[Federal Register Volume 81, Number 204 (Friday, October 21, 2016)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 72986-73001]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 2016-25315]



[[Page 72985]]

Vol. 81

Friday,

No. 204

October 21, 2016

Part III





Department of Defense





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Defense Acquisition Regulations System





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48 CFR Parts 202, 203, 204, et al.





Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Network Penetration 
Reporting and Contracting for Cloud Services (DFARS Case 2013-D018); 
Final Rule

Federal Register / Vol. 81 , No. 204 / Friday, October 21, 2016 / 
Rules and Regulations

[[Page 72986]]


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DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

Defense Acquisition Regulations System

48 CFR Parts 202, 204, 212, 239, and 252

[Docket DARS-2015-0039]
RIN 0750-AI61


Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement: Network 
Penetration Reporting and Contracting for Cloud Services (DFARS Case 
2013-D018)

AGENCY: Defense Acquisition Regulations System, Department of Defense 
(DoD).

ACTION: Final rule.

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SUMMARY: DoD is adopting as final, with changes, an interim rule 
amending the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) 
to implement a section of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2013 and a section of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2015, both of which require contractor reporting on 
network penetrations, as well as DoD policy on the purchase of cloud 
computing services.

DATES: Effective October 21, 2016.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Dustin Pitsch, telephone 571-372-
6090.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

I. Background

    DoD published two interim rules in the Federal Register on August 
26, 2015 (80 FR 51739), and December 30, 2015 (80 FR 81472), to 
implement section 941 of the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) 
for Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 (Pub. L. 112-239) and section 1632 of the 
NDAA for FY 2015 (Pub. L. 113-291) regarding contractor reporting of 
network penetrations, as well as DoD policies and procedures with 
regard to purchases of cloud computing services. This final rule also 
implements, for DoD, section 325 of the Intelligence Authorization Act 
for FY 2014 (Pub. L. 113-126); however, implementing section 325 
requires no new changes to the rule, because the reporting requirement 
is already included.
    This rule is part of DoD's retrospective plan, completed in August 
2011, under Executive Order 13563, ``Improving Regulation and 
Regulatory Review.'' DoD's full plan and updates can be accessed at: 
http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=DOD-2011-OS-0036. Twenty-
five respondents submitted public comments in response to the interim 
rules.

II. Discussion and Analysis

    DoD reviewed the public comments in the development of the final 
rule. A discussion of the comments received and the changes made to the 
rule as a result of those comments follows:

A. Summary of Significant Changes From the Interim Rule

    1. The definition of ``covered defense information'' is amended to 
clarify that, in order to be designated as covered defense information, 
the information must be controlled technical information or other 
information (as described in the Controlled Unclassified Information 
(CUI) Registry) that requires safeguarding or dissemination controls 
and is (1) marked or otherwise identified in the contract, task order, 
or delivery order, and provided to the contractor by or on behalf of 
DoD in connection with the performance of the contract; or (2) 
collected, developed, received, transmitted, used, or stored by or on 
behalf of the contractor in support of the performance of the contract. 
This definition is in line with the National Archives and Record 
Administration (NARA) ``Controlled Unclassified Information'' final 
rule published in the Federal Register on September 14, 2016 (81 FR 
63324). Covered defense information includes all of the categories of 
information that are considered CUI. The rule also now specifies that 
all covered contractor information systems need to be protected in 
accordance with DFARS clause 252.204-7012, Safeguarding Covered Defense 
Information and Cyber Incident Reporting.
    2. The definition of ``covered contractor information system'' is 
amended to clarify that it is an ``unclassified'' information system 
that is owned, or operated by or for, a contractor and that processes, 
stores, or transmits covered defense information.
    3. DFARS 204.7304, Solicitation provision and contract clauses, is 
amended to specify that DFARS provision 252.204-7008, Compliance with 
Safeguarding Covered Defense Information Controls, and DFARS clause 
252.204-7012 are not prescribed for use in solicitations or contracts 
that are solely for the acquisition of commercially available off-the-
shelf (COTS) items.
    4. DFARS 239.7602-1, General, is amended to provide for two 
exceptions in which a contracting officer may award a contract to 
acquire cloud services from a cloud service provider (CSP) that has not 
been granted a provisional authorization by the Defense Information 
System Agency.
    5. DFARS clause 252.204-7000, Disclosure of Information, is amended 
to clarify that fundamental research, by definition, must not involve 
any covered defense information.
    6. DFARS clause 252.204-7012 is amended to--
    a. Specify that contractors are obligated to implement information 
protection requirements on all covered contractor information systems;
    b. Provide additional guidance on requests to vary from National 
Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Special Publication (SP) 
800-171, ``Protecting Controlled Unclassified Information in Nonfederal 
Information Systems and Organizations;''
    c. Clarify that contractors are not required to implement any 
security requirement if an authorized representative of the DoD Chief 
Information Officer (CIO) has adjudicated the contractor's request to 
vary from NIST SP 800-171 and indicated the security requirement to be 
nonapplicable or to have an alternative, but equally effective, 
security measure;
    d. Require contractors to ensure that external CSPs used in 
performance of the contract to store, process, or transmit any covered 
defense information meet security requirements equivalent to those 
established by the Government for the Federal Risk and Authorization 
Management Program (FedRAMP) Moderate baseline (available at https://www.fedramp.gov/resources/documents/) and comply with requirements in 
the clause for cyber incident reporting, malicious software, media 
preservation and protection, access to additional information and 
equipment necessary for forensic analysis, and cyber incident damage 
assessment;
    e. Clarify that subcontractor flowdown is only necessary when 
covered defense information is necessary for performance of the 
subcontract, and that the contractor may consult with the contracting 
officer, if necessary, when uncertain if the clause should flow down; 
and
    f. Clarify that the prime contract shall require its subcontractors 
to notify the prime contractor (or the next higher-tier subcontractor) 
when submitting requests to vary from a NIST SP 800-171 security 
requirement to the contracting officer.

[[Page 72987]]

B. Analysis of Public Comments

1. Applicability
a. Commercial/COTS Providers
    Comment: Multiple respondents commented on the applicability of the 
rule to contracts and subcontracts for commercial and COTS items. One 
suggested that the full potential impact of the interim rule on 
commercial providers should be studied and quantified by DoD before 
implementation of the rule. Others suggested that the vast majority of 
commercial contracts do not require that DoD provide information in 
order for the contractor or subcontractor to perform the work, and that 
the clause should only apply when DoD provides controlled unclassified 
information to a contractor as a necessary predicate to performing the 
contract. One respondent recommended that DoD exempt contracts for 
commercial and COTS items from application of the final rule or, in the 
alternative, exempt subcontractors supplying commercial or COTS items 
from the final rule.
    Response: The definition of covered defense information has been 
amended to clarify, as suggested by the respondents, that in order to 
be designated as covered defense information, the information must be 
marked or otherwise identified in the contract and provided to the 
contractor by or on behalf of DoD in connection with the performance of 
the contract; or collected, developed, received, transmitted, used, or 
stored by or on behalf of the contractor in support of the performance 
of the contract. In addition, to clarify that the rule does not apply 
to COTS items, the prescriptions at DFARS 204.7304 for use of the 
provision at 252.204-7008 and the clause at 252.204-7012 are amended to 
exclude solicitations and contracts solely for the acquisition of COTS 
items.

b. Fundamental Research

    Comment: Several respondents requested clarification regarding the 
application of the security requirements embedded in DFARS clause 
252.204-7012 to fundamental research.
    Response: The security requirements in 252.204-7012 need to be in 
place when covered defense information is present. A contract or 
project that is appropriately scoped as fundamental research will not 
contain any covered defense information. The final rule is modified to 
only flow down the requirements of 252.204-7012 to subcontractors when 
subcontract performance is for operationally critical support or will 
involve covered defense information, which means the clause will not 
flow down to subcontractors that are exclusively performing fundamental 
research. DFARS clause 252.204-7000 is modified to ensure that it is 
clear that no covered defense information is involved when making a 
fundamental research determination.
c. Classified Information System
    Comment: One respondent noted that it is unclear whether the clause 
applies to covered defense information resident on contractor 
classified information systems. While the covered defense information 
itself has been explicitly defined as unclassified, covered contractor 
systems are not specified as such.
    Response: The definition for ``covered contractor information 
system'' has been amended to clarify that it is ``an unclassified 
information system that is owned, or operated by or for, a contractor 
and that processes, stores, or transmits covered defense information.''
d. When Other Security Requirements Apply
    Comment: One respondent noted that the mandatory flowdowns of the 
data security and penetration reporting requirements to health care 
providers who are subcontractors to military health care plans should 
be amended to provide that such providers who comply with their data 
security obligations under Health Insurance Portability and 
Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the Health Information Technology for 
Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act are deemed to be in 
compliance with DoD's data security rules.
    Response: If the covered defense information provided is DoD HIPAA, 
then the requirement would be to meet both HIPAA and NIST SP 800-171. 
There are requirements of HIPAA that are not in 800-171, just as there 
are requirements in 800-171 that are not in HIPAA. DFARS 204.7300(b) 
states that the rule ``does not abrogate any other requirements 
regarding contractor physical, personnel, information, technical, or 
general administrative security operations governing the protection of 
unclassified information.''
e. Small Business
    Comment: Several respondents commented on the cost impact to small 
businesses. One respondent suggested that this rule will impact 
subcontracting cycles and deliveries throughout the DoD supply chain, 
due to the inability for smaller suppliers to afford the investment and 
skilled labor force required to meet and manage these requirements. 
Multiple respondents requested that, due to the high cost of 
compliance, DoD provide for an alternative approach for small business. 
One respondent suggested that DoD consider collaborating with 
universities or other companies, to provide low-cost cybersecurity 
services to small businesses, or providing a one-time subsidy to small 
businesses to help cover the cost of initial consultations with third 
party vendors. Another suggested that DoD coordinate with the Small 
Business Administration, Department of Commerce, and other relevant 
executive agencies, to establish policy, training mechanisms, and 
learning centers that allow access to the necessary resources to assist 
small and commercial businesses in creating compliant information 
systems.
    Response: While it is understood that implementing the minimum 
security controls outlined in the DFARS clause may increase costs, 
protection of unclassified DoD information is deemed necessary. The 
cost to the nation in lost intellectual property and lost technological 
advantage over potential adversaries is much greater than these 
initial/ongoing investments. The value of the information (and impact 
of its loss) does not diminish when it moves to contractors (prime or 
sub, large or small). NIST SP 800-171 was carefully crafted to use 
performance-based requirements and eliminate unnecessary specificity 
and include only those security requirements necessary to provide 
adequate protections for the impact level of CUI (e.g., covered defense 
information). Implementation of the NIST SP 800-171 security 
requirements will provide significant benefit to the small business 
community in the form of increased protection of their intellectual 
property. In addition, defining one set of standards will help small 
businesses to avoid a situation in which small business must adopt 
multiple standards and rule sets as small businesses navigate amongst 
the many different organizations with which they do business. The 
addition of a new provision at 252.204-7008, Compliance with 
Safeguarding Covered Defense Information Controls, ensures that the 
offeror is aware of the requirements of clause 252.204-7012 and has 
time to bring their system into compliance and negotiate the terms of 
the contract accordingly. With regard to training, DoD will engage 
across both Government and industry to educate and raise awareness of 
the importance of protecting our controlled unclassified information 
and to address implementation of the rule.

[[Page 72988]]

2. Regulatory Flexibility Act
    Comment: Various respondents addressed application of the rule to 
small entities.
    Response: For analysis of applicability to small entities see the 
regulatory flexibility analysis at section V of this preamble.
3. Definitions
a. Covered Defense Information
    Comment: Several respondents suggested that the definition of 
``covered defense information'' is too expansive, requiring that data 
be safeguarded without clear marking instructions and identification of 
operational processes. Several respondents commented that contractors 
should not be required to make independent decisions regarding whether 
information is subject to safeguarding requirements, and that the rule 
limit its application only to covered defense information marked or 
expressly identified as protected by DoD. One respondent requested 
clarification that the rule only imposes restrictions on covered 
defense information that DoD provides to the contractor to perform the 
contract. Another respondent suggested that the relationship between 
``controlled defense information'' and ``controlled unclassified 
information'' and the ``Controlled Unclassified Information Registry 
(CUI Registry)'' should be clearly articulated. Two respondents 
suggested that covered data be limited to the ``unclassified controlled 
technical information'' covered in the predecessor DFARS rule. One of 
the respondents further suggested that if the scope is not focused back 
to the ``unclassified controlled technical information'' definition, 
the rule should define covered defense information to specifically 
exclude the contractor's own information that is not delivered to the 
Government. One respondent commented that, because it is not possible 
to contemplate every type of information that may arise in the future, 
it would be prudent to set forth in the rule a centralized process that 
contractors could use when it is not clear whether a specific type of 
information falls within the definition of ``covered defense 
information'' to ensure that information is treated consistently across 
contracts and commands. This respondent further stated that the rule 
should provide a standard for evaluating whether a contractor has 
reasonably complied with the rule when faced with a judgment call as to 
whether information falls within the definition.
    Response: The final rule clarifies the definition of ``covered 
defense information'' and the requirement to provide adequate security. 
The definition of ``covered defense information'' is amended to state 
that covered defense information is unclassified controlled technical 
information or other information (as described in the CUI Registry at 
http://www.archives.gov/cui/registry/category-list.html) that requires 
safeguarding or dissemination controls pursuant to and consistent with 
law, regulations, and Governmentwide policies and is either (1) marked 
or otherwise identified in the contract and provided to the contractor 
by or on behalf of DoD in connection with the performance of the 
contract; or (2) collected, developed, received, transmitted, used, or 
stored by or on behalf of the contractor in support of the performance 
of the contract. This revised definition adds an affirmative 
requirement for Government to mark or otherwise identify in the 
contract all covered defense information that is being provided to the 
contractor, while recognizing the shared obligation of the contractor 
to recognize and protect covered defense information that the 
contractor is developing during contract performance. In addition, 
paragraph (b) of DFARS clause 252.204-7012 is amended to clarify that 
adequate security is required on all covered contractor information 
systems. Paragraph (m)(1) of the clause is also modified to indicate 
that, if necessary, the contractor shall determine if the information 
required for subcontractor performance retains its identity as covered 
defense information and will require protection under this clause and, 
if necessary, consult with the contracting officer.
b. Export Control
    Comment: Several respondents suggested that the definition of 
covered defense information should refer only to export controlled 
information, and not include a general description of the type of 
information that may be subject to export controls. One respondent 
suggested this section be reworded as follows: ``Unclassified 
information concerning items requiring licenses under the export 
administration regulations, or the international trafficking in arms 
regulations and munitions list.'' Another respondent suggested that DoD 
define ``export controlled information'' in the final rule, since 
particular categories of International Traffic in Arms Regulations 
(ITAR)--controlled technical data and designated control list 
categories of the Export Administration Regulations (EAR), such as 
national security, nonproliferation, and missile technology. Several 
respondents suggested the definition of ``export control'' be limited 
to technologies subject to the EAR, ITAR, or nuclear export 
regulations. One respondent suggested that DoD exclude items from its 
definition of ``covered defense information'' that are subject to 
minimal export controls.
    Response: The definition of ``covered defense information'' is 
amended to clarify that the information includes unclassified 
controlled technical information or other information (as described in 
the CUI Registry) that is marked or otherwise identified in the 
contract and provided to the contractor by or on behalf of DoD in 
connection with the performance of the contract; or be collected, 
developed, received, transmitted, used, or stored by or on behalf of 
the contractor in support of the performance of the contract. Export 
control is a category in the CUI Registry, but it is only considered 
covered defense information when both DoD contractors hold unclassified 
information that is export controlled, and the information is 
``provided to the contractor by or on behalf of DoD in connection with 
the performance of the contract, or collected, developed, received, 
transmitted, used, or stored by or on behalf of the contractor in 
support of the performance of the contract,'' as defined in the final 
rule. Protecting DoD-related export controlled information as covered 
defense information should not be interpreted to imply that the same 
information, not related to the DoD activity, requires protection as 
covered defense information.
c. Covered Defense Information--``Other'' Category
    Comment: Several respondents commented that DoD should provide more 
clarity regarding the categories of information that comprise covered 
defense information, specifically the scope of ``any other information. 
. . .'' One respondent suggested that the rule specifically address DoD 
information routinely handled by Contractors, such as information 
marked ``For Official Use Only'' and personally identifiable 
information (PII) maintained to support DoD clearance processing, and 
clearly indicate whether this information is in or out of scope. 
Another respondent suggested that the definition of ``covered defense 
information'' should be amended to exclude information, such as 
protected health information (PHI) that is already subject to security 
control regulations.

[[Page 72989]]

    Response: The definition of ``covered defense information'' is 
amended to clarify that ``other information'' is other information (as 
described in the CUI Registry) that requires safeguarding or 
dissemination controls pursuant to and consistent with law, 
regulations, and Governmentwide policies. The CUI Registry includes 
personal information, PII, and PHI. The security requirements in this 
clause set a baseline standard. Additional protections may be required 
for specific categories of information, such as PHI.
d. Operationally Critical Support and Critical Information (Operations 
Security)
    Comment: Several respondents commented on how the rule addresses 
``operationally critical support'' and ``critical information 
(operations security)'' and requested clarification of the terms 
``critical information'' and ``operations security.'' One respondent 
commented that the rule indicates that the Government will designate 
which supplies or services are critical for airlift, etc., but the rule 
neither indicates where such information will be found, nor defines a 
process for designating contractors in this category or notifying such 
contractors that they are critical to operational support. Another 
respondent suggested that while the interim rule suggests that DoD will 
designate specific portions of its contracts that it considers to be 
``operationally critical support,'' the scope of what constitutes a 
contractor's ``ability to provide operationally critical support'' is 
so vague that it may not accomplish its purpose. This respondent 
recommended that DoD clarify that a reportable incident occurs when a 
cyber incident affects the security or integrity of operationally 
critical information residing in a contractor information system. One 
respondent commented that ambiguities with regard to operationally 
critical support are particularly concerning to the transportation 
industry, suggesting that it is not clear whether ``package level 
detail'' which includes information about the identity of the shipping 
and receiving parties and the delivery address is considered ``covered 
defense information.'' This respondent also suggested that a cyber 
incident that affects the contractor's ability to perform 
``operationally critical support'' could also include incidents on 
systems beyond ``covered information systems'' and the interim rule 
requires reporting of those incidents, as well. Another respondent 
requested DoD clarify how or whether the term ``operationally 
critical'' applies to contractors/subcontractors.
    Response: The modified definition of covered defense information 
replaces the requirement that information ``falls in any of the 
following categories: Controlled technical information, critical 
information (operations security), export control, and any other 
information, marked or otherwise identified in the contract, that 
requires safeguarding or dissemination controls pursuant to and 
consistent with law, regulations, and Governmentwide policies'' with 
the statement ``as described in the CUI Registry at http://www.archives.gov/cui/registry/category-list.html, requires safeguarding 
or dissemination controls pursuant to and consistent with law, 
regulations, and Governmentwide policies.'' Because ``critical 
information (operations security)'' is not currently listed on the CUI 
Registry, it can no longer, in and of itself, be designated as covered 
defense information. Section 1632 of the NDAA for FY 2015, which 
requires that a contractor designated as operationally critical report 
each time a cyber incident occurs on that contractor's network or 
information systems, is implemented via the DFARS clause 252.204-7012 
requirement for contractors and subcontractors to report cyber 
incidents that result in an actual or potentially adverse effect on a 
their ability to provide operationally critical support. Operationally 
critical support is an ``activity''--not an information type--performed 
by the contractor or subcontract. DFARS does not require protections 
for contractor information systems that are used to provide 
operationally critical support, but does require the contractor to 
report a cyber incident that affects the contractor's ability to 
perform the requirements of the contract that are designated as 
operationally critical support. Operationally critical support 
requirements must be marked or otherwise identified in the contract, 
task order, or delivery order.
4. Compliance
a. Multiple Versions/Block Change
    Comment: Several respondents commented that the new rule could 
leave contractors subject to different security standards depending on 
which version of clause 252.204-7012 appears in their contracts and 
subcontracts. One respondent suggested that this results in them 
incurring costs due to the changes involved. Other respondents 
recommended that, in lieu of each contractor negotiating the phase-in 
relief provided in the amended rules on every transaction, DoD issue a 
block change modification to all contracts where the relevant August 
interim rule clauses are present to adopt the December 30 changes and 
allow for equitable adjustment to the contract price. One respondent 
suggested that DoD consider issuing instructions to contracting 
officers to substitute the most recent version of this clause for older 
versions, at the request of the contractor.
    Response: The security requirements in NIST SP 800-171 build upon 
the table of controls contained in the November 2013 version of DFARS 
clause 252.204-7012. While there is additional effort for the 
difference, none of the effort to implement the original controls is 
lost. Due to the differences in the multiple versions of 252.204-7012, 
however, amending the contract requires procuring contracting officer 
authority and is generally bilateral, requiring contractor signature. 
``Block changes'' and ``mass modifications'' are generally reserved for 
administrative changes, such as a payment office address change. There 
is nothing that precludes a contracting officer from considering a 
modification of the contract upon request of the contractor.
b. Cost
    Comment: One respondent commented that the cost recovery model for 
complying with the interim rule is not well understood, suggesting that 
the cost to them and their supply base will be significant as they 
expand their capabilities to meet the new controls and absorb the 
administrative costs to oversee the supply base's compliance. The 
respondent recommended that the Office of the Under Secretary of 
Defense (Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics) work with industry to 
clarify cost recovery options.
    Response: DoD does not develop ``cost recovery models'' for 
compliance with DFARS rules. The requirements levied by this rule 
should be treated the same as those levied by any other new DFARS rule 
and the cost related to compliance should be considered during proposal 
preparation. Contractors should continue to comply with their own 
internal accounting processes.
c. Certification and Oversight
    Comment: A number of respondents commented on the lack of oversight 
and certification of compliance with the NIST controls in the rule. 
Several respondents requested clarification on the requirements for an 
organization to be considered compliant, as well as the intended means 
of verification, which organization will verify, how compliance will be 
assessed, and how

[[Page 72990]]

often. One respondent requested details on the process for obtaining 
official, consistent interpretations of the standards when DoD and the 
contractor have different interpretations of the NIST SP 800-171 
standards. Another respondent recommended that large companies be 
allowed to certify at the company level, suggesting that the 
requirement to certify each program individually creates an 
insurmountable burden for both the company and DoD.
    Response: No new oversight paradigm is created through this rule. 
If oversight related to these requirements is deemed necessary, then it 
can be accomplished through existing Federal Acquisition Regulation 
(FAR) and DFARS allowances, or an additional requirement can be added 
to the terms of the contract. The rule does not require 
``certification'' of any kind. By signing the contract, the contractor 
agrees to comply with the contract's terms.
d. Implementation Deadline
    Comment: One respondent asked for clarification with regard to what 
the term ``as soon as practical'' means.
    Response: The phrase ``as soon as practical'' is added to encourage 
contractors to begin implementing the security requirements in NIST SP 
800-171 prior to the December 31, 2017, deadline, but allows 
contractors to exercise their own judgement when planning an optimal 
implementation strategy.
e. Source Selection
    Comment: One respondent inquired if DoD can require immediate 
compliance with all NIST controls as a condition of responsiveness to a 
solicitation, and urged DoD to prohibit source selection exclusions 
based on a desire or demand for 100% compliance at time of solicitation 
or contract prior to December 31, 2017. Another respondent suggested 
that the final rule clarify that DoD does not intend for DFARS clause 
252.204-7012 to be used in the evaluation process.
    Response: DFARS Clause 252.204-7012 is not structured to facilitate 
the use of the contractor's compliance with NIST SP 800-171 as a factor 
in the evaluation/source selection process. The requirements are set as 
the minimum acceptable level to protect covered defense information. 
The rule does not preclude a requiring activity from specifically 
stating in the solicitation that compliance with the NIST SP 800-171 
will be used as an evaluation factor in the source section process, and 
the specifics on how such an evaluation factor would be utilized to 
evaluate proposals would need to be detailed within the solicitation. 
However, this is outside of the scope of this rule and would need to be 
appropriately addressed on an individual solicitation basis.
5. 30-Day Notification and Alternative Controls
a. Notification Versus Alternatives
    Comment: Several respondents requested clarification as to why 
DFARS 252.204-7008 and 252.204-7012 are separate. Other respondents 
suggested that there is a contradiction between DFARS provision 
252.204-7008 and clause 252.204-7012, and requested clarification 
regarding the intent of the 30-day notification requirement. 
Respondents also requested that DoD clarify how the NIST controls 
requirements variance process identified in the representation clause 
at 252.204-7008 (i.e., a written explanation and adjudicative process 
by the DoD CIO pre-award) differs from the security clause at 252.204-
7012, which allows for phased-in implementation with a process of 
proposing alternatives without pre-award approval.
    Response: DFARS provision 252.204-7008 serves as a notice to 
offerors. The provision puts the offeror on notice that, when 
performance of the contract requires covered defense information on a 
covered contractor information system, the security requirements in 
NIST SP 800-171 apply and must be implemented no later than December 
31, 2017. In addition, the provision notifies the offeror that they may 
submit a request to vary from any of the security requirements in NIST 
SP 800-171 to the contracting officer, for adjudication by DoD CIO, 
prior to award. DFARS clause 252.204-7012 is amended by adding a new 
paragraph (b)(2)(ii)(B) to clarify that the contractor may submit a 
request to vary from the security requirements in NIST SP 800-171 after 
contract award.
    Separate and distinct from the process to request to vary from the 
security requirements in NIST SP 800-171, the 30-day notification 
requirement contained in DFARS clause 252.204-7012 requires the 
contractor to provide the DoD CIO with a list of the security 
requirements that the contractor is not implementing at the time of 
award. This notification will end for all contracts awarded after 
September 30, 2017, in preparation of the full security requirement 
implementation date of December 31, 2017.
b. Alternative Controls
    Comment: Several respondents requested that DoD clarify 252.204-
7008 with regard to the process to request variances from the SP 800-
171 security controls, to include where a contractor/subcontractor 
request should be sent, if subcontractors may bypass their prime 
contractor when submitting in order to safeguard any proprietary 
information, a timeline for the authorized representative from the DoD 
CIO's office to respond to contractor/subcontractor requests, and 
whether and how CIO evaluations could impact award decisions. One 
respondent recommends that DoD clarify that contractors may also 
identify and seek CIO adjudication on variances from NIST SP 800-171 
requirements after award as they progress through implementation, and 
that DoD clarify that such documents will be securely maintained and 
not be released publicly.
    Response: DFARS provision 252.204-7008 ensures that offerors are 
aware of the safeguarding requirements of DFARS clause 252.204-7012, 
and provides a process for the offeror to identify situations in which 
a security requirement in NIST SP 800-171 is not necessary in 
performance of the contract, or to propose an alternative to a security 
requirement is NIST SP 800-171. In such cases, the offeror must provide 
a written explanation in their proposal describing the reasons why a 
security requirement is not applicable, or how alternative, but equally 
effective, security measures can compensate for the inability to 
satisfy a particular requirement. The contracting officer will refer 
the proposed variance to the DoD CIO for adjudication. The DoD CIO is 
responsible for ensuring consistent adjudication of proposed non-
applicable or alternative security measures. If the DoD CIO needs 
additional information, a request is made to the contracting officer. 
Responses are then returned to the contracting officer who, in turn, 
advises the contractor of the decision. The timeframe for response by 
the DoD CIO is typically within five business days. The basis for 
determining if an alternative to a security requirement is acceptable 
is whether the alternative is equally effective; the basis for 
determining a security requirement is ``not applicable'' is whether the 
basis or condition for the requirement is absent. While the scope of 
this rule does not provide for the CIO evaluation to impact the award 
decision, there is nothing that precludes an activity from drafting the 
solicitation to provide for this.
    DFARS clause 252.204-7012 is amended by adding a new paragraph

[[Page 72991]]

(b)(2)(ii)(B) to clarify that the contractor may request the 
contracting officer seek DoD CIO adjudication on variances from NIST SP 
800-171 requirements after award. DFARS clause 252.204-7012 is flowed 
down to subcontractors without alteration when performance will involve 
operationally critical support or covered defense information. However, 
paragraph (m) of the clause is amended to clarify that the prime 
contractor shall require subcontractors to notify the prime contractor 
(or next higher-tier subcontractor) of any requests for variance 
submitted directly to the contracting officer.
c. 30-Day Notification
    Comment: Several respondents requested that clarification be 
provided regarding the requirement that the contractor provide 
notification to the DoD CIO within 30 days of contract award listing 
the unmet NIST SP 800-171 security requirements. Respondents asked the 
following questions: Is the 30-day deadline for the prime contractor's 
response only, or also for the prime's entire supply base? Would post-
award notifications also be required 30 days after award of 
subcontracts? Should subcontractors submit their notifications directly 
to the DoD CIO? Can subcontractors also be required to submit copies to 
the prime contractor? How will these sensitive documents be protected? 
One respondent asked what is required for the 30-day assessment, if the 
contract in question ends prior to the December 31, 2017, compliance 
date. One respondent also suggested that the requirement should be 
modified to allow at least 90 days after award, and that DoD should 
allow for a single corporate-wide compliance, and that such a 
compliance requirement could be accomplished at annual or semi-annual 
intervals, and not on every single transaction within 30 days.
    Response: DFARS clause 252.204-7012 requires the contractor to 
notify the DoD CIO, within 30 days of contract award, of the security 
requirements that are not implemented at the time of award. The list 
need only identify the security requirement(s) (e.g., NIST SP 800-171 
security requirement 3.1.1) that is/are not implemented. No additional 
information is required.
    DFARS clause 252.204-7012 is flowed down to subcontractors without 
alteration when performance will involve operationally critical support 
or covered defense information. As such, prior to October 1, 2017, the 
requirement is for the subcontractor to provide the DoD CIO, within 30 
days of the prime contractor's award to the subcontractor, with a list 
of the security requirements that the subcontractor has not implemented 
at the time of award. Bypassing the prime is a matter to be addressed 
between the prime and the subcontractor.
    Nothing precludes the contractor from providing a corporate-wide 
update to the status of requirements not implemented on a periodic 
basis, assuming it meets the requirements of the clause. If the 
contract in question ends prior to December 31, 2017, the Contractor 
must still provide the DoD CIO, within 30 days of contract award, with 
a list of the security requirements that are not implemented at the 
time of award.
    Comment: One respondent asked that DoD confirm/clarify that after 
the 30-day notification, contractors are expected to manage compliance 
with DFARS clause 252.204-7012 through system security plans and plans 
of action and milestones. The respondent also asked for clarification 
that the only required reporting to DoD CIO subsequent to the initial 
list is to identify any NIST SP 800-171 controls that a contractor does 
not intend to meet either because the contractor has deemed the 
controls to be not applicable or because mitigating controls have been 
implemented.
    Response: The notification to the DoD CIO of the NIST-SP security 
requirements not implemented at the time of contract award is a one-
time action per contract and is a requirement for contracts awarded 
prior to October 1, 2017 (see 252.204-7012(b)(2)(ii)(A)). Separately, a 
contractor may submit requests to vary from a NIST SP 800-171 security 
requirement (because it is believed to be not applicable or the 
contractor has an alternative in place) to the contracting officer for 
adjudication by the DoD CIO (see 252.204-7012(b)(2)(ii)(B)).
    During the course of performance under the contract, the contractor 
may manage compliance with the NIST SP 800-171 security requirements 
through a system security plan. One of the assumptions of NIST SP 800-
171 (per table E-12 of the document) is that nonfederal organizations 
routinely have a system security plan in place to manage and maintain 
their information systems. When a corrective action is necessary to 
maintain NIST compliance, a plan of action may be necessary in 
accordance with NIST 800-171 requirement 3.12. DFARS clause 252.204-
7012 is updated at paragraph (b)(3) to clarify that temporary 
deficiencies with compliance may be addressed within a system security 
plan.
6. Incident Reporting and Damage Assessment
a. Reporting (When, Where, What Versus 72 Hours)
    Comment: Two respondents commented on the 72-hour reporting 
requirement. One suggested that the 72-hour reporting requirement is 
unrealistic unless the rule is revised to limit its applicability to 
specific information that DoD has provided to the contractor or 
subcontractor with appropriate markings. One respondent suggested that 
72 hours is not enough time to investigate a potential cyber incident, 
confirm the incident, and obtain the requisite report information. 
Several respondents commented that the increased reporting requirement 
to include potentially adverse effects on an information system 
regardless of an actual compromise to covered defense information, is 
too burdensome to industry for little apparent benefit, and suggested 
that DoD eliminate the words ``or potentially'' from the definition of 
cyber incident. One respondent suggested that the rule address what 
factors contractors should consider when evaluating whether an incident 
has a ``potentially adverse effect.'' One respondent recommended that a 
threshold be established on when a contractor and subcontractor would 
be required to report a cyber incident, and that the agency point of 
contact be a centralized figure/office in which all cyber incident 
reports are submitted to or, in the alternative, a centralized figure/
office that handles reporting for all contracts under which a given 
contractor performs.
    Response: When a cyber incident is discovered, the contractor/
subcontractor should report whatever information is available to the 
DIBNet portal within 72 hours of discovery. If the contractor/
subcontractor does not have all the information required on the 
Incident Collection Form (ICF) at the time of the report, and if more 
information becomes available, the contractor should submit a follow-on 
report with the added information. The DoD Cyber Crime Center (DC3) 
serves as the DoD operational focal point for receiving cyber threat 
and incident reporting from those Defense contractors who have a 
contractual requirement to report under DFARS clause 252.204-7012. Upon 
receipt of the contractor/subcontractor-submitted ICF in the DIBNet 
portal, DC3 will provide the submitted ICF to the contracting officer 
identified on the ICF. The contracting officer is directed in DFARS 
Procedures, Guidance, and Information 204.7303-3 to notify the

[[Page 72992]]

requiring activities that have contracts identified in the ICF.
b. Incident Collection Form
    Comment: One respondent recommended that the ICF, for example on 
the DIBnet site, should include a field where the contractor can 
indicate the vulnerability suspected, known, or created.
    Response: The ICF fields are described at the ``Resources'' tab at 
http://dibnet.dod.mil. Field numbers 16 (Type of compromise), 17 
(Description of technique or method used in cyber incident), 19 
(Incident/Compromise narrative), and 20 (Any additional information) 
each provide the opportunity for the contractor to indicate the 
vulnerability suspected.
d. Access to Contractor Information
    Comment: Multiple respondents commented that the rule does not 
appropriately limit the Government's access to contractor systems and 
fails to adequately protect sensitive contractor data, suggesting that 
the rule be revised to recognize the need for appropriate limits on the 
Government's rights to request, use, and disclose sensitive contractor 
information it may obtain as a result of a reported cyber incident or 
investigation. Many respondents offered alternatives of how to limit 
access. Several respondents suggested that the final rule use the same 
use and disclosure rights that were contained in the prior unclassified 
controlled technical information (UCTI) rule. Others suggested that the 
rule be modified to state that DoD limit access to equipment or 
information only in connection with a contractor report of a ``cyber 
incident'' and as necessary to conduct a forensic analysis or damage 
assessment, adding that the parties should discuss in good faith 
whether additional information or equipment is necessary. One suggested 
that the rule indicate that the Government may require access to 
equipment or information only ``to determine whether information 
created by or for the Department in connection with any Department 
program was successfully exfiltrated from a network or information 
system and, if so, what information was exfiltrated.''
    Response: This rule adds on to the prior UCTI rule, by implementing 
10 U.S.C. 391 and 393 (previously section 941 of the NDAA for FY 2013 
and section 1632 of the NDAA for FY 2015), which state that contractors 
will provide access to equipment or information to determine if DoD 
information was successfully exfiltrated from a network or information 
system of such contractor and, if so, what information was exfiltrated. 
This requirement is implemented in DFARS clause 252.204-7012 by stating 
that, upon request by DoD, the Contractor shall provide DoD with access 
to additional information or equipment that is necessary to conduct a 
forensic analysis--thus limiting DoD access to equipment/information 
necessary to conduct the analysis resulting from a cyber incident, as 
suggested above. This analysis is critical to understand what 
information was exfiltrated from the information system.
e. Protection/Use of Contractor Information
    Comment: Multiple respondents commented that the interim rule 
should address how DoD will safeguard any contractor data provided. One 
respondent added that the clause also does not allow contractors an 
opportunity to review their security information before it is 
disclosed. Several respondents recommend that the final rule use the 
same use and disclosure rights that were contained in the prior UCTI 
rule. One respondent recommended that DoD make clear that the 
information it receives from contractors under the cyber incident 
reporting rules may not be used for Government commercial or law 
enforcement purposes. One respondent suggested that the rule should 
address personal information in internal contractor systems, 
recommending that the DoD Privacy Officer review the rule and conduct a 
privacy impact assessment, and that DoD address special procedures and 
protections for personal information. One respondent suggested that the 
DFARS prohibit the release outside DoD of PHI or PII provided to DoD in 
connection with the reporting or investigation of a cyber incident.
    Response: DoD protects against unauthorized use or release of cyber 
incident reporting information from the contractor, in accordance with 
applicable statutes and regulations. DoD complies with 10 U.S.C. 391 
and 393 and provides reasonable protection of trade secrets and other 
information, such as commercial or financial information, and 
information that can be used to identify a specific person. DoD limits 
the dissemination of cyber incident information to the entities 
specified in the rule.
f. Attributional/Proprietary Information
    Comment: One respondent suggested that the definition of contractor 
attributional/proprietary information exceeds the stated scope of the 
subpart 204.7300, namely, ``to safeguard covered defense information 
that resides in or transits through covered contractor information 
systems.'' One respondent commented that the rule places the burden on 
the contractor to mark information as ``contractor attributional/
proprietary,'' adding that the rule should either address how 
contractors can protect previously unmarked information while still 
complying with the requirement to preserve images of their information 
system, or enumerate what steps the Government will take to ensure that 
the absence of a marking on a document provided to the Government as 
part of that image will not be treated as determinative of the 
Government's ultimate obligations to protect that information as 
contractor attributional/proprietary.
    One respondent commented that restrictions and requirements imposed 
by the rule with regard to attributional/proprietary information would 
impact international suppliers of U.S. allies who provide critical 
components that are integrated into major systems and subsystems, 
suggesting that international suppliers may be unable to comply with 
the requirements of the DFARS due to the applicable laws in their 
country or a lack of resources.
    Response: The Government may request access to media to assess what 
covered defense information was affected by the cyber incident. DoD 
will protect against the unauthorized use or release of contractor 
attributional/proprietary information. The contractor should identify 
and mark attributional/proprietary information and personal information 
to assist DoD in protecting this information. To the extent that media 
may include attributional/proprietary information, the Government will 
protect against unauthorized access. DoD will need to work with the 
prime contractor to resolve challenges with international suppliers on 
a case by case basis.
g. Third Party Information
    Comment: Several respondents commented on third-party support 
contractors' access to other contractors' internal systems and/or 
information. One respondent suggested that third party support 
contractor access to other contractors' internal systems raises serious 
concerns and encouraged DoD to incorporate an effective mechanism to 
notify the originating party about third parties with access to such 
data, as well as any disclosure of such data by those third parties. 
One respondent recommended that DoD add a requirement for third parties 
to sign a non-disclosure agreement with each

[[Page 72993]]

company they may conduct a forensic analysis on or an investigation 
against.
    Response: The rule subjects support service contractors directly 
supporting Government activities related to safeguarding covered 
defense information and cyber incident reporting (e.g., providing 
forensic analysis services, damages assessment services, or other 
services that require access to data from another contractor) to 
restrictions on use and disclosure obligations.
h. Liability Protections
    Comment: One respondent recommended that the final rule integrate 
the liability protections provided by section 1641 of the NDAA for FY 
2016, further suggesting that DoD work to extend the liability 
protections so that all contractors and subcontractors that are 
required to report cyber incidents under its regulations are provided 
the same levels of protection.
    Response: DFARS Case 2016-D025, Liability Protections when 
Reporting Cyber Incidents, was opened on April 20, 2016 to implement 
section 1641 of the FY 2016 NDAA.
7. Subcontractors
a. Reporting
    Comment: Multiple respondents addressed the requirement for 
subcontractors to simultaneously report incidents directly to the 
Government and the prime contractor. One respondent suggested that 
having subcontractors report directly to DoD creates a control 
challenge for prime contractors. Another suggested that subcontractor 
reporting directly to DoD removes the prime contractors ability to 
educate themselves about the incident and to be a resource to DoD. 
Others suggested that the obligation for subcontractors to report 
violates the subcontractor's confidentiality rights. Other respondents 
requested clarification regarding the types of information that must be 
disclosed by subcontractors to prime contractors. One respondent 
suggest the rule should limit the information that a subcontractor is 
required to report to its prime contractor or, otherwise, limit the 
prime contractors' ability to disclose any information that is received 
as a result of the disclosures. One respondent commented that it is not 
clear how the Government intends to protect proprietary information 
reported by the subcontractor to the prime contractor from unauthorized 
use.
    Response: The rule has been amended to clarify that subcontractors 
are required to rapidly report cyber incidents directly to DoD at 
http://dibnet.dod.mil, and to provide the incident report number, 
automatically assigned by DoD, to the prime Contractor (or next higher-
tier subcontractor) as soon as practicable. Any requirement for the 
subcontractor to provide anything more than the incident report number 
to the prime Contractor (or next higher-tier subcontractor) is a matter 
to be addressed between the prime and the subcontractor.
    DoD will protect against the unauthorized use or release of cyber 
incident information reported by the contractor or subcontractor in 
accordance with applicable statutes and regulations.
b. Flowdown
    Comment: Multiple respondents commented on aspects of the flowdown 
and subcontractor requirements of the rule. One respondent asked which 
party determines whether a subcontractor's efforts involve covered 
defense information or require providing operationally critical 
support, suggesting that, without additional detail or guidance, the 
determination of what constitutes covered defense information or 
operationally critical support would vary. Several respondents 
requested clarification regarding how DoD intends to enforce the 
flowdown of DFARS clause 252.204-7012 beyond the first tier of the 
supply chain, and how subcontractors can comply with the final rule's 
requirements. One respondent asked DoD to clarify whether it will 
prohibit a prime contractor from entering into a subcontract if the 
subcontractor refuses to accept DFARS 252.207-7012. Several respondents 
commented on the change made to the second interim rule that, when 
applicable, the clause shall be included without alteration, except to 
identify the parties, suggesting that this requirement restrains prime 
contractors' and subcontractors' ability to negotiate flowdown 
provisions that address the specific needs of their contractual 
arrangements. Another asked if ``where DoD requires flow-down without 
alteration, can industry assume that wherever the language in 252.204-
7012 refers to a ``contractor,'' the term ``subcontractor'' should or 
can be used in the flowdown version of the clause, except where 
``subcontractor'' is already used in the clause''?
    Response: Paragraph (m) of DFARS clause 252.204-7012, states that 
the clause will be included without alteration, ``except to identify 
the parties.'' This allows the Contractor to identify the appropriate 
party as required. Paragraph (m) is amended in the final rule to 
clarify that flowdown of the clause is required for subcontracts for 
operationally critical support, or for which subcontract performance 
will involve ``covered defense information,'' instead of ``a covered 
contractor information system.'' Paragraph (m) is further amended to 
instruct the contractor to, if necessary, consult with the contracting 
officer to determine if the information required for subcontractor 
performance retains its identity as covered defense information and 
will require protection under this clause, thus driving when the 
substance of DFARS clause 252.204-7012 must be included in a 
subcontract. Flowdown is a requirement of the terms of the contract 
with the Government, which should be enforced by the prime contractor 
as a result of compliance with these terms. If a subcontractor does not 
agree to comply with the terms of 252.204-7012, then covered defense 
information shall not be on that subcontractor's information system.
8. Cloud Computing
a. Access
    Comment: One respondent commented that they did not agree with 
DFARS 252.239-7010(i)(3), ``which provides that a Government 
contracting officer may require physical access to data centers for 
purposes of audits, inspections, or other similar and undefined 
activities,'' suggesting that the DFARS be revised to reflect the 
practice of infrastructure as-a-service providers to limit third party 
access to data centers to accredited FedRAMP third party assessment 
organizations and to law enforcement activities.
    Response: DFARS 252.239-7010(i)(3) states that the contractor shall 
provide the Government or its authorized representatives (vice 
contracting officers) access to all Government data and Government-
related data, access to contractor personnel involved in performance of 
the contract, and physical access to any Contractor facility with 
Government data, for the purpose of audits, investigations, 
inspections, or other similar activities, as authorized by law or 
regulation (vice undefined activities).
b. 252.204-7012 Versus 252.239-7010
    Comment: One respondent commented that it is unlikely that a 
majority of CSPs have completed their review/audit of their systems in 
order to notify contracting officers within 30 days of award whether or 
not they comply with NIST SP 800-171 security

[[Page 72994]]

requirements. This respondent also commented that companies that have 
demonstrated compliance with DoD Impact Level L4/5 (as described in the 
Cloud Computing Security Requirements Guide (SRG)) should not be 
required to do all the paperwork or be subject to the requirement for 
an additional assessment.
    Response: When using cloud computing to provide information 
technology services in the performance of the contract (i.e., an 
information technology service or system operated on behalf of the 
Government), CSPs shall comply with the requirements of DFARS Clause 
252.239-7010, Cloud Computing Services, which points to the Cloud 
Computing SRG. The requirement to provide DoD CIO with a list of 
security requirements that are not implemented at the time of contract 
award applies only to implementation of security requirements as 
required in DFARS clause 252.204-7012. The rule has been amended to 
clarify that when the contractor is not providing cloud computing 
services in the performance of the contract, but intends to use an 
external CSP to store, process, or transmit any covered defense 
information for the contract, DFARS clause 252.204-7012 (b)(2)(ii)(D) 
applies. DFARS clause 252.204-7012(b)(2)(ii)(D) requires the CSP to 
meet security requirements equivalent to those established by the 
Government for the FedRAMP ``Moderate'' baseline at the time award. The 
text in DFARS clause 252.204-7012 has also been amended to clarify that 
the contractor shall, within 30 days of contract award, provide the DoD 
CIO with a list of the security requirements at (b)(2)(i) that are not 
implemented at the time of contract award, to include any security 
requirements not implemented by an external cloud service provider.
    Comment: One respondent suggested that the rule does not provide 
any guidance as to how to reconcile the implementation of DFARS clauses 
252.204-7012 and 252.239-7010, and that the appropriate security 
controls that should be applied to cloud systems is unclear. The 
respondent suggested that because the cloud computing exemption in 
DFARS 252.204-7012 is located within the ``adequate security'' 
requirements of the clause, the clause can be read as to impose the 
Cloud Computing SRG security requirements (included in 252.239-7010) on 
all cloud information systems, and that different reporting and 
preservation requirements would apply if the information stored on the 
CSP's cloud is covered defense information. This respondent further 
suggested that the scope of DFARS 252.204-7012(b)(1)(A) is defined by 
the type of service provided, rather than the environment in which 
information is stored.
    Response: DFARS clause 252.204-7012 has been amended to clarify the 
appropriate security controls that should be applied on all covered 
contractor information systems. Cyber incident reporting, media 
preservation, and system access are not part of the contractor's 
adequate security obligations, but rather distinct requirements of the 
clause when a cyber incident occurs on a covered contractor information 
system.
    Comment: One respondent commented that it is unclear whether the 
exemption for security controls contained within DFARS 252.204-7012 
covers ancillary cloud services, such as cloud migration and 
eDiscovery, that a CSP may provide as an add-on service to a cloud 
computing contract. This respondent suggested that a clarification of 
the scope of the exemption would be helpful for defining reporting and 
safeguarding obligations for these providers. One respondent suggested 
that DoD revise DFARS clause 252.204-7012 to clarify that data stored 
on a cloud is exempt from the requirements of this clause and subject 
only to the requirements of DFARS clause 252.239-7010. Such an approach 
will provide contractors with clear guidelines as to when they are 
subject to the requirements DFARS 252.204-7012 or DFARS 252.239-7010. 
Furthermore, through the application of the Cloud Computing SRG 
requirements to data stored on a cloud, this approach will ensure that 
DoD information receives the appropriate degree of protection for the 
environment in which it is stored.
    Response: DFARS clause 252.204-7012 requires that (for an 
information technology service or system operated on behalf of the 
Government) CSP shall comply with the requirements of DFARS clause 
252.239-7010, Cloud Computing Services, which points to the Cloud 
Computing SRG (see paragraph (b)(1)(i) of the clause). This clause has 
been amended to clarify that (for an information technology services or 
system not operated on behalf of the Government) when using an external 
CSP to store, process, or transmit any covered defense information, the 
CSP shall meet requirements equivalent to those established by the 
Government in the FedRAMP Moderate baseline (see paragraph 
(b)(2)(ii)(D) of the clause).
    Comment: One respondent commented that they understand that the 
subcontractor flowdown clause is not required in contracts between the 
contractor and the CSPs, and that the contractor is not responsible for 
ensuring that CSPs comply with DFARS clause 252.204-7012, and requested 
that this be confirmed or clarified.
    Response: When a contractor uses an external CSP to store, process, 
or transmit any covered defense information for the contract, DFARS 
Clause 252.204-7012(b)(2)(ii)(D) applies. While the flowdown provision 
in 252.204-7012 does not apply to the CSP in this case, the prime 
contractor is responsible to ensure that the CSP meets the requirements 
at 252.204-7012(b)(2)(ii)(D).
c. Reporting
    Comment: One respondent commented that the rule fails to define the 
information that must be reported and creates a reporting system 
separate from the FedRAMP and Cloud Computing SRG Requirements, 
suggesting that an established system with clear reporting requirements 
for cloud computing security incidents would be more efficient than 
utilizing a new, separate, possibly conflicting portal at http://dibnet.dod.mil.
    Response: The public facing DIBNet Web site includes a 
``Resources'' tab that describes the information required when 
reporting a cyber incident that is related to the cloud computing 
service provided under his contract. Consistent with reporting 
requirements in DFARS clause 252.205-7012 and the Cloud Computing SRG, 
reports shall be submitted to DoD via http://dibnet.dod.mil/. This is 
DoD's single reporting mechanism for DoD contractor reporting of cyber 
incidents on unclassified information systems. The rule streamlines the 
reporting processes for DoD contractors and minimizes duplicative 
reporting processes.
    Comment: One respondent commented that it is their understanding 
that if a contractor, when not providing information technology 
services in the performance of the contract, but is using an external 
CSP that is FedRAMP compliant to store, process, or transmit any 
covered defense information for the contract, the contractor only needs 
to ensure that the CSP reports cyber incidents to the contractor so the 
contractor can comply with its reporting requirements to the 
Government.
    Response: DFARS clause 252.204-7012 was amended to require that the 
CSP should be FedRAMP ``Moderate'' compliant, not simply FedRAMP 
compliant (as there are CSPs that are only FedRAMP ``Low'' compliant, 
which is not sufficient for covered defense information protection). 
The clause also requires that the external

[[Page 72995]]

CSP meets the cyber incident reporting, malicious software, media 
preservation and protection, access to additional information and 
equipment necessary for forensic analysis, and cyber incident damage 
assessment requirements at paragraphs (c) through (g) of the clause.
    Comment: One respondent suggested that CSPs should only be 
responsible for reporting incidents that result in an actual, or 
reasonably suspected, unauthorized disclosure of customer data, adding 
that if reporting requirements are scoped to customer data only, then 
the 72-hour reporting window is reasonable.
    Response: Cyber incidents that impact the environment could have an 
impact on the CSP's security accreditation and DoD data, which is the 
reason that all incidents that are on shared services and 
infrastructure should be reported.
    Comment: One respondent commented that the reporting requirements 
in DFARS clause 252.239-7010 fail to recognize the unique role of CSPs, 
stating that commercial CSPs and their customers typically agree to 
abide by strict privacy and access-to information controls which 
normally include limiting provisions that prevent CSPs from accessing 
customer information without prior consent and from providing customer 
data to third parties or providing third parties access to customer 
data. The respondent suggested that these limitations, in which only 
the customer would know whether an incident impacts a particular 
customer's data and whether there are additional reporting 
requirements, drive the need for a two-step reporting requirement that 
allows the customer who has full knowledge of the data that is stored 
in the cloud and the applicable classifications of such data to make 
the ultimate determination of any reporting obligations to the 
Government.
    Response: As any cyber incident to the shared infrastructure can 
have an adverse impact on DoD data, the CSP must report any cyber 
incident to the shared infrastructure to DoD. That may require 
modifications to their commercial terms of service to allow for that. 
In addition, communication between the Government and the contractor 
(whether CSP or not) is vital; any specific requirements, or 
interpretations of requirements, should be negotiated as part of the 
service level agreement.
    Comment: Several comments suggested that DFARS 252.239-7010, Cloud 
Computing Services, sets forth a number of requirements that commercial 
cloud infrastructure (i.e., infrastructure as a service (IaaS)) 
providers will not be able to sign up to (as prime contractors or 
subcontractors), because compliance with those requirements are outside 
of their control; compliance with those requirements falls within the 
control of the managed services providers, account owners, lead systems 
engineers, or prime contractors (the ``primes'') running DoD workloads 
and storing ``Government data'' and ``Government-related data'' in the 
cloud infrastructure. One comment suggested that the DIBNet cyber 
reporting requirements should not apply to IaaS providers, but to the 
prime using the cloud, stating that although IaaS providers will notify 
the primes of security breaches, they will not have insight into the 
nature of the data the primes are storing and processing in the 
infrastructure, or know whether a breach results in a ``cyber 
incident,'' as that term is defined in the clause.
    Response: The reporting requirement in DFARS 252.239-7010 requires 
the prime to report all cyber incidents that are related to the cloud 
computing service provided under the contract. In cases where the CSP 
is the prime contractor, the provider is required to report the 
incident to DoD. If the provider (acting as a prime) does not have 
insight into the nature of the data being stored or processed, any 
breach would be considered a cyber incident given the potential impact 
it could have on the information or the information system.
    Because the IaaS providers deliver shared services, any cyber 
incident on the shared infrastructure and services would be the 
responsibility of the IaaS provider and they are obligated to report 
those incidents.
9. Workforce Training
    Comment: One respondent asked about DoD plans to train the 
workforce to consistently apply the requirements for handling covered 
defense information.
    Response: DoD will engage across both Government and industry to 
educate and raise awareness of the importance of protecting covered 
defense information. The Better Buying Power 3.0 initiative includes 
efforts to educate our workforce on the value and best practices for 
system security and efforts to communicate the importance of 
cybersecurity across DoD and to the Defense Industrial Base. Efforts to 
improve technological superiority will be in vain if effective 
cybersecurity is not practiced throughout the product lifecycle. 
Defense Acquisition University, in coordination with education 
counterparts in the Intelligence Community and Defense Security 
Service, is working to develop education and training to increase 
workforce understanding of the value and best practices for covered 
defense information protection.

C. Other Changes

    The following additional changes are made in the final rule:
    1. Definitions. Several definitions already included in the rule 
are added to or removed from certain subparts based on their usage in 
the text, to include ``compromise,'' ``information system,'' ``media,'' 
``operationally critical support,'' ``spillage,'' and ``technical 
information.''
    2. Incident Report Number. DFARS 204.7302(b) and 252.204-
7012(m)(2)(ii) are amended to clarify that the incident report number 
is automatically assigned by DoD.
    3. NIST SP 800-171. DFARS 252.204-7008(c) is amended to clarify in 
the notice to offerors, the requirement to implement the NIST SP 800-
171 that is in effect at the time the solicitation is issued or as 
authorized by the contracting officer.
    4. Malicious Software. DFARS 252.204-7012(d) is amended to 
specifically direct the contractor to not send malicious software to 
the contracting officer.
    5. Access. DFARS 239.7602-1 is amended to provide the same list 
provided at DFARS 252.239-7010(i)(3) of activities in which the 
contractor is required to provide records and facility access.

D. Additional Information

    Defense Procurement and Acquisition Policy (DPAP) Program 
Development and Implementation (PDI) provides answers to frequently 
asked questions at http://www.acq.osd.mil/dpap/pdi/network_penetration_reporting_and_contracting.html. The answers to 
these general questions are intended to assist with understanding and 
implementing the requirements of this rule.

III. Applicability to Contracts at or Below the Simplified Acquisition 
Threshold and for Commercial Items, Including Commercially Available 
Off-the-Shelf Items

    The rule created two new provisions and two new clauses as follows: 
(1) DFARS 252.204-7008, Compliance with Safeguarding Covered Defense 
Information Controls; (2) DFARS 252.204-7009, Limitations on the Use or 
Disclosure of Third-Party Contractor Information; (3) DFARS 252.239-
7009, Representation of Use of Cloud Computing; and (4) DFARS 252.239-
7010, Cloud Computing Services.

[[Page 72996]]

Additionally, the rule amended the existing DFARS clause 252.204-7012, 
Safeguarding Covered Defense Information and Cyber Incident Reporting.
    The objectives of the rule are to improve information security for 
DoD information stored on or transiting contractor information systems 
as well as in a cloud environment. The rule implements section 941 of 
the NDAA for FY 2013 (Pub. L. 112-239), section 1632 of the NDAA for FY 
2015, and section 325 of the Intelligence Authorization Act of FY 2014 
(Pub. L. 113-126). Additionally the rule implements DoD CIO policy for 
the acquisition of cloud computing services. The only clause within 
this rule that is implementing the statutory requirements is clause 
252.204-7012, which already applied to acquisitions below the 
simplified acquisition threshold (SAT) and to commercial items, 
including commercially available off-the-shelf items (COTS). The 
following addresses the applicability of the new statutory requirements 
in DFARS clause 252.204-7012.

A. Applicability to Contracts at or Below the SAT

    41 U.S.C. 1905 governs the applicability of laws to contracts or 
subcontracts in amounts not greater than the simplified acquisition 
threshold (SAT). It is intended to limit the applicability of laws to 
such contracts or subcontracts. 41 U.S.C. 1905 provides that if a 
provision of law contains criminal or civil penalties, or if the FAR 
Council makes a written determination that it is not in the best 
interest of the Federal Government to exempt contracts or subcontracts 
at or below the SAT, the law will apply to them. The Director, DPAP, is 
the appropriate authority to make comparable determinations for 
regulations to be published in the DFARS, which is part of the FAR 
system of regulations.

B. Applicability to Contracts for the Acquisition of Commercial Items, 
Including COTS Items

    41 U.S.C. 1906 governs the applicability of laws to contracts for 
the acquisition of commercial items, and is intended to limit the 
applicability of laws to contracts for the acquisition of commercial 
items. 41 U.S.C. 1906 provides that if a provision of law contains 
criminal or civil penalties, or if the FAR Council makes a written 
determination that it is not in the best interest of the Federal 
Government to exempt commercial item contracts, the provision of law 
will apply to contracts for the acquisition of commercial items. 
Likewise, 41 U.S.C. 1907 governs the applicability of laws to 
commercially available off-the-shelf (COTS) items, with the 
Administrator for Federal Procurement Policy the decision authority to 
determine that it is in the best interest of the Government to apply a 
provision of law to acquisitions of COTS items in the FAR. The 
Director, DPAP, is the appropriate authority to make comparable 
determinations for regulations to be published in the DFARS, which is 
part of the FAR system of regulations.

C. Applicability Determination

    The Director, DPAP, has determined that it is in the best interest 
of the Government to apply the requirements of section 941 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2013, 
section 1632 of the NDAA for FY 2015, and section 325 of the 
Intelligence Authorization Act of FY 2014 (Pub. L. 113-126) to 
contracts at or below the SAT and to contracts for the acquisition of 
commercial items, for clause 252.204-7012, Safeguarding Covered Defense 
Information and Cyber Incident Reporting. However, the clause 
prescription is amended in the final rule to exempt use in 
solicitations and contracts that are solely for the acquisition of COTS 
items.
    The necessity to protect covered defense information is the same 
across all contract types for all dollar values. The harm that could 
result from the loss or compromise of covered defense information is 
the same under a FAR part 12 contract that is under the SAT as it would 
be under any other contract. Recent high-profile breaches of Federal 
information show the need to ensure that information security 
protections are clearly, effectively, and consistently addressed in 
contracts. Failure to apply this rule to contracts with covered defense 
information may cause harm to the Government which could directly 
impact national security. Therefore, exempting contracts below the SAT 
or for the acquisition of commercial items (excluding COTS items) from 
application of the statutes would severely decrease the intended effect 
of the statutes and increase the risk of mission failure.
    For the same reasons expressed in the preceding paragraph, DoD 
applied the following provisions and clauses to acquisitions below the 
SAT and to the acquisition of commercial items, excluding COTS items: 
(1) DFARS 252.204-7008, Compliance with Safeguarding Covered Defense 
Information Controls; (2) DFARS 252.204-7009, Limitations on the Use or 
Disclosure of Third-Party Contractor Information; (3) DFARS 252.239-
7009, Representation of Use of Cloud Computing; and (4) DFARS 252.239-
7010, Cloud Computing Services.

IV. Executive Orders 12866 and 13563

    Executive Orders (E.O.s) 12866 and 13563 direct agencies to assess 
all costs and benefits of available regulatory alternatives and, if 
regulation is necessary, to select regulatory approaches that maximize 
net benefits (including potential economic, environmental, public 
health and safety effects, distributive impacts, and equity). E.O. 
13563 emphasizes the importance of quantifying both costs and benefits, 
of reducing costs, of harmonizing rules, and of promoting flexibility. 
This is not a significant regulatory action and, therefore, was not 
subject to review under section 6(b) of E.O. 12866, Regulatory Planning 
and Review, dated September 30, 1993. This rule is not a major rule 
under 5 U.S.C. 804.

V. Regulatory Flexibility Act

    A final regulatory flexibility analysis (FRFA) has been prepared 
consistent with the Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 601, et seq. 
The FRFA is summarized as follows:
    This final rule expands on the existing information safeguarding 
policies in the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation System (DFARS), 
which were put in place in November 2013 (78 FR 69273), by requiring 
contractors to report cyber incidents to the Government in a broader 
scope of circumstances.
    The objective of this rule is to implement section 941 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2013 
(Pub. L. 112-239), section 1632 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year (FY) 2015, and DoD CIO policy for the 
acquisition of cloud computing services, in order to improve 
information security for DoD information stored on or transiting 
contractor information systems, as well as in a cloud environment.
    The significant issues raised by the public in response to the 
initial regulatory flexibility analysis are as follows:
    Comment: Respondents expressed concern that the estimated of the 
total number of small businesses impacted by the rule is too low and 
that the rule does not allow for alternative standards or exemption for 
small business due to potentially burdensome costs of compliance.

[[Page 72997]]

    Response: As there is no database collecting the number of 
contractors receiving covered defense information it is difficult to 
determine how many contractors are required to implement the security 
requirements of clause 252.204-7012, Safeguarding Covered Defense 
Information and Cyber Incident Reporting. Further, without adding a new 
information collection requirement to prime contractors it is not 
possible to determine how many subcontractors are in possession of 
covered defense information. Based on the respondent's analysis of the 
number of small entities, as prime contractors and as subcontractors, 
that may be affected by the rule the DoD estimate of small entities 
affected by this rule has been revised, to increase the number.
    The cost of compliance with the requirements of this rule is 
unknown as the cost is determined based on the make-up of the 
information system and the current state of security already in place. 
If a contractor is already in compliance with the 2013 version of the 
clause 252.204-7012, then the changes necessary to comply with the new 
rule are not as significant. For a new contractor that has not been 
subject to the previous iteration of the 252.204-7012 clause and is now 
handling covered defense information the cost could be significant to 
comply. The cost of compliance is allowable and should be accounted for 
in proposal pricing (in accordance with the entity's accounting 
practices). Though it is not a change specific to small entities the 
security requirements as amended in this rule are found in National 
Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Special Publication (SP) 
800-171, ``Protecting Controlled Unclassified information in Nonfederal 
Information Systems and organizations,'' to replace a table based on 
NIST SP 800-53. The security requirements in NIST SP 800-171 are 
specifically tailored for use in protecting sensitive information 
residing in contractor information systems and generally reduce the 
burden placed on contractors by eliminating Federal-centric processes 
and requirements and enabling contractors to use systems they already 
have in place with some modification instead of building a new system.
    Recommendations made by public comment to allow for alternative 
application of the rule for small entities include: An exemption for 
small entities, delaying application to small entities until costs are 
further analyzed, and creating a different set of security requirements 
for small entities. While all of these paths were considered, they were 
rejected as conflicting with the overarching purpose of this rule which 
is to increase the security of unclassified information that DoD has 
determined could result in harm if released. Regardless of the size of 
the contractor or subcontractor handling the information, the 
protection level of that information needs to be the same across the 
board to achieve the goal of increased information assurance.
    The Chief Counsel for Advocacy of the Small Business Administration 
submitted a response to the second interim rule. The response 
reiterated the concerns brought by one of the public comments and 
provided suggestions for alternative application of the rule for small 
businesses:
    Comment: The SBA Office of Advocacy suggested that DoD has 
underestimated the number of small businesses affected by this 
rulemaking, and recommended that DoD include small businesses serving 
as prime contractors and as subcontractors in their estimation of the 
number of impacted small entities. This respondent also commented that 
the cost of compliance with the rule will be a significant barrier to 
small businesses engaging in the Federal acquisition process, adding 
that many small businesses will be forced to purchase services and 
additional software from outside or third-party vendors in order to 
provide ``adequate safeguards'' for covered defense information and to 
adequately assess and evaluate their information systems and security 
controls.
    Response: The final rule clarifies that the protections are not 
required when contracting solely for COTS items, thereby reducing the 
impact on some small business. The need to protect covered defense 
information does not change when such information is shared with 
nonfederal partners including small businesses. The cost of not 
protecting covered defense information is an enormous detriment to DoD 
resulting in a potential loss or compromise of such information, 
adverse impacts to the DoD warfighting mission, and to the lives of 
service men and women.
    Comment: The SBA Office of Advocacy suggested that DoD has 
underestimated the number of small businesses affected by this 
rulemaking, and recommended that DoD include small businesses serving 
as prime contractors and as subcontractors in their estimation of the 
number of impacted small entities.
    Response: As noted in response to the same public comment, DoD 
revises the estimate to be 12,000 small business prime contractors and 
any small business subcontractors that will be required to handle 
covered defense information during performance of the subcontracted 
work. There is currently no system to track when covered defense 
information is present on contract or passed to subcontractors so this 
estimate is not made with a high level of certainty.
    Comment: The SBA Office of Advocacy commented that the cost of 
compliance with the rule will be a significant barrier to small 
businesses engaging in the Federal acquisition process, adding that 
many small businesses will be forced to purchase services and 
additional software from outside and third-party in order to provide 
``adequate safeguards'' for covered defense information and to 
adequately assess and evaluate their information systems and security 
controls.
    Response: While it is understood that implementing the minimum 
security controls outlined in the DFARs clause may increase costs, 
protection of unclassified DoD information is deemed necessary. The 
cost to the nation in lost intellectual property and lost technological 
advantage over potential adversaries is much greater than these 
initial/ongoing investments. The value of the information (and impact 
of its loss) does not diminish when it moves to contractors (prime or 
sub, large or small). NIST SP 800-171 was carefully crafted to use 
performance-based requirements and eliminate unnecessary specificity 
and include only those security requirements necessary to provide 
adequate protections for the impact level of CUI (e.g., covered defense 
information).
    Implementation of the NIST SP 800-171 security requirements will 
provide significant benefit to the small business community in the form 
of increased protection of their intellectual property. In addition, 
defining one set of standards will help small businesses to avoid a 
situation in which small business must adopt multiple standards and 
rule sets as they navigate amongst the many different organizations 
with which they do business. The addition of a new provision at DFARS 
252.204-7008, Compliance with Safeguarding Covered Defense Information 
Controls, ensures that the offeror is aware of the requirements of 
clause 252.204-7012 and has time to bring their system into compliance 
and negotiate the terms of the contract accordingly.
    Comment: The SBA Office of Advocacy suggested that DoD consider 
collaborating with universities or other companies, to provide low-cost 
cybersecurity services to small

[[Page 72998]]

businesses, or providing a one-time subsidy to small businesses to help 
cover the cost of initial consultations with third party vendors.
    Response: There is no funding appropriation attached to compliance 
with the rule so it is not feasible to create a program for compliance 
or a one-time subsidy related to the new security requirements 
associated with the rule. However, the costs associated with compliance 
are allowable and should be considered in proposals on solicitations 
including the 252.204-7008 provision and 252.204-7012 clause, when 
covered defense information is present. The final rule is amended to 
require the security requirements to be in place only when the covered 
defense information is marked or identified in the contract, which 
should cut down significantly on the number of contractors that 
mistakenly assumed they were required to comply.
    DoD has revised the estimate to be 12,000 small business prime 
contractors; however, the number of small business subcontractors that 
will be required to handle covered defense information during 
performance of the subcontracted work cannot be accurately estimated. 
Which small businesses will be required to comply, is entirely 
dependent on the work that they perform and the unclassified 
information involved. If they work solely in COTS items, then they will 
be exempt from the security requirements.
    This rule requires that contractors report cyber incidents to the 
Government in accordance with DFARS clause 252.204-7012. An information 
technology expert will likely be required to provide information 
describing the cyber incident in the report, or at least to determine 
what information was affected.
    For the final rule the prescriptions for provision 252.204-7008 and 
252.204-7012 are amended to exempt COTS items, to clarify that they do 
not apply to contracts that are solely for COTS items. The final rule 
will keep the subcontractor flowdown requirement as amended in the 
second interim rule to only require the clause to flowdown when the 
covered defense information has been provided to the subcontractor, and 
this will significantly decrease the amount of small subcontractors 
that are unnecessarily working toward compliance with the security 
requirements of clause 252.204-7012.

VI. Paperwork Reduction Act

    This rule contains information collection requirements that have 
been approved by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) under the 
Paperwork Reduction Act (44 U.S.C. chapter 35) under OMB Control Number 
0704-0478 entitled ``Enhanced Safeguarding and Cyber Incident Reporting 
of Unclassified DoD Information Within Industry.''

List of Subjects in 48 CFR Parts 202, 204, 212, 239, and 252

    Government procurement.

Jennifer L. Hawes,
Editor, Defense Acquisition Regulations System.
    Accordingly, the interim rule amending 48 CFR parts 202, 204, 212, 
239, and 252, which was published at 80 FR 51739 on August 26, 2015, 
and the interim rule amending 48 CFR part 252, which was published at 
80 FR 81472 on December 30, 2015, are adopted as final rules with the 
following changes:

0
1. The authority citation for 48 CFR parts 202, 204, 239, and 252 
continues to read as follows:

    Authority:  41 U.S.C. 1303 and 48 CFR chapter 1.

PART 202--DEFINITIONS OF WORDS AND TERMS


202.101  [Amended]

0
2. Amend section 202.101 by removing the definition of ``media''.

PART 204--ADMINISTRATIVE MATTERS


204.7300  [Amended]

0
3. Amend section 204.7300(a) by removing ``security controls'' and 
adding ``security requirements'' in its place.

0
4. Amend section 204.7301 by--
0
a. In the definition of ``covered contractor information system'', 
removing ``an information system'' and adding ``an unclassified 
information system'' in its place;
0
b. Revising the definition of ``covered defense information'';
0
c. Adding, in alphabetical order, the definition for ``media'';
0
d. Removing the definition of ``operationally critical support''; and
0
e. Amending the definition of ``rapid(ly) report(ing)'' by removing 
``Rapid(ly) report(ing)'' and adding ``Rapidly report'' in its place.
    The revisions and addition read as follows:


204.7301  Definitions.

* * * * *
    Covered defense information means unclassified controlled technical 
information or other information (as described in the Controlled 
Unclassified Information (CUI) Registry at http://www.archives.gov/cui/registry/category-list.html) that requires safeguarding or 
dissemination controls pursuant to and consistent with law, 
regulations, and Governmentwide policies, and is--
    (1) Marked or otherwise identified in the contract, task order, or 
delivery order and provided to the contractor by or on behalf of DoD in 
support of the performance of the contract; or
    (2) Collected, developed, received, transmitted, used, or stored by 
or on behalf of the contractor in support of the performance of the 
contract.
* * * * *
    Media means physical devices or writing surfaces including, but not 
limited to, magnetic tapes, optical disks, magnetic disks, large-scale 
integration memory chips, and printouts onto which covered defense 
information is recorded, stored, or printed within a covered contractor 
information system.
* * * * *

0
5. Amend section 204.7302 by--
0
a. Revising paragraphs (a) and (b);
0
b. In paragraph (c), removing ``The Government acknowledges that 
information shared by the contractor under these procedures may'' and 
adding ``Information shared by the contractor may'' in its place;
0
c. Revising paragraph (d); and
0
d. In paragraph (e), removing ``providing forensic analysis services, 
damages assessment services,'' and adding ``forensic analysis, damage 
assessment,'' in its place; and removing ``use and disclosure'' and 
adding ``use and disclosure of reported information'' in its place.
    The revisions read as follows:


204.7302  Policy.

    (a) Contractors and subcontractors are required to provide adequate 
security on all covered contractor information systems.
    (b) Contractors and subcontractors are required to rapidly report 
cyber incidents directly to DoD at http://dibnet.dod.mil. 
Subcontractors provide the incident report number automatically 
assigned by DoD to the prime contractor. Lower-tier subcontractors 
likewise report the incident report number automatically assigned by 
DoD to their higher-tier subcontractor, until the prime contractor is 
reached.
    (1) If a cyber incident occurs, contractors and subcontractors 
submit to DoD--
    (i) A cyber incident report;
    (ii) Malicious software, if detected and isolated; and

[[Page 72999]]

    (iii) Media (or access to covered contractor information systems 
and equipment) upon request.
    (2) Contracting officers shall refer to PGI 204.7303-4(c) for 
instructions on contractor submissions of media and malicious software.
* * * * *
    (d) A cyber incident that is reported by a contractor or 
subcontractor shall not, by itself, be interpreted as evidence that the 
contractor or subcontractor has failed to provide adequate security on 
their covered contractor information systems, or has otherwise failed 
to meet the requirements of the clause at 252.204-7012, Safeguarding 
Covered Defense Information and Cyber Incident Reporting. When a cyber 
incident is reported, the contracting officer shall consult with the 
DoD component Chief Information Officer/cyber security office prior to 
assessing contractor compliance (see PGI 204.7303-3(a)(3)). The 
contracting officer shall consider such cyber incidents in the context 
of an overall assessment of a contractor's compliance with the 
requirements of the clause at 252.204-7012.
* * * * *

0
6. Amend section 204.7304 by--
0
a. In paragraph (a), adding the phrase ``, except for solicitations 
solely for the acquisition of commercially available off-the-shelf 
(COTS) items'' to the end of the sentence;
0
b. In paragraph (b), removing ``contracts for services'' and adding 
``contracts, including solicitations and contracts using FAR part 12 
procedures for the acquisition of commercial items, for services'' in 
its place; and
0
c. In paragraph (c), adding the phrase ``, except for solicitations and 
contracts solely for the acquisition of COTS items'' to the end of the 
sentence.

PART 239--ACQUISITION OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

0
7. Amend section 239.7601 by adding, in alphabetical order, definitions 
for ``information system'' and ``media''; and removing the definition 
of ``spillage''.
    The additions read as follows:


239.7601  Definitions.

* * * * *
    Information system means a discrete set of information resources 
organized for the collection, processing, maintenance, use, sharing, 
dissemination, or disposition of information.
    Media means physical devices or writing surfaces including, but not 
limited to, magnetic tapes, optical disks, magnetic disks, large-scale 
integration memory chips, and printouts onto which information is 
recorded, stored, or printed within an information system.

0
8. Amend section 239.7602-1 by--
0
a. In paragraph (a), removing ``the DoD'' and adding ``DoD'' in its 
place;
0
b. Revising paragraph (b);
0
c. In paragraph (c) introductory text, removing ``provided in the 
purchase request--'' and adding ``provided by the requiring activity:'' 
in its place;
0
d. In paragraph (c)(1), removing the semicolon and adding a period in 
its place;
0
e. In paragraph (c)(2), removing ``CDRL, SOW task'' and adding ``DD 
Form 1423, Contract Data Requirements List; work statement task;'' in 
its place; and removing the semicolon at the end of the second sentence 
and adding a period in its place;
0
f. Removing paragraphs (c)(3) and (6);
0
g. Redesignating paragraphs (c)(4) and (5) as paragraphs (c)(3) and 
(4);
0
h. In the newly redesignated paragraph (c)(3), removing the semicolon 
and adding a period in its place; and
0
i. In the newly redesignated paragraph (c)(4), removing ``litigation, 
eDiscovery, records management associated with the agency's retention 
schedules,''; and removing ``activities; and'' and adding 
``activities.'' in its place.
    The revision reads as follows:


239.7602-1  General.

* * * * *
    (b)(1) Except as provided in paragraph (b)(2) of this section, the 
contracting officer shall only award a contract to acquire cloud 
computing services from a cloud service provider (e.g., contractor or 
subcontractor, regardless of tier) that has been granted provisional 
authorization by Defense Information Systems Agency, at the level 
appropriate to the requirement, to provide the relevant cloud computing 
services in accordance with the Cloud Computing Security Requirements 
Guide (SRG) (version in effect at the time the solicitation is issued 
or as authorized by the contracting officer) found at http://iase.disa.mil/cloud_security/Pages/index.aspx.
    (2) The contracting officer may award a contract to acquire cloud 
computing services from a cloud service provider that has not been 
granted provisional authorization when--
    (i) The requirement for a provisional authorization is waived by 
the DoD Chief Information Officer; or
    (ii) The cloud computing service requirement is for a private, on-
premises version that will be provided from U.S. Government facilities. 
Under this circumstance, the cloud service provider must obtain a 
provisional authorization prior to operational use.
* * * * *


239.7602-2  [Amended]

0
9. Amend section 239.7602-2(a) by removing ``DoD Instruction 8510.01, 
Risk Management Framework (RMF) for DoD Information Technology (IT)'' 
and adding ``DoD Instruction 8510.01'' in its place.

PART 252--SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES

0
10. Amend section 252.204-7000 by--
0
a. Removing the clause date of ``(AUG 2013)'' and adding ``(OCT 2016)'' 
in its place; and
0
b. Revising paragraph (a)(3) to read as follows:


252.204-7000  Disclosure of information.

* * * * *
    (a) * * *
    (3) The information results from or arises during the performance 
of a project that involves no covered defense information (as defined 
in the clause at DFARS 252.204-7012, Safeguarding Covered Defense 
Information and Cyber Incident Reporting) and has been scoped and 
negotiated by the contracting activity with the contractor and research 
performer and determined in writing by the contracting officer to be 
fundamental research (which by definition cannot involve any covered 
defense information), in accordance with National Security Decision 
Directive 189, National Policy on the Transfer of Scientific, Technical 
and Engineering Information, in effect on the date of contract award 
and the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology, and 
Logistics) memoranda on Fundamental Research, dated May 24, 2010, and 
on Contracted Fundamental Research, dated June 26, 2008 (available at 
DFARS PGI 204.4).
* * * * *


252.204-7008  [Amended]

0
11. Amend section 252.204-7008 by--
0
a. Removing the clause date of ``(DEC 2015)'' and adding ``(OCT 2016)'' 
in its place;
0
b. In paragraph (a), removing ``and covered defense information, are'' 
and adding ``covered defense information, cyber incident, information 
system, and technical information are'' in its place.
0
c. In paragraph (b), removing ``252.204-7012, Covered Defense 
Information and Cyber Incident Reporting,'' and adding ``252.204-7012'' 
in its place;

[[Page 73000]]

0
d. In paragraph (c) introductory text, removing ``(IT)''; and removing 
``252.204-7012(b)(1)(ii)'' and adding ``252.204-7012(b)(2)'' in its 
place;
0
e. In paragraph (c)(1), removing ``(see http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.SP.800-171),'' and adding ``(see http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.SP.800-171) that are in effect at the time the solicitation is 
issued or as authorized by the contracting officer'' in its place; and
0
f. In paragraph (c)(2)(i) introductory text, removing ``that is in 
effect'' and adding ``that are in effect'' in its place.

0
12. Amend section 252.204-7009 by--
0
a. Removing the clause date of ``(DEC 2015)'' and adding ``(OCT 2016)'' 
in its place; and
0
b. In paragraph (a)--
0
i. Revising the definition of ``covered defense information''; and
0
ii. Adding, in alphabetical order, the definitions for ``information 
system'', ``media'', and ``technical information''.
    The revision and additions read as follows:


252.204-7009  Limitations on the use or disclosure of third-party 
contractor reported cyber incident information.

* * * * *
    (a) * * *
    Covered defense information means unclassified controlled technical 
information or other information (as described in the Controlled 
Unclassified Information (CUI) Registry at http://www.archives.gov/cui/registry/category-list.html) that requires safeguarding or 
dissemination controls pursuant to and consistent with law, 
regulations, and Governmentwide policies, and is--
    (1) Marked or otherwise identified in the contract, task order, or 
delivery order and provided to the contractor by or on behalf of DoD in 
support of the performance of the contract; or
    (2) Collected, developed, received, transmitted, used, or stored by 
or on behalf of the contractor in support of the performance of the 
contract.
* * * * *
    Information system means a discrete set of information resources 
organized for the collection, processing, maintenance, use, sharing, 
dissemination, or disposition of information.
    Media means physical devices or writing surfaces including, but is 
not limited to, magnetic tapes, optical disks, magnetic disks, large-
scale integration memory chips, and printouts onto which covered 
defense information is recorded, stored, or printed within a covered 
contractor information system.
    Technical information means technical data or computer software, as 
those terms are defined in the clause at DFARS 252.227-7013, Rights in 
Technical Data--Noncommercial Items, regardless of whether or not the 
clause is incorporated in this solicitation or contract. Examples of 
technical information include research and engineering data, 
engineering drawings, and associated lists, specifications, standards, 
process sheets, manuals, technical reports, technical orders, catalog-
item identifications, data sets, studies and analyses and related 
information, and computer software executable code and source code.
* * * * *

0
13. Amend section 252.204-7012 by--
0
a. Removing the clause date of ``(DEC 2015)'' and adding ``(OCT 2016)'' 
in its place;
0
b. In paragraph (a)--
0
i. Removing the definition of ``contractor information system'';
0
ii. In the definition of ``covered contractor information system'' 
removing ``an information system'' and adding ``an unclassified 
information system'' in its place;
0
iii. Revising the definition of ``covered defense information'';
0
iv. Adding, in alphabetical order, the definition for ``information 
system'';
0
v. In the definition of ``media'', removing ``which information is 
recorded'' and adding ``which covered defense information is recorded'' 
in its place; and removing ``within an information system'' and adding 
``within a covered contractor information system'' in its place;
0
vi. In the definition of ``rapid(ly) report(ing)'', removing 
``Rapid(ly) report(ing)'' and adding ``Rapidly report'' in its place; 
and
0
vii. In the definition of ``technical information'', removing ``Rights 
in Technical Data-Non Commercial Items'' and adding ``Rights in 
Technical Data--Noncommercial Items'' in its place;
0
c. Revising paragraph (b);
0
d. In paragraph (c)(1) introductory text, removing ``critical support'' 
and adding ``critical support and identified in the contract'' in its 
place;
0
e. Revising paragraph (d); and
0
f. Revising paragraph (m).
    The revisions and addition read as follows:


252.204-7012  Safeguarding covered defense information and cyber 
incident reporting.

* * * * *
    (a) * * *
    Covered defense information means unclassified controlled technical 
information or other information, as described in the Controlled 
Unclassified Information (CUI) Registry at http://www.archives.gov/cui/registry/category-list.html, that requires safeguarding or 
dissemination controls pursuant to and consistent with law, 
regulations, and Governmentwide policies, and is--
    (1) Marked or otherwise identified in the contract, task order, or 
delivery order and provided to the contractor by or on behalf of DoD in 
support of the performance of the contract; or
    (2) Collected, developed, received, transmitted, used, or stored by 
or on behalf of the contractor in support of the performance of the 
contract.
* * * * *
    Information system means a discrete set of information resources 
organized for the collection, processing, maintenance, use, sharing, 
dissemination, or disposition of information.
* * * * *
    (b) Adequate security. The Contractor shall provide adequate 
security on all covered contractor information systems. To provide 
adequate security, the Contractor shall implement, at a minimum, the 
following information security protections:
    (1) For covered contractor information systems that are part of an 
information technology (IT) service or system operated on behalf of the 
Government, the following security requirements apply:
    (i) Cloud computing services shall be subject to the security 
requirements specified in the clause 252.239-7010, Cloud Computing 
Services, of this contract.
    (ii) Any other such IT service or system (i.e., other than cloud 
computing) shall be subject to the security requirements specified 
elsewhere in this contract.
    (2) For covered contractor information systems that are not part of 
an IT service or system operated on behalf of the Government and 
therefore are not subject to the security requirement specified at 
paragraph (b)(1) of this clause, the following security requirements 
apply:
    (i) Except as provided in paragraph (b)(2)(ii) of this clause, the 
covered contractor information system shall be subject to the security 
requirements in National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 
Special Publication (SP) 800-171, ``Protecting Controlled Unclassified 
Information in Nonfederal Information Systems and Organizations'' 
(available via the internet at http://dx.doi.org/10.6028/NIST.SP.800-171) in effect at the time the solicitation is issued or as authorized 
by the Contracting Officer.
    (ii)(A) The Contractor shall implement NIST SP 800-171, as soon as

[[Page 73001]]

practical, but not later than December 31, 2017. For all contracts 
awarded prior to October 1, 2017, the Contractor shall notify the DoD 
Chief Information Officer (CIO), via email at osd.dibcsia@mail.mil, 
within 30 days of contract award, of any security requirements 
specified by NIST SP 800-171 not implemented at the time of contract 
award.
    (B) The Contractor shall submit requests to vary from NIST SP 800-
171 in writing to the Contracting Officer, for consideration by the DoD 
CIO. The Contractor need not implement any security requirement 
adjudicated by an authorized representative of the DoD CIO to be 
nonapplicable or to have an alternative, but equally effective, 
security measure that may be implemented in its place.
    (C) If the DoD CIO has previously adjudicated the contractor's 
requests indicating that a requirement is not applicable or that an 
alternative security measure is equally effective, a copy of that 
approval shall be provided to the Contracting Officer when requesting 
its recognition under this contract.
    (D) If the Contractor intends to use an external cloud service 
provider to store, process, or transmit any covered defense information 
in performance of this contract, the Contractor shall require and 
ensure that the cloud service provider meets security requirements 
equivalent to those established by the Government for the Federal Risk 
and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP) Moderate baseline 
(https://www.fedramp.gov/resources/documents/) and that the cloud 
service provider complies with requirements in paragraphs (c) through 
(g) of this clause for cyber incident reporting, malicious software, 
media preservation and protection, access to additional information and 
equipment necessary for forensic analysis, and cyber incident damage 
assessment.
    (3) Apply other information systems security measures when the 
Contractor reasonably determines that information systems security 
measures, in addition to those identified in paragraphs (b)(1) and (2) 
of this clause, may be required to provide adequate security in a 
dynamic environment or to accommodate special circumstances (e.g., 
medical devices) and any individual, isolated, or temporary 
deficiencies based on an assessed risk or vulnerability. These measures 
may be addressed in a system security plan.
* * * * *
    (d) Malicious software. When the Contractor or subcontractors 
discover and isolate malicious software in connection with a reported 
cyber incident, submit the malicious software to DoD Cyber Crime Center 
(DC3) in accordance with instructions provided by DC3 or the 
Contracting Officer. Do not send the malicious software to the 
Contracting Officer.
* * * * *
    (m) Subcontracts. The Contractor shall--
    (1) Include this clause, including this paragraph (m), in 
subcontracts, or similar contractual instruments, for operationally 
critical support, or for which subcontract performance will involve 
covered defense information, including subcontracts for commercial 
items, without alteration, except to identify the parties. The 
Contractor shall determine if the information required for 
subcontractor performance retains its identity as covered defense 
information and will require protection under this clause, and, if 
necessary, consult with the Contracting Officer; and
    (2) Require subcontractors to--
    (i) Notify the prime Contractor (or next higher-tier subcontractor) 
when submitting a request to vary from a NIST SP 800-171 security 
requirement to the Contracting Officer, in accordance with paragraph 
(b)(2)(ii)(B) of this clause; and
    (ii) Provide the incident report number, automatically assigned by 
DoD, to the prime Contractor (or next higher-tier subcontractor) as 
soon as practicable, when reporting a cyber incident to DoD as required 
in paragraph (c) of this clause.
* * * * *

0
14. Amend section 252.239-7010 by--
0
a. Removing the clause date of ``(AUG 2015)'' and adding ``(OCT 2016)'' 
in its place;
0
b. In paragraph (a)--
0
i. Adding in alphabetical order, definitions for ``compromise'' and 
``information system''; and
0
ii. In the definition of ``media'', removing ``which covered defense 
information'' and adding ``which information'' in its place; and 
removing ``a covered contractor information system'' and adding ``an 
information system'' in its place;
0
c. In paragraph (b)(2), adding the phrase ``, unless notified by the 
Contracting Officer that this requirement has been waived by the DoD 
Chief Information Officer'' to the end of the sentence; and removing 
the semicolon and adding a period in its place;
0
d. In paragraph (d), removing ``submitted to the Department of 
Defense'' and adding ``submitted to DoD'' in its place;
0
e. In paragraph (f), removing ``identified in paragraph (d) of this 
clause'' and adding ``identified in the cyber incident report (see 
paragraph (d) of this clause)'' in its place;
0
f. In paragraph (j), removing ``Local'' and adding ``local'' in its 
place; and
0
g. In paragraph (l), removing the phrase ``the substance of''.
    The additions read as follows:


252.239-7010  Cloud computing services.

* * * * *
    (a) * * *
    Compromise means disclosure of information to unauthorized persons, 
or a violation of the security policy of a system, in which 
unauthorized intentional or unintentional disclosure, modification, 
destruction, or loss of an object, or the copying of information to 
unauthorized media may have occurred.
* * * * *
    Information system means a discrete set of information resources 
organized for the collection, processing, maintenance, use, sharing, 
dissemination, or disposition of information.
* * * * *

[FR Doc. 2016-25315 Filed 10-20-16; 8:45 am]
 BILLING CODE 5001-06-P