[Federal Register Volume 64, Number 94 (Monday, May 17, 1999)]
[Proposed Rules]
[Pages 26705-26711]
From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]
[FR Doc No: 99-12360]


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DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

Federal Aviation Administration

14 CFR Part 71

[Airspace Docket No. 95-AWA-4]


Proposed Modification of the Orlando Class B Airspace Area, 
Orlando, FL; and Modification of the Orlando Sanford Airport Class D 
Airspace Area, Sanford, FL

AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) DOT.

ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM).

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SUMMARY: This notice proposes to modify the Orlando Class B airspace 
area, Orlando, FL; and the Orlando Sanford Airport Class D airspace 
area, Sanford, FL. Specifically, this action proposes to modify several 
subareas within the lateral boundaries of the existing Orlando Class B 
airspace area; and lower the vertical limits of the Orlando Sanford 
Airport Class D airspace area. The FAA is proposing this action to 
enhance safety, reduce the potential for midair collision, and improve 
the management of air traffic operations into, out of, and through the 
Orlando terminal area while accommodating the concerns of airspace 
users.

DATES: Comments must be received on or before June 30, 1999.

ADDRESSES: Send comments on the proposal in triplicate to the Federal 
Aviation Administration, Office of Chief Counsel, Attention: Rules 
Docket, AGC-200, Airspace Docket No. 95-AWA-4, 800 Independence Avenue, 
SW., Washington, DC 20591. Comments may also be sent electronically to 
the following Internet address: [email protected] The official 
docket may be examined in the Rules Docket, Office of the Chief 
Counsel, Room 916, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC, 
weekdays, except Federal holidays, between 8:30 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. An 
informal docket may also be examined during normal business hours at 
the office of the Regional Air Traffic Division.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Sheri Edgett Baron, Airspace and Rules 
Division, ATA-400, Office of Air Traffic Airspace Management, Federal 
Aviation Administration, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 
20591; telephone: (202) 267-8783.

SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:

Comments Invited

    Interested parties are invited to participate in this proposed 
rulemaking by submitting such written data, views, or arguments as they 
may desire. Comments that provide the factual basis supporting the 
views and suggestions presented are particularly helpful in developing 
reasoned regulatory decisions on the proposal. Comments are 
specifically invited on the overall regulatory, aeronautical, economic, 
environmental, and energy-related aspects of the proposal. 
Communications should identify the airspace docket number and should be 
submitted in triplicate to the address listed above. Commenters wishing 
the FAA to acknowledge receipt of their comments on this notice must 
submit with those comments a self-addressed, stamped postcard on which 
the following statement is made: ``Comments to Airspace Docket No. 95-
AWA-4.'' The postcard will be date/time stamped and returned to the 
commenter. All communications received on or before the specified 
closing date for comments will be considered before taking action on 
the proposed rule. The proposal contained in this notice may be changed 
in light of comments received. All comments submitted will be available 
for examination in the Rules Docket both before and after the closing 
date for comments. A report summarizing each substantive public contact 
with FAA personnel concerned with this rulemaking will also be filed in 
the docket.

Availability of NPRM's

    An electronic copy of this document may be downloaded from the FAA 
regulations section of the Fedworld electronic bulletin board service 
(telephone: 703-321-3339) or the Government Printing Office's 
electronic bulletin board service (telephone: 202-512-1661) using a 
modem and suitable communications software.
    Internet users may reach the FAA's web page at http://www.faa.gov 
or the Government Printing Office's webpage

[[Page 26706]]

at http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara for access to recently published 
rulemaking documents.
    Any person may obtain a copy of this NPRM by submitting a request 
to the Federal Aviation Administration, Office of Air Traffic Airspace 
Management, 800 Independence Avenue, SW., Washington, DC 20591, or by 
calling (202) 267-8783. Communications must identify the notice number 
of this NPRM. Persons interested in being placed on a mailing list for 
future NPRM's should call the FAA's Office of Rulemaking, (202) 267-
9677, for a copy of Advisory Circular No. 11-2A, Notice of Proposed 
Rulemaking Distribution System, that describes the application 
procedure.
    The coordinates for this airspace docket are based on North 
American Datum 83. Class B and Class D airspace areas are published, 
respectively, in paragraphs 3000 and 5000 of FAA Order 7400.9F, 
Airspace Designations and Reporting Points, dated September 10, 1998, 
and effective September 16, 1998, which is incorporated by reference in 
14 CFR section 71.1. The Class B and Class D airspace areas listed in 
this document would be subsequently published in this Order.

Related Rulemaking Actions

    On May 21, 1970, the FAA published, in the Federal Register, the 
Designation of Federal Airways, Controlled Airspace, and Reporting 
Points Final Rule (35 FR 7782). This rule provided for the 
establishment of Terminal Control Airspace (TCA) areas (now known as 
Class B airspace areas).
    On June 21, 1988, the FAA published, in the Federal Register, the 
Transponder with Automatic Altitude Reporting Capability Requirement 
Final Rule (53 FR 23356). This rule, in part, requires all aircraft to 
have an altitude encoding transponder when operating within 30 nautical 
miles (NM) of any designated TCA (now known as Class B airspace area) 
primary airport from the surface up to 10,000 feet MSL. This rule also 
provides an exclusion for those aircraft not originally certificated 
with an engine-driven electrical system (or those that have not 
subsequently been certified with such a system) balloons, or gliders 
operating outside of the Class B airspace area, but within 30 NM of the 
primary airport.
    On October 14, 1988, the FAA published, in the Federal Register, 
the Terminal Control Area Classification and Terminal Control Area 
Pilot and Navigation Equipment Requirements Final Rule (53 FR 40318). 
This rule, in part, requires the pilot-in-command of a civil aircraft 
operating within a TCA (now known as Class B airspace area) to hold at 
least a private pilot certificate. Excepted from this requirement are 
student pilots who have received certain documented training.
    On December 17, 1991, the FAA published, in the Federal Register, 
the Airspace Reclassification Final Rule (56 FR 65638). This rule, in 
part, discontinued the use of the term ``Terminal Control Area'' (TCA) 
and replaced it with the designation ``Class B airspace area.'' This 
change in terminology is reflected in the remainder of this NPRM.

Background

    The Class B airspace area program was developed to reduce the 
potential for midair collision in the congested airspace surrounding 
airports with high density air traffic operations by providing an area 
wherein all aircraft are subject to certain operating rules and 
equipment requirements.
    The density of traffic and the type of operations being conducted 
in the airspace surrounding these major terminal areas increase the 
probability of midair collisions. In 1970, an extensive study found 
that the majority of midair collisions occurred between a general 
aviation (GA) aircraft and an air carrier or military aircraft, or 
another GA aircraft. The basic causal factor common to these conflicts 
was the mix of aircraft operating in accordance with visual flight 
rules (VFR) and aircraft operating under instrument flight rules (IFR). 
Class B airspace areas provide a method to manage the increasing number 
of IFR and VFR operations. The regulatory requirements of Class B 
airspace areas afford the greatest protection for the greatest number 
of people, by giving air traffic control (ATC) the increased capability 
to provide aircraft separation service.
    The standard configuration of a Class B airspace area contains 
three concentric circles centered on the primary airport extending to 
10, 20, and 30 NM respectively. The standard vertical limit of these 
airspace areas normally should not exceed 10,000 feet mean sea level 
(MSL) with the floor established at the surface in the inner area and 
at levels appropriate to the containment of operations in the outer 
areas. Variations of these criteria may be utilized contingent on the 
terrain, adjacent regulatory airspace, and factors unique to the 
terminal area.

Pre-NPRM Public Input

    As announced in the Federal Register on July 23, 1992 (57 FR 32834) 
an informal airspace meeting was held on September 23, 1992, at the 
Orlando Executive Airport. The purpose of this meeting was to provide 
local airspace users an opportunity to present input on the planned 
modifications to the Orlando Class B airspace area.
    Additional informal airspace meetings were held on January 27 and 
January 28, 1998 (63 FR 71043) at the Orlando Sanford Airport, and the 
Kissimmee Municipal Airport respectively, to discuss planned changes, 
in addition to those presented in 1992. These additional changes are 
necessitated in part by the growth of airport operations at the Orlando 
Sanford Airport, FL. All comments received in response to the initial 
and subsequent informal airspace meetings, and the ensuing comment 
periods, were considered and/or incorporated into this notice of 
proposed rulemaking.
    In response to initial and subsequent informal airspace meetings, 
the FAA received eleven written comments. These comments centered 
around the following: airspace configuration; equipment requirements; 
geographical landmarks; and flyways/corridors. An analysis of the 
comments and the Agency's response follows.

Analysis of Comments

Airspace Configuration

    Several commenters recommended that the ceiling of the Orlando 
Class B airspace area be lowered from the existing 10,000-foot ceiling 
to 7,000 feet.
    The FAA does not agree with these commenters. A ceiling at 10,000 
feet supports IFR approach and departure procedures for the Orlando 
terminal area, and provides optimum use of the airspace to contain 
aircraft operations, and enhance aviation safety. The current ceiling 
of 10,000 feet is required for the separation, segregation, and control 
of aircraft operations, creating a safer environment in this congested 
terminal area.
    The Air Line Pilots Association (ALPA) opposed raising the floors 
to the north in Area D from 1,600 to 2,100 feet MSL, and to the south 
of Orlando International Airport in Area C, from the current designated 
altitudes of 1,500 to 1,600 feet MSL. ALPA believes that raising the 
floors to the north and south of the Class B airspace area would reduce 
separation standards between IFR and VFR aircraft, and increase traffic 
conflicts and pilot deviations at critical phases of flight.
    The FAA does not agree with these comments. In order to effectively 
design a safe and efficient airspace area, the FAA examined several 
factors, including the required climb gradients for departing aircraft, 
the standard rate

[[Page 26707]]

of descent for landing aircraft, and the requirement for operations to 
be contained within the Class B airspace area. Based on this 
examination, the FAA believes that the floor in Area D could be raised 
from 1,600 to a newly proposed 2,000 feet MSL, and Area C from 1,500 to 
1,600 feet MSL without compromising safety.
    Several recommendations were received to raise the floor of Area E 
north and south of Orlando International Airport from 3,000 to 6,000 
feet MSL.
    The FAA does not agree with this recommendation. Currently the 
floor of the Class B airspace area is designated at 3,000 feet MSL 
between a 10- to 25-mile radius of the Orlando International Airport. 
The designated floor of Area E, north and south of the Orlando 
International Airport, is required to allow sufficient airspace for 
sequencing arriving and departing aircraft into and out of the Orlando 
terminal area.
    One commenter suggested eliminating the extensions to the Class B 
airspace area, in the vicinity of the LAMMA and LEESE intersections, 
and in the vicinity of the Lakeland Airport.
    The FAA agrees with this suggestion. Based on current arrival 
routes and altitudes, the FAA is proposing to reduce the current Class 
B airspace area by removing the extensions northeast, northwest, and 
southwest of the Orlando International Airport.
    Several pilots recommended removing the Mid-Florida Airport from 
the Class B airspace area, or raising the floor of the airspace between 
20-30 NM northwest of Orlando International Airport.
    The FAA agrees with this recommendation, and proposes to raise the 
floor in Area F over the Mid-Florida Airport from 3,000 to 6,000 feet 
MSL.
    Two commenters recommended a higher ceiling for the Class B 
airspace area south of the Orlando Executive Airport. These commenters 
are of the opinion that a higher ceiling would provide additional 
airspace for aircraft operating on Runways 13/31 when the Orlando 
Executive Airport tower is closed.
    The FAA agrees, in part, with this recommendation. The area south 
of the Orlando Executive Airport has been raised to 900 feet MSL, and 
the proposed boundary of the 1,600 feet MSL floor relocated to the Lake 
Underhill Road. These proposed changes will allow improved access for 
operations to and from Runway 13/31, and will allow Law Enforcement and 
Lifeguard helicopter operations below the floor of the Class B airspace 
area.
    One commenter stated that Area E, located east of Orlando 
International Airport, should be eliminated because it appears to have 
little significance. This commenter also suggested that the northwest 
edge of the inner core, Area A, would have a negative impact on the 
approaches to Runway 07/25 at Orlando Executive Airport.
    The FAA disagrees with this comment. Area E, east of Orlando 
International Airport, is required to contain approach procedures, and 
to ensure that aircraft remain in the Class B airspace area. Area A has 
been modified since the 1992 proposal and the proposed rule only 
encompass a 5-NM circle around the Orlando International Airport.

Equipment Requirements

    One commenter recommended eliminating the area commonly known as 
the Mode C veil area.
    The FAA does not agree with this comment. In response to the 
Department of Transportation and Related Agencies Appropriation Bill, 
1988 (Pub. L. 100-202) and the Airport and Airway Safety and Capacity 
Expansion Act of 1987 (Pub. L. 100-223) the FAA published, in the 
Federal Register, the Transponder with Automatic Altitude Reporting 
Capability Requirement Final Rule (53 FR 23356; June 21, 1988). This 
rule, commonly referred to as the ``Mode C rule,'' requires all 
aircraft to have an altitude encoding transponder when operating within 
30 NM of any designated Class B airspace area primary airport from the 
surface up to 10,000 feet MSL. This rule also provides an exclusion for 
those aircraft not originally certificated with an engine-driven 
electrical system, (or those that have not subsequently been certified 
with such a system) balloons, or gliders operating outside of the Class 
B airspace area, but within 30 NM of the primary airport.
    The commenter is correct that the proposed airspace area will have 
a veil area wherein a transponder with altitude encoding capability 
will be required. Section 91.215 of Title 14 of the Code of Federal 
Regulations (CFR) sets out requirements for ATC transponder and 
altitude reporting equipment and use; however, this regulation also 
includes procedures whereby aircraft not equipped with the required 
transponder equipment may get relief from the stipulated requirements.

Landmarks/Fixes

    Several commenters recommended using additional geographical 
landmarks to define the boundaries or subareas of the proposed Class B 
airspace area, and the establishment of VFR corridors or VFR flyways 
for the Orlando terminal area.
    The FAA agrees with the concept of these comments. Identifiable and 
prominent landmarks have proven to be extremely useful to pilots 
operating under VFR, providing assistance with identifying the 
boundaries of a Class B airspace area. During the preliminary planning 
for the Class B airspace area design, consideration was given to 
utilizing Global Positioning System coordinates, Very High Frequency 
Omnidirectional Radio Range (VOR) radials, latitudes and longitudes, as 
well as geographical landmarks wherever possible. The FAA will continue 
to work with airspace users to determine the feasibility of VFR 
flyways, and to further identify any additional landmarks to assist GA 
operators with identifying the Class B airspace area.

Corridors/Flyways

    Several pilots recommended the establishment of an uncontrolled 
east-west VFR corridor over Orlando International Airport. The 
Experimental Aircraft Association also supported this recommendation, 
and suggested that an east-west special flight rules area be 
established.
    The FAA does not agree with these recommendations, and believes 
that the establishment of an east-west special flight rules area, or an 
uncontrolled VFR corridor would restrict the flow of air traffic, and 
impede operations in the Orlando terminal area. Current approach 
procedures place a large volume of the aircraft arriving at the Orlando 
International Airport on the east downwind leg of flight while 
descending to 3,000 feet. The purpose of a Class B airspace area is to 
provide optimum use of the airspace to contain aircraft operations and 
enhance aviation safety, creating a safer environment in congested 
terminal areas. Establishing a VFR corridor in close proximity to 
aircraft operating in the Orlando Class B airspace area raises the 
potential for conflict.

The Proposal

    The FAA proposes to amend part 71 of the Federal Aviation 
Regulations (14 CFR part 71) by modifying the Orlando Class B airspace 
area, Orlando, FL; and the Orlando Sanford Airport Class D airspace 
area, Sanford, FL. This proposal (as depicted on the attached chart) 
would modify several subareas within the lateral boundaries of the 
existing Class B airspace area; and modify the vertical limits of the 
Orlando Sanford Airport Class D airspace area.

[[Page 26708]]

The FAA is proposing this action to enhance safety, reduce the 
potential for midair collision, and to improve the management of air 
traffic operations into, out of, and through the Orlando terminal area. 
Specifically, the FAA proposes the following:

Orlando Class B Airspace Area

    Area A. In the reconfiguration of Area A (that area beginning at 
the surface up to 10,000 feet MSL), the FAA proposes to reduce the size 
of Area A to a 5-mile radius of the primary airport, Orlando 
International Airport. This proposed airspace modification would 
contain large turbojet aircraft within the limits of the Class B 
airspace area while operating to and from the primary airport. In 
addition, a portion of Area A beyond 5 NM would be removed from the 
surface area and reconfigured as Area B.
    Area B. The FAA proposes to reconfigure Area B from a section of 
the current surface area, between the 5-mile radius of the primary 
airport, extending west to the John Young Parkway, north to Lake 
Underhill Road, east to the Stanton Power Plant, and south to the 
Orlando VORTAC 14 Distance Measuring Equipment (DME), extending upward 
from 900 feet MSL. This proposed modification would support approach 
and departure procedures for aircraft transitioning to and from the 
Orlando International Airport. Also, this proposed airspace 
modification would allow Law Enforcement and Lifeguard helicopter 
operations below the floor of the Class B airspace area.
    Area C. The floor of Area C would remain at 1,600 feet MSL north of 
the Orlando Executive Airport; however, the FAA proposes to modify the 
lateral limits of Area C to extend north of Lake Underhill Road, south 
of S.R. 436, east of S.R. 423 and S.R. 434, and extending 8 miles east 
of the Orlando Executive Airport. This proposed airspace modification 
would support approach procedures for aircraft transitioning to the 
final approach course for the Orlando International Airport.
    The FAA also proposes to lower the floor of Area C from 3,000 to 
1,600 feet MSL, extending 3 miles to the north and south of the Orlando 
Sanford Airport, east of the Wekiva River, and west of Lake Harney's 
eastern shore. This proposed airspace modification would support 
approach procedures for large turbojet aircraft operations 
transitioning to and from the Orlando Sanford Airport.
    In addition, the FAA proposes to raise the floor of Area C from 
1,500 to 1,600 feet MSL, extending south of the Orlando VORTAC 14 DME 
arc, north of the Orlando VORTAC 20 DME arc, and between 2 and 13 miles 
east of the Kissimmee Airport. This proposed airspace modification 
would support approach procedures for aircraft transitioning to the 
final approach course for the Orlando International Airport. This 
modification would also allow nonparticipating aircraft sufficient 
airspace to conduct VFR operations below the vertical limits of the 
Class B airspace area while transitioning to/from secondary satellite 
airports.
    Area D. The FAA is proposing to modify Area D by raising the floor 
of the area 10 miles north of the Orlando International Airport from 
1,600 to 2,000 feet MSL, and the area southwest of the Orlando 
International Airport from 1,500 to 2,000 feet MSL. This proposed area 
extends between S.R. 423 and Kirkman Road, 6 to 9 miles west of the 
primary airport, between 2 miles north and 5 miles south of the 
Kissimmee Airport, and between 7 miles and 11 miles north of the 
Orlando VORTAC. This proposed airspace modification would provide 
sufficient airspace for sequencing and vectoring arriving and departing 
aircraft in close proximity to the primary airport. It would also 
increase the navigable airspace below the Class B airspace area in the 
vicinity of Kissimmee Municipal Airport.
    Area E. The floor of Area E would remain at 3,000 feet MSL; 
however, the FAA is proposing to expand the lateral limits of Area E to 
the north and south. The FAA proposes to extend Area E 3 miles west of 
the Wekiva River, and between 3 to 6 miles north of the Orlando Sanford 
Airport. This proposed airspace modification would provide sufficient 
airspace for sequencing and vectoring aircraft, and ensure that 
operations are contained within the Class B airspace area.
    The FAA also proposes to extend Area E between the 20-mile and 30-
mile arcs south of the primary airport, and between 7 miles and 15 
miles east of the primary airport. This proposed airspace modification 
would provide sufficient airspace for sequencing and vectoring 
aircraft, and would provide a controlled environment for aircraft 
arriving and departing the Class B airspace area.
    Area F. The FAA proposes to reconfigure the subareas of the 
existing Class B airspace areas as Area F, from 6,000 up to and 
including 10,000 feet MSL, extending from 8 miles west of the primary 
airport to Highway 27. This proposed airspace modification would 
provide sufficient airspace to contain aircraft in a controlled 
environment when transitioning between the en route and terminal phase 
of flight.
    The FAA also proposes to modify Area F from the power line located 
approximately 15 miles east of the primary airport, eastward, to the 
power line located approximately 22 miles east of the primary airport. 
This proposed airspace modification would provide sufficient airspace 
to contain aircraft in a controlled environment when transitioning 
between the en route and terminal phase of flight.

Orlando Sanford Airport Class D Airspace Area

    The FAA proposes to lower the Orlando Sanford Airport Class D 
airspace area from 3,000 to 1,600 feet MSL. The Orlando Sanford Airport 
Class D airspace area would include a radius of 4.4 NM from the Orlando 
Sanford Airport up to but not including 1,600 feet MSL. This proposed 
airspace modification coincides with the FAA's proposal to lower the 
floor of the Class B airspace area in the vicinity of the Orlando 
Sanford Airport.

Regulatory Evaluation Summary

    Changes to Federal Regulations must undergo several economic 
analyses. First, Executive Order 12866 directs that each Federal agency 
shall propose or adopt a regulation only upon a reasoned determination 
that the benefits of the intended regulation justify its costs. Second, 
the Regulatory Flexibility Act requires agencies to analyze the 
economic effect of regulatory changes on small businesses and other 
small entities. Third, the Office of Management and Budget directs 
agencies to assess the effect of regulatory changes on international 
trade. In conducting these analyses, the FAA has determined that this 
proposed rule: (1) would generate benefits that justify its minimal 
costs and is not a ``significant regulatory action'' as defined in the 
Executive Order; (2) is not significant as defined in the Department of 
Transportation's Regulatory Policies and Procedures; (3) would not have 
a significant impact on a substantial number of small entities; (4) 
would not constitute a barrier to international trade; and (5) would 
not contain any Federal intergovernmental or private sector mandate. 
These analyses are summarized here in the preamble, and the full 
Regulatory Evaluation is in the docket.
    The FAA proposes to modify the Orlando Class B and the Orlando 
Sanford Airport Class D airspace areas. The Orlando Class B airspace 
area modification would maintain the 10,000 feet mean sea level (MSL) 
airspace ceiling and redefine the lateral limits of several of the 
existing subareas to

[[Page 26709]]

improve the management of air traffic operations in the Orlando 
terminal area. The Orlando Sanford Airport Class D airspace area 
modification would lower the airspace area from 3,000 to 1,600 feet MSL 
and would include a radius of 4.4 NM from the Orlando Sanford Airport 
up to but not including 1,600 feet MSL.
    The FAA has determined that the modification of the Orlando Class B 
and the Orlando Sanford Airport Class D airspace areas would improve 
the operational efficiency while maintaining aviation safety in the 
terminal area. Also, clearer boundary definition and changes to lateral 
and vertical limits of the subareas would leave additional 
noncontrolled airspace for VFR aircraft transitioning to and from 
satellite airports. This proposal would impose only negligible costs on 
airspace users and could potentially reduce circumnavigation costs to 
some operators.
    The proposed rule would result in negligible additional 
administrative costs to the FAA and no additional operational costs for 
personnel or equipment to the agency. Notices would be sent to pilots 
within a 100-mile radius of the Orlando International Airport at an 
estimated cost of $2,931.00 for postage. Printing of aeronautical 
charts which reflect the changes to the Class B and Class D airspace 
areas would be accomplished during a scheduled chart printing, and 
would result in no additional costs for plate modification and updating 
of charts. Furthermore, no staffing changes would be required to 
maintain the modified Class B and Class D airspace areas. Potential 
increase in FAA operations workload could be absorbed by current 
personnel and equipment.
    In view of the negligible cost of compliance, enhanced aviation 
safety, and improved operational efficiency, the FAA has determined 
that the proposed rule would be cost-beneficial.

Initial Regulatory Flexibility Determination

    The Regulatory Flexibility Act of 1980 establishes ``as a principle 
of regulatory issuance that agencies shall endeavor, consistent with 
the objective of the rule and of applicable statutes, to fit regulatory 
and informational requirements to the scale of the business, 
organizations, and governmental jurisdictions subject to regulation.'' 
To achieve that principal, the Act requires agencies to solicit and 
consider flexible regulatory proposals and to explain the rational for 
their actions. The Act covers a wide-range of small entities, including 
small businesses, not-for-profit organizations and small governmental 
jurisdictions.
    Agencies must perform a review to determine whether a proposed or 
final rule will have a significant economic impact on a substantial 
number of small entities. If the determination is that it will, the 
agency must prepare a regulatory flexibility analysis (RFA) as 
described in the Act.
    However, if an agency determines that a proposed or final rule is 
not expected to have a significant economic impact on a substantial 
number of small entities, section 605(b) of the 1980 act provides that 
the head of the agency may so certify and an RFA is not required. The 
certification must include a statement providing the factual basis for 
this determination, and the reasoning should be clear.
    The FAA has determined that the proposed rule would have a de 
minimus impact on small entities. All commercial and general aviation 
operators who presently use the Orlando International Airport are 
equipped to operate within the modified Class B airspace area. As for 
aircraft that regularly fly through the Orlando Sanford Airport Class D 
airspace area, since the airport is situated within the established 
Orlando Mode C Veil, all aircraft should already have the necessary 
equipment to transition the modified Class B airspace area. Therefore, 
there would be no additional equipment cost to these entities.
    Accordingly, pursuant to the Regulatory Flexibility Act, 5 U.S.C. 
605(b), the Federal Aviation Administration certifies that this rule 
would not have a significant economic impact on a substantial number of 
small entities. The FAA solicits comments from affected entities with 
respect to this finding and determination.

International Trade Impact Assessment

    The proposed rule would not constitute a barrier to international 
trade, including the export of U.S. goods and services to foreign 
countries or the import of foreign goods and services into the United 
States.

Unfunded Mandates Assessment

    Title II of the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (the Act), 
enacted as Public Law 104-4 on March 22, 1995, requires each Federal 
agency, to the extent permitted by law, to prepare a written assessment 
of the effects of any Federal mandate in a proposed or final agency 
rule that may result in the expenditure of $100 million or more (when 
adjusted annually for inflation) in any one year by State, local, and 
tribal governments in the aggregate, or by the private sector. Section 
204(a) of the Act, 2 U.S.C. 1534(a), requires the Federal agency to 
develop an effective process to permit timely input by elected officers 
(or their designees) of State, local, and tribal governments on a 
proposed ``significant intergovernmental mandate.'' A ``significant 
intergovernmental mandate'' under the Act is any provision in a Federal 
agency regulation that would impose an enforceable duty upon State, 
local, and tribal governments in the aggregate of $100 million 
(adjusted annually for inflation) in any one year. Section 203 of the 
Act, 2 U.S.C. 1533, which supplements section 204(a), provides that, 
before establishing any regulatory requirements that might 
significantly or uniquely affect small governments, the agency shall 
have developed a plan, which, among other things, must provide for 
notice to potentially affected small governments, if any, and for a 
meaningful and timely opportunity for these small governments to 
provide input in the development of regulatory proposals.
    This proposed rule does not contain any Federal intergovernmental 
or private sector mandates. Therefore, the requirements of Title II of 
the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 do not apply.

Paperwork Reduction Act

    In accordance with the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. 
3507(d)) there are no requirements for information collection 
associated with this notice.

List of Subjects in 14 CFR Part 71

    Airspace, Incorporation by reference, Navigation (air).

The Proposed Amendment

    In consideration of the foregoing, the Federal Aviation 
Administration proposes to amend 14 CFR part 71 as follows:

PART 71--DESIGNATION OF CLASS A, CLASS B, CLASS C, CLASS D, AND 
CLASS E AIRSPACE AREAS; AIRWAYS; ROUTES; AND REPORTING POINTS

    1. The authority citation for 14 CFR part 71 continues to read as 
follows:

    Authority: 49 U.S.C. 106(g), 40103, 40113, 40120; E.O. 10854, 24 
FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389.


Sec. 71.1  [Amended]

    2. The incorporation by reference in 14 CFR 71.1 of the Federal 
Aviation Administration Order 7400.9F, Airspace Designations and 
Reporting Points,

[[Page 26710]]

dated September 10, 1998, and effective September 16, 1998, is amended 
as follows:

Paragraph 3000--Subpart B--Class B Airspace

* * * * *

ASO FL B  Orlando, FL [Revised]

Orlando International Airport (Primary Airport)
    (Lat. 28 deg.25'44'' N., long. 81 deg.18'58'' W.)
Orlando VORTAC
    (Lat. 28 deg.32'34'' N., long. 81 deg.20'06'' W.)

Boundaries

    Area A--That airspace extending upward from the surface to and 
including 10,000 feet MSL within a radius of 5 NM from the Orlando 
International Airport.
    Area B--That airspace extending upward from 900 feet MSL to and 
including 10,000 feet MSL beginning at a point of the intersection 
of State Road (S.R.) 423 (John Young Parkway) and Interstate 4, 
thence northeast along Interstate 4 to the intersection of 
Interstate 4 and S.R. 441 (Orange Blossom Trail), thence direct to 
the intersection of Lake Underhill Road and Palmer Street, thence 
east along Lake Underhill Road to the intersection of Lake Underhill 
Road and the Central Florida Greenway, thence direct to lat. 
28 deg.30'00'' N., long. 8 deg.11'00'' W., (one mile northwest of 
the Stanton Power Plant), thence south to the intersection of the 
ORL VORTAC 14-mile radius arc, thence clockwise along the 14-mile 
radius arc of the ORL VORTAC to the intersection of S.R. 423, thence 
north along S.R. 423 to the point of beginning.
    Area C--That airspace extending upward from 1,600 feet MSL to 
and including 10,000 feet MSL beginning at a point of the 
intersection of the Wekiva River at lat. 28 deg.44'00'' N., long. 
81 deg.25'30'' W., thence north along the Wekiva River to the 
intersection of lat. 28 deg.50'00'' N. Thence east to lat. 
28 deg.50'00'' N., long. 81 deg.02''30'' W., thence south to the 
intersection of lat. 28 deg.44'00'' N., long. 81 deg.02'30'' W., 
thence west to the point of beginning.
    Also that airspace north of the Orlando Executive Airport 
extending upward from 1,600 feet MSL to and including 10,000 feet 
MSL beginning at a point of the intersection of Interstate 4 and 
S.R. 423. Thence north along S.R. 423 to the intersection of S.R. 
423 and S.R. 441 (Orange Blossom Trail). Thence direct to the 
intersection of S.R. 434 (Forest City Road) and S.R. 424 (Edgewater 
Drive), thence north along S.R. 434 to the intersection of S.R. 436 
(Altamonte Drive.), thence east along S.R. 436 to the intersection 
of Hwy 17-92, thence east along lat. 28 deg.39'20'' N., to long. 
81 deg.11'00'' W. Thence south to the intersection of lat. 
28 deg.30'00'' N., thence northwest direct to the intersection of 
Lake Underhill Road and S.R. 417 (Central Florida Greenway), thence 
west along Lake Underhill Road to the intersection of Palmer Street. 
Thence southwest direct to the intersection of Interstate 4 and the 
S.R. 441, thence southwest along Interstate 4 to the point of 
beginning.
    Also that airspace south of the primary airport extending upward 
from 1,600 feet MSL to and including 10,000 feet MSL beginning at a 
point of the intersection of long. 81 deg.24'06'' W. and the ORL 
VORTAC 14-mile radius arc, thence counterclockwise along the 14-mile 
radius arc of the ORL VORTAC to the intersection of long. 
81 deg.11'00'' W., thence south to the intersection of the ORL 
VORTAC 20-mile radius arc, thence clockwise along the ORL VORTAC 20-
mile radius arc to long. 81 deg.24'06'' W., thence north to the 
point of beginning.
    Area D--That airspace extending upward from 2,000 feet MSL to 
and including 10,000 feet MSL beginning at a point of the 
intersection of Interstate 4 and long. 81 deg.27'30'' W., thence 
north to lat. 28 deg.44'00'' N., thence east to long. 81 deg.11'00'' 
W., thence south to lat. 28 deg.39'20'' N., thence west to the 
intersection of S.R. 436 and Hwy 17-92, thence west along S.R. 436 
to the intersection of S.R. 436 and S.R. 434, thence south along 
S.R. 434 to the intersection of S.R. 434 and S.R. 424, thence direct 
to the intersection of S.R. 423 and S.R. 441, thence south along 
S.R. 423 to the intersection of the ORL VORTAC 14-mile radius arc, 
thence counterclockwise along the 14-mile radius arc of the ORL 
VORTAC to long. 81 deg.24'06'' W. thence south to the intersection 
of the ORL VORTAC 20-mile radius arc, thence clockwise to the 
intersection of long. 81 deg.27'30'' W., thence north to the point 
of beginning.
    Area E--That airspace extending upward from 3,000 feet MSL to 
and including 10,000 feet MSL beginning at a point of the 
intersection of lat. 28 deg.44'00'' N., long. 81 deg.27'30'' W., 
thence north to the intersection of lat. 28 deg.53'00'' N., thence 
east to the intersection of the MCO Mode C Veil 30-NM radius arc, 
thence southeast along this arc to the intersection of the power 
lines at lat. 28 deg.50'20'' N., thence southeast along these power 
lines to lat. 28 deg.44'00'' N., thence west to long. 81 deg.02'30'' 
W., thence north to lat. 28 deg.50'00'' N., thence west to the 
intersection of the Wekiva River, thence south along the Wekiva 
River to lat. 28 deg.44'00'' N., thence west to the point of 
beginning.
    Also that airspace extending upward from 3,000 feet MSL to and 
including 10,000 feet MSL beginning south of the primary airport at 
a point of the intersection of long. 81 deg.27'30'' W. and the ORL 
20-mile radius arc, thence counterclockwise along the 20-mile radius 
arc of the ORL VORTAC to the intersection of long. 81 deg.11'00'' 
W., thence north to the intersection of lat. 28 deg.44'00'' N., 
thence east to the intersection of the Florida Power transmission 
lines at lat. 28 deg.44'00'' N., long. 81 deg.05'20'' W., (one half 
mile west of Southerland Airport), thence south along this power 
line to the intersection of Highway 50 at lat. 28 deg.32'10'' N., 
long. 81 deg.03'45'' W., thence south to the Bee Line Expressway, at 
lat. 28 deg.27'05'' N., long. 81 deg.03'45'' W., thence west along 
the Bee Line Expressway to the intersection of lat. 28 deg.27'00'' 
N., long. 81 deg.04'40'' W., thence south to the intersection of the 
ORL VORTAC 30-mile radius arc, thence clockwise along the 30-mile 
radius arc of the ORL VORTAC to long. 81 deg.27'30'' W., thence 
north to the point of beginning.
    Area F--That airspace extending upward from 6,000 feet MSL to 
and including 10,000 feet MSL beginning south of the primary airport 
at the intersection of the ORL VORTAC 30-mile radius arc and long. 
81 deg.27'30'' W., thence clockwise to the intersection of Highway 
27, thence north along Highway 27 to the intersection of Highway 27 
and long. 81 deg.45'00'' W., thence north along long. 81 deg.45'00'' 
W. to the intersection of the ORL VORTAC 24-mile radius arc, thence 
clockwise along the 24-mile radius arc to the intersection of lat. 
28 deg.53'00'' N., thence east to lat. 28 deg.53'00'' N., long. 
81 deg.27'30'' W., thence south to the point of beginning.
    Also that airspace extending upward from 6,000 feet MSL to and 
including 10,000 feet MSL beginning at the Florida Power 
transmission lines at lat. 28 deg.44'00'' N., long. 81 deg.05'20'' 
W., thence east along lat. 28 deg.44'00'' N. to the Florida Power 
transmission lines at lat. 28 deg.44'00'' N., long. 81 deg.55'40'' 
W., thence southeast and south along these power lines to the 
intersection of Highway 50, thence south to the power lines at lat. 
28 deg.22'14'' N., long. 80 deg.52'30'' W., thence southwest along 
these power lines to the intersection of long. 81 deg.04'40' deg. 
W., thence north along long. 81 deg.04'40'' W., to the intersection 
of the Bee Line Expressway at lat. 28 deg.27'05'' N., long. 
81 deg.04'40'' W., thence east along the Bee Line Expressway to lat. 
28 deg.27'00'' N., long. 81 deg.03'45'' W., thence north to the 
intersection of Highway 50 and the Florida Power transmission lines 
at lat. 28 deg.32'10'' N., long. 81 deg.03'45'' W., thence north 
along these power lines to the point of beginning.
* * * * *

Paragraph 5000--Subpart D--Class D Airspace

* * * * *

ASO FL D  Sanford, FL [Revised]

Orlando Sanford Airport, FL [formerly known as the Central Florida 
Regional Airport]
    (Lat. 28 deg.46'44'' N., long. 81 deg.14'18'' W.)

    That airspace extending upward from the surface to but not 
including 1,600 feet MSL within a 4.4-mile radius of the Orlando 
Sanford Airport. This Class D airspace area is effective during the 
specific dates and times established in advance by a Notice to 
Airmen. The effective date and time will thereafter be continuously 
published in the Airport/Facility Directory.
* * * * *
    Issued in Washington, DC, on May 11, 1999.
Reginald C. Matthews,
Acting Program Director for Air Traffic Airspace Management.

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[[Page 26711]]

Appendix--Proposed Orlando Class B Airspace
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] TP17MY99.000


[FR Doc. 99-12360 Filed 5-14-99; 8:45 am]
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