must submit the results of the performance tests following 
the procedure specified in either paragraph (k)(1)(i) or (ii) of this 
section.
* * * * *
    (2) Unless otherwise specified by this subpart, within 60 days 
after the date of completing each CEMS performance evaluation required 
by Sec.  63.1571(a) and (b), you must submit the results of the 
performance evaluation following the procedure specified in either 
paragraph (k)(2)(i) or (ii) of this section.
* * * * *
    (l) Extensions to electronic reporting deadlines. (1) If you are 
required to electronically submit a report through the Compliance and 
Emissions Data Reporting Interface (CEDRI) in the EPA's Central Data 
Exchange (CDX), and due to a planned or actual outage of either the 
EPA's CEDRI or CDX systems within the period of time beginning 5 
business days prior to the date that the submission is due, you will be 
or are precluded from accessing CEDRI or CDX and submitting a required 
report within the time prescribed, you may assert a claim of EPA system 
outage for failure to timely comply with the reporting requirement. You 
must submit notification to the Administrator in writing as soon as 
possible following the date you first knew, or through due diligence 
should have known, that the event may cause or caused a delay in 
reporting. You must provide to the Administrator a written description 
identifying the date(s) and time(s) the CDX or CEDRI were unavailable 
when you attempted to access it in the 5 business days prior to the 
submission deadline; a rationale for attributing the delay in reporting 
beyond the regulatory deadline to the EPA system outage; describe the 
measures taken or to be taken to minimize the delay in reporting; and 
identify a date by which you propose to report, or if you have already 
met the reporting requirement at the time of the notification, the date 
you reported. In any circumstance, the report must be submitted 
electronically as soon as possible after the outage is resolved. The 
decision to accept the

[[Page 60725]]

claim of EPA system outage and allow an extension to the reporting 
deadline is solely within the discretion of the Administrator.
    (2) If you are required to electronically submit a report through 
CEDRI in the EPA's CDX and a force majeure event is about to occur, 
occurs, or has occurred or there are lingering effects from such an 
event within the period of time beginning 5 business days prior to the 
date the submission is due, the owner or operator may assert a claim of 
force majeure for failure to timely comply with the reporting 
requirement. For the purposes of this section, a force majeure event is 
defined as an event that will be or has been caused by circumstances 
beyond the control of the affected facility, its contractors, or any 
entity controlled by the affected facility that prevents you from 
complying with the requirement to submit a report electronically within 
the time period prescribed. Examples of such events are acts of nature 
(e.g., hurricanes, earthquakes, or floods), acts of war or terrorism, 
or equipment failure or safety hazard beyond the control of the 
affected facility (e.g., large scale power outage). If you intend to 
assert a claim of force majeure, you must submit notification to the 
Administrator in writing as soon as possible following the date you 
first knew, or through due diligence should have known, that the event 
may cause or caused a delay in reporting. You must provide to the 
Administrator a written description of the force majeure event and a 
rationale for attributing the delay in reporting beyond the regulatory 
deadline to the force majeure event; describe the measures taken or to 
be taken to minimize the delay in reporting; and identify a date by 
which you propose to report, or if you have already met the reporting 
requirement at the time of the notification, the date you reported. In 
any circumstance, the reporting must occur as soon as possible after 
the force majeure event occurs. The decision to accept the claim of 
force majeure and allow an extension to the reporting deadline is 
solely within the discretion of the Administrator.

0
26. Section 63.1576 is amended by revising paragraph (a)(2)(i) to read 
as follows:


Sec.  63.1576  What records must I keep, in what form, and for how 
long?

    (a) * * *
    (2) * * *
    (i) Record the date, time, and duration of each startup and/or 
shutdown period for which the facility elected to comply with the 
alternative standards in Sec.  63.1564(a)(5)(ii) or Sec.  
63.1565(a)(5)(ii) or Sec.  63.1568(a)(4)(ii) or (iii).
* * * * *

0
27. Table 3 to Subpart UUU is amended by revising the table heading and 
entries for items 2.c, 6, 7, 8 and 9 to read as follows:

  Table 3 to Subpart UUU of Part 63--Continuous Monitoring Systems for
            Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units
                              * * * * * * *
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                 If you use this
   For each new or existing      type of  control    You shall install,
 catalytic cracking unit . . .   device for  your  operate, and maintain
                                    vent . . .            a . . .
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                              * * * * * * *
2. * * *
                                c. Wet scrubber..  Continuous parameter
                                                    monitoring system to
                                                    measure and record
                                                    the pressure drop
                                                    across the
                                                    scrubber,\2\ the gas
                                                    flow rate entering
                                                    or exiting the
                                                    control device,\1\
                                                    and total liquid (or
                                                    scrubbing liquor)
                                                    flow rate to the
                                                    control device.
 
                              * * * * * * *
6. Option 1a: Elect NSPS        Any..............  See item 1 of this
 subpart J, PM per coke burn-                       table.
 off limit, not subject to the
 NSPS for PM in 40 CFR 60.102
 or 60.102a(b)(1).
7. Option 1b: Elect NSPS        Any..............  The applicable
 subpart Ja, PM per coke burn-                      continuous
 off limit, not subject to the                      monitoring systems
 NSPS for PM in 40 CFR 60.102                       in item 2 of this
 or 60.102a(b)(1).                                  table.
8. Option 1c: Elect NSPS        Any..............  See item 3 of this
 subpart Ja, PM concentration                       table.
 limit not subject to the NSPS
 for PM in 40 CFR 60.102 or
 60.102a(b)(1).
9. Option 2: PM per coke burn-  Any..............  The applicable
 off limit, not subject to the                      continuous
 NSPS for PM in 40 CFR 60.102                       monitoring systems
 or 60.102a(b)(1).                                  in item 2 of this
                                                    table.
 
                              * * * * * * *
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ If applicable, you can use the alternative in Sec.   63.1573(a)(1)
  instead of a continuous parameter monitoring system for gas flow rate.
\2\ If you use a jet ejector type wet scrubber or other type of wet
  scrubber equipped with atomizing spray nozzles, you can use the
  alternative in Sec.   63.1573(b) instead of a continuous parameter
  monitoring system for pressure drop across the scrubber.


0
28. Table 4 to Subpart UUU of Part 63 is amended by revising the 
entries for items 9.c and 10.c to read as follows:
* * * * *

[[Page 60726]]



  Table 4 to Subpart UUU of Part 63--Requirements for Performance Tests
          for Metal HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units
                              * * * * * * *
------------------------------------------------------------------------
For each  new or
     existing
    catalytic
  cracking unit    You must . . .    Using . . .     According to these
    catalyst                                         requirements . . .
   regenerator
   vent . . .
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                              * * * * * * *
9. * * *
                  c. Determine     XRF procedure    You must obtain 1
                   the              in appendix A    sample for each of
                   equilibrium      to this          the 3 test runs;
                   catalyst Ni      subpart 1; or    determine and
                   concentration.   EPA Method       record the
                                    6010B or 6020    equilibrium
                                    or EPA Method    catalyst Ni
                                    7520 or 7521     concentration for
                                    in SW-8462; or   each of the 3
                                    an alternative   samples; and you
                                    to the SW-846    may adjust the
                                    method           laboratory results
                                    satisfactory     to the maximum
                                    to the           value using
                                    Administrator.   Equation 1 of Sec.
                                                      63.1571, if
                                                     applicable.
 
                              * * * * * * *
10. * * *
                  c. Determine     See item 9.c.    You must obtain 1
                   the              of this table.   sample for each of
                   equilibrium                       the 3 test runs;
                   catalyst Ni                       determine and
                   concentration.                    record the
                                                     equilibrium
                                                     catalyst Ni
                                                     concentration for
                                                     each of the 3
                                                     samples; and you
                                                     may adjust the
                                                     laboratory results
                                                     to the maximum
                                                     value using
                                                     Equation 2 of Sec.
                                                      63.1571, if
                                                     applicable.
 
                              * * * * * * *
------------------------------------------------------------------------

* * * * *

0
29. Table 5 to Subpart UUU is amended by revising the entry for item 3 
to read as follows:

  Table 5 to Subpart UUU of Part 63--Initial Compliance With Metal HAP
              Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units
                              * * * * * * *
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                For the following
   For each new and existing     emission limit .  You have demonstrated
 catalytic cracking unit . . .         . .          compliance if . . .
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                              * * * * * * *
3. Subject to NSPS for PM in    PM emissions must  You have already
 40 CFR 60.102a(b)(1)(ii),       not exceed 0.5 g/  conducted a
 electing to meet the PM per     kg (0.5 lb PM/     performance test to
 coke burn-off limit.            1,000 lb) of       demonstrate initial
                                 coke burn-off).    compliance with the
                                                    NSPS and the
                                                    measured PM emission
                                                    rate is less than or
                                                    equal to 0.5 g/kg
                                                    (0.5 lb/1,000 lb) of
                                                    coke burn-off in the
                                                    catalyst
                                                    regenerator. As part
                                                    of the Notification
                                                    of Compliance
                                                    Status, you must
                                                    certify that your
                                                    vent meets the PM
                                                    limit. You are not
                                                    required to do
                                                    another performance
                                                    test to demonstrate
                                                    initial compliance.
                                                    As part of your
                                                    Notification of
                                                    Compliance Status,
                                                    you certify that
                                                    your BLD; CO2, O2,
                                                    or CO monitor; or
                                                    continuous opacity
                                                    monitoring system
                                                    meets the
                                                    requirements in Sec.
                                                      63.1572.
 
                              * * * * * * *
------------------------------------------------------------------------


0
30. Table 6 to Subpart UUU is amended by revising the entries for items 
1.a.ii and 7 to read as follows:

[[Page 60727]]



 Table 6 to Subpart UUU of Part 63--Continuous Compliance With Metal HAP
              Emission Limits for Catalytic Cracking Units
                              * * * * * * *
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                 Subject to this
                                  emission limit   You shall demonstrate
   For each new and existing    for your catalyst  continuous compliance
 catalytic cracking unit . . .   regenerator vent         by . . .
                                      . . .
------------------------------------------------------------------------
1. * * *......................  a. * * *.........
                                                   ii. Conducting a
                                                    performance test
                                                    before August 1,
                                                    2017 or within 150
                                                    days of startup of a
                                                    new unit and
                                                    thereafter following
                                                    the testing
                                                    frequency in Sec.
                                                    63.1571(a)(5) as
                                                    applicable to your
                                                    unit.
 
                              * * * * * * *
7. Option 1b: Elect NSPS        PM emissions must  See item 2 of this
 subpart Ja requirements for     not exceed 1.0 g/  table.
 PM per coke burn-off limit,     kg (1.0 lb PM/
 not subject to the NSPS for     1,000 lb) of
 PM in 40 CFR 60.102 or          coke burn-off.
 60.102a(b)(1).
 
                              * * * * * * *
------------------------------------------------------------------------


0
31. Table 10 to Subpart UUU is amended by revising the entry for item 3 
to read as follows:

  Table 10 to Subpart UUU of Part 63--Continuous Monitoring Systems for
           Organic HAP Emissions From Catalytic Cracking Units
                              * * * * * * *
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                     You shall install,
                                 And you use this  operate, and maintain
   For each new or existing      type of control        this type of
 catalytic cracking unit . . .   device for your   continuous monitoring
                                    vent . . .          system . . .
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                              * * * * * * *
3. During periods of startup,   Any..............  Continuous parameter
 shutdown or hot standby                            monitoring system to
 electing to comply with the                        measure and record
 operating limit in Sec.                            the concentration by
 63.1565(a)(5)(ii).                                 volume (wet or dry
                                                    basis) of oxygen
                                                    from each catalyst
                                                    regenerator vent. If
                                                    measurement is made
                                                    on a wet basis, you
                                                    must comply with the
                                                    limit as measured
                                                    (no moisture
                                                    correction).
------------------------------------------------------------------------


0
32. Table 43 to Subpart UUU is amended by revising the entry for item 2 
to read as follows:

      Table 43 to Subpart UUU of Part 63--Requirements for Reports
                              * * * * * * *
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                    The report must    You shall submit
      You must submit . . .          contain . . .     the report . . .
------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                              * * * * * * *
2. Performance test and CEMS      On and after        Semiannually
 performance evaluation data.      February 1, 2016,   according to the
                                   the information     requirements in
                                   specified in Sec.   Sec.   63.1575(b)
                                     63.1575(k)(1).    and (f).
------------------------------------------------------------------------


0
33. Table 44 to Subpart UUU is amended by revising the entries 
``63.6(f)(3)'', ``63.6(h)(7)(i)'', ``63.6(h)(8)'', ``63.7(a)(2)'', 
``63.7(g)'', ``63.8(e)'', ``63.10(d)(2)'', ``63.10(e)(1)-(2)'', and 
``63.10(e)(4)'' to read as follows:

[[Page 60728]]



          Table 44 to Subpart UUU of Part 63--Applicability of NESHAP General Provisions to Subpart UUU
                                                  * * * * * * *
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Applies to  subpart
              Citation                       Subject                   UUU                   Explanation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Sec.   63.6(f)(3)..................  ......................  Yes...................  Except the cross-references
                                                                                      to Sec.   63.6(f)(1) and
                                                                                      (e)(1)(i) are changed to
                                                                                      Sec.   63.1570(c) and this
                                                                                      subpart specifies how and
                                                                                      when the performance test
                                                                                      results are reported.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Sec.   63.6(h)(7)(i)...............  Report COM Monitoring   Yes...................  Except this subpart
                                      Data from Performance                           specifies how and when the
                                      Test.                                           performance test results
                                                                                      are reported.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Sec.   63.6(h)(8)..................  Determining Compliance  Yes...................  Except this subpart
                                      with Opacity/VE                                 specifies how and when the
                                      Standards.                                      performance test results
                                                                                      are reported.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Sec.   63.7(a)(2)..................  Performance Test Dates  Yes...................  Except this subpart
                                                                                      specifies that the results
                                                                                      of initial performance
                                                                                      tests must be submitted
                                                                                      within 150 days after the
                                                                                      compliance date.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Sec.   63.7(g).....................  Data Analysis,          Yes...................  Except this subpart
                                      Recordkeeping,                                  specifies how and when the
                                      Reporting.                                      performance test or
                                                                                      performance evaluation
                                                                                      results are reported and
                                                                                      Sec.   63.7(g)(2) is
                                                                                      reserved and does not
                                                                                      apply.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Sec.   63.8(e).....................  CMS Performance         Yes...................  Except this subpart
                                      Evaluation.                                     specifies how and when the
                                                                                      performance evaluation
                                                                                      results are reported.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Sec.   63.10(d)(2).................  Performance Test        No....................  This subpart specifies how
                                      Results.                                        and when the performance
                                                                                      test results are reported.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Sec.   63.10(e)(1)-(2).............  Additional CMS Reports  Yes...................  Except this subpart
                                                                                      specifies how and when the
                                                                                      performance evaluation
                                                                                      results are reported.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
Sec.   63.10(e)(4).................  COMS Data Reports.....  Yes...................  Except this subpart
                                                                                      specifies how and when the
                                                                                      performance test results
                                                                                      are reported.
 
                                                  * * * * * * *
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[FR Doc. 2018-25080 Filed 11-23-18; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 6560-50-P