[Federal Register Volume 73, Number 94 (Wednesday, May 14, 2008)]
[Rules and Regulations]
[Pages 27957-27975]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: E8-10109]



[[Page 27957]]

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Part IV





Department of Agriculture





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Office of Energy Policy and New Uses



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7 CFR Part 2902



Designation of Biobased Items for Federal Procurement; Final Rule

Federal Register / Vol. 73, No. 94 / Wednesday, May 14, 2008 / Rules 
and Regulations

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DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

Office of Energy Policy and New Uses

7 CFR Part 2902

RIN 0503-AA31


Designation of Biobased Items for Federal Procurement

AGENCY: Office of Energy Policy and New Uses, USDA.

ACTION: Final rule.

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SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is amending the 
guidelines for designating biobased products for Federal procurement, 
to add ten sections to designate items, including subcategories, within 
which biobased products will be afforded Federal procurement 
preference, as provided for under section 9002 of the Farm Security and 
Rural Investment Act of 2002. USDA also is establishing a minimum 
biobased content for each of these items and subcategories.

DATES: This rule is effective June 13, 2008.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Marvin Duncan, USDA, Office of the 
Chief Economist, Office of Energy Policy and New Uses, Room 4059, South 
Building, 1400 Independence Avenue SW., MS-3815 Washington, DC 20250-
3815; e-mail: [email protected]; phone (202) 401-0461. Information 
regarding the Federal Procurement of Biobased Products (one part of the 
BioPreferred Program) is available on the Internet at http://www.biopreferred.gov.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The information presented in this preamble 
is organized as follows:

I. Authority
II. Background
III. Summary of Changes
IV. Discussion of Comments
V. Regulatory Information
    A. Executive Order 12866: Regulatory Planning and Review
    B. Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA)
    C. Executive Order 12630: Governmental Actions and Interference 
With Constitutionally Protected Property Rights
    D. Executive Order 12988: Civil Justice Reform
    E. Executive Order 13132: Federalism
    F. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995
    G. Executive Order 12372: Intergovernmental Review of Federal 
Programs
    H. Executive Order 13175: Consultation and Coordination With 
Indian Tribal Governments
    I. Paperwork Reduction Act
    J. Government Paperwork Elimination Act Compliance

I. Authority

    These items, including their subcategories, are designated under 
the authority of section 9002 of the Farm Security and Rural Investment 
Act of 2002 (FSRIA), 7 U.S.C. 8102 (referred to in this document as 
``section 9002'').

II. Background

    As part of the Federal Procurement of Biobased Products, USDA 
published on August 17, 2006, a proposed rule in the Federal Register 
(FR) for the purpose of designating a total of 10 items for the 
preferred procurement of biobased products by Federal agencies 
(referred hereafter in this FR notice as the ``preferred procurement 
program''). This proposed rule can be found at 71 FR 47590. This 
rulemaking is referred to in this preamble as Round 3 (RIN 0503-AA31).
    The Round 3 proposed rule proposed designating the following items, 
including their subcategories, for the preferred procurement program: 
2-cycle engine oils; lip care products; non-durable films; \1\ 
stationary equipment hydraulic fluids; disposable cutlery; \2\ glass 
cleaners; greases, including food grade greases, multipurpose greases, 
rail track greases, truck greases, and greases not elsewhere specified 
as subcategories; dust suppressants; carpets; and carpet and upholstery 
cleaners.
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    \1\ At proposal, this item was identified as ``biodegradable 
films.'' Based on comments received, and as explained in this 
preamble, USDA has renamed this item as ``films'' and combined it 
with the proposed item ``durable films'' that was included in the 
October 11, 2006 Round 4 proposal (71 FR 59862).
    \2\ At proposal, this item was identified as ``biodegradable 
cutlery.'' Based on comments received, and as explained in this 
preamble, USDA has renamed this item as ``disposable cutlery.''
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    Today's final rule designates the following 10 items, including 
subcategories, within which biobased products will be afforded Federal 
procurement preference: 2-cycle engine oils; lip care products; films, 
including semi-durable films and non-durable films as subcategories; 
stationary equipment hydraulic fluids; disposable cutlery; glass 
cleaners; greases, including food grade greases, multipurpose greases, 
rail track greases, truck greases, and greases not elsewhere specified 
as its subcategories; dust suppressants; carpets; and carpet and 
upholstery cleaners, including spot removers and general purpose 
cleaners as subcategories. USDA has determined that each of the items, 
including the subcategories within them, being designated under today's 
rulemaking meets the necessary statutory requirements; that they are 
being produced with biobased products; and that their procurement will 
carry out the following objectives of section 9002: To improve demand 
for biobased products; to spur development of the industrial base 
through value-added agricultural processing and manufacturing in rural 
communities; and to enhance the Nation's energy security by 
substituting biobased products for products derived from imported oil 
and natural gas.
    When USDA designates by rulemaking an item (a generic grouping of 
products) for preferred procurement under the BioPreferred Program, 
manufacturers of all products under the umbrella of that item that meet 
the requirements to qualify for preferred procurement can claim that 
status for their products. To qualify for preferred procurement, a 
product must be within a designated item and must contain at least the 
minimum biobased content established for the designated item. When the 
designation of specific items is finalized, USDA will invite the 
manufacturers of these qualifying products to post information on the 
product, contacts, and performance testing on its BioPreferred Web 
site, http://www.biopreferred.gov. Procuring agencies will be able to 
utilize this Web site as one tool to determine the availability of 
qualifying biobased products under a designated item. Once USDA 
designates an item, procuring agencies are required generally to 
purchase biobased products within these designated items, including 
their subcategories, where the purchase price of the procurement item 
exceeds $10,000 or where the quantity of such items or of functionally 
equivalent items purchased over the preceding fiscal year equaled 
$10,000 or more.
    Subcategorization. Most of the items USDA is considering for 
designation for preferred procurement cover a wide range of products. 
For some items, there are groups of products within the item that meet 
different markets and uses and/or different performance specifications. 
For example, within the designated item ``hand cleaners and 
sanitizers,'' some products are required to meet performance 
specifications for sanitizing, while other products do not need to meet 
these specifications. Where such subgroups, or subcategories, exist, 
USDA intends to create subcategories. Thus, for example, for the 
designated item ``hand cleaners and sanitizers,'' USDA determined that 
it was reasonable to create a ``hand cleaner'' subcategory and a ``hand 
sanitizer'' subcategory. Sanitizing specifications would be applicable 
to the later subcategory, but not the former.

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In sum, USDA looks at the products within each item to evaluate whether 
there are groups of products within the item that meet different 
performance specifications and, where USDA finds this type of 
difference, it intends to create subcategories.
    For some items, however, USDA may not have sufficient information 
at the time of proposal to create subcategories within an item. For 
example, USDA may know that there are different performance 
specifications that de-icing products are required to meet, but it has 
only information on one type of de-icing product. In such instances, 
USDA may either designate the item without creating subcategories 
(i.e., defer the creation of subcategories) or designate one 
subcategory and defer designation of other subcategories within the 
item until additional information is obtained on products within these 
other subcategories.
    Within today's rulemaking, USDA has created subcategories within 
three items--films, greases, and carpet and upholstery cleaners. For 
films, the subcategories are semi-durable films and non-durable films. 
For greases, the subcategories are: Food grade greases, multipurpose 
greases, rail track greases, truck greases, and greases not elsewhere 
specified. For carpet and upholstery cleaners, the subcategories are 
spot removers and general purpose cleaners.
    Minimum Biobased Contents. The minimum biobased contents being 
established with today's rulemaking are based on products for which 
USDA has biobased content test data. In addition to considering the 
biobased content test data for each item, USDA also considers other 
factors when establishing the minimum biobased content. These other 
factors include: Public comments received on the proposed minimum 
biobased contents; product performance information to justify the 
inclusion of products at lower levels of biobased content; and the 
range, groupings, and breaks in the biobased content test data array. 
Consideration of this information allows USDA to establish minimum 
biobased contents on a broad set of factors to assist the Federal 
procurement community in its decision to purchase biobased products.
    USDA makes every effort to obtain biobased content test data on 
multiple products within each item. For most designated items, USDA has 
biobased content test data on more than one product within a designated 
item. However, USDA must rely on biobased product manufacturers to 
voluntarily submit product information and, in some cases, USDA has 
been able to obtain biobased content data for only a single product 
within a designated item. As USDA obtains additional data on the 
biobased contents for products within these ten designated items and 
their subcategories, USDA will evaluate whether the minimum biobased 
content for a designated item or subcategory will be revised.
    USDA anticipates that the minimum biobased content of an item or 
subcategory that is based on a single product is more likely to change 
as additional products in those items and subcategories are identified 
and tested. In today's rulemaking, none of the minimum biobased 
contents are based on a single tested product.
    For all items and subcategories where additional information 
indicates that it is appropriate to revise a minimum biobased content 
established under today's rulemaking, USDA will propose the change in a 
notice in the Federal Register to allow public comment on the proposed 
revised minimum biobased content. USDA will then consider the public 
comments and issue a final rulemaking on the minimum biobased content.
    Overlap with EPA's Comprehensive Procurement Guideline program for 
recovered content products. Some of the products that are biobased 
items designated for preferred procurement may also be items the 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has designated under the EPA's 
Comprehensive Procurement Guideline (CPG) for Products Containing 
Recovered Materials. Where that occurs, an EPA-designated recovered 
content product (also known as ``recycled content products'' or ``EPA-
designated products'') has priority in Federal procurement over the 
qualifying biobased product as identified in 7 CFR 2902.2. In 
situations where it believes there may be an overlap, USDA is asking 
manufacturers of qualifying biobased products to provide additional 
product and performance information to Federal agencies to assist them 
in determining whether the biobased products in question are, or are 
not, the same products for the same uses as the recovered content 
products. As this information becomes available, USDA will place it on 
the BioPreferred Web site with its catalog of qualifying biobased 
products.
    In cases where USDA believes an overlap with EPA-designated 
recovered content products may occur, manufacturers are being asked to 
indicate the various suggested uses of their product and the 
performance standards against which a particular product has been 
tested. In addition, depending on the type of biobased product, 
manufacturers are being asked to provide other types of information, 
such as whether the product contains petroleum-based components and 
whether the product contains recovered materials. Federal agencies may 
also ask manufacturers for information on a product's biobased content 
and its profile against environmental and health measures and life-
cycle costs (the Building for Environmental and Economic Sustainability 
(BEES) analysis or ASTM Standard D7075 for evaluating and reporting on 
environmental performance of biobased products). Such information will 
permit agencies to determine whether or not an overlap occurs.
    Section 6002 of RCRA requires a procuring agency procuring an item 
designated by EPA generally to procure such items composed of the 
highest percentage of recovered materials content practicable. However, 
a procuring agency may decide not to procure such an item based on a 
determination that the item fails to meet the reasonable performance 
standards or specifications of the procuring agency. An item with 
recovered materials content may not meet reasonable performance 
standards or specifications, for example, if the use of the item with 
recovered materials content would jeopardize the intended end use of 
the item.
    Where a biobased item is used for the same purposes and to meet the 
same Federal agency performance requirements as an EPA-designated 
recovered content product, the Federal agency must purchase the 
recovered content product. For example, if a biobased hydraulic fluid 
is to be used as a fluid in hydraulic systems and because ``lubricating 
oils containing re-refined oil'' has already been designated by EPA for 
that purpose, then the Federal agency must purchase the EPA-designated 
recovered content product, ``lubricating oils containing re-refined 
oil.'' If, on the other hand, that biobased hydraulic fluid is to be 
used to address a Federal agency's certain environmental or health 
performance requirements that the EPA-designated recovered content 
product would not meet, then the biobased product should be given 
preference, subject to cost, availability, and performance.
    This final rule designates three items for preferred procurement 
for which there may be overlap with EPA-designated recovered content 
products. These items are: (1) Films in the semi-durable films 
subcategory, (2) stationary equipment hydraulic fluids and (3) carpets. 
Depending on how they are to be used, qualifying products under

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these three items may overlap, respectively, with the EPA-designated 
recovered content products ``plastic trash bags,'' ``re-refined 
lubricating oil,'' and ``carpets (polyester).'' EPA provides recovered 
materials content recommendations for these three recovered content 
products in a Recovered Materials Advisory Notice (RMAN I). The RMAN 
recommendations for each of these CPG products can be found by 
accessing EPA's Web site http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/procure/products.htm and then clicking on the appropriate product name.
    EPA is proposing to designate nylon carpets as a recovered content 
product. If and when EPA finalizes designation of nylon carpets as a 
recovered content product, then carpets would have the potential to 
overlap with these types of carpets as well as the currently EPA-
designated recovered content polyester carpets.
    Future Designations. In making future designations, USDA will 
continue to conduct market searches to identify manufacturers of 
biobased products within items. USDA will then contact the identified 
manufacturers to solicit samples of their products for voluntary 
submission for biobased content testing and for the BEES analytical 
tool. Based on these results, USDA will then propose new items for 
designation for preferred procurement.
    As stated in the preamble to the first six items designated for 
preferred procurement (71 FR 13686, March 16, 2006), USDA plans to 
identify approximately 10 items in each future rulemaking. USDA has 
developed a preliminary list of items for future designation. This list 
is available on the BioPreferred Web site. While this list presents an 
initial prioritization of items for designation, USDA cannot identify 
with any certainty which items will be presented in each of the future 
rulemakings. Items may be added or dropped and the information 
necessary to designate an item may take more time to obtain than an 
item lower on the prioritization list.

III. Summary of Changes

    As the result of comments received on the proposed rule (see 
Section IV), USDA made changes to the rule, which are summarized below.
    Item names. The names for two of the 10 items were revised. 
``Biodegradable Films'' is now ``Films.'' ``Biodegradable Cutlery'' is 
now ``Disposable Cutlery.''
    Item Definitions. The definitions of six of the 10 items were 
revised to varying degrees. These six items are: 2-cycle engine oils; 
films; stationary equipment hydraulic fluids; disposable cutlery; 
greases; and carpets.
    Subcategories. In addition to finalizing the proposed subcategories 
under the ``greases'' item, subcategories were created for two items. 
The item that was proposed as ``biodegradable films'' and the proposed 
item ``durable films'' that was included in the October 11, 2006, Round 
4 proposal (71 FR 59862) were combined as two subcategories (semi-
durable films and non-durable films) under an item named ``films.'' The 
carpet and upholstery cleaners item was subcategorized into (1) spot 
removers and (2) general purpose cleaners.
    Minimum biobased content. Several of the proposed minimum biobased 
contents for the designated items have changed for the final rule in 
response to public comments and in consideration of available product 
performance information. As a result of the comments received regarding 
the proposed minimum biobased contents and the availability of 
additional biobased content tests for several items, USDA re-evaluated 
the proposed minimum biobased contents of all of the items.
    Items for which the minimum biobased content was changed from the 
proposed level are presented here and the rationale for the changes is 
discussed in the section of this preamble presenting the item-specific 
comments and responses.
    For 2-cycle engine oils, the proposed minimum biobased content of 7 
percent was changed to 34 percent.
    For the films item (proposed as ``biodegradable films''), the 
proposed minimum biobased content of 22 percent was changed to 45 
percent for the semi-durable films subcategory and 85 percent for the 
non-durable films subcategory.
    For the stationary equipment hydraulic fluids, the proposed minimum 
biobased content of 46 percent was changed to 44 percent.
    For the disposable cutlery item (proposed as ``biodegradable 
cutlery''), the proposed minimum biobased content of 33 percent was 
changed to 48 percent.
    For glass cleaners, the proposed minimum biobased content of 23 
percent was changed to 49 percent.
    For the greases item, the proposed 73 percent minimum biobased 
content for the multipurpose greases subcategory was changed to 72 
percent and the proposed 72 percent minimum biobased content for the 
truck greases subcategory was changed to 71 percent.
    For dust suppressants, the proposed minimum biobased content of 66 
percent was changed to 85 percent.
    For the proposed carpet and upholstery cleaners item the proposed 
minimum biobased content of 34 percent was changed to 54 percent for 
the general purpose cleaners subcategory and the minimum biobased 
content for the spot removers subcategory was set at 7 percent.
    Overlap with EPA CPG products. For the items stationary equipment 
hydraulic fluids and carpets, potential overlap with EPA CPG products 
was added to the final rule. Then, for both items that may overlap with 
EPA CPG products (re-refined lubricating oils and polyester carpets), a 
note was added to facilitate finding information on the two EPA CPG 
products.

IV. Discussion of Comments

    USDA solicited comments on the proposed rule for 60 days ending on 
October 16, 2006. USDA received comments from 31 commenters by that 
date. The comments were from private citizens, individual companies, 
industry organizations, one foreign government, and various Federal 
agencies.
    The comments contained in this Federal Register (FR) notice address 
general and specific comments related to Round 3 items. In addition to 
the information provided in the responses to public comments presented 
in this preamble, USDA has prepared a technical support document titled 
``Technical Support for Final Rule--Round 3 Designated Items,'' which 
contains documentation of USDA's efforts to research and respond to 
public comments. The technical support document is available on the 
BioPreferred Web site. The technical support document can be located by 
clicking on the Proposed and Final Regulations link on the left side of 
the BioPreferred Web site's home page (http://www.biopreferred.gov). 
Click on Supporting Documentation under Round 3 Designation under Final 
Rules. This will bring you to the link to the technical support 
document.
    The technical support document includes, but is not limited to: (1) 
Information on whether the standards presented in the preamble to the 
proposed rule are test methods, performance standards, or ``other'' 
(e.g., a certification by a trade association or council, a 
classification system) (Chapter 1.0), (2) BEES impact values for each 
item (Appendix B), and (3) a tabular and graphical presentation of the 
BEES environmental performance scores for each item (Appendix C). This 
information is being presented in the

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technical support document as the result of general comments received 
on both Rounds 2 and 3. The technical support document for Round 3 
includes additional information as identified in the remainder of this 
preamble.

General Comments

Minimum Biobased Content
    Several commenters felt that USDA was proposing minimum biobased 
contents that were too low for many of the products. These, and other, 
commenters also provided specific comments on the proposed minimum 
biobased contents for specific items. Those specific comments are 
addressed later in the preamble under Item Specific Comments. Here, 
USDA is responding to the comments that more generally address the 
procedure USDA uses in proposing minimum biobased contents.
    Comment: Several commenters were concerned about the approach USDA 
used to determine minimum biobased contents. One commenter recommended 
that, rather than setting the threshold level below the lowest 
percentage observed in the lowest end product in the survey, USDA 
reward the top half or top two thirds of the respondents, at least 
where the spread is more than 20 percentage points. Two other 
commenters recommended that USDA consider a minimum threshold of 50 
percent biobased content given that products with biobased contents 
above 50 percent are available in all categories.
    Response: In response to these public comments and ongoing 
discussions with other Federal agencies, and because several additional 
biobased content test results were obtained after proposal, USDA re-
evaluated the proposed minimum biobased contents for each of the 
proposed items. In re-evaluating the minimum biobased contents, USDA 
considered factors including the number of, and the distribution of, 
the test data points as well as the product manufacturer's claims 
related to performance, biodegradability, and range of applicability.
    In those cases where all of the products' biobased contents were 
within a narrow range and no data were available to distinguish 
significant performance differences among the products, USDA set the 
minimum biobased content at the level that would allow preferred 
procurement for all of the products for which data were available.
    For items where the products' biobased contents showed a wider 
range and included one or more significant breaks in the range, USDA 
reviewed the product information to determine if there were performance 
or applicability differences among the products that could be used for 
creating subcategories based on the groups of products that have 
similar biobased contents. For example, if the biobased contents of 
half of the products within an item were in the 30 to 50 percent range 
and the other half were in the 80 to 95 percent range, USDA considered 
whether the product information supported the creation of two 
subcategories. Information that was considered to be supportive of 
subcategorization were claims of product features such as ``special 
applications,'' ``high temperature applications,'' or ``single-use 
versus multiple-use.'' In those cases where the biobased content and 
other product information supported subcategorization, USDA has created 
subcategories in this final rule.
    In other cases, USDA has considered subcategorization for an item 
based upon initial performance information, but USDA does not currently 
have sufficient data to justify creating subcategories. Where that is 
the case, USDA has generally set the minimum biobased content based on 
the group of products with the higher biobased contents. For these 
items, USDA will continue to gather data on products within the item 
and will create subcategories in a future rulemaking if sufficient data 
are obtained.
    For some items, there was a significant range in the reported 
biobased contents but the data points were evenly spread over the 
entire range. In those cases, if there were no data to distinguish the 
features of any grouping or subset of the products, USDA has generally 
set the minimum biobased content based on the product with the lowest 
biobased content in order to allow procuring agencies the widest 
selection of products from which to select those that best meet their 
needs. As additional product performance information becomes available 
and as additional products within these items become available with 
higher biobased contents, USDA will consider increasing the minimum 
biobased content or creating subcategories where performance 
characteristics or application use justify subcategorizing.
    As a result of the re-evaluation, many of the proposed minimum 
biobased contents have been revised for the final rule. These revisions 
will be presented and discussed in the item specific sections later in 
this preamble. For two items, USDA reviewed the biobased content data 
but did not find sufficient justification for revising the proposed 
minimum biobased content level. For lip care products, 8 biobased 
content test results were available (85, 86, 88, 88, 92, 93, 98, and 
100 percent). Because this is a narrow range of data points, USDA 
proposed setting the minimum biobased content based on the product with 
a biobased content of 85 percent. Subtracting the three percentage 
points to allow for testing variability results in a minimum biobased 
content of 82 percent for this item. No public comments or additional 
data were received to support changing the proposed level. As a result, 
the proposed minimum biobased content of 82 percent was retained for 
the final rule.
    For the carpets designated item, USDA reviewed the biobased content 
data (10, 10, 23, 24, 31, 35, and 37 percent) and found that the 
biobased content of the products that have been tested increases as the 
``weight'' of the carpet increases. In most of these products the 
biobased material is used as the carpet backing and the thicker the 
backing, the higher the biobased content. The product with 37 percent 
biobased content also has a small amount of biobased material 
incorporated into the carpet face. USDA considered the possibility of 
creating subcategories within this item based on performance features 
(such as durability) but does not have sufficient data to justify 
subcategorization at this time. Because there are no significant breaks 
in the range of data points and the overall range is small, USDA has 
retained the proposed 7 percent minimum biobased content for this item. 
USDA will continue to gather information on this item and will consider 
creating subcategories in a future rulemaking.
Biobased Content Testing
    Comment: One commenter recommended that the ASTM active standard 
D6866-06 (standard test methods for determining the biobased content of 
natural range materials using radiocarbon and isotope ratio mass 
spectrometry analysis) replace the historical D6866-04.
    Response: USDA agrees that the most recent and active ASTM standard 
needs to be used. In order to minimize the need to update the 
regulation, USDA has decided to simply refer to the base ASTM 
designation (in this case, ASTM 6866) and drop the year designation (in 
this case, the -04) and instead specify in the final rule that ``the 
current version'' of ASTM D6866 be used for determining biobased 
content.

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Information on Designated Items
    Comment: One commenter, noting that USDA stated that its attempts 
to gather data were ``largely unsuccessful,'' urged USDA to re-examine 
and improve upon its prior efforts to gather complete, technically 
sound information on products within designated items and to use that 
information to further refine the program in the future.
    Response: USDA uses the phrase ``largely unsuccessful'' in the 
context of its efforts to obtain information on the amount of products 
within designated items that Federal agencies are using (for example, 
see Section IV.A, Executive Order 12866 in this preamble) and not on 
the information associated with the products within each item. 
Information on the usage of products would assist USDA to make 
estimates of the potential economic impact of the rule.
    USDA has in place a procedure to gather technical information on 
products within each item it proposed for designation. As USDA proposes 
additional items for designation, it seeks to improve this process with 
each successive rulemaking to ensure the information it has is 
technically sound. One area in which USDA is using the improved 
information is in the development of subcategories within items. There 
will always be some uncertainty in the data obtained, but USDA will 
continue to propose items for designation for preferred procurement 
with the data it has in hand. USDA encourages the provision of 
additional information on products within items prior to their being 
designated for preferred procurement. The items being considered for 
preferred procurement can be found on the BioPreferred Web site.
    Comment: One commenter suggested that the data that form the basis 
for USDA's decisions and their source be available to the public. The 
commenter noted, as one example, that USDA intends to post public 
comments on the ``positive environmental and human health attributes'' 
of products on its Web site, and make the comments available to Federal 
procurement agencies to ``* * * assist them in making `best value' 
purchasing decisions.''
    Response: Since the first round of six items were designated for 
preferred procurement, USDA has provided significantly more data on 
each item being proposed for preferred procurement on the BioPreferred 
Web site. At the BioPreferred Web site, technical information is 
provided on products within the items. The BioPreferred Web site can be 
accessed by the public at http://www.biopreferred.gov.
    USDA is concerned that the commenter might believe that USDA is 
using comments received on the ``positive'' attributes of biobased 
products as a basis for designating an item for preferred procurement, 
while ignoring potential ``negative'' attributes. This is not the case. 
The availability of information on the environmental and health 
attributes and life costs of items is part of the basis for proposing 
an item for preferred procurement. USDA is using the BEES analysis, 
which is ``neutral'' in regards to whether an environmental impact of a 
biobased product is ``positive'' or ``negative,'' to provide some of 
this information. Finally, the statute authorizing the preferred 
procurement program for biobased products requires USDA to, in part, 
provide information on ``environmental and health benefits'' of such 
materials and items. Thus, USDA has a statutory obligation to make such 
information on the positive environmental and human health attributes 
available.
    One way USDA is implementing this requirement is by posting public 
comments on the positive environmental and human health attributes of 
products on the BioPreferred Web site. Given the infancy of most 
biobased product markets, this type of information is often not 
generally known and providing access to such information, provided it 
is documented, is important to the success of the BioPreferred Program. 
If such information is anecdotal, it will be so indicated.
    Comment: One commenter suggested that USDA take reasonable steps to 
ensure that the information that is offered to government agencies and 
that is provided on the government's Web site be objective and 
accurate. The commenter states that, while USDA's preference for using 
data and certifications that come from consensus standards 
organizations is commendable, it does not alleviate this concern. 
According to the commenter, there appears to be no current mechanism to 
verify accuracy and that USDA's request ``When possible, please provide 
appropriate documentation to support the environmental and human health 
attributes you describe'' alone appears to be insufficient to ensure 
fairness.
    Response: USDA agrees with the commenter that the information made 
available to government agencies concerning biobased products needs to 
be objective and accurate. To address this situation, USDA is requiring 
manufacturers to provide documentation for information that will be 
posted directly on the BioPreferred Web site. If, in the opinion of 
USDA, such claims cannot be sufficiently supported, they will not be 
posted on the BioPreferred Web site. A manufacturer is still allowed to 
post such ``undocumented'' claims on their own Web sites, as any other 
manufacturer of any other product can do. USDA is not responsible for 
the information posted on a manufacturer's Web site. Thus, information 
obtained from the manufacturer's Web site needs to be considered in 
this context. Because USDA makes this distinction in the information it 
allows to be posted on the BioPreferred Web site, USDA disagrees with 
the commenter that this mechanism results in ``unfair'' results.
    The second step that USDA plans to implement to help ensure the 
accuracy of the information posted on the BioPreferred Web site is an 
audit program. Under this audit program, USDA will randomly select 
products for sampling to ensure the accuracy of the information on 
selected products. The size of the BioPreferred Program, however, makes 
it difficult for USDA to reasonably verify every claim on every 
product. Thus, USDA must rely on an audit program.
    Lastly, USDA notes that, by requiring the biobased content on 
products to be determined in an ISO-compliant facility, USDA is 
reasonably ensuring the accuracy of the reported biobased content. In 
conclusion, USDA believes the above steps meet the commenter's 
concerns.
Biobased Polymers
    Comment: One commenter requested that USDA evaluate and address the 
effect that biobased polymers will have on current recycling streams 
and markets. According to the commenter, to the best of their 
knowledge, no technology exists to screen out biobased products during 
the recycling process and the presence of a small fraction of biobased 
polymers in the recycling stream may result in unintended consequences 
to the recycling infrastructure.
    Response: The purpose of the BioPreferred Program is to encourage 
the purchase of biobased products, including products that are commonly 
recycled. However, like the commenter, USDA is concerned that such 
products are disposed of in an environmentally responsible manner. USDA 
has consulted with EPA and with representatives of the Association of 
Post-Consumer Plastic Recyclers

[[Page 27963]]

(APCPR) to discuss this issue. APCPR explained that their primary 
concern with attempts to place PLA or other biobased plastics in 
existing recycling streams related to the negative impacts that these 
biobased plastics have on the recycling of PET. They pointed out that 
over seven billion pounds of PET are used annually in the country and 
that the recycling of PET has been adopted on a large-scale basis. 
There are two primary concerns related to the introduction of biobased 
plastics into the PET recycling stream. First, the presence of biobased 
plastics even in very small amounts (less than 1 percent) causes the 
resulting recycled plastic to lose the clarity which is demanded in the 
largest market for these products (``soda'' and water bottles). Even a 
slight haze in the final product is unacceptable to the bottling 
industry. The second concern relates to the actual recycling 
technology. PET is separated from HDPE and other petroleum-based 
plastics by floatation. PET floats in water and the others do not. Most 
biobased plastics also float, however, making the separation of PET 
from biobased plastics using floatation technology impossible. Thus, if 
there are biobased plastics in the recycling stream they remain with 
the PET stream. Following separation, the PET is shredded and then 
placed in dryers to remove the moisture. Because biobased plastics melt 
at a temperature that is much lower than the melting temperature of 
PET, the biobased plastics tend to melt in the PET dryers. Recyclers 
have indicated that the presence of even 0.1 percent of biobased 
plastics in the shredded stream can cause the dryers to ``gum up'' and 
results in the rejection of the contaminated PET.
    APCPR pointed out that an optical-type technology for separating 
biobased plastics from PET is available, but that it is very expensive. 
Because there is currently such a small amount of biobased plastics 
available for recycling, there is no economic incentive for recyclers 
to purchase the equipment necessary to separate it from PET. APCPR 
further explained that for the recycling of biobased plastics to become 
economically viable there needs to be both a readily available supply 
of used material and a significant market for the recovered plastic, 
neither of which exists today.
    APCPR also pointed out that biobased polymers used for other 
applications, such as ``clam shell'' containers and other therma-form 
products, do not present a problem for the recycling of those products. 
They also noted that composting in commercial composting operations is 
a viable alternative to the recycling of biobased polymers. USDA 
encourages procuring agents and those involved in recycling to provide 
education material to potential purchasers and users on environmentally 
preferred disposal of such products. The APCPR Web site (http://www.plasticsrecycling.org) presents technical information on plastics 
recycling and procuring agents are urged to visit the site for more 
information. In addition, USDA will post relevant information in this 
regard on the BioPreferred Web site to assist manufacturers, 
purchasers, and users become aware of the potential impacts of biobased 
plastics on recycling and on the preferred disposable methods for such 
products.
Purchase of Biobased Products
    Comment: One commenter urged USDA to clarify in the final rule that 
it is not requiring procuring agencies to limit their choices to 
biobased products that fall under the items for designation in this 
proposed rule in order to avoid the unintended consequence of severely 
limiting product selection and material selection options. The 
commenter pointed out that a product should be reasonably available, 
meet USDA's requirements for performance for the application intended, 
and be available at a reasonable price.
    Response: USDA agrees with the commenter that Federal agencies are 
not limited to considering biobased products when making purchasing 
decisions under the preferred procurement program for biobased 
products. Even though biobased products are given preferred 
procurement, purchasing agencies can buy other competing products when 
biobased products are not readily available, are not available at a 
reasonable cost, or do not meet Agency performance standards. USDA 
believes that this is clearly stated for the current rulemaking and 
will continue to make it clear in future rulemakings as well.

Item Specific Comments

2-Cycle Engine Oils
    Comment: One commenter stated that the definition of 2-cycle engine 
oil needed to be modified to make it clearer as to what products are 
within the item designation.
    Response: USDA appreciates the need expressed by the commenter to 
have clearly defined items to identify which products are included in 
the item. USDA has modified the definition slightly to be clearer that 
products in this item are ``designed for use in 2-cycle engines'' and 
that such products provide lubrication and/or other properties 
beneficial to 2-cycle engines.
    Comment: Two commenters stated that the list of performance 
standards shown for 2-cycle engine oils were not the applicable 
performance standards. The commenters referred to the standards set by 
four standard-setting organizations--the National Marine Manufacturers 
Association (NMMA), American Petroleum Institute (API), Japanese 
Automobile Standards Organization (JASO), and International Standards 
Organization (ISO). The commenters pointed out that the only relevant 
standard for outboard motors is the one set by the NMMA. The commenters 
felt that to continue to include 2-cycle engine oils that do not meet 
or exceed standards set by these four organizations would result in 
engine failure and a bad reputation for products within this item 
designation. The commenters, therefore, recommended that only those 2-
cycle engine oils that meet one or more of the standards set by those 
four organizations be included in the preferred procurement program.
    One of the commenters further recommended that the level of 
criteria be included so that purchasers can buy products according to 
the level of performance needed.
    Response: USDA thanks the commenters for the information concerning 
the standards being set by the four organizations identified by the 
commenters. USDA agrees that purchasers of 2-cycle engine oils need to 
be aware of these standards when purchasing any 2-cycle engine oil, 
including biobased 2-cycle engine oils. USDA believes the best way to 
provide this information is to make it available on the BioPreferred 
Web site. USDA disagrees that such standards need to be incorporated 
into the rule for these products because to do so, in part, would place 
restrictions on the manufacturers of biobased 2-cycle engine oils that 
do not exist for manufacturers of non-biobased 2-cycle engine oils. 
Although USDA believes that it would be beneficial to the manufacturer 
of any product to be able to demonstrate that their products meet or 
exceed applicable performance standards, USDA does not believe that it 
should force biobased product manufacturers, by regulation, to test 
against all applicable performance standards prior to marketing their 
products. USDA believes this is unnecessary because purchasing agencies 
should not buy biobased 2-cycle engine oils or, for that matter, 
petroleum-based 2-cycle engine oils if

[[Page 27964]]

they do not meet the agency's specifications or performance standards.
    Comment: Three commenters stated that the proposed minimum biobased 
content of 7 percent for 2-cycle engine oils was too low. One of the 
commenters recommended a minimum biobased content of 30 percent. 
According to this commenter, there are a variety of 2-cycle engine oils 
with renewable contents in the 30 to 50 percent range that meet the 
applicable performance standards and that are commercially available 
from different manufacturers.
    The second commenter recommended that the minimum biobased content 
for 2-cycle engine oils be at least 50 percent. This commenter 
expressed concerned that at this low biobased content, 2-cycle engine 
oils would not even pass the ASTM-D5864 Biodegradable Classification 
and that European Union 2-cycle engine oils are at least biodegradable.
    The third commenter suggested that, based on the data in the 
background information, USDA recommend multiple content levels 
reflecting differences in product use.
    All three commenters expressed concern that petroleum companies 
would add just enough biobased oils to their products to qualify for 
preferred procurement. One of the commenters stated that this would 
ruin biobased manufacturers in this particular market and another 
stated that this would be contrary to the objectives of the Farm 
Security and Rural Investment Act.
    Response: As discussed earlier in this preamble, USDA re-evaluated 
the proposed minimum biobased content for all of the proposed items. 
Based on the re-evaluation of the biobased content data, the minimum 
biobased content for 2-cycle engine oils has been set at 34 percent. 
The biobased content for products that have been tested are: 37, 39, 
60, 77, and 78 percent. At proposal, the minimum biobased content of 7 
percent was based on a product that was described as being formulated 
to meet specific Japanese performance standards for small engines. 
Since proposal, this product has been withdrawn by its manufacturer and 
is no longer available.
    Because there is a significant break in the data between the 39 
percent product and the 60 percent product, USDA considered the 
possibility of establishing subcategories within this item. The two 
products with 37 and 39 percent biobased content have shown that they 
meet certain small engine performance specifications and 
biodegradability standards, while such information is not available for 
the products with the higher biobased contents. At this time, however, 
USDA has not received sufficient information related to small engine 
performance specifications to justify subcategorizing this item. USDA 
will continue to collect performance information and will consider 
subcategorizing this item through future rulemakings as additional 
information is made available.
    Based on the presently available information, USDA believes that 
setting a minimum biobased content to allow procuring agencies to 
select products at this lower biobased content level is desirable. USDA 
will continue to gather additional information on the performance of 
other products within this item. If verification is obtained that 
products with significantly higher biobased contents can meet the 
performance and biodegradability standards offered by the products with 
lower biobased contents, USDA will also consider raising the minimum 
biobased content for this item in a future rulemaking. As additional 
information becomes available, USDA will also consider creating 
subcategories within this item at a later date based on features such 
as biodegradability.
    Because biodegradability can be an important attribute for 2-cycle 
engine oils used in marine environments, USDA continues to encourage 
all manufacturers of 2-cycle engine oils, and other biobased products, 
to provide as much information as possible concerning biodegradability 
and other beneficial characteristics of their products. The ASTM method 
mentioned by the one commenter (ASTM-5864) is a test method that can be 
used to determine the level of biodegradability. The availability of 
such information will assist procuring agencies in selecting biobased 
products that meet particular needs, such as biodegradability.
Lip Care Products
    Comment: One commenter pointed out that there is no standard for 
lip care balm.
    Response: USDA appreciates the commenter's review of, and comment 
on, the proposed designated item. USDA agrees with the commenter that 
no performance standards for lip balm have been identified. USDA points 
out, however, that the lack of identified performance standards is not 
relevant to the designation of an item for preferred procurement. In 
order to designate items for preferred procurement, section 9002 of 
FSRIA requires USDA to consider: (1) The availability of items; and (2) 
the economic and technological feasibility of using the items, 
including the life cycle costs of the items. If and when performance 
standards and other relevant measures of performance are identified for 
this item, USDA will provide such information on the BioPreferred Web 
site.
Films (Formerly Biodegradable Films)
    Comment: One commenter stated that the definition for biodegradable 
films was vague and needed clarification. The commenter assumed that, 
based on the proposed definition, the designated item includes non-
durable films intended to be used once before being discarded. The 
commenter then asked: How will the ``durable films'' item to be 
proposed at a later date be differentiated from this item? The 
commenter recommended that this item be retitled ``disposable bags, 
wrappings and liners.''
    Response: USDA agrees with the commenter that the name for this 
item should not refer to ``biodegradable'' films. USDA has renamed this 
item as ``films'' and has an included a non-durable films subcategory 
for the products that were in the ``biodegradable films'' item at 
proposal. USDA also proposed, under a separate rulemaking, designating 
an item named ``durable films'' and has now included under the new 
``films'' item a subcategory for the products that were in that 
proposed item. USDA has revised the definitions in the final rule for 
the ``semi-durable films'' subcategory to make it clearer as to the 
types of products it covers as opposed to those films that would be 
covered by the ``non-durable films'' subcategory. For example, USDA has 
revised the definition to clearly state that non-durable films are 
intended for single use before being discarded, as suggested by the 
commenter.
    Comment: One commenter recommended that, based on the data in the 
background information, the minimum biobased content for this item be 
set based on the products with tested biobased contents of either 52 or 
62 percent, rather than on the product with a tested biobased content 
of 25 percent, which resulted in the proposed minimum biobased content 
of 22 percent. The commenter then stated that USDA should obtain 
information to justify the claim made in the preamble that Federal 
agencies need products with a longer shelf-life, thereby supporting the 
22 percent content recommendation.
    Response: As discussed above, USDA has established two 
subcategories for this item, one for semi-durable films and one for 
non-durable films. For the semi-durable films subcategory, USDA has 
biobased content data for 11 products (25, 48, 49, 52, 62, 62, 62, 62,

[[Page 27965]]

62, 62, and 64 percent biobased). Because there is a significant break 
in the data between the 25 percent product and the 48 percent product, 
USDA investigated the product information available for the 25 percent 
product to determine if it offered characteristics not offered by the 
other products. USDA found that there were no performance claims for 
this product that distinguished it from the products with a higher 
biobased content. The biobased content for the remaining products were 
within a narrow range and no performance or applicability information 
was available to further divide the products within the subcategory. 
Therefore, the minimum biobased content has been set at 45 percent for 
this subcategory, based on the product with the tested biobased content 
of 48 percent.
    For the non-durable films subcategory, the tested biobased contents 
are: 88, 89, 90, 94, and 96 percent. The data points are within a 
narrow range and no information was available to further divide the 
products within the subcategory. USDA is, therefore setting the minimum 
biobased content for non-durable films at 85 percent, based on the 
product with a biobased content of 88 percent.
Stationary Equipment Hydraulic Fluids
    Comment: One commenter requested that USDA designate as a 
subcategory hydraulic oil used in mobile equipment for preferred 
procurement.
    Response: USDA has already designated mobile hydraulic fluids under 
the first group of products designated for preferred procurement. The 
commenter is referred to the March 16, 2006, Federal Register notice 
(71 FR 13686). To help avoid such confusion, USDA will try in future 
proposals to group similar items together within a rulemaking.
    Comment: Two commenters stated that the definition of stationary 
equipment hydraulic fluids was somewhat unclear and needed to be 
modified. One of the commenters suggested the following definition: 
Fluids used in stationary hydraulic equipment systems that have various 
mechanical parts, such as cylinders, pumps, valves, pistons, and gears, 
that are used for the transmission of power (and also for lubrication 
and/or wear, rust, or oxidation protection).
    Response: USDA appreciates the commenters' suggested revisions to 
the proposed definition of this designated item and has incorporated 
the suggestions into the definition in the final rule.
    Comment: Two commenters addressed the proposed minimum biobased 
content for stationary equipment hydraulic fluids. One commenter agreed 
with the proposed minimum biobased content of 46 percent. The other 
commenter felt that, based on the data in the background information, 
the proposed content was too low and should be based on the product 
with a tested biobased content of 64 percent. This commenter also 
stated that, if the lower content levels reflect products used for 
different applications than those with higher content levels, then USDA 
should provide separate content recommendations.
    Response: The 48 biobased content data points in this data set 
range from 47 percent to 100 percent. USDA's re-evaluation of the 
biobased content data for this item did not identify any significant 
breaks in the range nor was there data available to support 
subcategorization. Because of the very wide range of applications in 
which these products are used, USDA was unable to identify discreet 
subcategories without significant overlaps in the biobased contents 
among the subcategories. USDA is setting the minimum biobased content 
for this item at 44 percent, based on the product with a tested 
biobased content of 47 percent, because the products at this end of the 
range are believed to offer performance characteristics, such as the 
ability to be used in low temperature applications, not offered by some 
of the products with a higher biobased content. USDA will continue to 
gather additional information for this item and will consider creating 
subcategories based on product performance and/or applicability if 
sufficient supporting documentation can be obtained.
    Comment: One commenter stated that, as a practical matter, the 
overlap with biobased hydraulic fluids and EPA-designated recovered 
content lubricating oils is likely to be limited because most re-
refined oil is being used for motor/engine oil, not hydraulic fluids. 
The commenter stated that DLA's re-refined oil program is focused on 
motor/engine oil and not hydraulic fluids and that a check of the DLA 
Web site does not indicate any standards for, or purchase contract for, 
re-refined hydraulic fluid. Further, according to the commenter, most 
of the re-refined oil vendors listed in EPA's CPG supplier database are 
selling re-refined motor/engine oil, with only one or two companies on 
the list appearing to sell re-refined hydraulic fluids. The commenter 
believes that market factors are directing the current supply of re-
refined base oil stock into the engine oil segment, which probably 
makes sense given the size of that market.
    Based on these factors, the commenter believes that it is entirely 
possible that Federal buyers may have a difficult time finding and, 
with very limited choices, buying re-refined hydraulic fluids. The 
commenter believes that buyers wanting to replace petroleum-based 
hydraulic fluid products may find biobased hydraulic fluids more 
available in the marketplace than re-refined hydraulics. The commenter 
noted that, in situations where there are concerns for spills, readily 
biodegradable biobased hydraulic oil would be a better choice based on 
performance.
    Finally, the commenter stated that if more re-refined base stock 
oil becomes available in the market place, it is possible that 
manufacturers of hydraulic fluids could use a combination of vegetable 
oils and re-refined oil base stock to meet both biobased content and 
CPG Guidelines.
    Response: USDA believes that the commenter makes some very good and 
valid observations concerning the potential for, or lack of, overlap 
between biobased hydraulic fluids for stationary equipment and EPA-
designated recovered content re-refined lubricating oil. However, USDA 
continues to believe there is a potential for overlap and that to 
identify such potential is still worthwhile. Furthermore, USDA 
appreciates the point raised by the commenter concerning the potential 
preference to be shown to biobased hydraulic fluids over EPA-designated 
recovered content products where biodegradability may be an issue in 
the use of the fluid. In such instances, the biobased fluid may be able 
to meet the need to be biodegradable while the non-biobased fluid 
cannot.
Disposable Cutlery (Formerly Biodegradable Cutlery)
    Comment: One commenter asked why this biobased item was also 
``biodegradable.'' Another commenter pointed out that the other 
``biodegradable'' items referenced ASTM D6400 in their definitions and 
asked whether cutlery should also reference ASTM D6400 instead of ASTM 
D5338.
    Response: The products covered by this item were intended to be 
disposable cutlery, with preferred procurement to be given to biobased 
disposable cutlery. Further, it was USDA's intent that preferred 
procurement is given to biobased disposable cutlery that is also 
biodegradable. As discussed earlier in this preamble, where 
disposability considerations are equally important as

[[Page 27966]]

performance characteristics, USDA plans on requiring biodegradability 
for products within the designated item if there are established 
biodegradability standards. Some of the manufacturers of products 
within this item claim biodegradability as a feature of their products. 
However, USDA has not been successful in obtaining sufficient evidence 
that these products provide acceptable levels of performance. Thus, 
USDA does not believe that, at this time, biodegradability should be a 
requirement that products in this item must meet to qualify for 
preferred procurement. However, USDA will continue to investigate the 
performance of biodegradable disposable cutlery and, if sufficient 
evidence of acceptable performance is obtained, USDA will amend the 
designation of disposable cutlery to add biodegradability as a 
requirement for this item. USDA also continues to urge procuring 
agencies to consider biodegradability as a desirable feature of 
products within this item and to purchase biodegradable biobased 
disposable cutlery to the extent that these products meet their 
performance needs.
    USDA agrees with the commenter that ASTM D6400 should be the 
primary test method for demonstrating the biodegradability of biobased 
cutlery. However, there may be other biobased formulations for which 
ASTM D6400 would not be the appropriate test method for demonstrating 
biodegradability. For example, if the cutlery is to be disposed of in a 
marine environment, the appropriate test method would be ASTM D7081. 
Thus, while biodegradability is not a requirement for products within 
this item, manufacturers wishing to demonstrate biodegradability are 
encouraged to use the most appropriate ASTM test methods.
    Lastly, USDA notes that disposable cutlery needs to be composted 
rather than landfilled in order for the cutlery to biodegrade and that 
they need to be composted in commercial composting facilities in order 
to be exposed to the proper temperature and moisture requirements for 
composting. Composting these products in a ``backyard'' compost pile 
will not necessarily result in the complete biodegradation of the 
product.
    Comment: One commenter stated that the information provided in the 
Performance Standards document does not indicate whether biodegradable 
cutlery will perform when used for eating. A second commenter noted 
that biobased cutlery, if purchased, may not initially replace the 
combat-tested utensil, heavy duty, long handled spoon in the Meal, 
Ready-To-Eat without extensive DoD review, testing, field test and 
approval from U.S. Army Natick, ACES, Surgeon General and the Military 
Services. The second commenter also noted that applying the procurement 
preference rule to this combat-related product would not result in the 
multiplied effect across the economy that they would expect in the 
cutlery similar to that used in restaurants across the nation.
    Response: USDA agrees with the points made by the commenters. USDA 
was unable to identify any performance standards relevant to disposable 
cutlery and encourages the development of such to assist in the 
evaluation of such products. Without such standards as a guide, the 
performance of biobased cutlery may be unknown in any one situation. 
USDA does know through real-world experience that the performance of 
biobased cutlery will vary depending on its formulation and on the 
particular environment in which it is used.
    With regard to the second commenter, USDA notes that, for the 
reasons provided earlier in this preamble, the final rule does not 
require preferred procurement for disposable cutlery purchased for use 
in combat or combat-related missions. If and when biobased cutlery is 
demonstrated to meet all of the performance requirements of DoD in 
tactical situations, USDA reserves the right to withdraw such 
exemptions for disposable cutlery. Should that situation occur, USDA 
appreciates the fact that purchase of biobased cutlery may be more 
limited for combat-related purchases than for general restaurant 
purchases, but the statute for this program is aimed at Federal agency 
purchases and not for private enterprise purchases.
    Comment: Two commenters recommended that USDA set the minimum 
biobased content near 100 percent given the availability of products in 
this item containing 100 percent biobased content. One of the 
commenters stated that 33 percent is too low. A third commenter 
expressed concern with the direction of the biobased content for 
cutlery based on their experience. The commenter stated that they are 
likely to start procuring 50 percent biobased cutlery even though a 
superior 100 percent biobased utensil already exists. This commenter 
asked ``What are practical ways the Federal Government can find and 
place incentives in its policies for contractors to develop biobased 
products with the greatest degree (high percent) of biobased content, 
and measure its success in this regard?''
    Response: USDA appreciates the fact that some biobased cutlery can 
be made with nearly 100 percent biobased content, such as in the 
production of spoons based on PLA. However, the performance variability 
of currently available biobased cutlery under different food 
environments (for example, hot soups and drinks) is well known and this 
variability is associated directly with biobased content. Purchasers of 
biobased cutlery need to take into account such performance aspects, 
even if they occur in a trial-and-error mode as there are no 
performance standards established for this item. To account for these 
different applications, a wider range of biobased content cutlery 
should be made available. USDA currently has biobased content test data 
on six samples of products within this item (36, 49, 51, 73, 97, and 
100 percent). As discussed earlier, USDA has re-evaluated the biobased 
content data and the proposed minimum biobased contents for all of the 
proposed items. In reviewing the data for this item, USDA found that 
the product with the 49 percent biobased content is currently being 
reformulated by its manufacturer and, thus, it will not be considered 
in setting the minimum biobased content. Within the remaining data, 
there are breaks in the data between the 36 and 51 percent products, 
the 51 and 73 percent products, and the 73 and 97 percent products. 
USDA did not have sufficient data on the performance of products within 
these groups to justify creating subcategories. However, USDA is aware 
that there does appear to be a correlation between biobased content and 
performance with high temperature food and beverages. That is, the 
higher biobased content products do not generally perform as well in 
high temperature applications. As a result, USDA is setting the minimum 
biobased content for this item at 48 percent, based on the product with 
a tested biobased content of 51 percent. USDA believes that setting the 
minimum biobased content at this level will allow products with 
acceptable high temperature performance characteristics to receive the 
procurement preference.
    As more information is developed on the biobased content of 
products within this item and on the associated performance of those 
products, USDA will revisit this item to determine if the minimum 
biobased content needs to be revised or if it is appropriate to develop 
subcategories. USDA will also continue to investigate the performance 
of biodegradable disposable cutlery and, if sufficient evidence of 
acceptable

[[Page 27967]]

performance is obtained, USDA will amend the designation of disposable 
cutlery to add biodegradability as a requirement for this item.
Glass Cleaners
    Comment: One commenter stated that they were concerned that USDA's 
collection methods were deficient because so few products formed the 
basis of the proposed rule. The commenter referred to a California Air 
Resources Board (CARB) survey, which identified 127 aerosol glass 
cleaners sold in the state of California alone. The commenter, 
therefore, recommended that USDA conduct a very thorough evaluation of 
glass cleaners. The commenter also stated that the BEES and biobased 
contents obtained may not be representative of all products on the 
market, representing instead only a small subset of products. The 
commenter recommended that the rulemaking demonstrate that the products 
evaluated are representative of the market and appear to have been 
overlooked in USDA's initial investigation.
    Response: USDA appreciates the information concerning the CARB 
study, which covered both biobased and non-biobased products. Because 
one of the purposes of the BioPreferred Program is to identify biobased 
products for potential preferred procurement, USDA's product 
investigation efforts did not seek out non-biobased products. USDA 
identified, at proposal, 16 manufacturers of biobased products within 
this item, with 19 biobased products being marketed.
    While USDA has in place a rigorous procedure for identifying 
products that are biobased, USDA recognizes that its procedure will not 
uncover all possible biobased products. Based on available data, USDA 
cannot determine if the samples that were voluntarily submitted by 
manufacturers are representative of all biobased products within this 
item. Regardless, USDA believes that it is reasonable to set minimum 
biobased contents based on the information it does have. If the 
commenter or others have additional information on the biobased content 
of other biobased products within this item, USDA encourages the 
commenter and others to submit that information to USDA. USDA will 
evaluate the additional information in relationship to the minimum 
biobased content for this designated item.
    For this and all other items, USDA welcomes assistance in 
identifying manufacturers and their biobased products for the 
BioPreferred Program. A list of such items can be found on the 
BioPreferred Web site.
    Comment: One commenter stated that some of the products 
investigated under glass cleaners do not seem to fit the proposed 
definition. For example, one product description states: ``* * * 
(product) is for use on bathroom mirrors, goggles, or any lens surface 
where confined areas tend to mist or fog. Forms an invisible shield, or 
film, that keeps mirrors, car windows, glass, goggles, lenses and 
plastic, free from mist, steam, or fogging.'' The commenter, therefore, 
recommended that the category be clearly defined and restricted to 
glass cleaners only. The commenter also recommended that the definition 
be refined based on their input.
    Response: USDA has re-examined the products identified under the 
glass cleaner item designation. The product identified by the commenter 
also performs a glass cleaning function. Thus, USDA believes that it is 
reasonable to retain this particular product as a product under this 
item. However, USDA agrees in principle with the commenter that the 
information provided on products under each item should be only for 
products that are within the definition of the item designated for 
preferred procurement. Therefore, USDA will review products within all 
items designated to make sure this occurs. Because the product 
questioned by the commenter still falls within the intended group of 
products defined by this item, USDA has determined that it is 
unnecessary to redefine the item in the final rule.
    Comment: One commenter recommended that the standard for 
performance should not be restricted to the U.S. Navy NASEA 
6840 and Green Seal (GS) GS-37 methods, but must include other methods 
such as the EPA Design for the Environment performance standards, or 
other science-based performance criteria. The commenter then stated 
that all test methods should be thoroughly researched and evaluated 
and, if relevant, included in the proposed rule.
    Response: USDA points out that the performance standards and test 
methods that are reported in the preamble are neither requirements nor 
the entire universe of relevant and applicable performance standards 
for glass cleaners. The reported performance standards and test methods 
are those that have been used and reported by manufacturers of biobased 
glass cleaners. While it is not necessary to identify all test methods 
and performance standards that are applicable to an item in order to 
designate that item for preferred procurement, USDA encourages the 
provision of additional information on other relevant and appropriate 
test methods and performance standards for glass cleaners and will post 
relevant information on the BioPreferred Web site.
    With regard to the comment on the Design for the Environment (DfE), 
the DfE Formulator program is not a standard per se, but an industry 
partnership program designed to help manufacturers design products with 
better environmental profiles. The DfE program provides recognition to 
participating companies and products that have ``passed'' the DfE 
criteria. The DfE review process focuses primarily on health and 
environmental criteria, and has reviewed both glass cleaners and carpet 
cleaners, two items within this rulemaking. The DfE program does 
include relevant performance standards, such as ASTM and CSMA 
standards, for cleaning products. Relevant industry standards for 
cleaners identified through DfE include: SSPA Method DCC09 for 
cleaning, streaking, and smearing for glass cleaners; ASTM D488 for 
soil removal on relevant substrates for general purpose cleaners; CSMA 
DCC-03 and AATCC test method 171-1995 for carpet cleaners; and ASTM 
D5345 for soil removing for washroom cleaners. For more information on 
the DfE program, visit http://epa.gov/dfe/pubs/projects/formulat/formpart.htm. Appendix A of the document Technical Support for Final 
Rule--Round 3 Designated Items, which can be accessed on the 
BioPreferred Web Site, contains a draft document of the DfE Formulator 
Program.
    Comment: One commenter stated that the minimum biobased content for 
glass cleaners, based on the data in the background information, should 
be 52 percent, not the proposed 23 percent. The commenter also stated 
that if USDA decides to retain the 23 percent level, that this level 
appears to be erroneous and should be 26 percent because the data in 
the background information shows products with biobased contents 
ranging from 29 to 100 percent. Therefore, the content level should be 
26 percent, not 23 percent.
    Response: At proposal, USDA had biobased content test data on four 
glass cleaners. The biobased contents were 29, 52, 67, and 100 percent. 
As pointed out by the commenter, the range of reported biobased 
contents for tested products is 29 to 100 percent and, using the 
rationale presented at proposal, the minimum biobased content should 
have been set at 26 percent. At one point during the evaluation of this 
item USDA

[[Page 27968]]

had information on a product with a tested biobased content of 26 
percent. However, this product was withdrawn from consideration. USDA 
inadvertently failed to revise the minimum biobased content for this 
item when that product was withdrawn.
    USDA has reevaluated the proposed minimum biobased content based on 
the additional data and on public comments. At this time, USDA has 
biobased content data for 12 tested products (5, 16, 26, 27, 29, 52, 
61, 67, 76, 81, 98, and 100 percent biobased content) within this item. 
There is a significant break in the range of data points between the 29 
percent and the 52 percent products. USDA considered whether the 
products with biobased contents below this break and those above it 
could be included in two separate subcategories. USDA found that there 
was not sufficient information on product performance or applicability 
to justify creating subcategories. As a result the minimum biobased 
content for this item has been set at 49 percent based on the product 
with a tested biobased content of 52 percent. As more information is 
developed on the biobased content of products within this item and on 
the associated performance of those products, USDA will revisit this 
item to determine if the minimum biobased content needs to be revised 
or if it is appropriate to develop subcategories.
Greases
    Comment: One commenter stated that the definitions of greases, 
multipurpose grease, rail track greases, and greases not elsewhere 
specified need to be modified to make them better understood. Another 
commenter pointed out that the definition of greases was ``fine as far 
as it goes,'' but pointed out that there are greases that are thickened 
with polymers and other forms of solids. The commenter pointed to a 
class of grease thickened with Polyurea (this type of grease is found 
in the drive axles on front wheel drive cars) and noted that this was a 
very large market.
    Response: USDA agrees that the various other compounds cited by the 
one commenter can be constituents in the formulation of a biobased 
grease. While the definition proposed for ``greases'' did not preclude 
these other substances, USDA has modified the definition slightly to 
accommodate the commenter's suggestion.
    With regard to the definitions of multipurpose grease and rail 
track grease, USDA continues to believe that the proposed definitions 
are sufficient to define the types of greases that are covered by the 
two items. Therefore, USDA did not make any changes to these two 
definitions.
    With regard to greases not elsewhere specified, USDA has also not 
changed the definition from what was proposed. Products that fall 
within this category are greases that cannot be classified under any of 
the other four subcategory definitions. USDA believes that the proposed 
definition is clear on this. As additional information becomes 
available on other types of greases, USDA will consider additional 
subcategories, thereby reducing the number of grease products that 
would fall into the ``greases not elsewhere specified'' subcategory by 
default (see the following comment and response).
    Comment: One commenter recommended that USDA add additional 
subcategories for: (1) Heavy duty grease with EP (Extreme performance) 
additives for the very heavy loaded joints often found in heavy duty 
earthmoving equipment, (2) water resistant grease, and (3) greases for 
very high and very low temperatures. The commenter recognized that 
these subcategories would need to be investigated before minimum 
biobased contents could be established, but encouraged USDA to 
establish the subcategories because the need for these types of greases 
exist.
    Response: USDA appreciates the commenter's suggestion for 
additional grease subcategories and will seek to collect information on 
these suggested subcategories for potential future designation. In the 
meantime, USDA notes that such greases would qualify for preferred 
procurement under the ``Greases not elsewhere specified'' subcategory 
if they meet the minimum biobased content of 75 percent set for the 
``greases not elsewhere specified'' subcategory.
    Comment: Two commenters submitted comments on the proposed minimum 
biobased content for greases. One commenter supported the provision of 
multiple biobased contents depending on the use of a grease product, 
but felt that, based on the information in the background document, it 
is not possible to determine whether some of the recommended content 
levels should be higher. Therefore, the commenter requested that USDA 
re-characterize the background data by use (e.g., food grade, 
multipurpose, rail track, etc.).
    In addition, the commenter requested that for greases that will be 
exposed directly to the environment, such as rail track greases, USDA 
conduct further research and determine whether a higher biobased 
content level and a biodegradability requirement are appropriate in 
order to minimize adverse impacts on the environment.
    The second commenter felt that most of the proposed minimum 
biobased contents were too high and that one was too low. The commenter 
recommended the following minimum biobased contents:
    Food grade grease: 40 percent (vs. proposed 42 percent);
    Multipurpose grease: 40 percent (vs. proposed 73 percent);
    Rail track grease: 50 percent at least (vs. proposed 30 percent);
    Truck grease: 50 percent (vs. proposed 72 percent); and
    Greases not elsewhere specified: 50 percent (vs. proposed 75 
percent).
    This commenter also stated that, for four of the greases (i.e., 
multipurpose, food grade, truck, and greases not elsewhere specified), 
they would not be able to get the proper additives to make a high 
performance multipurpose or food grade grease or certain of their other 
greases because the required additives and thickeners are not biobased 
at this time.
    Response: USDA agrees that the information in the background 
documentation could have made clearer which grease products were 
included in which grease subcategory. USDA has reorganized the 
background information to make this clear. Additional details on the 
subcategorization and the biobased contents for products within this 
item can be found in Chapter 2.0 of the document ``Technical Support 
for Final Rule--Round 3 Designated Items,'' which is available on the 
BioPreferred Web site.
    USDA has re-evaluated the minimum biobased contents for each of the 
subcategories in this item. For the food grade greases subcategory only 
three data points are available (45, 62, and 95) and no further 
subcategorization can be supported by the data. Thus, the minimum 
biobased content remains at 42 percent, as proposed. For the multi-
purpose greases subcategory, the tested biobased contents are all 
within a narrow range (75, 76, 76, and 76 percent). The minimum 
biobased content is set at 72 percent based on the product with the 75 
percent biobased content, which is a new test data point received after 
proposal. For the truck greases subcategory, the tested biobased 
contents are also within a narrow range (74, 75, 77, and 77 percent). 
The minimum biobased content is set at 71 percent based on the product 
with the 74 percent biobased content, which is a new test data point 
received after proposal. For the greases not elsewhere specified 
subcategory, the tested biobased contents are somewhat more

[[Page 27969]]

widely spread than the previous subcategories but are still within a 
reasonably close range (78, 87, 95, and 96 percent). USDA found no 
justification in the data to support further subdividing this 
subcategory and the minimum biobased content remains at the proposed 
level of 75 percent.
    For rail track greases, the tested biobased contents are 33, 33, 
39, 51, 66, and 66 percent and USDA has identified only two 
manufacturers of rail track greases. One manufacturer produces two rail 
track greases for use in cold temperature (both at 33 percent biobased 
content), two multi-season/all season rail track greases (39 percent 
and 51 percent biobased content), and one summer rail track grease (66 
percent biobased content). The other manufacturer produces a rail track 
grease that can be used under a wide range of temperatures.
    USDA believes that with sufficient information it would make sense 
to subdivide rail track greases. Based on the current information, USDA 
could subdivide rail track greases into three subcategories--winter/
arctic greases, all season greases, and summer greases. If this were 
done, the minimum biobased contents would be, respectively, 30, 36, and 
63 percent. Because only one manufacturer has been identified to date 
for two of these three potential subcategories, USDA would defer the 
effective preferred procurement dates for two of the three 
subcategories (i.e., for winter rail track greases and summer rail 
track greases).
    USDA does not believe that the above option is in the best interest 
of the BioPreferred Program at this time. Instead, USDA believes that 
the preferred procurement program under the BioPreferred Program is 
better served at this time by not subcategorizing rail track greases. 
By establishing a minimum biobased content at 30 percent (as proposed), 
all rail track greases would be available for preferred procurement 
(i.e., there would be no deferred effective dates for preferred 
procurement). This option allows the purchasing agency at least two 
manufacturers from which to select their product to meet their needs. 
If a purchasing agency needs a ``summer'' rail track grease, the 
purchasing agency would not select a winter or arctic rail track 
grease, but instead would have the option of selecting one of the ``all 
season'' rail track greases or a summer grease. Similarly, if a 
purchasing agency needs a ``winter'' rail track grease, it would have 
the option of selecting one of the winter rail track greases or one of 
the ``all season'' rail track greases. Thus, USDA is setting the 
minimum biobased content for rail track greases at 30 percent, as was 
proposed. As additional information is obtained on more biobased rail 
track grease products, USDA will re-evaluate this subcategory with 
regard to further subcategorization and the minimum biobased content.
    Lastly, one of the commenters requested that USDA consider whether 
biodegradability should be included as a requirement for greases, in 
particularly for rail track greases. USDA agrees with the commenter 
that the level of biodegradability should be considered when purchasing 
greases or other products that may be released into the environment 
during their use or disposal. As discussed earlier in this preamble, 
USDA is requiring biodegradability as a prerequisite for some 
designated items when concern about the disposal of the items is a key 
criterion. USDA believes, however, that performance is the key factor 
in a purchaser's decision as to which product within this designated 
item to purchase. In the case of items where USDA judges performance to 
be the key decision-making factor for purchasers, USDA will not require 
biodegradability as a prerequisite for participation in the preferred 
procurement program. Therefore, USDA is not requiring biodegradability 
as a requirement for greases.
Dust Suppressants
    Comment: One commenter stated that the OSHA Hazard Communication 
Standard for dust suppressants does not convey whether the product 
does, in fact, suppress dust.
    Response: USDA agrees with the commenter. This OSHA standard, which 
was cited in the background document for one of the manufacturer's 
products, is designed to ensure that information about health and 
physical hazards of chemicals and associated protective measures is 
disseminated to people in the workplace, and does not address 
performance standards for these products. Therefore, when evaluating 
the performance of dust suppressants, this particular standard is not 
relevant.
    Although USDA received no public comments related to the proposed 
minimum biobased content for dust suppressants, the proposed value was 
re-evaluated as part of USDA's review of all biobased content data. For 
this item, five biobased content tests were available (69, 88, 89, 98, 
and 100 percent). Because there is a significant break in the data 
between the 69 percent product and the 88 percent product, USDA 
reviewed the product performance information to determine if there was 
sufficient justification for creating subcategories or for setting the 
minimum biobased content based on the one product with a biobased 
content below 88 percent. No unique performance characteristics or 
applications were identified that would justify either 
subcategorization or setting the minimum biobased content based on the 
69 percent product. Therefore, the minimum biobased content for this 
item is set at 85 percent, based on the product with the 88 percent 
tested biobased content.
Carpets
    Comment: One commenter proposed the following definition for carpet 
to better reflect the various ways carpets are made: Floor coverings 
composed of woven, tufted, or knitted fiber and a backing system.
    Response: USDA agrees with the commenter and has revised the 
definition accordingly in the final rule.
    Comment: One commenter asked if any of the tested carpet samples 
had biobased content in the face. The commenter pointed out that a 
carpet manufactured by Interface had 15 percent biobased content in its 
face.
    Response: One of the carpet samples evaluated by USDA did have 
biobased material in the carpet face. The biobased content of this 
sample was 37 percent.
    Comment: Four commenters suggested that USDA set minimum biobased 
content requirements separately for backing and face used in carpets. A 
fifth commenter suggested that for now USDA proceed as proposed, but 
that USDA continue to collect additional biobased content data on 
carpet backing and carpet face fiber as these products become 
available, because carpet fiber and carpet backing can come from very 
different biobased material sources and it may make sense in the future 
to treat them separately.
    One commenter suggested setting separate minimum biobased content 
requirements for backing and face because the technology to produce 
biobased backings is considerably advanced over that of face fiber. In 
situations where a Federal buyer may be able to use a natural fiber 
faced carpet product, the commenter recommended that this be encouraged 
separately.
    One of the other commenters suggested that USDA create three 
subcategories as follows:
    Fiber face (broadloom)--materials that are used to make the face of 
carpet produced in widths generally wider than six feet.
    Fiber face (modular)--materials that are used to make the face of 
carpet produced in squares generally varying

[[Page 27970]]

in measurements from 18 inches to 36 inches.
    Backing Systems--includes primary, secondary and attached cushion.
    According to this commenter, such an approach would be compatible 
with the way Federal agencies make carpet purchasing decisions; that 
is, in selecting carpets, agencies have to decide if they want 
broadloom or carpet tile, and then what type of face fiber (e.g., 
polyester, nylon, wool), type of pile (e.g., cut, loop), the weight of 
the face, the color and pattern, and the backing systems. All of these 
aspects of a carpet have to fit together to achieve the performance 
that the purchaser needs. Further, because buyers assemble a set of 
specifications when they purchase carpet, having subcategories of 
designated biobased item for carpet would better inform potential 
buyers about the availability of biobased content in various parts of 
the carpet construction and in various carpet types (e.g., broadloom 
and tiles).
    Response: USDA has not changed the definition of the designated 
item for the final rule. USDA acknowledges that the commenters have 
provided valid reasons why subcategorization of this designated item 
may be appropriate at some point. However, given the current state of 
development of biobased products within this designated item, USDA does 
not believe that sufficient data are available to support such a 
subcategorization. USDA will continue to gather and review information 
that could be used to support subcategorization of this designated item 
and the establishment of different minimum biobased content 
requirements in the future.
    Comment: One commenter felt that the proposed minimum biobased 
content (7 percent) was reasonable at this time, while two commenters 
recommend that the minimum biobased content for carpets be raised. One 
commenter stated that setting the initial minimum biobased content 
based on the lower end of the samples tested to date will provide more 
potential products and will encourage more widespread use of biobased 
products. The commenter pointed out that carpet containing biobased 
material is still very much in a development stage and the proposed 
level should help stimulate more development of biobased carpets.
    The two other commenters recommended raising the minimum biobased 
content to a minimum of 50 percent. These commenters felt that such a 
minimum level was necessary for many of the proposed items in order to 
further the goal of the program.
    Response: USDA reviewed the biobased content data for carpets (10, 
10, 23, 24, 31, 35, and 37 percent) and found that the biobased content 
of the products that have been tested increases as the ``weight'' of 
the carpet increases. In most of these products the biobased material 
is used as the carpet backing and the thicker the backing, the higher 
the biobased content. The product with 37 percent biobased content also 
has a small amount of biobased material incorporated into the carpet 
face. USDA considered the possibility of creating subcategories within 
this item based on performance features (such as durability) but does 
not have sufficient data to justify subcategorization at this time. 
Because there are no significant breaks in the range of data points and 
the overall range is small, USDA has retained the proposed 7 percent 
minimum biobased content for this item. USDA will continue to gather 
information on this item and will consider creating subcategories in a 
future rulemaking.
    Comment: One commenter stated that the Standard Title column in the 
Performance Standards document for carpeting does not address how well 
the carpet will wear. Another commenter stated that NSF International's 
Sustainable Carpet Assessment Draft Standard (Draft Standard NSF 140-
2005) should be mentioned. The commenter pointed out that this has been 
published as a draft ANSI standard, and products can be certified to 
the draft standard. The commenter also pointed out that the state of 
California has adopted the gold and platinum levels of certification 
under this standard as their state purchasing specification.
    Response: USDA has not identified applicable performance standards 
for carpet wear. However, ASTM D3181 has been identified as a test 
method that can be used to measure carpet wear. While this method does 
not specify an ``acceptable'' level of performance, it does define a 
standardized test procedure that can be used to develop carpet wear 
data that can then be used to compare expected wear between different 
carpet samples. USDA will add information on both the ASTM D3181 test 
method and the NSF International's Sustainable Carpet Assessment Draft 
Standard (Draft Standard NSF 140-2005) to the information available on 
the BioPreferred Web site for this designated item.
    Comment: Three commenters urged USDA to have biobased procurement 
preference take priority over recycled content preference for carpets 
where carpet backing is made from recycled polyvinyl chloride (PVC). 
One of the commenters made this request because, according to the 
commenter, PVC has serious health impacts throughout its life cycle--
notably the production of dioxin in manufacture and disposal and 
release of phthalates. This commenter pointed out that (1) dioxin 
reduction is a goal that the U.S. government has committed to through 
its signing of the Stockholm Treaty on Persistent Organic Pollutants 
and (2) neither issue is captured and compared by BEES analyses.
    The other two commenters similarly stated that the production of 
PVC has serious environmental health impacts that are not captured in 
the BEES analysis (such as dioxin production, reproductive toxicity, 
and neurotoxicity). The commenters stated that this is one clear case 
where biobased materials are preferable to recycled content.
    A fourth commenter noted that the CPG Guidelines for carpet 
currently apply only to: (1) Carpet with a polyester face, and (2) 
separate detached ``cushion'' placed under the carpet during 
installation. Therefore, according to the commenter, there currently 
would not be an overlap between CPG guidelines for polyester face and 
detached cushion and biobased content in carpet backing systems 
(including attached cushion). The commenter also made numerous other 
points, presented in the remainder of this paragraph, concerning the 
relationship between the CPG program and the preferred procurement 
program under the BioPreferred Program. The commenter stated that EPA's 
proposed CPG guidelines for nylon carpet face and backing with a 
recovered vinyl material content would not overlap or conflict with 
biobased content in a carpet's polyurethane backing system (including 
attached cushion). Furthermore, EPA Guidelines would not require a 
buyer to purchase a carpet with a vinyl backing just because it is a 
CPG item. EPA has stated that a CPG recommendation does not preclude a 
procuring agency from purchasing carpet made of other materials (e.g., 
polyurethane backing system versus vinyl backing). For performance 
reasons, a Federal buyer may specify a polyurethane backing system 
because it has a number of performance advantages. For polyurethane 
laminate, these include preventing delamination and increasing product 
life, lower VOC levels, being compatible with low VOC adhesives used in 
installation, and creating a function liquid barrier for ease of 
cleaning (including the possibility of wick-back staining and adverse

[[Page 27971]]

moisture effects). Attached polyurethane cushion offers the additional 
benefits of lessening standing and walking fatigue by reducing heel 
strike and leg muscle response, reducing excess workplace sounds, 
resisting crushing and extending carpet life, and increasing thermal 
insulation. Furthermore, there are polyurethane backing systems 
commercially available that contain both biobased and recycled/
recovered material. In addition, it would be possible to make a carpet 
that had a face with recycled/recovered fiber content and a backing 
system with biobased content.
    Finally, a fifth commenter stated that EPA proposed a designation 
for nylon carpet, is working on finalizing that designation, and 
requested that USDA check on the status of EPA's final rule for nylon 
carpet and adjust the above preamble and regulation language for the 
final rule accordingly.
    Response: USDA does not have the statutory authority to require 
that a preference be given to a biobased product over a competing 
recycled content product. However, USDA agrees that there are cases 
where the manufacture, use, and disposal of biobased products results 
in an overall benefit to the environment when compared to recycled 
content products. In the information that USDA has provided in the 
preamble to the proposed rule (71 FR 47591), we point out that Federal 
agencies may ask manufacturers for information on a product's 
environmental and human health measures as determined by the BEES 
analysis. They can then use this information to make a more informed 
decision on which product meets their goals and needs. In sum, USDA 
encourages Federal agencies to consider the overall environmental and 
human health impacts when evaluating the performance of recycled 
content products and biobased products.
    USDA also points out that there may be cases where the specific 
features of the two products eliminates the ``appearance'' of an 
overlap between biobased and recycled content products. As one 
commenter notes, the CPG guidelines for recycled content carpet apply 
to carpet with a polyester face and a separate detached cushion. The 
biobased carpets upon which USDA designation of the item is based 
primarily used the biobased material in the carpet backing. Also, as 
the commenter points out, there may be important performance 
considerations in choosing a carpet ``system.'' Thus, even though there 
may be the appearance of an overlap between the two preference 
programs, Federal agencies may not find a conflict once all of their 
performance criteria have been considered.
    Prior to publishing this notice, USDA checked the status of the 
EPA's proposed designation of nylon carpet for the CPG program. As of 
the date of publication of this notice, EPA had not finalized the 
designation of nylon carpet.
Carpet and Upholstery Cleaners
    Comment: One commenter stated that the proposed minimum biobased 
content of 34 percent for carpet upholstery cleaners is low and 
suggested that the word ``biobased'' implies a minimum biobased content 
of 51 percent.
    Response: Where there is no other information available, USDA 
believes that it is not unreasonable to consider products as 
``biobased'' if they are composed predominantly of biobased materials; 
that is, at least 50 percent of the product is biobased. However, for 
some products a 50 or 51 percent minimum biobased content may result in 
a product that is not viable. Furthermore, a 50 or 51 percent minimum 
biobased content could discourage the development of new biobased 
products or the continued development of existing biobased products.
    During the investigation of potential items for designation, USDA 
has identified many items where biobased product development has not 
reached the point where these products can be manufactured successfully 
with a biobased content of greater than 50 percent. USDA believes that 
the designation of items where biobased products exist, even at the 
lower levels such as in the carpet and upholstery cleaners item, will 
not only create a demand for the existing products but will encourage 
the development of additional products with higher biobased contents.
    USDA has re-evaluated the products within this item and has decided 
that the creation of two subcategories within this item is justified. 
Three of the 12 products for which USDA has information are described 
and marketed as ``spot'' or ``stain'' removers and the other nine 
products are marketed simply as carpet and upholstery cleaners, or 
general purpose cleaners. The tested biobased contents of the spot 
removers are 10, 15, and 19 percent. USDA has set the minimum biobased 
content for the spot removers subcategory at 7 percent, based on the 
product with a tested biobased content of 10 percent, because the range 
of the data points is so narrow.
    For the general purpose cleaners subcategory, the tested biobased 
contents are 37, 54, 57, 66, 67, 79, 80, 82, and 98 percent. USDA 
reviewed the product information to determine whether specific 
performance or applicability features were claimed by any of the 
products. The two products with 57 and 66 percent biobased content were 
found to be formulated without any volatile organic compounds (VOC), 
while many of the other products were not. Because the absence of VOC 
is considered to be a desirable feature, and because no other 
significant performance features were found, USDA decided to set the 
minimum biobased content at a level that these two products would meet. 
Therefore, USDA has set the minimum biobased content at 54 percent 
based on the product with a tested biobased content of 57 percent. As 
new products are developed and as existing products are reformulated 
with higher biobased contents, USDA will continue to gather and review 
data and assess the possibility of raising the minimum biobased content 
for these subcategories.
    Comment: One commenter noted that the Green Seal standard for 
industrial and institutional cleaners (GS 37) includes carpet cleaners 
and should be mentioned.
    Response: USDA appreciates the information provided by the 
commenter and will add the information on GS 37 to the list of 
applicable test methods and performance standards found on the 
BioPreferred Web site for this item.
    Comment: One commenter provided information on health and 
environmental aspects of carpet cleaning in response to USDA's request 
for such information on any of the proposed designated items. Most of 
the information provided by the commenter dealt with water versus dry 
cleaning methods.
    Response: USDA appreciates the information provided by the 
commenter and will review it for potential addition to the technical 
information on carpet and upholstery cleaners on the BioPreferred Web 
site.

V. Regulatory Information

A. Executive Order 12866: Regulatory Planning and Review

    This action has been determined significant for purposes of 
Executive Order 12866 and, therefore, has been reviewed by the Office 
of Management and Budget. We are not able to quantify the annual 
economic effect associated with this final rule. As discussed in the 
proposed rule, USDA made extensive efforts to obtain information on the

[[Page 27972]]

Federal agencies' usage within the ten designated items, including 
their subcategories. These efforts were largely unsuccessful. Therefore 
attempts to quantify the economic impact of this rule would require 
estimation of the anticipated market penetration of biobased products 
based upon many assumptions. In addition, because agencies have the 
option of not purchasing designated items if costs are 
``unreasonable,'' the product is not readily available, or the product 
does not demonstrate necessary performance characteristics, certain 
assumptions may not be valid. While facing these quantitative 
challenges, USDA relied upon a qualitative assessment to determine the 
impacts of this rulemaking. This assessment was based primarily on the 
offsetting nature of the program (an increase in biobased products 
purchased with a corresponding decrease in petroleum products 
purchased). Consideration was also given to the fact that agencies may 
choose not to procure designated items due to unreasonable costs.
1. Summary of Impacts
    This rulemaking is expected to have both positive and negative 
impacts to individual businesses, including small businesses. USDA 
anticipates that the biobased preferred procurement program will 
provide additional opportunities for businesses and manufacturers to 
begin supplying products under the designated biobased items to Federal 
agencies and their contractors. However, other businesses and 
manufacturers that supply only non-qualifying products and do not offer 
biobased alternatives may experience a decrease in demand from Federal 
agencies and their contractors. USDA is unable to determine the number 
of businesses, including small businesses, that may be adversely 
affected by this rule. The rule, however, will not affect existing 
purchase orders, nor will it preclude businesses from modifying their 
product lines to meet new requirements for designated biobased 
products. Because the extent to which procuring agencies will find the 
performance and costs of biobased products acceptable is unknown, it is 
impossible to quantify the actual economic effect of the rule.
2. Benefits of the Rule
    The designation of these ten items, including their subcategories, 
provides the benefits outlined in the objectives of section 9002: To 
increase domestic demand for many agricultural commodities that can 
serve as feedstocks for production of biobased products; to spur 
development of the industrial base through value-added agricultural 
processing and manufacturing in rural communities; to enhance the 
Nation's energy security by substituting biobased products for products 
derived from imported oil and natural gas; and to substitute products 
with a possibly more benign or beneficial environmental impact, as 
compared to the use of fossil energy-based products. On a national and 
regional level, this rule can result in expanding and strengthening 
markets for biobased materials used in these items.
3. Costs of the Rule
    Like the benefits, the costs of this rule have not been quantified. 
Two types of costs are involved: Costs to producers of products that 
will compete with the preferred products and costs to Federal agencies 
to provide procurement preference for the preferred products. Producers 
of competing products may face a decrease in demand for their products 
to the extent Federal agencies refrain from purchasing their products. 
However, it is not known to what extent this may occur. Procurement 
costs for Federal agencies may rise as they evaluate the availability 
and relative cost of preferred products before making a purchase.

B. Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA)

    When an agency issues a final rule following a proposed rule, the 
Regulatory Flexibility Act (RFA, 5 U.S.C. 601-612) requires the agency 
to prepare a final regulatory flexibility analysis. 5 U.S.C. 604. 
However, the requirement for a final regulatory flexibility analysis 
does not apply if the head of the agency certifies that the rule will 
not, if promulgated, have a significant economic impact on a 
substantial number of small entities. 5 U.S.C. 605(b).
    USDA evaluated the potential impacts of its designation of these 
items to determine whether its actions would have a significant impact 
on a substantial number of small entities. Because the Federal 
Procurement of Biobased Products under section 9002 of FSRIA applies 
only to Federal agencies and their contractors, small governmental 
(city, county, etc.) agencies are not affected. Thus, this rule will 
not have a significant economic impact on small governmental 
jurisdictions. USDA anticipates that this program will affect entities, 
both large and small, that manufacture or sell biobased products. For 
example, the designation of items for preferred procurement will 
provide additional opportunities for businesses to manufacture and sell 
biobased products to Federal agencies and their contractors. Similar 
opportunities will be provided for entities that supply biobased 
materials to manufacturers. Conversely, the preferred procurement 
program may decrease opportunities for businesses that manufacture or 
sell non-biobased products or provide components for the manufacturing 
of such products. However, this rule will not affect existing purchase 
orders and it will not preclude procuring agencies from continuing to 
purchase non-biobased items under certain conditions relating to the 
availability, performance, or cost of biobased items. This rule will 
also not preclude businesses from modifying their product lines to meet 
new specifications or solicitation requirements for these products 
containing biobased materials. Thus, the economic impacts of this rule 
are not expected to be significant.
    The intent of section 9002 is largely to stimulate the production 
of new biobased products and to energize emerging markets for those 
products. Because the program is still in its infancy, however, it is 
unknown how many businesses will ultimately be affected. While USDA has 
no data on the number of small businesses that may choose to develop 
and market products within the items and their subcategories designated 
by this rulemaking, the number is expected to be small. Because 
biobased products represent a small emerging market, only a small 
percentage of all manufacturers, large or small, are expected to 
develop and market biobased products. Thus, the number of small 
businesses affected by this rulemaking is not expected to be 
substantial.
    After considering the economic impacts of this rule on small 
entities, USDA certifies that this action will not have a significant 
economic impact on a substantial number of small entities.
    While not a factor relevant to determining whether the rule will 
have a significant impact for RFA purposes, USDA has concluded that the 
effect of the rule will be to provide positive opportunities to 
businesses engaged in the manufacture of these biobased products. 
Purchase and use of these biobased products by procuring agencies 
increase demand for these products and result in private sector 
development of new technologies, creating business and employment 
opportunities that enhance local, regional, and national economies. 
Technological innovation associated with the use of biobased materials 
can translate into economic growth and

[[Page 27973]]

increased industry competitiveness worldwide, thereby, creating 
opportunities for small entities.

C. Executive Order 12630: Governmental Actions and Interference With 
Constitutionally Protected Property Rights

    This rule has been reviewed in accordance with Executive Order 
12630, Governmental Actions and Interference with Constitutionally 
Protected Property Rights, and does not contain policies that would 
have implications for these rights.

D. Executive Order 12988: Civil Justice Reform

    This rule has been reviewed in accordance with Executive Order 
12988, Civil Justice Reform. This rule does not preempt State or local 
laws, is not intended to have retroactive effect, and does not involve 
administrative appeals.

E. Executive Order 13132: Federalism

    This rule does not have sufficient federalism implications to 
warrant the preparation of a Federalism Assessment. Provisions of this 
rule will not have a substantial direct effect on States or their 
political subdivisions or on the distribution of power and 
responsibilities among the various government levels.

F. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995

    This rule contains no Federal mandates under the regulatory 
provisions of Title II of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 
(UMRA), 2 U.S.C. 1531-1538, for State, local, and tribal governments, 
or the private sector. Therefore, a statement under section 202 of UMRA 
is not required.

G. Executive Order 12372: Intergovernmental Review of Federal Programs

    For the reasons set forth in the Final Rule Related Notice for 7 
CFR part 3015, subpart V (48 FR 29115, June 24, 1983), this program is 
excluded from the scope of the Executive Order 12372, which requires 
intergovernmental consultation with State and local officials. This 
program does not directly affect State and local governments.

H. Executive Order 13175: Consultation and Coordination With Indian 
Tribal Governments

    Today's rule does not significantly or uniquely affect ``one or 
more Indian tribes, * * * the relationship between the Federal 
Government and Indian tribes, or * * * the distribution of power and 
responsibilities between the Federal Government and Indian tribes.'' 
Thus, no further action is required under Executive Order 13175.

I. Paperwork Reduction Act

    In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 
3501 through 3520), the information collection under this rule is 
currently approved under OMB control number 0503-0011.

J. Government Paperwork Elimination Act Compliance

    The Office of Energy Policy and New Uses is committed to compliance 
with the Government Paperwork Elimination Act (GPEA) (44 U.S.C. 3504 
note), which requires Government agencies in general to provide the 
public the option of submitting information or transacting business 
electronically to the maximum extent possible. USDA is implementing an 
electronic information system for posting information voluntarily 
submitted by manufacturers or vendors on the products they intend to 
offer for preferred procurement under each designated item. For 
information pertinent to GPEA compliance related to this rule, please 
contact Marvin Duncan at (202) 401-0461.

List of Subjects in 7 CFR Part 2902

    Biobased products, Procurement.

0
For the reasons stated in the preamble, the Department of Agriculture 
is amending 7 CFR chapter XXIX as follows:

CHAPTER XXIX--OFFICE OF ENERGY POLICY AND NEW USES, DEPARTMENT OF 
AGRICULTURE

PART 2902--GUIDELINES FOR DESIGNATING BIOBASED PRODUCTS FOR FEDERAL 
PROCUREMENT

0
1. The authority citation for part 2902 continues to read as follows:

    Authority: 7 U.S.C. 8102.


0
2. Add Sec. Sec.  2902.25 through 2902.34 to subpart B to read as 
follows:


Sec.  2902.25   2-Cycle engine oils.

    (a) Definition. Lubricants designed for use in 2-cycle engines to 
provide lubrication, decreased spark plug fouling, reduced deposit 
formation, and/or reduced engine wear.
    (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product 
must have a biobased content of at least 34 percent, which shall be 
based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a 
percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the 
finished product.
    (c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, 
procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a 
procurement preference for qualifying biobased 2-cycle engine oils. By 
that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting 
or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that 
the relevant specifications require the use of biobased 2-cycle engine 
oils.


Sec.  2902.26  Lip care products.

    (a) Definition. Personal care products formulated to replenish the 
moisture and/or prevent drying of the lips.
    (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product 
must have a biobased content of at least 82 percent, which shall be 
based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a 
percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the 
finished product.
    (c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, 
procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a 
procurement preference for qualifying biobased lip care products. By 
that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting 
or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that 
the relevant specifications require the use of biobased lip care 
products.


Sec.  2902.27  Films.

    (a) Definition. (1) Products that are used in packaging, wrappings, 
linings, and other similar applications.
    (2) Films for which preferred procurement applies are:
    (i) Semi-durable films. Films that are designed to resist water, 
ammonia, and other compounds, to be re-used, and to not readily 
biodegrade. Products in this item are typically used in the production 
of bags and packaging materials.
    (ii) Non-durable films. Films that are intended for single use for 
short-term storage or protection before being discarded. Non-durable 
films that are designed to have longer lives when used are included in 
this item.
    (b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content for all 
films shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the 
product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon 
in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased contents are:
    (1) Semi-durable films--45 percent.
    (2) Non-durable films--85 percent.
    (c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, 
procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a 
procurement preference for qualifying biobased semi-durable and non-
durable films. By that date, Federal

[[Page 27974]]

agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing 
specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant 
specifications require the use of biobased semi-durable and non-durable 
films.
    (d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content 
product. Qualifying products within the semi-durable films subcategory 
may overlap with the EPA-designated recovered content product: Plastic 
trash bags. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these qualifying 
biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred Web site of 
qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the product, 
information on whether or not the product contains any recovered 
material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and performance 
standards against which the product has been tested. This information 
will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not a qualifying 
biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated plastic trash bags and 
which product should be afforded the preference in purchasing.

    Note to paragraph (d): Biobased semi-durable film products 
within this designated item can compete with plastic trash bag 
products with recycled content. Under the Resource Conservation and 
Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency designated plastic trash bags containing recovered 
materials as items for which Federal agencies must give preference 
in their purchasing programs. The designation can be found in the 
Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.16. EPA provides 
recovered materials content recommendations for plastic trash bags 
in the May 1, 1995, Recovered Materials Advisory Notice (RMAN I). 
The RMAN recommendations can be found on EPA's Web site http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/procure/products.htm and then clicking 
on the appropriate product name.

Sec.  2902.28  Stationary equipment hydraulic fluids.

    (a) Definition. Fluids formulated for use in stationary hydraulic 
equipment systems that have various mechanical parts, such as 
cylinders, pumps, valves, pistons, and gears, that are used for the 
transmission of power (and also for lubrication and/or wear, rust, and 
oxidation protection).
    (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product 
must have a biobased content of at least 44 percent, which shall be 
based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a 
percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the 
finished product.
    (c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, 
procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a 
procurement preference for qualifying biobased stationary equipment 
hydraulic fluids. By that date, Federal agencies that have the 
responsibility for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be 
procured shall ensure that the relevant specifications require the use 
of biobased stationary equipment hydraulic fluids.
    (d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content 
product. Qualifying biobased products that fall under this item may, in 
some cases, overlap with the EPA-designated recovered content product: 
Re-refined lubricating oils. USDA is requesting that manufacturers of 
these qualifying biobased products provide information for the 
BioPreferred Web site of qualifying biobased products about the 
intended uses of the product, information on whether or not the product 
contains any recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, 
and performance standards against which the product has been tested. 
This information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or 
not a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated re-
refined lubricating oils and which product should be afforded the 
preference in purchasing.

    Note to paragraph (d): Stationary equipment hydraulic fluid 
products within this designated item can compete with hydraulic 
fluid products with recycled content. Under the Resource 
Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, section 6002, the U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency designated re-refined lubricating 
oils containing recovered materials as items for which Federal 
agencies must give preference in their purchasing programs. The 
designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 
40 CFR 247.11. EPA provides recovered materials content 
recommendations for re-refined lubricating oils in the May 1, 1995, 
Recovered Materials Advisory Notice (RMAN I). The RMAN 
recommendations can be found by accessing EPA's Web site http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/procure/products.htm and then clicking 
on the appropriate product name.

Sec.  2902.29  Disposable cutlery.

    (a) Definition. Hand-held, disposable utensils designed for one-
time use in eating food.
    (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product 
must have a biobased content of at least 48 percent, which shall be 
based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a 
percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the 
finished product.
    (c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, 
procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a 
procurement preference for qualifying biobased disposable cutlery. By 
that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting 
or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that 
the relevant specifications require the use of biobased disposable 
cutlery.


Sec.  2902.30  Glass cleaners.

    (a) Definition. Cleaning products designed specifically for use in 
cleaning glass surfaces, such as windows, mirrors, car windows, and 
computer monitors.
    (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product 
must have a biobased content of at least 49 percent, which shall be 
based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a 
percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the 
finished product. If the finished product is to be diluted before use, 
the biobased content of the cleaner must be determined before dilution.
    (c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, 
procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a 
procurement preference for qualifying biobased glass cleaners. By that 
date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or 
reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the 
relevant specifications require the use of biobased glass cleaners.


Sec.  2902.31  Greases.

    (a) Definitions. (1) Lubricants composed of oils thickened to a 
semisolid or solid consistency using soaps, polymers or other solids, 
or other thickeners.
    (2) Greases for which preferred procurement applies are:
    (i) Food grade greases. Lubricants that are designed for use on 
food-processing equipment as a protective anti-rust film, as a release 
agent on gaskets or seals of tank closures, or on machine parts and 
equipment in locations in which there is exposure of the lubricated 
part to food.
    (ii) Multipurpose greases. Lubricants that are designed for general 
use.
    (iii) Rail track greases. Lubricants that are designed for use on 
railroad tracks or heavy crane tracks.
    (iv) Truck greases. Lubricants that are designed for use on the 
fifth wheel of tractor trailer trucks onto which the semi-trailer rests 
and pivots.
    (v) Greases not elsewhere specified. Lubricants that meet the 
general

[[Page 27975]]

definition of greases as defined in paragraph (a)(1) of this section, 
but are not otherwise covered by paragraphs (a)(2)(i) through (iv) of 
this section.
    (b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content for all 
greases shall be based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in 
the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic 
carbon in the finished product. The applicable minimum biobased 
contents are:
    (1) Food grade grease--42 percent.
    (2) Multipurpose grease--72 percent.
    (3) Rail track grease--30 percent.
    (4) Truck grease--71 percent.
    (5) Greases not elsewhere specified--75 percent.
    (c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, 
procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a 
procurement preference for qualifying biobased greases. By that date, 
Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing 
specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant 
specifications require the use of biobased greases.


Sec.  2902.32  Dust suppressants.

    (a) Definition. Products formulated to reduce or eliminate the 
spread of dust associated with gravel roads, dirt parking lots, or 
similar sources of dust, including products used in equivalent indoor 
applications.
    (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product 
must have a biobased content of at least 85 percent, which shall be 
based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a 
percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the 
finished product. If the finished product is to be diluted before use, 
the biobased content of the suppressant must be determined before 
dilution.
    (c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, 
procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a 
procurement preference for qualifying biobased dust suppressants. By 
that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting 
or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that 
the relevant specifications require the use of biobased dust 
suppressants.


Sec.  2902.33  Carpets.

    (a) Definition. Floor coverings composed of woven, tufted, or 
knitted fiber and a backing system.
    (b) Minimum biobased content. The preferred procurement product 
must have a biobased content of at least 7 percent, which shall be 
based on the amount of qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a 
percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the 
finished product.
    (c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, 
procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a 
procurement preference for qualifying biobased carpet. By that date, 
Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or reviewing 
specifications for items to be procured shall ensure that the relevant 
specifications require the use of biobased carpet.
    (d) Determining overlap with an EPA-designated recovered content 
product. Qualifying biobased products that fall under this item may, in 
some cases, overlap with the EPA-designated recovered content product: 
Carpets (polyester). USDA is requesting that manufacturers of these 
qualifying biobased products provide information for the BioPreferred 
Web site of qualifying biobased products about the intended uses of the 
product, information on whether or not the product contains any 
recovered material, in addition to biobased ingredients, and 
performance standards against which the product has been tested. This 
information will assist Federal agencies in determining whether or not 
a qualifying biobased product overlaps with EPA-designated carpets 
(polyester) and which product should be afforded the preference in 
purchasing.

    Note to paragraph (d): Biobased carpets within this designated 
item can compete with polyester carpet products with recycled 
content. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, 
section 6002, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency designated 
carpets (polyester) containing recovered materials as items for 
which Federal agencies must give preference in their purchasing 
programs. The designation can be found in the Comprehensive 
Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.12. EPA provides recovered 
materials content recommendations for carpets (polyester) in the May 
1, 1995, Recovered Materials Advisory Notice (RMAN I). The RMAN 
recommendations can be found on EPA's Web site http://www.epa.gov/epaoswer/non-hw/procure/products.htm and then clicking on the 
appropriate product name.

Sec.  2902.34  Carpet and upholstery cleaners.

    (a) Definition. (1) Cleaning products formulated specifically for 
use in cleaning carpets and upholstery, through a dry or wet process, 
found in locations such as houses, cars, and workplaces.
    (2) Carpet and upholstery cleaners for which preferred procurement 
applies are:
    (i) General purpose cleaners. Carpet and upholstery cleaners 
formulated for use in cleaning large areas such as the carpet in an 
entire room or the upholstery on an entire piece of furniture.
    (ii) Spot removers. Carpet and upholstery cleaners formulated for 
use in removing spots or stains in a small confined area.
    (b) Minimum biobased content. The minimum biobased content for all 
carpet and upholstery cleaners shall be based on the amount of 
qualifying biobased carbon in the product as a percent of the weight 
(mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. The 
applicable minimum biobased contents are:
    (1) General purpose cleaners--54 percent.
    (2) Spot removers--7 percent.
    (c) Preference compliance date. No later than May 14, 2009, 
procuring agencies, in accordance with this part, will give a 
procurement preference for qualifying biobased carpet and upholstery 
cleaners. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility 
for drafting or reviewing specifications for items to be procured shall 
ensure that the relevant specifications require the use of biobased 
carpet and upholstery cleaners.

    Dated: May 2, 2008.
Harry Baumes,
Associate Director, Office of Energy Policy and New Uses, U.S. 
Department of Agriculture.
 [FR Doc. E8-10109 Filed 5-13-08; 8:45 am]
BILLING CODE 3410-GL-P