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United States In cooperation with Department of South Carolina Agriculture Agricultural Experiment Soil Survey of Station and Soil South Carolina Horry County, Conservation Land Resources Service Conservation Commission South Carolina 'M N N", A f-1 A. A' i- HOW TO L .... . ...... Locate Your area of interest on ............. .................. the "Index to Map Sheets." . ...... .......... ............. ................ :j:::.v N P..: -7 ... . . ...... ............... v F.: :v: Note the number of the map sheet and turn to that sheet. Locate your, area of interest 30 on the map sheet. WaF 7 Fa BaC AsB v: BaC 4 CA. X j.:::::: X ::::.::!::v List the map unit symbols 40 that are in your area. Symbols xxv: WdF::::: AsB ........ .. . . .......... BaC 4- Ce 17 @Fa IF. .......... ................. Fa ..... . .... .......... ........ .. H a .... . ..... .... ...... . WaF 11S SOIL SURVEY Turn to "Index to Soil Map Units" --ppq ............ which lists the name of each map unit and the page where that map unit is described. ........... ................... . . . ..... .... .... ......... ---------- . ... .... VXPF ..... . ....... ........ .... .. .... . .............. ......... ............. ........... . . ............... ......... . '00. @- ...... ........ ........ . .... ........ .. ..................... ...... ...... XXXX:@:.- "W-ft. See "Summary of Tables" (following the Contents) for location of additional data 7. on a specific soil use. q FXF: Consult "Contents" for parts of the publication that will meet your specific needs. This survey contains useful information for farmers or ranchers, foresters or agronomists; for planners, community decision makers, engineers, developers, builders, or homebuyers; for conservationists, recreationists, teachers, or students; to specialists in wildlife management, waste disposal, or pollution cnntrol. This soil survey is a publication of the National Cooperative Soil Survey, a joint effort of the United States Department of Agriculture and other federal agencies, state agencies including the Agricultural Experiment Stations, and local agencies. The Soil Conservation Service has leadership for the federal part of the National Cooperative Soil Survey. In line with Department of Agriculture policies, benefits of this program are available to all, regardless of race, color, national origin, sex, religion, marital status, or age. Major fieldwork for this soil survey was completed in 1982. Soil names and descriptions were approved in 1983. Unless otherwise indicated, statements in this publication refer to conditions in the survey area in 1983. This soil survey was made cooperatively by the Soil Conservation Service, the South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station, and the South Carolina Land Resources Conservation Commission. It is part of the technical assistance furnished to the Horry County Soil and Water Conservation District. Soil maps in this survey may be copied without permission. Enlargement of these maps, however, could cause misunderstanding of the detail of mapping. If enlarged, maps do not show the small areas of contrasting soils that could have been shown at a larger scale. The first soil survey of Horry County was published in 1918. This survey updates the previous publication and provides additional information. Cover: Tobacco growing on Centenary fine sand. This soil Is suited to most row crops. Contents Index to map units ...............................I ........................ iv Engineering .................................................................. 50 Summary of tables...'. ... **-- ... -* .... ** ....... ** .... -- ...* .....v Soil properties ............................................................... 55 Foreword .................... *... ** ...... ** .....* ...... -- ...... -' ...* ....... vii Engineering index properties ...................................... 55 General nature of the county ......................................... 1 Physical and chemical properties .............................. 56 How this survey was made ............................................2 Soil and water features ............................................... 57 Map unit composition ..................................................3 Engineering index test data ........................................ 58 General soil map units .................................................5 Classification of the soils ............................................ 59 Detailed soil map units ................................................ 15 Soil series and their morphology ................................... 59 Prime farmland .............................................................. 41 Formation of the soils .................................................. 85 Use and management of the soils ............................ 43 Factors of soil formation ............................................. 85 Crops and pasture ....................................................... 43 Processes of soil horizon differentiation ................... 87 Woodland management and productivity ................. 46 References ..................................................................... 89 Recreation .................................................................... 47 Glossary .......................................................................... 91 Wildlife habitat ............................................................. 48 Tables .............................................................................. 95 Soil Series Bladen series ................................................................... 59 Lynn Haven series .......................... ............................... 71 Blanton series .................................................................. 60 Meggett series ................................................................. 72 Bohicket series ................................................................ 61 Nankin series ................................................................... 72 Brookman series .............................................................. 61 Nansemond series .......................................................... 73 Centenary series .............................................................. 62 Newhan series ................................................................. 74 Chisolm series ................................................................. 63 Norfolk series...".". ..... ... 74 Coxville series .................................................................. 63 Ogeechee series ............................................................. 75 Duplin series .................................................................... 64 Osier series .... :..... *-* ....... 76 Echaw series .................................................................... 65 Pocomoke series ............................................................. 76 Emporia series ................................................................. 65 Rimini series ..................................................................... 77 Eulonia series ..............................o ................................... 66 Rutlege series .................................................................. 77 Goldsboro series ......... 0................................................... 67 Suffolk series..".."... .... *-* ......... **** ...... .... 78 Hobcaw series ................................................................. 67 Surnmerton series ........................................................... 78 Hobonny series ................................................................ 68 Wahee series ................................................................... 79 Johnston series ............................................0 .................. 68 Witherbee series .............................................................. 80 Kenansville series ........................................................... 69 Woodington series .......................................................... 80 Lakeland series .............o................................................. 69 Yauhannah series ............................................................ 81 Leon series ....................................................................... 70 Yemassee series ............................................................. 82 Lynchburg series ............................................................. 70 Yonges series .................................................................. 83 Issued November 1986 proqextY 0' CSC jus Department of commerce LibrarY Center 140AA C 2234 [email protected] .-13 dc Index t o* Map Units Bc-Beaches ................................................................... 15 Me-Meggett loam ................................................... ** ..... 29 Bd-Bladen fine sandy loam ......................................... 16 NaB-Nankin fine sandy loam, 2 to 6 percent BnA-Blanton sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes ................. 17 slopes ........................................................................ 30 Bo-Bohicket silty clay loam ......................................... 17 NeA-Nansemond loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent Br-Brookman loam ........................................................ 17 slopes ........................................................................ 30 Ce-Centenary fine sand ............................................... 18 NhB-Newhan fine sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes ......... 31 ChB-Chisolm fine sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes ......... 19 NoA-Norfolk loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent Co-Coxville fine sandy loam ........................................ 19 slopes ........................................................................ 31 DuA-Duplin loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes. 21 Og-Ogeechee loamy fine sand ................................... 32 Ec-Echaw sand ............................................................. 21 Os-Osier loamy sand .................................................... 32 EmB-Emporia loamy fine sand, 2 to 6 percent Po-Pocomoke fine sandy loam ................................... 33 slopes ........................................................................ 22 RmB-Rimini sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes ................... 33 EuA-Eulonia loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent Ru-Rutlege loamy sand ................................................ 34 slopes ........................................................................ 22 SfA-Suffolk loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes. 34 EuB-Eulonia loamy fine sand, 2 to 6 percent SfB-Suffolk loamy fine sand, 2 to 6 percent slopes. 34 slopes ........................................................................ 23 GoA-Goldsborc, loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent SmA-Summerton fine sandy loam, 0 to 2 percent slopes ........................................................................ 24 slopes ......................................... .............................. 35 Ho-Hobcaw fine sandy loam .... .................................. 24 Ud-Udorthents and Udipsamments, well drained ..... 35 Hy-Hobonny muck ........................................................ 25 Wa-Wahee fine sandy loam ........................................ 36 Jo-Johnston loam ......................................................... 26 We-Witherbee sand ...................................................... 36 KeB-Kenansville fine sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes ... 26 Wo-Woodington fine sandy loam ................................ 37 LaB-Lakeland sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes ............... 27 YaA-Yauhannah fine sandy loam, 0 to 2 percent Le-Leon fine sand ......................................................... 28 slopes ........................................................................ 37 Ln--Lynchburg loamy fine sand .................................... 28 Ye-Yemassee loamy fine sand ................................... 38 Ly-Lynn Haven sand ..................................................... 29 Yo-Yonges fine sandy loam ........................................ 39 iv Summary of Tables Temperature and precipitation (table 1) ........................................................... 96 Freeze dates in spring and fall (table 2) .......................................................... 97 Probability Temperature. Growing season (table 3) ................................................................................... 97 Acreage and proportionate extent of the soils (table 4) ................................ 98 A cres. Percent Land capability classes and yields per acre of crops and pasture (table 5) ....................................................................................................................... 99 Land capability. Corn. Soybeans. Tobacco. Wheat Oats. Bahiagrass. Improved bermudagrass. Capability classes and subclasses (table 6) .................................................... 102 Total acreage. Major management concerns. Woodland management ard productivity (table 7) ......................................... 103 Ordination symbol. Management concerns. Potential productivity. Trees to plant Recreational development (table 8) .................................................................. 107 Camp areas. Plcnlc areas. Playgrounds. Paths and tralls. Golf fairways. Wildlife habitat (table 9) ..................................................................................... 110 Potential for habliat elements. Potential as habItat for- Openland wildlife, Woodland wildlife, Welland wildlife. Building site development (table 10) ................................................................ 113 Shallow excavations. Dwellings without basements. Dwellings with basements. Sma# commercial buildings. Local roads and streets. Lawns and landscaping. Sanitary facilities (table 11) ................................................................................ 116 Septic tank absorption fields Sewage lagoon areas Trench sanitary landfill. Area sanitaly landfill, Daily cover for landfill. Construction materials (table 12) ...................................................................... 119 Roadfill. Sand. Gravel, Topsoil. Water management (table 13) ........................................................................... 122 Limitations for-Pond reservoir areas, Embankments, dikes, and levees; Aquifer-fed excavated ponds. Features affecting-Drainage, Irrigation, Grassed waterways Engineering index properties (table 14) ........................................................... 125 Depth USDA texture Classificaflon-UnIfied, AASHTO Percentage passing sieve-4, 10, 40, 200. Liquid limit. Plasticity index. v Physical and chemical properties of the soils (table 15) ............................... 130 Depth. Clay. Moist bulk density. Permeability. Available water capacity Soll reaction Salinity Shrink-swell potential. Erosion factors. Organic matter Soil and water features (table 16) ..................................................................... 133 Hydrologic group Flooding High water table Rlsk of corrosion. Engineering index test data (table 17) ............................................................. 136 Classification. Graln-size d1stributlon. Liquid 11mit Plasticity index. Classification of the soils (table 18) .................................................................. 137 Family or higher taxonomic class Vi Foreword In This soil survey contains information that can be used in land-planning programs in Horry County. It contains predictions of soil behavior for selected land uses. The survey also highlights limitations and hazards inherent in the soil, improvements needed to overcome the limitations, and the impact of selected land uses on the environment. This soil survey is designed for many different users. Farmers, foresters, and agronomists can use it to evaluate the potential of the soil and the management needed for maximum food and fiber production. Planners, community officials, engineers, developers, builders, and home buyers can use the survey to plan land use, select sites for construction, and identify special practices needed to insure proper performance. Conservationists, teachers, students, and specialists in recreation, wildlife management, waste disposal, and pollution control can use the survey to help them understand, protect, and enhance the environment. Great differences in soil properties can occur within short distances. Some soils are seasonally wet or subject to flooding. Some are too unstable to be used as a foundation for buildings or roads. Clayey or wet soils are poorly suited to use as septic tank absorption fields. A high water table makes a soil poorly suited to basements or underground installations. These and many other soil properties that affect land use are described in this soil survey. Broad areas of soils are shown on the general soil map. The location of each soil is shown on the detailed soil maps. Each soil in the survey area is described. Information on specific uses is given for each soil. Help in using this publication and additional information are available at the local office of the Soil Conservation Service or the Cooperative Extension Service. 00- [email protected] (4e. )0AW&Q&d4 Billy R. Abercrombie State Conservationist Soil Conservation Service vii SOUTH CAROLINA COLUMBIA 0 Location of Horry County in South Carolina. Soil Survey of Horry County, South Carolina By Travis A. Dudley, Soil Conservation Service Fieldwork by Travis A. Dudley, party leader, C.J. Mitchell, Jr., Frank Stiff, and Robert T. Eppinette, Soil Conservation Service, and J.J. Pitts, South Carolina Land Resources Conservation Commission United States Department of Agriculture Soil Conservation Service, in cooperation with South Carolina Agricultural Experiment Station and South Carolina Land Resources Conservation Commission Horry County is in the eastern part of South Carolina. Pee Dee River form the western boundary of Horry Its land area is 1, 150 square miles, or 736,000 acres. County. 7he population of the county is approximately 100,000. Conway, the county seat, is in the south-central part of Conway, the county seat, has a population of the county. A long, narrow area of smooth, sandy approximately 10,000. Most of Horry County is rural, but beaches bordering the Atlantic Ocean extends along the urban centers are concentrated along the Atlantic Coast. eastern edge of Horry County from the North Carolina Much of the land is in woodland, but some is used for State line to the north into Georgetown County to the the production of row crops, such as corn, soybeans, south. This strip of beaches is called the Grand Strand and tobacco. The main industries are textiles, electronics Area. equipment, wood products, and tourism. Most of Horry County is in the Atlantic Coast Flatwoods Land Resource Area. A narrow area adjacent General Nature of the County to the coast making up an estimated 1 percent of the The first inhabitants of Horry County were Indians of county is in the Tidewater Area. Relief generally is slight the Pee Dee culture. The first Europeans made up a except in the areas adjacent to major rivers and large Spanish expedition that passed through the area in the swamps. Elevation ranges from sea level in the early 1500's. southeastern part of the county to about 113 feet in the In the 1730's, King George 11 of England had many north-central and northern part of the county. townships established to defend the countryside from The county is somewhat rectangular. Its boundaries Indian attack. One of these townships, Kingston, was are North Carolina on the north and east, Georgetown surveyed in 1731 on the west bank of the Waccamaw County and the Atlantic Ocean on the south, and Dillon, River. About three years later, a town, also called Marion, and Georgetown Counties on the west. The Kingston, was planned near the center of the township. Waccamaw River meanders along the southwestern part The town was opened for settlement in 1735. This area of the county. Its headwaters are in North Carolina, and was included in the Georgetown District, one of seven it empties into Winyah Bay in Georgetown County. The districts into which the state was divided in 1768. In Lumber River, the Little Pee Dee River, and the Great 1785, Georgetown District was further divided into four 2 Soil Survey counties. One of them was Kingston, which had the The prevailing wind is from the south-southwest. same boundaries as the present Horry County. The Average windspeed is highest, 10 miles per hour, in name was changed in 1801, when the citizens of summer. Kingston County, Georgetown District, petitioned the General Assembly to make the county into Horry District. The name honored Peter Horry, Brigadier General of the How This Survey Was Made militia that encompassed Kingston. The name of the town of Kingston was changed to Conwayborough, and This survey was made to provide information about the later it was changed to Conway. In 1868 Horry District soils in the survey area. The information includes a was changed to Horry County. description of the soils and their location and a The growth and development of this part of South discussion of the suitability, limitations, and management Carolina have been held back by poor drainage. The of the soils for specified uses. Soil scientists observed settlers were able to use the higher areas for the steepness, length, and shape of slopes; the general homesteads and as small fields to produce food crops. pattern of drainage; and the kinds of crops and native Low, wet areas were left in their natural state. plants growing on the soils. They dug many holes to study the soil profile, which is the sequence of natural Climate layers, or horizons, in a soil. The profile extends from the surface down into the unconsolidated material from Prepared by the National Climatic Center, Asheville, North Carolina. which the soil formed. The unconsolidated material is Table 1 gives data on temperature and precipitation devoid of roots and other living organisms and has not for the survey area as recorded at Conway, South been changed by other biological activity. Carolina, in the period 1951 to 1978. Table 2 shows The soils in the survey area occur in an orderly pattern probable dates of the first freeze in fall and the last that is related to the geology, the landforms, relief, freeze in spring. Table 3 provides data on length of the climate, and the natural vegetation of the area. Each growing season. kind of soil is associated with a particular kind of In winter the average temperature is 47 degrees F, landscape or with a segment of the landscape. By and the average daily minimum temperature is 35 observing the soils in the survey area and relating their degrees. The lowest temperature on record, which position to specific segments of the landscape, a soil occurred at Conway on December 14, 1962, is 10 scientist develops a concept, or model, of how the soils degrees. In summer the average temperature is 79 were formed. Thus, during mapping, this model enables degrees, and the average daily maximum temperature is the soil scientist to predict with considerable accuracy 89 degrees. The highest recorded temperature, which the kind of soil at a specific location on the landscape. occurred at Conway on June 28, 1954, is 106 degrees. Commonly, individual soils on the landscape merge Growing degree days are shown in table 1. They are into one another as their characteristics gradually equivalent to "heat units." During the month, growing change. To construct an accurate soil map, however, soil degree days accumulate by the amount that the average scientists must determine the boundaries between the temperature each day exceeds a base temperature (50 soils. They can observe only a limited number of soil degrees F). The normal monthly accumulation is used to profiles. Nevertheless, these observations, supplemented schedule single or successive plantings of a crop by an understanding of the soill-landscape relationship, between the last freeze in spring and the first freeze in are sufficient to verify predictions of the kinds of soil in fall. an area and to determine the boundaries. The total annual precipitation is 51 inches. Of this, 31 Soil scientists recorded the characteristics of the soil inches, or 60 percent, usually falls in April through profiles that they studied. They noted soil color, texture, September. The growing season for most crops falls size and shape of soil aggregates, kind and amount of within this period. In 2 years out of 10, the rainfall in April rock fragments, distribution of plant roots, acidity, and through September is less. than 25 inches. The heaviest other features that enable them to identify soils. After 1-day rainfall during the period of record was 8.25 inches describing the soils in the survey area and determining at Conway on September 13, 1964. their properties, the soil scientists assigned the soils to Snowfall is rare. In 60 percent of the winters, there is taxonomic classes (units). Taxonomic classes are no measurable snowfall. In 15 percent, the snowfall, concepts. Each taxonomic class has a set of soil usually of short duration, is more than 2 inches. The characteristics with precisely defined limits. The classes heaviest 1-day snowfall on record was more than 12 are used as a basis for comparison to classify soils inches. systematically. The system of taxonomic classification The average relative humidity in midafternoon is about used in the United States is based mainly on the kind 60 percent. Humidity is higher at night, and the average and character of soil properties and the arrangement of at dawn is about 80 percent. The sun shines 65 percent horizons within the profile. After the soil scientists of the time possible in summer and 60 percent in winter. classified and named the soils in the survey area, they Florry County, South Carolina 3 compared the individual soils with similar soils in the identified and named according to the taxonomic same taxonomic class in other areas so that they could classification of the dominant soil or soils. Within a confirm data and assemble additional data based on taxonomic class there are precisely defined limits for the experience and research. properties of the soils. On the landscape, however, the While a soil survey is in progress, samples of some of soils are natural objects. In common with other natural the soils in the area are generally collected for laboratory objects, they have a characteristic variability in their analyses and for engineering tests. Soil scientists properties. Thus, the range of some observed properties interpreted the data from these analyses and tests as may extend beyond the limits defined for a taxonomic well as the field-observed characteristics and the soil class. Areas of soils of a single taxonomic class rarely, if properties in terms of expected behavior of the soils ever, can be mapped without including areas of soils of under different uses. Interpretations for all of the soils other taxonomic classes. Consequently, every map unit were field tested through observation of the soils in is made up of the soil or soils for which it is named and different uses under different levels of management. some soils that belong to other taxonomic classes. In Some interpretations are modified to fit local conditions, the detailed soil map units, these latter soils are called and new interpretations sometimes are developed to inclusions or included soils. In the general soil map units, meet local needs. Data were assembled from other they are called soils of minor extent. sources, such as research information, production Most inclusions have properties and behavioral records, and field experience of specialists. For example, patterns similar to those of the dominant soil or soils in data on crop yields under defined levels of management the map unit, and thus they do not affect use and v%,ere assembled from farm records and from field or plot management. These are called noncontrasting (similar) experiments on the same kinds of soil. inclusions. They may or may not be mentioned in the Predictions about soil behavior are based not only on map unit descriptions. Other inclusions, however, have soil properties but also on such variables as climate and properties and behavior divergent enough to affect use oiological activity. Soil conditions are predictable over or require different management. These are contrasting @ong periods of time, but they are not predictable from (dissimilar) inclusions. They generally occupy small areas year to year. For example, soil scientists can state with a and cannot be shown separately on the soil maps -fairly high degree of probability that a given soil will have because of the scale used in mapping. The inclusions of a high water table within certain depths in most years, contrasting soils are mentioned in the map unit but they cannot assure that a high water table will descriptions. A few inclusions may not have been always be at a specific level in the soil on a specific observed, and consequently are not mentioned in the date. descriptions, especially where the soil pattern was so After soil scientists located and identified the complex that it was impractical to make enough significant natural bodies of soil in the survey area, they observations to identify all of the kinds of soils on the drew the boundaries of these bodies on aerial landscape. photographs and identified each as a specific map unit. The presence of inclusions in a map unit in no way Aerial photographs show trees, buildings, fields, roads, diminishes the usefulness or accuracy of the soil data. and rivers, all of which help in locating boundaries The objective of soil mapping is not to delineate pure accurately. taxonomic classes of soils but rather to separate the landscape into segments that have similar use and 10ap Unit Composition management requirements. The delineation of such landscape segments on the map provides sufficient A map unit delineation on a soil map represents an information for the development of resource plans, but area dominated by one major kind of soil or an area onsite investigation is needed to plan for intensive uses dominated by several kinds of soil. A map unit is in small areas. 5 General Soil Map Units The general soil map at the back of this publication map unit has many roads that provide easy access to all shows broad areas that have a distinctive pattern of parts of the map unit. Farm ponds are numerous. soils, relief, and drainage. Each map unit on the general This map unit makes up about 15.5 percent of the soil map is a unique natural landscape. Typically, a map county. It is about 21 percent Woodington soils, 17 unit consists of one or more major soils and some minor percent Goldsboro soils, and 8 percent Pocomoke soils. soils. It is named for the major soils. The soils making up The remaining 54 percent is soils of minor extent. one unit can occur in other units but in a different The Woodington soils are in broad, nearly level areas pattern. or in slightly concave areas on intermediate elevations. The general soil map can be used to compare the These soils have a grayish loamy surface layer and a suitability of large areas for general land uses. Areas of grayish loamy subsoil. suitable soils can be identified on the map. Likewise, The Goldsboro soils are in broad, nearly level areas areas where the soils are not suitable can be identified. on slightly higher elevations. These soils have a Because of its small scale, the map is not suitable for brownish sandy surface layer and a mottled, brownish planning the management of a farm or field or for loamy subsoil. se lecting a site for a road or a building or other structure. The Pocomoke soils are in broad, nearly level areas or rhe soils in any one map unit differ from place to place in drainageways on the lower elevations. These soils in slope, depth, drainage, and other characteristics that have a black loamy surface layer and a grayish brown affect management. loamy subsoil. The soils of minor extent in this map unit include the Nearly Level and Gently Sloping Soils Blanton, Kenansville, Suffolk, Norfolk, Emporia, Nankin, nat Have a Loamy Subsoil and Surnmerton soils on the higher ridges; the Lynchburg soils at intermediate elevations; and the Three general soil map units, all of them in the Johnston and Rutlege soils in depressions and along western half of the county, make up this group. The soils drainageways. range from very poorly drained to well drained. The About half of the acreage of this map unit has been acreage of these soils is about evenly divided between cleared. Most of the cleared areas are used for row openland and woodland. crops; some are used for pasture and hay, In most areas, the soils are suited to corn, soybeans, and 1. Woodington-Goldsboro-Pocomoke tobacco. Drainage is needed to produce consistently high yields. Leaving crop residue on or near the surface Poorly drained, moderately well drained, and very poorly helps to conserve moisture, maintain tilth, control drained soils that have a loamy or sandy surface layer erosion, and increase production. and a loamy subsoll,- on broad, nearly level and slightly These soils are mostly suited to pasture and hay. concave areas Improved bermudagrass and bahiagrass grow well. A This map unit is in nearly level areas on uplands and proper stocking rate, pasture rotation, and restricted in drainageways that are generally poorly defined. Soils grazing during wet periods help keep the pasture and in the broad, nearly level areas have a lower water table soil in good condition. Lowering the water table by the than do the soils in the slightly concave areas. This map use of shallow surface drains improves yields and unit is about ten miles wide and crosses the upper lengthens the grazing season. northern part of the county in an easterly direction. These soils are suited to slash pine, loblolly pine, and About half of the acreage of this map unit, mostly on longleaf pine. Where competing vegetation is controlled higher lying areas, is in openland. The rest of the or removed by site preparation, burning, cutting, or acreage, which is in lower lying areas that have not been girdling, seedlings survive and grow well. In some areas drained, is in woodland of mostly mixed pine and of this map unit, the use of planting and harvesting hardwood trees. About half of the buildings in this map equipment is severely limited by wetness and ponding. unit are farmsteads that have many adjacent buildings. Most areas of this map unit are poorly suited to most The other buildings are homes on small acreages. This engineering uses because of wetness. Except for the 6 Soil Survey soils on the higher elevations, the soils in this map unit These soils are suited to pasture and hay. Improved have severe limitations for use as septic tank absorption bermudagrass and bahiagrass grow well. A proper fields. Wetness and ponding severely limit most areas of stocking rate, pasture rotation, and restricted grazing this map unit for use as sites for dwellings, for local during wet periods help keep the pasture and soil in roads and streets, and for most recreation uses. This good condition. Shallow surface drains can be used to limitation can commonly be reduced by special design lower the water table. and increased maintenance. These soils are suited to slash pine, loblolly pine, and longleaf pine. Where competing vegetation is controlled 2. Nansemond-Pocomoke-Kenansville or removed, by site preparation, burning, cuffing, or Moderately well drained, vely poorly drained, and well girdling, seedlings survive and grow well. In some areas drained soils that have a sandy or loamy surface layer of this map unit, the use of planting and harvesting and a loamy subsoil,- on broad, nearly level and gently equipment is severely limited by wetness and ponding. sloping areas Most areas of this map unit are poorly suited to most This map unit is on upland ridges and in moderately engineering uses because of wetness. Except for the well-defined drainageways, Soils in the gently sloping soils on the higher elevations, the soils in this map unit areas have a lower water table than the soils in the have severe limitations for use as septic tank absorption nearly level areas. Areas of this map unit are about six fields. Wetness and ponding severely limit most areas of miles wide and stretch across the northern part of the this map unit for use as sites for dwellings and local county in an easterly direction. These soils are generally roads and streets and for most recreation uses. These undulating. About half of the acreage, mostly on the limitations can generally be reduced by special design higher lying areas, is in openland. The rest, in lower lying and increased maintenance. areas that have not been drained, is in woodland. The woodland supports mostly a mixture of pine and 3. Goldsboro-Kenansville-Woodington hardwood trees. About half of the buildings in this map unit are farmsteads that have many adjacent buildings. Moderately well drained, well drained, and poorly drained The other buildings are homes on small acreages. There soils that have a sandy or loamy surface layer and a are many roads that provide easy access to all parts of loamy subsod,- on broad, nearly level and gently sloping the map unit. Small farm ponds are numerous. areas This map unit makes up about 13.5 percent of the This map unit generally is on low ridges and in county. It is about 20 percent Nansemond soils, 13 moderately well-defined drainageways. Soils in the gently percent Pocomoke soils, and 10 percent Kenansville sloping areas have a lower water table than the soils in soils. The remaining 57 percent is soils of minor extent. the nearly level areas, which have a shallow water table. The Nansemond soils are in broad, nearly level areas Areas of this map unit are triangular, about six miles on intermediate elevations in this map unit. These soils wide, and in the western part of the county. These areas have a brownish sandy surface layer and a mottled, are generally undulating. About half of the acreage, brownish loamy subsoil. mostly on higher lying areas, is in openland. The rest, in The Pocomoke soils are in broad, nearly level areas or lower in areas that have not been drained, is in in drainageways on the lower elevations in this map unit. woodland of mostly a mixture of pine and hardwood They have a black loamy surface layer and a grayish trees. About half of the buildings in this map unit are brown loamy subsoil. farmsteads that have many adjacent buildings. The other The Kenansville soils are in broad, nearly level and buildings are homes on small acreages. There are many gently sloping areas on the higher elevations in this map roads that provide easy access to all parts of the map unit. They have a thick, brownish sandy surface layer unit. Small farm ponds are numerous. and a yellowish loamy subsoil. This map unit makes up about 5.5 percent of the The soils of minor extent in this map unit include the county. It is about 14.5 percent Goldsboro soils, 10.5 Blanton, Suffolk, and Emporia soils on the side slopes percent Kenansville soils, and 10 percent Woodington and higher ridges, the Goldsboro and Lynchburg soils at soils. The remaining 65 percent is soils of minor extent. intermediate elevations, and the Woodington and The Goldsboro soils are in broad, nearly level areas Rutlege soils in the depressions and drainageways. on intermediate elevations in this map unit. They have a About half of the acreage of this map unit has been brownish sandy surface layer and a mottled, brownish cleared. Most of the cleared areas are used for row loamy subsoil. crops; some are used for pasture and hay. In most The Kenansville soils are in broad, nearly level and areas, the soils are suited to corn, soybeans, and gently sloping areas on the higher elevations in this map tobacco. Drainage is needed to produce consistently unit. These soils have a thick, brownish sandy surface high yields. Leaving crop residue on or near the surface layer and a yellowish loamy subsoil. helps to conserve moisture, maintain tilth, control The Woodington soils are in broad, nearly level areas erosion, and increase production. or in slightly concave areas on the lower elevations in Horry County, South Carolina 7 this map unit. These soils have a grayish loamy surface shallow water table. Areas of this map unit are scattered layer and a grayish loamy subsoil. from east to west across the middle part of the county The soils of minor extent in this map unit include the and on the northern side of the Waccamaw River. The Blanton, Suffolk, and Emporia soils on the side slopes areas generally are nearly level. About one-third of the and higher ridges, the Lynchburg soils at intermediate acreage, mostly on the higher lying areas, is openland. elevations, and the Coxville and Pocomoke soils in the The rest, on lower lying areas that have not been depressions and drainageways. drained, is in woodland of mostly a mixture of pine and About 50 percent of this map unit has been cleared. hardwood trees. About one-third of the buildings on this Most of the cleared areas are used for row crops; some map unit are farmsteads that have a few adjacent are used for pasture and hay. In most areas, the soils buildings. The other buildings are homes on small are suited to corn, soybeans, and tobacco. Drainage is acreages. This map unit has a moderate number of required to produce consistently high yields. Leaving roads. Farm ponds are common. crop residue on or near the surface helps to conserve This map unit makes up about 7.5 percent of the moisture, maintain tilth, control erosion, and increase county. It is about 22 percent Eulonia soils, 15 percent production. Bladen soils, and 11 percent Wahee soils. The remaining These soils are suited to pasture and hay. Improved 52 percent is soils of minor extent. bermudagrass and bahiagrass grow well. A proper The Eulonia soils are in nearly level to gently sloping stocking rate, pasture rotation, and restricted grazing areas on the higher elevations in this map unit. These during wet periods help keep the pasture and soil in soils have a brownish sandy surface layer and a mottled, good condition. Shallow surface drains can be used to brownish clayey subsoil. lower the water table. The Bladen soils are in nearly level areas on the lower These soils are suited to slash pine, loblolly pine, and elevations in this map unit. They have a grayish loamy longleaf pine. Where competing vegetation is controlled surface layer and a mottled, grayish clayey subsoil. or removed by site preparation, burning, cutting, or The Wahee soils are in nearly level areas on girdling, seedlings survive and grow well. In some areas intermediate elevations in this map unit. They have a of this map unit, the use of planting and harvesting grayish loamy surface layer and a mottled, grayish and equipment is severely limited by wetness and ponding. brownish clayey subsoil. Most areas of this map unit are poorly suited to most The soils of minor extent in this map unit include the engineering uses because of wetness. Except for the Yemassee soils at intermediate elevations and the soils on the higher elevations, the soils in this map unit Meggett, Ogeechee, and Hobcaw soils in depressions are severely limited for use as sites for septic tank and along drainageways. absorption fields. Wetness and ponding severely limit About one-third of the acreage of this map unit has most areas of this map unit for use as sites for been cleared. Most of the cleared areas are used for dwellings, local roads and streets, and for most row crops; some are used for pasture and hay. In most recreation uses. These limitations can generally be areas, the soils are suited to corn and soybeans. In reduced by special design and increased maintenance. some areas, they are suited to tobacco and specialty crops, such as strawberries (fig. 1). Drainage is required Nearly Level and Gently Sloping Soils to produce consistently high yields. Leaving crop residue That Have a Clayey or Loamy Subsoil on or near the surface helps to conserve moisture, maintain tilth, control erosion, and increase production. Four general soil map units are in this group. Areas of These soils are suited to pasture and hay. Improved these soils are throughout the county, but most of them bermudagrass, bahiagrass, and tall fescue grow well. A are in the eastern part of the county. These soils range proper stocking rate, pasture rotation, and restricted from very poorly drained to moderately well drained. grazing during wet periods help keep the pasture and Less than one-third of the acreage of these soils is in soil in good condition. Shallow surface drains can be openland, and the rest is in woodland. used to lower the water table. 4. Eulonia-Bladen-Wahee These soils are suited to slash pine, loblolly pine, and longleaf pine. Where competing vegetation is controlled Moderately well drained, poorly drained, and somewhat or removed by site preparation, burning, cutting, or poorly drained soils that have a loamy or sandy surface girdling, seedlings survive and grow well. In some areas layer and a clayey or loamy subsoil- on nearly level and of this map unit, the use of planting and harvesting gently sloping areas equipment is severely limited by wetness and ponding. This map unit is in nearly level areas, on some slide Most areas of this map unit are poorly suited to slopes on uplands, and in poorly defined drainageways. engineering uses because of wetness. The soils in this Soils in the areas adjacent to drainageways commonly map unit have severe limitations for use as septic tank have gentle slopes and a lower water table than do most absorption fields. Wetness and ponding severely limit of the soils in the nearly level areas, which have a most areas of this map unit for use as sites for dwellings 8 Soil Survey AW Ar Zrll ft v KI z' V Figure l.-Specialty crops, such as strawberries, grow well on Eulonia loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes. and local roads and streets and for most recreation mostly a mixture of pine and hardwood trees. About one- uses. These limitations can generally be reduced by third of the buildings in this map unit are farmsteads that special design and increased maintenance. have few adjacent buildings. The other buildings are mostly homes on small acreages. This map unit has a 5. Yauhannah-Ogeechee-Bladen moderate number of roads. Farm ponds are common. This map unit makes up about 19 percent of the Moderately well drained and poorly drained soils that county. It is about 26 percent Yauhannah soils, 22 have a loamy or sandy surface layer and a loamy or percent Ogeechee soils, and 13 percent Bladen soils. clayey subsoil; on broad, nearly level areas The remaining 39 percent is soils of minor extent. This map unit generally is on nearly level areas of the The Yauhannah soils are in broad, nearly level areas Atlantic Coast flatwoods and in poorly defined on the higher elevations in this map unit. These soils drainageways. Almost all areas of these soils have a have a brownish loamy surface layer and a mottled, shallow water table. Soils in the higher lying areas have brownish loamy subsoil. the lowest water table. Some areas of this map unit are The Ogeechee soils are in nearly level areas on the scattered from east to west across the lower middle part lower elevations in this map unit. These soils have a of the county. Other areas are on the north and south black sandy surface layer and a mottled, grayish loamy side of the Waccamaw River from the North Carolina subsoil. State line to the Georgetown County line. About one- The Bladen soils are in nearly level areas on the lower third of the acreage of this map unit, mostly in the higher elevations in this map unit. These soils have a grayish lying areas, is openland. The rest, in lower lying areas loamy surface layer and a mottled, grayish clayey that have not been drained, is in woodland, supporting subsoil. Horry County, South Carolina 9 The soils of minor extent in this map unit include the Meggett soils. The remaining 51 percent is soils of minor Chisolm and Eulonia soils on the higher ridges and in extent. gently sloping areas, the Yemassee and Wahee soils on The Yonges soils are in drainageways and in nearly intermediate elevations, and the Meggett soils on the level areas on the lowest elevations in this map unit. lower elevations and on flats. These soils have a grayish brown loamy surface layer About one-third of the acreage of this map unit has and a mottled, grayish loamy subsoil. been cleared. Most of the cleared areas are used for The Meggett soils are in drainageways and on flood row crops; some are used for pasture and hay. In most plains throughout the map unit. These soils have a dark areas, the soils are suited to corn and soybeans. In grayish brown loamy surface layer and a mottled, grayish some areas, they are suited to tobacco. Drainage is loamy and clayey subsoil. required to produce consistently high yields. Leaving The soils of minor extent in this map unit include the crop residue on or near the surface helps to conserve Wahee soils on the higher elevations, the Ogeechee moisture, maintain tilth, control erosion, and increase soils at lower elevations, and the Johnston, Rutlege, production. Pocomoke, and Hobcaw soils in the depressions and These soils are suited to pasture and hay. Improved drainageways. bermudagrass, bahiagrass, and tall fescue grow well on These soils are mostly in woodland. Some small, open most areas of these soils. A proper stocking rate, areas are used for pasture and wildlife habitat. Flooding, pasture rotation, and restricted grazing during wet wetness, and ponding are severe limitations to use of periods help keep the pasture and soil in good condition. these soils for cultivated crops and pasture. Shallow surface drains can be used to lower the water table. These soils are suited to bottom land hardwood tree These soils are suited to slash pine, loblolly pine, and species and if drained, to loblolly and slash pine. longleaf pine. Where competing vegetation is controlled Wetness and flooding are severe limitations to seedling or removed by site preparation, burning, cutting, or survival. These limitations can be partly reduced by the girdling, seedlings survive and grow well. In some areas use of dikes, diversion ditches, and embankments. of these soils, the use of planting and harvesting Planting seedlings on beds also helps to reduce these equipment is severely limited by wetness and ponding. limitations. Restricting the use of equipment to the drier Most areas of this map unit are poorly suited to months and using specially designed equipment help engineering uses because of wetness. The soils in this reduce the limitations caused by wetness. map unit have severe limitations for use as septic tank These soils are poorly suited to engineering uses. The absorption fields. Wetness and ponding severely limit soils in this map unit have severe limitations for use as most areas of this map unit for use as sites for dwellings septic tank absorption fields because of flooding, and local roads and streets and for most recreation wetness, and ponding. These limitations are so severe uses. These limitations can generally be reduced by and difficult to reduce that alternate sites should be special design and increased maintenance. selected. Wetness, flooding, and ponding severely limit the use of these soils as sites for local roads and streets 6. Yonges-Meggett and for most recreational uses. Poorly drained soils that have a loamy surface layer and a loamy or clayey subsoll, In drainageways, on flood 7. Brookman-Bladen plains, and on nearly level areas Vely poorly drained and poorly drained soils that have a This map unit is in nearly level, swampy, moderately loamy surface layer and a clayey subsoil,- in broad, nearly well defined drainageways. Except for soils on a few level depressions and on flats high knolls, all of the soils in this map unit have a very shallow water table and are subject to some flooding This map unit is in nearly level areas and in adjacent and ponding. Some areas of this map unit are in the poorly defined drainageways. All of the soils in this map western part of the county in Lake Swamp and Chinners unit have a very shallow water table and are subject to Swamp. Other areas, in the middle part of the county, some flooding and ponding. Areas of this map unit are extend from east to west parallel to and adjacent to the about four miles wide and are in the southeastern part of Waccamaw River. Almost all areas of this map unit are the county near Myrtle Beach. About one-fourth of the in woodland of mostly hardwood trees but also a few acreage of this map unit, mostly drained areas, is in scattered pine on the knolls. These areas have not been openland. The rest of the acreage has not been drained drained. A few small, open areas are used for pasture and is in woodland of mostly a mixture of pine and and wildlife habitat. There are very few buildings in this hardwood trees. Most buildings are in urban areas, but map unit. Roads have been built only at major crossings there are a few homes on small lots. This map unit has to higher lands. Farm ponds are few. many roads and streets. Farm ponds are very few. This map unit makes up about 8 percent of the county. This map unit makes up about 2 percent of the county. It is about 25 percent Yonges soils and 24 percent It is about 28 percent Brookman soils, and 22 percent 10 Soil Survey Bladen soils. The remaining 50 percent is soils of minor This map unit is on low, nearly level, sandy ridges and extent. in poorly defined drainageways. Soils in the The Brockman soils are in broad, nearly level drainageways have a higher water table and, generally, a depressions and on flats at slightly lower elevations in more loamy subsoil than the soils in the nearly level this map unit. These soils have a black loamy surface areas. These soils have a lower water table and a layer and a grayish clayey subsoil. stained organic layer below a depth of 30 inches. Areas The Bladen soils are in nearly level areas on the lower of this map unit are scattered mostly around the west- elevations in this map unit. These soils have a loamy central part of the county. About one-fifth of it, mostly on surface layer and a mottled, grayish clayey subsoil. the higher lying areas, is open land. The rest is in The soils of minor extent in this map unit include the woodland, which is dominantly pine and has an Yauhannah and Eulonia soils on the higher elevations understory vegetation of wiregrass. There are very few and the Meggett and Yonges soils in depressions and farmsteads and adjacent buildings in this map unit. Most drainageways. buildings are houses on small acreages. Roads and farm About one-fourth of the acreage of this map unit has ponds are few. been cleared and drained. Most of the cleared areas are This map unit makes up about 10 percent of the used for row crops; some are used for pasture and hay. county. It is about 11 percent Pocomoke soils, 10 In most areas, these soils, if adequately drained, are percent Echaw soils and 8 percent Centenary soils. The suited to corn and soybeans. Drainage is required to remaining 71 percent is soils of minor extent. produce consistently high yields. Leaving crop residue on The Pocomoke soils are mostly in drainageways on or near the surface helps to conserve moisture, maintain the lower elevations. They have a black loamy surface tilth, control erosion, and increase production. layer and a grayish brown loamy subsoil. These soils are suited to pasture and hay. Bahiagrass The Echaw soils are in nearly level areas on and tall fescue grow well. A proper stocking rate, pasture intermediate elevations. They have a brownish sandy rotation, and restricting grazing during wet periods help surface layer and a brownish or black stained subsoil. to keep the pasture and soil in good condition. Deep The Centenary soils are in nearly level areas on the subsurface drains and shallow surface drains can be higher elevations. They have a grayish sandy surface used to lower the water table. layer and a mottled, brownish sandy subsurface layer. These soils are well suited to slash pine and loblolly They have a brownish or black sandy subsoil. pine. Drainage improves woodland production on these The soils of minor extent in this map unit include the soils. In areas where competing vegetation is controlled Lakeland soils on the higher ridges, the Witherbee soils and the water table lowered, seedlings survive and grow on the intermediate elevations, and the Leon, Lynn well. Plant competition can be controlled by several Haven, and Rutlege soils on the lower elevations. methods, such as bedding, site preparation, burning, About one-fifth of the acreage of this map unit has cutting, or girdling. In most areas of this map unit, the been cleared. Most of the cleared areas are used for use of planting and harvesting equipment is severely row crops or as pasture and hayland. In most areas, the limited by wetness and ponding. soils are suited to corn and soybeans, and some areas These soils are poorly suited to engineering uses. The are suited to tobacco. Drainage is required to produce soils in this map unit are severely hmited for use as sites consistently high yields. Leaving crop residue on or near for septic tank absorption fields. The severe limitations the surface helps to conserve moisture, maintain tilth, are so difficult to reduce that alternate sites should be control erosion, and increase production. selected. Wetness, flooding, and ponding severely limit These soils are suited to pasture and hay. Improved the use of soils in this map unit as sites for dwellings, bermudagrass grows well on most of the soils. A proper local roads and streets, and for most recreation uses. stocking rate, pasture rotation, and restricted grazing during wet periods help keep the pasture and soil in Nearly Level and Gently Sloping Soils good condition. Shallow surface drains can be used to That Have a Sandy or Loamy Subsoil lower the water table. These soils are suited to slash pine, loblolly pine, and The three general soil map units in this group are longleaf pine. Where competing vegetation is controlled throughout the county. The soils range from very poorly or removed by site preparation, burning, cutting, or drain-ed to excessively drained. Some areas are in urban girdling, seedlings survive and grow well. In many areas land, but most areas are in woodland. of this map unit, the use of planting and harvesting equipment is severely limited by wetness and ponding. 8. Pocomoke-Echaw-Centenary Most areas of this map unit are poorly suited to engineering uses because of wetness. Except for the Very poorly drained and moderately well drained soils soils on the higher elevations, the soils in this map unit that 17ave a loamy or sandy surface layer and a loamy or have severe limitations for use as septic tank absorption sandy subso#,- in drainageways and on nearly level areas fields. Wetness and the sandy texture of these soils limit Horry County, South Carolina their use as sites for dwellings, local roads and streets, and for most recreation uses. These limitations can and for most recreation uses. These limitations can generally be reduced by special design and increased generally be reduced by special design and increased maintenance. maintenance. 9. Lynn Haven-Leon 10. Lakeland-Leon-Newhan Poorly drained soils that are sandy throughout; in Excessively drained and poorly drained soils that are drainageways and on nearly level areas sandy throughout; in drainageways, on broad ridges and This map unit is on low, nearly level, sandy ridges and slopes, and on dunes in poorly defined drainageways. Almost all of the soils in This map unit is on gently sloping sand dunes and this map unit have a high water table and a stained ridges adjacent to the Atlantic Ocean and in moderately organic layer within 30 inches of the surface. This map defined drainageways. Soils in the drainageways have a unit is in the southeastern part of the county. About four- high water table and a stained organic layer within 30 fifths of it is in woodland, which is dominantly pine forest. inches of the surface. Soils in the nearly level to gently The rest, mostly small areas used for pasture and as sloping areas have a deep water table. Areas of this wildlife habitat, is in openland. There are a few houses map unit are in the extreme southeastern part of the on small acreages around the perimeter of this map unit. county and border the Atlantic Ocean. These soils are Roads and farm ponds are very few. nearly level to gently sloping, and most areas have been This map unit makes up about 6.5 percent of the developed for urban uses or for recreation. There are a county. It is about 31 percent Lynn Haven soils and 29 few small scattered areas of woodland of mostly pine percent Leon soils. The remaining 40 percent is soils of trees on undeveloped lots. There are very few minor extent. farmsteads, as the entire area is mostly urban. This map The Lynn Haven soils are mostly in drainageways on unit has many roads and streets. Farm ponds are few. the lowest elevations in this map unit. These soils have This map unit makes up about 4.5 percent of the a black sandy surface layer underlain by a grayish sandy county. It is about 32 percent Lakeland soils, 15 percent subsurface layer and a brownish or black subsoil. The Leon soils are in nearly level areas on slightly Leon soils, and 7 percent Newhan soils. The remaining higher elevations in this map unit. These soils have a 46 percent is soils of minor extent. black sandy surface layer, a grayish sandy subsurface The Lakeland soils are in nearly level and gently layer, and a black or brownish subsoil. sloping areas on the higher elevations in this map unit. The soils of minor extent in this map unit include the These soils have a brownish.sandy surface layer and are Echaw, Centenary, and Witherbee soils on the higher underlain by yellowish brown sand. elevations and the Pocomoke, Rutlege, and Johnston The Leon soils are in nearly level areas on the lower soils on the lower elevations. elevations in this unit. These soils have a black sandy About one-fifth of the acreage of this map unit has surface layer and a grayish sandy subsurface layer been cleared. The cleared areas are used mostly as underlain by a black or brownish sandy subsoil. wildlife habitat, but some areas are used for pasture and The Newhan soils are mostly on gently sloping dunes hay. Drainage is required to produce consistent yields. on the higher elevations in this map unit. They have a These soils are suited to pasture and hay. Improved grayish sandy surface layer that contains small bermudagrass grows well on most areas of the soils. A fragments of marine shells and yellowish sandy proper stocking rate, pasture rotation, and restricted underlying material. grazing during wet periods help keep the pasture and The soils of minor extent in this map unit include the soil in good condition. Deep subsurface drains and Blanton soils on the higher ridges and gently sloping shallow surface drains can be used to help lower the areas, the Centenary soils at the intermediate elevations, water table. These soils are poorly suited to woodland. Limitations the sandy beaches along the coast, and the Bohicket for seedling survival are moderate to severe because of soils in the tidal marsh areas on the lower elevations. wetness and the sandy nature of the soils. These Nearly all of the acreage of this map unit has been limitations can be partially controlled by drainage, cleared. Almost the entire area has been developed for planting seedlings on beds, scheduling planting and urban and recreation uses. harvesting during dry seasons, and using specially Most of these soils are well suited to engineering designed equipment. uses. Poor filtration is a severe hazard for use of these These soils are poorly suited to engineering uses soils as septic tank absorption fields. The soils in this because of wetness. The soils in this map unit have map unit are suited to use as sites for dwellings and for severe limitations for use as septic tank absorption local roads and streets. These soils are well suited to fields. Wetness and ponding severely limit the soils for recreation uses. use as sites for dwellings and local roads and streets 12 Soil Survey Nearly Level Soils on Flood Plains and in months and using specially designed equipment help Drainageways reduce the limitations caused by excess water. These soils are poorly suited to engineering uses. The The two general soil map units in this group are along soils in this map unit are severely limited for use as sites the Pee Dee River, the Waccamaw River, and the for septic tank absorption fields. Because the severity of Lumber River, and along the other major streams in the these limitations makes them difficult to reduce, alternate county. These poorly drained soils are almost entirely in sites should be selected. Wetness, flooding, and ponding woodland. severely limit the use of soils in this map unit as sites for 11. Johnston-Rutlege dwellings and local roads and streets and for most recreation uses. Poorly drained soils that are loamy or sandy throughout; in drainageways and on flood plains 12. Hobonny This map unit is in swamps and on nearly level flood Poorly drained soils that are organic throughout; on flood plains. Almost all areas of these soils have a high water plains table and generally are flooded during part of the year. Most of the acreage of this map unit is in the western This map unit is in swamps and on nearly level flood part of the county along the Little Pee Dee River swamp. plains. Most areas of these soils have a high water table Areas of this map unit are also in the eastern part of the and generally are flooded during part of the year. This county at the upper end of the Waccamaw River swamp. map unit is in the southern part of the county along the Nearly all of the acreage of this map unit is in woodland Waccamaw River swamp from the Georgetown County of mostly hardwood trees but also a few scattered pine line to the town of Conway. Almost all areas of this map on the knolls at slightly higher elevations. These soils unit are in woodland, mostly in hardwood trees. A few have not been drained. A few small open areas are used scattered pine trees are on the knolls at slightly higher as wildlife habitat. A few buildings, mostly recreation elevations. These soils have not been drained. A few cabins, are adjacent to the rivers. Roads have been built small open areas are used as wildlife habitat. A very few only at major crossings to higher points. Farm ponds are buildings, mostly recreation homes, are adjacent to the very few. rivers. This map unit has roads only at major crossings This map unit makes up about 5 percent of the county. to higher lands. Farm ponds are few. It is about 47 percent Johnston soils and 12 percent This map unit makes up about 3 percent of the county. Rutlege soils. The remaining 41 percent is soils of minor It is about 78 percent Hobonny soils and 22 percent is extent. soils of minor extent. The Johnston soils are in depressions and The Hobonny soils are in depressions and drainageways and, generally in the deeper part of the drainageways and on nearly level flood plains throughout swamp, on nearly level flood plains. These soils have a this map unit. They have a brownish muck surface layer black loamy surface layer and a grayish brown loamy over a brownish muck underlying layer. subsoil. The soils of minor extent in this map unit include the The Rutlege soils are in depressions and Eulonia and Wahee soils on the higher elevations on the drainageways and are scattered throughout the flood edges of the map unit, the Megget soils on the plains, generally around the edges of the swamp. These intermediate elevations, and the Johnston soils on the soils have a black sandy surface layer underlain by lower elevations in small drainageways. grayish sand. These soils are mostly in woodland. A few small, open The soils of minor extent in this map unit include the areas are used as wildlife habitat and for recreation. Lakeland soils on the highest elevations, the Echaw, Flooding, wetness, and ponding are severe limitations for Leon, Lynn Haven, and Osier soils on intermediate the use of these soils for cultivated crops and pasture. elevations, and the Pocomoke soils on the lower These soils are severely limited for tree production elevations. because of the flooding and wetness and the mucky These soils are mostly in woodland. Some small, open nature of the soil. Using special equipment, such as areas are used as wildlife habitat. Flooding, wetness, helicopters, for logging in dry seasons can help reduce and ponding are severe limitations to the use of these wetness and the hazard of flooding. soils for cultivated crops and pasture. These soils are poorly suited to engineering uses. The These soils are suited to bottom land hardwood trees soils in this map unit have severe limitations to use as and, if drained, to loblolly and slash pine. Limitations to sites for septic tank absorption fields. Because the seedling survival are severe because of wetness and severity of these limitations makes them difficult to flooding. These limitations can be partly controlled by reduce, alternate sites should be selected. Wetness, using dikes, diversions, ditches, and embankments. flooding, and ponding severely limit the soils in this map Planting seedlings on beds also helps to overcome unit for use as sites for dwellings and local roads and these limitations. Restricting equipment use to the drier streets and for recreation uses. Horry County, South Carolina 13 Broad Land Use Considerations Approximately 25 percent of the land in the county is used for crops, mainly soybeans, corn, small grain, and The soils in Horry County vary widely in their potential tobacco. The cropland is scattered throughout the for major land uses. Approximately 70 percent of the county, but most of it is in map units 1 and 2. land in the county is used primarily as woodland and as About 5 percent of the county is in urban or developed wildlife habitat. Most areas are suited to wildlife habitat. land. The soils in the county range from well suited to The soils in map units 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 generally are well poorly suited to urban development. Many of the soils suited to use as habitat for openland wildlife, and the have a seasonal high water table. The soils in map units soils in map units 6 and 7 generally are suited to use as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, and 10 generally have some areas that habitat for woodland wildlife. The soils in map units 11 are suited to development. and 12 generally are well suited to use as habitat for wetland wildlife. 15 Detailed Soil Map Units The map units on the detailed soil maps at the back of substantially from those of the major soil or soils. Such this survey represent the soils in the survey area. The differences could significantly affect use and map unit descriptions in this section, along with the soil management of the soils in the map unit. The included maps, can be used to determine the suitability and soils are identified in each map unit description. Some potential of a soil for specific uses. They also can be small areas of strongly contrasting soils are identified by used to plan the management needed for those uses. a special symbol on the soil maps. More information on each map unit, or soil, is given The presence of inclusions in a map unit in no way under "Use and Management of the Soils." diminishes the usefulness or accuracy of the soil data. Each map unit on the detailed soil maps represents an The objective of soil mapping is not to delineate pure area on the landscape and consists of one or more soils taxonomic classes of soils but rather to separate the for which the unit is named. landscape into segments that have similar use and A symbol identifying the soil precedes the map unit management requirements. The delineation of such name in the soil descriptions. Each description includes landscape segments on the map provides sufficient general facts about the soil and gives the principal information for the development of resource plans, but hazards and limitations to be considered in planning for onsite investigation is needed to plan for intensive uses specific uses. in small areas. Soils that have profiles that are almost alike make up This survey includes miscellaneous areas. Such areas a soil series. Except for differences in texture of the have little or no soil material and support little or no surface layer or of the underlying material, all the soils of vegetation. Beaches is an example. Miscellaneous areas a series have major horizons that are similar in are shown on the soil maps. Some that are too small to composition, thickness, and arrangement. be shown are identified by a special symbol on the soil Soils of one series can differ in texture of the surface maps. layer or of the underlying material. They also can differ in Table 4 gives the acreage and proportionate extent of slope, stoniness, salinity, wetness, degree of erosion, each map unit. Other tables (see "Summary of Tables") and other characteristics that affect their use. On the give properties of the soils and the limitations, basis of such differences, a soil series is divided into soil capabilities, and potentials for many uses. The Glossary phases. Most of the areas shown on the detailed soil defines many of the terms used in describing the soils. maps are phases of soil series. The name of a soil phase commonly indicates a feature that affects use or Bc-Beaches. This map unit is on sandy shorelines management. For example, Goldsboro loamy fine sand, that border the Atlantic Ocean. Only a small acreage of 0 to 2 percent slopes, is one of several phases in the this map unit is in the county. The Beaches are covered Goldsboro series. twice daily by tides and are nearly level or gently sloping. Some map units in this county are made up of tw6 or Typically, the surface layer is light gray fine sand. The more major soils. These map units are called underlying material consists of irregularly occurring undifferentiated groups. narrow bands of fine sand that ranges from gray to very An undifferentiated group is made up of two or more dark gray. Reaction in this map unit ranges from neutral soils that could be mapped individually but are mapped to moderately alkaline. Areas of this map unit are highly as one unit because similar interpretations can be made saline. This map unit contains varying amounts of shells for :use and management. The pattern and proportion of and shell fragments and commonly has many fine black the soils in a mapped area are not uniform. An area can minerals. be made up of only one of the major soils, or it can be Most of the acreage of this map unit is unstable and is made up of all of them. Udorthents and Udipsamments, being eroded at the rate of a few inches to more than a well drained, is an undifferentiated group in this survey toot per year. In a few areas, the acreage of this map area. unit is growing. Erosion and deposition of material on Most map units include small scattered areas of soils this map unit are related to tidal currents and wind other than those for which the map unit is named. Some direction. The hazard of erosion is a constant of these included soils have properties that differ management concern that is expensive to control (fig. 2). 16 Soil Survey This map unit is suited to recreation use. It is used included soils make up about 15 percent of this map extensively by bathers in the summer. This map unit is unit. also used for surf fishing, walking, and jogging. It is This soil is low in content of organic matter. unsuited to most other uses. Permeability is slow, and the available water capacity is The capability subclass of this map unit is VIIIw. It has moderate. The seasonal high water table ranges from 1 not been assigned to a woodland suitability group. foot above the surface to 1 foot below the surface from December through May. Shrink-swell potential is Bd-Bladen fine sandy loam. This poorly drained, moderate. nearly level soil is on low fluvial or marine terraces on Most areas of this soil are in woodland. Some small the lower elevations in the county. Individual areas of areas are in cropland, hayland, pasture, and urban uses. this soil are irregular in shape and range from 20 to 150 This soil is well suited to use as woodland. it is poorly acres. suited to use as cropland and to most urban uses. Typically, the surface layer is very dark gray fine sandy This soil is poorly suited to row crops, such as corn, loam about 6 inches thick. The subsoil to a depth of 62 soybeans, and tobacco. It is also poorly suited to use as inches is gray clay that has mottles in shades of brown, pasture and hayland because of the seasonal high water yellow, and red. table and ponding. Because this soil is low on the Included with this soil in mapping are a few small landscape and does not have suitable outlets, drainage areas of Eulonia, Yauhannah, and Yemassee soils. The commonly is not feasible. A V *!T 771 _C% P-, Rl" N, [email protected] - Figure 2.-An area of Beaches adjacent to Newhan fine sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes. Beaches is unsuited to development because of the hazard of erosion. Horry County, South Carolina 17 This soil is well suited to use as woodland. Loblolly allows nutrients to leach out. This limitation can be pine, slash pine, and American sycamore are suitable reduced by using split applications of fertilizer. trees to plant. The understory vegetation consists of This soil is moderately suited to use as woodland. broom sedge, little bluestem, giant cane, and sedge. Loblolly pine and slash pine are suitable trees to plant. Limitations on the use of equipment are severe, and the The understory vegetation consists of turkey oak, post rate of seedling mortality is high because of the high oak, blackjack oak, pineland threeawn, and other water table and ponding. Planting and harvesting should grasses and shrubs. The thick, sandy surface layer of be done during dry seasons, and specially designed this soil is a moderate limitation to the use of equipment equipment should be used to help reduce these and causes a moderate rate of seedling mortality. Tracks limitations. or wide tires can be used on equipment to improve This soil is poorly suited to urban uses. Ponding and traction and prevent vehicles from bogging down. The the slow permeability of the soil are severe limitations to rate of seedling survival can be improved by proper the use of this soil as septic tank absorption fields. This seedbed preparation, such as planting seedlings in deep soil has severe limitations to use as sites for dwellings furrows, and by selecting timely planting dates. without basements and for local roads and streets This soil is well suited to urban uses. It has moderate because of the ponding, low strength, and shrink-swell limitations to use as septic tank absorption fields potential. These limitations are difficult to reduce, and because of wetness. It has slight limitations to use as alternate sites should be selected. sites for dwellings without basements and for local roads The capability subclass of this soil is Vw, and the and streets. woodland suitability group is 2w. The capability subclass of this soil is Ills, and the woodland suitability group is 3s. BnA-Blanton sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes. This Bo-Bohicket silty clay loam. This very poorly somewhat excessively drained soil is on nearly level to drained, nearly level soil is on broad tidal flats. Individual gently sloping landscapes adjacent to drainageways. areas of this map unit are irregular in shape and range Areas of this soil are throughout the county. Individual from 50 to 800 acres. areas of this soil are irregular in shape and range from Typically, the surface layer is dark greenish gray silty 10 to 200 acres. clay loam about 12 inches thick. The underlying material Typically, the surface layer is grayish brown sand to a depth of 72 inches is dark greenish gray silty clay about 11 inches thick. The subsurface layers, to a depth loam or silty clay. of 58 inches, are very pale brown and light yellowish Included with this soil in mapping are a few small brown sand. The subsoil to a depth of 75 inches is areas of Centenary, Lakeland, Leon, Lynn Haven, yellowish brown and brownish yellow sandy loam. In Newhan, and Rutlege soils; Beaches; and Udorthents. some areas, the subsoil has mottles. The included soils make up less than 10 percent of this Included with this soil in mapping are a few small map unit. areas of Chipley, Lakeland, Nansemond, and Osier soils. This soil is moderate in content of organic matter. Also included are some small areas that have a clayey Permeability is very slow, and the available water substratum and a few small areas that have slopes capacity is very low. Twice a day, this soil is flooded by greater than 6 percent. The included soils make up three feet of tidal saltwater. Shrink-swell potential is high. about 15 percent of this map unit. Most areas of this soil are in a natural state. The This soil is low in content of organic matter. vegetation consists of smooth cordgrass, needlegrass, Permeability is moderate, and the available water and big cordgrass. This soil is well suited to use as capacity is low. This soil has a perched water table marine and wildlife habitat. It is not suited to use as between a depth of 5 and 6 feet from December through cropland or woodland or to urban uses because of March. Shrink-swell potential is low. flooding, ponding, low strength, and shrink-swell Most areas of this soil are in woodland. Some areas potential. These severe limitations are difficult to reduce, are in cropland and pasture, and some small areas are and alternate sites should be selected. in urban uses. This soil is moderately suited to use as This soil is well suited to certain types of recreation, cropland and woodland. It is well suited to most urban such as fishing, hunting, shrimping, and crabbing (fig. 3). uses. It is well suited to marsh vegetation and provides a This soil is moderately suited to most row crops, natural habitat for marine life and wildlife. including tobacco, and to use as pasture and hayland. The capability of this soil is VlIIw. It has not been. Moderate droughtiness and soil blowing are hazards. assigned to a woodland suitability group. Using minimum tillage, planting windbreaks, and leaving crop residue on the soil help prevent soil blowing and Br-Brookman loam. This very poorly drained, nearly also help to conserve soil moisture. This soil has a low level soil is in broad, shallow depressions and on fiats in nutrient holding capacity because its sandy texture the southeastern part of the county. Individual areas of 18 Soil Survey won, Figure 3.-A marsh on Bohicket silty clay loam at high tide. This area is used for fishing, crabbing, hunting, and boating. this map unit are irregular in shape and range from 40 to This soil is well suited to use as woodland. Loblolly 1,000 acres. pine, slash pine, sweetgum, and water tupelo are Typically, the surface layer is black loam about 10 suitable trees to plant. The understory vegetation inches thick. The subsoil is very dark gray or gray clay to consists of cabbage palm, greenbriar, red maple, sedge, a depth of 46 inches and mottled gray sandy clay loam and switchgrass. Equipment limitations and seedling to a depth of 68 inches. mortality are severe management concerns because of Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of wetness. Woodland production can be increased by Yemassee, Yonges, and Wahee soils. The included soils adequate drainage. Planting and harvesting during dry make up about 10 percent of this map unit. seasons and using specially designed equipment help This soil is moderate in content of organic matter. reduce the limitations cause by wetness. Planting Permeability is slow, and the available water capacity seedlings on beds helps improve the survival rate of the ranges from high to very high. The seasonal high water seedlings. table ranges from the surface to I foot below the This soil is poorly suited to most urban uses because surface from November through May. Shrink-swell of wetness, slow permeability, and low strength. It has potential is moderate. severe limitations for use as septic tank absorption Most areas of this soil are in woodland. Some areas fields, as sites for dwellings without basements, and for are in cropland, and small areas are in urban uses. This local roads and streets because of wetness and the soil is well suited to use as woodland, moderately suited clayey subsoil. These severe limitations are difficult to to cropland, and poorly suited to urban uses. overcome and alternate sites should be selected. This soil is suited to corn and soybeans and well The capability subclass of this soil is IIIw, and the suited to bahiagrass, pasture, and hay. It is poorly suited woodland suitability group is 2w. to tobacco. The seasonal high water table and the clayey subsoil are major management concerns. Deep Ce-Centenary fine sand. This moderately well ditches and shallow surface drains can be used to drained, nearly level soil is on broad ridges and flats provide drainage if good outlets are available. Land throughout the county. Individual areas of this map unit shaping improves drainage. Planting on beds helps are irregular in shape and range from 20 to 200 acres. prevent crop damage caused by wetness. Using Typically, the surface layer is dark gray fine sand minimum tillage and leaving crop residue on or near the about 5 inches thick. The subsurface layer, to a depth of surface help reduce the formation of clods and improve 42 inches, is brownish yellow fine sand that is mottled in the tilth. Restricting the use of this soil as pasture and the lower part. To a depth of 68 inches, the subsurface hayland during wet periods helps to keep the pasture layer is light gray fine sand. The subsoil to a depth of 80 and soil in good condition. inches is very dark brown and black fine sand. Horry County, South Carolina 19 Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of Chisolm, Lakeland, Leon, and Yauhannah soils. The Lakeland, Meggett, Ogeechee, Yauhannah, and included soils make up about 20 percent of this map Yemassee soils. The included soils make up about 20 unit. percent of this map unit. This soil is low in content of organic matter. This soil is low in content of organic matter. Both the Permeability is rapid, and the available water capacity is permeability and the available water capacity are very low or low. The depth to the seasonal high water moderate. The depth to the seasonal high water table table ranges from 3.5 to 5.0 feet below the surface from ranges from 3.5 to 5.0 feet below the surface from December through March. Shrink-swell potential is low. January through March. Shrink-swell potential is low. Most areas of this soil are in cropland or pasture or Most areas of this soil are in cropland. Some areas are used as hayland. Some areas are in woodland, and are used as pasture and woodland, and some small small areas are in urban uses. This soil is suited to use areas are in urban uses. This soil is moderately suited to as cropland and woodland, and it is well suited to most use as cropland. It is well suited to use as woodland and urban uses. to most urban uses. This soil is suited to most crops, including tobacco, to This soil is moderately suited to crops, including pasture, and to use as hayland. It is poorly suited to tobacco, and to use as pasture and hayland. It is well corn. Moderate soil wetness and the low nutrient holding suited to coastal bermudagrass. Moderate droughtiness capacity of the soil are the main management concerns. and soil blowing are hazards, and the low nutrient Surface and subsurface drainage systems can be used holding capacity of the soil is a management concern. to provide drainage if good outlets are available. Tile Minimum tillage, crop residue management, and drains require the use of filters to keep sand out. These windbreaks help prevent soil blowing and conserve soils have a low available water capacity and may be moisture. Using split applications of fertilizer increases overdrained during dry seasons. Leaving crop residue on the availability of plant nutrients. the field, using minimum tillage, planting cover crops, This soil is well suited to use as woodland. Slash pine and using split applications of fertilizer help improve the and longleaf pine are suitable trees to plant. The soil's nutrient-holding capacity. understory vegetation consists of little bluestem, This soil is suited to use as woodland. Slash pine and panicum, threeawn, and other annual grasses. loblolly pine are suitable trees to plant. The understory Limitations on the use of equipment are moderate and vegetation consists of little bluestem, panicum, the rate of seedling mortality is moderate because of the switchgrass, and large holly, Limitations on the use of thick sandy surface layer. Using specially designed equipment are moderate, and the rate of seedling equipment and planting the seedlings in a furrow help mortality is moderate because of the sandiness of the reduce this limitation. soil. Using specially designed equipment and planting the This soil is well suited to most urban uses. It has a seedlings in a furrow help reduce these limitations. moderate limitation to use as septic tank absorption This soil is well suited to most urban uses. It has fields because of wetness. The limitation can be reduced severe limitations to use as septic tank absorption fields by special design or by using another kind of system. because of wetness. The limitation can be reduced by This soil is well suited to use as sites for dwellings special design or by using another kind of system. There without basements and for local roads and streets. are no major limitations to the use of this soil as sites for There are no major hazards to these uses. dwellings without basements or for local roads and The capability subclass of this soil is Ils, and the streets. woodland suitability group is 2s. The capability subclass of this soil is Ills, and the woodland suitability group is 3s. Co-Coxville fine sandy loam. This poorly drained, nearly level soil is in depressions and along ChB-Chisolm fine sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes. drainageways in the northern part of the county. This well drained soil is on nearly level to gently sloping Individual areas of this soil are irregular in shape and rolling areas that are adjacent to drainageways in the commonly range from 10 to more than 100 acres. southeastern part of the county. Individual areas of this Typically, the surface layer is very dark gray fine sandy map unit are irregular in shape and range from 10 to 150 loam about 8 inches thick. The subsoil is mostly mottled acres. gray clay to a depth of 56 inches and mottled gray sandy Typically, the surface layer is grayish brown fine sand clay loam to a depth of 72 inches. about 8 inches thick. The subsurface layer, to a depth of Included with this soil in mapping are a few small 24 inches, is light yellowish brown loamy sand. The areas of Goldsboro, Lynchburg, and Pocomoke soils. subsoil is strong brown sandy clay loam to a depth of 46 The included soils make up about 20 percent of this map inches and yellowish red sandy loam to a depth of 58 unit. inches. The substratum to a depth of 80 inches is This soil is low in content of organic matter. mottled yellow sand. Permeability is slow, and the available water capacity is 20 Soil Survey moderate to high. The seasonal high water table ranges crop residue on or near the surface help reduce clodding from the surface to 1.5 feet below the surface from of the surface layer and improve the soil's tilth. November through April. Shrink-swell potential is Restricting use of the soil for pasture and as hayland moderate. during wet periods helps keep the pasture and soil in Most areas of this soil are in woodland. A few small good condition. areas are in cropland, pasture, hayland, and urban uses. This soil is well suited to use as woodland. Loblolly This soil is well suited to use as woodland, moderately pine is a suitable tree to plant. The understory vegetation suited to use as cropland, and poorly suited to most consists of common carpetgrass, longleaf uniola, little urban uses. This soil is well suited to use as pond bluestem, and large holly. This soil has moderate reservoirs (fig. 4). limitations to the use of equipment and a moderate rate This soil is moderately suited to most row crops and to of seedling mortality because of wetness and ponding. In use as hayland. It is well suited to use as pasture. This most areas of this soil, drainage helps reduce wetness soil is poorly suited to tobacco. Wetness and the clayey and ponding. Planting and harvesting during dry periods subsoil are the main management concerns. These and using specially designed equipment also help reduce limitations can be modified by the use of land smoothing, these limitations. Planting seedlings on beds improves deep ditches, and shallow surface drains. Planting seeds the survival rate of the seedlings. on beds helps reduce damage to crops caused by This soil is poorly suited to most urban uses. Wetness wetness. Using minimum tillage practices and leaving and slow permeability of the soil are severe limitations to -V1 Aug -Z [email protected] Figure 4.-Most areas of Coxville fine sandy loam are suited to recreation ponds. Horry County, South Carolina 21 the use of this soil as septic tank absorption fields and consists mainly of American holly, greenbriar, maple, as sites for dwellings without basements and for local dogwood, waxmyrtle, and other shrubs. This soil has roads and streets. These limitations are difficult to moderate limitations to the use of equipment and a reduce, and alternate sites should be selected. In moderate rate of seedling mortality because of the addition, low strength is a severe limitation to the use of seasonal high water table. These limitations can be this soil as sites for local roads and streets. This reduced by drainage, restricting equipment use to drier limitation can be reduced by constructing roads and months, and planting seedlings on beds. streets on suitable subgrade and base material or by This soil is moderately suited or poorly suited to urban constructing them on raised fill material and installing a uses. It is poorly suited to use as septic tank absorption drainage system. fields because of wetness and slow permeability. These The capability subclass of this soil is IIIw, and the limitations can be reduced by special design or by using woodland suitability group is 2w. another kind of system. These severe limitations are difficult to reduce, and alternate sites should be DuA-Duplin loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent selected. This soil is suited to use as sites for dwellings slopes. This moderately well drained soil is on broad, without basements. Wetness and shrinking and swelling nearly level areas and low ridges adjacent to the flood are moderate limitations. The wetness limitation can be plains of large streams in the northern part of the county. modified by installing tile drains near footings and by Individual areas of this map unit are irregular in shape shaping the land so that surface water and runoff are and commonly range from 5 to 100 acres. diverted from the dwelling. The shrinking and swelling Typically, the surface layer is grayish brown loamy fine limitation can be modified by using extra reinforcements sand about 9 inches thick. The subsurface layer, to a in footings and by backfilling with sandy material. This depth of 17 inches, is very pale brown loamy fine sand. soil is poorly suited to local roads and streets. The low The subsoil, to a depth of 35 inches, is mostly mottled strength of the soil is a severe limitation, but this brownish yellow clay. To a depth of 70 inches the limitation can be modified by providing a suitable subsoil is clay loam and clay that has fine strata of subgrade or base material and by constructing roads and sandy loam and sandy clay loam and brown, red, and streets so that they are adequately supported. gray mottles. The capability subclass of this soil is l1w, and the Included with this soil in mapping are a few small woodland suitability group is 2w. areas of Blanton, Emporia, Kenansville, and Nankin soils and small areas that have 2 to 6 percent slopes. The Ec-Echaw sand. This moderately well drained, included soils make up about 20 percent of this map nearly level soil is on broad interstream divides and flats unit. throughout the county. Individual areas of this map unit This soil is low in content of organic matter. are irregular in shape and range from 5 to 100 acres. Permeability is moderately slow. The available water Typically, the surface layer is dark grayish brown sand capacity ranges from moderate to high. Depth to the about 4 inches thick. The subsurface layer, to a depth of seasonal high water table ranges from 2 feet to 3 feet 36 inches, is light yellowish brown or brownish yellow below the surface from December through April. The loamy sand or sand that has mottles in the lower part. shrink-swell potential of this soil is moderate. The subsoil to a depth of 72 inches is very dark brown Most areas of this soil are in cropland. Some small or black sand. areas are in woodland or pasture or are used as Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of hayland. Some small areas are in urban uses. This soil is Leon, Rimini, and Rutlege soils. The included soils make moderately suited to use as cropland and well suited to up about 15 percent of this map unit. use as woodland and pasture. It is moderately suited or This soil is low in content of organic matter. poorly suited to urban uses. Permeability is moderately rapid or rapid, and the This soil is moderately suited to most row crops, available water capacity is low. The depth to the including tobacco. It is well suited to use as pasture and seasonal high water table ranges from 2.5 feet to 5.0 hayland. Wetness and the clayey subsoil are the main feet below the surface from November through April. management concerns. The wetness limitation can be Shrink-swell potential is low. modified by land smoothing and by constructing deep Most areas of this soil are in woodland, but some ditches and shallow surface drains, if suitable outlets are areas are in cropland and pasture. A few small areas are available. Minimum tillage, subsoiling, and crop residue in urban uses. This soil is moderately suited to use as management help increase the rate of water infiltration, woodland and cropland, and it is well suited to most improve the soil's structure and tilth, and increase the urban uses. organic matter content of the soil. This soil is moderately suited to crops, including The soil is well suited to use as woodland. Loblolly tobacco, to pasture, and to use as hayland. Wetness pine, slash pine, sweetgum, and yellow-poplar are and the low nutrient-holding capacity of the soil are the suitable trees to plant. The understory vegetation main management concerns. The wetness limitation can 22 Soil Survey be modified by using surface and subsurface drainage This soil is moderately suited to most row crops. It is systems, if good outlets are available. Subsurface well suited to tobacco and to use as pasture and drainage systems require sand filters in order to function hayland. This soil has no major limitations if planted to properly. These soils have low available water capacity pasture or hayland. Erosion is a hazard if this soil is and may be overdrained during dry seasons. Leaving planted to row crops. Contour tillage, crop rotations that crop residue on or near the surface, using minimum include close-growing grasses, and water management tillage, planting cover crops, and using split applications help reduce soil loss from water erosion. Using minimum of fertilizer help improve the availability of crop nutrients. tillage and leaving crop residue on or near the surface This soil is moderately suited to use as woodland. improve the rate of water infiltration and soil tilth and Longleaf pine, loblolly pine, and slash pine are suitable increase the content of organic matter in the soil. trees to plant. The understory vegetation consists of little This soil is moderately suited to use as woodland. bluestem, panicum, switchgrass, and large gallberry. The Loblolly pine and sweetgum are suitable trees to plant. sandiness of the soil is a moderate limitation to the use The understory vegetation consists of American holly, of equipment, but using specially designed equipment blueberry, panicum, flowering dogwood, and other helps reduce this limitation. shrubs. This soil has a moderate rate of seedling This soil is well suited to most urban uses. However, mortality. this soil is poorly suited to use as septic tank absorption This soil is moderately suited to most urban uses. It fields because of wetness. The wetness limitation can be has severe limitations to use as septic tank absorption reduced by installing diversions to intercept water fields because of slow permeability and wetness. These coming from higher areas and by using a specially limitations can be modified by using specially designed designed or other alternate system. The soil is well or other alternate systems. This soil has slight limitations suited to use as sites for dwellings without basements to use as sites for dwellings without basements. Low and for local roads and streets. strength is a moderate limitation to the use of this soil The capability subclass of this soil is Ills, and the for local roads and streets, but this limitation can be woodland suitability group is 3s. reduced by providing suitable subgrade or base material and by constructing roads and streets so that they are EmB-Emporia loamy fine sand, 2 to 6 percent adequately supported. slopes. This. well drained, gently sloping soil is on knolls The capability subclass of this soil is Ile, and the and on slopes that range from smooth to choppy in the woodland suitability group is 3s. northern part of the county. Individual areas of this map unit are irregular in shape and commonly range from 10 EuA-Eulonia loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent to 50 acres. slopes. This moderately well drained, nearly level soil is Typically, the surface layer is dark brown loamy fine on broad, smooth ridges in the southeastern part of the sand about 5 inches thick. The subsoil, to a depth of 54 county. Individual areas of this map unit are irregular in inches, is yellowish red, strong brown, and yellowish shape and commonly range from 10 to 150 acres. brown sandy clay loam and sandy loam that is mottled in Typically, the surface layer is grayish brown loamy fine the lower part. The underlying material to a depth of 68 sand about 8 inches thick. The subsurface layer, to a inches is mottled and stratified loamy sand. depth of 12 inches, is light yellowish brown fine sandy Included with this soil in mapping are a few small loam. To a depth of 20 inches, the subsoil is yellowish areas of Duplin, Kenansville, Lynchburg, Nankin, and brown sandy clay loam; to a depth of 40 inches, it is Rutlege soils. Also included are small areas that have 0 yellowish brown clay and has red and gray mottles; and to 2 percent slopes and small areas that have a sandy to a depth of 55 inches, the subsoil is mottled gray, loam and sandy clay loam surface layer because of brown, and red sandy clay loam. The substratum to a erosion. The included soils make up about 20 percent of depth of 80 inches is mottled loamy sand. this map unit. Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of This soil is low in content of organic matter. Bladen, Chisolm, Meggett, and Ogeechee soils. Small Permeability is moderate in the upper part of the subsoil areas that have slopes ranging from 3 to 4 percent are and moderately slow or slow in the lower part of the included. These soils make up about 20 percent of this subsoil. The available water capacity ranges from map unit. moderate to high, and a seasonal perched water table This soil is low in content of organic matter. ranges from a depth of 3.0 feet to 4.5 feet from Permeability is moderately slow, and the available water November through April. Shrink-swell potential is low to capacity is moderate. The depth to the seasonal high moderate. water table ranges from 1.5 feet to 3.5 feet below the Most areas of the soil are in cropland. Some small surface from December through May. Shrink-swell areas are in pasture, hayland, woodland, and urban potential is low. uses. This soil is moderately suited to use as cropland Most areas of this soil are in cropland or pasture or and woodland and to most urban uses. are used as hayland. Some areas are in woodland. A Horry County, South Carolina 23 few small areas are in urban uses. This soil is and gray mottles to a depth of 40 inches; and mottled moderately suited to use as cropland and well suited to gray, brown, and red sandy clay loam to a depth of 55 use as woodland. It is moderately suited or poorly suited inches. The substratum to a depth of 80 inches is to most urban uses. mottled loamy sand. This soil is moderately suited to row crops, including Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of tobacco, and well suited to use as pasture and hayland. Bladen, Chisolm, Meggett, Ogeechee, and Suffolk soils. Wetness and the clayey subsoil are the main Also included are small areas that have slopes of less management concerns. The wetness limitation can be than 2 percent. Other small areas in which the topsoil modified by land smoothing and by constructing deep has been eroded and the subsoil exposed are included. ditches and shallow surface drains, if suitable outlets are The included soils make up about 20 percent of this map available. Chisel plowing and subsoiling help decrease unit. the rate of surface runoff. Using minimum tillage, planting This soil is low in content of organic matter. cover crops in the winter, and leaving crop residue on or Permeability is moderately slow, and the available water near the surface help increase the available water capacity is moderate. The depth to the seasonal high capacity, increase the organic matter content, and water table ranges from 1.5 feet to 3.5 feet below the improve the soil's tilth. surface from December through May. Shrink-swell This soil is well suited to use as woodland. Loblolly potential is low. pine, slash pine, sweetgum, and yellow-poplar are Most areas of this soil are in cropland or are used as suitable trees to plant. The understory vegetation pasture and hayland. Some areas are in woodland, and consists of little bluestem, panicum, and longleaf uniola. a few small areas are in urban uses. This soil is Limitations to the use of equipment and the rate of moderately suited to use as cropland and well suited to seedling mortality are moderate because of wetness. use as woodland. It is moderately suited or poorly suited Planting and harvesting during dry seasons, using to most urban uses. specially designed equipment, and planting seedlings on This soil is moderately suited to row crops, including beds help reduce the limitations caused by wetness. tobacco, and well suited to use as pasture and hayland. This soil is moderately suited or poorly suited to most Erosion is a hazard, and wetness and the clayey subsoil urban uses. It has severe limitations to use as septic are management concerns. Stripcropping, farming on the tank absorption fields because of slow permeability and contour, including close-growing grasses in crop wetness. These limitations can be reduced by special rotations, and crop residue management help control design or by using an alternative system. These severe erosion in areas where row crops are grown. Chisel limitations are difficult to overcome, and alternate sites plowing and subsoiling help increase the rate of water should be selected. This soil has moderate limitations to infiltration and decrease the rate of surface runoff. The use as sites for dwellings without basements because of wetness limitation can be modified by land smoothing wetness. The wetness limitation can be reduced by and by constructing shallow surface drains that have installing tile drains, by constructing footings, and by outlets on grassed waterways. shaping the land so that surface runoff moves away from This soil is well suited to use as woodland. Loblolly the dwelling. This soil has moderate limitations to use for pine, slash pine, sweetgum, and yellow-poplar are local roads and streets because of low strength and suitable trees to plant. The understory vegetation wetness. The limitation of low strength can be modified consists of little bluestem, panicum, and longleaf uniola. by providing suitable subgrade or base material and by This soil has moderate limitations to the use of special construction that provides adequate support. The equipment and a moderate rate of seedling mortality wetness limitation can be modified by constructing roads because of wetness. Planting and harvesting during dry and streets on raised fill material and installing drainage seasons, using specially designed equipment, and systems. planting seedlings on beds help reduce the limitations The capability subclass of this soil is l1w, and the caused by wetness. woodland suitability group is 2w. This soil is moderately suited or poorly suited to most urban uses. It has severe limitations to use as septic EuB-Eulonia loamy fine sand, 2 to 6 percent tank absorption fields because of slow permeability and slopes. This moderately well drained, gently sloping soil wetness. These limitations can be reduced by special is on side slopes in the southeastern part of the county. design or by using an alternative system. These severe Individual areas of this map unit are irregular in shape limitations are difficult to overcome, and alternate sites and range from 5 to 40 acres. should be selected. This soil has moderate limitations to Typically, the surface layer is grayish brown loamy fine use as sites for dwellings without basements because of sand about 8 inches thick. The subsurface layer, to a wetness. The wetness limitation can be reduced by depth of 12 inches, is light yellowish brown fine sandy installing tile drains, by constructing footings, and by loam. The subsoil is yellowish brown sandy clay loam to shaping the land so that surface water and runoff move a depth of 20 inches; yellowish brown clay that has red away from the dwelling. This soil has moderate 24 Soil Survey limitations to use for local roads and streets because of table. Installing drainage and restricting equipment use to low strength and wetness. The limitation of low strength the drier months help reduce this limitation. can be reduced by providing suitable subgrade or base This soil is poorly suited or moderately suited to urban material and by special construction that provides uses. Wetness is a severe limitation to the use of this adequate support. The wetness limitation can be soil for septic tank absorption fields. This limitation can reduced by constructing roads and streets on raised fill be reduced by special design or by using an alternative material and installing drainage systems. system. This soil has moderate limitations to use as sites The capability subclass of this soil is Ile, and the for dwellings without basements and for local roads and woodland suitability group is 2w. streets because of wetness. The limitation of wetness for dwellings without basements can be reduced by GoA-Goldsboro loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent installing tile drains, by constructing footings, and by slopes. This moderately well drained, nearly level soil is shaping the land so that surface water and runoff move on broad, smooth interstrearn divides in the northern part away from the dwelling. The wetness limitation for local of the county. Individual areas of this map unit are roads and streets can be reduced by constructing roads irregular in shape and commonly range from 10 to 300 and streets on raised fill material and by installing acres. drainage systems. Typically, the surface layer is dark brown loamy fine The capability subclass of the soil is l1w, and the sand about 7 inches thick. The subsoil is yellowish woodland suitability group to 2w. brown sandy clay loam to a depth of 31 inches, strong brown sandy clay loam that has mottles to a depth of 44 Ho-Hobcaw fine sandy loam. This very poorly inches, mottled sandy clay loam that has strata of clay drained, nearly level soil is in small stream bottoms and loam and sandy loam to a depth of 59 inches, and slight depressional areas in the southeastern part of the mottled gray clay that has strata of sandy loam and county. Individual areas of this map unit are long and sandy clay loam to a depth of 72 inches. narrow and commonly range from 10 to 100 acres. Included with this soil in mapping are a few small Typically, the surface layer is black and very dark areas of Duplin, Emporia, Kenansville, Nansemond, grayish brown fine sandy loam and loamy sand about 15 Suffolk, and Woodington soils. The included soils make inches thick. The subsoil, to a depth of 48 inches, is up about 20 percent of this map unit. predominantly mottled, very dark grayish brown sandy This soil is low in content of organic matter. loam. The substratum to a depth of Winches is very Permeability is moderate, and the available water dark grayish brown and brownish gray loamy sand. capacity is moderate to high. The depth to the seasonal Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of high water table ranges from 2 feet to 3 feet below the Eulonia, Osier, Wahee, and Yauhannah soils. The surface from December through April. Shrink-swell included soils make up about 20 percent of this map potential is low. unit. Most areas of this soil are in cropland. Some areas This soil is moderate in content of organic matter. are in woodland, and a few small areas are in pasture Permeability is moderate, and the available water and urban uses. This soil is well suited to use as capacity ranges from moderate to high. The seasonal cropland and woodland and poorly suited or moderately high water table ranges from 1 foot above the surface to suited to most urban uses. 1 foot below the surface from November through April. This soil is well suited to row crops, including tobacco Shrink-swell potential is low. (fig. 5), and to use as pasture. Wetness is a major Most areas of this soil are in woodland. A few small management concern. The wetness limitation can be areas are in pasture. This soil is poorly suited to use as modified by land smoothing, constructing shallow surface woodland, to cropland, and to urban uses. drains, and by using tile drainage, if suitable'outlets are This soil is poorly suited to row crops, such as corn, available. Using minimum tillage and planting cover soybeans, and tobacco, and to use as pasture and crops improve the soil's tilth and increase its organic hayland because of the seasonal high water table and matter content. ponding. Because of the low position on the landscape Restricting the use of this soil as pasture and hayland and the absence of suitable outlets, drainage is during wet periods helps to keep the pasture and soil in commonly not feasible. good condition. This soil is poorly suited to use as woodland. The soil is well suited to use as woodland. Loblolly Sweetgurn and water tupelo are the most suitable trees pine, slash pine, sweetgum, and yellow-poplar are to plant. The understory vegetation consists of little suitable trees to plant. The understory vegetation bluestem, panicum, lespedeza, and tickclover. This soil consists mainly of holly, greenbriar, dogwood, water oak, has severe limitations to the use of equipment and a and panicum. This soil has a moderate limitation to the high rate of seedling mortality because of the high water use of equipment because of the seasonal high water table and ponding. Drainage, scheduling planting and Horry County, South Carolina 25 AL, A.2-o A W_ AL A& AA& AL Figure 5.-Goldsboro loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes, Is well suited to tobacco. harvesting during dry periods, and planting seedlings on Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of beds help reduce these limitations. Johnston and Rutlege soils. The included soils make up This soil is poorly suited to use as septic tank about 10 percent of this map unit. absorption fields or as sites for dwellings without This soil is very high in content of organic matter. basements or local roads and streets because of Permeability is moderate, and the available water wetness and ponding. These limitations are difficult to capacity is high. The water table ranges from 1 foot reduce, and alternate sites should be selected. above the surface to the level of the surface from The capability subclass of this soil is Vlw, and the January through December unless areas of this soil are woodland suitability group is 4w. protected from flooding. Shrink-swell potential is low. Most of the acreage of this soil has been left in the Hy-Hobonny muck. This very poorly drained, nearly natural state; some small areas are managed for wetland level, organic soil is on the flood plains of the wildlife habitat. This soil is well suited to use as wetland Waccamaw River in the southern part of the county. wildlife habitat. It is not suited to use as cropland, Individual areas of this map unit are irregular in shape woodland, or to urban uses because of flooding. and commonly range to hundreds of acres. Because of the low position on the landscape and the Typically, the surface layer is dark reddish brown muck absence of suitable outlets, drainage is commonly not about 30 inches thick. The underlying material to a depth feasible. These limitations are difficult to reduce, and of 80 inches is dark reddish brown muck. alternate locations should be selected. 26 Soil Survey Some areas of this soil were used for rice culture prior KeB-Kenansville fine sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes. to the twentieth century. This well drained, nearly level to gently sloping soil is on The capability subclass of this soil is VIIw. It is not smooth, broad ridges in the northern part of the county. placed in a woodland suitability group. Individual areas of this map unit are long, broad, and irregular in shape. The areas commonly range from 5 to Jo-Johnston loam. This very poorly drained soil is in 200 acres. shallow depressions and on nearly level flood plains Typically, the surface layer is grayish brown fine sand along streams and rivers throughout the county. about 8 inches thick. The subsurface layer is very pale Individual areas of this map unit are irregular in shape brown fine sand to a depth of 28 inches. The subsoil is and commonly range from 50 to 500 acres. brownish yellow sandy clay loam to a depth of 44 inches Typically, the surface layer is black loam about 30 and very pale brown sandy loam to a depth of 51 inches. inches thick. The substratum to a depth of 70 inches is The substratum to a depth of 70 inches is mottled mostly grayish brown and dark grayish brown sandy brown, gray, and yellow loamy sand. loam and loamy fine sand. Included with this soil in mapping are a few small Included with this soil in mapping are a few small areas of Blanton, Goldsboro, Lynchburg, and Suffolk areas of Leon, Meggett, Ogeechee, and Yonges soils. soils and small areas that have short, steep slopes The included soils make up about 25 percent of this map greater than 6 percent. The included soils make up unit. about 20 percent of this map unit. This soil is low in content of organic matter. This soil is moderate in content of organic matter. Permeability is moderately rapid, and the available water Permeability is moderately rapid in the surface layer and capacity is moderate. The seasonal high water table rapid in the substratum. The available water capacity ranges from 4 feet to 6 feet below the surface from ranges from moderate to high, and the seasonal high December to April. Shrink-swell potential is low. water table ranges from 1.0 foot above the surface to Most areas of this soil are in cropland. Some small 1.5 feet below the surface during the months of areas are in pasture, hayland, woodland, and urban November through June. This soil is frequently flooded uses. This soil is moderately suited to woodland and during this period. Shrink-swell potential is low. cropland. It is well suited to most urban uses. Most areas of this soil are in woodland. A few small This soil is moderately suited to use as cropland, areas are in urban uses. This soil is poorly suited to including tobacco, and well suited to use as hayland and cropland, suited to woodland, and poorly suited to urban pasture. Moderate droughtiness and soil blowing are uses. hazards, and the low nutrient holding capacity of the soil This soil is poorly suited to row crops and to use as is a management concern. Using minimum tillage, pasture and hayland because of wetness and flooding. planting windbreaks, and leaving crop residue on or near Because of this soil's low position on the landscape and the .surface help reduce soil blowing and conserve the absence of suitable outlets, drainage is commonly moisture. Using split applications of fertilizer increases not feasible. the availability of plant nutrients. This soil is suited to use as woodland if water-tolerant This soil is moderately suited to use as woodland. trees are planted. Baldcypress are suitable trees to Loblolly pine are suitable trees to plant. The understory plant. The understory vegetation consists of greenbriar, vegetation consists of flowering dogwood, sassafras, switchcane, American holly, and blueberry. This soil has turkey oak, blackjack oak, and common persimmon. This severe limitations to the use of equipment and a high soil has moderate limitations to the use of equipment and a moderate rate of seedling mortality because of the rate of seedling mortality because of the high water table thick, sandy surface layer. Using tracks or wider tires on and flooding (fig. 6). Restricting the use of equipment to equipment helps improve traction and reduces the - drier months and planting seedlings on beds help reduce likelihood of equipment bogging down. Proper seedbed the effect of these limitations. Constructing shallow preparation, planting seedlings in deep furrows, and surface drains and embankments helps to lower the carefully selecting planting dates help improve the rate water table. of seedling survival. This soil is poorly suited to urban uses because of This soil is well suited to most urban uses. It has flooding and ponding. It has severe limitations to use as moderate limitations to use as septic tank absorption septic tank absorption fields, as sites for dwellings fields because of wetness. The limitation can be reduced without basements, and to use for local roads and by special design or by using an alternative system. This streets because of wetness and flooding. These soil is well suited to use as sites for dwellings without limitations are difficult to reduce, and alternate sites basements and for local roads and streets. There are no should be selected. major limitations to these uses. The capability subclass of this soil is VIIw, and the The capability subclass of this soil is Ils, and the woodland suitability group is 4w. woodland suitability group is 3s. Horry County, South Carolina 27 + k 4; ME& _7 77 IC A, Figure 6.-Flooded road and woodland in a swampy area along the Waccamaw River. Johnston loam is frequently flooded. LaB-Lakeland sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes. This This soil is low in content of organic matter. excessively drained, nearly level to gently sloping soil is Permeability is very rapid, and the available water on broad, smooth ridges and narrow, irregular slopes capacity is very low or low. The depth to the seasonal throughout the county. Individual areas of this map unit high water table is more than 6 feet. Shrink-swell are irregular in shape and range from 10 to 400 acres. potential is low. Typically, the surface layer is very dark grayish brown Most areas of this soil are in woodland. Some areas sand about 8 inches thick. The substratum is yellowish are in cropland or pasture or are used for hayland. Small brown sand to a depth of 50 inches and very pale brown areas are in urban uses. This soil is moderately suited to sand to a depth of 82 inches. use as cropland. It is poorly suited to use as woodland Included with this soil in mapping are some small and well suited to most urban uses. areas of Centenary, Chisolm, and Kenansville soils. The This soil is poorly suited to most row crops, including included soils make up about 20 percent of this map tobacco, but it is suited to soybeans. It is suited to unit. pasture and hayland. Severe droughtiness and wind erosion are hazards, and the low nutrient-holding 28 Soil Survey capacity of the soil is a major limitation in areas planted require good outlets, and tile drains require filters to to row crops. The hazard of wind erosion can be keep sand out. These soils have low available water reduced by planting pasture and hayland crops. capacity and may be overdrained during dry periods. Irrigation, minimum tillage, windbreaks, and crop residue Using split applications of fertilizer increases the left on or near the surface help reduce soil blowing and availability of plant nutrients. Minimum tillage, cover conserve soil moisture. Split applications of fertilizer crops, and crop residue management help reduce soil increase the availability of plant nutrients. blowing. This soil is poorly suited to use as woodland. Slash This soil is poorly suited to use as woodland. Slash pine and longleaf pine are suitable trees to plant. The pine are suitable trees to plant. The understory understory vegetation consists of creeping bluestem, vegetation consists of panicum, gallberry, blueberry, and hairy panicum, turkey oak, blackjack oak, and other annual forbs. Limitations to the use of equipment broomsedge bluestem. This soil has moderate limitations are moderate and the rate of seedling mortality is to the use of equipment and a moderate rate of seedling moderate because of the high water table and the sandy mortality because of the sandy nature of the soil. Tracks nature of the soil. Drainage, using specially designed or wider tires can be used on equipment to improve equipment, planting and harvesting during dry periods, traction and help reduce the likelihood of equipment and planting seedlings on beds help reduce these bogging down. Proper seedbed preparation, such as limitations. planting seedlings in deep furrows, and selecting planting This soil is poorly suited to urban uses. Wetness and dates carefully help improve the rate of seedling survival. the poor filtering capacity of the soil are severe This soil is well suited to most urban uses. It has slight limitations to its use as septic tank absorption fields. limitations to use as septic tank absorption fields, as Wetness is a severe limitation to the use of this soil as sites for dwellings without basements, and for local sites for dwellings without basements. These limitations roads and streets. are difficult to reduce, and alternate sites should be The capability subclass of this soil is IV% and the selected. Wetness is a severe limitation to the use of woodland suitability group is 4s. this soil for local roads and streets. These limitations can Le-Leon fine sand. This poorly drained, nearly level be reduced by constructing roads and streets on raised soil is in broad, nearly level areas and in slightly fill material and by installing drainage systems. depressional areas throughout the county. Individual The capability subclass of this soil is IVw, and the areas of this map unit are irregular in shape and range woodland suitability group is 4w. from 10 to 500 acres. Ln-Lynchburg loamy fine sand. This somewhat Typically, the surface layer is black fine sand about 5 poorly drained, nearly level soil is in flat areas and inches thick. The subsurface layer, to a depth of 9 shallow depressions in the northern part of the county. inches, is light gray fine sand. The subsoil to a depth of Individual areas of this map unit are irregular in shape 72 inches is mostly black and dark brown fine sand. and commonly range from 10 to 200 acres. Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of Centenary, Echaw, Lynn Haven, Rutlege, Witherbee, and Typically, the surface layer is dark gray loamy fine Yemassee soils. The included soils make up about 25 sand about 8 inches thick. The subsoil is mottled percent of this map unit. brownish yellow sandy clay loam to a depth of 13 inches This soil is low in content of organic matter. and mottled gray, yellow, and red sandy clay loam to a Permeability is rapid in the upper part of the soil and depth of 58 inches. To a depth of 80 inches the moderate or moderately rapid in the lower part. Available substratum is light gray stratified sandy clay loam. water capacity is low. The seasonal high water table Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of ranges from the level of the surface to a depth of 1 foot Coxville, Nansemond, Norfolk, and Woodington soils. below the surface from June through February. Shrink- The included soils make up about 25 percent of this map swell potential is low. unit. Most areas of this soil are in woodland. A few small The soil is low in content of organic matter. areas are in cropland, pasture, hayland, and urban uses. Permeability is moderate, and the available water The soil is poorly suited to most cropland, woodland, and capacity is moderate to high. The depth to the seasonal urban uses. high water table ranges from 0.5 foot to 1.5 feet below This soil is poorly suited to most crops, including the surface from November through April. Shrink-swell tobacco. It is well suited to common bermuclagrass and potential is low. to use as pasture and hayland. Wind erosion is a hazard, About half of the acreage of this soil is in cropland, and wetness and the low nutrient-holding capacity of the and most of the rest is in woodland. Some small areas soil are severe management concerns. The limitation of are in pasture and hayland. A few small areas are in wetness can be modified by installing surface and urban uses. This soil is well suited to use as cropland subsurface drainage systems. All drainage systems and woodland and poorly suited to most urban uses. Horry County, South Carolina 29 This soil is well suited to row crops and to use as wetness and the low nutrient holding capacity of the soil pasture and hayland. It is suited to tobacco. Wetness is are severe management concerns. The limitation of a major management concern. The wetness limitation wetness can be modified by installing surface and can be modified by land smoothing, constructing open subsurface drainage systems. All drainage systems ditches, and tile drainage, or by a combination of these require good outlets in order to function properly, and tile practices. Good outlets are needed for all drainage drains need filters to keep sand from filling the lines. systems to function properly. Using minimum tillage, These soils have a low available water capacity and may planting cover crops, and leaving crop residue on or be overdrained during dry seasons. Using split near the surface improve the soil's tilth and increase the applications of fertilizer helps increase the availability of organic matter content. Restricting use of this soil as plant nutrients. Using minimum tillage, planting cover pasture and hayland during wet periods helps keep the crops, and leaving crop residue on or near the surface pasture and soil in good condition. help reduce soil blowing. Establishing pasture and This soil is well suited to use as woodland. Slash pine, hayland crops reduces the hazard of wind erosion. loblolly pine, and sweetgum are suitable trees to plant. This soil is moderately suited to use as woodland. The understory vegetation consists of common Loblolly pine and slash pine are suitable trees to plant. carpetgrass, longleaf uniola, switchcane, large holly, and The understory vegetation consists of sweetbay, panicum. Wetness is a moderate limitation to the use of gallberry, blueberry, panicum, and other annual forbs. equipment on this soil. This limitation can be reduced by The limitation to the use of equipment is moderate, and drainage and by planting and harvesting during dry the rate of seedling mortality is moderate because of the periods. high water table. The effect of this limitation can be This soil is poorly suited to most urban uses. Wetness reduced by drainage, planting and harvesting during dry is a severe limitation to the use of this soil as septic tank seasons, planting seedlings on beds, and using specially absorption fields and as sites for dwellings without designed equipment. basements. These limitations are difficult to reduce, and This soil is poorly suited to urban uses. Wetness and alternate sites should be selected. Wetness is a severe the poor filtering capacity of the soil are severe limitation to the use of this soil for local roads and limitations to the use of this soil as septic tank streets. This limitation can be reduced by constructing absorption fields. Wetness is a severe limitation to the streets and roads on raised fill material and by installing use of this soil as sites for dwellings without basements. drainage systems. These limitations are difficult to reduce, and alternate The capability subclass of this soil is l1w, and the sites should be selected. Wetness is a severe limitation woodland suitability group is 2w. to the use of this soil for local roads and streets. These Ly-Lynn Haven sand. This poorly drained, nearly limitations can be reduced by constructing roads and level soil is in broad, nearly level areas and slightly streets on raised fill material and by installing drainage depressional areas throughout the county. Individual systems. areas of this map unit are irregular in shape and range The capability subclass of this soil is lVw, and the from 10 to 400 acres. woodland suitability group is 3w. Typically, the surface layer is black sand about 10 Me-Meggett loam. This inches thick. The subsurface layer, to a depth of 13 poorly drained, nearly level inches, is gray sand. The subsoil to a depth of 75 inches soil is on broad and narrow flood plains that are is very dark brown, dark brown, or black sand. throughout the county, but mostly in the southern part of Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of the county. Individual areas of this map unit are irregular Pocomoke, Rutlege, and Witherbee soils. The included in shape and commonly range from 20 to 200 acres. soils make up about 20 percent of this map unit. Typically, the surface layer is dark grayish brown loam This soil is low in content of organic matter. about 4 inches thick. The subsoil, to a depth of 46 Permeability is moderate or moderately rapid, and the inches, is mostly mottled gray clay loam. The substratum available water capacity ranges from low to very low. to a depth of 72 inches is mottled gray sand. The seasonal high water table ranges from the level of Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of the surface to 1 foot below the surface from June Ogeechee, Wahee, and Yonges soils. Also included are through February. Shrink-swell potential is low. small areas of well drained soils. The included soils Most areas of this soil are in woodland. A few small make up about 15 percent of this map unit. areas are in cropland, pasture, hayland, and urban uses. This soil is low in content of organic matter. The This soil is moderately suited to use as woodland and permeability is slow, and the available water capacity poorly suited to use as cropland. It is poorly suited to ranges from moderate to high. The seasonal high water urban uses. ranges from the level of the surface to 1 foot below the The soil is poorly suited to row crops and suited to use surface from November through April. Shrink-swell as pasture and hayland. Wind erosion is a hazard, and potential is high. 30 Soil Survey Most areas of this soil are in woodland. Some small suited to use as cropland and woodland. It is well suited areas are in cropland, pasture, hayland, and engineering to most urban uses. uses. This soil is well suited to use as woodland. It is This soil is moderately suited to row crops and poorly suited to use as cropland and to urban uses. tobacco and to use as hayland and pasture. There are This soil is poorly suited to row crops, such as corn, no limitations to the use of this soil for hayland or soybeans, and tobacco. It is poorly suited to use as pasture. Erosion is a hazard if this soil is planted to row pasture and hayland. The hazard of flooding and crops. Contour tillage, including close-growing grasses in wetness are severe limitations. Because this soil is low the crop rotation, and water management practices on the landscape and suitable outlets are generally not reduce soil loss from water erosion. Using minimum available, drainage is commonly not feasible. tillage, subsoiling, and leaving crop residue on or near This soil is well suited to use as woodland. Loblolly the surface of the soil increase the rate of water pine and slash pine are suitable trees to plant. The infiltration, improve the soil's tilth, and help reduce understory vegetation consists mainly of cabbage palm, erosion. red maple, greenbriar, inkberry, and other shrubs. This This soil is moderately suited to use as woodland. soil has severe limitations to the use of equipment and a Loblolly pine and slash pine are suitable trees to plant. high rate of seedling mortality because of flooding and The understory vegetation consists of longleaf uniola, wetness. Constructing drains, dikes, diversion ditches, pinehill bluestem, beaked panicum, and other shrubs. and embankments help reduce these limitations. This soil has no major limitations to use as woodland. Restricting equipment use to the drier months and This soil is well suited to most urban uses. It has planting seedlings on beds also help to reduce these severe limitations to use as septic tank absorption fields limitations. because of slow permeability. This limitation can be This soil is poorly suited to urban uses. Flooding, slow reduced by special design or by using an alternative permeability, and wetness are severe limitations to the system. This soil has slight limitations to use as sites for use of this soil as septic tank absorption fields. This soil dwellings without basements and for local roads and has severe limitations to use as sites for dwellings streets. without basements and for local roads and streets The capability subclass of this soil is Ile, and the because of flooding, shrink-swell potential, and wetness. woodland suitability group is 3o. These limitations are difficult to reduce, and alternate sites should be selected. NeA-Nansemond loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent The capability subclass of this soil is VIw, and the slopes. This moderately well drained soil is on woodland suitability group is 1w. interstrearn divides and stream terraces adjacent to small natural drainageways. Areas of this soil are mostly NaB-Nankin fine sandy loam, 2 to 6 percent in the northern part of the county. Individual areas are slopes. This well drained, gently sloping soil is on side irregular in shape and commonly range from 10 to 80 slopes in the northern part of the county. Individual areas acres. of this map unit are irregular in shape and commonly Typically, the surface layer is very dark grayish brown range from 10 to 30 acres. loamy fine sand about 8 inches thick. The subsurface Typically, the surface layer is reddish brown fine sandy layer, to a depth of 12 inches, is light yellowish brown loam about 4 inches thick. The subsoil, to a depth of 40 loamy fine sand. The subsoil is yellowish brown and inches, is mostly yellowish red clay that has mottles in brownish yellow fine sandy loam to a depth of 32 inches the lower part. To a depth of 48 inches, the subsoil is and mottled yellowish brown loamy fine sand to a depth mottled strong brown sandy clay loam. The substratum of 54 inches. The substratum to a depth of 72 inches is to a depth of 72 inches is mottled red, brown, and gray mottled light gray and yellow loamy fine sand. loamy sand. Included with this soil are small areas of Centenary, Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of Echaw, Lynchburg, Rutlege, Suffolk, and Woodington Coxville, Duplin, Goldsboro, and Rutlege soils. A few soils. The included soils make up about 25 percent of small areas have relic gray mottles in the upper part of this map unit. the subsoil. The included soils make up about 20 This soil is low in content of organic matter. percent of this map unit. Permeability is moderately rapid in the surface layer, This soil is low in content of organic matter. subsurface layer, and subsoil and rapid in the underlying Permeability is moderately slow, and the available water material. The available water capacity ranges from low to capacity ranges from moderate to high. The seasonal moderate. The depth to the seasonal high water table high water table is more than 6 feet below the surface. ranges from 1.5 feet to 2.5 feet below the surface from Shrink-swell potential is low. December through April. Shrink-swell potential is low. Most areas of this soil are in cropland. Some of the Most areas of this soil are in cropland. Some areas acreage is in hayland, pasture, and woodland. A few are in woodland, pasture, or hayland. Small areas are in small areas are in urban uses. This soil is moderately urban uses. This soil is well suited to use as cropland Horry County, South Carolina 31 and woodland, and it is moderately suited or poorly This soil is very low in content of organic matter. suited to most urban uses. Permeability is very rapid, and the available water This soil is well suited to row crops and tobacco and capacity is very low. The depth to water table is more to use as pasture and hayland. Moderate wetness and than 6 feet. Shrink-swell potential is low. the low nutrient-holding capacity of the soil are the main Most areas of this soil are in recreation development management concerns. The wetness limitation can be and urban uses. Some small areas are in woody shrubs. modified by land smoothing, constructing shallow surface This soil is poorly suited to use as cropland and is not drains, and installing tile drainage, or by using a suited to woodland. It is well suited to most urban uses. combination of the two systems if suitable outlets are This soil is poorly suited to row crops, such as corn, available. Where tile is installed, filters are needed to soybeans, and tobacco, and also to use as pasture and prevent sand from entering the tile system. Crop residue hayland. The main limitations are the excessively sandy management practices, such as minimum tillage and and droughty nature of this soil and its location along the planting cover crops, improve the nutrient holding beach. capacity of the soil. Split applications of fertilizer This soil is not suited to use as woodland because of increase the availability of plant nutrients. Restricting use its sandy, droughty nature and its location along the of this soil as pasture and hayland during wet periods beach. The understory vegetation consists of bushy helps keep the pasture and soil in good condition. bluestem, yaupon, live oak, and sea oats. This soil is well suited to use as woodland. Loblolly This soil is well suited to most urban uses. It has pine, slash pine, yellow-poplar, and black walnut are severe limitations to use as septic tank absorption fields suitable trees to plant. The understory vegetation because of the poor filtering capacity of the soil, which consists of American holly, flowering dogwood, low may cause pollution of the ground water. This limitation blueberry, and waxmyrtle. This soil has a moderate is difficult to overcome, and alternate sites should be limitation to the use of equipment and a moderate rate of selected. This soil has slight limitations to use as sites seedling mortality because of wetness. The wetness for dwellings without basements and for local roads and limitation can be modified by installing drainage ditches streets. and restricting equipment use to dry periods. The capability subclass of this soil is Vills. It is not This soil is moderately suited or poorly suited to urban placed in a woodland suitability group. uses. Wetness is a severe limitation to the use of this soil as septic tank absorption fields, but this limitation NoA-Norfolk loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent can be reduced by special design or by using another slopes. This well drained, nearly level soil is on broad, kind of system. Wetness is a moderate limitation to the smooth ridges in the northern part of the county. use of this soil as sites for dwellings without basements Individual areas of this map unit are irregular in shape and for local roads and streets. The limitation of wetness and commonly range from 10 to 200 acres. for dwellings without basements can be reduced by Typically, the surface layer is brown loamy fine sand installing tile drains and footings and by shaping the land about 13 inches thick. The subsurface layer, to a depth so that surface water and runoff move away from the of 16 inches, is light yellowish brown loamy sand. The dwelling. The wetness limitation for local roads and subsoil, to a depth of 56 inches, is yellowish brown streets can be reduced by constructing roads and streets sandy clay loam that is mottled in the lower part. To a on raised fill material and installing drainage systems. depth of 75 inches it is mostly mottled red, brown, and The capability subclass of this soil is l1w, and the gray clay loam that contains strata of coarser material. woodland suitability group is 2s. Included with this soil in mapping are a few small areas of Coxville, Duplin, Goldsboro, Lynchburg, Nankin, NhO-Newhan fine sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes. and Summerton soils and small areas that have 2 to 6 This excessively drained, nearly level to gently sloping percent slopes. These soils make up about 25 percent of soil is on dunes adjacent to the beaches in the this map unit. southeastern part of the county. Individual areas of this This soil is low in content of organic matter. map unit are irregular in shape. This map unit is Permeability is moderate in the upper part of the subsoil predominantly one area that is about 33 miles long and and slow in the lower part of the subsoil. The available that ranges from about 300 feet to 1,500 feet wide. water capacity ranges from moderate to high. The depth Typically, the surface layer is light brownish gray fine to the seasonal high water table ranges from 3 to 6 feet sand about 7 inches thick. The underlying material to a from January through March. Shrink-swell potential is depth of 80 inches is pale yellow to white fine sand. low. Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of Most areas of this soil are in cropland. Some small Bohicket, Centenary, and Lakeland soils and small areas areas are in pasture, hayland, woodland, and urban of Beaches. These soils make up about 20 percent of uses. This soil is well suited to use as cropland and this map unit. woodland and suited to most urban uses. 32 Soil Survey This soil is well suited to row crops, including tobacco, ditches, and installing dikes. Planting crops on high and to use as pasture and hayland. There are no major seedbeds helps protect against crop damage caused by management concerns, but such practices as minimum wetness. Restricting use of this soil for pasture and tillage, subsoiling, and leaving crop residue on or near hayland during wet periods helps to keep the pasture the surface improve water infiltration, soil tilth, and crop and soil in good condition. yields. This soil is well suited to use as woodland. Loblolly This soil is well suited to use as woodland. Loblolly pine, slash pine, and sweetgum are suitable trees to pine and slash pine are suitable trees to plant. The plant. The understory vegetation consists of panicum, understory vegetation consists of American holly, greenbriar, maidencane, switchgrass, little bluestem, and flowering dogwood, and other shrubs. There are no gallberry. This soil has severe limitations to the use of major limitations to woodland use or management. equipment and a moderate rate of seedling mortality. This soil is suited to most urban uses. It has severe Drainage, special equipment design, restricting limitations for septic tank absorption fields because of equipment use to the drier months, and planting the slowly permeable subsoil. The limitation can be seedlings on beds help reduce these limitations. reduced by special design or by using an alternative This soil is poorly suited to urban uses. Wetness is a system. This soil has slight limitations to use as sites for severe limitation to the use of this soil for septic tank dwellings without basements and for local roads and absorption fields, as sites for dwellings without streets. basements, and for local roads and streets. These The capability class of this soil is 1, and the woodland limitations are difficult to reduce, and alternate sites suitability group is 2o. should be selected. The capability subclass of this soil is IIIw, and the Og-Ogeechee loamy fine sand. This poorly drained, woodland suitability group is 2w. nearly level soil is in broad, flat areas and slightly depressional areas in the southern part of the county. Os-Osier loamy sand. This poorly drained, nearly Individual areas of this map unit are irregular in shape level soil is on flood plains, in depressional areas, and and range from 10 to 300 acres. on stream terraces throughout the county. Individual Typically, the surface layer is black loamy fine sand areas of the map unit are long and narrow or are about 5 inches thick. The subsurface layer, to a depth of irregular in shape and range from 10 to 75 acres. 10 inches, is mottled grayish brown loamy fine sand. The Typically, the surface layer is very dark gray loamy subsoil, to a depth of 60 inches, is mostly mottled gray sand about 8 inches thick. The underlying material to a sandy clay loam that has sandy loam in the lower part. depth of 65 inches is grayish or brownish loamy sand or The substratum to a depth of 72 inches is mottled light sand. gray loamy sand. Included with this soil are small areas of Nansemond, Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of Pocomoke, Rutlege, and Woodington soils. The included Bladen, Yauhannah, and Yonges soils and small areas soils make up about 25 percent of this map unit. that have a sandy surface layer more than 20 inches This soil is low in content of organic matter. thick. The included soils make up about 25 percent of Permeability is rapid, and the available water capacity is the map unit. low. The seasonal high water table ranges from the level This soil is low in content of organic matter. of the surface to 1 foot below the surface during Permeability is moderately slow, and the available water November through March. Shrink-swell potential is low. capacity is moderate. The seasonal high water table Most areas of this soil are in woodland. Some small ranges from the level of the surface to a depth of 6 areas are in cropland, hayland, and pasture. A few small inches below the surface from December through May. areas are in urban uses. This soil is moderately suited to Shrink-swell potential is low. use as woodland and poorly suited to use as cropland. It Most areas of this soil are in woodland. Some small is poorly suited to urban uses. areas are used as cropland or pasture or are in urban This soil is poorly suited to row crops, such as corn, uses. The soil is well suited to use as woodland and soybeans, and tobacco. It is poorly suited to use as pasture. It is moderately suited to use as cropland and pasture and hayland because of the seasonal high water poorly suited to urban uses. table and the hazard of flooding. Because of this soil's This soil is well suited to soybeans, suited to corn, and low position on the landscape and the absence of poorly suited to tobacco. It is well suited to bahiagrass suitable outlets, drainage is commonly not feasible. pasture. The seasonal high water table is a major This soil is moderately suited to use as woodland. management concern. Installing surface and subsurface Slash pine and loblolly pine are suitable trees to plant. drains or a combination of both systems can help reduce The understory vegetation consists of holly, panicum, the limitation of wetness. Good outlets are needed for switchgrass, gallberry, and waxmyrtle. Flooding is a drains to function effectively. Other practices that help hazard on this soil.' The high water table is a severe reduce wetness are land smoothing, constructing deep limitation to the use of equipment, and the rate of Horry County, South Carolina 33 seedling mortality is high. These limitations can be This soil is poorly suited to use as septic tank reduced by drainage, planting and harvesting during dry absorption fields, sites for dwellings without basements, periods, and using specially designed equipment. and for local roads and streets because of wetness and Planting seedlings in beds improves the survival rate of ponding. These limitations are difficult to reduce, and seedlings. alternate sites should be selected. This soil is poorly suited to urban uses. Flooding is a The capability of subclass of this soil is VIw, and the severe limitation to the use of this soil as septic tank woodland suitability group is 2w. absorption fields, as sites for dwellings without basements, and for local roads and streets. These RmB-Rimini sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes. This limitations are difficult to reduce, and alternate sites excessively drained, nearly level to gently sloping soil is should be selected. on rims around Carolina bays throughout the county and The capability subclass of this soil is Vw, and the on narrow, smooth divides along the Little Pee Dee woodland suitability group is 3w. River. Individual areas of this map unit are irregular in shape and range from 10 to 200 acres. Po-Pocomoke fine sandy loam. This very poorly Typically, the surface layer is dark gray sand about 4 drained, nearly level soil is in small drainageways, inches thick. The subsurface layer, to a depth of 65 shallow depressions, and on flats throughout the county. inches, is white and light gray sand. The subsoil to a individual areas of this map unit are irregular in shape depth of 72 inches is dark reddish brown sand. and commonly range from 10 to 50 acres. Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of Typically, the surface layer is black fine sandy loam Echaw, Lakeland, Leon, Lynn Haven, and Rutlege soils. about 11 inches thick. The subsurface layer, to a depth The included soils make up about 15 percent of this map of 16 inches, is mottled gray and dark grayish brown unit. loamy sand. The subsoil, to a depth of 36 inches, is very This soil is low in content of organic matter. dark grayish brown sandy loam. The underlying material Permeability is moderate, and the available water is grayish brown loamy sand to a depth of 54 inches and capacity is very low. The depth to seasonal high water light brownish gray sandy clay loam to a depth of 72 table is more than 6 feet. Shrink-swell potential is low. inches. Most areas of this soil are in woodland. A few small Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of areas are in urban uses, such as recreational homes. Johnston, Lynchburg, Lynn Haven, Osier, and Rutlege This soil is poorly suited to use as cropland and soils. The included soils make up about 25 percent of this map unit. woodland. It is well suited to most urban uses. This soil is moderate in content of organic matter. This soil is poorly suited to row crops, such as corn, Permeability is moderate or moderately rapid, and the soybeans, and tobacco, and also to pasture, hayland, available water capacity ranges from low to moderate. and woodland. This soil is limited for these uses because The seasonal high water table ranges from the level of it is excessively drained, droughty, and has a low the surface to 6 inches below the surface from nutrient-holding capacity. December through May. Shrink-swell potential is low. This soil is poorly suited to use as woodland. Slash Most areas of this soil are in woodland. Some small pine and longleaf pine are suitable trees to plant. The areas are in cropland, pasture, hayland, and urban uses. understory vegetation consists of little bluestem, This soil is well suited to use as woodland. It is poorly panicum, blackjack oak, and pineland threeawn. This soil suited to use as cropland and to urban uses. has moderate limitations on the use of equipment and a This soil is poorly suited to row crops, such as corn, moderate rate of seedling mortality because of the soybeans, and tobacco, and to use as pasture and sandiness of the soil. Tracks or wide tires can be used hayland, because of the seasonal high water table and on equipment to improve traction and keep equipment ponding. Because of the low position on the landscape from bogging down. The rate of seedling survival can be and the absence of suitable outlets, drainage is improved by proper seedbed preparation, such as commonly not feasible. planting in deep furrows, and by selecting planting dates This soil is well suited to use as woodland. Loblolly carefully. pine and sweetgum are suitable trees to plant. The This soil is well suited to most urban uses. It has understory vegetation consists of greenbriar, holly, and severe limitations to use as septic tank absorption fields switchcane. This soil has severe limitations to the use of because of the poor filtering capacity of the soil. This equipment and a high rate of seedling mortality because limitation is difficult to reduce, and alternate sites should of wetness and ponding. Practices that help reduce be selected. This soil has slight limitations to use as these limitations are drainage, planting and harvesting sites for dwellings without basements and for local roads during dry periods, and using specially designed and streets. equipment. Seedlings can be planted on beds to improve The capability subclass of this soil is Vis, and the their likelihood of survival. woodland suitability class is 5s. 34 Soil Survey Ru-Rutlege loamy sand. This very poorly drained, Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of nearly level soil is in small drainageways, in shallow oval Blanton, Emporia, Kenansville, Lynchburg, and depressions, and along the flood plains throughout the Nansemond soils. Also included are small areas that county. Individual areas of this map unit are irregular in have slopes of 2 to 6 percent. The included soils make shape and range from 10 to 100 acres. up about 25 percent of this map unit. Typically, the surface layer is black loamy sand about This soil is low in content of organic matter, 12 inches thick. The substratum to a depth of 72 inches Permeability is moderate, and the available water is mostly gray or dark grayish brown sand. capacity ranges from moderate to high. Depth to the Included with this soil in mapping are a few small seasonal high water table is more than 6 feet. Shrink- areas of Lynchburg, Lynn Haven, Pocomoke, swell potential is low. Woodington, and Yemassee soils. The.included soils Most areas of this soil are in cropland. A small make up about 20 percent of this map unit. acreage is in woodland, pasture, hayland, and urban This soil is moderate in content of organic matter. uses. This soil is well suited to use as cropland, and it is Permeability is rapid, and the available water capacity is suited to use as woodland. It is well suited to most urban low. The seasonal high water table ranges from 2 feet uses. above the surface to 1 foot below the surface from This soil is well suited to row crops and to use as December through May. Shrink-swell potential is low. pasture or hayland. There are no major management Most areas of this soil are in woodland. A few small hazards. Using minimum tillage, planting cover crops, areas are in cropland, pasture, hayland, and urban uses. and leaving crop residue on or near the surface help This soil is poorly suited to use as woodland, cropland, improve the soil's tilth, increase the rate of water and to urban uses. infiltration, and increase the organic matter content of This soil is poorly suited to row crops, such as corn, the soil. soybeans, and tobacco, and also to use as pasture and This soil is suited to use as woodland. Loblolly pine hayland because of the seasonal high water table and are suitable trees to plant. The understory vegetation ponding. Because of the low position on the landscape consists of flowering dogwood, American holly, and the absence of suitable outlets, drainage is blueberry, greenbriar, and sourwood. This soil has a commonly not feasible. moderate limitation to seedling survival because of the This soil is poorly suited to woodland. Baldcypress are sandy surface layer. This limitation can be reduced by suitable trees to plant. The understory vegetation selecting planting dates carefully. consists of greenbriar, holly, and blueberry. This soil has This soil is well suited to most urban uses. Limitations severe limitations to the use of equipment and a high rate of seedling mortality because of wetness and are slight to the use of this soil as septic tank absorption ponding. These limitations can be reduced by planting fields and as sites for dwellings without basements and and harvesting during dry periods, using specially local roads and streets. designed equipment, and drainage. Seedlings can be The capability class of this soil is 1, and the woodland planted on beds to improve their likelihood of survival. suitability group is 3s. This soil is poorly suited to use as septic tank absorption fields, sites for dwellings without basements, SfB-Suffolk loamy fine sand, 2 to 6 percent and for local roads and streets because of wetness and slopes. This well drained, gently sloping soil is on ridges ponding. These limitations are difficult to reduce, and and side slopes on the uplands of the Coastal Plains in alternate sites should be selected. the northern part of the county. Individual areas are long The capability subclass of this soil is VIw, and the and narrow or irregular in shape and commonly range woodland suitability group is 4w. from 10 to 30 acres. Typically, the surface layer is grayish brown loamy fine SfA-Suffolk loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent sand about 8 inches thick. The subsurface layer, which slopes. This well drained, nearly level soil is on uplands extends to a depth of 14 inches, is light yellowish brown of the Coastal Plains in the northern part of the county. loamy fine sand. The subsoil, to a depth of 56 inches, is Individual areas of the map unit are irregular in shape yellowish brown or brownish yellow sandy clay loam that and commonly range from 10 to 100 acres. has mottles and thin strata of coarser material in the Typically, the surface layer is grayish brown loamy fine lower part. The underlying material to a depth of 72 sand about 8 inches thick. The subsurface layer, to a inches is mottled brownish yellow sandy loam. depth of 14 inches, is light yellowish brown loamy fine Included with this soil in mapping are a few small sand. The subsoil, to a depth of 56 inches, is yellowish areas of Blanton, Kenansville, Lynchburg, Coxville, brown or brownish yellow sandy clay loam that has Rutlege, and Woodington soils. Also included are some mottles and thin strata of coarser material in the lower small areas that have a sandy loam surface layer part. The underlying material to a depth of 72 inches is because of erosion. The included soils make up about mottled brownish yellow sandy loam. 20 percent of this map unit. Horry County, South Carolina 35 This soil is low in content of organic matter. This soil is moderately suited to row crops, including Permeability is moderate, and the available water tobacco and well suited to hayland and pasture. This soil capacity is moderate to high. Depth to the seasonal high has no special hazards or management concerns. Such water table is more than 6 feet. Shrink-swell potential is practices as minimum tillage, planting cover crops, low. subsoiling, and crop residue management increase the Most areas of this soil are in cropland. Some small rate of water infiltration, improve the soil's tilth, and areas are in hayland, pasture, woodland, and urban reduce runoff. uses. This soil is well suited to use as cropland and This soil is moderately suited to use as woodland. suited to use as woodland. It is well suited to most Loblolly pine and slash pine are suitable trees to plant. engineering uses. The understory vegetation consists of longleaf uniola, This soil is well suited to some row crops and to use pinehill bluestem, beaked panicum, and other shrubs. as pasture and hayland. It is suited to soybeans and There are no major management concerns. tobacco. This soil has no special limitations or hazards if This soil is moderately suited to most urban uses. planted to pasture or hayland. Erosion is a hazard if this Slow permeability is a severe limitation to the use of this soil is planted to row crops. Contour tillage, including soil as septic tank absorption fields, but this limitation close-growing crops in crop rotations, and water can be reduced by special design or by using another management practices help reduce soil loss from water kind of system. This soil has slight limitations to use as erosion. Using minimum tillage, planting cover crops, and sites for dwellings without basements. Low strength is a leaving crop residue on or near the surface of the soil severe limitation to use of this soil for local roads and help increase the rate of water infiltration, improve the streets, but this limitation can be reduced by providing soil's tilth, and increase the organic matter content of the suitable subgrade or base material and by constructing soil. roads and streets so that they are adequately supported. This soil is suited to use as woodland. Loblolly pine The capability class of this soil is 1, and the woodland are suitable trees to plant. The understory vegetation suitability group is 3o. consists of flowering dogwood, American holly, blueberry, greenbriar, and sourwood. This soil has a Ud-Udorthents and Udipsamments, well drained. moderate limitation to seedling survival. This limitation Most of the acreage of this map unit consists of areas can be reduced by timely planting. that have been formed by the spoil from the excavation This soil is well suited to most urban uses. Limitations of the Intracoastal Waterway. Other areas have been cut are slight to the use of this soil as septic tank absorption or filled during grading for roads, housing developments, fields, as sites for dwellings without basements, and for recreation areas, and similar projects. Most areas of this local roads and streets. map unit are in the southeastern part of the county along The capability subclass of this soil is Ile, and the the Intracoastal Waterway. These areas range from 50 woodland suitability group is 3s. to 1,000 acres. Other areas throughout the county range from about 1 acre to 40 acres. Slopes range from nearly SmA-Summerton fine sandy loam, 0 to 2 percent level to sloping. slopes. This well drained, nearly level soil is on the The mineral materials that make up this map unit are higher landscapes in the northern part of the county. generally characteristic of the soil and underlying Individual areas of this map unit are irregular in shape material in the adjacent areas, Some of the adjacent and commonly range from 10 to 50 acres. soils are the Bladen, Centenary, Echaw, Lakeland, Leon, Typically, the surface layer is yellowish brown fine Lynn Haven, Meggett, Witherbee, and Yonges soils. sandy loam about 6 inches thick. The subsoil, to a depth Included with this map unit are some small areas that of 37 inches, is mostly strong brown clay. To a depth of are moderately well drained and that have not been 61 inches the subsoil is mottled brownish yellow clay. appreciably altered by fill material. Other small areas are Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of made up entirely of miscellaneous fill material. Also Coxville, Duplin, Goldsboro, and Lynchburg soils. These included are excavated areas, 4 to 40 acres, from which soils make up about 25 percent of this map unit. the surface layer, the subsoil, and much of the This soil is low in content of organic matter. substratum have been removed. The included areas Permeability is moderately slow, and the available water make up about 10 percent of this map unit. capacity ranges from moderate to high. The seasonal This map unit is very low in content of organic matter. high water table is more than 6 feet below the surface. Reaction in these soils is variable. Permeability ranges Shrink-swell potential is low. from moderate to rapid, and the surface runoff ranges to Most areas of this soil are in cropland. Some of the rapid. The internal drainage is variable. The available acreage is in hayland, pasture, and woodland. A few water capacity is low, and the hazard of erosion is slight small areas are in urban uses. This soil is moderately to moderate. suited to use as cropland, woodland, and to most urban Individual areas of this map unit vary widely in uses. suitability for different uses. Generally, areas of this map 36 Soil Survey unit are suited to use as building sites. Possible mortality because of the high water table. This limitation limitations are caving, seepage, droughtiness, and sandy can be reduced by drainage, restricting equipment use to texture. Characteristics of this map unit are so variable the drier months, and planting seedlings on beds. that onsite investigation is needed to determine the This soil is poorly suited to most urban uses. Wetness suitability of each area for any proposed use. and the slow permeability of the soil are severe The capability subclass of these soils is VIIs. They are limitations to the use of this soil as septic tank not placed in a woodland suitability group. absorption fields and as sites for dwellings without basements. These limitations are difficult to reduce, and Wa-Wahee fine sandy loam. This somewhat poorly alternate sites should be selected. Wetness and low drained, nearly level soil is in broad, nearly level areas strength are severe limitations to the use of this soil for and in shallow depressions in the southeastern part of local roads and streets. The wetness limitation can be the county. Individual areas of this map unit are irregular reduced by constructing roads and streets on raised fill in shape and range from 10 to 500 acres. material and installing drainage systems. The limitation Typically, the surface layer is dark gray fine sandy of low strength can be reduced by providing a suitable loam about 7 inches thick. The subsurface layer, to a subgrade or base material or by constructing roads and depth of 11 inches, is mottled pale brown loam. The streets so that they are adequately supported. subsoil is mottled brown clay loam to a depth of 15 The capability subclass of this soil is l1w, and the inches and mostly mottled gray clay loam and sandy clay woodland suitability group is 2w. to a depth of 56 inches. The underlying material to a depth of 65 inches is mottled gray and brownish yellow We-Witherbee sand. This somewhat poorly drained, sandy clay loam. nearly level soil is on interstrearn divides and flats Included with this soil in mapping are a few small throughout the county. Individual areas of this map unit areas of Bladen, Meggett, Ogeechee, and Yemassee are irregular in shape and range from 5 to 80 acres. soils. The included soils make up about 30 percent of Typically, the surface layer is very dark gray sand this map unit. about 5 inches thick. The subsurface layer, to a depth of This soil is low in content of organic matter. 22 inches, is yellowish brown sand. The subsoil to a Permeability is slow, and the available water capacity depth of 80 inches is dark reddish brown and very dark ranges from moderate to high. The seasonal high water brown sand. table is 0.5 foot to 1.5 feet below the surface from Included with this soil in mapping are small areas of December through March. Shrink-swell potential is Centenary, Leon, Lynn Haven, Rimini, and Rutlege soils. moderate. Most areas of this soil are in woodland. A few small The included soils make up about 20 percent of this map areas are in row crops, in pasture, and in urban uses. unit. This soil is well suited to use as woodland, moderately This soil is low in content of organic matter. suited to use as cropland, and poorly suited to most Permeability is rapid, and the available water capacity is urban uses. low. Depth to the seasonal high water table ranges from This soil -is moderately suited to row crops, such as 1 foot to 2 feet below the surface from November corn and soybeans. It is poorly suited to tobacco. It is through April. Shrink-swell potential is low. well suited to tall fescue or bahiagrass pasture. The Most areas of this soil are in woodland. Some areas seasonal high water table and clayey subsoil are major are used as cropland and pasture, and a few small areas management concerns. The limitation of wetness can be are in urban uses. This soil is well suited to use as modified by land smoothing, digging deep ditches, and woodland and moderately suited to use as cropland. It is installing shallow surface drains if suitable outlets are poorly suited to most urban uses. available. Crops can be planted on high beds to help This soil is moderately suited to use as cropland, prevent damage from wetness. Chisel plowing and including tobacco, and is well suited to use as pasture subsoiling help increase the rate of water infiltration into and hayland. Wetness and the low nutrient- holding the soil. Crop residue management practices, such as capacity of the soil are major management concerns. minimum tillage and planting cover crops, help improve The wetness limitation can be modified by drainage and the soil's tilth and workability. Restricting use of this soil land smoothing. Both surface and subsurface drainage as pasture and hayland during wet periods helps keep systems require good outlets, and filters are needed for the pasture and soil in good condition. tile drains to function properly. The low nutrient-holding This soil is well suited to use as woodland. Loblolly capacity can be modified by leaving crop residue on or pine, slash pine, and sweetgum are suitable-trees to near the surface, using minimum tillage, planting cover plant. The understory vegetation consists mainly of large crops, and using split applications of fertilizer. Restricting gallberry, panicum, greenbriar, switchcane, and other use of this soil for pasture and hayland during wet grasses and shrubs. This soil has a moderate limitation periods helps keep the pasture and soil in good to the-use of equipment and a moderate rate of seedling condition. Horry County, South Carolina 37 This soil is well suited to use as woodland. Loblolly This soil is moderately suited to use as woodland. pine, longleaf pine, slash pine, and shortleaf pine are Loblolly pine, slash pine, and sweetgum are suitable suitable trees to plant. The understory vegetation trees to plant. The understory vegetation consists of consists of little bluestem, panicum, switchgrass, and maidencane, bay bush, and gallberry. This soil has large holly. This soil has moderate limitations to the use severe limitations to the use of equipment and a high of equipment because of wetness. Planting and rate of seedling mortality because of wetness. Drainage, harvesting during dry periods and using specially restricting equipment use to the drier months, and designed equipment help reduce the effects of excess planting seedlings on beds help reduce these limitations. wetness. This soil is poorly suited to urban uses. Wetness is a The soil is poorly suited to most urban uses. Wetness severe limitation to use of this soil as septic tank and the poor filtering capacity of the soil are severe absorption fields and as sites for dwellings without limitations to the use of this soil as septic tank basements. These limitations are difficult to reduce, and absorption fields, and wetness is a severe limitation to its alternate sites should be selected. Wetness is a severe use as sites for dwellings without basements. These limitation to use of this soil for local roads and streets. limitations are difficult to reduce, and alternate sites This limitation can be reduced by constructing roads and should be selected. Wetness is a moderate limitation to streets on raised fill material and by installing drainage the use of this soil for local roads and streets. This systems. limitation can be reduced by constructing roads and The capability subclass of this soil is IIIw, and the streets on raised fill material and installing drainage woodland suitability group is 3w. systems. The capability subclass of this soil is 111w, and the YaA-Yauhannah fine sandy loam, 0 to 2 percent woodland suitability group is 2w. slopes. This moderately well drained, nearly level soil is on broad, smooth interstrearn divides in the southeastern Wo-Woodington fine sandy loam. This poorly part of the county. Individual areas of this map unit are drained, nearly level soil is on stream terraces and irregular in shape and range from 10 to 200 acres. upland flats in the northern part of the county. Individual Typically, the surface layer is brown fine sandy loam areas of this map unit are irregular in shape and range about 8 inches thick. The subsoil, to a depth of 40 from 5 to more than 60 acres. inches, is mostly yellowish brown sandy clay loam that Typically, the surface layer is very dark gray fine sandy has mottles in shades of gray, brown, and red. To a loam about 7 inches thick. The subsurface layer is light depth of 48 inches, the subsoil is mottled sandy loam. gray fine sandy loam to a depth of 14 inches, mottled The substratum to a depth of 72 inches is mottled light gray sandy loam to a depth of 31 inches, and brownish yellow and light gray sand. mottled light gray stratified sandy clay loam to a depth of Included with this soil in mapping are some small 58 inches. The substratum to a depth of 84 inches is areas of Bladen, Chisolm, Hobcaw, and Ogeechee soils. mottled gray stratified sandy clay loam. The included soils make up about 25 percent of this map Included with this soil in mapping are a few small unit. areas of Coxville, Goldsboro, Pocomoke, and Osier soils. This soil is low in content of organic matter. These soils make up about 25 percent of this map unit. Permeability is moderate, and the available water This soil is low in content of organic matter. The capacity is moderate. The depth to the seasonal high permeability is moderately rapid, and the available water water table ranges from 1.5 feet to 2.5 feet below the capacity is moderate. The depth to the seasonal high surface from December through March. Shrink-swell water table ranges from 0.5 foot to 1 foot below the potential is low. surface from December through May. Shrink-swell Most areas of this soil are in cropland. Some areas potential is low. a Most areas of this soil are in woodland. Some small re used as woodland, pasture, and hayland. Small areas are in cropland, pasture, and urban uses. This soil areas are in urban uses. This soil is well suited to use as is moderately suited to use as woodland and cropland cropland and woodland, and it is poorly suited to most and poorly suited to urban uses. urban uses. This soil is moderately suited to most row crops, but it This soil is well suited to use as cropland, including is poorly suited to tobacco. It is well suited to tall fescue tobacco, pasture, and hayland. Wetness is a major pasture (fig. 7). Wetness is a severe limitation. The management concern. The limitation of wetness can be wetness limitation can be modified by the use of surface modified by land smoothing, shallow surface ditches, and and tile drainage, if suitable outlets are available, and by installing tile drainage systems. All drainage systems land smoothing. Sand filters are needed for tile drains to need good outlets in order to function property. Leaving function properly. Planting crops on high seedbeds helps crop residue on or near the surface, using minimum reduce crop damage caused by wetness. Restricting use tillage, and planting cover crops help improve the tilth during wet seasons helps keep the pasture and soil in and increase the organic matter content of the soil. good condition. Restricting use of this soil as pasture and hayland during 38 Soil Survey Figure 7.-Woodington fine sandy loam, where adequately drained, is well suited to fescue pasture. wet periods helps keep the pasture and soil in good Ye-Yemassee loamy fine sand. This somewhat condition. poorly drained, nearly level soil is in broad, nearly level This soil is well suited to use as woodland. Loblolly areas and in shallow depressions in the southeastern pine, slash pine, yellow-poplar, and American sycamore part of the county. Individual areas of this map unit are are suitable trees to plant. The understory vegetation irregular in shape and range from 10 to 200 acres. consists of little bluestem, switchcane, tickclover, Typically, the surface layer is black loamy fine sand panicum, and slender bluestem. This soil has moderate about 7 inches thick. The subsurface layer, to a depth of limitations to the use of equipment because of wetness. 14 inches, is mottled light yellowish brown loamy fine Drainage, planting and harvesting during dry periods, and sand. The subsoil, to a depth of 56 inches, is mostly using specially designed equipment help reduce the mottled gray sandy clay loam. The substratum to a depth limitations caused by wetness. of 72 inches is mottled light brownish gray loamy sand. This soil is poorly suited to most urban uses. This soil Included with this soil in mapping are some small is severely limited to use as septic tank absorption fields areas of Bladen, Ogeechee, Wahee, and Witherbee because of wetness. This limitation can be reduced by soils. These included soils make up about 25 percent of special design or by using an alternative system. This' this map unit. soil has moderate limitations to use as sites for dwellings This soil is low in content of organic matter. without basements and for local roads and streets Permeability is moderate, and the available water because of wetness. The wetness limitation to use of capacity is moderate. The depth to the seasonal high this soil as sites for dwellings without basements can be water table ranges from 1 foot to 1.5 feet from reduced by installing tile drains near footings and by December through March. Shrink-swell potential is low. shaping the land so that surface and runoff water move Most areas of this soil are in woodland. Some areas away from the dwelling. The wetness limitation to use of are in cropland, pasture, and hayland. A few small areas are in urban uses. This soil is well suited to use as this soil for local roads and streets can be reduced by cropland and woodland. It is poorly suited to most urban constructing roads and streets on raised fill material and uses. by installing drainage systems. This soil is well suited to most row crops, but it is only The capability subclass of this soil is l1w, and the suited to tobacco. This soil is well suited to use as woodland suitability group is 2w. pasture and hayland. Wetness is a major management concern. The wetness limitation can be modified by land Horry County, South Carolina 39 smoothing, use of open ditches. and installing tile capacity is moderate. The seasonal high water table drainage, or a combination of all of these practices. ranges from the level of the surface to 1 foot below the Good outlets are needed for all drainage systems to surface from November through April. Shrink-swell function properly. Crops can be planted on high beds to potential is low. help reduce crop damage caused by wetness. Using Most areas of this soil are in woodland. A few small minimum tillage, planting cover crops, and leaving crop areas are in cropland, pasture, hayland, and urban uses. residue on or near the surface help improve the soil's This soil is moderately suited to use as cropland and tilth and increase the organic matter content of the soil. well suited to use as woodland. It is poorly suited to Restricting the use of this soil as pasture and hayland most urban uses. during wet periods help keep the pasture and soil in This soil is moderately suited to such crops as corn good condition. and soybeans and to use as hayland. This soil is poorly This soil is well suited to use as woodland. Slash pine, suited to tobacco and well suited to use as pasture. loblolly pine, and yellow-poplar are suitable trees to Wetness is a major management concern, but this plant. The understory vegetation consists of little limitation can be modified by the use of land smoothing, bluestem, panicum, switchcane, tickclover, and other open ditches, and tile drainage or a combination of these shrubs. This soil has a moderate limitation to the use of equipment because of wetness. This limitation can be practices. Good outlets are needed for all drainage reduced by planting and harvesting during dry periods. systems to function properly. Using minimum tillage and This soil is poorly suited to most urban uses. Wetness leaving crop residue on or near the surface help reduce is a severe limitation to the use of this soil as septic tank clodding of the surface layer, improve the soil's tilth, and absorption fields and as sites for dwellings without increase the organic matter content of the soil. basements. These limitations are difficult to reduce, and Restricting use of this soil for pasture and hayland during alternate sites should be selected. Wetness is a wet periods helps keep the pasture and soil in good moderate limitation to the use of this soil for local roads condition. and streets. The wetness limitation can be reduced by This soil is well suited to use as woodland. Loblolly constructing roads and streets on raised fill material and pine, slash pine, sweetgum, and water tupelo are by installing drainage systems. suitable trees to plant. The understory vegetation The capability subclass of this soil is l1w, and the consists of little bluestem, panicum, cabbage palm, and woodland suitability group is 2w. tickclover. Wetness in this soil is a severe limitation to Yo-Yonges fine sandy loam. This poorly drained, the use of equipment and causes a high rate of seedling nearly level soil is in low, flat areas near small streams mortality. Drainage, planting and harvesting during dry and swamps. Areas of this map unit are throughout the seasons, and using specially designed equipment help to county, but most are in the southeastern part of the reduce this limitation. Planting seedlings on beds county. Individual areas are irregular in shape and improves the rate of seedling survival. commonly range from 10 to 300 acres. This soil is poorly suited to urban uses. Wetness and Typically, the surface layer is very dark grayish brown the slow permeability of the soil are severe limitations to and dark grayish brown fine sandy loam about 16 inches use of this soil as septic tank absorption fields. Wetness thick. The subsoil, to a depth of 52 inches, is mostly is also a severe limitation to the use of this soil as sites mottled gray and brown sandy loam. The substratum to for dwellings without basements. These limitations are a depth of 68 inches is olive gray sandy loam. difficult to reduce, and alternate sites should be Included with this soil in mapping are some small selected. Wetness is a severe limitation to the use of areas of Bladen, Brookman, Leon, Meggett, Ogeechee, this soil for local roads and streets. This limitation can be and Wahee soils. The included soils make up about 25 reduced by constructing roads and streets on raised fill percent of the map unit. material and by installing drainage systems. This soil is low in content of organic matter. The capability subclass of this soil is IIIw, and the Permeability is moderately slow, and the available water woodland suitability group is 1w. 41 Prime Farmland In this section, prime farmland is defined and acceptable. The soils have few or no rocks and are discussed, and the prime farmland soils in Horry County permeable to water and air. They are not excessively are listed. erodible or saturated with water for long periods and are Prime farmland is one of several kinds of important not subject to frequent flooding during the growing farmland defined by the U.S. Department of Agriculture. season. The slope ranges mainly from 0 to 6 percent. It is of major importance in meeting the nation's short- The following map units, or soils, make up prime and long-range needs for food and fiber. The acreage of farmland in Horry County. About 27 percent of the high-quality farmland is limited, and the U.S. Department county, or 201,340 acres, is prime farmland. The location of Agriculture recognizes that government at local, state, of each map unit is shown on the detailed soil maps at and federal levels, as well as individuals, must the back of this publication. The extent of each unit is encourage and facilitate the wise use of our nation's given in table 4. The soil qualities that affect use and prime farmland. management are described in the section "Detailed Soil Prime farmland soils, as defined by the U.S. Map Units." This list does not constitute a Department of Agriculture, are soils that are best suited recommendation for a particular land use. to producing food, feed, forage, fiber, and oilseed crops. Soils that have limitations, such as a high water table Such soils have properties that are favorable for the or a hazard of flooding, may qualify as prime farmland if economic production of sustained high yields of crops. these limitations are overcome by such measures as The soils need only to be treated and managed using drainage or flood control. In the following list, the acceptable farming methods. The moisture supply, of measures needed to overcome the limitations of a map course, must be adequate, and the growing season has unit, if any, are shown in parentheses after the map unit to be sufficiently long. Prime farmland soils produce the name. Onsite evaluation is necessary to determine if the highest yields with minimal inputs of energy and limitations have been overcome by the corrective economic resources. Farming these soils results in the measures. least damage to the environment. DuA Duplin loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes Prime farmland soils may presently be in use as EmB Emporia loamy fine sand, 2 to 6 percent slopes cropland, pasture, or woodland, or they may be in other EuA Eulonia loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes uses. They either are used for producing food or fiber or EuB Eulonia loamy fine sand, 2 to 6 percent slopes are available for these uses. Urban or built-up land and GoA Goldsboro loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes water areas cannot be considered prime farmland. Urban Ln Lynchburg loamy tine sand (where drained) or built-up land is any contiguous unit of land 10 acres or NaB Nankin fine sandy loam, 2 to 6 percent slopes more in size that is used for such purposes as housing, NeA Nansemond loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent industrial, and commercial sites, sites for institutions or slopes public buildings, small parks, golf courses, cemeteries, NoA Norfolk loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes railroad yards, airports, sanitary landfills, sewage SfA Suffolk loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes treatment plants, and water control structures. SfB Suffolk loamy fine sand, 2 to 6 percent slopes Prime farmland soils usually get an adequate and SmA Summerton fine sandy loam, 0 to 2 percent dependable supply of moisture from precipitation or slopes irrigation. The temperature and growing season are YaA Yauhannah fine sandy loam, 0 to 2 percent slopes favorable. The acidity or alkalinity level of the soils is Ye Yemassee loamy fine sand (where drained) 43 Use and Management of the Soils This soil survey is an inventory and evaluation of the yields of the main crops and hay and pasture plants are soils in the survey area. It can be used to adjust land listed for each soil. uses to the limitations and potentials of natural Planners of management systems for individual fields resources and the environment. Also, it can help avoid or farms should consider the detailed information given soil-related failures in land uses. in the description of each soil under "Detailed Soil Map In preparing a soil survey, soil scientists, Units." Specific information can be obtained from the conservationists, engineers, and others collect extensive local office of the Soil Conservation Service or the field data about the nature and behavior characteristics Cooperative Extension Service. of the soils. They collect data on erosion, droughtiness, About 152,500 acres in Horry County was used for flooding, and other factors that affect various soil uses crops and pasture in 1974, according to figures provided and management. Field experience and collected data by the Horry County Soil and Water Conservation on soil properties and performance are used as a basis District. Of this total, about 7,500 acres was in for predicting soil behavior. permanent pasture and 145,000 was in row crops, Information in this section can be used to plan the use mainly soybeans, corn, and tobacco. Less than 5,000 and management of soils for crops and pasture; as acres was planted to close-growing crops, mainly wheat woodland; as sites for buildings, sanitary facilities, and oats. Most of the acreage in close-growing crops highways and other transportation systems, and parks was double cropped with a late planted row crop. and other recreation facilities; and for wildlife habitat. It can be used to identify the potentials and limitations of The soils in Horry County have good potential for each soil for specific land uses and to help prevent increased production of food. In 1967, according to the construction failures caused by unfavorable soil Conservation Needs Inventory, more than 170,000 acres properties. of potentially good cropland was in woodland and about Planners and others using soil survey information can 11,000 acres was in permanent pasture. In addition to evaluate the effect of specific land uses on productivity the reserve productive capacity represented by the land, and on the environment in all or part of the survey area. food production could be increased by extending better The survey can help planners to maintain or create a crop production technology to all land in the county. land use pattern that is in harmony with nature. In general, the soils in the county that are well suited Contractors can use this survey to locate sources of to crops are also well suited to urban development. sand and gravel, roadfill, and topsoil. They can use it to According to data collected for the 1982 Resource identify areas where wetness or very firm soil layers can Inventory, Horry County had about 34,000 acres of urban cause difficulty in excavation. land and about 10,000 acres in built-up areas. This figure Health officials, highway officials, engineers, and has been growing at the rate of about 800 acres per others may also find this survey useful. The survey can year. In the area of most rapid urbanization, many of the help them plan the safe disposal of wastes and locate soils used are not well suited to cropland or to urban sites tor pavements, sidewalks, campgrounds, uses, but were considered desirable because of their playgrounds, lawns, and trees and shrubs. proximity to the beaches. Soil erosion by water is a major concern on less than Crops and Pasture 1 percent of the total land and less than 5 percent of the cropland in the county. In most areas where erosion is a Gene E. Hardee, conservation agronomist, Soil Conservation hazard, slopes are more than 2 percent. Service, helped prepare this section. Loss of the surface layer through erosion is damaging General management needed for crops and pasture is for two reasons. First, productivity is reduced as the suggested in this section. The crops or pasture plants surface layer is lost and part of the subsoil is best suited to the soils, including some not commonly incorporated into the plow layer. This is especially grown in the survey area, are identified; the system of damaging on soils that have a clayey subsoil, such as land capability classification used by the Soil the Eulonia, Nankin, and Summerton soils. Second, soil Conservation Service is explained; and the estimated erosion on farmland results in sedimentation in streams 44 Soil Survey and decreases the quality of water for municipal use, for Without applied drainage practices, wetness recreation, and for fish and wildlife. significantly damages crops on the somewhat poorly Erosion control practices generally provide protective drained Lynchburg, Wahee, Witherbee, and Yemassee surface cover, reduce runoff, and increase the rate of soils; on the poorly drained Bladen, Brookman, Coxville, water infiltration. A cropping system that keeps plant Leon, Lynn Haven, Meggett, Ogeechee, Woodington, cover on the soil for extended periods can hold erosion and Yonges soils; and on the very poorly drained losses to amounts that do not reduce the productive Hobcaw soils. In some years, crops may be damaged on capacity of the soils. On livestock farms that require the moderately well drained Duplin, Eulonia, Goldsboro, pasture and hay, the legumes and grass forage crops in Nansemond, and Yauhannah soils. the cropping system reduce erosion on the sloping land Hobcaw, Hobonny, Johnston, Ogeechee, Osier, and and may provide nitrogen for the following crop in the Rutlege soils are subject to flooding by freshwater. sequence. Bohicket soils are subject to flooding by saltwater. Terraces reduce runoff and erosion by reducing the The best design of surface and subsurface drainage length of slope. In Horry County, however, most areas of systems is determined to a large extent by the kind of gently sloping soils are small. As a result, diversions and soil and by the crops to be grown. If row crops are to be grassed waterways are commonly the most suitable grown, a combination of surface drainage and tile structural means of erosion control. drainage is needed in most areas of the somewhat Contour farming and contour stripcropping reduce poorly drained soils, the poorly drained soils, and the runoff velocity and erosion. These practices are very poorly.drained soils that can be drained sufficiently especially practical on gently sloping sandy soils, such for row crops. For special crops, such as tobacco or as Blanton, Chisolm, Kenansville, Lakeland, and Rimini vegetable crops, which require intensive farming soils, where the instability of the sandy soil limits practices, a combination of surface and subsurface structural erosion control measures. drainage is needed on most areas of the moderately well Minimizing tillage and leaving crop residues on the drained soils. Tile drainage is very slow in the Bladen, surface help increase the rate of water infiltration and Coxville, Meggett, and Wahee soils. When tile drains are reduce the hazards of runoff and erosion. Nearly all of used on Centenary, Echaw, Leon, Lynn Haven, the sheet and rill erosion hazards in Horry County could Nansemond, Witherbee, and Woodington soils, a filter is be adequately treated by using crop residue needed to prevent sand from entering tile lines. management systems in which crop residues are left on Low available water capacity is a limitation on the the surface. Blanton, Centenary, Chisolm, Echaw, Kenansville, Soil blowing is a hazard on the Blanton, Chisolm, Lakeland, Lynn Haven, and Witherbee soils. This Centenary, Emporia, Eulonia, Goldsboro, Kenansville, limitation can be reduced by crop residue management, Lakeland, Nankin, Nansemond, Norfolk, Rimini, and proper crop selection, and irrigation. These soils are well Suffolk soils. Soil blowing can damage these soils if suited to pasture grasses, such as bahiagrass and extensive areas are left unprotected. Young, tender coastal bermudagrass, and to drought-tolerant crops, plants are damaged most by soil blowing in Horry such as grain sorghum, rye, and watermelons. Also, County. Planting annual wind control strips, windbreaks, because nutrients are rapidly leached from these soils, and cover crops and roughening the soil's surface by fertilizer and lime should be applied frequently for good proper tillage minimize soil blowing on these soils. plant growth. Fall plowing is generally not a good practice on the The Bohicket soils and the Beaches are too saline to gently sloping soils that are subject to erosion by water grow crops or pasture. The Newhan soils and the or on soils that are subject to soil blowing. If fall tillage Beaches are too sandy for crops or pasture. operations are performed, the equipment used should Soil fertility is naturally low in many of the soils in the leave a significant amount of residue on the surface, or county. However, most of the soils respond well to the tilled area should be planted to a cover crop. additions of fertilizers and lime. Information on the design of erosion control practices Most of the soils in Horry County range from very for each kind of soil is contained in the Technical Guide strongly acid to slightly acid. The Bladen, Coxville, Leon, available in local offices of the Soil Conservation Lynchburg, Lynn Haven, Nansemond, Osier, Pocomoke, Service. Rimini, Rutlege, Suffolk, Surnmerton, Witherbee, and Soil drainage is the major management need on about Yemassee soils range from extremely acid to strongly 50 percent of the acreage used for crops and pasture. acid. The Bohicket, Meggett, Newhan, and Yonges soils Bohicket, Hobonny, Johnston, Osier, and Rutlege are range from slightly acid to moderately alkaline. naturally so wet that production of crops common to the The natural acidity of most of these soils means that county is generally not possible. These poorly drained regular applications of lime are needed for most crops to and very poorly drained soils make up about 95,000 grow well. The levels of available phosphorus and acres in the county. potash are naturally low in most of the soils. Horry County, South Carolina 45 Additions of lime and fertilizer on any soil should be The soils that have good natural drainage and based on soil tests, the needs of the crop, and the moderate available water capacity and that warm up desired level of yields. The Cooperative Extension early in the spring are especially well suited to many Service can help in determining the kinds and amount of vegetables and small fruits. Such soils include the fertilizer and lime to apply. Emporia, Eulonia, Nankin, Norfolk, Suffolk, and Most of the soils used for crops in the county have a Summerton soils. In addition, with a well designed surface layer of sandy loam or loamy sand. The tilth is drainage system, the Duplin, Goldsboro, Lynchburg, generally good on most of the well drained to somewhat Nansemond, Wahee, Yauhannah, and Yemassee soils poorly drained soils, and these soils can be worked over are especially well suited to vegetables planted later in a wide range of moisture conditions. the spring. Crops generally can be planted and Field crops suited to the soils and climate of the harvested earlier on all of these soils than on the other county include many that are not now commonly grown soils in the county. (fig. 8). Corn, soybeans, and tobacco are the principal Most of the well drained soils in the county are suited row crops. Wheat, oats, and rye are the common close- to orchards and nursery plants. However, in low areas growing crops. Coastal bermudagrass and bahiagrass where frost is frequent and air drainage is poor, the soils are grown for pasture and hay. generally are poorly suited to early vegetables and Specialty crops grown in Horry County are vegetables, orchards. Blueberries commonly grow best on soils that small fruits, and nursery plants. A significant acreage is are wet in their natural state, but on which good drainage used for vegetable crops, including sweet potatoes, systems have been installed. cabbage, broccoli, string beans, cucumbers, melons, More information and suggestions for growing crops tomatoes, lima beans, sweet corn, and peas, and for and pastures can be obtained from the local offices of small fruits, such as strawberries and blueberries. In the Cooperative Extension Service and the Soil addition, large areas are suited to special crops, such as Conservation Service. grapes, peaches, and pecans. -,A A.9 7t': [email protected] [email protected] % Figure 8.-Centenary fine sand is fairly well suited to sunflowers, a new crop that is being tested in the county. 46 Soil Survey Yields Per Acre narrower choices for practical use. The classes are The average yields per acre that can be expected of defined as follows: - the principal crops under a high level of management Class I soils have few limitations that restrict their use. are shown in table 5. In any given year, yields may be Class 11 soils have moderate limitations that reduce the higher or lower than those indicated in the table because choice of plants or that require moderate conservation of variations in rainfall and other climatic factors. practices. The yields are based mainly on the experience and Class III soils have severe limitations that reduce the records of farmers, conservationists, and extension choice of plants or that require special conservation agents. Available yield data from nearby counties and practices or both. results of field trials and demonstrations are also Class [email protected] soils have very severe limitations that reduce considered. the choice of plants or that require very careful The management needed to obtain the indicated management, or both. yields of the various crops depends on the kind of soil Class V soils are not likely to erode, but they have and the crop. Management can include drainage, erosion other limitations, impractical to remove, that limit their control, and protection from flooding; the proper planting use. and seeding rates; suitable high-yielding crop varieties; Class VI soils have severe limitations that make them appropriate and timely tillage; control of weeds, plant generally unsuitable for cultivation. diseases, and harmful insects; favorable soil reaction Class VII soils have very severe limitations that make and optimum levels of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, them unsuitable for cultivation. and trace elements for each crop; effective use of crop Class VIII soils and miscellaneous areas have residue, barnyard manure, and green manure crops; and limitations that nearly preclude their use for commercial harvesting that insures the smallest possible loss. crop production. The estimated yields reflect the productive capacity of Capability subclasses are soil groups within one class. each soil for each of the principal crops. Yields are likely They are designated by adding a small letter, e, w, or c, to increase as new production technology is developed. to the class numeral, for example, Ile. The letter e shows The productivity of a given soil compared with that of that the main limitation is risk of erosion unless a close- other soils, however, is not likely to change. growing plant cover is maintained; w shows that water in Crops other than those shown in table 5 are grown in or on the soil interferes with plant growth or cultivation the survey area, but estimated yields are not listed (in some soils the wetness can be partly corrected by because the acreage of such crops is small. The local artificial drainage); and s shows that the soil is limited office of the Soil Conservation Service or of the mainly because it is shallow, droughty, or stony. Cooperative Extension Service can provide information There are no subclasses in class I because the soils about the management and productivity of the soils for of this class have few limitations. The soils in class V are those crops. subject to little or no erosion, but they have other limitations that restrict their use to pasture, rangeland, Land Capability Classification woodland, wildlife habitat, or recreation. Class V contains Land capability classification shows, in a general way, only the subclasses indicated by w, or c. the suitability of soils for use as cropland. Crops that The acreage of soils in each capability class and require special management are excluded. The soils are subclass is shown in table 6. The capability classification grouped according to their limitations for field crops, the of each map unit is given in the section I "Detailed Soil risk of damage if they are used for crops, and the way Map Units." they respond to management. The criteria used in grouping the soils do not include major, and generally Woodland Management and Productivity expensive, landforming that would change slope, depth, Norman W. Runge, forester, Soil Conservation Service, helped or other characteristics of the soils, nor do they include prepare this section. possible but unlikely major reclamation projects. Capability classification is not a substitute for When Horry County was first settled, it was covered by interpretations designed to show suitability and pine, oak, and hickory on the uplands and by limitations of groups of soils for woodland and for baldcypress and water-tolerant hardwoods in the low- engineering purposes. lying wet areas. The virgin forest provided material for In the capability system, soils are generally grouped at naval stores and logging industries. three levels: capability class, subclass, and unit. Only Trees now cover about 70 percent of the survey area. class and subclass are used in this survey. These levels Fifty-five percent of the forest land is in southern pine are defined in the following paragraphs. and pine-oak forest types. Ten percent of the forested Capability classes, the broadest groups, are area is in the upland oak-hickory forest type. The designated by Roman numerals I through VIII. The remaining 35 percent is in bottom land hardwood forest numerals indicate progressively greater limitations and types. Horry County, South Carolina 47 The upland areas are dominated by pine species, the Ratings of the erosion hazard indicate the risk of loss most common being loblolly pine. Longleaf pine, slash of soil in a well-managed woodland. The risk is slight if pine, and pond pine occur to a lesser extent. Hardwood the expected soil loss is small, moderate if measures are forests are found mainly in the low-lying areas and needed to control erosion during logging and road drainageways. Some common hardwoods are water oak, construction, and severe if intensive management or sweetgum, blackgum, sycamore, water tupelo, yellow- special equipment and methods are needed to prevent poplar, and baldcypress. excessive loss of soil. Soils differ in their suitability for trees because of their Ratings of equipment limitation reflect the different elevations, positions, and other individual characteristics and conditions of the soil that restrict use characteristics. The most important characteristics are of the equipment generally needed in woodland those that determine moisture supply and growing space management or harvesting. A rating of slight indicates for tree roots, such as the thickness and texture of the that use of equipment is not limited to a particular kind of surface layer and subsoil, the depth to a root-restricting equipment or time of year; moderate indicates a short layer, the depth to the water table, and salinity. seasonal limitation or a need for some modification in The climate in Horry County is very favorable to tree management or in equipment; and severe indicates a growth; annual rainfall averages 50 inches and there are seasonal limitation, a need for special equipment or about 245 frost-free days in the year. management, or a hazard in the use of equipment. The level of woodland management has improved Seedling mortality ratings indicate the degree to which significantly in recent years. Wildfires caused by the soil affects the mortality of tree seedlings. Plant uncontrolled burning, which were common in the area competition is not considered in the ratings. The ratings about two decades ago, have been significantly reduced apply to seedlings from good stock that are properly by fire protection and prescribed burning. Drainage planted during a period of sufficient rainfall. A rating of ditches that have access roads on the spoil banks are slight indicates that the expected mortality is less than common in large wooded areas that are low-lying and 25 percent; moderate, 25 to 50 percent; and severe, wet. Droughty soils are commonly furrowed and the more than 50 percent. seedlings planted in the beds. Additional measures being The potential productivity of merchantable or common practiced or considered include planting genetically trees on a soil is expressed as a site index. This index is improved strains, water management to stabilize the the average height, in feet, that dominant and water table, and fertilization, codominant trees of a given species attain in a specified The commercial value of wood products in the county number of years. The site index applies to fully stocked, is substantial, but it is below the potential capacity. Much even-aged, unmanaged stands. Commonly grown trees of the woodland is owned by major paper companies are those that woodland managers generally favor in and other large landowners and is managed for intermediate or improvement cuttings. They are selected sawtimber and pulp production. In addition to its on the basis of growth rate, quality, value, and commercial use, woodland is valuable for grazing, wildlife marketability. habitat, recreation, natural beauty, and watershed Trees to plant are those that are suited to the soils protection. and to commercial wood production. Table 7 can be used by woodland owners or forest managers in planning the use of soils for wood crops. Only those soils suitable for wood crops are listed. The Recreation table lists the ordination symbol (woodland suitability) for William J. Melven, biologist, Soil Conservation Service, helped each soil. Soils assigned the same ordination symbol prepare this section. require the same general management and have about the same potential productivity. Recreation is an increasingly important land use in The first part of the ordination symbol, a number, Horry County. In a recent report from the Yadkin-Pee indicates the potential productivity of the soils for Dee River Basin study, the summary stated that "most important trees. The number I indicates very high recreation land will come from the present forest land, productivity; 2, high; 3, moderately high; 4, moderate; with only a relatively small amount coming from what is and 5, low. The second part of the symbol, a letter, now cropland or pasture land." This statement, made for indicates the major kind of soil limitation. The letter w the entire Basin, applies only in part to Horry County. indicates excessive water in or on the soil and s The Coastal Zone of Horry County is widely known for its indicates sandy texture. The letter o indicates that tourist attractions and continues to be developed. Such limitations or restrictions are insignificant. If a soil has development includes second homes or living quarters more than one limitation, the priority is w and s. built for leisure and recreation use. In table 7, slight, moderate, and severe indicate the Development decisions are complicated by the fragile degree of the major soil limitations to be considered in resources of the Coastal Zone. Many different kinds of management. information must be available for decision makers. The 48 Soil Survey following soils data for recreation planning should be are not subject to flooding more than once a year during considered. the period of use. They have moderate slopes. In table 8, the soils of the survey area are rated Goff fairways are subject to heavy foot traffic and according to the limitations that affect their suitability for some light vehicular traffic. Cutting or filling may be recreation. The ratings are based on restrictive soil required. The best soils for use as golf fairways are firm features, such as wetness, slope, and texture of the when wet, are not dusty when dry, and are not subject to surface layer. Susceptibility to flooding is considered. Not prolonged flooding during the period of use. They have considered in the ratings, but important in evaluating a moderate slopes. The suitability of the soil for tees or site, are the location and accessibility of the area, the greens is not considered in rating the soils. size and shape of the area and its scenic quality, vegetation, access to water, potential water Wildlife Habitat impoundment sites, and access to public sewerlines. The William J. Melven, biologist, Soil Conservation Service, helped capacity of the soil to absorb septic tank effluent and the prepare this section. ability of the soil to support vegetation are also important. Soils subject to poncling and flooding are Soils help determine the kinds of wildlife that inhabit limited for some recreational uses by the duration and an area by influencing the kinds of plants that grow in an depth of flooding and the season when inundation area. Other influences are man's activities, which directly occurs. In planning recreation facilities, onsite evaluation affect the quantity and quality of wildlife habitat, and of these factors is essential. such natural conditions as topography, the amount of In table 8, the degree of soil limitation is expressed as water, and whether the water is salt, brackish, or fresh. slight, moderate, or severe. Slight means that soil In Horry County, there are two broad general habitat properties are generally favorable and that limitations are areas, the Coastal Marsh and the Coastal Plain. minor and easily overcome. Moderate means that In the narrow Coastal Marsh strip, the common plants limitations can be overcome or alleviated by planning, are the large palmetto, dwarf palmetto, holly, and design, or special maintenance. Severe means that soil groundsel. The low marsh is covered by an extensive properties are unfavorable and that limitations can be pure stand of smooth cordgrass. offset only by costly soil reclamation, special design, The rest of Horry County is a coastal plain that is intensive maintenance, limited use, or by a combination characterized by low sandy plains and damp flatwoods. of these measures. The common trees are live oak, laurel oak, white oak, The information in table 8 can be supplemented by magnolia, hickories, gum, and pines. Red fruited haws, other information in this survey. For example, tupelo gum, and balclcypress grow in the swamps. Areas interpretations for septic tank absorption fields in table of dense vegetation in this region are predominantly evergreen, due largely to the tangled growth of many 11 and interpretations for dwellings without basements species of smilax, yellow jessamine, gallberry, redbay, and for local roads and streets in table 10 may apply to sweetbay, and loblollybay. recreation development. A variety of land use patterns contributes to the Camp areas require site preparation such as shaping diversity of Horry County's wildlife habitat. In general, the and leveling the tent and trailer parking areas, stabilizing patterns of land use favor openland wildlife species roads and intensively used areas, and installing sanitary rather than forest land wildlife species. The great facilities and utility lines. Camp areas are subject to majority of wildlife habitat is privately owned and heavy foot traffic and some vehicular traffic. The best controlled. In 1978, 22 hunting clubs controlled over soils have gentle slopes and are not wet or subject to 101,000 acres, and the State of South Carolina flooding during the period of use. The surface absorbs controlled one 17,000 acre game management area. rainfall readily but remains firm and is not dusty when Water resources in Horry County range in size from dry. small blackwater streams to the Atlantic Ocean. In Picnic areas are subject to heavy foot traffic. Most between these two extremes are ponds and lakes as vehicular traffic is confined to access roads and parking large as Busbee Lake, which is 350 acres, and brackish areas. The best soils for picnic areas are firm when wet, marshes, which are still larger. Fish live in all of these are not dusty when dry, and are not subject to flooding water areas. during the period of use. Some endangered wildlife species of national concern Playgrounds require soils that can withstand intensive can be seen in Horry County, and other species on the foot traffic. The best soils are almost level and are not national list occasionally visit the area. Species that can wet or subject to flooding during the season of use. The be rather easily observed include the eastern brown surface is firm after rains and is not dusty when dry. pelican, red-cockaded woodpecker, and the American Paths and trails for hiking and horseback riding should alligator. require little or no cutting and filling. The best soils are Soils affect the kind and amount of vegetation that is not wet, are firm after rains, are not dusty when dry, and available to wildlife as food and cover. They also affect Horry County, South Carolina 49 the construction of water impoundments. The kind and little bluestem, goldenrod, beggarweed, partridge pea, abundance of wildlife depend largely on the amount and and broomsedge. distribution of food, cover, and water. Wildlife habitat can Hardwood trees and woody understory produce nuts be created or improved by planting appropriate or other fruit, buds, catkins, twigs, bark, and foliage. Soil vegetation, by maintaining the existing plant cover, or by properties and features that affect the growth of promoting the natural establishment of desirable plants. hardwood trees and shrubs are depth of the root zone, In table 9, the soils in the survey area are rated the available water capacity, and wetness. Examples of according to their potential for providing habitat for these plants are oak, poplar, cherry, sweetgum, apple, various kinds of wildlife. This information can be used in hawthorn, dogwood, hickory, blackberry, and blueberry. planning parks, wildlife refuges, nature study areas, and Examples of fruit-producing shrubs that are suitable for other developments for wildlife; in selecting soils that are planting on soils rated good are pyracantha, autumn- suitable for establishing, improving, or maintaining olive, and crabapple. specific elements of wildlife habitat; and in determining Coniferous plants furnish browse and seeds. Soil the intensity of management needed for each element of properties and features that affect the growth of the habitat. Coniferous trees, shrubs, and ground cover are depth of The potential of the soil is rated good, fair, poor, or the root zone, available water capacity, and wetness. very poor. A rating of good indicates that the element or Examples of coniferous plants are pine and cedar. kind of habitat is easily established, improved, or maintained. Few or no limitations affect management Wedandplants are annual and perennial, wild and satisfactory results can be expected. A rating of @air herbaceous plants that grow on moist or wet sites. indicates that the element or kind of habitat can be Submerged or floating aquatic plants are excluded. Soil established, improved, or maintained in most places. properties and features affecting wetland plants are Moderately intensive management is required for texture of the surface layer, wetness, reaction, salinity, satisfactory results. A rating of poor indicates that and slope. Examples of wetland plants are smartweed, limitations are severe for the designated element or kind wild millet, wildrice, saltgrass, cordgrass, rushes, sedges, of habitat. Habitat can be created, improved, or and reeds. maintained in most places, but management is difficult Shallow water areas have an average depth of less and must be intensive. A rating of velypoor indicates than 5 feet. Some are naturally wet areas. Others are that restrictions for the element or kind of habitat are created by dams, levees, or other water-control very severe and that unsatisfactory results can be structures. Soil properties and features affecting shallow expected. Creating, improving, or maintaining habitat is water areas are wetness, slope, and permeability. impractical or impossible. Examples of shallow water areas are marshes, waterfowl The elements of wildlife habitat are described in the feeding areas, and ponds. following paragraphs. The habitat for various kinds of wildlife is described in Grain and seed crops are domestic grains and seed- the following paragraphs. producing herbaceous plants. Soil properties and Habitat for openland wildlife consists of cropland, features that affect the growth of grain and seed crops pasture, meadows, and areas that are overgrown with are depth of the root zone, texture of the surface layer, grasses, herbs, shrubs, and vines. These areas produce available water capacity, wetness, slope, surface grain and seed crops, grasses and legumes, and wild stoniness, and flood hazard. Soil temperature and soil herbaceous plants. The wildlife attracted to these areas moisture are also considerations. Examples of grain and include bobwhite quail, pheasant, meadowlark, field seed crops are corn, wheat, oats, and barley. sparrow, cottontail, and red fox. Grasses and legumes are domestic perennial grasses and herbaceous legumes. Soil properties and features Habitat for woodland wildlife consists of areas of that affect the growth of grasses and legumes are depth deciduous plants or coniferous plants or both and of the root zone, texture of the surface layer, available associated grasses, legumes, and wild herbaceous water capacity, wetness, flood hazard, and slope. Soil plants. Wildlife attracted to these areas include wild temperature and soil moisture are also considerations. turkey, ruffed grouse, woodcock, thrushes, woodpeckers, Examples of grasses and legumes are bermuclagrass, squirrels, gray fox, raccoon, and deer. Bear are bahiagrass, and clover. occasionally reported in the vicinity of Lumber River. Wild herbaceous plants are native or naturally Habitat for wetland wildlife consists of open, marshy or established grasses and forbs, including weeds. Soil swampy shallow water areas. Some of the wildlife properties and features that affect the growth of these attracted to such areas are ducks, geese, shore birds, plants are depth of the root zone, texture of the surface muskrat, mink, and beaver. layer, available water capacity, wetness, and flood hazard. Soil temperature and soil moisture are also considerations. Examples of wild herbaceous plants are 50 Soil Survey Engineering recreational uses; make preliminary estimates of construction conditions; evaluate alternative routes for Lennie J. Farmer, area engineer, Soil Conservation Service, helped roads, streets, highways, pipelines, and underground prepare this section. cables; evaluate alternative sites for sanitary landfills, There are many soil properties important to septic tank absorption fields, and sewage lagoons; plan engineering. Among them are permeability, strength, detailed onsite investigations of soils and geology; locate compaction characteristics, soil drainage, shrink-swell potential sources of gravel, sand, earthfill, and topsoil; potential, grain size, plasticity, and soil reaction. Slope plan drainage systems, irrigation systems, ponds, and depth to the water table are also important. terraces, and other structures for soil and water In this section, soils are rated for land uses related to conservation; and predict performance of proposed small urban development and to water management. Ratings structures and pavements by comparing the performance are based on the soil's capabilities for various uses, and of existing similar structures on the same or similar soils. the most limiting features are identified. The information in the tables, along with the soil maps, The ratings are given in the following tables: Building the soil descriptions, and other data provided in this site development, Sanitary facilities, Construction survey can be used to make additional interpretations. materials, and Water management. The ratings are Some of the terms used in this soil survey have a based on observed performance of the soils and on the special meaning in soil science and are defined in the estimated data and test data in the "Soil Properties" Glossary. section. Information In this section Is intended for land use Building Site Development planning, for evaluating land use alternatives, and for planning site Investigations pnor to design and Table 10 shows the degree and kind of soil limitations construction. The information, however, has limitations. that affect shallow excavations, dwellings with and For example, estimates and other data generally apply without basements, small commercial buildings, local only to that part of the soil within a depth of 5 or 6 feet roads and streets, and lawns and landscaping. The Because of the map scale, small areas of different soils limitations are considered slight if soil properties and site may be included within the mapped areas of a specific features are generally favorable for the indicated use soil. and limitations are minor and easily overcome; moderate The information is not site specific and does not if soil properties or site features are not favorable for the eliminate the need for onsite investigation of the soils or indicated use and special planning, design, or for testtng and analysis by personnel expenenced in the maintenance is needed to overcome or minimize the design and construction of engineering works Within the limitations; and severe if soil properties or site features larger areas, there may be smaller areas of varied soil are so unfavorable or so difficult to overcome that types that require in-depth interpretation for selected special design, significant increases in construction engineering uses, especially those that involve heavy costs, and possibly increased maintenance are required. loads or that requIre excavations to depths greater than Special feasibility studies may be required where the soil 6 feet limitations are severe. Government ordinances and regulations that restrict Shallow excavations are trenches or holes dug to a certain land uses or impose specific design criteria were maximum depth of 5 or 6 feet for basements, graves, not considered in preparing the information in this utility lines, open ditches, and other purposes. The section. Local ordinances and regulations must be ratings are based on soil properties, site features, and considered in planning, in site selection, and in design. observed performance of the soils. The ease of digging, Soil properties, site features, and observed filling, and compacting is affected by the depth to a very performance were considered in determining the ratings firm dense layer, soil texture, and slope. The time of the in this section. During the fieldwork for this soil survey, year that excavations can be made is affected by the determinations were made about grain-size distribution, depth to a seasonal high water table and the liquid limit, plasticity index, soil reaction, soil wetness, susceptibility of the soil to flooding. The resistance of the depth to a seasonal high water table, slope, likelihood of excavation walls or banks to sloughing or caving is flooding, natural soil structure aggregation, and soil affected by soil texture and the depth to the water table. density. Data were collected about kinds of clay Dwellings and small commercial buildings are minerals, mineralogy of the sand and silt fractions, and structures built on. shallow foundations on undisturbed the kind of adsorbed cations. Estimates were made for soil. The load limit is the same as that for single-family erodibility, permeability, corrosivity, shrink-swell potential, dwellings no higher than three stories. Ratings are made available water capacity, and other behavioral for small commercial buildings without basements, for characteristics affecting engineering uses. dwellings with basements, and for dwellings without This information can be used to: evaluate the potential basements. The ratings are based on soil properties, site of areas for residential, commercial, industrial, and features, and observed performance of the soils. A high Horry County, South Carolina 51 water table, flooding, shrink-swell potential, and organic through subsurface tiles or perforated pipe. Only that layers can cause the movement of footings. A high water part of the soil between depths of 24 and 60 inches is table and flooding affect the ease of excavation and evaluated. The ratings are based on soil properties, site construction. Landscaping and grading that require cuts features, and observed performance of the soils. and fills of more than 5 to 6 feet are not considered. Permeability, a high water table, and flooding affect Local roads and streets have an all-weather surface absorption of the effluent. and carry automobile and light truck traffic all year. They Unsatisfactory performance of septic tank absorption have a subgrade of cut or fill soil material, a base of fields, including excessively slow absorption of effluent, gravel, crushed rock, or stabilized soil material, and a surfacing of effluent, and hillside seepage, can affect flexible or rigid surface. Cuts and fills are generally public health. Ground water can be polluted if highly limited to less than 6 feet. The ratings are based on soil permeable sand is less than 4 feet below the base of properties, site features, and observed performance of the absorption field, if slope is excessive, or if the water the soils. Depth to a high water table, flooding, and slope table is near the surface. There must be unsaturated soil affect the ease of excavating and grading. Soil strength material beneath the absorption field to filter the effluent (as inferred from the engineering classification of the effectively. Many local ordinances require that this soil), shrink-swell potential, frost-action potential, and material be of a certain thickness. depth to a high water table affect the traffic-supporting Sewage lagoons are shallow ponds constructed to capacity. hold sewage while aerobic bacteria decompose the solid Lawns and landscaping require soils on which turf and and liquid wastes. Lagoons should have a nearly level ornamental trees and shrubs can be established and floor surrounded by cut slopes or embankments of maintained. The ratings are based on soil properties, site compacted soil. Lagoons generally are designed to hold features, and observed performance of the soils. Soil the sewage within a depth of 2 to 5 feet. Nearly reaction, a high water table, the available water capacity impervious soil material for the lagoon floor and sides is in the upper 40 inches, and the content of salts, sodium, required to minimize seepage and contamination of and sulfidic materials affect plant growth. Flooding, ground water. wetness, slope, and the amount of sand, clay, or organic Table 11 gives ratings for the natural soil that makes matter in the surface layer affect trafficability after up the lagoon floor. The surface layer and, generally, 1 vegetation is established. or 2 feet of soil material below the surface layer are Sanitary Facilities excavated to provide material for the embankments. The ratings are based on soil properties, site features, and Table 11 shows the degree and the kind of soil observed performance of the soils. Considered in the limitations that affect septic tank absorption fields, ratings are slope, permeability, a high water table, sewage lagoons, and sanitary landfills. The limitations flooding, and content of organic matter. are considered slight if soil properties and site features Excessive seepage due to rapid permeability of the are generally favorable for the indicated use and soil or a water table that is high enough to raise the level limitations are minor and easily overcome; moderate if of sewage in the lagoon causes a lagoon to function soil properties or site features are not favorable for the unsatisfactorily. Pollution results if seepage is excessive indicated use and special planning, design, or or if floodwater overtops the lagoon. A high content of maintenance is needed to overcome or minimize the organic matter is detrimental to proper functioning of the limitations; and severe if soil properties or site features lagoon because it inhibits aerobic activity. Slope can are so unfavorable or so difficult to overcome that cause construction problems. special design, significant increases in construction Sanitary landfills are areas where solid waste is costs, and possibly increased maintenance are required. disposed of by burying it in soil. There are two types of Table 11 also shows the suitability of the soils for use landfill-trench and area. In a trench landfill, the waste is as daily cover for landfills. A rating of good indicates that placed in a trench. It is spread, compacted, and covered soil properties and site features are favorable for the use daily with a thin layer of soil excavated at the site. In an and that good performance and low maintenance can be area landfill, the waste is placed in successive layers on expected; fair indicates that soil properties and site the surface of the soil. The waste is spread, compacted, features are moderately favorable for the use and one or and covered daily with a thin layer of soil from a source more soil properties or site features make the soil less away from the site. desirable than the soils rated good; and poor indicates Both types of landfill must be able to bear heavy that one or more soil properties or site features are vehicular traffic. Both types involve a risk of ground unfavorable for the use and overcoming the unfavorable water pollution. Ease of excavation and revegetation properties requires special design, extra maintenance, or needs to be considered. costly alteration. The ratings in table 11 are based on soil properties, Septic tank absorption fields are areas in which site features, and observed performance of the soils. effluent from a septic tank is distributed into the soil Permeability, depth to bedrock or to a cemented pan, a 52 Soil Survey high water table, slope, and flooding affect both types of How well the soil performs in place after it has been landfill. Texture, highly organic layers, soil reaction, and compacted and drained is determined by its strength (as content of salts and sodium affect trench type landfills. inferred from the engineering classification of the soil) Unless otherwise stated, the ratings apply only to that and shrink-swell potential. part of the soil within a depth of about 6 feet. For deeper Soils rated good contain significant amounts of sand trenches, a limitation rated slight or moderate may not or gravel or both. They have at least 5 feet of suitable be valid. Onsite investigation is needed. material and low shrink-swell potential. Depth to the Daily cover for landfill is the soil material that is used water table is more than 3 feet. Soils rated fair are more to cover compacted solid waste in an area type sanitary than 35 percent -silt- and clay-sized particles and have a landfill. The soil material is obtained offsite, transported plasticity index of less than 10. They have moderate to the landfill, and spread over the waste. shrink-swell potential. Depth to the water table is 1 to 3 Soil texture, wetness, coarse fragments, and slope feet. Soils rated poor have a plasticity index of more affect the ease of removing and spreading the material than 10 or a high shrink-swell potential. They are wet, during wet and dry periods. Loamy or silty soils are the and the depth to the water table is less than 1 foot. They best cover for a landfill. Clayey soils are sticky or cloddy may have layers of suitable material, but the material is and are difficult to spread; sandy soils are subject to soil less than 3 feet thick. blowing. Sand and gravel are natural aggregates suitable for After soil material has been removed, the soil material commercial use with a minimum of processing. Sand and remaining in the borrow area must be thick enough over gravel are used in many kinds of construction. bedrock, a cemented pan, or the water table to permit Specifications for each use vary widely. In table 12, only revegetation. The soil material used as final cover for a the probability of finding material in suitable quantity is landfill should be suitable for plants. The surface layer evaluated. The suitability of the material for specific generally has the best workability, more organic matter, purposes is not evaluated, nor are factors that affect and the best potential for plants. Material from the excavation of the material. surface layer should be stockpiled for use as the final The properties used to evaluate the soil as a source of cover. sand or gravel are gradation of grain sizes (as indicated Construction Materials by the engineering classification of the soil), the Table 12 gives information about the soils as a source thickness of suitable material, and the content of rock of roadfill, sand, gravel, and topsoil. The soils are rated fragments. Kinds of rock, acidity, and stratification are good, fair, or poor as a source of roadfill and topsoil. g .iven in the soil series descriptions. Gradation of grain sizes is given in the table on engineering index They are rated as a probable or improbable source of properties. sand and gravel. The ratings are based on soil A soil rated as a probable source has a layer of clean properties and site features that affect the removal of sand or gravel or a layer of sand or gravel that is up to the soil and its use as construction material. Normal 12 percent silty fines. This material must be at least 3 compaction, minor processing, and other standard feet thick and less than 50 percent, by weight, large construction practices are assumed. Each soil is stones. All other soils are rated as an improbable evaluated to a depth of 5 or 6 feet. source. Roadfill is soil material that is excavated in one place Topsoil is used to cover an area so that vegetation and used in road embankments in another place. In this can be established and maintained. The upper 40 inches table, the soils are rated as a source of roadfill for low embankments, generally less than 6 feet high and less of a soil is evaluated for use as topsoil. Also evaluated is exacting in design than higher embankments. the reclamation potential of the borrow area. The ratings are for the soil material below the surface Plant growth is affected by toxic material and by such layer to a depth of 5 or 6 feet. It is assumed that soil properties as soil reaction, available water capacity, and layers will be mixed during excavating and spreading. fertility. The ease of excavating, loading, and spreading Many soils have layers of contrasting suitability within is affected by a water table, soil texture, and thickness of their profile. The table showing engineering index suitable material. Reclamation of the borrow area is properties provides detailed information about each soil affected by slope, a water table, and toxic material. layer. This information can help determine the suitability Soils rated good have friable, loamy material to a of each layer for use as roadfill. The performance of soil depth of at least 40 inches. They have slopes of less after it is stabilized with lime or cement is not considered than 8 percent. They are low in content of soluble salts, in the ratings. are naturally fertile or respond well to fertilizer, and are The ratings are based on soil properties, site features, not so wet that excavation is difficult. and observed performance of the soils. The thickness of Soils rated fair are sandy soils, loamy soils that have a suitable material is a major consideration. The ease of relatively high content of clay, soils that have only 20 to excavation is affected by a high water table and slope. 40 inches of suitable material, soils that have soluble Horry County, South Carolina 53 salts, or soils that have slopes of 8 to 15 percent. The Generally, deeper onsite investigation is needed to soils are not so wet that excavation is difficult. determine these properties. Soils rated poor are very sandy or clayey, have less Soil material in embankments must be resistant to than 20 inches of suitable material, have a large amount seepage, piping, and erosion and have favorable of soluble salts, or have a seasonal water table at or compaction characteristics. Unfavorable features include near the surface. less than 5 feet of suitable material and a high content The surface layer of most soils is generally preferred of organic matter or salts or sodium. A high water table for topsoil because of its organic matter content. Organic affects the amount of usable material. It also affects matter greatly increases the absorption and retention of trafficability. moisture and nutrients for plant growth. Aquifer-fed excavated ponds are pits or dugouts that Water Management extend to a ground-water aquifer or to a depth below a permanent water table. Excluded are ponds that are fed Table 13 gives information on the soil properties and only by surface runoff and embankment ponds that site features that affect water management. The degree impound water 3 feet or more above the original surface. and kind of soil limitations are given for pond reservoir Excavated ponds are affected by depth to a permanent areas; embankments, dikes, and levees; and aquifer-fed water table, permeability of the aquifer, and the salinity ponds. The limitations are considered slight if soil of the soil. properties and site features are generally favorable for Drainage is the removal of excess surface and the indicated use and limitations are minor and are easily subsurface water from the soil. How easily and overcome; moderate if soil properties or site features are effectively the soil is drained depends on the depth to not favorable for the indicated use and special planning, layers that affect the rate of water movement; design, or maintenance is needed to overcome or permeability; depth to a high water table or depth of minimize the limitations; and severe if soil properties or standing water if the soil is subject to ponding; slope; site features are so unfavorable or so difficult to susceptibility to flooding; and subsidence of organic overcome that special design, significant increase in layers. Excavating and grading and the stability of construction costs, and possibly increased maintenance ditchbanks are affected by slope and the hazard of are required. cutbanks caving. The productivity of the soil after This table also gives the restrictive features that affect drainage is adversely affected by extreme acidity or by each soil for drainage, irrigation, terraces and diversions, toxic substances in the root zone, such as salts, sodium, and grassed waterways. or sulfur. Availability of drainage outlets is not considered Pond reservoir areas hold water behind a dam or in the ratings. embankment. Soils best suited to this use have low Irrigation is the controlled application of water to seepage potential in the upper 60 inches. The seepage supplement rainfall and support plant growth. The design potential is determined by the permeability of the soil and management of an irrigation system are affected by and the depth to permeable material. Excessive slope depth to the water table, the need for drainage, flooding, can affect the storage capacity of the reservoir area. available water capacity, intake rate, permeability, Embankments, dikes, and levees are raised structures erosion hazard, and slope. The performance of a system of soil material, generally less than 20 feet high, is affected by the depth of the root zone, the amount of constructed to impound water or to protect land against salts or sodium, and soil reaction. overflow. In this table, the soils are rated as a source of Grassed waterways are natural or constructed material for embankment fill. The ratings apply to the soil channels, generally broad and shallow, that conduct material below the surface layer to a depth of about 5 surface water to outlets at a nonerosive velocity. feet. It is assumed that soil layers will be uniformly mixed Wetness and slope affect the construction of grassed and compacted during construction. waterways. A hazard of wind erosion, low available water The ratings do not indicate the ability of the natural capacity, restricted rooting depth, toxic substances such soil to support an embankment. Soil properties to a as salts or sodium, and restricted permeability adversely depth greater than the height of the embankment can affect the growth and maintenance of the grass after affect performance and safety of the embankment. construction. 55 Soil Properties Data relating to soil properties are collected during the adopted by the American Association of State Highway course of the soil survey. The data and the estimates of and Transportation Officials (1). soil and water features, listed in tables, are explained on The Unified system classifies soils according to the following pages. properties that affect their use as construction material. Soil properties are determined by field examination of Soils are classified according to grain-size distribution of the soils and by laboratory index testing of some the fraction less than 3 inches in diameter and according benchmark soils. Established standard procedures are to plasticity index, liquid limit, and organic matter followed. During the survey, many shallow borings are content. Sandy and gravelly soils are identified as GW, made and examined to identify and classify the soils and GP, GM, GC, SW, SP, SM, and SC; silty and clayey soils to delineate them on the soil maps. Samples are taken as ML, CL, OL, MH, CH, and OH; and highly organic from some typical profiles and tested in the laboratory to soils as PT. Soils exhibiting engineering properties of two determine grain-size distribution, plasticity, and groups can have a dual classification, for example, SP- compaction characteristics. These results are reported in sm. table 17. The AASHTO system classifies soils according to Estimates of soil properties are based on field those properties that affect roadway construction and examinations, on laboratory tests of samples from the maintenance. In this system, the fraction of a mineral soil survey area, and on laboratory tests of samples of that is less than 3 inches in diameter is classified in one similar soils in nearby areas. Tests verify field of seven groups from A-1 through A-7 on the basis of observations, verify properties that cannot be estimated grain-size distribution, liquid limit, and plasticity index. accurately by field observation, and help characterize Soils in group A-1 are coarse grained and low in content key soils. of fines (silt and clay). At the other extreme, soils in The estimates of soil properties shown in the tables group A-7 are fine grained. Highly organic soils are include the range of grain-size distribution and Atterberg classified in group A-8 on the basis of visual inspection. limits, the engineering classifications, and the physical If laboratory data are available, the A-1, A-2, and A-7 and chemical properties of the major layers of each soil. groups are further classified as A-1 -a, A-1-b, A-2-4, A-2- Pertinent soil and water features also are given. 5, A-2-6, A-2-7, A-7-5, or A-7-6. As an additional refinement, the suitability of a soil as subgrade material Engineering Index Properties can be indicated by a group index number. Group index numbers range from 0 for the best subgrade material to Table 14 gives estimates of the engineering 20, or higher, for the poorest. The AASHTO classification classification and of the range of index properties for the for soils tested, with group index numbers in major layers of each soil in the survey area. Most soils parentheses, is given in table 17. have layers of contrasting properties within the upper 5 Rock fragments larger than 3 inches in diameter are or 6 feet. indicated as a percentage of the total soil on a dry- Depth to the upper and lower boundaries of each layer weight basis. The percentages are estimates determined is indicated. The range in depth and information on other mainly by converting volume percentage in the field to properties of each layer are given for each soil series weight percentage. under "Soil Series and Their Morphology." Percentage (of soil particles) passing designated Texture is given in the standard terms used by the sieves is the percentage of the soil fraction less than 3 U.S. Department of Agriculture. These terms are defined inches in diameter based on an ovendry weight. The according to percentages of sand, silt, and clay in the sieves, numbers 4, 10, 40, and 200 (USA Standard fraction of the soil that is less than 2 millimeters in Series), have openings of 4.76, 2.00, 0.420, and 0.074 diameter. "Loam," for example, is soil that is 7 to 27 millimeters, respectively. Estimates are based on percent clay, 28 to 50 percent silt, and less than 52 laboratory tests of soils sampled in the survey area and percent sand. Textural terms are defined in the Glossary. in nearby areas and on estimates made in the field. Classification of the soils is determined according to Liquid limit and plasticity index (Atterberg limits) the Unified soil classification system (2) and the system indicate the plasticity characteristics of a soil. The 56 Soil Survey estimates are based on test data from the survey area, varies, depending on soil properties that affect the or from nearby areas, and on field examination. retention of water and the depth of the root zone. The The estimates of grain-size distribution, liquid limit, and most important properties are the content of organic plasticity index are rounded to the nearest 5 percent. matter, soil texture, bulk density, and soil structure. Thus, if the ranges of gradation and Atterberg limits Available water capacity is an important factor in the extend a marginal amount (11 or 2 percentage points) choice of plants or crops to be grown and in the design across classification boundaries, the classification in the and management of irrigation systems. Available water marginal zone is omitted in the table. capacity is not an estimate of the quantity of water actually available to plants at any given time. Physical and Chemical Properties Soil reaction is a measure of acidity or alkalinity and is expressed as a range in pH values. The range in pH of Table 15 shows estimates of some characteristics and each major horizon is based on many field tests. For features that affect soil behavior. These estimates are many soils, values have been verified by laboratory given for the major layers of each soil in the survey area. analyses. Soil reaction is important in selecting crops The estimates are based on field observations and on and other plants, in evaluating soil amendments for test data for these and similar soils. fertility and stabilization, and in determining the risk of Clay as a soil separate, or component, consists of corrosion. mineral soil particles that are less than 0.002 millimeter Salinity is a measure of soluble salts in the soil at in diameter. In this table, the estimated clay content of saturation. It is expressed as the electrical conductivity each major soil layer is given as a percentage, by of the saturation extract, in millimhos per centimeter at weight, of the soil material that is less than 2 millimeters 25 degrees C. Estimates are based on field and in diameter. laboratory measurements at representative sites of The amount and kind of clay greatly affect the fertility nonirrigated soils. The salinity of irrigated soils is and physical condition of the soil. They determine the affected by the quality of the irrigation water and by the ability of the soil to adsorb cations and to retain frequency of water application. Hence, the salinity of moisture. They influence shrink-swell potential, soils in individual fields can differ greatly from the value permeability, plasticity, the ease of soil dispersion, and given in the table. Salinity affects the suitability of a soil other soil properties. The amount and kind of clay in a for crop production, the stability of soil if used as soil also affect tillage and earthmoving operations. construction material, and the potential of the soil to Moist bulk density is the weight of soil (ovendry) per corrode metal and concrete. unit volume. Volume is measured when the soil is at field Shfink-swellpotential is the potential for volume moisture capacity, that is, the moisture content at 1/3 change in a soil with a loss or gain in moisture. Volume bar moisture tension. Weight is determined after drying change occurs mainly because of the interaction of clay the soil at 105 degrees C. In this table, the estimated minerals with water and varies with the amount and type moist bulk density of each major soil horizon is of clay minerals in the soil. The size of the load on the expressed in grams per cubic centimeter of soil material soil and the magnitude of the change in soil moisture that is less than 2 millimeters in diameter. Bulk density content influence the amount of swelling of soils in data are used to compute shrink-swell potential, place. Laboratory measurements of swelling of available water capacity, total pore space, and other soil undisturbed clods were made for many soils. For others, properties. The moist bulk density of a soil indicates the swelling was estimated on the basis of the kind and pore space available for water and roots. A bulk density amount of clay minerals in the soil and on of more than 1.6 can restrict water storage and root measurements of similar soils. penetration. Moist bulk density is influenced by texture, If the shrink-swell potential is rated moderate to very kind of clay, content of organic matter, and soil structure. high, shrinking and swelling can cause damage to Permeability refers to the ability of a soil to transmit buildings, roads, and other structures. Special design is water or air. The estimates indicate the rate of downward often needed. movement of water when the soil is saturated. They are Shrink-swell potential classes are based on the based on soil characteristics observed in the field, change in length of an unconfined clod as moisture particularly structure, porosity, and texture. Permeability content is increased from air-dry to field capacity. The is considered in the design of soil drainage systems, change is based'on the soil fraction less than 2 septic tank absorption fields, and construction where the millimeters in diameter. The classes are low, a change of rate of water movement under saturated conditions less than 3 percent; moderate, 3 to 6 percent; and high, affects behavior. more than 6 percent. Vely high, greater than 9 percent, Available water capacity refers to the quantity of water is sometimes used. that the soil is capable of storing for use by plants. The Erosion factor K indicates the susceptibility of a soil to capacity for water storage in each major soil layer is sheet and rill erosion by water. Factor K is one of six stated in inches of water per inch of soil. The capacity factors used in the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) Horry County, South Carolina 57 to predict the average annual rate of soil loss by sheet Table 16 gives the frequency and duration of flooding and rill erosion. Losses are expressed in tons per acre and the time of year when flooding is most likely to per year. These estimates are based primarily on occur. percentage of silt, sand, and organic matter (up to 4 Frequency, duration, and probable dates of occurrence percent) and on soil structure and permeability. Values of are estimated. Frequency is expressed as none, rare, K range from 0.02 to 0.69. The higher the value, the common, occasional, and frequent. None means that more susceptible the soil is to sheet and rill erosion by flooding is not probable; rare that it is unlikely but water. possible under unusual weather conditions; common that it is likely under normal conditions; occasional that it Soil and Water Features occurs, on the average, no more than once in 2 years; and frequent that it occurs, on the average, more than Table 16 gives estimates of various soil and water once in 2 years. Duration is expressed as vely brief if features. The estimates are used in land use planning less than 2 days, brief if 2 to 7 days, and long if more that involves engineering considerations. than 7 days. Probable dates are expressed in months; Hydrologic soil groups are used to estimate runoff November-May, for example, means that flooding can from precipitation. Soils are assigned to one of four occur during the period November through May. groups. They are grouped according to the intake of The information is based on evidence in the soil water when the soils are thoroughly wet and receive profile, namely thin strata of gravel, sand, silt, or clay precipitation from long-duration storms. deposited by floodwater; irregular decrease in organic The four hydrologic soil groups are: matter content with increasing depth; and absence of Group A. Soils having a high infiltration rate (low runoff distinctive horizons that form in soils that are not subject potential) when thoroughly wet. These consist mainly of to flooding. deep, well drained to excessively drained sands or Also considered are local information about the extent gravelly sands. These soils have a high rate of water and levels of flooding and the relation of each soil on transmission. the landscape to historic floods. Information on the Group B. Soils having a moderate infiltration rate when extent of flooding based on soil data is less specific than thoroughly wet. These consist chiefly of moderately deep that provided by detailed engineering surveys that or deep, moderately well drained or well drained soils delineate flood-prone areas at specific flood frequency that have moderately fine texture to moderately coarse levels. texture. These soils have a moderate rate of water High water table (seasonal) is the highest level of a transmission. saturated zone in the soil in most years. The depth to a Group C. Soils having a slow infiltration rate when seasonal high water table applies to undrained soils. The estimates are based mainly on the evidence of a thoroughly wet. These consist chiefly of soils having a saturated zone, namely grayish colors or mottles in the layer that impedes the downward movement of water or soil. Indicated in table 16 are the depth to the seasonal soils of moderately fine texture or fine texture. These high water table; the kind of water table-that is, soils have a slow rate of water transmission. perched or apparent; and the months of the year that Group D. Soils having a very slow infiltration rate (high the water table commonly is high. A water table that is runoff potential) when thoroughly wet. These consist seasonally high for less than I month is not indicated in chiefly of clays that have high shrink-swell potential, soils table 16. that have a permanent high water table, soils that have a An apparent water table is a thick zone of free water claypan or clay layer at or near the surface, and soils in the soil. It is indicated by the level at which water that are shallow over nearly impervious material. These stands in an uncased borehole after adequate time is soils have a very slow rate of water transmission. allowed for adjustment in the surrounding soil. A perched Some of the soils are shown in table 16 with dual water table is water standing above an unsaturated hydrologic groups, for example A/D. This means that zone. In places an upper, or perched, water table is under natural conditions the soil is in group D, but by separated from a lower one by a dry zone. artificial methods the water table can be lowered to the Only saturated zones within a depth of about 6 feet point that the soil fits in group A. Onsite investigation is are indicated. A plus sign preceding the range in depth needed, however, to determine the hydrologic group of indicates that the water table is above the surface of the the soil at any particular location because there are soil. The first numeral in the range indicates how high different degrees of drainage and water table control. the water rises above the surface. The second numeral Flooding, the temporary inundation of an area, is indicates the depth below the surface. caused by overflowing streams, by runoff from adjacent Risk of corrosion pertains to potential soil-induced slopes, or by tides. Water standing for short periods after electrochemical or chemical action that dissolves or rainfall or snowmelt is not considered flooding, nor is weakens uncoated steel or concrete. The rate of water in swamps and marshes. corrosion of uncoated steel is related to such factors as 58 soil moisture, particle-size distribution, acidity, and Engineering Index Test Data electrical conductivity of the soil. The rate of corrosion of concrete is based mainly on the sulfate and sodium Table 17 shows laboratory test data for several content, texture, moisture content, and acidity of the soil. pedons sampled at carefully selected sites in the survey Special site examination and design may be needed if area. The pedons are typical of the series and are the combination of factors creates a severely corrosive described in the section "Soil Series and Their environment. The steel in installations that intersect soil Morphology." The soil samples were tested by the South boundaries or soil layers is more susceptible to corrosion Carolina Department of Highways and Public Safety. than steel in installations that are entirely within one kind The testing methods generally are those of the of soil or within one soil layer. American Association of State Highway and For uncoated steel, the risk of corrosion, expressed as Transportation Officials (AASHTO) or the American low, moderate, or high, is based on soil drainage class, Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). total acidity, electrical resistivity near field capacity, and The tests and methods are: AASHTO classification-M electrical conductivity of the saturation extract. 145 (AASHTO), D 3282 (ASTM); Unified classification- For concrete, the risk of corrosion is also expressed D 2487 (ASTM); Mechanical analysis-T 88 (AASHTO), as low, moderate, or high. It is based on soil texture, D 2217 (ASTM); Liquid limit-T 89 (AASHTO), D 423 acidity, and the amount of sulfates in the saturation (ASTM); Plasticity index-T 90 (AASHTO), D 424 extract. (ASTM). 59 Classification of the Soils The system of soil classification used by the National and characteristics considered are particle-size class, Cooperative Soil Survey has six categories (5). Beginning mineral content, temperature regime, depth of the root with the broadest, these categories are the order, zone, consistence, moisture equivalent, slope, and suborder, great group, subgroup, family, and series. permanent cracks. A family name consists of the name Classification is based on soil properties observed in the of a subgroup preceded by terms that indicate soil field or inferred from those observations or on laboratory properties. An example is siliceous, thermic Typic measurements. Table 18 shows the classification of the Psammaquents. soils in the survey area. The-categories are defined in SERIES. The series consists of soils that have similar the following paragraphs. horizons in their profile. The horizons are similar in color, ORDER. Ten soil orders are recognized. The texture, structure, reaction, consistence, mineral and differences among orders reflect the dominant soil- chemical composition, and arrangement in the profile. forming processes and the degree of soil formation. There can be some variation in the texture of the surface Each order is identified by a word ending in sol. An layer or of the substratum within a series. example is Entisol. SUBORDER. Each order is divided into suborders, primarily on the basis of properties that influence soil Soil Series and Their Morphology genesis and are important to plant growth or properties In this section, each soil series recognized in the that reflect the most important variables within the survey area is described. The descriptions are arranged orders. The last syllable in the name of a suborder in alphabetic order. indicates the order. An example is Aquent (Aqu, meaning Characteristics of the soil and the material in which it water, plus ent, from Entisol). formed are identified for each series. The soil is GREAT GROUP. Each suborder is divided into great compared with similar soils and with nearby soils of groups on the basis of close similarities in kind, other series. A pedon, a small three-dimensional area of arrangement, and degree of development of pedogenic soil, that is typical of the series in the survey area is horizons; soil moisture and temperature regimes; and described. The detailed description of each soil horizon base status. Each great group is identified by the name follows standards in the Soil Survey Manual (4). Many of of a suborder and by a prefix that indicates a property of the technical terms used in the descriptions are defined the soil. An example is Psammaquents (Psamm, in Soil Taxonomy (5). Unless otherwise stated, colors in meaning sandy, plus aquent, the suborder of the Entisols the descriptions are for moist soil. Following the pedon that have an aquic moisture regime). description is the range of important characteristics of SUBGROUP. Each great group has a typic subgroup. the soils in the series. Other subgroups are intergrades or extragrades. The The map units of each soil series are described in the typic is the central concept of the great group; it is not section "Detailed Soil Map Units." necessarily the most extensive. Intergrades are transitions to other orders, suborders, or great groups. Bladen Series Extragrades have some properties that are not representative of the great group but do not indicate The Bladen series consists of poorly drained, slowly transitions to any other known kind of soil. Each permeable soils that formed in clayey Coastal Plain subgroup is identified by one or more adjectives sediments on low, flat, fluvial or marine terraces on lower preceding the name of the great group. The adjective elevations. Slope is dominantly less than 1 percent. Typic identifies the subgroup that typifies the great These soils are clayey, mixed, thermic Typic Albaquults. group. An example is Typic Psammaquents. Bladen soils are geographically associated with the FAMILY. Families are established within a subgroup on Ogeechee, Brookman, Wahee, Yemassee, Eulonia, and the basis of physical and chemical properties and other Yauhannah soils. The Ogeechee and Brookman soils are characteristics that affect management. Mostly the on landscapes similar to those of the Bladen soils. properties are those of horizons below plow depth where Ogeechee soils have a fine-loamy control section. The there is much biological activity. Among the properties Brookman soils have an umbric epipeclon and are 60 Soil Survey Alfisols. The Wahee, Yernassee, Eulonia, and Blanton Series Yauhannah soils are on higher elevations. Some part of the Bt horizon of these soils'has a dominant chroma of 3 The Blanton series consists of somewhat excessively or more. drained, moderately permeable soils that formed in Typical pedon of Bladen fine sandy loam, about 1.25 sandy and loamy Coastal Plain sediments on rolling miles southwest of Conway-Horry County Airport, 50 feet landscapes adjacent to large stream flood plains. Slope north of the junction of unimproved roads; Map 68: ranges from 0 to 6 percent. These soils are loamy, siliceous, thermic Grossarenic Paleudults. A-0 to 6 inches; very dark gray (10YR 3/1) fine sandy Blanton soils are geographically associated with the loam; weak fine granular structure; very friable; Kenansville, Chisolm, Nansemond, Lakeland, and Osier many fine and medium roots; strongly acid; clear soils. The Kenansville and Chisolm soils are on slightly smooth boundary. lower elevations than the Blanton soil, and the Btg1-6 to 31 inches; gray (10YR 5/1) clay; common Nansemond soils are on nearly level landscapes. The medium prominent brownish yellow (10YR 6/8), Kenansville, Chisolm, and Nansemond soils have an mottles; moderate medium and coarse subangular arenic surface layer. The Lakeland soils are on similar- blocky structure; very firm; common distinct clay landscapes and are sandy throughout. Osier soils are on lower elevations, are sandy throughout, and have a films on faces of peds; few fine and medium roots; higher seasonal water table. few fine holes and pores; very strongly acid; gradual Typical pedon of Blanton sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes, smooth boundary. about 11.5 miles southwest of Loris and 2.3 miles east Btg2-31 to 42 inches; gray (10YR 5/1) clay; common of the intersection of U.S. Highway 701 and South medium distinct brownish yellow (10YR 6/8) and Carolina Secondar%y Highway 97, about 1.1 mile north of few fine prominent yellowish red (5YR 5/8) mottles; dirt road, 360 feet west of road, in a field; Map 44: moderate medium subangular blocky structure; very firm; common distinct clay films on faces of peds; Ap-O to 11 inches; grayish brown (1 OYR 5/2) sand; few fine holes and pores; very strongly acid; gradual single grained; loose; many fine roots; strongly acid; smooth boundary. abrupt smooth boundary. Btg3-42 to 58 inches; gray (10YR 6/1) clay; common El -11 to 26 inches; very pale brown (1 OYR 7/4) sand, medium distinct brownish yellow (10YR 6/8) mottles; few fine distinct yellow (10YR 7/6) mottles; single moderate medium subangular blocky structure; very grained; loose; few fine roots; few uncoated sand firm; common distinct clay films on faces of peds; grains; strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. few fine holes and pores; very strongly acid; gradual E2-26 to 44 inches; light yellowish brown (1 OYR 6/4) smooth boundary. sand, common medium distinct yellowish brown Btg4-58 to 62 inches; gray (10YR 6/1) clay; moderate (10YR 5/6) mottles; single grained; loose; few medium subangular blocky structure; very firm; uncoated sand grains; strongly acid, gradual wavy common distinct clay films on faces of peds; few boundary. fine holes and pores; very strongly acid. E3-44 to 58 inches; very pale brown (10YR 7/3) sand; few medium distinct yellow (10YR 7/6) mottles; The thickness of the solum is more than 60 inches. single grained; loose; few uncoated sand grains; Reaction in this soil ranges from extremely acid to strongly acid, gradual wavy boundary. strongly acid, except in areas where the soil has been Btl-58 to 63 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/8) sandy limed. loam; weak fine subangular blocky structure; very The A horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 2 to 4, and friable; sand grains coated and bridged with clay; chroma of 1 or 2. It is fine sandy loam, sandy loam, or few small quartz pebbles; strongly acid; gradual loam. wavy boundary. The E horizon, where present, has hue of 10YR, value Bt2-63 to 75 inches; brownish yellow (10YR 6/6) sandy of 5 to 7, and chroma of 1 or 2. Few to common mottles loam; common medium distinct yellowish brown in shades of brown are in most pedons. The E horizon is (10YR 5/8), light gray (10YR 7/2), and very pale fine sandy loam or sandy loam. brown (10YR 7/4) mottles; moderate medium The Btg horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 4 to 6, and subangular blocky structure; friable; sand grains chroma of 1. It has few to many mottles in shades of coated and bridged with clay; few faint clay films on brown, yellow, red or gray, or it is mottled in these ped faces; very strongly acid. colors. The Btg horizon is sandy clay or clay. In some The thickness of the solum ranges from 60 to more pedons, thin strata of sandy material are in the lower than 80 inches. The soil is very strongly acid or strongly part of the Btg horizon. acid throughout the profile, except in areas where the soil has been limed. Horry County, South Carolina 61 The A horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 4 or 5, and Cg4-50 to 72 inches; dark greenish gray (5GY 4/1) silty chroma of I to 3. It is sand, fine sand, or loamy fine clay loam; massive; sticky; soil flows easily between sand. fingers when squeezed and leaves small residue in The E horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 6 to 8, and hand; moderately alkaline. chroma of 3 to 8. It is sand, fine sand, or loamy sand. The Bt horizon has hue of 7.5YR or 1 OYR, value of 5 These soils are saturated continuously by sea water. or 6, and chroma of 6 or 8. It has none to common Soil salinity is high or very high. The n value of all mottles in shades of yellow, brown, or gray. The Bt horizons within the 10- to 40-inch control section is 1 or horizon is sandy loam or sandy clay loam. more. Fragments of shell are within 50 inches of the surface in most pedons. Reaction ranges from slightly Bohicket Series acid to moderately alkaline throughout. Few to common thin strata and pockets of sand are present in the upper The Bohicket series consists of poorly drained, very part of the Cg horizon of most pedons. slowly permeable soils that formed in silty and clayey The A horizon has hue of 5Y and 5GY, value of 4 or 5, Coastal Plain sediments on broad tidal flats bordering and chroma of 1. Mottles, in shades of brown caused by the Atlantic Ocean. Slope is dominantly less than 1 root stains, are present in some pedons. The A horizon percent. These soils are fine, mixed, nonacid, thermic is silty clay loam, silty clay, or clay. Typic Sulfaquents. The Cg horizon has hue of 5GY, value of 4 or 5, and Bohicket soils are geographically associated with the chroma of 1. Mottles in shades of brown are present in Newhan, Lakeland, Centenary, Leon, and Rutlege soils. some pedons. The Cg horizon is silty clay loam, silty The Bohicket soils are also closely associated with clay, or clay. Beaches and Udorthents. All of the associated soils and miscellaneous areas are on higher elevations than the Bohicket soils. The Newhan, Lakeland, and Centenary Brookman Series soils have a sandy control section. The Leon soils have The Brookman series consists of very poorly drained, a spodic horizon, and the Rutlege soils have an umbric slowly permeable soils that formed in clayey Coastal epipedon. Beaches are sandy and smooth, and Plain sediments in broad, shallow depressions. Slope is Udorthents consist of spoil material from dredging dominantly less than 1 percent. These soils are fine, operations. mixed, thermic Typic Umbraqualfs. Typical pedon of Bohicket silty clay loam, about 0.5 Brookman soils are geographically associated with the mile southeast from Nixons Crossroads on South Bladen, Meggett, Yonges, Yauhannah, Wahee, Eulonia, Carolina Secondary Highway 20, about 3.5 miles east on and Yemassee soils. The Bladen soils are on South Carolina Secondary Highway 236, about 0.5 mile landscapes similar to those of the Brookman soils, but east on private dirt road, about 0.5 mile southeast on they do not have an umbric epipedon and are Ultisols. private causeway to Waiters Island, 150 feet northeast of The Meggett and Yonges soils are also on similar the causeway; Map 66: landscapes, but do not have an umbric epipedon. The A-0 to 12 inches; dark greenish gray (5GY 4/1) silty Yonges, Yauhannah, and Yemassee soils have a fine clay loam; massive; very sticky; many medium and loamy control section. The Yauhannah, Wahee, Eulonia, fine roots; soil flows easily between fingers when and Yemassee soils are on higher elevations. Some part squeezed and leaves small residue in hand; of the Bt horizon of these soils has a dominant chroma moderately alkaline; gradual wavy boundary. of 3 or more. Cgl-12 to 22 inches; dark greenish gray (5GY 4/1) silty Typical pedon of Brookman loam, about 2 miles north clay loam; massive; very sticky; few fine roots; soil of Myrtle Beach, 1 mile northwest on 29th Street from its flows easily between fingers when squeezed and intersection with U.S. Highway 17, 200 feet southwest of leaves small residue in hand; common greenish gray street, in a cultivated field; Map 83: (5GY 5/1) sand lenses and strata; few fragments of shell; moderately alkaline; gradual wavy boundary. Ap-0 to 10 inches; black (10YR 2/1) loam; weak Cg2-22 to 34 inches; dark greenish gray (5GY 4/1) silty medium granular structure; friable; common fine and clay; massive; sticky; soil flows easily between medium roots; slightly acid; clear smooth boundary. fingers when squeezed and leaves small residue in Btgl -10 to 22 inches; very dark gray (1 OYR 3/ 1) clay; hand; moderately alkaline; gradual wavy boundary. few medium prominent yellowish red (5YR 4/8) and Cg3-34 to 50 inches; dark greenish gray (5GY 4/1) silty dark gray (10YR 4/1) mottles; moderate medium clay; massive; sticky; soil flows easily between subangular blocky structure; firm; many distinct clay fingers when squeezed and leaves small residue in films on faces of peds; many fine roots; few streaks hand; many small and medium fragments of shell; or pockets of black material from the surface layer; moderately alkaline; gradual wavy boundary. strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. 62 Soil Survey Btg2-22 to 46 inches; gray (1 OYR 5/ 1) clay; common is defined for the Centenary series. This difference does medium distinct yellowish brown (10YR 5/6), and not significantly alter the use or behavior of the soils. light gray (10YR 6/1) mottles; moderate medium Centenary soils are geographically associated with the subangular blocky structure; very firm; many distinct Chisolm, Lakeland, Yauhannah, Yemassee, Leon, clay films on faces of peds; few fine roots; few fine Ogeechee, Bladen, and Yonges soils. The Chisolm, pores; medium acid; clear wavy boundary. Lakeland, and Yauhannah soils are on landscapes Bcg-46 to 60 inches; gray (10YR 5/1) sandy clay loam; similar to those of the Centenary soils, but they do not common medium distinct yellowish brown (10YR have a spodic horizon. The Yemassee soils are on 5/6), few medium prominent yellowish red (5YR slightly lower elevations but do not have a spodic 4/6), and few medium distinct light gray (10YR 6/1) horizon. The Ogeechee, Bladen, and Yonges soils are mottles; weak medium subangular blocky structure; on lower elevations but do not have a spodic horizon. friable; common faint clay films on faces of peds; The Leon soils are on lower elevations and are Aquods. few fine roots; few fine pores; slightly acid; gradual Typical pedon of Centenary fine sand, about 2.5 miles wavy boundary. northeast of Surfside Beach; northwest on South Cgl-60 to 68 inches; greenish gray (5G 5/1) sandy Carolina Secondary Highway 375, 0.7 mile from junction loam; few medium prominent yellowish red (5YR of U.S. Highway 17, northeast 0.8 mile on South Carolina 4/6) and common medium distinct yellowish brown Secondary Highway 394 (1,500 feet southwest of (10YR 5/4) mottles; weak medium subangular Lakewood Elementary School), about 100 feet southeast blocky structure; very friable; few fine holes and of the road; Map 88: pores; moderately alkaline. A-0 to 5 inches; dark gray (10YR 4/1) fine sand; single The thickness of the solurn ranges from 50 to more grained; loose; common fine and medium roots; very than 70 inches. Reaction ranges from strongly acid to strongly acid; abrupt smooth boundary. slightly acid in the A horizon, and from strongly acid to E1-5 to 21 inches; brownish yellow (10YR 6/6) fine moderately alkaline in the B horizon. In some pedons, sand; single grained; loose; few fine roots; few clean the lower part of the B and the C horizons contain few to sand grains; medium acid; gradual wavy boundary. many small fragments of marine shells and small E2-21 to 42 inches; brownish yellow (10YR 6/6) fine nodules of calcium carbonate. sand; few medium distinct yellowish brown (10YR The A horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 2 to 3, and 5/6) and common medium distinct light gray (10YR chroma of 1 or 2. It is loam. 7/2) mottles; single grained; loose; few fine roots; The Btg horizon is neutral or has hue of 10YR to 5Y, medium acid; gradual wavy boundary. value of 3 to 6, and chroma of 0 to 2. It has few to many E3-42 to 68 inches; light gray (10YR 7/1) fine sand; mottles in shades of gray, yellow, brown, or red, or it single grained; loose; slightly acid; clear wavy may have mottles of high and low chroma. The Btg boundary. horizon is clay or sandy clay. Bhl-68 to 72 inches; very dark brown (10YR 2/2) fine The BCg horizon is neutral or has hue of 1 OYR or sand; few medium distinct light brownish gray (10YR 2.5Y, value of 5 to 6, and chroma of 0 to 1. It has few to 6/2) mottles; single grained; slightly acid; gradual many mottles in shades of gray, brown, yellow, or red, or wavy boundary. it may have mottles of high and low chroma. The BCg Bh2-72 to 80 inches; black (10YR 2/1) fine sand; weak horizon is sandy clay loam or clay. fine granular structure; very friable; most sand grains The Cg horizon is neutral or has hue of 5YR to 5G, have organic coatings; slightly acid. value of 4 to 7, and chroma of 0 to 1. It has few to common mottles in shades of yellow, brown, red, or This soil is sand or fine sand to a depth of 50 inches gray. Some mottles are mixed brown and gray. The Cg or more and may range to loamy sand below that depth. horizon is loamy sandy, sandy loam, or sandy clay loam. The depth to the Bh horizon ranges from 50 to 80 inches. Reaction ranges from very strongly acid to Centenary Series slightly acid throughout. The A horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 3 to 4, and The Centenary series consists of moderately well chroma of 1. drained, rapidly permeable soils that formed in sandy The upper part of the E horizon has hue of 1 OYR, Coastal Plain sediments, on broad ridges and flats. value of 5 to 7, and chroma of 3 to 8. It has few to Slope is dominantly less than 1 percent. These soils are common mottles in shades of brown, gray, or red. sandy, siliceous, thermic Grossarenic Entic Mottles that have chroma of 2 or less are within 40 Haplohumods. inches of the surface. The lower part of the E horizon The Centenary soils in Horry County are a taxadjunct has hue of 10YR, value of 5 to 8, and chroma of 1 or 2. to the Centenary series because they have a slightly Mottles of higher chroma are present in the lower part of higher reaction range in the lower part of the profile than the E horizon in some pedons. Horry County, South Carolina 63 The Bh horizon has hue of 5YR to 10YR, value of 2 or The E horizon has hue of I OYR, value of 5 to 7, and 3, and chroma of 1 or 2. Mottles in shades of brown or chroma of 3 to 6. It is loamy sand. gray are present in some pedons. The BE horizon, where present, has hue of 7.5YR or 1 OYR, value of 5 to 7, and chroma of 6. It is sandy loam. Chisolm Series The Bt horizon has hue of 5YR to 10YR, value of 5 or 6, and chroma of 6 or 8. Few to common mottles in The Chisolm series consists of well drained, shades of brown, red, and gray are in some pedons. The moderately permeable soils that formed in sandy and Bt horizon is sandy clay loam. loamy Coastal Plain sediments on lower elevations. The BC horizon has hue of 5YR to 1 OYR, value of 5 or Slope is dominantly less than 4 percent, but it ranges to 6, and chroma of 6 or 8, or it is mixed in varying shades as much as 6 percent along drainageways. These soils of gray, brown, and red. The BC horizon is sandy loam. are loamy, siliceous, thermic Arenic Hapludults. The C horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 5 to 8, and Chisolm soils are geographically associated with the chroma of 2 to 8, with few to common mottles in shades Lakeland, Yauhannah, Yemassee, Ogeechee, and of brown, gray, and yellow, or it is a mixture of these Meggett soils. The Lakeland soils are on landscapes colors. The C horizon is loamy sand or sand. similar to those of the Chisolm soils, but they do not have an argillic horizon. The Yauhannah, Yemassee, and Ogeechee soils are on slightly lower elevations, are Coxville Series wetter, and are not arenic. The Meggett soils are on the The Coxville series consists of poorly drained, slowly lowest elevations, are adjacent to drainageways, and have a clayey particle-size control section. permeable soils that formed in clayey Coastal Plain Typical pedon of Chisolm fine sand, 0 to 6 percent sediments in depressions and along drainageways. slopes, 4 miles west of Surfside Beach; about 2.2 miles Slope ranges from 0 to 2 percent. These soils are northwest on South Carolina Secondary Highway 544 clayey, kaolinitic, thermic Typic Paleaquults. from the Georgetown County line, across Collings Creek, Coxville soils are geographically associated with the about 0.5 mile west on dirt road, about 2 miles south on Summerton, Norfolk, Goldsboro, Duplin, Lynchburg, and dirt road, 45 feet west of road; Map 91: Woodington soils. The Summerton and Norfolk soils are on higher elevations than those of the Coxville soil, and A-0 to 8 inches; grayish brown (10YR 5/2) fine sand; the Lynchburg, Goldsboro, and Duplin soils are on weak fine granular structure; very friable; common slightly higher elevations. In all of these soils, part of the fine and medium roots; strongly acid; clear smooth Bt horizon has dominant chroma of 3 or more. boundary. Woodington soils are on similar landscapes and have a E-8 to 24 inches; light yellowish brown (11 OYR 6/4) fine-loamy control section. loamy sand; weak fine granular structure; very Typical pedon of Coxville fine sandy loam, about 2.8 friable; few fine and medium roots; strongly acid; miles north of Loris on U.S. Highway 701, about 1 mile clear wavy boundary. northeast on South Carolina Secondary Highway 842, Bt-24 to 46 inches; strong brown (7.5YR 5/8) sandy 800 feet north of highway, in a cultivated field (300 feet clay loam; moderate medium subangular blocky north of small farm pond); Map 16: structure; friable; few distinct clay films on faces of peds; few fine roots; few fine flakes of mica; very Ap-O to 8 inches; very dark gray (10YR 3/1) fine sandy strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. loam; weak fine granular structure; very friable; BC-46 to 58 inches; yellowish red (5YR 5/8) sandy many fine, medium, and large roots; few fine pores; loam; weak medium subangular blocky structure; very strongly acid; clear wavy boundary. very friable; few fine roots; few fine flakes of mica; Btg1-8 to 16 inches; gray (10YR 5/1) clay loam; few very strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. medium distinct yellowish brown (10YR 5/8) mottles; C-58 to 80 inches; yellow (10YR 7/6) sand; common weak fine subangular blocky structure; friable; few medium distinct reddish yellow (5YR 6/8) mottles; fine and medium roots; few fine pores; very strongly single grained; loose; few fine flakes of mica; acid; gradual wavy boundary. strongly acid. Btg2-16 to 44 inches; gray (10YR 5/1) clay; common medium distinct brownish yellow (10YR 6/8) and The thickness of the solum ranges from 50 to more few fine prominent red (2.5YR 4/8) mottles; than 75 inches. Reaction ranges from very strongly acid moderate fine subangular blocky structure; firm; to moderately acid in the upper part of the profile and is common distinct clay films on faces of peds; few very strongly acid or strongly acid in the lower part. Few fine and medium roots; few fine pores; very strongly to common fine flakes of mica are in the lower part of acid; gradual wavy boundary. the soil profile of most peclons. Btg3-44 to 56 inches; gray (10YR 5/1) clay; common The A horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 3 to 6, and medium distinct brownish yellow (10YR 6/6) and chroma of 1 to 4. It is fine sand. common medium prominent red (2.5YR 4/8) 64 Soil Survey mottles; moderate fine subangular blocky structure; friable; few fine and medium roots; medium acid; firm; common distinct clay films on faces of peds; clear wavy boundary. few fine and medium roots; few fine pores; very Btl - 17 to 28 inches; brownish yellow (1 OYR 6/6) clay; strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. common medium distinct yellowish red (5YR 5/6) BCg-56 to 72 inches; gray (11 OYR 5/ 1) sandy clay loam; and yellow (10YR 7/6) mottles and few fine! distinct thin strata of sand and clayey material; common very pale brown (10YR 7/3) mottles; strong coarse medium distinct light gray (1 OYR 7/ 1) and few fine subangular blocky structure; firm; few faint clay films faint brownish yellow and red mottles; weak medium on faces of peds; few to common fine and medium subangular blocky structure; friable; very strongly roots; few medium pores; strongly acid; clear wavy acid. boundary. Bt2-28 to 35 inches; brownish yellow (10YR 6/6) clay The thickness of the solum is more than 60 inches. loam; common medium distinct yellowish red (5YR Reaction is extremely acid or strongly acid throughout, 5/6), yellow (10YR 7/1), and light gray (10YR 7/1) except in areas where the soil has been limed. mottles; strong coarse subangular blocky structure; The A horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 3 or 4, and firm; few distinct clay films on faces of peds and chroma of 1 or 2. Texture is fine sandy loam or sandy along old root channels; few fine and medium roots; loam. few medium pores; strongly acid; gradual wavy The E horizon, where present, has hue of 10YR, value boundary. of 5 to 7, and chroma of 2. It is sandy loam. BC1-35 to 48 inches; mottled yellowish brown (10YR The Btg horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 5 or 6, and 5/6), light gray (10YR'1/2), and yellowish red (5YR chroma of 1 or 2. It has mottles in shades of red, yellow, 5/8) clay loam that has strata of sandy loam and and brown, and it is clay, sandy clay, or clay loam. sandy clay loam; moderate medium subangular The BCg horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 5 or 6, blocky structure; friable; few fine roots; strongly acid; and chroma of 1 or 2. It has mottles in shades of gray, gradual wavy boundary. brown, and red. The BCg horizon is sandy clay loam that BC2-48 to 70 inches; mottled light gray (10YR 7/1), has pockets, lenses, and strata of coarser and finer very pale brown (10YR 7/4), yellowish red (5YR material. 5/8), and yellow (10YR 7/8) clay that has fine strata Duplin Series of sandy loam and sandy clay loam; weak rnedium subangular blocky structure; firm; few fine roots; The Duplin series consists of moderately well drained, very strongly acid. moderately slowly permeable soils that formed in clayey The thickness of the solum is more than 60 inches Coastal Plain sediments on broad flats and low ridges and has strata in the lower horizons. Reaction is strongly adjacent to the flood plains of large streams. Slope acid or very strongly acid throughout, except in areas ranges from 0 to 2 percent. These soils are clayey, where the soil has been limed. kaolinitic, thermic Aquic Paleudults. The A horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 4 or 5, and Duplin soils are geographically associated with the chroma of 2 or 3. It is loamy sand, loamy fine sand, or Summerton, Coxville, Norfolk, Kenansville, Blanton, and fine sandy loam. Goldsboro soils. The Summerton, Coxville, Kenansville, and Blanton soils are on slightly higher elevations than The E horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 7, and the Duplin soils and do not have wetness mottles of chroma of 3 or 4. It is loamy sand or loamy fine! sand. chroma 2 or less within a depth of 30 inches. The The BE horizon, where present, has hue of 1 OYR, Coxville soils are on lower elevations and have a Bt value of 5, and chroma of 6. It is clay loam. horizon that is dominantly gray. The Goldsboro soils are The upper part of the Bt horizon has hue of 7.5YR or on similar landscapes and have a fine-loamy control 10YR, value of 5 or 6, and chroma of 6 or 8. It has few section. to common mottles in shades of yellow, red, and brown, Typical pedon of Duplin loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 Texture of the upper part of the Bt horizon is sandy clay percent slopes, about 1.5 miles north of Bayboro, about or clay. The lower part of the Bt horizon has hue of 1.8 miles northwest on secondary road 34, 1 mile west 1 OYR, value of 5 or 6, and chroma of 6 or 8. It has few on dirt road, northwest 0.2 mile at fork of dirt road, 30 to common mottles in shades of yellow, red, and gray, or feet north of road, in pine plantation; Map 19: it is mottled in shades of gray, red, and yellow. Texture of the lower part of the Bt horizon is clay loam, sandy A-0 to 9 inches; grayish brown (10YR 5/2) loamy fine clay, or clay. sand; weak medium granular structure; very friable; The BC horizon is mottled in shades of gray, red, common to many fine and medium roots; few large brown, and yellow, or it is light gray and has few to roots; medium acid; clear smooth boundary. common mottles of brownish yellow and red. The BC E-9 to 17 inches; very pale brown (10YR 7/3) loamy horizon is clay, clay loam, or sandy clay loam and has fine sand; moderate medium granular structure; very strata of sandy loam. Horry County, South Carolina 65 Echaw Series Emporia Series The Echaw series consists of moderately well drained, The Emporia series consists of well drained soils that rapidly permeable soils that formed in sandy Coastal formed in loamy Coastal Plain marine sediments. These Plain sediments on broad interstrearn divides and flats. soils have moderate permeability in the upper part of the Slope is dominantly less than 1 percent. These soils are subsoil and moderately slow or slow permeability in the sandy, siliceous, thermic Entic Haplohumods. lower part of the subsoil. These gently sloping soils are Echaw soils are geographically associated with the commonly on the higher landscapes of the county; they Centenary, Leon, Witherbee, Rimini, and Rutlege soils. are on knolls and on short, smooth, and choppy slopes The Leon and Witherbee soils.have a Bh horizon at a above elevations of 70 feet. Slopes range from 2 to 6 depth of less than 30 inches from the surface. The percent. These soils are fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic Rimini and Centenary soils have a Bh horizon at Typic Hapludults. between a depth of 50 and 80 inches from the surface. Emporia soils are geographically associated with the Rutlege soils have an umbric epipedon and do not have Nankin, Norfolk, Suffolk, Goldsboro, Lynchburg, and a spodic horizon. Woodington soils. The Nankin, Norfolk, and Suffolk soils Typical pedon of Echaw sand, about 2.3 miles are on landscapes similar to those of the Emporia soils. northwest of the Intracoastal Waterway bridge (at The Nankin soils have a clayey control section. The Socastee) on South Carolina Primary Highway 544, Norfolk soils have a solum that is 60 inches or more about 1 mile northeast on International Paper Company thick. The Suffolk soils have moderate permeability dirt road, 100 feet southeast of the road; Map 82: throughout the subsoil. The Goldsboro, Woodington, and A-0 to 4 inches; dark grayish brown (10YR 4/2) sand; Lynchburg soils are on slightly lower elevations, and they salt-and-pepper appearance; single grained; loose, have a higher seasonal water table. common fine and medium roots; very strongly acid; Typical pedon of Emporia loamy fine sand, 2 to 6 clear smooth boundary. percent slopes, about 2 miles northwest from Green Sea E11-4 to 16 inches; light yellowish brown (10YR 6/4) on South Carolina Highway 9, northeast 0.8 mile on sand; single grained; loose; few fine and medium paved road to intersection, northwest 0.2 mile, road cut roots; strongly acid; gradual smooth boundary. on west side of the road; old house across the street; E2-16 to 30 inches; brownish yellow (10YR 6/6) loamy Map 9: sand; weak fine granular structure; very friable; few fine roots; strongly acid; clear smooth boundary. A-0 to 5 inches; dark brown (I OYR 4/3) loamy fine E3-30 to 36 inches; brownish yellow (10YR 6/6) sand; sand; weak fine granular structure; very friable; common medium distinct light gray (1 OYR 7/ 1) and many fine and medium roots; strongly acid; clear pale brown (10YR 6/3) mottles; weak fine smooth boundary. subangular blocky structure; very friable; strongly Btl -5 to 30 inches; yellowish red (5YR 4/8) sandy clay acid; clear smooth boundary. loam moderate medium subangular blocky structure; B111-36 to 60 inches; very dark brown (10YR 2/2) sand; friable; common faint clay films on faces of peds; weak fine subangular blocky structure; very friable; few fine roots; few fine tubular pores; very strongly slightly brittle; strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. acid; gradual wavy boundary. Bh2-6O to 72 inches; black (10YR 2/1) sand; weak fine Bt2-30 to 44 inches; strong brown (7.5YR 5/8) sandy subangular blocky structure; very friable; slightly clay loam; common medium faint brownish yellow brittle; strongly acid. (10YR 6/8) and few medium distinct red (1OR 4/8) mottles; moderate medium subangular blocky The thickness of the solum ranges from 45 to more structure; friable; common faint clay films on faces than 60 inches. It is sand throughout. Depth to the Bh of peds; few fine tubular pores; very strongly acid; horizon ranges from 30 to 50 inches. Reaction is very gradual wavy boundary. strongly acid to medium acid throughout. BC-44 to 54 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/8) sandy The A horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 2 to 4, and loam; stratified; few medium prominent red (1OR chroma of 1 or 2. 4/8) and few fine distinct light gray (10YR 7/1) The upper part of the E horizon has hue of 1 OYR, mottles; weak medium subangular blocky structure; value of 5 or 6, and chroma of 3 to 6. The lower part of very friable; very strongly acid; gradual wavy the E horizon has the same colors as the upper part, boundary. and it has few to common mottles of chroma of 2 or C-54 to 72 inches; mottled red (1 OR 4/8), strong brown less; or it is dominantly gray or mottled in shades of gray and brown. (7.5YR 5/8) and light gray (1 OYR 7/ 1) loamy sand; The Bh horizon has hue of 5YR to 10YR, value of 2 or stratified with sandy loam; single grained; loose; very 3, and chroma. of 1 to 3. strongly acid. 66 Soil Survey The thickness of the solurn ranges from 40 to 60 Btl-12 to 20 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/8) sandy inches. In some profiles, the lower part of the solurn is clay loam; common medium prominent red (2.5YR stratified. Reaction ranges from very strongly acid to 4/8) mottles; moderate medium subangular blocky medium acid throughout. structure; firm; common distinct clay films on faces The A horizon has hue of I OYR, value of 4 to 6, and of peds; common fine and medium roots; few very chroma of 2 to 4. It is loamy sand or loamy fine sand. fine pores; few fine flakes of mica; very strongly The E horizon, where present, has hue of 10YR, value acid; gradual wavy boundary. of 6 or 7, and chroma of 3 or 4. It is loamy sand or Bt2-20 to 40 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/6) clay; loamy fine sand. common medium distinct gray (10YR 6/1), and The Bt horizon has hue of 5YR to 1 OYR, value of 4 to common medium prominent red (2.5YR 4/6) 6, and chroma of 5 to 8. Texture is sandy clay loam in mottles; moderate medium subangular blocky the upper part of the Bt. The lower part of the Bt horizon structure; firm; common distinct clay films on faces is sandy clay that has strata of sandy clay loam and of peds; few to common fine and medium roots; few more heavily textured material. fine pores; few fine flakes of mica; very strongly The BC horizon has hue of 7.5YR to 2.5Y, value of 6 acid; gradual wavy boundary. to 8, and chroma of 3 to 8 and has few to common BC-40 to 55 inches; mottled strong brown (7.5YR 5/8) mottles in shades of yellow, red, brown, and gray. It is and gray (1 OYR 6/ 1) sandy clay loam; common sandy loam or has strata of variably textured material medium prominent yellowish red (5YR 5/8) mottles; ranging from sandy loam to clay. we The C horizon is neutral or has hue of 5YR to 2.5Y, ak medium subangular blocky structure; friable; value of 3 to 8, and chroma of 0 to 8. Most pedons have common fine flakes of mica; very strongly acid; mottles of high and low chroma. Texture ranges from gradual wavy boundary. loamy sand to clay. C-55 to 80 inches; mottled white (10YR 8/1), yellowish brown (10YR 5/4), and brownish yellow (10YR 6/6) Eulonia Series loamy sand; massive; very friable; common fine flakes of mica; very strongly acid. The Eulonia series consists of moderately well drained, moderately slowly permeable soils that formed The thickness of the solurn ranges from 50 inches to in clayey Coastal Plain sediments on broad, smooth more than 70 inches. Reaction ranges from very strongly ridges. Slope is dominantly less than 2 percent. These acid to medium acid throughout. Few to many fine flakes soils are clayey, mixed, thermic Aquic Hapludults. of mica are in the lower part of the B and the C horizons Eulonia soils are geographically associated with the of most pedons. Yauhannah, Ogeechee, Wahee, Yemassee, Yonges, The A horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 3 to 6, and Meggett, and Johnston soils. The Yauhannah soils are chroma of 1 or 2. It is loamy fine sand, fine sandy loam, on landscapes similar to those of the Eulonia soils and or sandy loam. have a fine loamy subsoil. The Wahee and Yemassee The E horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 6 or 7, and soils are on somewhat lower elevations, and the chroma of 4. It is fine sandy loam, sandy loam, or loamy Meggett, Yonges, and Ogeechee soils are on lower fine sand. elevations. All of these soils are Aquults or Aqualfs. The The upper part of the Bt horizon has hue of 5YR to Johnston soils are on the lowest elevations and are 10YR, value of 5 or 6, and chroma of 4 to 8, and few to Inceptisols. common mottles in varying shades of red, brown, or Typical pedon of Eulonia loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 gray- The lower part of the Bt horizon has hue of 5YR to percent slopes, about 4 miles west of Surfside Beach, 1 OYR, value of 5 or 6, and chroma of 6 or 8, and few to 2.7 miles north on South Carolina Primary Highway 544 many mottles in varying shades of red, brown, or gray. In from the Georgetown County line (0.5 mile northeast of some pedons, the lower part of the Bt horizon is mixed Collins Creek Church), 1,000 feet east of highway, with red, brown, or gray, or it is gray and has brown and behind a country store in a cultivated field; Map 89: red mottles. The Bt horizon is sandy clay or clay. Ap-O to 8 inches; grayish brown (10YR 5/2) loamy fine The BC horizon is mixed in varying shades of brown, sand; weak fine granular structure; very friable; red, and gray, or it is gray and has brown and red many fine and medium roots; medium acid; clear mottles. It is sandy loam or sandy clay loam. smooth boundary. The C horizon is mixed in varying shades of white, E-8 to 12 inches; light yellowish brown (10YR 6/4) fine gray, brown, yellow, and red, or it is gray and has sandy loam; weak medium granular structure; very mottles of higher chroma. It is sandy clay loam, sandy friable; few fine roots; few streaks and holes filled loam, or loamy sand. with grayish brown (10YR 5/2) material from the Ap; medium acid; clear smooth boundary. Horry County, South Carolina 67 Goldsboro Series BCg2-59 to 72 inches; mottled light gray (10YR 7/1) and light brownish gray (1 OYR 6/2) clay with thin The Goldsboro series consists of moderately well strata of sandy loam and sandy clay loam; common dra:ined, moderately permeable soils that formed in medium distinct brownish yellow (IOYR 6/6) and loamy Coastal Plain sediments on stream terraces and few fine prominent red (2.5YR 4/8) mottles; weak broad interstrearn divides on the higher elevations in the medium subangular blocky structure; firm; strongly county. Slope ranges from 0 to 2 percent. These soils acid. are fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic Aquic Paleudults. Goldsboro soils are geographically associated with the The thickness of the solum is more than 60 inches. Kenansville, Nansemond, Duplin, Norfolk, Woodington, The lower part of the solum is stratified. The soil is very and Lynchburg soils. The Kenansvilie and Norfolk soils strongly acid or strongly acid throughout, except in areas are on higher elevations than the Goldsboro soils and do where the soil has been limed. not have wetness mottles within 30 inches of the The A horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 3 to 5, and surface. The Kenansville soils are also Arenic. The chroma of 1 to 3. It is loamy fine sand or sandy loam. Duplin and Nansemond soils are in similar position on The E horizon, where present, has hue of 10YR, value the landscape. The Duplin soils have a clayey control of 5 or 6, and chroma of 3 or 4. It is loamy sand or section, and the Nansemond soils have a coarse-loamy sandy loam. control section. The Woodington and Lynchburg soils are The BE horizon, where present, has hue of 10YR, on lower elevations and are Aquults. value of 5 or 6, and chroma, of 3 to 6. It is fine sandy Typical pedon of Goldsboro loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 loam or sandy loam. percent slopes, about 2.5 miles north of Green Sea, The upper part of the B horizon has hue of 7.5YR and about 0.5 mile west from intersection of South Carolina 10YR, value of 5 or 6, and chroma of 4 to 8. It is sandy Secondary Highways 33 and 306, 140 feet south of the clay loam. The lower part of the B horizon is mottled in highway, in a cultivated field; Map 9: shades of red, brown, yellow, and gray. It is sandy clay loam, sandy clay, or sandy clay loam that has strata Ap-O to 7 inches; dark brown (1 OYR 4/3) loamy fine ranging from clay loam to loamy sand. sand; weak fine granular structure; very friable; few fine roots; few fine holes and pores; neutral; abrupt Hobcaw Series smooth boundary. Btl-7 to 23 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 56) sandy The Hobcaw series consists of very poorly drained, clay loam; few medium prominent red (2.5YR 4/8) moderately permeable soils that formed in loamy Coastal and few medium distinct very pale brown (10YR 7.3) Plain sediments in small stream bottoms and slightly mottles; weak medium subangular blocky structure; depressional areas on lower elevations. Slope ranges friable; few faint clay films on faces of peds; few fine from 0 to 2 percent. These soils are fine-loamy, roots; few fine pores; strongly acid; gradual smooth siliceous, thermic Typic Umbraquults. boundary. Hobcaw soils are geographically associated with the Bt2-23 to 31 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/6) sandy Rutlege, Johnston, Yernassee, Wahee, Osier, Ogeechee, clay loam; common medium distinct pale brown and Bladen soils. The Yemassee and Wahee soils are OOYR 6/3) and common medium prominent red on higher elevations than the Hobcaw soils, and the (2.5YR 4/8) and few fine distinct light gray (10YR Osier, Ogeechee, and Bladen soils are on slightly higher 7/2) mottles; weak medium subangular blocky elevations. None of these soils has an umbric epipedon. structure; friable; few faint clay films on faces of The Rutlege and Johnston soils are on similar peds; few fine pores; strongly acid; gradual wavy landscapes. The Rutlege soils have a sandy control boundary. section, and Johnston soils have a coarse-loamy control BC-31 to 44 inches; strong brown (7.5YR 5/8) sandy section. clay loam with thin strata of loamy sand and sandy Typical pedon of Hobcaw fine sandy loam, about 1 loam; common medium prominent red (2.5YR 4/8) mile northwest of Intercoastal Waterway Bridge at and common medium distinct gray (1 OYR 6/ 1) Socastee on South Carolina Highway 544, about 1,000 mottles; weak medium subangular blocky structure; feet northeast on International Paper Company dirt road, friable; few fine pores; strongly acid; gradual wavy 20 feet east of road; Map 82: boundary. BCg1-44 to 59 inches; mottled brownish yellow (10YR A1-0 to 12 inches; black (10YR 2/1) fine sandy loam; 6/6) light gray (10YR 7/1), and light brownish gray weak medium subangular blocky structure; friable; (1 OYR 6/2) sandy clay loam with thin strata of many fine and medium roots; few fine pores; very sandy loam and clay loam; weak medium strongly acid; clear smooth boundary. subangular blocky structure; friable; strongly acid; A2-12 to 15 inches; very dark grayish brown (10YR gradual wavy boundary. 3/2) loamy sand; weak medium subangular blocky 68 Soil Survey structure; friable; few fine and medium roots; few Oa2-30 to 50 inches; dark reddish brown (5YR 3/2) fine pores; very strongly acid; clear smooth muck very dark gray (5Y 3/1) pressed and rubbed; boundary. massive; flows easily between fingers when Btg-1 5 to 48 inches; very dark grayish brown (1 OYR squeezed and leaves small residue in hand; few fine 3/2) sandy loam; common medium distinct light and medium roots; common wood fragments; brownish gray (10YR 6/2) mottles; weak medium strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. subangular blocky structure; friable; few medium Oa3-50 to 80 inches; dark reddish brown (5YR 3/2) roots; few fine pores; strongly acid; gradual smooth muck, dark reddish brown (5YR 2/2) pressed and boundary. rubbed; about 10 percent fiber, about 3 percent Cg-48 to 68 inches; mottled very dark grayish brown rubbed; massive; flows easily between fingers when (10YR 3/2) and light brownish gray (10YR 6/2) squeezed and leaves small residue in hand; few fine loamy sand; massive; friable; strongly acid. roots; common wood fragments; very strongly acid. The thickness of the solum ranges from 40 to 60 Thickness of the organic material ranges from 51 to inches. Reaction ranges from very strongly acid to more than 72 inches. The soil is very strongly acid or slightly acid throughout. strongly acid in all horizons. The A horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 2 or 3, and The surface tier has hue of 5YR to 1 OYR, value of 2 chroma of 1 or 2. It is fine sandy loam or loamy sand. or 3, and chroma of 2. Either the chroma or the value, The Btg horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 3 to 5, and and sometimes both, generally changes by [email protected] unit chroma of 1 or 2, or it is neutral and has value of 3 to 5. when sample is pressed and rubbed. The organic Some pedons have few to common mottles of higher materials of the surface tier, after rubbing, have less chroma. than 20 percent fiber. The BCg, where present, has hue of 1 OYR, value of 3 The subsurface tier has hue of 5YR to 1 OYR, value of to 6, and chroma of 1 or 2, or it is neutral and has value 2 or 3, and chroma of 2. Either the chroma or the value, of 3 to 5. and sometimes both, generally changes by one unit The C horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 3 or 4, and when sample is pressed and rubbed. The subsurface tier chroma of 1 or 2. It is loamy sand or sand. contains 30 to 40 percent fibers unrubbed, but less than 15 percent after rubbing. Hobonny Series The bottom tier has hue of 5YR or 7.5YR, value of 2 or 3, and chroma of 2. Either the chroma or the value, The Hobonny series consists of very poorly drained, and sometimes both, generally changes by one unit moderately permeable soils that formed in Coastal Plain when sample is pressed and rubbed. The bottom tier has organic deposits of herbaceous and woody plants on the 10 to 20 percent fibers unrubbed, but less than 5 flood plains of the Waccamaw River. Slope ranges up to percent after rubbing. 1 percent. These soils are euic, thermic Typic The Cg horizon, where present, ranges from sand to Medisaprists. sandy clay loam. Hobonny soils are geographically associated with the Johnston, Rutlege, Yauhannah, and Ogeechee soils. The Johnston Series Johnston and Rutlege soils are on landscapes similar to those of the Hobonny soils and are mineral soils. The The Johnston series consists of very poorly drained, Yauhannah and Ogeechee soils are on higher elevations rapidly permeable soils that formed in loamy and sandy and are mineral soils. stratified Coastal Plain sediments in shallow depressions Typical pedon of Hobonny muck, in Waccamaw River and on nearly level flood plains along streams Swamp, 5.3 miles west of Surfside Beach, about 1 mile throughout the county. Slope is dominantly less than 1 southwest of St. James Church and School on South percent. These soils are coarse-loamy, siliceous, acid, Carolina Highway 544, about 1 mile northwest on dirt thermic Cumulic Humaquepts. road, about 1,000 feet northeast on dirt road, about 0.5 Johnston soils are geographically associated with the mile west on dirt road, 500 feet west from the end of dirt Rutlege, Pocomoke, Osier, Lakeland, and Blanton soils. road, in swamp; Map 89: The Rutlege, Pocomoke, and Osier soils are on landscapes similar to those of the Johnston soils. The Oal-O to 30 inches; dark reddish brown (5YR 2/2) Rutlege and Osier soils have a sandy control section, muck, very dark gray (10YR 3/1) pressed and and the Pocomoke soils have an argillic horizon. The rubbed; about 15 percent fiber, about 5 percent Lakeland and Blanton soils are on higher elevations. The rubbed; massive; flows easily between fingers when Lakeland soils are Entisols, and the Blanton soils are squeezed and leaves small residue in hand; Ultisols. common fine and medium roots; few wood Typical pedon of Johnston loam, in Little Pee Dee fragments; strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. River swamp, about 2.3 miles southwest of Galivants Horry County, South Carolina 69 Ferry, about 3,100 feet west-northwest of Old Zion granular structure; very friable; many fine and Church Cemetery, about 100 feet northwest of a private medium roots and few large roots; medium acid; unimproved road; Map 24: abrupt smooth boundary. E-8 to 28 inches; very pale brown (10YR 7/3) fine sand A-0 to 30 inches; black (10YR 2/1) loam; massive; with common clean sand grains; weak fine granular friable, many fine, medium, and large roots; few fine structure; very friable; common fine and medium holes and pores; strongly acid; abrupt smooth roots; few fine and medium holes; few iron nodules boundary. in lower part of horizon; strongly acid; clear smooth Cgl-30 to 45 inches; grayish brown (10YR 5/2) loamy boundary. fine sand; single grained; loose; common fine and Bt-28 to 44 inches; brownish yellow (10YR 6/8) sandy medium roots; very strongly acid; abrupt smooth clay loam; few medium distinct strong brown (7.5YR boundary. 5/8) mottles and few clean sand grains along old Cg2-45 to 70 inches; dark grayish brown (10YR 4/2) root channels; moderate medium subangular blocky sandy loam; massive; friable; few fine and medium structure; friable; few faint clay films on faces of roots; strongly acid. peds; few fine roots; few fine pores; strongly acid; This soil is very strongly acid or strongly acid gradual wavy boundary. throughout. BC-44 to 51 inches; very pale brown (10YR 7/4) sandy The All horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 2 or 3, and loam; common medium distinct brownish yellow chroma of 1 or 2. It is loam or fine sandy loam. (10YR 6/6) and common medium distinct light gray The AC horizon, where present, has hue of 1 OYR, (11 OYR 7/ 1) mottles; moderate medium subangular value of 4, and chroma of 1 or 2. It is loam, loamy fine blocky structure; friable; few fine roots; few fine sand, or sand. pores; strongly acid; clear wavy boundary. The Cg horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 4 to 6, and C-51 to 70 inches; mottled very pale brown (11 OYR chroma of 1 or 2. Texture is loamy fine sandy, sandy 7/4), light gray (10YR 7/1), and brownish yellow loam, loamy sand, or sand. (11 OYR 6/6) loamy sand; massive; very friable; strongly acid. Kenansville Series The thickness of the solurn ranges from 40 to 60 The Kenansville series consists of well drained, inches. Reaction ranges from very strongly acid to moderately permeable soils that formed in loamy Coastal medium acid throughout, except in areas where the soil Plain sediments on the smoother parts of the landscape has been limed. between the higher sandy ridges and the lower wet The A horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 4 to 6, and areas throughout the county. Slope ranges from 0 to 6 chroma of 1 to 3. It is loamy sand, loamy fine sand, or percent. These soils are loamy, siliceous, thermic Arenic fine sand. Hapludults. The E horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 6 to 8, and The Kenansville soils in Horry County are a taxadjunct chroma of 3 to 6. It is fine sand or loamy sand. to the Kenansville series because they have a base The Bt horizon has hue of 7.5YR or 10YR, value of 5 saturation of slightly higher than 35 percent in the lower or 6, and chroma of 6 or 8. It is mottled in shades of part of the Bt horizon. This difference does not strong brown or yellowish brown. The Bt horizon is significantly alter the use or behavior of the soils. sandy loam or sandy clay loam. Kenansville soils are geographically associated with The BC horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 5 to 7, and the Suffolk, Norfolk, Goldsboro, Nansemond, and chroma of 1 to 8. It is mottled in shades of brown or Blanton soils. The Suffolk and Norfolk soils are on gray. The BC horizon is loamy sand or sandy loam and landscapes similar to those of the Kenansville soil but has strata of sandy clay loam in some pedons. are not arenic. The Goldsboro and Nansemond soils are The C horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 6 or 7, and on slightly lower elevations and are not Arenic. The chroma of 1 to 6, and is mottled in shades of brown or Blanton soils are on similar landscapes and are gray. It is sand or loamy sand. Some pedons have strata Grossarenic. of Typical pedon of Kenansville fine sand, 0 to 6 percent sandy loam or sandy clay loam in the 0 horizon. slopes, about 6 miles northeast of Aynor, about 1.3 miles east of junction of South Carolina Secondary Highways Lakeland Series 308 and 23 (McQueen Crossroads), about 0.7 mile south on dirt road, 100 feet northwest from the junction of dirt The Lakeland series consists of excessively drained, roads; Map 18: very rapidly permeable soils that formed in sandy Coastal Plain sediments on broad, smooth ridges and A-0 to 8 inches; grayish brown (10YR 5/2) fine sand narrow, irregular slopes. Slope is dominantly less than 4 with common clean grains of sand; weak fine percent, but it ranges to as much as 6 percent along 70 Soil Survey drainageways. These soils are thermic, coated Typic Typical pedon of Leon fine sand, about 800 feet Quartzipsamments. northwest of Surfside Beach City Hall on paved road, Lakeland soils are geographically associated with the about 200 feet southwest of road, 10 feet southeast of Blanton, Chisolm, Kenansville, Centenary, Echaw, power line right-of-way; Map 90: Rutlege, Osier, Ogeechee, and Hobcaw soils. The Blanton, Chisolm, and Kenansville soils are on A-0 to 5 inches; black (10YR 2/1) fine sand; weak fine landscapes similar to those of the Lakeland soils and granular structure; very friable; many fine and have a Bt horizon. The Centenary and Echaw soils are medium roots; many clean sand grains give a salt- on slightly lower elevations and have a spodic horizon. and-pepper appearance; very strongly acid; clear The Rutlege, Osier, Ogeechee, and Hobcaw soils are on smooth boundary. lower elevations and have a higher seasonal water table. E-5 to 9 inches; light gray (10YR 6/1) fine sand; Typical pedon of Lakeland sand, 0 to 6 percent common medium distinct very dark gray (10YR 3/1) slopes, about 13 miles east of Conway, about 2 miles mottles along old root channels; weak fine granular south of Shell on dirt road, 200 feet west of road, 1,200 structure; very friable; few fine and medium roots; feet west of Waccamaw River; Map 53: very strongly acid; clear smooth boundary. Bh1-9 to 14 inches; black (N 2/0) fine sand; weak A-0 to 8 inches; very dark grayish brown (10YR 3/2) medium suangular blocky structure; friable; weakly sand; single grained; loose; common fine and cemented; fine and medium roots; very strongly medium roots; few clean grains of sand; strongly acid; clear wavy boundary. acid; clean wavy boundary. Bh2-14 to 20 inches; dark brown (7.5YR 3/2) line Bwl-8 to 20 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/4) sand; sand; common medium distinct very dark brown single grained; loose; common fine and medium (10YR 2/2) mottles; weak medium subangular roots; few clean grains of sand; medium acid; blocky structure; friable; weakly cemented; strongly gradual wavy boundary. acid; gradual wavy boundary. Bw2-20 to 50 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/6) E'2&Bh3-20 to 40 inches; mottled pale brown (10YR sand; single grained; loose; few fine roots; few clean 6/3) and dark grayish brown (10YR 4/2) fine sand; grains of sand; medium acid; gradual wavy few fine distinct yellowish brown (10YR 6/6) mottles; boundary. weak medium subangular blocky structure; very C-50 to 82 inches; very pale brown (10YR 7/3) sand; friable; medium acid; gradual wavy boundary. single grained; loose; many clean grains of sand; B'h-40 to 72 inches; dark brown (7.5YR 4/2) fine sand; medium acid. weak medium granular structure; very friable; Thickness of the sand exceeds 80 inches. Reaction medium acid. ranges from very strongly acid to medium acid Reaction in the upper part of the soil is very strongly throughout. acid or strongly acid, and reaction in the lower part The A horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 3 to 5, and ranges from strongly acid to medium acid. The soil is chroma of 1 or 2. fine sand throughout. The Bw horizon has hue of 10YR or 7.5YR, value of 5 The A horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 2 or 3, and to 7, and chroma of 4 to 8. Some pedons have few to chroma of 1. common mottles in shades of brown. The E horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 5 to 7, and The C horizon has hue of 10YR or 7.5YR, value of 5 chroma of 1 or 2. Mottles in varying shades of gray are to 7, and chroma of 3 or 4. in some pedons. Leon Series The Bh horizon has hue of 5YR to 1 OYR, or is neutral, value of 2 or 3, and chroma of 0 to 2. Mottles in varying The Leon series consists of poorly drained, moderately shades of brown are in some pedons. rapidly permeable soils that formed in sandy Coastal The E'2&Bh3 horizon is mottled in shades of brown Plain sediments on broad, nearly level areas and in and gray. slightly depressional areas. Slope is dominantly less than The B'h horizon has hue of 7.5YR or 10YR, value of 4, 1 percent, but it ranges up to 2 percent. These soils are and chroma of 2. It may be mottled in varying shades of sandy, siliceous, thermic Aeric Haplaquods. brown. Leon soils are geographically associated with the Lakeland, Centenary, Echaw, Witherbee, Blanton, and Lynchburg Series Lynn Haven soils. The Lakeland, Centenary, Echaw, Witherbee, and Blanton soils are on higher elevations The Lynchburg series consists of somewhat poorly and do not have as high a seasonal water table as the drained, moderately permeable soils that formed in 1-eon soils. The Lynn Haven soils are on slightly lower loamy Coastal Plain sediments on broad, nearly level -,levations and have an umbric epipedon. areas on the higher landscapes in the county. Slope Horry County, South Carolina 71 ranges from 0 to 2 percent. These soils are fine-loamy, the Bt horizon is mottled in shades of gray, yellow, and siliceous,.thermic Aeric Paleaquults. brown. The Bt horizon is sandy clay loam. Lynchburg soils are geographically associated with the The Btg horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 5 or 6, and Suffolk, Emooria, Goldsboro, Woodington, and Coxville chroma of 1 or 2. It contains few to many mottles in soils. The Suffolk, Emporia, and Goldsboro soils are on shades of yellow, brown, and red; or it is mottled in higher elevations than the Lynchburg soils and have a shades of gray, brown, and red. The Btg horizon is lower seasonal water table. The Woodington and sandy clay loam. Coxville soils are on lower elevation and have a higher The BCg horizon is mottled in shades of gray, brown, seasonal water table. and red; or it is gray and has few to many mottles in Typical pedon of Lynchburg loamy sand, about 2.5 shades of brown and red. The BCg horizon is sandy clay miles east of Floyds, north 1.0 mile, east 2.6 miles on loam or sandy loam and has thin strata that range in South Carolina Secondary Highway 400, about 450 feet texture from sandy loam to sand. southeast on South Carolina Secondary Highway 142, 100 feet southwest of the road; Map 6: Ap-O to 8 inches; dark gray (10YR 4/1) loamy fine Lynn Haven Series sand; weak medium granular structure; very friable; The Lynn Haven series consists of poorly drained, common fine roots; slightly acid; abrupt smooth moderately rapidly permeable soils that formed in sandy boundary. Coastal Plain sediments on broad, nearly level areas and Bt-8 to 13 inches; brownish yellow (10YR 6/6) sandy in slightly depressional areas throughout the county. clay loam; few medium distinct yellowish brown Slope is dominantly less than 1 percent, but range up to (11 OYR 5/8) and light brownish gray (11 OYR 6/2) 2 percent. These soils are sandy, siliceous, thermic Typic mottles; weak medium subangular blocky structure; Haplaquods. friable; few faint clay films on faces of peds; few fine Lynn Haven soils are geographically associated with roots; few fine holes and pores; small areas of old the Rimini, Witherbee, Leon, Pocomoke, and Rutlege roots or wormholes filled with A horizon material; soils. The Rimini and Witherbee soils are on higher strongly acid; clear smooth boundary. elevations than the Lynn Haven soils, and the Leon soils Btg-13 to 58 inches; mottled gray (10YR 6/1), brownish are on similar landscapes. All of these soils have an yellow (10YR 6/8), and red (2.5YR 4/8) sandy clay loam; moderate medium subangular blocky ochric epipedon. The Pocomoke and Rutlege soils are structure; friable; common distinct clay films on on slightly lower elevations and do not have a Bh faces of peds; few fine roots; few fine holes and horizon. pores; very strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. Typical pedon of Lynn Haven sand, about 5.0 miles BCg-58 to 80 inches; light gray (1 OYR 7/ 1) sandy clay northwest of Myrtle Beach on U.S. Highway -501, about loam that has thin strata of sandy clay, sandy loam, 1.7 miles southwest on International Paper Company dirt and loamy sand; common medium distinct brownish road (Joe Mill Trail), 50 feet south of road; Map 82: yellow (1 OYR 6/8) and few fine prominent red mottles; weak medium subangular blocky structure; A-0 to 10 inches; black (10YR 2/1) sand; single firm; very strongly acid. grained; loose; many fine and medium roots; few fine and medium holes; few fine and medium pores; The thickness of the sollum is more than 60 inches. very strongly acid; clear wavy boundary. The lower part of the solum is stratified. Reaction ranges E-10 to 13 inches; gray (10YR 5/1) sand; single from extremely acid to strongly acid throughout, except grained; loose; few fine roots; few fine holes; few in areas where the soil has been limed. fine and medium pores; strongly acid; abrupt wavy The A horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 2 to 4, and boundary. chroma of 1 or 2. It is loamy fine sand, loamy sand, or Bh1-13 to 40 inches; very dark brown (10YR 2/2) sand; sandy loam. weak fine granular structure; friable; weakly The E horizon, where present, has hue of 10YR, value cemented; few fine roots; strongly acid; gradual of 5 or 6, and chroma of 2 to 4. Mottles in shades of wavy boundary. yellow and gray are in some pedons. The E horizon is loamy sand. Bh2-40 to 52 inches; dark brown (10YR 3/3) sand; The BE horizon, where present, has hue of 10YR, weak fine granular structure; friable; weakly value of 5 or 6, and chroma of 3 to 6. Mottles in shades cemented; few fine and medium roots; strongly acid; of yellow and gray are in some pedons. The BE horizon gradual wavy boundary. is sandy loam. Bh3-52 to 60 inches; very dark grayish brown (1 OYR The Bt horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 5 to 7, and 3/2) sand; weak fine granular structure; very friable; chroma of 3 to 6. Some pedons contain few to many weakly cemented; few medium and large roots; very mottles that have chroma of 2 or less. In some pedons, strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. 72 Soil Survey Bh4-60 to 75 inches; black (10YR 2/1) sand; weak fine strong medium subangular blocky structure; very granular structure; friable; weakly cemented; few firm; many distinct clay films on faces of peds; few medium roots; very strongly acid. fine roots; few fine pores; few fine nodules of calcium carbonate; moderately alkaline; gradual The soil is sand or fine sand to a depth of 80 inches wavy boundary. or more. It is very strongly acid or strongly acid Btg3-26 to 36 inches; gray (1 OYR 5/ 1) clay loam; few throughout. fine distinct yellowish brown (10YR 5/6) mottles; The A horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 2 or 3, and moderate medium subangular blocky structure; firm; chroma of 1. few faint clay films on faces of peds; few fine roots; The E horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 5 or 6, and few fine pores; few very fine nodules of calcium chroma of 1 or 2. Mottles in varying shades of gray are carbonate; mildly alkaline; gradual wavy boundary. in some pedons. BCg-36 to 46 inches; light gray (10YR 6/1) sandy loam; The Bh horizon has hue of 5YR to 10YR, value of 2 or few medium distinct yellowish brown (10YR 5/4) 3, and chroma of 1 to 4. Mottles in varying shades of mottles; weak medium subangular blocky structure; gray are in some pedons. very friable; few fine and medium roots; fevi fine white specks of calcium carbonate; mildly alkaline; Meggett Series gradual wavy boundary. The Meggett series consists of poorly drained, slowly 2Cg-46 to 72 inches; light gray (I OYR 7/1) sand; few permeable soils that formed in clayey Coastal Plain medium distinct yellowish brown (10YR 5/4) mottles; sediments on broad and narrow flood plains throughout single grained; loose; few very fine white specks of the county, but mostly in the lower part of the county. calcium carbonate; mildly alkaline. Slope is dominantly less than 1 percent. These soils are The thickness of the solum ranges from 40 to more fine, mixed, thermic Typic Albaqualfs. than 70 inches. Reaction ranges from very strongly acid The Meggett soils in Horry County are a taxadjunct to to slightly acid in the A horizon and from slightly acid to the Meggett series because they have slightly less clay moderately alkaline in the B horizon. In most pedons the in the control section than is defined for the Meggett B and C horizons contain few to many small fragments series. This difference does not significantly alter the use of marine shells or small nodules or specks of calcium or behavior of the soils. carbonate. Meggett soils are geographically associated with the The A horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 2 to 4, and Eulonia, Wahee, Bladen, Ogeechee, Yonges, and chroma of 1 or 2. It is loam, sandy loam, or fine sandy Brookman soils. The Eulonia and Wahee soils are on loam. higher elevations than the Meggett soils and are Ultisols. The E horizon, where present, has hue of 10YR, value The Brookman, Bladen, Ogeechee, and Yonges soils are of 4 to 6, and chroma of 1 or 2. It has none to common on similar landscapes. The Ogeechee and Yonges soils mottles in varying shades of brown. The E horizon is have a fine-loamy control section. The Bladen soils are loam, sandy loam, or fine sandy loam. Ultisols. The Brookman soils have an umbric epipedon. The Btg horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 4 to 6, and Typical pedon of Meggett loam, about 4 miles west of chroma of 1 or 2. It has few to many mottles in shades Myrtle Beach, about 3 miles west along South Carolina of gray, yellow, brown, or red. The Btg horizon is clay or Highway 707 from the intersection of U.S. Highway 501 clay loam. Some pedons contain a few pockets of sand and South Carolina Highway 707, about 0.5 mile north or have greenish gray coatings on faces of peds. on dirt road, 500 feet east on dirt road parallel to the The BCg horizon has hue of 10YR and 2.5Y, value of Intracoastal Waterway; Map 83: 5 or 6, and chroma of 1 or 2. It has few or common A-0 to 4 inches; dark grayish brown (10YR 4/2) loam; mottles in shades of gray, brown, or red. Some pedons weak fine subangular blocky structure; friable; are mottled and do not have a dominant color. The BCg common fine and medium roots; slightly acid; abrupt horizon is sandy loam, sandy clay loam, sandy clay, or smooth boundary. clay. Btgl-4 to 16 inches; gray (10YR 5/1) clay loam; The Cg or 2Cg horizon has hue of 10YR, 5G, or 5GY, common medium distinct brownish yellow (1 OYR 6/6) value of 5 to 7, and chroma of 1. It has few to common mottles; moderate medium subangular blocky mottles in shades of brown or gray. The Cg or 2Cg structure; very firm; many distinct clay films on faces horizon ranges from sand to clay. of peds; few fine roots; few fine pores; few very fine nodules of calcium carbonate, neutral; gradual wavy Nankin Series boundary. Btg2-16 to 26 inches; gray (10YR 5/1) clay loam; many The Nankin series consists of well drained, moderately medium distinct light gray (10YR 6/1) and few slowly permeable soils that formed in loamy and clayey medium distinct yellowish brown (10YR 5/8) mottles; Coastal Plain marine sediments. These gently sloping Horry County, South Carolina 73 soils are on side slopes and rolling landscapes on the The E horizon, where present, has hue of 10YR or higher elevations, generally about 70 feet. Slope ranges 2.5Y, value of 4 to 6, and chroma of 2 to 4. It is sandy from 2 to 6 percent. These soils are clayey, kaolinitic, loam or loamy sand. thermic Typic Hapludults. The upper part of the Bt horizon has hue of 2.5YR to Nankin soils are geographically associated with the 7.5YR, value of 4 to 6, and chroma of 6 to 8. Texture is Duplin, Emporia, Suffolk, Norfolk, Goldsboro, Lynchburg, sandy clay or clay. The lower part of the Bt horizon has and Coxville soils. The Emporia, Suffolk, and Norfolk hue of 5YR to 1 OYR, value of 4 to 6, and chroma of 6 or soils are on landscapes similar to those of the Nankin 8. The lower part of the Bt horizon has few to many soils but they have a fine-loamy control section. The mottles in shades of red, brown, and yellow, or it is Duplin and Goldsboro soils are on slightly lower mottled in these colors. It is sandy clay or clay. elevations and are aquic. The Lynchburg and Coxville The BC horizon has hue of 2.5YR to 1 OYR, value of 3 soils are on lower elevations and are Aquults. to 5, and chroma of 6 or 8, with few to common gray Typical pedon of Nankin fine sandy loam, 2 to 6 mottles, and common to many mottles of higher chroma, percent slopes, about 2 miles northwest from Green Sea or it is mottled in these colors. Texture is sandy clay on South Carolina Highway 9, northeast 0.6 mile on loam and has thin strata of loamy sand. paved road, northwest 0.3 mile on dirt field road, 150 The C horizon is mottled in hue of 1 OR to 10YR, value feet west of road, in a sloping cultivated field; Map 9: of 3 to 7, and chroma of 1 to 8. It is loamy sand and has Ap-O to 4 inches; reddish brown (5YR 4/4) fine sandy thin strata of sandy loam or sandy clay loam. loam; weak fine subangular blocky structure; friable; few fine roots; strongly acid; clear smooth boundary. Nansemond Series Btl-4 to 22 inches; yellowish red (5YR 5/8) clay; moderate medium subangular blocky structure; firm; The Nansemond series consists of moderately well few fine roots; common distinct clay films on faces drained, rapidly permeable soils that formed in loamy of peds; few fine pores; very strongly acid; clear Coastal Plain sediments on interstream divides and wavy boundary. stream terraces, and adjacent to small natural Bt2-22 to 34 inches; strong brown (7.5YR 5/8) clay; drainageways on higher elevations. Slope ranges from 0 common medium faint yellowish red (5YR 5.8) to 2 percent. These soils are coarse-loamy, siliceous, mottles; moderate medium subangular blocky thermic Aquic Hapludults. structure; firm; common medium distinct clay films Nansemond soils are geographically associated with on faces of peds; very few fine pores; very strongly the Suffolk, Goldsboro, Echaw, Lynchburg, Woodington, acid; clear wavy boundary. and Pocomoke soils. The Suffolk soils are on higher Bt3-34 to 40 inches; yellowish red (5YR 5/8) clay; elevations, and the Goldsboro and Echaw soils are on common medium faint strong brown (7.5YR 5/8) landscapes similar to those of the Nansemond soils. The and few medium prominent red (10YR 5/8) and few Suffolk and Goldsboro soils have a fine-loamy control fine distinct pale brown (10YR 6/3) mottles; section, and the Echaw soils have a sandy control moderate medium subangular blocky structure; firm; section. The Lynchburg soils are on slightly lower few fine irregular clay films on faces of peds; very elevations and have a fine-loamy control section. The strongly acid; clear wavy boundary. Woodington and Pocomoke soils are on lower elevations BC-40 to 48 inches; strong brown (7.5YR 5/8) sandy and are Aquults. clay loam; common medium prominent red (1 OYR Typical pedon of Nansemond loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 5/8) and few medium distinct pale brown (10YR 6/3) and gray (10YR 6/1) mottles; weak medium percent slopes, about 3 miles east of Aynor, about 1,200 subangular blocky structure; friable, very strongly feet east of Midlands Elementary School on paved road, acid; gradual wavy boundary. 200 feet south of the road; Map 25: C-48 to 72 inches; mottled red (10YR 5/8) and strong Ap-O to 8 inches; very dark grayish brown (1 OYR 3/2) brown (7.5YR 5/8) loamy sand; common medium loamy fine sand; weak fine granular structure; very distinct light gray (10YR 7/1) mottles; structureless; friable; many fine roots; medium acid; clear smooth loose; very strongly acid. boundary. The thickness of the solum ranges from 40 to 60 E-8 to 12 inches; light yellowish brown (10YR 6/4) inches or more. Strata are in the lower part of some loamy fine sand; weak fine granular structure; very profiles. Reaction is very strongly acid or strongly acid friable; few fine roots; strongly acid; gradual smooth throughout, except in areas where the soil has been boundary. limed. Btl-12 to 24 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/6) fine The A horizon has hue of 5YR through 1 OYR, value of sandy loam; few medium distinct strong brown 3 to 5, and chroma of 2 to 5. Texture is loamy sand, (7.5YR 5/6) mottles; weak medium subangular sandy loam, or fine sandy loam. blocky structure; friable; slightly sticky, nonplastic; 74 Soil Survey common fine roots; few fine pores; strongly acid; and Leon soils have a spodic horizon. The Bohicket soils gradual wavy boundary. are in tidal marsh areas and are Sulfaquents. Bt2-24 to 32 inches; brownish yellow (10YR 6/6) fine Typical peclon of Newhan fine sand, 0 to 6 [email protected] sandy loam; common medium distinct pale brown slopes, about 0.2 mile southwest of Garden City Beach (10YR 6/3) mottles; weak medium subangular fishing pier on Main Street, 200 feet northwest of street; blocky structure; friable; slightly sticky, nonplastic; Map 92: few medium roots; strongly acid; gradual smooth boundary. A-0 to 7 inches; light brownish gray (10YR 6/,2) fine BC-32 to 54 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/4) loamy sand; single grained; loose; few fine roots; common fine sand; common medium distinct light gray (10YR small fragments of colored marine shells; common 7/1) mottles; single grained; loose; stratified; very fine black material; mildly alkaline; clear wavy strongly acid; diffuse wavy boundary. boundary. C-54 to 72 inches; mottled light gray (1 OYR 7/ 1) and C1-7 to 26 inches; pale yellow (2.5Y 7/4) fine sand; yellow (10YR 7/6) loamy fine sand; single grained; common medium distinct light gray (10YR 7/2) stratified in orange and purple colors; strongly acid. mottles; single grained; loose; few fine roots; few The thickness of the solum ranges from 46 to 60 small fragments of colored marine shells; common inches. Many profiles have stratified color and texture in very fine black mineral; mildly alkaline; gradual wavy the lower part of the B horizon and in the C horizon. The boundary. soil ranges from extremely acid to strongly acid C2-26 to 54 inches; very pale brown 10YR 7/3) fine throughout, except in areas where the soil has been sand; single grained; loose; common very fine black limed. mineral; mildly alkaline; gradual wavy boundary. The A horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 3 to 5, and C3-54 to 80 inches; white (10YR 8/2) fine sand; single chroma of 1 or 2. It is loamy sand or loamy fine sand. grained; loose; common very fine black mineral; The E horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 5 or 6, and mildly alkaline. chroma of 4. It is loamy fine sand. The upper part of the Bt horizon has hue of 1 OYR, The thickness of the A and C horizon is more than 72 value of 5 or 6, and chroma of 3 to 6. In some places, it inches. The content of silt plus clay is less than 5 has few to common mottles in shades of brown and percent. The soil is neutral or mildly alkaline. Calcareous yellow. The lower part of the Bt horizon has hue of fragments of marine shell are present in most peclons. 1 OYR, value of 5 or 6, and chroma of 3 to 6, and few to The soil contains few to common very fine grains of dark common mottles in shades of gray, brown, and yellowish minerals. red. The Bt horizon is sandy loam or fine sandy loam. The A horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 5 or 6, and The BC horizon, where present, has hue of 10YR, chroma of 2 or 3. It is fine sand or sand. value of 5 or 6, and chroma of 3 to 6. It has few to many The C horizon has hue of 1 OYR to 5Y, value of 5 to 8, mottles in shades of gray, brown, and red; or it is and chroma of 1 to 4. It is fine sand or sand. mottled in gray, brown, and yellow. The BC horizon is stratified loamy sand, and fine sandy loam. The C horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 5 to 7, and Norfolk Series chroma of 2 or 3. It has few to many mottles in shades The Norfolk series consists of well drained, moderately of gray and yellow, or it is mottled in shades of gray, permeable soils that formed in loamy Coastal Plain yellow, and brown. The C horizon is stratified loamy sediments on uplands on the higher elevations. Slope sand, sand, fine sand, and loamy fine sand. ranges from 0 to 2 percent. These soils are fine-loamy, Newhan Series siliceous, thermic Typic Paleuclults. Norfolk soils are geographically associated with the The Newhan series consists of excessively drained, Nankin, Suffolk, Goldsboro, Lynchburg, Coxville, and very rapidly permeable soils that formed in thick, sandy Woodington soils. The Nankin and Suffolk soils are on Coastal Plain sediments adjacent to beaches along the landscapes similar to those of the Norfolk soils and are coast on nearly level to gently sloping, undulating dunes. Hapluclults. The Nankin soils have a clayey control Slope ranges from 0 to 6 percent. These soils are section. The Goldsboro and Lynchburg soils are on thermic, uncoated Typic Quartzipsamments. slightly lower elevations. The Goldsboro soils are aquic. Newhan soils are geographically associated with the The Lynchburg, Coxville, and Woodington soils are on Lakeland, Centenary, Leon, and Bohicket soils. The lower elevations and are Aquults. Lakeland and Centenary soils are on landscapes that are Typical peclon of Norfolk loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 parallel to the Newhan soils but further inland from the percent slope, about 1.5 miles northwest from Floycls on ocean. The Lakeland soils contain more fines in the South Carolina Highway 9, northeast 0.2 mile on dirt control section than the Newhan soils. The Centenary road, 75 feet north of road, in a cultivated field; Map 5: Horry County, South Carolina 75 Ap-O to 13 inches; brown (10YR 5/3) loamy fine sand; Ogeechee Series weak fine granular structure; very friable; few fine roots; medium acid; clear wavy boundary. The Ogeechee series consists of poorly drained, E-13 to 16 inches; light yellowish brown (10YR 6/4) rapidly permeable soils that formed in loamy Coastal loamy sand; weak fine granular structure; very Plain sediments on broad, nearly level areas and in slight friable; few fine roots; common holes filled with Ap depressional areas. Slope is dominantly less than 1 material; medium acid; clear wavy boundary. percent, but ranges to 2 percent along drainageways. Btl-16 to 39 inches; yellowish bown (10YR 5/6) sandy These soils are fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic Typic clay loam; weak medium subangular blocky Ochraquults. structure; friable; few faint clay films on faces of Ogeechee soils are geographically associated with the peds; few fine roots; few fine holes and pores-, Yauhannah, Wahee, Yernassee, Yonges, and Bladen strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. soils. The Yauhannah soils are on higher elevations than Bt2-39 to 46 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/6) sandy the Ogeechee soils and are Uduults. The Wahee and clay loam; common medium prominent yellowish red Yemassee soils are on slightly higher elevations and in (5YR 5/8) mottles; weak medium subangular blocky some places have a Bt horizon that is not dominantly structure; friable; few faint clay films on faces of gray. The Yonges and Bladen soils are on landscapes peds; few fine holes and pores; very strongly acid; similar to those of the Ogeechee soils. The Bladen soils gradual wavy boundary. have a clayey control section, and the Yonges soils are BC1-46 to 56 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/6) Alfisols. sandy clay loam that has thin strata of clay loam Typical pedon of Ogeechee loamy fine sand, about 2.0 and sandy loam; common medium distinct gray miles southeast of Socastee on South Carolina (10YR 6/1) and common medium prominent Secondary Highway 375, about 0.7 mile southwest of yellowish red (5YR 5/8) mottles; weak medium highway, 100 feet northwest of private air strip; Map 87: subangular blocky structure; ffiable; very strongly A-0 to 5 inches; black (1 OYR 2/ 1) loamy fine sand; acid; gradual wavy boundary. weak fine granular structure; very friable; few to BC2-56 to 61 inches; mottled yellowish brown (10YR large roots; few clean grains of sand; strongly acid; 5/6), gray (10YR 6/1), and red (2.5YR 4/6) sandy clear smooth boundary. clay that has thin strata of sandy loam and sandy E-5 to 10 inches; grayish brown (1 OYR 5/2) loamy fine clay loam; weak coarse subangular blocky structure; sand; common medium distinct light gray (10YR firm; very strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. 7/1) and few medium distinct light yellowish brown BC3-61 to 75 inches; mottled red (2.5YR 4/6), (10YR 6/4) mottles; weak fine granular structure; yellowish brown (10YR 5/8) and gray (10YR 6/1) very friable; common fine and medium roots; very clay loam that has strata of sandy loam and sandy strongly acid; clear smooth boundary. clay loam; weak coarse subangular blocky structure; Btg1-10 to 30 inches; gray (10YR 5/1) sandy clay firm; very strongly acid. loam; common medium distinct yellowish brown (10YR 5/8) mottles; weak medium subangular The thickness of the solum is more than 60 inches. biocky structure; friable; few faint clay films on faces The lower part of the solum is stratified. Reaction is very of peds; common fine and medium roots; few fine strongly acid or strongly acid throughout, except in areas pores; few fine flakes of mica; very strongly acid; where the soil has been limed. gradual wavy boundary. The A horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 5 or 6, and Btg2-30 to 54 inches; gray (1 OYR 5/ 1) sandy clay chroma of 3 or 4. It is loamy sand or loamy fine sand. loam; common medium distinct brownish yellow The E horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 6 or 7, and (10YR 6/8), few medium distinct light gray (10YR chroma of 3 or 4. It is loamy sand or loamy fine sand. 7/1), few medium distinct dark gray (10YR 4/1) The Bt horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 5 or 6, and mottles; weak medium subangular blocky structure; chroma of 6 or 8. It has mottles in shades of red and friable; few faint clay films on faces of peds; few fine gray in the lower part. The Bt horizon is sandy clay loam roots; few fine pores; few fine flakes of mica; few or clay loam. pockets and lenses of clean sand; very strongly The BC horizon has hue of 7.5YR or 10YR, value of 5 acid; gradual wavy boundary. or 6, and chroma of 6 or 8. It has few to common BCg-54 to 60 inches; mottled dark gray (10YR 4/1) and mottles in shades of gray and red, or it is mottled in light gray (1 OYR 7/ 1) sandy loam; common medium shades of red, gray, brown, and yellow. The BC horizon distinct yellowish brown (10YR 5/8) mottles; weak is sandy clay loam, clay loam, sandy clay, or clay. Strata medium granular structure; friable; few lenses of of sandy loam and sandy clay loam are in some pedons. sandy clay loam; few fine flakes of mica; very strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. 76 Soil Survey Cg-60 to 72 inches; light gray (1 OYR 6/ 1) loamy sand; feet east on dirt road, 100 feet north of road, in woods; few medium distinct brownish yellow (1 OYR 6/8) Map 36: and common medium distinct dark gray (1 OYR 4/ 1) mottles; very friable; few fine flakes of mica; very A-0 to 8 inches; very dark gray (10YR 3/1) loarny sand; strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. weak fine granular structure; very friable; many fine and medium roots and a few large roots; fe%v fine The thickness of the solum ranges from 50 to more pores; very strongly acid; clear smooth boundary. than 70 inches. Reaction is very strongly acid or strongly Cgl-8 to 21 inches; grayish brown (10YR 5/2) loamy acid throughout, except in areas where the soil has been sand; weak fine granular structure; very friable; few limed. Few to many fine flakes of mica are present in the medium and common fine roots; medium acid; lower part of the B horizon and in the C horizon of most gradual wavy boundary. pedons. Cg2-21 to 48 inches; light brownish gray (10YR 6/2) The A horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 2 or 3, and sand; common medium distinct yellowish brown chroma, of 1. It is sandy loam, loamy sand, or loamy fine (10YR 5/6) mottles; single grained; loose; fow fine sand. roots; medium acid; gradual wavy boundary. The E horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 5 to 7, and Cg3-48 to 65 inches; very dark grayish brown 0 OYR chroma of 1 or 2. Some pedons have few to common 3/2) sand; weak fine granular structure; very friable; mottles in shades of gray and brown. The E horizon is medium acid. sandy loam, loamy sand, or loamy fine sand. The BE horizon, where present, has hue of 10YR, Reaction ranges from very strongly acid to medium value of 4 or 5, and chroma of 1. It is sandy loam. acid throughout. The Btg horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 5 or 6, and The A horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 2 to 4, and chroma of 1 or 2. It has few to many mottles in varying chroma of 1 or 2. It ranges from fine sandy loam to shades of gray, brown, yellow, and red. In some pedons, sand. it is coarsely mottled in shades of gray, brown, and red. The Cg horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 3 to 8, and The Btg horizon is sandy clay loam or clay loam. chroma of 1 or 2. Most pedons have mottles in shades The BCg horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 4 to 7, of brown and gray. The Cg horizon is sand, loamy sand, and chroma of 1, and has few to many mottles in varying or loamy fine sand. shades of gray, brown, and red. Some pedons are coarsely mottled in shades of gray, brown, and red. The Pocomoke Series BCg horizon is sandy loam to sandy clay. Pockets and strata of contrasting textures are in most pedons. The Pocomoke series consists of very poorly drained, The Cg horizon has hue of 10YR to 5Y, value of 5 to moderately rapidly permeable soils that formed in sandy 8, and chroma of 1, and has few to many mottles in Coastal Plain sediments in small drainageways, in shades of brown, red, and gray. Some pedons are shallow depressions, and on flats throughout the county. coarsely mottled in varying shades of brown, red, and Slope is dominantly less than I percent. These soils are gray. The Cg horizon is fine sandy loam, loamy sand, coarse-loamy, siliceous, thermic Typic Umbraquults. sand, sandy clay loam, or sandy clay. Pocomoke soils are geographically associated with the Osier, Woodington, and Rutlege soils. The Woodington Osier Series soils are on slightly higher elevations than the Pocomoke soils and do not have an umbric epipedon. The Osier The Osier series consists of poorly drained, rapidly and Rutlege soils are on similar landscapes. The Rutlege permeable soils that formed in sandy Coastal Plain and Osier soils have a sandy control section. sediments on flood plains, in depressions, and on stream Typical pedon of Pocomoke fine sandy loam, about 3 terraces throughout the county. Slope ranges from 0 to 2 miles northeast of Nixonville on South Carolina Primary percent. These soils are siliceous, thermic Typic Highway 90, 50 feet north of the highway, in woods; Map Psammaquents. 63: Osier soils are geographically associated with the Blanton, Kenansville, Rutlege, and Woodington soils. A-0 to 11 inches; black (1 OYR 2/ 1) fine sandy loam; The Blanton and Kenansville soils are on higher weak fine granular structure; very friable; common elevations than the Osier soils and are Ultisols. The fine and medium roots; very strongly acid; clear Rutlege soils are on slightly lower elevations and are wavy boundary. Humaquepts. The Woodington soils are on similar E-1 1 to 16 inches; mottled gray (1 OYR 6/ 1) and dark landscapes and have a fine-loamy control section. grayish brown (10YR 4/2) loamy sand; weak fine Typical pedon of Osier loamy sand, about 5 miles granular structure; very friable; few fine and medium southwest of Loris, about 2 miles south of Allsbrook on roots; few fine pores; very strongly acid; gradual South Carolina Secondary Highway 139, about 1,500 smooth boundary. Horry County, South Carolina 77 Btg-1 6 to 36 inches; very dark grayish brown (11 OYR A-0 to 4 inches; dark gray (10YR 4/1) sand; many 3/2) sandy loam; weak fine subangular blocky uncoated white grains of sand; salt-and-pepper structure; friable; few fine roots; few fine pores; very appearance; single grained; loose; few medium and strongly acid; clear wavy boundary. many fine roots; strongly acid; gradual wavy Cg-36 to 54 inches; grayish brown (10YR 5/2) loamy boundary. sand; common medium distinct gray (10YR 6/1) E1-4 to 34 inches; white (N 8/0) sand; single grained; mottles; massive; very friable; few fine and medium loose; uncoated grains of sand; common medium roots; few pores; very strongly acid; gradual wavy roots; very strongly acid; gradual smooth boundary. boundary. E2-34 to 65 inches; light gray (1 OYR 7/ 1) sand; single 2Cg-54 to 72 inches; light brownish gray (10YR 6/2) grained; loose; uncoated grains of sand; very sandy clay loam that has strata of coarser material; strongly acid; abrupt wavy boundary. massive; friable; few fine and medium roots; strongly Bh-65 to 72 inches; dark reddish brown (5YR 2/2) acid. sand; weak fine granular structure; friable; slightly brittle and weakly cemented; most grains of sand The thickness of the solum ranges from 22 to 40 coated with organic matter; very strongly acid. inches. Reaction is extremely acid to strongly acid throughout, except in areas where the soil has been Reaction is extremely acid to strongly acid throughout. limed. The A horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 3 or 7, and The A horizon has hue of I OYR, value of 2 or 3, and chroma of 1 or 2. chroma of 1 or 2. It is fine sandy loam, sandy loam, or The E horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 7 or 8, and loam. chroma of 1 or 2, or it is neutral and has value of 7 or 8. The E horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 4 to 6, and The Bh horizon has hue of 5YR to 1 OYR, value of 2 or chroma of 1 or 2. It is sandy loam or loamy sand. 3, and chroma of 1 or 2. The Btg horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 3 to 6, and chroma of 1 or 2. It is sandy loam. Rutlege Series The Cg horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 5 to 7, and chroma of 1 or 2. Few or common mottles in shades of The Rutlege series consists of very poorly drained, brown to gray are present. The Cg horizon is loamy sand rapidly permeable soils that formed in sandy Coastal or sand. Plain sediments in small drainageways, shallow The 2Cg horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 5 or 6, depressions, and oval bays and on flood plains along and chroma of 1 or 2. It has strata that range from sandy streams throughout the county. Slope is dominantly less clay loam to sand. than 1 percent. These soils are sandy, siliceous, thermic Typic Humaquepts. Rimini Series Rutlege soils are geographically associated with the Osier, Lynn Haven, Woodington, Johnston, Centenary, The Rimini series consists of excessively drained, Lakeland, and Pocomoke soils. The Lakeland soils are moderately permeable soils that formed in thick beds of on higher elevations than the Rutlege soils. The Osier, sandy Coastal Plain sediments. These soils are on rims Centenary, and Woodington soils are on slightly higher around Carolina Bays throughout the county and on elevations. The Johnston, Lynn Haven, and Pocomoke narrow, smooth divides along the Little Pee Dee River soils are on similar landscapes. The Lakeland soils are and the Waccamaw River. Slope is dominantly less than Quartzipsamments. The Johnston soils have a black A 3 percent, but it ranges to 6 percent along the edge of horizon more than 24 inches thick, and the Lynn Haven bays. These soils are sandy, siliceous, thermic and Centenary soils have a spodic horizon. The Grossarenic Entic Haplohumods. Woodington and Pocomoke soils have an argillic horizon. Rimini soils are geographically associated with the Typical pedon of Rutlege loamy sand, about 0.7 mile Lakeland, Leon, Lynn Haven, Paxville, Echaw, northeast of Allsbrook on U.S. Highway 701, about 800 Witherbee, Centenary, and Rutlege soils. The Lakeland feet north on dirt road, across Seaboard Coastline soils are on higher elevations than the Rimini soils and Railroad, 200 feet west of road; Map 28: do not have a spodic horizon. The Lynn Haven, Paxville, and Rutlege soils are on lower elevations and have an A-0 to 12 inches; black (10YR 2/1) loamy sand; weak umbric epipedon. The Leon, Echaw, Witherbee, and medium granular structure; very friable; common fine Centenary soils are on lower elevations and have a and medium roots; very strongly acid; abrupt smooth higher seasonal water table. boundary. Typical pedon of Rimini sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes, Cgl -12 to 20 inches; dark gray (1 OYR 4/ 1) sand; about 1.5 miles west of Wampee on South Carolina commn medium faint gray (10YR 6/1) mottles; few Primary Highway 90, about 2.8 miles south on dirt road, clean sand grains; very strongly acid; clear wavy 150 feet east of road; Map 64: boundary. 78 Soil Survey Cg2-20 to 35 inches; gray (10YR 5/1) sand; single medium granular structure; very friable; strongly grained; loose; very strongly acid; gradual wavy acid; gradual wavy boundary. boundary. C-56 to 72 inches; brownish yellow (10YR 6/8) sandy Cg3-35 to 72 inches; dark grayish brown (10YR 4/2) loam that has thin strata of clean sand; common sand; few medium distinct gray (10YR 6/1) mottles; medium prominent yellowish red (5YR 5/8) and few single grained; loose; very strongly acid. medium distinct very pale brown (10YR 7/31) Reaction is extremely acid to strongly acid throughout. mottles; massive; very friable; strongly acid. The A horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 2 or 3, and The thickness of the solum ranges from 40 to 60 chroma of 1. It is loamy sand or sand. inches. In most pedons, strata are in the lower part of The Cg horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 4 to 7, and the solum and in the C horizon. Reaction is very strongly chroma of 1 or 2. Mottles in shades of brown and gray acid or strongly acid throughout, except in areas where are in some pedons. The Cg horizon is sand. the soil has been limed. The A horizon has hue of I OYR, value of 4 or 5, and Suffolk Series chroma of 2 or 3. It is fine sandy loam, loamy fine sand, The Suffolk series consists of well drained, moderately or loamy sand. permeable soils that formed in loamy Coastal Plain The E horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 6, and sediments on uplands on the higher elevations. Slope chroma of 3 to 6. It is loamy fine sand or loamy sand. ranges from 0 to 6 percent. These soils are fine-loamy, The Bt horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 5 or 6, and siliceous, thermic Typic Hapludults. chroma of 6 or 8. Mottles in shades of brown and red The Suffolk soils in Horry County are a taxadjunct to are in some pedons. The Bt horizon is sandy clay loam the Suffolk series because they have a thicker solum or sandy loam. and loamy texture in the BC and C horizons than is The C horizon has hue of 7.5YR or 10YR, value of 5 defined for the Suffolk series. These differences do not or 6, and chroma of 6 or 8. Mottles in shades of brown significantly alter the use or behavior of the soils. and red are in some pedons, or this horizon may be Suffolk soils are geographically associated with the mottled in shades of brown. The C horizon is sandy clay Goldsboro, Lynchburg, Kenansville, Blanton, and Norfolk loam, sandy loam, or loamy sand and is stratified with soils. The Goldsboro and Lynchburg soils are on slightly sand. lower elevations than the Suffolk soils and have a higher seasonal water table. The Kenansville, Blanton, and Summerton Series Norfolk soils are on similar landscapes. The Kenansville and Blanton soils have a sandy surface horizon more The Summerton series consists of well drained, slowly than 20 inches thick. The Norfolk soils are Paleudults. permeable soils that formed in clayey Coastal Plain Typical pedon of Suffolk loamy sand, 0 to 2 percent sediments on uplands on the higher elevations. Slope slopes, about 0.7 mile south of Loris, about 0.4 mile ranges from 0 to 2 percent. These soils are clayey, south on South Carolina Secondary Highway 31 (Daisy kaolinitic, thermic Typic Paleudults. Road), 700 feet east on dirt road, 100 feet south of road, The Surnmerton soils in Horry County are a taxadjunct in a cultivated field; Map 21: to the Surnmerton series because they have slightly less Ap-O to 8 inches; grayish brown (10YR 5/2) loamy fine clay in the upper part of the Bt horizon and are less red sand; weak fine granular structure; very friable; in the Bt horizon than is typical for the Summerton common fine roots; slightly acid; clear smooth series. These differences do not significantly alter the boundary. use or behavior of the soils. E-8 to 14 inches; light yellowish brown (10YR 6/4) Surnmerton soils are geographically associated with loamy fine sand; weak fine granular structure; very the Emporia, Suffolk, Duplin, Goldsboro, Lynchburg, and friable; common fine roots; common holes filled with Coxville soils. The Emporia and Suffolk soils are on Ap material; slightly acid; clear smooth boundary. landscapes similar to those of the Summerton soils. Bt-14 to 44 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/8) sandy They have a fine-loamy control section. The Duplin and clay loam; weak medium subangular blocky Goldsboro soils are on slightly lower elevations and are structure; friable; few faint clay films on faces of aquic. The Lynchburg and Coxville soils are on lower peds; few fine roots; few very fine pores; strongly elevations and are Aquults. acid; gradual wavy boundary. Typical pedon of Surnmerton fine sandy loam, 0 to 2 BC-44 to 56 inches; brownish yellow (10YR 6/8) sandy percent slopes, about 3.7 miles west of Finkleas clay loam that has thin strata of clean sand; few Crossroads along South Carolina Highway 917, about medium prominent yellowish red (5YR 5/8) and few 450 feet north on County Road 59, about 50 feet east of medium faint pale brown (10YR 6/3) mottles; weak road, in a cultivated field; Map 13: Horry County, South Carolina 79 Ap-O to 6 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/4) fine soils. The Eulonia soils are on slightly higher elevations sandy loam; weak fine granular structure; very than the Wahee soils and are Udults. The Bladen, friable; many fine roots; very strongly acid; gradual Ogeechee, and Meggett soils are on lower elevations irregular boundary. and have a higher seasonal water table. The Yemassee Btl-6 to 12 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/6) sandy soils are on similar landscapes and have a fine-loamy clay loam; moderate medium subangular blocky control section. structure; friable; common fine roots; few fine holes; Typical pedon of Wahee fine sandy loam, about 4 old root channels filled with Ap material; extremely miles northwest of Myrtle Beach, on U.S. Highway 501 acid; gradual wavy boundary. about 1.8 miles southwest on South Carolina Secondary Bt2-12 to 26 inches; strong brown (7.5YR 5/8) clay; Highway 992, 135 feet southeast of the highway; Map few fine distinct yellowish red (5YR 5/8) mottles; 82: moderate medium subangular blocky structure; firm; few faint clay films on ped faces and along old root A-0 to 7 inches; dark gray (11 OYR 4/ 1) fine sandy loam; channels; common fine roots; few fine holes; weak fine granular structure; very friable; many fine extremely acid; clear smooth boundary. and medium roots; few fine pores; medium acid; Bt3-26 to 37 inches; strong brown (7.5YR 5/8) clay; clear smooth boundary. common medium distinct yellowish red (5YR 5/6) mottles; moderate medium subangular blocky E-7 to 11 inches; pale brown (11 OYR 6/3) loam; few fine structure; firm; common distinct clay films on ped faint light brownish gray mottles; weak medium faces; few fine roots; extremely acid; gradual wavy subangular blocky structure; friable; common fine boundary. and medium roots; few fine pores; strongly acid; Bt4-37 to 61 inches; brownish yellow (10YR 6/8) clay; clear smooth boundary. common medium distinct light gray (10YR 7/2) and Bt-1 1 to 15 inches; brown (11 OYR 5/3) clay loam; few strong brown (7.5YR 5/8) mottles, common medium fine distinct yellowish red (5YR 5/8) and few fine prominent red (2.5YR 4/6) and few medium faint light brownish gray mottles; moderate medium prominent weak red (10YR 4/4) mottles; moderate subangular blocky structure; firm; few distinct clay medium subangular blocky structure; firm; common films on faces of peds; common fine roots and few distinct clay films on ped faces; very strongly acid. medium roots; few fine pores; strongly acid; clear The thickness of the solum is more than 60 inches wavy boundary. and has strata in the lower horizons. Reaction is Btgl -15 to 30 inches; grayish brown (2.5Y 5/2) clay extremely acid to strongly acid throughout, except in loam; common medium distinct reddish yellow areas where the soil has been limed. (7.5YR 6/8) and few medium prominent red (2.5YR The A horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 5 or 6, and 4/8) mottles; moderate medium subangular blocky chroma of 3 or 4. It is loamy sand, sandy loam, or fine structure; firm; few distinct clay films on faces of sandy loam. peds; common fine roots and few medium roots; few The E horizon, where present, has hue of 10YR, value fine pores; strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. of 6, and chroma of 4. It is loamy sand. Btg2-30 to 46 inches; gray (10YR 6/1) clay loam; many The upper part of the Bt horizon has hue of 5YR to medium distinct strong brown (7.5YR 5/8) and 10YR, value of 5 or 6, and chroma of 6 or 8. Some common medium prominent red (2.5YR 4/6) pedons are mottled in shades of red, brown, and yellow. mottles; moderate medium subangular blocky The upper part of the Bt horizon is mostly sandy clay or structure; firm; few distinct clay films on faces of clay. The lower part of the Bt horizon has hue of 1 OYR, peds; few fine roots; few fine pores; few flakes of value of 5 or 6, and chroma of 6 or 8 and is mottled in mica; very strongly acid; clear wavy boundary. shades of red, brown, yellow, and gray. The lower part of Btg3-46 to 56 inches; gray (5Y 6/1) sandy clay; the Bt horizon is sandy clay loam to clay and has strata common medium distinct brownish yellow (10YR of sandy clay loam or sandy loam. 6/8) and few fine prominent red (2.5YR 5/6) mottles; moderate medium subangular blocky Wahee Series structure; firm; few distinct clay films on faces of The Wahee series consists of somewhat poorly peds; few fine roots; few fine pores; few flakes of drained, slowly permeable soils that formed in clayey mica; very strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. Coastal Plain sediments on broad terraces and in BCg-56 to 65 inches; mottled light gray (5Y 7/1) and shallow depressions on the lower elevations in the brownish yellow (10YR 6/8) sandy clay loam; few county. Slope ranges from 0 to 2 percent. These soils medium faint yellowish brown and few medium are clayey, mixed, thermic Aeric Ochraquults. distinct yellowish red (5YR 5/8) mottles; weak Wahee soils are geographically associated with the medium subangular blocky structure; friable; few fine Eulonia, Bladen, Meggett, Yemassee, and Ogeechee pores; very strongly acid. 80 Soil Survey The thickness of the solum ranges from 40 to more Bhl-22 to 40 inches; dark reddish brown (5YR 3/2) than 65 inches. Reaction is extremely acid to strongly sand; weak fine granular structure; very friable; acid throughout, except in areas where the soil has been weakly cemented and slightly brittle; strongly acid; limed. diffuse wavy boundary. The A horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 2 to 5, and Bh2-40 to 80 inches; very dark brown (11 OYR 2 /2) sand; chroma of 1 or 2. It is sandy loam, fine sandy loam, or weak fine granular structure; very friable; weakly loam. cemented and slightly brittle; strongly acid. The E horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 6, and chroma of 3 or 4. It has mottles in shades of gray. The E Texture of these soils is sand to a depth of 80 inches horizon is sandy loam or loam. or more. Reaction ranges from very strongly acid to The Bt horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 5 or 6, and slightly acid throughout. chroma of 3 to 8. It has mottles in shades of gray, The A or Ap horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 3 or 4, yellow, red, and brown, or it is mixed in shades of gray and chroma of 1 or 2. and brown. The Bt horizon is clay loam or clay. The E horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 5 or, 6, and The Btg horizon has hue of 1 OYR to 5Y, value of 5 to chroma of 2 to 6. Mottles in shades of gray, brown, and 7, and chroma of 1 or 2. It has mottles in shades of red may be present. yellow, brown, or red. The Btg horizon is clay loam, clay, The Bh horizon has hue of 5YR to 1 OYR, value of 2 or or sandy clay. 3, and chroma of 1 to 4. Mottles in shades of gray and The BCg horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 7, and brown may be present. chroma of 1 or 2, or it is mottled in shades of gray, yellow, brown, or red. It is sandy clay loam or clay loam. Woodington Series Some pedons have strata of sandy loam and clay. The Woodington series consists of poorly drained, Witherbee Series moderately permeable soils that formed in loamy Coastal Plain sediments on stream terraces and upland flats on The Witherbee series consists of somewhat poorly the higher elevations. Slope ranges from 0 to 1 percent. drained, rapidly permeable soils that formed in sandy These soils are coarse-loamy, siliceous, thermic Typic Coastal Plain sediments on broad interstream divides Paleaquults. and flats throughout the county. Slope ranges from 0 to The Woodington soils in Horry County are a taxadjunct 2 percent. These soils are sandy, siliceous, thermic Entic to the Woodington series because they are Ochraquults. Haplaquods. This difference does not significantly alter the use, Witherbee soils are geographically associated with the management, and behavior of these soils. Leon, Lynn Haven, Rutlege, Centenary, Rimini, and Woodington soils are geographically associated with Echaw soils. The Leon, Lynn Haven, and Rutlege soils the Goldsboro, Lynchburg, Pocomoke, Osier, and are on lower elevations than the Witherbee soils and Coxville soils. The Goldsboro and Lynchburg soils are on have a higher seasonal water table. The Centenary, slightly higher elevations than the Woodington soils and Rimini, and Echaw soils are on higher elevations and have a lower seasonal water table. The Pocomoke soils have a lower seasonal water table. are on lower elevations and have an umbric epipedon. Typical pedon of Witherbee sand, about 1.8 miles The Coxville soils are on similar landscapes and have a southwest of Nixonville on South Carolina Primary clayey control section. The Osier soils are on similar Highway 90, about 0.5 mile southeast on International landscapes and have less than 15 percent clay in the Paper Company dirt road, 150 feet west of the road; control section. Map 71: Typical pedon of Woodington fine sandy loam, about 3 miles northwest of Green Sea, about 1.8 miles west from A-0 to 5 inches; very dark gray (11 OYR 3/ 1) sand; weak Green Sea along South Carolina Highway 9, about 2 fine granular structure; very friable; common fine miles north on South Carolina Highway 142, about 600 and medium roots; strongly acid; clear smooth feet east on South Carolina Secondary Highway 306, boundary. and about 1,000 feet southeast on dirt road, 500 feet E1-5 to 16 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/4) sand; west of road; Map 9: weak fine granular structure; very friable; few fine and medium roots; very strongly acid; clear wavy A-0 to 7 inches; very dark gray (10YR 3/1) fine sandy boundary. loam; weak fine granular structure; very friable; E2-16 to 22 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/4) sand; many fine and medium roots; few fine pores; common medium distinct dark grayish brown (10YR strongly acid; clear wavy boundary. 4/2) and few fine distinct light gray mottles; weak E-7 to 14 inches; light gray (10YR 7/1) fne sandy loam; fine granular structure; very friable; few fine roots; few medium distinct yellowish brown (10YR 5/8) strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. mottles; weak medium subangular blocky structure; Horry County, South Carolina 81 very friable; few fine roots; few fine pores; strongly divides on the lower elevations in the county. Slope is acid; gradual wavy boundary. dominantly less than 1 percent, but it ranges up to 2 Btg1-14 to 31 inches; light gray (10YR 7/1) sandy percent. These soils are fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic loam; common medium distinct yellowish brown Aquic Hapludults. (11 OYR 5/8) and few fine prominent red mottles; Yauhannah soils are geographically associated with weak fine subangular blocky structure; friable; few the Chisolm, Blanton, Eulonia, Yemassee, Bladen, faint clay films on faces of peds; few fine roots; few Ogeechee, and Hobcaw soils. The Chisolm and Blanton fine pores; strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. soils are on higher elevations than the Yauhannah soils Btg2-31 to 47 inches; light gray (11 OYR 7/ 1) sandy clay and have thicker horizons. The Eulonia and Yemassee loam with thin strata of sandy loam; many coarse soils are on similar landscapes. The Eulonia soils have a distinct yellowish brown (10YR 5/8) and common clayey control section, and the Yemassee soils are medium prominent red (2.5YR 5/8) mottles; weak Aquults. The Bladen, Ogeechee, and Hobcaw soils are fine subangular blocky structure; friable; few faint on lower elevations and are Aquults. clay films on faces of peds; few fine roots; strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. Typical pedon of Yauhannah fine sandy loam, 0 to 2 BCg-47 to 58 inches; light gray (10YR 7/1) stratified percent slopes, about 3.2 miles northwest of Little River sandy clay loam and clay loam; many coarse distinct on South Carolina Secondary Highway 111 to yellowish brown (10YR 5/8) and common coarse Brooksville, about 500 feet northwest of Brooksville on prominent red (2.5YR 4/8) mottles; weak medium South Carolina Secondary 111, 300 feet southwest of subangular blocky structure; friable; few fine roots; highway; Map 48: strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. Cg-58 to 84 inches; mottled light gray (10YR 7/1), gray Ap-O to 8 inches; brown (10YR 4/3) fine sandy loam; (10YR 5/1), yellowish brown (10YR 5/6), and red weak medium subangular structure; very friable; few (2-5YR 4/8) stratified sandy clay loam and sandy fine and medium roots; slightly acid; clear smooth loam; massive; friable; few fine roots; strongly acid. boundary. Btl-8 to 16 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/6) sandy The thickness of the solum ranges from 40 to more clay lam; moderate medium subangular blocky than 60 inches. Reaction ranges from extremely acid to structure; friable; few distinct clay films on faces of strongly acid throughout, except in areas where the soil peds; few fine roots; few fine pores; few pockets of has been limed. dark grayish brown (10YR 4/2) Ap material; strongly The A horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of or 3, and acid; gradual wavy boundary. chroma of 1 or 2. It is sandy loam or fine sandy loam. Bt2-16 to 23 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/6) sandy The E horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 5 to 7, and clay loam; common medium prominent red (2.5YR chroma of 1 or 2. Some pedons have few mottles in 4/6), and common medium distinct light yellowish shades of brown. The E horizon is sandy loam or fine sandy loam. brown (10YR 6/4) mottles; few distinct clay films on The Btg horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 5 to 7, and faces of peds; few fine roots; few fine pores; few chroma of 1 or 2. Mottles in shades of brown, yellow, streaks of dark grayish brown (10YR 4/2) material; and red are in most pedons. The Btg horizon is sandy strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. loam in the upper part and ranges to sandy clay loam in Bt3-23 to 31 inches; yellowish brown (10YR 5/6) sandy the lower part. In most pedons, the lower part of the Btg clay loam; common medium prominent red (2.5YR horizon is stratified. 4/6), and common medium distinct light gray (10YR The BCg horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 4 to 7, 7/1) mottles; moderate medium subangular blocky and chroma of 1 or 2. It has mottles in shades of brown, structure; friable; few distinct clay films on faces of yellow, and red, or it is mottled in shades of gray, brown, peds; few fine roots; few fine pores; strongly acid; yellow, and red. The BCg horizon is dominantly sandy, gradual wavy boundary. but it has stratified layers ranging from sandy to clayey. Bt4-31 to 40 inches; mottled yellowish brown (10YR The Cg horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 4 to 7, and 5/6), light gray (11 OYR 7/ 1), and red (2.5YR 4/6) chroma of 1 or 2. It has mottles in shades of yellow and sandy clay loam; moderate medium subangular red, or it is mottled in shades of gray, brown, yellow, and blocky structure; friable; few distinct clay films on red. The Cg horizon has strata that range from sandy to faces of peds; very strongly acid; gradual wavy clayey. boundary. Yauhannah Series BC-40 to 48 inches; mottled yellowish brown (10YR 5/6), light gray (10YR 7/1), and red (2.5YR 4/6) The Yauhannah series consists of moderately well sandy loam; weak medium subangular blocky drained, moderately permeable soils that formed in structure; very friable; very strongly acid; gradual loamy Coastal Plain sediments on broad interstream wavy boundary. 82 Soil Survey C-48 to 72 inches; mottled brownish yellow (10YR 6/6) Btg1-14 to 28 inches; gray (10YR 6/1) sandy clay and light gray (10YR 7/1) sand; single grained; loam; common medium distinct yellowish brown loose; strongly acid. (1 OYR 5/8) and few medium prominent yellowish red (5YR 5/8) mottles; moderate medium The thickness of the solurn ranges from 40 to 60 subangular blocky structure; friable; few distinct clay inches. Reaction ranges from very strongly acid to films on faces of peds; few fine roots; common fine medium acid throughout, except in areas where the soil and few large pores; few fine flakes of micat; few has been limed. thin vertical streaks and pockets of white sand; very The A or Ap horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 4 or 5, strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. and chroma of 1 to 3. It is loamy sand, fine sandy loam, Btg2-28 to 46 inches; mottled gray (10YR 6/1) and or loamy fine sand. yellowish brown (10YR 5/8) sandy clay loam; The E horizon, where present, has hue of 10YR, value common medium prominent red (2.5YR 4/8) of 5 or 6, and chroma of 3 or 4. It is loamy sand. mottles; moderate medium subangular blocky The BE horizon, where present, has hue of 10YR, structure; friable; few distinct clay films on faces of value of 5, and chroma of 6. It is sandy loam. peds; few fine roots; common fine and medium The Bt horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 5 or 6, and pores; few fine flakes of mica; few thin vertical chroma of 4 to 8. There are few to common mottles in streaks and pockets of white sand; very strongly varying shades of red, brown, and gray. Mottles of acid; gradual wavy boundary. chroma 2 or less are in the upper 24 inches of the Bt BCg-46 to 56 inches; light brownish gray (11 OYR 6/2) horizon. sandy loam; common medium distinct yellowish The BC horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 5 to 7, and brown (10YR 5/8) and few medium prominent chroma of 1 to 6. It has few to many mottles in varying yellowish red (5YR 5/6) mottles; weak medium shades of gray, brown, or red, or it is mottled in gray, subangular blocky structure; friable; few fine pores; brown, or red. few to common thin vertical streaks and pockets The C horizon is mottled in varying shades of gray, and strata of white fine sand; few fine flakes of brown, yellow, and red, or it is gray and has mottles in mica; very strongly acid; gradual wavy boundary. shades of gray, brown, and red. The C horizon is sand or Cg-56 to 72 inches; light brownish gray (10YR 6/2) loamy sand. loamy sand that has strata of sandy clay loam and clay loam; common medium distinct brownish yellow Yemassee Series (10YR 6/8) mottles; weak medium granular structure; few fine pores; few fine flakes of mica; The Yemassee series consists of somewhat poorly few to common thin vertical streaks and pockets of drained, moderately permeable soils that formed in white sand; very strongly acid. loamy Coastal Plain sediments on broad, nearly level areas on elevations less than 42 feet. Slope ranges from The thickness of the solum ranges from 40 to more 0 to 2 percent. These soils are fine-loamy, siliceous, than 60 inches. Reaction ranges from extremely acid to thermic Aeric Ochraquults. strongly acid throughout, except in areas where the soil Yemassee soils are geographically associated with the has been limed. Few to many fine flakes of mica are in Yauhannah, Ogeechee, and Bladen soils. The the Btg and Cg horizons of most pedons. Few to Yauhannah soils are on higher elevations than the common thin vertical streaks and pockets of light gray or Yemassee soils and are Udults. The Ogeechee and white sand or fine sand are in the Btg and Cg horizons Bladen soils are on lower elevations and are not aeric. of most pedons. Typical pedon of Yemassee loamy fine sand, about The A horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 2 to 5, and 3.5 miles southwest of Socastee on South Carolina chroma of 1 or 2. It is loamy fine sand. Primary Highway 544, about 1.5 miles northwest on dirt The E horizon has hue of I OYR, value of 5 or 6, and road, 200 feet southwest of the road; Map 86: chroma of 3 or 4. Some pedons have mottles in shades of gray or brown. The E horizon is loamy fine sand. A-0 to 7 inches; black (10YR 2/1) loamy fine sand; The Btg horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 5 or 6, and weak medium granular structure; very friable; chroma of 1 or 2, and mottles of higher chromai, or it common fine and medium roots; very strongly acid; may have mottles of high and low chroma. The Btg abrupt smooth boundary. horizon is dominantly sandy clay loam, but it ranges to E-7 to 14 inches; light yellowish brown (I OYR 6/4) clay loam in the lower part. loamy fine sand; few fine faint light brownish gray The BCg horizon has hue of 10YR, value of 6, and and strong brown mottles; weak medium subangular chroma of 1 or 2. It has mottles of higher chroma and, in blocky structure; very friable; few fine and medium some pedons, mottles of high and low chroma. The BCg roots; common fine and medium pores; very strongly horizon is dominantly sandy loam and has pockets and acid; clear smooth boundary. strata of finer and coarser textures. Horry County, South Carolina 83 The Cg horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 6, and 5/4) and common medium subangular blocky chroma. of 1 or 2. It has mottles that are of higher structure; friable; few distinct clay films on faces of chroma or that are white. Some pedons are coarsely peds; few fine pores; few thin lenses and strata of mottled with high or low chroma. The Cg horizon is sand; mildly alkaline; gradual smooth boundary. dominantly sand or loamy sand and has strata of finer BCg-40 to 52 inches; mottled light brownish gray (10YR textures, but it ranges to sandy loam or clay loam and 6/2) and gray (10YR 5/1) sandy loam; few medium has pockets and strata of finer and coarser textures. distinct yellowish brown (10YR 5/4) mottles; weak medium subangular blocky structure; friable; few fine Yonges Series pores; mildly alkaline; gradual smooth boundary. The Yonges series consists of poorly drained, Cg-52 to 68 inches; olive gray (5Y 5/2) sandy loam; moderately slowly permeable soils that formed in loamy massive; friable; common fragments of shell; Coastal Plain sediments on low, nearly level areas and moderately alkaline. along small streams and swamps on lower elevations. The thickness of the solum ranges from 40 to more Slope is dominantly less than 1 percent. These soils are fine-loamy, mixed, thermic Typic Ochraqualfs. than 60 inches. Reaction ranges from strongly acid to Yonges soils are geographically associated with the mildly alkaline in the A horizon, from strongly acid to Eulonia, Wahee, Meggett, Bladen, and Brookman soils. moderately alkaline in the upper part of the B horizon, The Eulonia and Wahee soils are on higher elevations and from slightly acid to moderately alkaline in the lower than the Yonges soils and are Ultisols. The Meggett and part of the B horizon and in the C horizon. Few pockets Bladen soils are on similar landscapes. The Meggett and or thin strata of clean sand are in the lower part of the B Bladen soils have a clayey control section. The horizon of most pedons. Fragments of shell range from Brookman soils are on slightly lower elevations and have few to common in the lower part of the B horizon and in an umbric epipedon. the C horizon of most pedons. Typical pedon of Yonges fine sandy loam, about 1.3 The Ap or A horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 3 or 4, miles west of Wampee on South Carolina Primary and chroma. of 1 or 2. It is fine sandy loam or loamy fine Highway 90, about 1.5 miles southeast on dirt road to sand. junction of dirt roads, about 1.1 miles southwest of The E horizon, where present, has hue of 10YR, value junction, 1,300 feet east on a narrow woods road, 200 of 5 or 6, and chroma of 2. It is loamy fine sand or fine feet south of road, in a cultivated field; Map 64: sandy loam. Ap-O to 8 inches; very dark grayish brown (10YR 3/2) The BA horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 4 or 5, and fine sandy loam; weak fine granular structure; very chroma of 1 or 2, with higher chroma mottles. It is sandy friable; few fine and medium roots; medium acid; loam, or fine sandy loam. clear smooth boundary. The Btg horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 4 to 6, and BA-8 to 16 inches; dark grayish brown (10YR 4/2) chroma of 1 or 2, with mottles in varying shades of finesandy loam; few medium distinct yellowish brown brown and gray. It may be mixed with varying shades of (10YR 5/4) mottles; weak medium subangular gray. Greenish gray coatings are on the faces of peds in blocky structure; friable; few fine roots; slightly acid; some pedons. It is sandy loam, sandy clay loam, or clay gradual wavy boundary. loam. Btg1-16 to 30 inches; gray (10YR 5/1) sandy loam; The BCg horizon has hue of 1 OYR, value of 4 to 7, common medium distinct yellowish brown (10YR and chroma. of 1 or 2, and has mottles in varying shades 5/6, 5/4) mottles; moderate medium subangular of brown, gray, or olive gray. It is sandy loam or loamy blocky structure; friable; few distinct clay films on sand. faces of peds; common fine pores; neutral; gradual The Cg horizon has hue of 10YR to 58G, value of 4 to wavy boundary. 7, and chroma of 1 or 2. Mottles in varying shades of Btg2-30 to 40 inches; gray (10YR 5/1) sandy clay brown or gray are in some pedons. The Cg horizon is loam; few medium distinct yellowish brown (10YR sandy loam, loamy sand, or sand. 85 Formation of the Solis In the paragraphs that follow, the factors of soil and Wahee soils. Other loamy soils that have siliceous formation are described and related to the soils in the mineralogy include the Chisolm, Hobcaw, Ogeechee, county. The processes of soil horizon differentiation are Yauhannah, and Yemassee soils. also described. The Talbot Terrace ranges from 25 to 42 feet above sea level. This terrace makes up about 20 percent of the Factors of Soil Formation county. It runs northwest from the Intracoastal Waterway to the Waccamaw River flood plains, from the North Soil is the natural medium for the growth of plants. It is Carolina State boundary to South Carolina Highway 544 the product of soil-forming processes acting on and takes in the communities of Brooksville, Wampee, accumulated geologic material. The five important and Nixonville. Northwest of the Waccamaw River and factors in soil formation are parent material, climate, adjacent to its flood plains is an area underlain by the living organisms (plants and animals), relief, and time. Talbot Terrace. The communities of Red Bluff, Shell, and Climate and living organisms are the active forces of Hickory Grove are in this area. The soils on this terrace soil formation. Their effect on the parent material is are generally similar to those on the Pamlico Terrace. modified by relief and by the length of time the parent The Penholoway Terrace ranges from 42 to 70 feet material has been in place. The relative importance of above sea level. This terrace makes up about 20 percent each factor differs from place to place. In some places, of the county. In Horry County, this terrace forms a a single factor exerts a dominant influence on the soil narrow band in the central part of the county and that is formed, but in general all five factors interact to adjacent to the upper Little Pee Dee River flood plains to determine the kind of soil that forms at any given place. the North Carolina State boundary. The communities of Although soil formation is complex, a clearer Longs, Aynor, and Causey are in this area. Lake Swamp understanding of the soil-forming processes may be is also in this area. The more common soils on this gained by considering each of the five factors separately. terrace are Pocomoke, Echaw, Centenary, and It must be remembered, however, that each of the five Kenansville soils. factors is affected by and also affects each of the The Wicomico Terrace ranges from about 70 to 100 others. feet above sea level, and the Sunderland Terrace from 100 to 170 feet above sea level. A small number of Parent Material remnant scarps more than 100 feet in elevation are also Parent material is the unconsolidated material in which present, but they are hard to recognize in the field. a soil forms. It determines the mineral and chemical These two terraces, which make up about 35 percent of composition of the soil. The parent materials in the soils the county, are in the upper northern part of the county. of Horry County are marine or fluvial deposits, which The communities of Loris, Bayboro, Finklea, and Floyd contain varying amounts of sand, silt, and clay (fig. 9). are in this area. Soils on this terrace are more highly All of the soils in the county were deposited or formed developed than those on the lower terraces, and they during the Pleistocene, or glacial, epoch. The terraces in have either siliceous or kaolinitic mineralogy. Some of Horry County, in sequence from the lowest to the highest the more common soils in this area include the Norfolk, elevations, are Pamlico, Talbot, Penholoway, Wicomico, Suffolk, Goldsboro, Lynchburg, and Woodington soils. and Sunderland Terraces (3). Climate The Pamlico Terrace ranges from sea level to 25 feet above sea level. This terrace makes up about 25 percent The climate in Horry County is temperate. Rainfall is of the county. It runs southeast from the Intercoastal well distributed throughout the year. The climate is fairly Waterway to the Atlantic Ocean and along the flood uniform throughout the county. Therefore, climate does plains of the Waccamaw River, Bull Creek, and the Little not account for significant differences among the soils. Pee Dee River. The soils on this terrace are younger Precipitation and temperature affect the physical, than most of the soils at the higher elevations. The chemical, and biological activity in the soil. The amount clayey soils have mixed minerology. Among the clayey of water that percolates through the soil depends on the soils on this terrace are the Bladen, Brookman, Meggett, amount of rainfall, the length of the frost-free season, 86 Soil Survey Ni;& A% 74MM Figure 9.-In some areas of Bladen fine sandy loam, sand suitable for mining is below a depth of 10 feet. relief, and the permeability of the soil material. Water weathering of minerals and the decomposing of organic dissolves minerals, aids chemical.and biological activity, matter. Larger plants alter the soil microclimate, furnish and transports the dissolved mineral and organic organic matter, and transfer chemical elements from the material through the soil profile. The abundant rainfall in subsoil to the surface soil. Horry County promotes leaching of soluble bases and Most of the fungi, bacteria, and other micro-organisms the translocation of less soluble, fine-textured soil are in the upper few inches of soil. The activity of material downward through the soil profile. earthworms and other small invertebrates is chiefly in the Warm, humid conditions, such as those in Horry A horizon and the upper part of the B horizon, where County, speed the weathering of the parent material and these organisms slowly and continuously mix the soil cause an increase in the growth and activity of living material. Bacteria and fungi decompose organic matter organisms. Thus, in Horry County, the high rainfall, warm and release nutrients for plant use. temperatures, and long frost-free season have directly Animals play a secondary role in soil formation, but affected the soils and the other soil-forming factors. their influence is great. Plant-eating animals help to Living Organisms return plant material to the soil. Burrowing animals help to mix and aerate the soil material. The kind and number of plants and animals that live in In Horry County, the native vegetation on the better and on the soil are determined mainly by the climate drained soils is mainly loblolly pine, longleaf pine, oak, and, to a lesser extent, by the parent material, relief, and and hickory. In the wetter areas, it is mainly sweetgum, age of the soil. blackgum, yellow-poplar, maple, ash, tupelo, and Bacteria, fungi, and other micro-organisms are cypress. Large trees influence soil formation by bringing indispensable in soil formation. They hasten the nutrients up from deep within the soil, by bringing soil Horry County, South Carolina 87 material up from varying depths when trees are blown Most soils have four major horizons, which are called over, and by providing large openings that are filled by the A, E, 6, and C horizons (6). These horizons can be material from above as large roots decay. subdivided by the use of subscripts and letters that Relief indicate changes within a horizon. An example is the Bt horizon, which represents a layer within the B horizon Relief influences soil formation because of its effect that has translocated clay. on moisture, temperature, and erosion. Because of The A horizon is the surface layer. The layer that has differences in relief, different kinds of soil can form from the largest accumulation of organic matter is called the. similar parent material. A horizon. If the soils have been cleared and plowed, the There are three general landscapes in Horry County plow layer is called the Ap horizon. Yemassee and that affect the formation of soils. These landscapes are Bladen soils, for example, have a distinctive, dark- described as follows: colored A or Ap horizon. 1. Nearly level to gently sloping areas that are The E horizon is the layer of maximum leaching, or moderately dissected by streams. The soils in eluviation, of clay and iron. The E horizon forms just these areas generally are well drained and deep. below the surface layer. Generally the E horizon is the 2. Broad, nearly level, slightly dissected areas lightest colored horizon in the soil. It is well expressed in between streams. Most of the soils are yellow to Chisolm and Blanton soils. gray in color, and many are distinctly mottled. The B horizon lies below the A and E horizon. It is They are deep and range from moderately well commonly called the subsoil. It is the horizon of drained to poorly drained. maximum accumulation, or illuviation, of clay and of iron, 3. Nearly level areas on stream bottoms and low aluminum, and other compounds. Norfolk, Yauhannah, terraces. The soils in these areas are young, are and Eulonia soils have a well expressed B horizon. predominantly gray, and have poorly defined The C horizon is below the B horizon. In some soils, genetic layers. however, there is no B horizon, and the C horizon lies directly below the A horizon. This is the case in the Time Newhan and Rutlege soils. The C horizon consists of The length of time required for a soil to develop material that is little altered by the soil-forming processes depends largely on the intensity of other soil-forming but that may be modified by weathering. factors. The soils in Horry County range from immature Well drained and moderately well drained soils in to mature. On the higher elevations on the uplands the Horry County have a yellowish brown or reddish subsoil. soils generally have well-developed horizons that [email protected] These colors are mainly caused by thin coatings of iron easily recognized. However, where the parent material is oxide on the sand, silt, and clay particles. A well drained very sandy, little horizonation has taken place; and soil does not have gray mottles, chroma of 2 or less, where the relief is very low and the soils are permanently within a depth of at least 30 inches. Among the well saturated, horizons are only moderately distinct. On the drained soils in this county are Norfolk, Suffolk, and first bottoms of streams, the soil material has not been Chisolm soils. Moderately well drained soils are wet for in place long enough for soil horizons to form. short periods and generally do not have gray mottles within a depth of about 15 to 20 inches. Yauhannah, Processes of Soil Horizon Differentiation Goldsboro, and Eulonia soils are moderately well drained soils. The differentiation of horizons is the result of many The reduction and transfer of iron is associated with soil-forming processes. These include the accumulation the wetter, more poorly drained soils. This process is of organic matter; the leaching of soluble salts; the called gleying. In poorly drained and very poorly drained reduction and translocation of iron; the formation of soil soils, such as the Bladen and Hobcaw soils, the subsoil structure; physical weathering, for example, freezing and and underlying material are gray or grayish. These colors thawing; and the chemical weathering of primary result from the reduction and transfer of iron. Somewhat minerals or rocks. poorly drained soils have yellowish brown and gray Some of these processes are continually taking place mottles, which indicate the segregation of iron. in all soils, but the number of active processes and the Yemassee and Wahee soils are among the somewhat degree of their activity vary from one soil to another. poorly drained soils in Horry County. 89 References (1) American Association of State Highway (and (3) Cooke, C. Wythe. 1936. Geology of the coastal plain Transportation) Officials. 1970. Standard of South Carolina. U.S. Dep. Interior, Geol. Surv. specifications for highway materials and methods of Bull. 867, 196 pp. sampling and testing. Ed. 10, 2 vol., illus. (4) United States Department of Agriculture. 1951. Soil (2) American Society for Testing and Materials. 1974. survey manual. U.S. Dep. Agric. Handb. 18, 503 pp., Method for classification of soils for engineering illus. purposes. ASTM Stand. D 2487-69. In 1974 Annual Book of ASTM Standards, Part 19, 464 pp., illus. (5) United States Department of Agriculture. 1975. Soil taxonomy: A basic system of soil classification for making and interpreting soil surveys. Soil Conserv. Serv., U.S. Dep. Agric. Handb. 436, 754 pp., illus. 91 Glossary Association, soil. A group of soils geographically Hard.-When dry, moderately resistant to pressure; associated in a characteristic repeating pattern and can be broken with difficulty between thumb and defined and delineated as a single map unit. forefinger. Available water capacity (available moisture Soft.-When dry, breaks into powder or individual capacity). The capacity of soils to hold water grains under very slight pressure. available for use by most plants. It is commonly Cemented.-Hard; little affected by moistening. defined as the difference between the amount of Control section. The part of the soil on which soil water at field moisture capacity and the amount classification is based. The thickness varies among at wilting point. It is commonly expressed as inches different kinds of soil, but for many it is that part of of water per inch of soil. The capacity, in inches, in the soil profile between depths of 10 inches and 40 a 60-inch profile or to a limiting layer is expressed or 80 inches. as- Corrosive. High risk of corrosion to uncoated steel or Inches deterioration of concrete. Very low ................................................................... 0 to 3Cover crop. A close-growing crop grown primarily to Low ........................................................................... 3 to 6improve and protect the soil between periods of Moderate ................................................................. 6 to 9 High ........................................................................ 9 to 12 regular crop production, or a crop grown between Very high .................................................... more than 12 trees and vines in orchards and vineyards. Base saturation. The degree to which material having Cutbanks cave (in tables). The walls of excavations cation-exchange properties is saturated with tend to cave in or slough. exchangeable bases (sum of Ca, Mg, Na, K), Deferred grazing. Postponing grazing or resting expressed as a percentage of the total cation- grazingland for a prescribed period. exchange capacity. Drainage class (natural). Refers to the frequency and Clay. As a soil separate, the mineral soil particles less duration of periods of saturation or partial saturation than 0.002 millimeter in diameter. As a soil textural during soil formation,, as opposed to altered class, soil material that is 40 percent or more clay, drainage, which is commonly the result of artificial less than 45 percent sand, and less than 40 percent drainage or irrigation but may be caused by the silt. sudden deepening of channels or the blocking of Clay film. A thin coating of oriented clay on the surface drainage outlets. Seven classes of natural soil of a soil aggregate or lining pores or root channels. drainage are recognized: Synonyms: clay coating, clay skin. Excessively drained.-Water is removed from the Consistence, soil. The feel of the soil and the ease with soil very rapidly, Excessively drained soils are which a lump can be crushed by the fingers. Terms commonly very coarse textured, rocky, or shallow. commonly used to describe consistence are- Some are steep. All are free of the mottling related Loose. -Noncoherent when dry or moist; does not to wetness. hold together in a mass. Somewhat excessively drained.-Water is removed Friable.-When moist, crushes easily under gentle from the soil rapidly. Many somewhat excessively pressure between thumb and forefinger and can be drained soils are sandy and rapidly pervious. Some pressed together into a lump. are shallow. Some are so steep that much of the Firm.-When moist, crushes under moderate water they receive is lost as runoff. All are free of pressure between thumb and forefinger, but the mottling related to wetness. resistance is distinctly noticeable. Well drained.-Water is removed from the soil Plastic.-When wet, readily deformed by moderate readily, but not rapidly. It is available to plants pressure but can be pressed into a lump; will form a throughout most of the growing season, and 11 wire" when rolled between thumb and forefinger. wetness does not inhibit growth of roots for Sticky-When wet, adheres to other material and significant periods during most growing seasons. tends to stretch somewhat and pull apart rather than Well drained soils are commonly medium textured. to pull free from other material. They are mainly free of mottling. 92 Soil Survey Moderately well drained-Water is removed from Fertility, soil. The quality that enables a soil to provide the soil somewhat slowly during some periods. plant nutrients, in adequate amounts and in proper Moderately well drained soils are wet for only a balance, for the growth of specified plants when short time during the growing season, but light, moisture, temperature, tilth, and other growth periodically they are wet long enough that most factors are favorable. mesophytic crops are affected. They commonly Flood plain. A nearly level alluvial plain that borders a have a slowly pervious layer within or directly below stream and is subject to flooding unless protected the solum, or periodically receive high rainfall, or artificially. both. Horizon, soil. A layer of soil, approximately parallel to Somewhat poorly drained. -Water is removed slowly the surface, having distinct characteristics produced enough that the soil is wet for significant periods by soil-forming processes. In the identification of soil during the growing season. Wetness markedly horizons, an upper case letter represents the major restricts the growth of mesophytic crops unless horizons. Numbers or lower case letters that follow artificial drainage is provided. Somewhat poorly represent subdivisions of the major horizons. An drained soils commonly have a slowly pervious explanation of the subdivisions is given in the Soil layer, a high water table, additional water from Survey Manual. The major horizons of mineral soil seepage, nearly continuous rainfall, or a combination are as follows: ofthese. 0 horizon.-An organic layer of fresh and decaying Poorly drained.-Water is removed so slowly that plant residue at the surface of a mineral soil. the soil is saturated periodically during'the growing A horizon.-The mineral horizon at or nearthe season or remains wet for long periods. Free water surface in which an accumulation of humified is commonly at or near the surface for long enough organic matter is mixed with the mineral material. during the growing season that most mesophytic Also, a plowed surface horizon, most of which was crops cannot be grown unless the soil is artificially originally part of a B horizon. drained. The soil is not continuously saturated in Ehorizon.-The mineral horizon in which the main layers directly below plow depth. Poor drainage feature is loss of silicate clay, iron, aluminum, or results from a high water table, a slowly pervious some combination of these. layer within the profile, seepage, nearly continuous B horizon.-The mineral horizon below an 0, A, or E rainfall, or a combination of these. horizon. The B horizon is, in part, a layer of Vely poorly drained. -Water is removed from the transition from the overlying horizon to the soil so slowly that free water remains at or on the underlying C horizon. The B horizon also has surface during most of the growing season. Unless distinctive characteristics, such as accumulation of the soil is artificially drained, most mesophytic crops clay, sesquioxides, humus, or a combination of cannot be grown. Very poorly drained soils are these; prismatic or blocky structure; redder or commonly level or depressed and are frequently browner colors than those in the A horizon; or a ponded. Yet, where rainfall is high and nearly combination of these. The combined A and B continuous, they can have moderate or high slope horizons are generally called the solum, or true soil. gradients. If a soil does not have a 8 horizon, the A horizon Drainage, surface. Runoff, or surface flow of water, alone is the solum. from an area. C horizon.-The mineral horizon or layer, excluding indurated bedrock, that is little affected by soil- Erosion. The wearing away of the land surface by water, forming processes and does not have the properties wind, ice, or ot-her geologic agents and by such typical of the A or B horizon. The material of a C processes as gravitational creep. horizon may be either like or unlike that in which the Erosion (geologic). Erosion caused by geologic solurn formed. If the material is known to differ from processes acting over long geologic periods and that in the solum, the Arabic numeral 2 precedes the resulting in the wearing away of mountains and the letter C. building up of such landscape features as flood Hydrologic soil groups. Refers to soils grouped plains and coastal plains. Synonym: natural erosion. according to their runoff-producing characteristics. Erosion (accelerated). Erosion much more rapid The chief consideration is the inherent capacity of than geologic erosion, mainly as a result of the soil bare of vegetation to permit infiltration. The activities of man or other animals or of a slope and the kind of plant cover are not considered catastrophe in nature, such as fire, that exposes the but are separate factors in predicting runoff. Soils surface. are assigned to four groups. In group A are soils Excess fines (in tables). Excess silt and clay are in the having a high infiltration rate when thoroughly wet soil. The soil is not a source of gravel or sand for and having a low runoff potential. They are mainly construction purposes. deep, well drained, and sandy or gravelly. In group Horry County, South Carolina 93 D, at the other extreme, are soils having a very slow Parent material. The unconsolidated organic and infiltration rate and thus a high runoff potential. They mineral material in which soil forms. have a claypan or clay layer at or near the surface, Ped. An individual natural soil aggregate, such as a have a permanent high water table, or are shallow granule, a prism, or a block. over nearly impervious bedrock or other material. A Pedon. The smallest volume that can be called "a soil." soil is assigned to two hydrologic groups if part of A pedon is three dimensional and large enough to the acreage is artificially drained and part is permit study of all horizons. Its area ranges from undrained. about 10 to 100 square feet (1 square meter to 10 Infiltration. The downward entry of water into the square meters), depending on the variability of the immediate surface of soil or other material, This soil. contrasts with percolation, which is movement of Percs slowly (in tables). The slow movement of water water through soil layers or material. through the soil adversely affects the specified use. Irrigation. Application of water to soils to assist in Permeability. The quality of the soil that enables water production of crops. A method of irrigation is- to move downward through the profile. Permeability Sprinkler. -Water is sprayed over the soil surface is measured as the number of inches per hour that through pipes or nozzles from a pressure system. water moves downward through the saturated soil. Liquid limit. The moisture content at which the soil Terms describing permeability are: passes from a plastic to a liquid state. Very slow .......................................... less than 0.06 inch Loam. Soil material that is 7 to 27 percent clay particles, Slow ........................................................ 0.06 to 0.2 inch 28 to 50 percent silt particles, and less than 52 Moderately slow ....................................... 0.2 to 0.6 inch Moderate ...................................... 0.6 inch to 2.0 inches percent sand particles. Moderately rapid .................................. 2.0 to 6.0 inches Low strength. The soil is not strong enough to support Rapid ...................................................... 6.0 to 20 inches loads. Very rapid ....................................... more than 20 inches Mineral soil. Soil that is mainly mineral material and low Phase, soil. A subdivision of a soil series based on in organic material. Its bulk density is more than that features that affect its use and management. For of organic soil. example, slope, stoniness, and thickness. Minimum tillage. Only the tillage essential to crop pH value. A numerical designation of acidity and production and prevention of soil damage. alkalinity in soil. (See Reaction, soil.) Miscellaneous area. An area that has little or no natural Piping (in tables). Subsurface tunnels or pipelike cavities soil and supports little or no vegetation. are formed by water moving through the soil. Morphology, soil. The physical makeup of the soil, Plasticity index. The numerical difference between the including the texture, structure, porosity, liquid limit and the plastic limit; the range of moisture consistence, color, and other physical, mineral, and content within which the soil remains plastic. biological properties of the various horizons, and the Plastic limit. The moisture content at which a soil thickness and arrangement of those horizons in the changes from semisolid to plastic. soil profile. Ponding. Standing water on soils in closed depressions. Mottling, soil. Irregular spots of different colors that vary Unless the soils are artificially drained, the water can in number and size. Mottling generally indicates poor be removed only by percolation or aeration and impeded drainage. Descriptive terms evapotranspiration. are as follows: abundance-few, common, and Productivity, soil. The capability of a soil for producing many, size-fine, medium, and coarse; and a specified plant or sequence of plants under contrast-faint, distinct, and prominent. The size specific management. measurements are of the diameter along the Profile, soil. A vertical section of the soil extending greatest dimension. Fine indicates less than 5 through all its horizons and into the parent material. millimeters (about 0.2 inch); medium, from 5 to 15 Reaction, soil. A measure of the acidity or alkalinity of a millimeters (about 0.2 to 0.6 inch); and coarse, more soil expressed in pH values. A soil that tests to pH than 15 millimeters (about 0.6 inch). 7.0 is described as precisely neutral in reaction Muck. Dark, finely divided, well decomposed organic soil because it is neither acid nor alkaline. The degree of material. (See Sapric soil material.) acidity or alkalinity is expressed as- Munsell notation. A designation of color by degrees of pH the three simple variables-hue, value, and chroma. Extremely acid .................................................. below 4.5 For example, a notation of 1 OYR 6/4 is a color of Very strongly acid ............................................ 4.5 to 5.0 10YR hue, value of 6, and chroma. of 4. Strongly acid ..................................................... 5.1 to 5.5 Neutral soil. A soil having a pH value between 6.6 and Medium acid ..................................................... 5.6 to 6.0 7.3. (See Reaction, soil.) Slightly acid ....................................................... 6.1 to 6.5 Neutral ............................................................... 6.6 to 7.3 Organic matter. Plant and animal residue in the soil in Mildly alkaline ................................................... 7.4 to 7.8 various stages of decomposition. Moderately alkaline .......................................... 7.9 to 8.4 94 Soil Survey Strongly alkaline ............................................... 8.5 to 9.0 climate and living matter acting on earthy parent Very strongly alkaline .............................. 9.1 and higher material, as conditioned by relief over periods of Relief. The elevations or inequalities of a land surface, time. considered collectively. Solum. The upper part of a soil profile, above the C Root zone. The part of the soil that can be penetrated horizon, in which the processes of soil formation are by plant roots. active. The solurn in soil consists of the A, E, and B Runoff. The precipitation discharged into stream horizons. Generally, the characteristics of the channels from an area. The water that flows off the material in these horizons are unlike those of the surface of the land without sinking into the soil is underlying material. The living roots and plant and called surface runoff. Water that enters the soil animal activities are largely confined to the solum. before reaching surface streams is called ground- Structure, soil. The arrangement of primary soil water runoff or seepage flow from ground water. particles into compound particles or aggregates. The Sand. As a soil separate, individual rock or mineral principal forms of soil structure are-platy fragments from 0.05 millimeter to 2.0 millimeters in (laminated), prismatic (vertical axis of aggmgates diameter. Most sand grains consist of quartz. As a longer than horizontal), columnar (prisms with soil textural class, a soil that is 85 percent or more rounded tops), blocky (angular or subangular), and sand and not more than 10 percent clay. granular. Structureless soils are either singile grained Sapric soil material (muck). The most highly (each grain by itself, as in dune sand) or massive decomposed of all organic soil material. Muck has (the particles adhering without any regular cleavage, the least amount of plant fiber, the highest bulk as in many hardpans). density, and the lowest water content at saturation Subsoil. Technically, the B horizon; roughly, the part of of all organic soil material. the solurn below plow depth. Seepage (in tables). The movement of water through the Substratum. The part of the soil below the solum. soil adversely affects the specified use. Subsurface layer. Technically, the A2 horizon. Generally Series, soil. A group of soils that have profiles that are refers to a leached horizon lighter in color and lower almost alike, except for differences in texture of the in organic matter content than the overlying surface surface layer or of the underlying material. All the layer. soils of a series have horizons that are similar in composition, thickness, and arrangement. Surface layer. The soil ordinarily moved in tillage, or its Shrink-swell. The shrinking of soil when dry and the equivalent in uncultivated soil, ranging in depth from swelling when wet. Shrinking and swelling can 4 to 10 inches (10 to 25 centimeters). Frequently damage roads, dams, building foundations, and designated as the "plow layer," or the "Ap horizon." other structures. It can also damage plant roots. Taxadjuncts. Soils that cannot be classified in a series Sift. As a soil separate, individual mineral particles that recognized in the classification system. Such soils range in diameter from the upper limit of clay (0.002 are named for a series they strongly resemble and millimeter) to the lower limit of very fine sand (0.05 are designated as taxadjuncts to that series millimeter). As a soil textural class, soil that is 80 because they differ in ways too small to be of percent or more silt and less than 12 percent clay. consequence in interpreting their use and behavior. Site index. A designation of the quality of a forest site Terrace (geologic). An old alluvial plain, ordinarily flat or based on the height of the dominant stand at an undulating, bordering a river, a lake, or the sea. arbitrarily chosen age. For example, if the average Texture, soil. The relative proportions of sand, silt, and height attained by dominant and codominant trees in clay particles in a mass of soil. The basic textural a fully stocked stand at the age of 50 years is 75 classes, in order of increasing proportion of fine feet, the site index is 75 feet. particles, are sand, loamy sand, sandy loam, loam, Slope. The inclination of the land surface from the sllt loam, silt, sandy clay loam, clay loam, sifty clay horizontal. Percentage of slope is the vertical loam, sandy clay, silty clay, and clay. The sand, distance divided by horizontal distance, then loamy sand, and sandy loam classes may be further multiplied by 100. Thus, a slope of 20 percent is a divided by specifying "coarse," "fine," or "very drop of 20 feet in 100 feet of horizontal distance. fine." Slow intake (in tables). The slow movement of water Topsoil. The upper part of the soil, which is the most into the soil. favorable material for plant growth. it is ordinarily Slow refill (in tables). The slow filling of ponds, resulting rich in organic matter and is used to topdress from restricted permeability in the soil. roadbanks, lawns, and land affected by mining. Soil. A natural, three-dimensional body at the earth's Upland (geology). Land at a higher elevation, in general, surface. It is capable of supporting plants and has than the alluvial plain or stream terrace; lend above properties resulting from the integrated effect of the lowlands along streams. 95 Tables 96 Soil Survey TABLE l.--TEMPERATURE AND PRECIPITATION [Recorded in the period 1951-78 at Conway, South Carolina) Temperature Precipitation 2 years in 2 years in 10 10 will have-- Aver-age will have-- -1 Average Month lAveragelAveragelAverage number oflAveragel 1 number oflAverage I daily I daily I I Maximum Minimum I growing I I Less I More Idays withl'3nowfall imaximumiminimuml litemperatureltemp;raturel degree I lthan--ithan--10 10 inchl' I I ghe I lower I days- I I I I I I I I bi r or more I I I th -- I -- I I I I I I an than I 0 F I OF I OF 0F 1 0F I Units I In In In In January ---- 56.8 33.7 45.3 79 16 92 3.67 2.13 5.03 8 .3 February --- 59.8 35.3 47.6 81 18 81 3.51 1.81 4.99 7 .8 March ------ 67.2 42.6 54.9 87 26 206 4.17 2.32 5.80 7 .1 April ------ 76.0 50.9 63.5 92 34 405 2.94 1.13 4.46 5 .0 May -------- 83.0 59.4 71.3 97 42 660 4.53 2.39 6.39 7 .0 June ------- 87.9 66.4 77.2 100 52 816 5.73 2.43 8.52 8 .0 July ------- 90.5 70.2 80.4 100 60 942 6.22 3.53 8.59 10 .0 August ----- 89.6 69.8 79.7 99 60 921 5.96 3.86 7.86 10 .0 September--I 84.8 1 64.6 1 74.7 1 96 1 49 1 741 1 5.36 1 2.88 1 7.53 1 7 1 .0 I I I I I I I I I I I October ---- 76.3 1 52.7 64.5 90 32 450 3.23 1.00 5.03 5 .0 I November --- 67.6 42.2 55.0 85 24 177 2.41 1.14 3.49 4 .0 December --- 59.3 35.5 47.4 79 18 90 3.33 1.66 4.77 6 .0 Yearly: Average--I 74.9 1 51.9 1 63.5 1 --- I --- I --- I --- I --- I --- I --- I I I I I I I I I I I I Extreme--I --- I --- I --- 1 10, 1 14 1 --- I --- I --- I --- I --- I I I I I I I Total ---- 11 51581 1 51 06 142.80 158.94 1 84 1 1.2 *A growing degree day is a unit of heat available for plant growth. It can be calculated by adding the maximum and minimum daily temperatures, dividing the sum ty 2, and subtracting the temperature below which growth is minimal for the principal crops in the area (50 F). Horry County, South Carolina 97 TABLE 2.--FREEZE DATES IN SPRING AND FALL [Recorded in the period 1951-78 at Conway, South Carolina] Temperature Probability 24' F 28' F 320 F or lower or lower or lower Last freezing temperature in spring: 1 year in 10 later than-- March 4 March 24 April 4 2 years in 10 later than-- February 24 March 17 March 29 5 years in 10 later than-- February 10 March 2 March 17 First freezing temperature in fall- 1 year in 10 earlier than-- November 24 November 3 October 30 2 years in 10 earlier than-- November 29 November 10 November 3 5 years in 10 earlier than-- December 11 November 22 November 11 TABLE 3.--GROWING SEASON [Recorded in the period 1951-78 at Conway, South Carolina] Length of growing season if daily minimum temperature is --- Probability Higher Higher Higher th8n thgn th8n 24 F 28 F 32 F @ s ay -as -s 9 years in 10 276 234 216 8 years in 10 285 244 224 5 years in 10 303 265 238 2 years in 10 321 286 252 1 year in 10 330 296 260 98 Soil Survey TABLE 4.--ACREAGE AND PROPORTIONATE EXTENT OF THE SOILS Map Soil name Acres IPercent symboll I I Bc Beaches ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1,540 0.2 Bd Bladen fine sandy loam ------------------------------------------------------------- 32,295 4.4 BnA Blanton sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes ------------------------------------------------ 13,815 1.9 Bo Bohicket silty clay loam ----------------------------------------------------------- 2,705 0.4 Br Brookman loam ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 4,490 0.6 Ce Centenary fine sand ---------------------------------------------------------------- 20,955 2.8 ChB Chisolm fine sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes ------------------------------------------- 10,475 1.4 Co Coxville fine sandy loam ----------------------------------------------------------- 6,600 0.9 DuA Duplin loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes -------------------------------------- 2,835 0.4 Ec Echaw sand ------------------------------------------------------------------------- 18,910 2.6 EmB Emporia loamy fine sand, 2 to 6 percent slopes ------------------------------------- 5,530 0.8 EuA Eulonia loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes ------------------------------------- 28,755 3.9 EuB Eulonia loamy fine sand, 2 to 6 percent slopes ------------------------------------- 2,795 0.4 GoA Goldsboro loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes ----------------------------------- 32,705 4.4 Ho Hobcaw fine sandy loam ------------------------------------------------------------- 11,615 1.6 Hy Hobonny muck ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 19,015 2.6 Jo Johnston loam ---------------------------------------------------------------------- 51,125 6.9 KeB Kenansville fine sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes --------------------------------------- 28,060 3.8 LaB Lakeland sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes ----------------------------------------------- 15,650 2.1 Le Leon fine sand --------------------------------------------------------------------- 33,975 4.6 Ln Lynchburg loamy fine sand ---------------------------------------------------------- 12,040 1.6 Ly Lynn Haven sand -------------------------------------------------------------------- 23,285 3.2 Me Meggett loam ----------------------------------------------------------------------- 34,330 4.7 NaB Nankin fine sandy loam, 2 to 6 percent slopes -------------------------------------- 3,025 0.4 NeA Nansemond loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes ---------------------------- ... _ 35,435 4.8 NhB Newhan fine sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes -------------------------------------------- 2,930 0.4 NoA Norfolk loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes ------------------------------------- 9,330 1.3 Og Ogeechee loamy fine sand ------------------------------------------------------ 35,350 4.8 Os Osier loamy sand ------------------------------------------------------------------- 4,380 0.6 Po Pocomoke fine sandy loam ----------------------------------------------------------- 38,220 5.2 RmB Rimini sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes ------------------------------------------------- 2,200 0.3 RU Rutlege loamy sand ------------------------------------------------------------------ 18,255 2.5 SfA Suffolk loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes ------------------------------------- 8,300 1.1 SfB Suffolk loamy fine sand, 2 to 6 percent slopes ------------------------------------- 2,360 0.3 SmA Summerton fine sandy loam, 0 to 2 percent slopes ----------------------------------- 1,195 0.2 Ud Udorthents and Udipsamments, well drained ------------------------------------------ 4,655 0.6 Wa Wahee fine sandy loam --------------------------------------------------------------- 15,430 2.1 We Witherbee sand --------------------------------------------------------------------- 4,395 0.6 Wo Woodington fine sandy loam --------------------------------------------------------- 40,735 5.5 YaA IYauhannah fine sandy loam, 0 to 2 percent slopes ----------------------------------- 41,155 5.6 Ye IYemassee loamy fine sand ----------------------------------------------------------- 15,885 2.2 Yo IYonges fine sandy loam ------------------------------------------------------------- 29 730 4.0 'Water ------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 9'535 1.3 Total ------------------------------------------------------------------------- 736,000 100.0 t Horry County, South Carolina 99 TABLE 5.--LAND CAPABILITY CLASSES AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE (Yields are those that can be expected under a high level of management. Absence of a yield indicates that the soil is not suited to the crop or the crop generally is not grown on the soil] I I I I Map symbol and I Land I i I i i 11 1 Improved soil name Icapabilityl Corn I Soybeans I Tobacco I Wheat I Oats lBabiagrass I bermuda- I I I I I I 1 1 grass I I BU Lu Lbs Bu Lu AUM- AUM- Bc** ------------ I VIIIw Beaches Bd -------------- Vw Bladen BnA ------------- HIS 60 25 2,000 6.5 8.0 Blanton 130 -------------- VIIIw Bohicket Br -------------- IIIw 80 35 60 9.0 Brookman Ce -------------- HIS 65 20 2,000 7.5 7.5 Centenary ChB ------------- Hs 100 30 2,400 50 8.0 10.0 Chisolm Co -------------- IIIw 110 40 50 70 Coxville DuA ------------- IN 110 50 2,800 60 Duplin Ec -------------- HIS 70 30 2,200 7.5 7.5 Echaw EmB ------------- Ile 100 30 2,900 50 Emporia EuA ------------- IN 100 40 2,600 75 9.5 9.5 Eulonia EuB ------------- Ile 90 35 2,500 70 9.0 10.0 Eulonia GoA ------------- IN 125 45 3,000 60 Goldsboro Ho -------------- VIw Hobcaw Hy -------------- VIIw Hobonny Jo -------------- VIIw Johnston KeB ------------- TIS 85 25 2,200 Kenansville LaB ------------- Ivs 55 20 1,700 20 7.0 7.0 Lakeland See footnote at end of table. 100 Soil Survey TABLE 5.--LAND CAPABILITY CLASSES AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE--Continued I - I Map symbol and I Land i i i i i i I Improved soil name Icapabilityl Corn I Soybeans I Tobacco I Wheat I Oats lBahiagrass I be:rmuda- g ass r I I I LU_ Lbs AUM- AUM- Le -------------- I IVw 50 7.5 Leon In -------------- IIW 115 45 2,800 75 10.0 Lynchburg Ly -------------- IVw 70 7.5 Lynn Haven Me -------------- VIW Meggett NaB ------------- IIe 75 30 2,200 7.0 9.0 Nankin NeA ------------- IIW 110 35 2,600 40 Nansemond NbB -------------- VIIIS Newhan NoA ------------- 1 110 40 3,000 60 Norfolk Og -------------- IIIw 100 45 9.0 Ogeechee Os -------------- Vw 5.0 Osier P0 -------------- VIW Pocomoke RmB ------------- VIS Rimini Ru -------------- VIW Rutlege SfA ------------- 1 115 30 2,600 40 Suffolk SfB ------------- Ile 110 30 2,200 40 Suffolk SmA ------------- 1 100 40 2,200 9.0 10.0 Summerton Ud -------------- VIIs Udorthents and Udipsamments Wa -------------- IIW 110 45 1,800 70 8.0 Wahee w --------------- II1w 70 25 2,200 30 30 10.0 10.0 Witherbee Wo -------------- IIIw 100 35 Woodington See footnote at end of table. Horry County, South Carolina 101 TABLE 5.--LAND CAPABILITY CLASSES AND YIELDS PER ACRE OF CROPS AND PASTURE--Continued Map symbol and Land Improved soil name Icapabilityl Corn I Soybeans I Tobacco I Wheat I Oats lBahiagrass Ibermuda- I I I I I I I I a I I I I grass [email protected] DIS BU Lun AUM* YaA ------------- IN 125 45 2,900 9.0 11.0 Yauhannah Ye -------------- IN 120 45 2,600 11.0 12.0 Yemassee Yo -------------- IIIw 110 40 12.0 Yonges Animal-unit-month: The amount of forage or feed required to feed one animal unit (one cow, one horse, one mule, five sheep, or five goats) for 30 days. See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the map unit. 102 Soil Survey TABLE 6.--CAPABILITY CLASSES AND SUBCLASSES [Miscellaneous areas are excluded. Absence of an entry indicates no acreage] IMajor anagement concerns Subc ass) Class I Tota I Soil Iacreage I Erosion I Wetness I problem (e) M (s) I Acres Acres Acres I 18,8251 --- I --- I --- I I I 11 1 236,4851 13,710 1 184,240 1 38,535 111 174,980, --- 121,300 53,680 IV 72,910, --- 57,260 15,650 V 1 36,6751 --- 1 36,675 1 --- VI 1 104,6201 --- 1 102,420 2,200 VII 1 70,1401 --- 1 70,140 1 --- VIII 1 7,1751 --- 1 4,245 1 2,930 Horry County, South Carolina 103 TABLE 7.--WOODLAND MANAGEMENT AND PRODUCTIVITY [Only the soils suitable for production of commercial trees are listed. Absence of an entry indicates that information was not available] Management concerns J Potential productivity_ Map symbol and 10rdi- i- I I I I i soil name Inatiorl Erosion 1Equipment ISeedling I Common trees I Site I Trees to plant isymboll hazard Ilimitationi mortalityl I index I Bd ----------------- I 2w ISlight ISevere ISevere ILoblolly pine ------- 1 94 ILoblolly pine, slash Bladen I I I I ISlash pine ---------- 1 91 1 pine, American I I I I ISweetgum ------------ 1 90 1 sycamore, water oak. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I BnA ---------------- I 3s ISlight IModerate IModerate Slash pine ---------- 1 90 ISlash pine, loblolly Blanton Loblolly pine ------- 80 pine. Longleaf pine ------- 70 IBluejack oak --------I -_ ITurkey oak ---------- I --- I ISoutbern red oak ---- I --- I ILive oak ------------ I --- I I I I Br ----------------- I 2w ISligbt ISevere ISevere Baldcypress --------- I --- Loblolly pine, slash Brookman Loblolly pine ------- 95 pine, sweetgum, Southern red oak ---- water tupelo. ISlash pine ---------- 1 95 1 ISweetgum. ------------1 100 1 lWhite oak -----------I --- I IYellow-poplar ------- I --- I I I I Ce ----------------- I 3s ISlight IModerate IModerate ISlash pine ---------- 1 85 ISlash pine, loblolly Centenary I I I I ILoblolly pine ------- 1 85 1 pine. I I I I ILongleaf pine ------- 1 72 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ChB ---------------- I 2s ISlight IModerate IModerate Loblolly pine ------- 1 90 ISlash pine, longleaf Chisolm I I I I ISlash pine ---------- 1 90 1 pine. I I I I ILongleaf pine ------- 1 78 1 ISouthern red oak ---- I --- I lHickory ------------- I --- I I I I Co ----------------- I 2w ISlight ISevere IModerate Loblolly pine ------- 1 90 ILoblolly pine. Coxville Longleaf pine ------- I --- I Sweetgum ------------ I Blackgum ------------ I Water oak -----------I lWillow oak ---------- I --- I lWater tupelo --------I --- I Elm ----------------- I --- I lHickory ------------- I --- I I I I DuA ---------------- I 2w ISlight IModerate IModerate Loblolly pine ------- 1 90 ILoblolly pine, slash Duplin I I I I Slash pine ---------- 1 90 1pine, yellow-poplar, I I I I Sweetgum ------------ I -- IAmerican sycamore, I I I I IBlackgum ------------ I Isweetgum. I I ISouthern red oak ---- I I I I lWhite oak -----------I --- I I I IYellow-poplar ------- 1 100 1 I I II I I I I I Ec ----------------- I 3s ISlight IModerate ISligbt ILongleaf pine ------- 1 68 ILongleaf pine, Echaw I I I I ILoblolly pine ------- 1 85 1 loblolly pine, slash I I I I ISlasb pine ---------- 1 80 1 pine, shortleaf pine. I I I I I I I EmB ---------------- I 3s ISlight ISlight IModerate ILoblolly pine 1 75 ILoblolly pine, &poria I I I I ISouthern red 70 1 sweetgum. I I I I I I I 104 Soil Survey TABLE 7.--WOODLAND MANAGEMENT AND PRODUCTIVITY--Continued Mana ement concerns Potential productivity Map symbol and 10rdi- i 7 1 1 i soil name Inationl Erosion 1Equipment I Seedling I Common trees I Site I Trees to plimt isymboll hazard 111 itationi mortalityl I index I I I I I I I I EuA, EuB ----------- I 2w ISlight IModerate IModerate Loblolly pine ------- 1 90 ILoblolly pine, slash Eulonia I I I Slash pine ---------- 1 88 1 pine, American I I Water oak ----------- 1 90 1 sycamore, sweetgum, I I Sweetgum ------------ 1 90 1 yellow-poplar. I I I IBlackgum ------------ I I I I I ISouthern red oak ---- I I I I I ILongleaf pine ------- 1 85 1 1 1 1 lHickory ------------- I --- I I I I i I I GoA ---------------- I 2w ISTight IModerate ISlight Loblolly pine ------- 1 90 ILoblolly pine, slash Goldsboro I I I I Slash pine ---------- 93 1 pine, yellow-poplar, I I I I ILongleaf pine ------- 1 77 1 American sycamore, I I I I ISweetgum ------------ 1 90 1 sweetgum. I I I I ISouthern red oak ---- I -- I I I I I lWhite oak ----------- I --- I I I I I I I I Ho ----------------- I 4w ISlight ISevere ISevere Baldcypress --------- --- fWater tupelo, Hobcaw I I Sweetgum ------------ --- I sweetgum. I I IBlackgum ------------ I --- I I I lWater oak ----------- I --- I I I ISwamp tupelo -------- I --- I I I lWater tupelo -------- I --- I I I I I I J0 ----------------- I 4w ISlight ISevere ISevere Water tupelo -------- I --- lBaldcypress, American Johnston I ISwamp tupelo -------- I --- I sycamore, sweetgum, I lWater oak ----------- I --- I green ash. I IPond pine ----------- I --- I I I I I lBaldcypress --------- I --- I I I I I I I I KeB ------------- 7- 1 3s ISlight IModerate IModerate ILoblolly pine ------- 1 80 ILoblolly pine.. Kenansville I I I I iLongleaf pine ------- 1 65 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 LaB ---------------- I 4s ISlight. IModerate IModerate Slash pine ---------- 1 75 ISlash pine, Lakeland I I I I Loblolly pine ------- 1 75 1 longleaf pine. I I I I ILongleaf pine ------- 1 60 1 1 1 1 1 ITurkey oak ---------- I --- I I I IBlackjack oak ------- I --- I I I IPost oak ------------ I --- I I I I I I Le ----------------- I 4w ISlight IModerate IModerate ISlash pine ---------- 1 70 ISlash pine. Leon I I I I ILongleaf pine ------- 1 65 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 In ----------------- I 2w ISlight IModerate ISlight Slash pine ---------- 91 Slash pine, loblolly Lynchburg I I I I I Loblolly pine ------- 86 pine, American Longleaf pine ------- 74 sycamore, sweetgum. Yellow-poplar ------- 92 ISweetgum ------------ 1 90 ISouthern red oak ---- I --- I I I I lWhite oak ------------ I --- I I I I I IBlackgum ------------ I --- I I I I I I I I Ly ----------------- I 3w ISlight IModerate IModerate ISlash pine ---------- 1 90 ISlash pine, loblolly Lynn Haven I I I I ILoblolly pine ------- 1 80 1 pine. I I I I ILongleaf pine ------- 1 70 1 IPond pine ----------- 1 70 1 Me ----------------- I lw ISlight ISevere ISevere iSlash pine ---------- 1 100 ISlash pine, loblolly Meggett I ILoblolly pine ------- 100 1 pine. I IPond pine ----------- 1 75 1 Horry County, South Carolina 105 TABLE 7.--WOODLAND MANAGEMENT AND PRODUCTIVITY--Continued Management concerns Potential productivi-ty Map symbol and 10rdi- I I I I soil name InationI Erosion IEquipment I Seedling I Common trees I Site I Trees to plant Isymboll hazard Ilimitationi mortalityl I index I I I I NaB ---------------- I 3o ISlight ISlight ISlight ILoblolly pine -------1 80 ILoblolly pine, slash Nankin I I I I ISlash pine ----------1 80 1 pine. I I I I ILongleaf pine -------1 70 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 NeA ---------------- I 2s ISlight IModerate IModerate Loblolly pine ------- 88 ILoblolly pine, yellow- Nansemond I I I I ISweetgum ------------1 90 1 poplarr black walnut, I I I I IShortleaf pine ------1 77 1 sweetgum. I I I I IYellow-poplar -------1 90 1 1 1 1 1 IWhite oak -----------I -- I I I I I I I I NoA ---------------- I 2o ISlight ISlight ISlight ILoblolly pine -------1 86 ISlash pine, loblolly Norfolk I I I I ILongleaf pine -------1 68 1 pine. I I I I ISlash pine ----------1 86 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Og ----------------- I 2w ISlight ISevere IModerate ILoblolly pine -------1 90 ILoblolly pine, slash Ogeechee I I I I ISlash pine ----------1 90 1 pine, sweetgum. I I I I IPond pine -----------1 70 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Os ----------------- I 3w ISlight ISevere ISevere ISlash pine ----------1 85 ISlash pine, loblolly Osier I I I I ILoblolly pine -------1 87 1 pine. I I I I ILongleaf pine -------1 69 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Po ----------------- I 2w ISlight ISevere ISevere ILoblolly pine -------1 90 ILoblolly pine, Pocomoke I I I I IPin oak -------------1 85 1 sweetgum. I I I ISweetgum ------------1 90 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 RmB ---------------- 1 5S ISligbt ISevere ISevere ILoblolly pine -------1 65 ISlash pine, longleaf Rimini I I I I ISlash pine ----------1 65 1 piner sand pine. I I I I ILongleaf pine -------1 55 1 I I I I I I I Ru ----------------- I 4w ISligbt ISevere iSevere ISweetgum ------------1 90 IBaldcypress. Rutlege I I I I IPin Oak -------------1 85 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 SfA, SfB ----------- I 3s ISlight ISlight IModerate Loblolly pine ------- 82 Loblolly pine. Suffolk I I I I Shortleaf pine ------ 72 1 1 1 1 1 ISouthern red oak ----1 70 1 1 1 1 1 ILoblolly pine -------1 82 1 1 1 1 1 IShortleaf pine ------1 72 1 1 1 1 1 ISouthern red oak ----1 70 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 SmA ---------------- I 3o ISlight ISlight ISlight ILoblolly pine -------1 80 ILoblolly pine, slash Summerton I I I I ISlash pine ----------1 80 1 pine. I I I I ILongleaf pine -------1 65 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Wa ----------------- I 2w ISlight IModerate IModerate Loblolly pine ------- 1 86 iLoblolly pine, slash Wahee Slash pine ---------- 1 86 1pine, sweetgum, Sweetgum ------------1 _90 1American sycamore, Blackgum ------------I -_ Iwater oak. IWater oak -----------I --- I ISwamp chestnut oak--I --- I IWillow oak ----------I --- I ISouthern red oak ----I --- I I I I We ----------------- I 2w ISlight IModerate ISlight Longleaf pine ------- 1 72 ILoblolly pine, Witherbee I I I I ILoblolly pine -------1 90 1longleaf pine, slash ISlash pine ----------1 90 1pine, shortleaf pine. IWater oak -----------I -- I IPost oak ------------I --- I 106 Soil Survey TABLE 7.--WOODLAND MANAGEMENT AND PRODUCTIVITY--Continued Management concerns I Potential productivity Map symbol and 10rdi- i I I I I soil name Inationi Erosion 1Equipment I Seedling I Common trees I Site I Trees to plant Isymboll hazard Ilimitationl mortalityl I index I Wo ----------------- I 3w ISlight ISevere ISevere Slash pine ---------- I --- Slash pine, loblolly Woodington I I I I Loblolly pine ------- 83 1pine, American I I I I I --- I ISweetgum ------------ I sycamore, water I I I lWhite oak ----------- --- Itupelo, water oak, I I I ISouthern red oak ---- I --- Isweetgum. I I I lWater tupelo --------I --- I I I I I I I YaA ---------------- I 2w ISlight IModerate ISlight Loblolly pine ------- 90 Loblolly pine, slash Yauhannah I I I I I Slash pine ---------- 90 1pine, yellow-poplar, I I I I Sweetgun. ------------ 90 sweetgum, American I I I I ISouthern red oak ---- 1 80 1sycamore. I I I I lWhite oak ----------- 1 80 1 1 1 1 1 IYellow-poplar ------- 1 100 1 I I I I ILongleaf pine ------- 80 Ye ----------------- I 2w ISlight IModerate ISlight Loblolly pine ------- 90 iSlash pine, loblolly Yemassee I I I I Slash pine ---------- 88 pine, American I I I I Sweetgum ------------ 95 sycamore, yellow- I I I I Southern red oak ---- poplar. I I I I White oak ----------- I I I I IYellow-poplar ------- 1 100 1 I I I I ILongleaf pine ------- 1 80 1 I I I I IBlackgum ------------ I --- I I I I I lHickory ------------- Yo ----------------- I lw ISlight ISevere ISevere ILoblolly pine ------- 1 105 ILoblolly pine, slash Yonges I I I I ISweetgum ------------ 1 100 1pine, sweetgLot, I I I I lWater oak ----------- 1 100 1American sycamore, water tupelo. See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the map unit. Horry County, South Carolina 107 TABLE B.-RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (Some terms that describe restrictive soil features are defined in the Glossary. See text for definitions of "slight," "moderate," and "severe." Absence of an entry indicates that the soil was not rated] Map symbol and Camp areas Picnic areas Playgrounds IPaths and trailsl Golf fairways soil name Bc. Beaches Bd -------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Bladen I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I I I I I BnA ------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Blanton I too sandy. I too sandy. I too sandy. I too sandy. I droughty. I I I I I Bo -------------------- ISevere: ISevere- ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: Bohicket I flooding, ponding I [email protected], ponding, excess salt, I ponding, excess ;alt I flooding. Iflooding. Iexcess sulfur, I percs slowly. I flooding. I I I ponding. I I I I I Br -------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Brookman wetness. wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I I I Ce -------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Centenary I too sandy. I too sandy. I too sandy. I too sandy. I droughty. I I I I I ChB ------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IModerate: Chisolm too sandy. I too sandy. I too sandy. I too sandy. I droughty. I I I I Co -------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Coxville wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I I I I DuA ------------------- IModerate: IModerate- IModerate- ISlight ---------- ISlight. I I Duplin I wetness, I wetness* I wetness, I percs slowly. I percs slowly. I percs slowly. I I I I I I I Ec -------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IModerate: Echaw I too sandy. I too sandy. I too sandy. I too sandy. I droughty. I I I I I EmB ------------------- IModerate: IModerate- IModerate- ISlight ---------- IModerate: Emporia I percs slowly. I percs slowly. I slope, I I droughty. I I I percs slowly. I I I I I I I EuA ------------------- IModerate: IModerate- IModerate- IModerate: IModerate: Eulonia I percs slowly, I wetness; I percs siowly, I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I percs slowly. I wetness. I I I I I EuB ------------------- IModerate: IModerate- IModerate- IModerate: IModerate: Eulonia I percs slowly, I wetness; I slope, I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I percs slowly. I wetness, I I I percs slowly. I I I I I GoA ------------------- IModerate: IModerate: IModerate: ISlight ---------- ISlight. Goldsboro I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I I I I I I I Ho -------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Hobcaw I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I I I I I See footnote at end of table. 108 Soil Survey TABLE 8.--RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT--Continued Map symbol and Camp areas Picnic areas Playgrounds IPaths and trailsi Golf fairways soil name I I I I Hy -------------------- ISevere- ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere- Hobonny I flooding, I flooding, I ponding, I ponding I pondi* I I I flooding, I excess 'umus. I flo ngr I ponding, I ponding ' I I h I oding, I excess humus. I excess humus. Iexcess humus. I I excess humus. Jo -------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Johnston I flooding, I ponding. I ponding, I ponding. I ponding, I ponding. I I flooding. I I flooding. I I I I I KeB ------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IModerate: Kenansville I too sandy. I too sandy. too sandy. I too sandy. I droughty. I I I I LaB ------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IModerate: Lakeland I too sandy. I too sandy. too sandy. too sandy. I droughty, I I I too sandy. I I I Le -------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Leon I wetness, I wetness, too sandy, I wetness, I wetness, too sandy. I too sandy. wetness. I too sandy. I droughty. Ln -------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Lynchburg wetness. I wetness. wetness. wetness. wetness. I LY -------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Lynn Haven wetness, I wetness, I too sandy, I wetness, I wetness, too sandy. I too sandy. I wetness. I too sandy. I droughty. I I I I Me -------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Meggett I flooding, wetness. I wetness, I wetness. I wetness, wetness. flooding. I I flooding. NaB ------------------- IModerate: IModerate- IModerate: ISlight ---------- ISlight. Nankin I percs slowly. I percs siowly. I slope, I I I I I percs slowly. I I I I I I I NeA ------------------- IModerate: IModerate: IModerate: IModerate: IModerate: Nansemond I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness, I I I I I droughty. I I I I I NhB, ------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Newhan I too sandy. I too sandy. I too sandy. I too sandy. I droughty. I I I I I NoA ------------------- IModerate: IModerate- IModerate: ISlight ---------- ISlight. Norfolk I percs slowly. I percs siowly. I percs slowly. I I I I I I I Og -------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Ogeechee I wetness. wetness. wetness. wetness. wetness. I Os -------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Osier I flooding, I wetness. I wetness, I wetness. I wetness, I wetness. flooding. droughty, I flooding. I Po -------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Pocomoke wetness. I wetness. wetness. I wetness. wetness. I I RmB ------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Rimini I too sandy. I too sandy. I too sandy. I too sandy. I droughty., I I I I I Ru -------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Rutlege I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I I I I I See footnote at end of table. Horry County, South Carolina 109 TABLE 8.--RECREATIONAL DEVELOPMENT--Continued Map symbol and Camp areas Picnic areas Playgrounds IPaths and trailsl Golf fairways soil name I I SfA ------------------- ISlight ---------- ISlight ---------- ISlight ---------- ISlight ---------- IModerate: Suffolk I I I I I droughty. I I I I I SfB ------------------- ISlight ---------- ISlight ---------- IModerate: ISlight ---------- IModerate: Suffolk I I I slope. I I droughty. I I I I I SmA ------------------- IModerate: IModerate- IModerate: ISlight ---------- ISlight. Summerton Ipercs slowly. Ipercs slowly. Ipercs slowly. I I Ud.* Udorthents Udipsamments Wa -------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Wahee I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I I I I I We -------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Witherbee I wetness, I too sandy. I too sandy, I too sandy. I droughty. too sandy. I I wetness. I I I I I I Wo -------------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Woodington I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I I I I I YaA ------------------- IModerate: IModerate: IModerate: IModerate: IModerate: Yauhannah wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I I I I Ye -------------------- ISevere: IModerate: ISevere: IModerate: IModerate: Yemassee I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I I I I I Yo -------------------- iSevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Yonges I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I I I I I See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the map unit. 110 Soil Survey TABLE 9.--WILDLIFE HABITAT [See text for definitions of "good," "fair," "poor," and "very poor." Absence of an entry indicates that the soil was not rated] Potential for habitat elemen I ts Potential as habitat or- Map symbol and I I I Wild ' I I I I I I soil name Grain lGrasses I herba- lHardwroodl Conif- Wetland IShallow 10penlandilWoodlandIWetland la dl and i ceous I tree I erous plants I w lwildlifelwildlifelwildlife nd see ater crops lants I plants !legumes areas Bc.* Beaches Bd ----------------- IPoor lFair lFair lFair lFair lGood lGood lFair lFair lGood. Bladen I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I BnA ---------------- IPoor lFair lFair lFair lFair lVery lVery lFair lFair lVery Blanton I I I I I I poor. I poor. I I I poor. I I I I I I I I I I Bo ----------------- lVery lVery lVery lVery lVery lGood lGood lVery lVery lGood. Bohicket I poor. I poor. I poor. I poor. I poor. I I I poor. I poor. I I I I I I I I I I I Br ----------------- lFair lFair lFair lFair lFair lFair lFair lFair lFair lFair. Brookman I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Ce ----------------- IPoor lFair lFair IPoor lFair lVery lVery lFair lFair lVery Centenary I I I I I I poor. I poor. I I I poor. I I I I I I I I I I ChB ---------------- lGood lGood lGood lGood lGood lVery lVery lGood lGood I'Very Chisolm I I I I I I poor. I poor. I I I poor. I I I I I I I I I I Co ----------------- lGood lGood lGood lGood lGood IPoor lFair lGood lGood 11loor. Coxville I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I DuA ---------------- lGood lGood lGood lGood iGood IPoor IPoor lGood lGood IF'oor. Duplin I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Ec ----------------- IPoor lFair lGood lFair lFair IPoor lVery lFair lFair lVery Echaw I I I I I I I poor. I I I poor. I I I I I I I I I I EmB ---------------- lGood lGood iGood lGood lGood IPoor lVery lGood lGood lVery Emporia I I I I I I I poor. I I I poor. I I I I I I I I I I EuA, EuB ----------- lGood lGood lGood lGood lGood IPoor IPoor lGood lGood 11loor. Eulonia I I I I I I I I GoA ---------------- lGood lGood iGood lGood lGood IPoor IPoor iGood lGood 11loor. Goldsboro I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Ho ----------------- lVery lVery lVery lFair lFair lGood lGood lVery lFair lGood. Hobcaw I poor. I poor. I poor. I I I I I poor. I I I I I I I I Hy ----------------- lVery lVery lVery lVery lVery lGood lGood lVery lVery lGood. Hobonny I poor. I poor. I poor. I poor. I poor. I I I poor. I poor. I I I I I I I I I I I Jo ----------------- lVery IPoor IPoor IPoor IPoor lGood lGood IPoor IPoor lGood. Johnston I poor. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I KeB ---------------- lGood lGood lGood lGood lGood IPoor lVery lGood lGood 11fery Kenansville I I I I I I I poor. I I I poor. I I I I I I I I I I LaB ---------------- IPoor lFair lFair IPoor lFair lVery lVery lFair lFair 11fery Lakeland I I I I I I poor. I poor. I I I poor. I I I I I I I I I I Le ----------------- IPoor lFair lGood iPoor lFair lFair IPoor lFair lFair Illoor. Leon I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I See footnote at end of table. Horry County, South Carolina TABLE 9.--WIIDLIFE HABITAT--Continued Potential for habitat elements tential as habitat [email protected] mbol and Wild Map sy soil name Grain lGrasses I herba- lHardwood Conif- lWetland Shallow 10penlandIWoodlandiWetland iand seedl and l ceous I trees erous I plants I water lwildlifelwildlifelwildlife I I I I IlegMes I I _plants areas cr02s I I plants I I lin ----------------- lFair lGood lGood lGood lGood lFair lFair lGood lGood lFair. Lynchburg I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Ly ------------------ 1,Poor lFair lFair IPoor IPoor lFair lFair lFair IPoor lFair. Lynn Haven I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Me ----------------- IPoor lFair lFair lFair lGood lGood lGood lFair lGood lGood. Meggett I I I I I I I I I I I I I I NaB ---------------- lGood lGood lGood lGood lGood IPoor lVery lGood lGood lVery Nankin I I I I I I I poor. I I I poor. I I I I I I I I I I NeA ---------------- IPoor lFair lGood lGood lGood IPoor IPoor lFair lGood IPoor. Nansemond NhB ---------------- lVery IPoor IPoor lVery lVery lVery lVery 1poor lVery lVery Newhan I poor. I I I poor. I poor. I poor. I poor. I I poor. I poor. I I I I I I I I I I NoA ---------------- lGood lGood lGood lGood lGood IPoor lVery lGood lGood lVery Norfolk I I I I I I I poor. I I I poor. I I i I I I I I I i Og ----------------- IPoor lFair lFair lFair lFair lGood lGood lFair lFair lGood. Ogeechee I I I I I I Os ----------------- lVery IPoor lFair iFair lFair lFair lGood IPoor lFair lFair. Osier I poor. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I PO ----------------- lVery IPoor IPoor IPoor IPoor lGood lFair IPoor IPoor lGood. Pocomoke I poor. I I I I I I I I I I I RmB ---------------- lVery lVery IPoor IPoor IPoor lVery lVery lVery IPoor lVery Rimini I poor. I poor. I I I I poor. I poor. I poor. I I poor. I I I I I I I I I I Ru ----------------- lVery IPoor IPoor IPoor IPoor lFair lGood IPoor IPoor lFair. Rutlege I poor. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I SfA, SfB ----------- IPoor lFair lGood lGood lGood IPoor lVery lFair lGood lVery Suffolk poor. poor. SmA ---------------- lGood lGood lGood lGood lGood lVery lVery lGood lGood lVery Summerton poor. I poor. poor. Ud*: Udorthents. Udipsamments. Wa ----------------- lGood lGood lGood lGood lGood IPoor IPoor lGood lGood IPoor. Wahee I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I We ----------------- IPoor lFair lFair lFair lFair lFair lVery lFair lFair IPoor. Witherbee I I I I I I I poor. I I I I I I I I I WO ----------------- lGood iGood lGood lGood lGood IPoor IPoor lGood lGood IPoor. Woodington I I I I I I I I I I I I YaA ---------------- lGood lGood lGood lGood lGood IPoor IPoor lGood lGood IPoor. Yauhannah I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I See footnote at end of table. 112 Soil Survey TABLE 9.--WILDLIFE HABITAT--Continued Potential for-habitat elements IlPoteRial as habita'F-To-r- Map symbol and 7 soil name Grain lGrasses Iherb - lHardwoodl Conif- lWetland Shallow OpenlandIWoodlandiWitland I I I I I I ? land seedl and ceo S trees erous plants water wildlifelwildlifelwildlife Icrops Ilegumes I plants I I plants I I areas I I I I I I Ye ----------------- lFair lGood lGood lGood lGood lFair lFair lGood lGood lFair. Yemassee I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Yo ----------------- lFair lFair lFair lGood lGood lFair lFair lFair lGood lFair. Yonges I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the map unit. d a u Horry County, South Carolina 113 TABLE 10.--BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT [Some terms that describe restrictive soil features are defined in the Glossary. See text for definitions of "slight," "moderate," and "severe," Absence of an entry indicates that the soil was not rated. The information in this table indicates the dominant soil condition but does not eliminate the need for onsite investigation] Map symbol and Shallow Dwellings Dwellings Small Local roads Lawns and soil name with landscaping excavations without commercial and streets basements basements buildings Bc.* Beaches Bd ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere- Bladen I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I low strength, I pondin*g. I I I I I ponding. I I I I I I I BnA --------------- ISevere: ISlight --------- IModerate: ISlight --------- ISlight --------- ISevere: Blanton I cuthanks cave.1 I wetness. I I I droughty. I I I I I I Bo ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere* ISevere- ISevere- ISevere: Bohicket I ponding. I flooding, I flooding I flooding, I low sirength, 1, excess salt, I I I I I excess sulfur, I I ponding, ponding, ponding, I ponding, I ponding. shrink-swell. Ishrink-swell. I shrink-swell. 1 flooding. I I I I I Br ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere- Brookman I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I low strength, I wetneLs. I I I I I wetness. I I I I I I I Ce ---------------- ISevere: ISlight --------- IModerate: ISlight --------- ISlight --------- ISevere: Centenary I cuthanks cave,1 I wetness. I I I droughty. wetness. I I ChB --------------- ISevere: ISlight --------- IModerate: ISlight --------- ISlight --------- IModerate: Chisolm I cutbanks cave.1 I wetness. droughty. I I I Co ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere- Coxville I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I low strength, I wetnes's. I I I I I wetness. I I I I I I I DuA --------------- ISevere: IModerate: ISevere- lModerate: ISevere- ISlight. Duplin I wetness. I wetness, I wetne;s. I wetness, I low sirength. I I I shrink-swell. I I shrink-swell. I I I I I I I I Ec ---------------- ISevere: ISlight --------- IModerate: ISlight --------- ISlight ------- I-IModerate: Echaw cutbanks cave.1 wetness. droughty. I EmB --------------- IModerate: ISlight --------- IModerate: IModerate: IModerate: IModerate- Emporia I wetness. I I wetness, i slope. I low strength. droughty*_ I I I shrink-swell. I I I I I I I EuA --------------- ISevere: IModerate: ISevere: IModerate: IModerate: IModerate- Eulonia I wetness. I wetness. wetness. wetness. low strength, I wetness: wetness. EuB --------------- ISevere: IModerate: ISevere: IModerate: IModerate: IModerate- Eulonia I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness, I low strength, I wetness'. I I I I slope. I wetness. I I I I I I I GoA --------------- ISevere: IModerate: ISevere: IModerate- IModerate: ISlight. Goldsboro I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I I I I I I I See footnote at end of table. 114 Soil Survey TABLE 1O.--BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT--Continued ow Dwellings Dwellings Small Map symbol and Shall Local roads Lawns and soil name excavations without with commercial and streets landscaping basements basements buildings Ho ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Hobcaw I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I I I I I I Hy ---------------- ISevere: ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere- ISevere: Hobonny I excess humus, I flooding I flooding, I flooding, I pondin*g, I ponding, I ponding. I low strength, low strength, I low strength, I flooding. I flooding, I I I I ponding. I I excess humus. I I ponding. I ponding. I I I Jo ---------------- ISevere: ISevere- 'Severe: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Johnston I cuthanks cave,1 flooding , 1 flooding, I flooding, I ponding, I ponding, I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I flooding. I flooding. I I I I I I KeB --------------- ISevere: ISlight --------- 'Moderate: ISlight --------- ISlight --------- IModerate: Kenansville I cuthanks cave.1 I wetness. droughty. I I I LaB --------------- ISevere: ISlight --------- ISlight --------- ISlight --------- ISlight --------- IModerate: Lakeland I cuthanks cave.1 I I I I droughty, I I I I too sandy. I I I I Le ---------------- ISevere: ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Leon I cuthanks cave,1 wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness, I wetness. I I I I I droughty. I I I I I I Ln ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: fSevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Lynchburg I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I I I I I I LY ---------------- ISevere: ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Lynn Haven I cutbanks cave,1 wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness, I wetness. I I I I I droughty. I I I I I I Me ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere- ISevere: ISevere- ISevere: Meggett wetness, flooding, flooding floodingi shrini-swell, wetness, too clayey. wetness, wetness wetness , wetness, floo':)ding. shrink-swell. shrink-s'well. Ishrink-swell. I flooding. I I NaB --- f ------------ IModerate: ISlight --------- ISlight --------- IModerate: ISlight --------- [email protected] Nankin I too clayey. I I I slope. I I I I I I NeA --------------- ISevere: IModerate- ISevere: IModerate: IModerate: IModerate: Nansemond I wetness, I wetness* I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness, I cutbanks cave.1 I I I I droughty. I I I I I I NhB --------------- ISevere: ISlight --------- ISlight --------- ISlight --------- ISlight --------- ISevere: Newhan I cuthanks cave.1 I I I I droughty. I I I I I I NoA --------------- IModerate: ISlight --------- (Moderate: ISlight --------- (Slight --------- ISlight. Norfolk wetness. wetness. Og ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Ogeechee I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I I I I I I Os ---------------- ISevere: ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Osier I cuthanks cave,1 flooding , I flooding I flooding, I flooding, I wetness, I wetness. I wetness. I wetness.' I wetness. I wetness. I droughty, I I I flooding. I I I Po ---------------- ISevere: ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Pocomoke I cutbanks cave,1 wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. wetness. I I I I I See footnote at end of table. Horry County, South Carolina 115 TABLE 10.--BUILDING SITE DEVELOPMENT--Continued Map symbol and Shallow Dwellings Dwellings Small Local roads Lawns and soil name I with I excavations without commercial and streets landscaping basements basements buildings RmB --------------- ISevere: ISlight --------- ISlight --------- ISlight --------- ISlight --------- Severe: Rimini I cutbanks cave.1 I I I I droughty. I I I I I I Ru ----------------- ISevere: ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Rutlege I cuthanks cave,1 pondin*g. I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I ponding. I I I I I I I I I I I SfA --------------- ISevere: ISlight --------- ISlight --------- ISlight --------- ISlight --------- IModerate: Suffolk I cuthanks cave.1 I I I I droughty. I I I I I I SfB --------------- ISevere: ISlight --------- [email protected] -------- IModerate: ISlight --------- IModerate: Suffolk I cutbanks cave.1 I I slope. I I droughty. i I I I i I SmA --------------- IModerate: ISlight --------- ISlight --------- ISlight --------- ISevere: ISlight. Summerton Itoo clayey. low strength. I Ud.* Udorthents Udipsamments Wa ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere- Wahee I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I low strength, I wetneLs. I I I I I wetness. I I I I I I I We ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IModerate: ISevere: Witherbee I cutbanks cave,1 wetness. wetness. wetness. wetness. droughty. I wetness. I I I Wo ---------------- ISevere: ISevere- ISevere: iSevere: ISevere: ISevere: Woodington I cuthanks cave,1 wetne;s. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. wetness. YaA --------------- ISevere: IModerate: ISevere: IModerate: IModerate: IModerate: Yauhannah I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I I I I I I Ye ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IModerate: IModerate: Yemassee I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I I I I I I Yo ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: Yonges I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. wetness. I wetness. See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the map unit. 116 Soil Survey TABLE ll.--SANITARY FACILITIES (Some terms that describe restrictive soil features are defined in the Glossary. See text for definitions of 11slight," "good," and other terms. Absence of an entry indicates that the soil was not rated. The information in this table indicates the dominant soil condition but does not eliminate the need for onsite investigation] Map symbol and Septic tank Sewage lagoon Trench Area Daily cover soil name absorption areas sanitary sanitary for landfill fields landfill landfill Bc.* Beaches Bd ------------------ ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Bladen ponding, I ponding. I ponding, I ponding. I too clayey, percs slowly. I I too clayey. hard to pack, I I ponding. I I BnA ----------------- IModerate: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Blanton I wetness. I seepage. I too sandy. I seepage. I too sandy, I I I I I seepage. I I I I I Bo ------------------ ISevere: ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Bohicket I flooding, I flooding, I flooding, I flooding, I too clayey, I ponding, I ponding. I ponding, I ponding. I hard to pack, I percs slowly. I I too clayey. I I ponding. I I I I I Br ------------------ ISevere: ISlight ----------- ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Brookman I wetness, I I wetness, I wetness. too clayey, I percs slowly. I I too clayey. I hard to pack, I I I I wetness. I I I I Ce ------------------ ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Centenary I wetness, I seepage. I seepager I seepage. I seepage, I poor filter. I I wetness, I I too sandy. too sandy. I I I I ChB ----------------- IModerate: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: lGood. Chisolm I wetness. I seepage. I seepage, I seepage. I I I I wetness. I I I I I I I Co ------------------ ISevere: ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Coxville I wetness, I wetness. I wetness, I wetness. I wetness. I percs slowly. I I too clayey. I I I I I I I DuA ----------------- ISevere: ISlight ----------- ISevere: ISevere: lFair: Duplin I wetness, I I wetness. I wetness. I too clayey, I percs slowly. I I I I hard to pack, I I I I I wetness. I I I I I Ec ------------------ ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Echaw I wetness, I seepage, I seepage, I seepage, I too sandy. I poor filter. I wetness. I wetness, I wetness. I I I I too sandy. I I I I I I I EmB ----------------- ISevere: ISevere- IModerate: ISlight ----------- lFair: Emporia I wetness, I seepa;e, I wetness, I I too clayey, I percs slowly. I wetness. I too clayey. I I wetness. I I I I I EuA, EuB ------------ ISevere: ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Eulonia percs slowly, I wetness. I wetness, I wetness. too clayey. wetness. too clayey. See footnote at end of table. Horry County, South Carolina 117 TABLE ll.--SANITARY FACILITIES--Continued Map symbol and Septic tank Sewage lagoon Trench Area Daily cover soil name areas itary I absorption san: sanitary for landfill fields landfill landfill GoA ----------------- ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: iSevere: lFair: Goldsboro I wetnes"s. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I I I I I Ho ------------------ ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Hobcaw I pondin*g. I seepagel I ponding. I ponding, I ponding. I I ponding. I I seepage. I I I I I I Hy ------------------ ISevere: ISevere: ISevere- ISevere: IPoor: Hobonny I flooding, I flooding, I flooding I flooding, I ponding, I ponding. I excess humus, I excess L'Iffus, I ponding. I excess humus. I Iponding. I ponding. I I I I I I I JO ------------------ ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Johnston I flooding, seepage, I flooding, flooding, I seepage, I ponding, flooding, I seepage, seepage, I ponding. I poor filter. ponding. ponding. ponding. I I I KeB ----------------- IModerate: ISevere: ISevere: 'Severe: lFair: Kenansville I wetness. I seepage. I seepage, I seepage. I too sandy. I I I wetness. I I I I I I I LaB ----------------- ISlight ----------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Lakeland I I seepage. I seepage, I seepage. I seepage, I I I too sandy. I I too sandy. I I I I I Le ------------------ ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Leon I wetness, I seepage, I seepage, I seepage, I seepage, I poor filter. wetness. I wetness, I wetness. I too sandy, I I too sandy. I I wetness. I I I I Ln ------------------ ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Lynchburg I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I I I I I Ly ------------------ ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Lynn Haven I wetness, I seepage, I seepage, I seepage, I seepage, I poor filter. I wetness. I wetness, I wetness. I too sandy, I I I too sandy. I I wetness. I I I I I Me ------------------ ISevere: ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Meggett I flooding, I flooding, I flooding, I flooding, I too clayey, I wetness, I wetness. wetness, I wetness. I hard to pack, I percs slowly. too clayey. wetness. I NaB ----------------- ISevere: IModerate: IModerate: ISlight ----------- lFair: Nankin I percs slowly. I seepage, too clayey. I too clayey. I I slope. I I i I NeA ----------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: lFair: Nansemond I wetness. I seepage, I seepaget I seepage, I too sandy, I I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I I I I I ----------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Newhan I poor filter. I seepage. I too sandy. I seepage. I seepage, I I I I I too sandy. I I I I I NoA ----------------- ISevere: ISevere- IModerate: ISlight ----------- lFair: Norfolk I percs slowly. I seepage, I too clayey, I I too clayey, I wetness. I I wetness. wetness. I I I Og ------------------ ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Ogeechee I wetneLs. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I I I I I See footnote at end of table. 118 Soil Survey TABLE ll.--SANITARY FACILITIES--Continued Map symbol and Septic tank Sewage lagoon Trench Area Daily cover soil name absorption areas sanitary sanitary for landfill fields landfill landfill Os ------------------ ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Osier I flooding, I seepage, I flooding, I flooding, I seepage, I wetness. I flooding, I wetness. I seepage. I too sandy, I I wetness. I I I wetness. I I I I I Po ------------------ ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Pocomoke I wetness. I seepage, I seepage, I seepage, I too sandy, I I wetness. wetness, I wetness. I wetness. I I too sandy. I I I I I I RmB ----------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Rimini I poor filter. seepage. I seepage, seepage. I seepage, too sandy. I too sandy. I Ru ------------------ ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Rutlege I ponding, I seepage, I seepage, I seepage, I too sandy, I poor filter. I ponding. I ponding, I ponding. I ponding. I I I too sandy. I I I I I I I SfA, SfB ------------ ISlight ----------- ISevere: ISevere: ISlight ----------- IPoor: Suffolk I I seepage. I seepage. I I thin layer. I I I I I SmA ----------------- ISevere: ISlight ----------- IModerate: ISlight ----------- lFair: Summerton Ipercs slowly. I I too clayey. I I too clayey, hard to pack. Ud.* Udorthents Udipsamments Wa ------------------ ISevere: ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Wahee I wetness, I wetne;s. I wetness, I wetness. I too clayey, I percs slowly. I I too clayey. I I hard to pack, wetness. We ------------------ ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Witherbee I wetness, I seepage, I seepage, I seepage, I seepage, I poor filter. I wetness. I wetness, I wetness. I too sandy, I I I too sandy. I I wetness. I I I I I Wo ------------------ ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Woodington I wetness. I seepage, I seepage, I seepage, I wetness. I I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I I I I I I YaA ------------------ ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: lFair: Yauhannah wetness. seepage, I seepage, wetness. wetness. wetness. I wetness. I Ye ------------------ ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Yemassee I wetness. I seepage, I wetness. I seepage, I wetness. I I wetness. I I wetness. I I I I Yo ------------------ ISevere: ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: IPoor: Yonges I wetness, I wetness I wetness. I wetness. I wetness. I percs slowly. I seepagef I See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the map unit. Horry County, South Carolina 119 TABLE 12.--CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS [Some terms that describe restrictive soil features are defined in the Glossary. See text for definitions of "good," "fair," and other terms. Absence of an entry indicates that the soil was not rated. The information in this table indicates the dominant soil condition but does not eliminate the need for onsite investigation] Map symbol and Roadfill Sand Gravel Topsoil soil name Bc.* Beaches Bd -------------------- IPoor: lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Bladen I low strength, I excess fines. I excess fines. I thin layer, I wetness. I I I wetness. I I I I BnA ------------------- lGood ----------------- 1Probable ------------- lImprobable: IPoor: Blanton I I I too sandy. I too sandy, small stones. Bo -------------------- IPoor: lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Bohicket I low strength, I excess fines. I excess fines. I excess salt, wetness, I I I wetness. shrink-swell. I I I I I I Br -------------------- IPoor: lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Brookman I low strength, I excess fines. I excess fines. thin layer, I wetness. I I wetness. I I I Ce -------------------- lGood ----------------- lProbable ------------- lImprobable: IPoor: Centenary I I I too sandy. I too sandy. I I I I ChB ------------------- lGood ----------------- 1Probable ------------- lImprobable: IPoor: Cbisolm I I I too sandy. I too sandy. I I I I Co -------------------- IPoor: lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Coxville I wetness, I excess fines. I excess fines. I thin layer, I low strength. I I I wetness. I I I I DuA ------------------- IPoor: lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Duplin I low strength. I excess fines. I excess fines. I thin layer. I I I I Ec -------------------- lFair: 1Probable ------------- lImprobable: IPoor: Echaw I wetness. I I too sandy. too sandy. I I I EmB ------------------- lFair: lImprobable: lImprobable: lFair: Emporia shrink-swell. excess fines. excess fines. too sandy. EuA, EuB -------------- lFair: lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Eulonia I wetness. I excess fines. I excess fines. I thin layer. I I I I GoA ------------------- lFair: lImprobable: lImprobable: lFair: Goldsboro wetness. excess fines. excess fines. too sandy. Ho -------------------- IPoor: lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Hobcaw I wetness. I excess fines. I excess fines. I wetness. I I I I Hy -------------------- IPoor: lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Hobonny I wetness. I excess fines. I excess fines. I wetness, I I I I excess humus. I I I I See footnote at end of table. 120 Soil Survey TABLE 12.--CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS--Continued Map symbol and Roadfill Sand Gravel Topsoil soil name Jo -------------------- IPoor: lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Johnston I wetness. I excess fines. I excess fines. I wetness. I I i I KeB ------------------- lGood ----------------- lImprobable: lImprobable: lGood. Kenansville excess fines. excess fines. LaB ------------------- lGood ----------------- lProbable ------------- iImprobable: IPoor: Lakeland I I I too sandy. I too sandy. I I I I Le -------------------- IPoor: 1Probable ------------- lImprobable: IPoor: Leon I wetness. I I too sandy. I too sandy, I I I I wetness. I I I I Ln -------------------- IPoor: lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Lynchburg I wetness. I excess fines. I excess fines. I wetness. I I I I Ly -------------------- IPoor: lProbable ------------- lImprobable: IPoor: Lynn Haven I wetness. I I too sandy. I too sandy, I I I I wetness. I I I I Me -------------------- IPoor: lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Meggett I wetness, I excess fines. I excess fines. I thin layer, I shrink-swell. I I I wetness. I I I I NaB ------------------- lGood ----------------- lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Nankin I I excess fines. I excess fines. I thin layer. I I I I NeA ------------------- lFair: 1Probable ------------- lImprobable: lFair: Nansemond wetness. too sandy. too sandy. NhB ------------------- lGood ----------------- lProbable -------------- lImprobable: IPoor: Newhan I I too sandy. too sandy. I I NoA ------------------- lGood ----------------- lImprobable: lImprobable: lFair: Norfolk excess fines. excess fines. too sandy. Og -------------------- IPoor: lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Ogeechee I wetness. I excess fines. I excess fines. I wetness. I I I I Os -------------------- IPoor: 1Probable ------------- lImprobable: IPoor: Osier I wetness. I I too sandy. I wetness. Po -------------------- IPoor: lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Pocomoke I wetness. I excess fines. I excess fines. I small stones, I I I I wetness. I I I I RmB ------------------- lGood ----------------- 1Probable ------------- lImprobable: IPoor: Rimini I I I too sandy. I too sandy. I I I I Ru -------------------- IPoor: lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Rutlege I wetness. I excess fines. I too sandy. I wetness. I I I I SfA, SfB -------------- lGood ----------------- 1Probable ------------- lImprobable: lFair: Suffolk too sandy. small stones. SmA ------------------- IPoor: lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Summerton I low strength. I excess fines. I excess fines. I too clayey. I I I I See footnote at end of table. Horry County, South Carolina 121 TABLE 12.--CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS--Continued Map symbol and Roadfill Sand Gravel Topsoil soil name Ud.* Udorthents Udipsamments Wa -------------------- IPoor: lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Wahee I low strength, I excess fines. I excess fines. I thin layer, I wetness. I I I wetness. I I I I We -------------------- IModerate: lProbable ------------- lImprobable: IPoor: Witberbee I wetness. I I too sandy. I too sandy. I I I I Wo -------------------- IPoor: lProbable ------------- lImprobable: IPoor: Woodington I wetness. I I too sandy. I wetness. I I I I YaA ------------------- lFair: 1Probable ------------- lImprobable: lGood. Yauhannah wetness. too sandy. Ye -------------------- lFair: lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Yemassee I wetness. I excess fines. I excess fines. I thin layer. I I I I Yo -------------------- IPoor: lImprobable: lImprobable: IPoor: Yonges I wetness. I excess fines. I excess fines. I thin layer, I I I I wetness. I I I - I - See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the map unit. 122 Soil Survey TABLE 13.--WATER MANAGEMENT [Some terms that describe restrictive soil features are defined in the Glossary. See text for definitions of "slight," "moderate," and "severe." Absence of an entry indicates that the soil was not evaluated. The information in this table indicates the dominant soil condition but does not eliminate the need for onsite investigation] I Limitations tor-- Features affecting-- Map symbol and Pond Embankments, Aquifer-fed I soil name )ir dike excavated Drainage Irrigation Grassed reserv( s, and ponds waterways areas levees Bc. Beaches Bd ----- ----------- ISligbt --------- ISevere: iSlight --------- IPercs slowly, IPercs slowly, lWetneSS, Bladen I I ponding. I I ponding. I ponding. I percs slowly. I I I I I I BnA --------------- 'Severe: ISevere: ISevere: IDeep to water IDroughty, IDroucrhty. Blanton I seepage. I seepage. I no water. I I fast intake I I I I I I soil blowing' I I I I I I I Bo ---------------- ISlight --------- ISevere: ISevere- IPonding, IPonding, lWetness, Bohicket I I hard to pack, I slow iefill. I percs slowly, I percs slowly. I excess salt, I I ponding, I I flooding. I I percs slowly. I Iexcess salt. I I I I I I I I I I Br ---------------- IModerate: ISevere: IModerate- lFavorable ------ lWetness, lWetness Brookman I seepage. I hard to pack, slow ref"ill. I I percs slowly. I wetness. Ce ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: lCuthanks cave IDroughty, IDroughty. Centenary I seepage. I seepage. I cutbanks cave.1 I fast intake I I I I I I soil blowin;. I I I I I I I ChB; --------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IDeep to water IDroughty, 1,Droughty. Chisolm seepage. I seepage, I cuthanks cave.1 I fast intake, I piping. I I I slope. I I I I I I Co ---------------- 'Slight --------- ISevere: ISevere: iFavorable ------ lWetness -------- lWetness. Coxville I I wetness. Islow refill. I I I I I I I I I DuA ------------- .--ISI*gbt --------- IModerate: ISevere- lFavorable ------ lWetness, lFavorable. Duplin I piping, I slow iefill. I I fast intake. I I hard to pack, I I I I I wetness. I I I I I I I I I Ec ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: lCutbanks cave lWetness, liDroughty. Ecbaw I seepage. I seepage, Icuthanks cave.1 I droughty, I I I I I piping. I fast intake. I I I I I Ea --------------- IModerate: IModerate: ISevere: IDeep, to water lFast intake, 1Drougbtyj Emporia I seepage, I thin layer, I no water. I I soil blowing, I per(.:s slowly. I slope. I piping. I I I slope. I I I I I I I EuA --------------- IMaderate: IModerate: IModerate: lFavorable ------ lWetness, lFavorable. Eulonia I seepage. I wetness. I deep to water.1 I fast intake I I I I I I soil blowin' I I I I I 1 9- 1 EuB --------------- IModerate: IModerate: IModerate: ISlope ---------- lWetness, lFavorable Eulonia I seepage. I wetness. I deep to water.1 I soil blowing, I I I I I I slope. I I I I I I I GoA --------------- IModerate: IModerate: IModerate: lFavorable ------ lWetness, lFavorable. Goldsboro I seepage. I wetness. Ideep to water.1 I fast intake. I See footnote at end of table. Horry County, South Carolina 123 TABLE 13.--WATER MANAGEMENT--Continued Limitations for-- Features affectin Map symbol and _Po_nT__ Embankments, Aquifer-fed 1 soil name reservoir dikes, and excavated Drainage Irrigation Grassed areas levees ponds waterways Ho ---------------- IModerate: ISevere: IModerate: IPonding -------- IPonding, lWetness. Hobcaw I seepage. I piping, I slow refill. I I soil blowing. I I I ponding. I I I I I I I I I I Hy ---------------- IModerate: ISevere: IModerate- lFlooding, IPonding, lWetness. Hobonny I seepage. I excess humus, I slow ref'ill. I ponding, I soil b 1owing. I I I ponding. I I subsides. I I I I I I I I Jo ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPonding, IPonding, lWetness. Johnston I seepage. I seepage, I cutbanks cave.1 flooding, I flooding. I I I piping, I I cutbanks cave.1 I I I ponding. I I I I I I I I I I KeB --------------- ISevere: IModerate: ISevere: IDeep to water lFast intake, IDroughty. Kenansville I seepage. I seepage. I cutbanks cave.1 I droughty. I I I I I I I LaB --------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IDeep to water IDroughty, IDroughty. Lakeland I seepage. I seepage. I no water. I I fast intake I I I I I I soil blowin' I I I I I 1 9. 1 Le ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: lCuthanks cave iWetness, iWetness, Leon I seepage. I seepage, I cutbanks cave.1 I droughty, I droughty. I I piping, I I I fast intake. I I I wetness. I I I I I I I I I I Ln ---------------- IModerate: ISevere: IModerate: lFavorable ------ lWetness, lWetness. Lynchburg I seepage. I piping, slow refill. fast intake. I I wetness. I I Ly ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: lCuthanks cave lWetness, lWetness, Lynn Haven I seepage. I seepage, I cutbanks cave.1 I droughty, I droughty. I I piping, I I I fast intake. I I wetness. I I Me ---------------- IModerate: ISevere: ISevere- IPercs slowly, lWetness, lWetness, Meggett I seepage. I hard to pack, I slow @efill. I flooding. I percs slowly. I percs slowly. I I wetness. I I I I I I i I I I NaB --------------- IModerate: ISevere: ISevere: IDeep to water ISlope ---------- lFavorable. Nankin seepager I thin layer. I no water. I I I slope. I I I I I I I I I I NeA --------------- ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: lCutbanks cave lWetness, IDroughty. Nansemond I seepage- I seepage, I cutbanks cave.1 I droughty, I I I piping, I I I fast intake. I I I wetness. I I I I I I I I I i NhB --------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IDeep to water IDroughty, IDroughty. Newhan I seepage. I seepage, I no water. I I fast intake, I I I piping. I I I I I I I I , slope. I NoA --------------- IModerate: ISlight --------- ISevere: IDeep to water lFast intake ---- lFavorable. Norfolk I seepage. I I deep to water.1 I I I I I I I I Og ---------------- IModerate: ISevere: lFavorable ------ lFavorable ------ Netness, lWetness. Ogeechee I seepage. I wetness. I I I fast intake. I I I I I I I See footnote at end of table. 124 'Soil Survey TABLE 13.--WATER MANAGEMENT--Continued Limitations for- Features affectin Map symbol and F_ Pond Embankments Aquifer-fed I soil name reservoir dikes, and' excavated Drainage Irrigation Cirassed areas levees ponds waterways Os ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: lFlooding, lWetness, lWetnEISS, Osier seepage. seepage, cuthanks: cave.1 cutbanks cave.1 flooding, droughty. piping, droughty. wetness. Po ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: lCutbanks cave lWetness -------- lWetness. Pocomoke I seepage. I seepage, I cutbanks cave.1 I I I I piping, I I I I I I wetness. I I I I I I I I I I RmB ---------------- ISevere- ISevere: ISevere: IDeep to water IDroughty, lDroughty. Rimini I I fast intake, I I seepage I seepage I no water. I I I I I I slope. I I I piping. I I I I Ru ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IPonding, IPonding, lWetness, Rutlege I seepage. seepage, I cuthanks cave.1 cutbanks cave.1 droughty. I droughty. I piping, I ponding. I SfA --------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: IDeep to water IDroughty, lDroughty Suffolk seepage. I thin layer. I no water. I I soil blowing, I fast intake. I SfB --------------- ISevere: ISevere: iSevere: IDeep to water IDroughty, 1Droughty Suffolk I seepage. I thin layer. I no water. I soil blowing, I slope. I SmA --------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere- IDeep to water ISoil blowing --- lFavorable. Summerton I slope. I hard to pack. I no water. I I Ud.* Udorthents Udipsamments Wa ---------------- ISlight --------- ISevere: ISevere: iPercs slowly---IWetness, lWetness Wahee I I wetness. I slow refill. I I soil blowing, I percs slowly. I I I I I percs slowly. I I I I I I I We ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: lCutbanks cave lWetness, lWetness, Witherbee I seepage. I seepage, I cuthanks cave.1 I droughty, I droughty. I I piping. I I I fast intake. I I I I I I I Wo ---------------- ISevere: ISevere: ISevere: lCuthanks cave lWetness -------- lWetness. Woodington I seepage. I piping, I cuthanks cave.1 I I I I wetness. I I I I I I I I I I YaA --------------- IModerate: ISevere: ISevere: lFavorable ------ lWetness -------- lFavorable. Yauhannah I seepage. I piping, I cuthanks; cave.1 I I I I wetness. I I I I I I I I I I Ye ---------------- IModerate: ISevere: ISevere: lCutbanks cave lWetness, lWetness. Yemassee I seepage. I piping, I cuthanks cave.1 I fast intake I wetness. I I soil blowing' I I I - I Yo ---------------- IModerate: ISevere: ISevere: lFavorable ------ lWetness, lWetness. Yonges I seepage. I piping, I slow refill. I I soil blowing. I I I wetness. I I I I See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the map unit. Horry County, South Carolina 125 TABLE 14.--ENGINEERING INDEX PROPERTIES [The symbol < means less than. Absence of an entry indicates that data were not estimated] I I I Classification Percentage passing Map symbol and Depth USDA texture I I sieve number- ILiquid IPlas- soil name I Unified I AASHTO I I I limit Iticity 4 10 40 200 !index In Bc.* Beaches Bd --------------- 1 0-6 IFine sandy loam ISM IA-2 A-4 1 100 197-100160-85 120-50 1 --- I NP Bladen 1 6-42 IClay, sandy clay ICL: CH, SCIA-7' A-6F 11 100 199:100175:100155-85 1 40-67 119-45 1 42-62 IClay, sandy clay ,ICL CH IA-4' A-6, 100 189 99 175 95 145-75 1 25-60 1 8-35 1 1 clay loam. I I A-7' I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I BnA -------------- 1 0-58 Sand ------------- ISP-SM IA-3F A-2-41 100 1100 165-1001 5-12 1 --- I NP Blanton 58-63 Sandy loam, loamyISM IA-2-4 1 100 1100 165-96 113-30 1 <25 INP-3 sand, loamy I I I I I I I I I coarse sand - I I I I I I I I 1 63-75 ISandy clay loam, IISC, SM-SC IA-4, A-2-41 100 1100 169-96 125-50 1 12-45 1 3-22 sandy loam, fine SM 'I A-2-6, I I I I I sandy loam. I I A-6 I I Bo --------------- 0-12 ISilty clay loam ICH MH IA-7 1 100 199:100190-100180-1001 60-100115-60 Bohicket 1 12-72 ISilty clay, clay,ICH.' MH IA-7 1 100 199 100180-100170-95 1 50-100116-60 sandy clay. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Br --------------- 1 0-10 ILoam ------------- CL, ML, A-6, A-4, 100 195-100175-100151-81 1 25-40 1 6-20 Brookman I I I CL-ML I A-8 I I I I I I 1 10-46 ISandy clay, clay ICH CL IA-7 A-6 1 100 198:100185-100155-91 1 37-65 118-41 1 46-68 ISandy clay, clay,ICL' CH SC,IA-6: A-7, 1 100 190 100170-100132-90 1 23-55 1 7-35 1 1 sandy clay loam.1 SM'-SC' I A-2-4 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Ce --------------- 1 0-68 IFine sand -------- ISP, SP-SM IA-3 1 100 1100 160-90 14-10 1 --- I NP Centenary 1 68-80 ISand, fine sand, ISP-SMI SPIIA-3? A-2-41 100 1100 165-90 14-20 1 --- I NP loamy sand. SM I I I I I I I I I I I ChB -------------- 1 0-24 IFine sand -------- SP-SMj SM A-2r A-3 1 100 198-100175-98 15-20 1 --- I NP Chisolm 1 24-46 ISandy clay loam ISM-SCI SC IA-4 A-6 1 100 198-100175-98 136-55 1 20-35 1 4-15 C 11 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 L CL-ML 46-58 Sandy loam, fine ISM"SM-SC,IA-2, A-4, 1 100 198-100165-98 125-50 1 15-35 1 2-15 sandy loam, SC I A-6 I I I I I I I sandy clay loam I I I I I I I I 1 58-80 IFine sandy loam,*ISM, SP-SM IA-2, A-3 1 100 198-100160-98 110-20 1 <30 INP-7 loamy sand, sand. Co --------------- 1 0-8 IFine sandy loam ISM, MLI IA-4 A-6 1 100 1100 185-97 146-75 1 20-46 1 3-15 Coxville C I I I I I I I L-ML CL A-7 1 8-72 IClay loam, sandy ICL, CH' IA-6, A-7 1 100 1100 185-98 150-85 1 30-55 112-35 clay, clay. DuA -------------- 1 0-17 1 ISM, SM-SC IA-2 A-4 1 100 1100 167-98 120-49 1 <26 INP-7 Duplin 1 17-70 ISandy clay, clay ICL, CH, SCIA-6: A-7 1 100 198-100180-100145-79 1 24-54 113-35 loam, clay. I I I I I I EC --------------- 1 0-36 ISand ------------- ISP SP-SM IA-3 1 100 1100 150-80 14-10 1 --- I NP Echaw 1 36-72 ILoamy sand, fine ISM" IA-2, A-3 1 100 1100 150-75 15-30 1 --- I NP I I sand, sand. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I See footnote at end of table. 126 Soil Survey TABLE 14.--ENGINEERING INDEX PROPERTIES--Continued Classification Percentage passing Map symbol and Depth USDA texture I I sieve number-- Liquid Plas- soil name Unified AASHTO I _r I I limit Iticity 4 10 1 40 200 1 lindex Lat are -------------- 0-5 Loamy fine sand ISM SM-SC IA-21 A-1 190-100180-100140-85 115-35 1 <18 INP-7 Emporia 5-54 Sandy clay loam,, ISCY' CL IA-2 A-4 190-100180-100145-95 125-70 1 20-50 1 8-30 1 cl I A-' , -7' 1 1 1 1 1 11 sandy loam, ay, 1 6 A I I loam. 1 54-68 fStratified sandy ISM, SC MLIA-1 A-21 170-100155-100130-90 120-60 1 <40 INP-25 I loam to clay I I CL A-4, A-6 I I loam. EuA, EuB --------- 1 0-12 Loamy fine sand ISM, SM-SC A-2 100 195-100150-96 118-35 1 <20 INP-4 Eulonia 1 12-40 ISandy clay, clay ,ISC, CL IA-6, A-7, 1 100 195-100170-99 145-80 1 25-45 1 8-20 1 1 clay loam. I I A-4 I I I I I I 1 40-80 ISandy clay loam, ISC, SM IA-2 A-4, 1 100 190-100160-100118-50 1 15-35 1 3-15 sandy loam. SM-SC' I A-6' I I I I I I I I I I I I I GoA -------------- 1 0-7 ILoamy fine sand SM, SM-SC, A-2, A-4, 90-100175-100150-100115-45 1 <25 INP-14 Goldsboro I I SC A-6 I I I I I I 7-31 Sandy clay loam ISM-SCI SC IA-2 A-4f IFS-100195-100160-100125-55 1 16-37 1 4-18 1 sandy loam. I CL-ML CL'I A- 6' 1 1 1 1 1 1 31-72 ISandy clay loam, ISC CL' IA-4 A-6, 195-10019G-100165-95 136-70 1 25-55 1 6-32 1 clay loam, sandyl CL'-ML', I CHI A-7 6 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 clay. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Ho --------------- 1 0-15 Fine sandy loam ISM, ML IA-2, A-4 1 100 1100 170-95 130-65 1 <35 INP-7 Hobcaw 1 15-48 ISandy clay loam ISM-SC SC,IA-4 A-61 100 1100 175-98 136-70 1 18-45 INP-22 I I clay loam, fine' I CL-ML, CLI A-7' I I I I I sandy loam. I I I I 1 48-68 lVariable ----- I --- I --- I --- I--- I--- I --- I --- I I I I I I I I I I I Hy --------------- 1 0-80 IMuck ------------- IPt I I --- I--- I--- I --- I --- I Hobonny I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Jo --------------- 1 0-30 Loam ------------- IML SM IA-2 A-4 1 100 110 160-100118-65 1 <35 INP-10 Johnston 30-45 Stratified loamy ISM: SP-SM IIA-21' A-3 1 100 11000 150-1001 5-30 1 --- I NP I sand to sand. I I I I I I 1 45-70 IStratified fine ISM IA-2, A-4 1 100 1100 150-100125-49 1 <35 INP-10 I I sandy loam to I I sandy loam. I I KeB -------------- 1 0-28 Fine sand -------- SM IA-1 A-2 1 100 195-100145-60 110-25 1 <25 INP-3 Kenansville 1 28-51 ISandy loam, fine ISM, Sc IA-2' A-4 1 100 195-100150-75 120-40 1 <30 INP-10 I I sandy loam, I SM-SC I I I I I I I I I sandy clay loam I I I I I I I I 1 51-70 ISand, loamy sand*ISP-SM SM IA-1 A-21 1 100 195-100140-60 1 5-30 1 --- I NP I I I SP 'I A-3' I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I LaB -------------- 1 0-50 ISand ------------- ISP-SM IA-3 A-2-4190:100190-100160-1001 5-12 1 --- I NP Lakeland 1 50-82 ISand, fine sand ISP, SP-SM IIA-31' A-2-4190 100190-100150-1001 1-12 1 --- I NP I I I I I I I I I Le --------------- 1 0-9 IFine sand -------- ISP SP-SM IA-3, A-2-41 100 1100 180-1001 2-12 1 --- I NP Leon 1 9-20 ISand, fine sand ISM' SP-SM,IA-3, A-2-41 100 1100 180-1001 3-20 1 --- I NP I I loamy sand. I SP' I I I I I I I 1 20-72 ISand, fine sand ISP, SP-SM IA-3, A-2-41 100 1100 180-1001 2-12 1 --- I NP I I I I I I I I I I Ln --------------- 1 0-8 ILoamy fine sand ISM, SP-SM IA-2 192-100190-100160-100111-35 1 <25 INP-4 Lynchburg 1 8-80 ISandy clay loam, ISM-SC SC IA-2 ,A-4, 192-100190-100170-100125-67 1 15-40 1 4-18 1 sandy loam, clayl CL, C'L-MLI A-6 I I I I I I I loam. See footnote at end of table. Horry County, South Carolina 127 TABLE 14.--ENGINEERING INDEX PROPERTIES--Continued I Classification Percentage passing Map symbol and Depth USDA texture I I I sieve number-- ILiquid Plas soil'name IUnified I AASHTO I I limit Iticity 200 1 1 4 1, 10 40 index Ly --------------- 1 0-13 ISand ------------- ISPF SP-SM'IA-3, A-2-41 100 1100 180-1001 2-14 1 --- I NP Lynn Haven I I I SM I I I I I I I 113-75 ISand, fine sand, I SM, SP-SM IA-3, A-2-41 100 1100 170-1001 5-20 1 --- I NP I I loamy sand. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Me --------------- 1 0-4 Loam ------------- IML, CL-ML IA-4 1100 190-100185-100151-75 1 <35 INP-10 Meggett 4-46 Clay, sandy clay,ICH, MH, CLIA-6 , A-7 1100 190-100185-100151-90 1 30-60 120-30 1 clay loam. I I I I I I I I 146-72 ISandy clay, clay ICL, SC, SMIA-4? A-6 190-100165-100150-100140-60 1 <40 INP-25 I I loam, sandy clayl I I I I I I I I I loam. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I NaB -------------- 1 0-4 Fine sandy loam SM, SM-SC A-2, A-4 85-100185-100170-90 125-45 1 <25 INP-4 Nankin 1 4-48 ISandy clay? clay,ISC, CLF IIA-4f A-6, 198-100195-100175-95 140-70 1 25-45 1 7-20 1 1 sandy lay loam. CL-ML A-7 I I I I I I 148-72 ISandy cclay loam, ISC, SM-SC IA-2, A-4, 198-100195-100170-85 125-55 1 <30 INP-12 I I sandy loam. I CL ,CL-MLI A-6 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I NeA -------------- 1 0-12 ILoamy fine sand ISM, SM-SC A-1, A-2, 100 195-100145-95 115-50 1 <20 INP-7 Nansemond I I I I A-4 I I I I I I 12-32 Fine sandy loam, ISMI SM-SC IA-2 A-4 1100 195-100160-85 130-50 1 <25 INP-15 sandy loam. SC I A-6' ' I I I I I I 32-54 Loamy fine sand, ISM, SM-SC IA-2, A-4 1100 195-100145-95 115-50 1 <25 INP-10 I loamy sand I I I I I I I I 154-72 ISand, loamy'fine ISM, SC, IA-1 A-21 195-100175-100140-95 1 5-50 1 <25 INP-7 I I sand, loamy I SM SC I A-3, A-4 I I I I I I I I sand. I SP-SM' I I I I I I I NhB -------------- 1 0-80 IFine sand -------- ISP IA-3 195-100195-100160-75 1 0-5 1 --- I NP Newhan I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I NoA -------------- 1 0-16 Loamy fine sand ISM iA-2f A-4 195-100192-100150-95 113-37 1 <20 1 NP Norfolk 16-56 Sandy loam, sandyISC SM-SC IA-2 A-4 195-100191-100170-96 130-63 1 20-38 1 4-15 clay loam, clay 11 CLI CL-ML'I A-6' I loam I 156-75 ISandy'clay loam, ISC SM-SC IA-4 _A-6, 1100 198-100165-98 136-72 1 20-52 1 4-23 1 1 clay loam, sandyl CL', CL-MLi A-7' 6 1 1 1 1 1 1 I I clay. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Og --------------- 1 0-10 Loamy fine sand ISM IA-2r A-1 1100 195-100148-70 110-25 1 --- I NP Ogeechee 10-54 Sandy clay loam, ISC ,CL IA-6 1100 195-100165-85 140-55 1 32-40 116-23 clay loam. I I I I I I I I 154-60 ISandy clay, sandyl,SC, CL IA-61 A-7 1100 195-100165-85 143-65 1 32-46 116-24 1 1 clay loam clay I I I I I I I 160-72 ISandy clay'loam,*ISC IA-61 A-2 1100 190-100150-65 125-45 1 30-40 115-25 sandy loam. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Os --------------- 1 0-8 ILoamy sand ------- ISP-SM SM IA-2 A-3 1100 198-100160-85 1 5-22 1 --- I NP Osier 1 8-65 ISand, loamy sand iSP-SM" SM IA-2: A-3 1100 195-100165-96 1 5-20 1 --- I NP I I loamy fine sand'I Po --------------- 1 0-11 IFine sandy loam ISM, SCI IA-21 A-4 185-100175-100140-85 115-55 1 19-26 1 3-10 Pocomoke I I I CL-ML I I I I I I I 111-16 ILoamy sand, sand ISM SP-SM IA-2, A-3 180-100165-lOOi3O-75 1 4-30 1 <22 INP-8 116-72 ISandy clay loam, I M, A-21 A-4 , 180-100165-100130-90 1 4-55 1 <38 INP-15 I I IS I SC, CLI I I I I I I sandy loam, I A-6 sand. I I RmB -------------- 1 0-65 ISand ------------- ISP SP-SM IA-3 1100 198-100160-98 1 2-5 1 --- I NP rine sand ISP: SP-SM IA-3 1100 198-100175-10 1 3-10 1 NP Rimini 165-72 ISand, f 0 See footnote at end of table. 128 Soil Survey TABLE 14.--ENGINEERING INDEX PROPERTIES--Continued Classification Percentage passing Map symbol and Depth USDA texture I I sieve number-- Liquid IPlas- soil name I Unified I AASHTO Ilimit Iticity 200 lindex 4 1 10 40 , I 11 11 1 Pct i Ru --------------- 1 0-12 ILoamy sand ------- ISM[f SP-SM IA-2, A-3 195-100195-100150-80 1 5-35 1 --- I NP Rutlege 1 12-72 ISand, loamy sand,,1SP-SM, SP ,IIA-211 A-3 195-100195-100150-80 1 2-25 1 --- I NP I I loamy fine sand. SN I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I SfA, SfB --------- 1 0-14 ILoamy fine sand ISMf SM-SC IA-1 A-2, 195-100190-100140-85 115-40 1 <18 1111P-6 Suffolk I I I I A-4' I I I I I I 14-44 Sandy clay loam, ISC, CL 11A-2f A-6 195-100190-100150-95 125-75 120-40 110-25 clay loam, sandyl 10 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 44-56 ILoaamy*fine sand, ISP,_SM IA-1 A-2 175-100160-100130-80 1 3-50 1 <18 INP-7 I I fine sandy loam,l SM SCf I A-3', A-4' I I I I I I I I gravelly sand. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I SmA -------------- 1 0-6 IFine sandy loam ISM ML IA-2 A-4 1 100 195-100175-95 130-60 1 <35 INP-7 Summerton 1 6-61 ISandy clay, clay ICL: ML CHIA-6f A-7 1 100 198-100190-100155-81 135-71 111-35 loam, clay. I k Ud.* Udorthents Udipsamments Wa --------------- 1 0-11 IFine sandy loam ISM SM-SC IA-2 A-4 1 100 195-100150-98 130:50 1 <28 INP-7 Wahee 1 11-56 lClay, clay loam, 1,CLft CH IIA-6'f A-7 1 100 1100 185-100151 90 138-70 118-42 1 1 silty clay. I I I I I I 1 56-65 lVariable --------- I --- I --- I --- I --- I --- I --- I --- I --- I I I I I I I I I I We --------------- 1 0-22 ISand ------------- ISP-SM SM IA-3 A-2 1 100 1100 180-1001 5:15 1 --- 1 NP Witherbee 1 22-80 IFine sand, sand, ISP-SM' SP ,IA-3: A-2 1 100 1100 180-1001 3 15 1 --- I NP I I loamy fine sand. I SM I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Wo --------------- 0-14 Fine sandy loam ISM IA-2 A-4 1 100 195-100150-100120:50 1 <25 INP-3 14-58 Woodington Sandy loam, fine ISM IA-21 A-4 1 100 195-100150-100120 50 1 <25 INP-3 I sandy loam. I I I I I I I I 1 58-84 ISandy loam, loamyISM, SP-SM IA-2f A-4 1 100 195-100150-100110-50 1 <25 INP-3 I I sand, loamy finel I I I I I I I I I sand. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I YaA -------------- 0-8 Fine sandy loam SM, SM-SC A-21 A-4 1 100 195-100175-100125:50 1 <25 INP-7 Yauhannah 8-40 Sandy clay loam, SC, CL, IA-2 A-4, 1 100 195-100175-100125 55 1 <35 IMP-16 I clay loam, sandy, SM-SC, I A-6' I I I loam. CL-ML I I I 40-48 Fine sandy loam, ISM, SM-SCdA-21 A-4 1 100 195-100175-100125-50 125-50 IMP-25 I sandy loam, I SC I I I I I I I sandy clay loam I I I I I I I I 1 48-72 ISandy loam, IoL;ISM, SM-SC IA-2 A-4 1 100 1100 175-100110-45 1 <28 INP-6 I I fine sand, fine I SP-SM sand. Ye --------------- 0-14 Loamy fine sand SM A-2-4 1 100 1100 175-100115-35 1 <25 INP-4 Yemassee 14-46 Sandy clay loam, CL, SCf IA-2 A-4f 11 100 1100 175-100130-70 116-40 1 4-20 Iclay loam, fine CL-ML, I A-6 sandy loam. I SM-SC 1 46-56 ISandy clay loamf ISC, SM IA-2 A-4, 1 100 1100 175-100125-55 1 <35 INP-15 fine sandy loam , CL-ML' A-6' sandy clay. SM_SCf 1 56-72 IVariable -------- I --- I --- I --- I --- I --- I --- I --- I --- See footnote at end of table. Horry County, South Carolina 129 TABLE 14.--ENGINEERING INDEX PROPERTIES--Continued I Classification Percentage passing Map symbol and Depth USDA texture I I i sieve number-- Liquid Plas- soil name Unified AASHTO I I limit Iticity 4 10 40 200 lindex I Yo --------------- 1 0-16 IFine sandy loam ISMF SM-SC,IA-4 1100 1100 170-85 140-55 1 <30 INP-7 Yonges I I ML I I I I I I I 1 16-68 ISandy clay loam ICL-'ML CL IA-4, A-6, 1100 1100 195-100140-70 120-45 1 6-28 1 1 clay loam, sand'y! SCI ;M-KI A-7 I I I I I I I I clay. I I I I I I I I I -_ I I I I I I I I See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the map unit. 130 Soil Survey TABLE 15.--PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE SOILS [The symbol < means less than; > means more than. Entries under "Erosion factors--T" apply to the entire profile. Entries under "Organic matter" apply only to the surface layer. Absence of an entry indicates that data were not available or were not estimated] I I I I I I I I I Erosion Map symbol and IDepthl,Clay Moist I Permea- lAvailablel Soil ISalinitylShrink-swellf factors Organic soil name I I bulk I bility I water Ireactioni Ipotential I------ r- matter density 11capacity ! I I I X I T I 11CM jaLhE 1RLE LH I Pct Bc.* Beaches Bd ---------------10-6 110-2011 35-1.451 0 6-2 0 10 10-0 1313 6-5 5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 24 1 5 1 1-4 Bladen 16-42135-5511:65-1 7510 66-0:2 10:12-0:1613'6-5*5 1 <2 IModerate ---- I-!-- 1 1 142-62135-7011 .60-1:7010:06-0.2 10.12-0 .1613:6-5:5 1 <2 IModerate ---- I---- I I I i I I I I I I I I I BnA -------------- 1 0-581 1-7 11 30-1.601 6 0-20 10.03-0.0714 5-6 0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 10 1 5 1.5-1 Blanton 158-63110-1811:53-1 651 2:0-6.0 10 10-0.1514:5-5:5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:15 1 163-75112-3011 .60-1:701 0. 6-2.0 10:10-0.1514 . 5-5 .51 <2 ILow --------- 10.20 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Bo --------------- 1 0-12130-6011 20-1.4010.06-0 2 10 02-0 0616 1-8 4 1 >8 lHigh -------- 10 28 1 5 1 5-25 Bohicket 112-72135-6011:30-1.601 <0.06' 10:02-0:0616:1-8'.4 1 >8 lHigh -------- 10:24 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Br --------------- 1 0-10130-5811.20-1.451 0.6-2.0 10.15-0.2015.1-6 5 1 <2 ILow --------- 0.24 1 4 110-23 Brookman 110-46115-2511 40-1 601 0 6-2 0 10 18-0 2215 1-6:5 1 <2 IModerate-----10 28 1 1 146-68135-5511:45-1:6510.66-0:2 10:12-0:1615:1-7 .81 <2 IModerate ---- 10:24 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Ce --------------- 1 0-681 1-9 11.40-1 601 6 0-20 10 03-0 0814 5-6 5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 10 1 5 1 <1 Centenary 168-801 2-8 11.40-1:601 6:0-20 10:03-0:0514:5-6:0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:10 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I ChB -------------- 1 0-241 2-1011 40-1 701 6 0-20 10.03-0 0514.5-6 0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10.10 1 5 1 <1 Chisolm 124-46118-3511:30-1:501 0:6-2.0 10 10-0:1514.5-6:0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 15 1 146-58115-3511 30-1 501 0 6-6 0 10:08-0 1514.5-6 0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:15 1 158-801 2-2011:40-1:701 6:0-26 10.03-0:0814.5-5:5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10.15 1 Co --------------- 1 0-8 1 5-271, 45-1 651 0 6-2 0 10 12-0 1713 6-6 0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 24 1 5 1 2-4 Coxville 18-72135-6011:25-1:451 0:2-0:6 10:14-0:1813:6-5:5 1 <2 IModerate ---- 10:32 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 DuA --------------10-171 4-1811 45-1 651 2 0-6 0 10 10-0.1515.1-7 3 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 24 1 5 1.5-2 Duplin 117-70135-6011:25-1:401 0:2-0:6 10:13-0.1814.5-5:5 1 <2 IModerate ---- 10:28 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 EC --------------- 1 0-361 1-8 11 40-1 601 2.0-20 10 03-0 0814 5-6 0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 10 1 5 1 <1 Echaw 136-721 2-1011:40-1.*601 6.0-20 10:05-0:1014:5-6."0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:10 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I EmB -------------- 1 0-5 1 5-1011 30-1 401 6.0-20 10 05-0 1014.5-6 0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10-28 1 4 1.5-3 Emporia 15-54118-3511:35-1:451 0.2-2 0 10:10-0:1814 5-6:0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 28 1 1 154-681 5-4011 .45-1.6010.06-2:0 10.08-0 .1814:5-6 .01 <2 IModerate ---- 10:20 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 EuA, EuB --------- 1 0-121 5-1511.50:1 601 6.0-20 10 06-0 0914 5-6 '151 <2 ILow --------- 10 15 1 5 1 5-2 Eulonia 112-40135-4511 50_1:701 0 2-0 6 10:12-0:1614*5-6 0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:24 1 1 140-80115-3511:50 1 .701 0:6-2:0 10.10-0.1414:5-6:0 1 <2 ILow ---------- 10 20 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 * I I GoA -------------- 1 0-7 1 5-1511.40-1.601 2.0-6.0 10.08-0.1214.5-6 6 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 20 1 5 1 5-2 Goldsboro 17-31118-3011.30-1 501 0 6-2 0 10 11-0 1514.5-5'5 1 <2 iLow --------- 10-24 1 1 131-72120-4511.30-1:401 0:2-2:0 10:11-0:1514.5-5:5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:24 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Ho --------------- 1 0-151 5-2011 20-1 501 2 0-6 0 10 10-0 1614 5-6 5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10.17 1 5 1 2-9 Hobcaw 115-48118-3511:30-1:601 0:6-2:0 10:12-0:1814:5-6:5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 24 1 1 148-681 --- I --- I --- I --- I --- I -- I------------ I_:__ I I I I I I I I I I I I I Hy --------------- 1 0-801 --- 10.20-0.651 0.6-6.0 10.20-0.2514.5-5.5 1 <2 ILow --------- I ---- 1 120-60 Hobonny See footnote at end of table. Horry County, South Carolina 131 TABLE 15.--PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE SOILS--Continued I I I I I I I Erosion Map symbol and IDepthlClay , Moist I Permea- lAvailablel Soil ISalinitylShrink-swelll factors lOrganic Soil name I bulk I bility I water ireactioni I potential I ----- T-- I matter I I I Icapac I I I I K T I , densityI I ity 1 1 In 11 Pct 1, Glcm In1hr 1, InlIn pH j- os/cm, Pct Jo -----I----------1 0-301 5-1811.30-1.551 2.0-6 0 10.10-0.2014 5-5 1 . .5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 20 1 5 1 3-8 Johnston 130-451 2-1211 55-1 651 6 0-2; 10 2-0 07 4.5-5 5 1 <2 ILow-- ------ 10*17 1 145-701 5-2011:45-1:651 6:0-20 10:06-0:1214.5-5:5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:17 1 KeB -------------- 1 0-281 3-101 1 5-1 7 1 6 0-20 10 04-0.1014.5-6 0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10.15 1 5 1 .5-2 Kenansville 128-511 5-181 1:3-1:51 2:0-6 0 10:10-0 1514 5-6:0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 15 1 1 151-701 1-101 1.5-1.7 6.0-2; <0.0; 14:5-6.0 1 <2 ILow --------- I-:-- I I I I I I I I I. I I LaB -------------- 1 0-501 2-8 11.35-1 651 6 0-20 10.05-0 0914 5-6 0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 10 1 5 1 <1 Lakeland 150-821 1-6 11.50-1:601 6:0-20 10.02-0:0814:5-6:0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:10 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I Le --------------- 1 0-9 1 1-6 11 40-1.651 6 0-20 10.02-0-0513 6-5 5 1 <2 Low --------- 10 10 1 5 1 .5-4 Leon 1 9-201 2-8 11:50-1 701 0:6-6 0 10 05-0 1013:6-5:5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:15 1 1 120-721 1-6 11 .40-1:651 0.6-6:0 10:02-0:0513 .6-6.0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 .10 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I In --------------- 1 0-8 1 2-10il 40-1 701 6 0-20 10 07-0 1013.6-6 5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10.15 1 5 1 .5-5 Lynchburg 1 8-80118-3511:30-1:501 0:6-2.0 10:12-0:1613.6-5:5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10.20 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Ly --------------- 1 0-131 1-4 11 35-1 601 6 0-20 10 05-0 1013 6-5 5 1 <2 Low --------- 10 10 1 5 1 1-4 Lynn Haven 113-751 2-8 11:40-1:551 0:6-6.0 10:10-0:2013:6-5:5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:15 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Me --------------- 1 0-4 115-2511 20-1 401 0 6-2.0 10 15-0.2014 5-6 5 1 <2 Low --------- 10 28 1 5 1 2-8 Meggett 1 4-46135-6011:50-1:7510 66-0 2 10:13-0 1816:1-8:4 1 <2 lHigh -------- 10:32 1 1 14ei-72125-5011 .40-1.601 ;.2-2:0 10.12-0:1616 .1-8.4 1 <2 IModerate ---- 10.28 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 NaB -------------- 1 0-4 1 7-2011 45-1 551 2.0-6 0 10 08-0 1214 5-6 0 1 <2 Low --------- 10 28 1 3 1 .5-1 Nankin 1 4-48135-5011:60-1:701 0 2-0:6 10:11-0:1614:5-5:5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:24 1 1 148-68115-3511 .60-1.701 0:6-2.0 10.10-0. 1514 .5-5.5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 .24 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 NeA -------------- 1 0-121 4-1011 20-1 451 2.0-20 10 05-0.1013 6-6.0 1 <2 Low --------- 10 15 1 3 1 .5-1 Nansemond 112-32110-1811'25-1:451 2.0-6.0 10*10-0.1613:6-5 5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10'17 1 1 132-541 4-1211"30-1 551 2 0-6 0 10:06-0 1113 6-5:5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10-15 1 1 154-721 2-1211:35-1:551 6:0-2; 10.02-0:1013:6-5 .5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:15 1 NhB --------------- 1 0-801 <5 11.30-1.701 >20 1 <0.05 16.6-7.8 1 <2 ILow --------- 10.10 1 5 1 --- Newhan NoA -------------- 1 0-161 2-8 11 55-1 751 60-20 10 06-0 1114.5-6 0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10.20 1 5 1 .5-2 Norfolk 116-56118-3511:35-1:451 0*6-2 0 10*10-,0:1514 5-5:5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 24 1 1 156-75120-4011 .30-1.4010.66-2:0 10:10-0.1514:5-5.5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:24 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Og ---------------- 1 0-101 5-1011 40-1 501 2 0-6.0 10.03-0-0514 5-5 5 1 <2 Low --------- 10 10 1 5 1-2 Ogeecbee ilO-54120-3511'55-1:651 0:6-2 0 10.08-0.1414:5-5:5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:15 1 154-60130-4511*60-1 701 0 6-2:0 10 10-0 1414 5-5 5 1 <2 iLow --------- 10 15 1 160-72115-3011:55-1:651 0:6-2.0 10:10-0:1414:5-5:5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:15 1 Os ---------------- 0-8 1 1-1011 35-1 601 6.0-20 10 03-0 1013 6-6.0 1 <2 Low --------- 10.10 1 5 1 --- Osier 1 8-651 1-1011:40-1:601 6.0-20 10:03-0:1013:6-6.0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10.10 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I Po ----------------1 0-111 7-1811 35-1 501 0 6-2 0 10 12-0 2013 6-5 5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 28 1 3 1 2-9 Pocomoke 111-161 5-1811:40-1:601 2:0-6:0 10:06-0:1013:6-5:5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:20 1 1 116-721 5-3011.40-1 .601 0.6-6.0 10.06-0. 1813.6-5.5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 .20 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 RmB --------------- 1 0-651 <3 11 40-1 601 >20 10 02-0 0513 6-5 5 1 <2 Low --------- 10 10 1 5 1 <1 Rimini 165-721 1-5 11:50-1:701 6.0-20 10:03-0:0713:6-5:5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:10 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I Ru. --------------- 1 0-121 <10 11 35-1 601 6 0-20 10 06-0 1013 6-5.5 1 <2 Low --------- 10 17 1 5 1 3-15 Rutlege 112-721 <10 11:40-1:601 6:0-20 10:04-0:0813:6-5.5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:17 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 See footnote at end of table. 132 _Soil Survey TABLE 15.--PHYSICAL AND CHEMICAL PROPERTIES OF THE SOILS--Continued I I I I I I I Erosion Map symbol and 1,DepthICla Moist I Permea- lAva'lable, Soil lSalinitylShrink-swelli factors Organic I y I I I I I I soil name I I I bulk I bility I water reaction I Ipotential I- matter t , density i !Capacity i I I K 1 T I in i Pct 1 Glcm --I,- In1hr 1, Inlin pH mmhos/c---i SfA, SfB --------- 10-141 4-1011.40-1 501 2 0-20 10 05-0.1013 6-6 5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 24 1 4 1.5-1 Suffolk 114-44110-3311.40-1:501 0:6-2 0 10:10-0 1513:6-5:5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:24 1 1 144-561 4-1011.40-1 .5012 .0-26 10.04-0:1013 . 6-5.5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10. 171 SmA -------------- 10-6 110-1811 40-1 601 0 6-6 0 10 09-0 1214 5-6 5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 28 1 5 1 <1 Summerton 16-61135-7011:30-1:501 0:2-0:6 10:10-0:1414:5-5:5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:28 1 1 Ud.* Udorthents Udipsamments Wa --------------- 10-111 5-2011 30-1 601 0 6-2 0 10 10-0 1514 5-6 0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 24 1 5 1.5-5 Wahee 111-56135-5511:40-1:6010 ;6-0:2 10:12-0:2013:6-5:5 1 <2 IModerate ---- 10*28 1 1 156-651 --- I --- 1 ;.2-0.6 10.12-0.2013 . 6-5.5 1 <2 IModerate ---- 10:28 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 We --------------- 1 0-221 1-5 11 35-1 601 >20 10 05-0 0814 5-6 5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 10 1 5 5-2 Witherbee 122-801 1-8 11:40-1:701 6.0-20 10:03-0:0814:5-6:5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:10 1 I I I I I I I I I I Wo --------------- 1 0-141 5-1811 45-1 651 2.0-6.0 10 10-0.1513.6-6.0 1 <2 iLow --------- 10.20 1 5 1 2-4 Woodington 114-581 5-1811:45-1:651 2 0-6.0 10:10-0 1513 6-5 5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 20 1 1 1 8-841 3-1811 . 45-1 .651 2 0-20 10.06-0 1513 6-5 1 ---------- 10,10 1 11 5 :5 <2 LOW I I I I I I I YaA -------------- 1 0-8 ilO-2011 30-1.601 2 0-6.0 10.10-0 1514 5-6 5 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 20 1 5 .5-4 Yauhannah 18-40118-3511:30-1.501 0:6-2.0 10 11-0:1614'5-6:0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:24 1 140-48110-3011 30-1 501 2 0-6 0 10:10-0 1514:5-6 0 1 <2 11,ow --------- 10 241 1 148-721 5-1511:30-1:601 2:0-26 10.06-0:1214.5-6:0 1 <2 ILow, --------- 10:171 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Ye --------------- 1 0-141 5-1511 40-1 601 6 0-20 10 06-0 1113.6-6.0 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 15 1 5 1 5-4 Yemassee 114-46118-3511:30-1:501 0:6-2 0 10:11-0*1813 6-5 5 1 <2 ILow ---------- 10*201 146-56112-01.30-1.501 0 .6-2:0 10 11-0:1713:6-5:5 1 <2 fLow --------- 10'20 1 156-721 --- I --- ------------- I-:-- I I I I I I I I Yo --------------- 1 0-16110-2011 30-1 601 0 6-2 0 10 11-0 1515 1-7 8 1 <2 ILow --------- 10 20 1 5 1 1-5 Yonges 116-68118-3511:30-1:601 0:2-0:6 10:13-0:1815:1-8:4 1 <2 ILow --------- 10:17 1 See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the map unit. Horry County, South Carolina 133 TABLE 16.--SOIL AND WATER FEATURES ("Flooding" and "water table" and terms such as "rare," "brief," "apparent," and "perched" are explained in the text. The symbol > means more than. Absence of an entry indicates that the feature is not a concern or that data were not estimated] I I Flooding High water table Ri f corrosion Map symbol and IHydrologicl r- I I I - soil name I group IFrequency I Duration I Months I Depth I Kind IMonths lUncoated IConcret I I I steel I Et Bc.* Beaches Bd** --------------I D INone --------I --- I I I,-l.OlApparentIDec-MaylHigh ----- lHigh. Bladen I I I I I I I I I I BnA ---------------I A INone --------I --- I --- 15.0-6.OiPerched IDec-MarIHigb ----- IHigb. Blanton I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Bo** --------------I D IFrequent ---- IVery bried Jan-Dec 1 +3-0 lApparentiJan-DeclHigh ----- IHigh. Bohicket I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Br ----------------I D INone --------I --- I --- I 0-I.OlApparentINov-MaylModerate IModerate. Brookman I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Ce ----------------I B INone --------I --- I --- 13.5-5.OlApparentIDec-MarlModerate lHigh. Centenary I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ChB ---------------I A INone --------I --- I --- 13.5-5.OlApparentiJan-MariLow ------ lHigh. Chisolm I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Co ----------------I D INone --------I --- I --- I 0-1.5lApparentiNov-ApriHigb-----IHigh. Coxville I I I I I I I I DuA ---------------I C INone --------I --- I --- 12.0-3.OlApparentIDec-ApriHigh ----- lHigh. Duplin I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Ec ----------------i B INone --------I --- I --- 12.5-5.OIApparentINov-AprILow ------ lHigh. Echaw I I EmB ---------------I C INone --------I --- I --- 13.0-4.5lPerched INov-AprIModerate lHigh. Emporia I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I EuA, EuB ----------I C INone --------I --- I --- 11.5-3.5iApparentiDec-MaylModerate IHigh. Eulonia GoA ---------------I B INone --------I --- I --- 12.0-3.OiApparentIDec-ApriModerate IHigh. Goldsboro I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Ho** --------------I D INone --------I --- I --- I 'l-l.OlApparentiNov-AprIHigh-----IHigh. Hobcaw I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Hy** --------------I D lFrequent ---- IVery long IJan-Dec 1 +1-0 lApparentiJan-DeclHigh ----- IHigh. Hobonny I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I i I I Jo** --------------I D IFrequent ---- IBrief to INov-Jul 1 +l-1.51ApparentINov-JunIHigh ----- IHigh. Johnston I I I long. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I KeB ---------------i A INIDII --------1 --- --- 14.0-6.OlApparentiDec-AprILow ------ IHigh. Kenansville I I I I I I I I LaB ---------------I A INone --------1 1 >6.0 1 --- I --- ILow ------ IModerate. Lakeland I I I I I I I I See footnote at end of table. 134 Soil Survey TABLE 16.--SOIL AND WATER FEATURES--Continued Flooding High water table Risk of corrosion Map symbol and IHydrologicl I I i. I I I soil name group IFrequency IDuration I Months I Depth I Kind IMonths IUncoated IConcrete steel I I I Le ---------------- I B/D INone -------- I --- I --- I 0-I.OlApparentiJun-FebiHigh ----- IHigh. Leon I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Ln ----------------- I C INone -------- I --- I --- 10.5-1.5lApparentINov-ApriHigh-----IH'Lgh. Lynchburg I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I LY ----------------- I B/D INone -------- I --- I --- I O-l.OlApparentiJun-FebiHigh ----- IH:Lgh. Lynn Haven I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I i I I Me ----------------- I D IFrequent ---- ILong ------IDec-Apr I 0-l.OIApparentINov-AprIHigh ----- IModerate. Meggett I I NaB ---------------- I C INone -------- I --- I --- 1 @6.0 I --- lHigh ----- IHigh. Nankin I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I NeA ---------------- I C INone -------- I --- I --- 11.5-2.5lApparentIDec-ApriModerate IHigh. Nansemond I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I NhB ---------------- I A INone -------- I --- I @6.0 1 --- I --- IHigh ----- ILow. Newhan I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I NbA ---------------- I B INone -------- I --- I 13.0-6.OlApparentIJan-MarlModerate lHigh. Norfolk I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Og ----------------- I B/D 1 .1 --- I --- I 0-0.5lApparentiDec-MaylHigh ----- lHigh. Ogeechee I INone -------- I I Os ----------------- I A/D lFrequent ---- IBrief -----IDec-Apr I 0-l.OlApparentiNov-MariHigh ----- IHigh. Osier I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I PO ----------------- I B/D INone -------- I --- I --- I 0-0.5lApparentiDec-MaylHigh ----- lHigh. Pocomoke RmB ---------------- I A INone -------- 1 1 @6.0 1 --- ILow ------ ILow. Rimini I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Ru** --------------- I B/D INone -------- I --- I --- I 12-I.OlApparentiDec-MayiHigh ----- lHigh. Rutlege SfA, SfB ----------- I B INone -------- I --- I --- 1 >6.0 I --- IModerate lHigh. Suffolk I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I SmA ---------------- I B INone ---------I --- I --- 1 >6.0 I --- lHigh ----- lHigh. Summerton Ud.* Udorthents Udipsamments Wa ----------------- I D INone -------- I --- I --- 10.5-1.5lApparentiDec-MarlHigh ----- IHigh. Wahee I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I We ----------------- I A/D INone -------- I --- I --- 11.0-2.OiApparentINov-ApriLow ------ IHigh. Witherbee I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Wo ----------------- I B/D INone -------- I --- I --- 10.5-l.OlApparentiDec-MaylHigh ----- IHigh. Woodington I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I See footnote at end of table. Horry County, South Carolina 135 TABLE 16.--SOIL AND WATER FEATURES--Continued Flooding High water table Risk of corrosion Map symbol and 1Hydrologicl I I I I soil name group Frequency Duration Months I Depth I Kind IMonths lUncoated lConcret I I steel YaA --------------- I B lNone --------I --- I --- 11.5-2.5lApparentiDec-MarlModerate lHigh. Yauhannah I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I Ye ---------------- I C iNone --------I --- --- 11.0-1.5lApparentIDec-MariHigh ----- lHigh. Yemassee YO ---------------- I D INone --------I --- I I O-l.OlApparentiNov-ApriHigh ----- lModerate. Yonges I I See description of the map unit for composition and behavior characteristics of the map unit. In the "High water table--Depth" column, a plus sign preceding the range in depth indicates that the water table is above the surface of the soil. The first numeral in the range indicates how high the water rises above the surface. The second numeral indicates the depth below the surface. 136 S)oil Survey TABLE 17.--FNGINEERING INDEX TEST DATA [All soils except Bladen are the typical pedon for the series. Their location is described in the "Classification of the Soils" section. Dashes indicate data were not available. NP means nonplastic] i i Grain-size distribution 'I i Series name, report Classification I I Liquid IPlasti- number, horizon and I Percentage Percentage__ I limit I city depth in inches 1AASHTO lUnifiedl passing sieve-- smaller tha I I index I I I i No., Ro.1, NO; 1.02 .005 .002 4 10 60 20 imm mm mm Pct I Bladen* (S77SCO51-7 Ap ---------0 to 6 IA-2-4(0) ISM 1100 1100 188 1 35 1 --- 1 21 1 --- I --- I NP Btgl ------- 10 to 24 IA-6(10) ICL_ 1100 1100 199 1 66 1 --- 1 54 1 --- 1 40_ 1 19 Cg --------- @58 to 72 IA-3(0) ISP SM 1100 1100 191 1 6 1 --- 1 5 1 NP Brookman: (S77SCO51-6) Ap ---------0 to 10 IA-4(05) IML 1100 1100 193 1 59 1 --- 1 41 1 --- 1 32 1 7 Btg2 ------- :22 to 46 IA-7-6(19)1 CH 1100 1100 197 1 82 1 --- 1 68 1 --- 1 54 1 37 Bcg -------- 46 to 60 IA-2-4(0) ISM SC 1100 1100 192 1 32 1 --- 1 24 1 --- 1 23 1 7 Duplin: (S80SCO51-6) A---------- 0 to 9 IA-2-4(0) ISM 1100 1100 198 1 23 1 --- 1 8 1 --- I --- I NP Btl -------- 17 to 28 IA-6(10) ICL 1100 1100 1100 1 68 1 --- 1 50 1 --- 1 38 1 19 Bt2 -------- :28 to 35 IA-7-6(17)1 CL 1100 1100 1100 1 79 1 --- 1 53 1 --- 1 48 1 27 Lynchburg: (S80SCO51-1) Ap ---------0 to 8 IA-2-4(0) ISP-SM 1100 1 99 197 1 11 1 --- 1 40 1 --- I --- I NF Btg --------- 13 to 42 IA-6(07) ICL 1100 1100 199 1 60 37 34 16 Bcg -------- 42 to 58 IA-6(06) ICL 1100 1100 199 1 56 1 --- 1 32 1 --- 1 33 1 14 Norfolk: (SSOSCO51-3) Ap ---------0 to 13 IA-4(0) ISM 1100,1100 193 1 37 1 --- 1 8 1 --- I --- I NF Btl -------- 16 to 39 IA-6(04) ICL 1100 1100 194 1 52 1 --- 1 30 1 --- 1 27 1 12 Bt2 --------- 39 to 46 IA-6(07) ICL 1100 1100 196 1 57 1 --- 1 34 1 --- 1 34 1 16 Osier: (S80SC051-8) A---------- 0 to 8 IA-2-4(0) ISM 1100 1100 171 1 22 1 --- 1 18 1 --- I NP Cgl --------8 to 21 IA-2-4(0) ISM 1100 1100 171 1 17 1 --- 1 14 1 --- I --- I Nr Cg2 -------- :21 to 48 IA-3(0) ISP-SM 1100 1100 176 1 7 1 --- 1 5 1 --- I --- I NP Summerton: (S80SCO51-12) Ap -------- 0 to 6 IA-4(04) IML 1100 1100 190 1 54 1 --- 1 11 1 NP Bt2 ------- 12 to 26 IA-7-6(13)1 CL 1100 1100 195 1 79 1 --- 1 43 1 --- 1 43 1 22 BU ------- 26 to 37 IA-7-6(14)1 CL 1100 1100 190 1 81 1 --- 1 46 1 --- 1 46 1 21 Yemassee: (S77SC-51-3) A---------- 0 to 7 IA-2-4(0) ISM 1100 1100 192 1 25 1 --- 1 15 Btgl -------- 14 to 28 IA-6(04) ISC 1100 1100 195 1 47 1 37 1 32 1 14 Btg2 ------- 28 to 46 IA-6(07) ICL 1100 1100 197 1 51 1 --- 1 43 39 20 About 5 miles southwest of Socastee, about 1.2 mile southwest of St. James Church and school, about 0.6 mile northwest of South Carolina Hwy. 544, about 400 feet northeast of road; Map 89. Horry County, South Carolina 137 TABLE 18.--CLASSIFICATION OF THE SOILS Soil name Family or higher taxonomic class Bladen -------------------- Clayey, mixed, thermic Typic Albaquults Blanton ------------------- Loamy, siliceous, thermic Grossarenic Paleudults Bohicket ------------------ Fine, mixed, nonacid, thermic Typic Sulfaquents Brookman ------------------ Fine, mixed, thermic Typic Umbraqualfs *Centenary ----------------- Sandy, siliceous, thermic Grossarenic Entic Haplobumods Chisolm ------------------- Loamy, siliceous, thermic Arenic Hapludults Coxville ------------------ Clayey, kaolinitic, thermic Typic Paleaquults Duplin -------------------- Clayey, kaolinitic, thermic Aquic Paleudults Echaw-- ------- Sandy, siliceous, thermic Entic Haplohumods Emporia ------------------- Fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic Typic Hapludults Eulonia ------------------- Clayey, mixed, thermic Aquic Hapludults Goldsboro ----------------- Fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic Aquic Paleudults Hobcaw -------------------- Fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic Typic Umbraquults Hobonny ------------------- Euic, thermic, Typic Medisaprists Johnston ------------------ Coarse-loamy, siliceous, acid, thermic Cumulic Humaquepts *Kenansville --------------- Loamy, siliceous, thermic Arenic Hapludults Lakeland ------------------ Thermic, coated Typic Quartzipsamments Leon ---------------------- Sandy, siliceous, thermic Aeric Haplaquods Lynchburg ----------------- Fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic Aeric Paleaquults Lynn Haven ---------------- Sandy, siliceous, thermic Typic Haplaquods *Meggett ------------------- Fine, mixed, tbermic Typic Albaqualfs Nankin -------------------- Clayey, kaolinitic, tbermic Typic Hapludults Nansemond ----------------- Coarse-loamy, siliceous, tbermic Aquic Hapludults Newban -------------------- Thermic, uncoated Typic Quartzipsamments Norfolk ------------------- Fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic Typic Paleudults Ogeechee ------------------ Fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic Typic Ochraquults Osier --------------------- Siliceous, thermic Typic Psammaquents Pocomoke ------------------ Coarse-loamy, siliceous, thermic Typic Umbraquults Rimini -------------------- Sandy, siliceous, thermic Grossarenic Entic Haplohumods Rutlege ------------------- Sandy, siliceous, thermic Typic Humaquepts *Suffolk ------------------- Fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic Typic Hapludults *Summerton ----------------- Clayey, kaolinitic, thermic Typic Paleudults Udipsamments -------------- Udipsamments Udorthents ---------------- Udorthents Wahee --------------------- Clayey, mixed, thermic Aeric Ochraquults Witherbee ----------------- Sandy, siliceous, thermic Entic Haplaquods *Woodington ---------------- Coarse-loamy, siliceous, thermic Typic Paleaquults Yauhannah ----------------- Fine-loamy, siliceous, tbermic Aquic Hapludults Yemassee ------------------ Fine-loamy, siliceous, thermic Aeric Ochraquults Yonges -------------------- Fine-loamy, mixed, thermic Typic Ochraqualfs The soil is a taxadjunct to the series. See text for a description of those characteristics of the soil that are outside the range of the series. U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE : 1986 0 - 477-204 QL 3 @3 Ea M CD 0 a' w I or C, Z zr ., [email protected] ", I X,Kfloo No'nia E5., M . Z D'Q 0 0 0 CD CD 2!7 m:l zrw z C' CD -R- C, 0 r W :3 Gap W,. 0 @Z: o ID A61 CD B 10 e I Cu zv Cl) :3 Lake x 'Pa Al. Re 19 a ICY C 42 Z' N [email protected] m x e4, 'k Pa LA ear 61 It [email protected] '9 x ILI > > IRV COA lk nt [email protected] 9s cn 0 c -q X 0 c --i 0:1 H P H H H n- H H 0 '0 Z ;0 "V m 0 > 0 z 'OL 2. [email protected] z - ESP .5 z [email protected] > > > T Z > VT ;u 0 0' m r- m > 2 0 0 A --.3 Sc z M, -< Z 9, - g - < > F m .7 M m ,,, .0 [email protected] m M C-: V @ g el ' 0 5 [email protected] 8 1 o- m > 0 > M< 'g E.6 a a 2 =:, -b 0 A < C) m G) 0 A .0 ;k M. FF z H 0. 'a Z> M. z z U) g 2 0 M I - , - 101 - 0 > oc C: m < ; i 0. 0 _-4 Gr" 57 Ob r._ M r- - - .. . cm) < z m 2 T m z 'f .1 R < 0 0 3 0 r- m - m m = > tA m C: Pl - U) M 0 -M < < -n 0 a 0 - . - 0 0 < C 0 0 > 0 > c) cl 0 z C) S% 0 & lw -0 b r 0 1 2z 0, 2 ct M v m 0 0 w z o I = go z cn 56 01. [email protected] R - M, I m 0 'z 0 0 Z. C) (n rr, z L ;0 m 3 m m > CL L" 2. m [email protected] ; 0 11 m a M:2 Fg rs m > :3. 1. g m o 'a Cl 9 C/) * - < 5 om 0 a COL 4 > > 3: M 10 3 > '.0 -w z U 31 > m @ a 19 " , -4 1 -. -4 0 g or E5 z m 0 Z > L., _3 > > 0 0 m [email protected] @ a < 0 m -M m -M - < PL g m z > OL . > < > > m m -0 > 0 'o . * - @@ 0 !k 0 > VT s' . a V =g 0 CL 05 T. m z T. 0 10 w U) 0 0 < 0 3 0 03 Ol z UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SOUTH CAROLINA AGRICULTURAL EXPERIMENT STATION SOIL CONSERVATION SERVICE HORRY COUNTY, SOUTJ CAROLINA SOUTH CAROLINA LAND RESOURCES CONSERVATION COMMISSION SOIL LEGENO CONVENTWNAL ANU SPECAL SYMBOLS LEGEND SPE0AL SYMBOLS FOR The first capital letter is the initial one of the soil name. The CULTURAL FEATURES second position is used to further identify the map units and to =L SURVEV identify additional mapping units that have the same initial capital lette OLS No posi r, The second position is a lower case letter. The third [email protected] MISCELLANEOUS CULTURAL FEATURES SOIL DELINEATIONS AND SYMB :@[email protected] tion, if used, is a capital letter and connotes slope class. [email protected] without a slope letter are for nearly level soils. Nationa state or province Farmstead, house ESCARPMENTS (omit in urban areas) County or parish Church Bedrock I (points down slope) Minor ciLil division School Other than bedrock SYMBOL N A M E Indian (points down slope) Reservation (national forest or park, Indian mound (label) [email protected], Mound SHORT STEEP SLOPE ............. state forest or park, ac Beaches and large airport) Located object (label) 0 To- GULLY - Bd Bladen fine sandy loam BnA Blanton sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes Land grant Tank (label) o Gas DEPRESSION OR SINK 0 So Bohicket silty clay loam Br Brookman loam Limit of soil survey (label) Wells, oil or gas SOI L SAMPLE SITE 0 Ce Centenary fine sand (normally not shown) ChB Chisolm fine sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes Field [email protected] matchline & neatline Co Coxville fine sandy loam I Windmill MISCELLANEOUS AD HOC [email protected] (label) DuA Duplin loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes Kitchen midden Blowout Ec Echaw sand Small airport, airfield, park, oilfield, N-f EmB Emporia loamy fine sand, 2 to 6 percent slopes cemetery, or flood pool Clay spot X. EuA Eulonia loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes STATE COORDINATE TICK EuB Eulonia loamy fine sand, 2 to 6 percent slopes Gravelly spot LAND DIVISION CORNERS L -L GoA Goldsboro loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes (sectionsland land grants) @IUATER FEATURES Gumbo, stick or scabby spot (sodic) 0 ROADS Ho Hobcaw fine sandy loam Hy Hobonny muck Dumps and other similar Divided (median shown DRAINAGE non soil areas Jo Johnston loam if scale permits) Prominent hill or peak Other roads Perennial, double line KeB Kenansville fine sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes Trail I Rock outcrop LaB Lakeland sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes Perennial, single line (includes sandstone and shale) Le Leon fine sand ROAD EMqLEM & DESIGNATIONS Intermittent Saline spot + Ln Lynchburg loamy fine sand Ly Lynn Haven sand Interstate Drainage end Sandy spot Me Meggett loam Federal Severely eroded spot NaB Nankin fine sandy loam, 2 to 6 percent slopes Canals or ditches NeA Nansemond loamy fine sand. 0 to 2 percent slopes Slide or slip (tips point upslope) NhB Newhan fine sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes State Double-line (label) CANAL_ NoA Norfolk loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes County, farm or ranch F1 -2 873 Stony spot, very stony spot 0 co Og Ogeechee loamy fine sand Drainage and/or irrigation Os Osier loamy sand RAILROAD LAKES, PONDS AND RESERVOIRS Po Pocomoke fine sandy loam POWER TRANSMISSION LINE --------------- RmB Rimini sand, 0 to 6 percent slopes (normally not shown) Perennial Ru Rutlege loamy sand PIPE LINE' 1-4 ([email protected] not shown) Intermittent x_,nt i_', SfA Suffolk loamy fine sand, 0 to 2 percent slopes FENCE SfB Suffolk loamy fine sand, 2 to 6 percent slopes (norm not shown) MISCELLANEOUS WATER FEATURES SmA Surnmerton fine sandy loam, 0 to 2 percent slopes LEVEES Ld Udorthents and Udipsamments, well drained Marsh or swamp 4L& Without road Wa Wahee fine sandy loam Spring We Witherbee sand With [email protected] Wo Woodington fine sandy loam Well, artesian YaA Yauhannah fine sandy loam, 0 to 2 percent slopes With railroad Ye Yemassee loamy fine sand I Well, irrigation Yo Yonges fine sandy loam DAMS l Large ([email protected] scale) Wet spot Medium pr small PITS Gravel pil Mine or uarry --3 IV gap 19 A61 [email protected] [email protected] 'D-- 6NI- Ob 'lip W unti CL ci 19 12, 1919 M 7 if 19 IN L /> [email protected] @,reek -CIO, 00, O."Do Z7 L A OlqV T 0 OV 00, 0 W CP @t 0 ci [email protected] Lo 0 > m HORRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SHEET NUMBER 2 (Joins sheet 1) E Le Ce Wo PC Ec j Ru 4 Ly VD Ru Le (D Jo Wo (D Ce Ec WIDi, LaB Le LL PC 0 Le 0 R u T Ec Po cp (D L e L e C e C e Ly Ln Le Po LaB Ru Le Wo wo Ln Ln a PC Wo Ln 0 KeB 0 Le 0 Ru 0 (D NeA Ru Ln os KeS 0 Ce 00 0 Le e v i PC I NeA (D Wo Ce Ce CD R u N KeEl R u C e R u Le NeA Po KeS Wo NeA w (3) eA Ru 0 Ce ce Ru 0 Wo NeA C) KeB GoA (D KeEl KeB PC u-1 Ce SfA SfEl NeA 0 NeA KeEl N PC Po (D wo .1 KeB Ru GoA KeEl w Ce 76 0 a5 GoA NeA A J. L 400 CD 0 PC NeA BnA Wo fB NoA 'Ru KeB GoA:@ Emil eB E w -.* * 4: @@Ln NeA KeEl Ru GO NoA N.A SfA Le Ru R u-/' p -FJi.. sheet 5) 12 575 000 FFFT HORRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLIW SHEET NUMBER 1 12 575 000 FEET 4. N Jo (D w Ec Jo Po Le Le Ru Ec Ru w Po Le E c Po Ly Po (D Ec w e Le Ec Ru Ec c Le NeA Wo c Ec Ec Ec Ce (D Jo Le Po Ec 4D W IY Ly (D Ec Le Le Ec Ec Le Po NeA Jo We os Ec p Ec Po Ru' Le Ec Le We W Io,,-, op? Ru (D Wo Ce Wo Ru (Joins sh I HORRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SHEET NUMBER 4 N "Y V, u- 7hree RmB R Jo RmB 'jo 0 rn iz RU 0 Rm0' Le- Ha,#4 Islond Rp LaB Jo RmB RmB RmB w Jo Ru Ly Ec Lb j?55b000FFE7 I (Joins sheef.7) I HORRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SHEET NUMBER 3 2 600 000 FEET Wo GoA KeB GoA GoA (1) NoA Wo 62 1000 FEET KeB Wo GoA 0 Ln GoA\ KeS W 0 GoA, Wo GoA wo GoA Wo NoA a) 0 Wo GoA GoA Po n 0- wo NoA GoA NoA r'o @(D (D Ln 0 0 Wo a t Wo Ln GoA EmB Wo ot Wo NoA Ln Wo Po (D UOA ((DD Ag t 0 co NoA G oA Wo KeB GoA NoA ot- Wo NoA KeB Ln GoA GoA P o Ln Wo GoA NoA m GoA Ln NoA NoA Wo wo GoA Po v ox, (D EmB @G( GoA GoA GoA oA (D 01 G SmA (@A Wck- NoA K B FmB NoA f-, No, Ln Gc ,/p.\ Wo v shp -,f A.) I @ CAROLINA - SHEET NUMBER 6 HORRY COUNTY, SOUTH (joirls sheet 3) Amw GOA NoA EmB GOA Wo w GOA 0 A N GOAG Ln [email protected] Ln Wo NoA EmB a) GOA 142 GOA GOA Wo Ln GOA GOA Wo '@A eA N A NoA Po e B NoA W 0 mA GOA GOA mA :E IZ NoA w Ln W.16* u- (D GOA "(D 0 Wo KeB 0 270 GOA po [email protected] GOA NoA (D NoA NoA Po @x NoA Wo GOA KeB NoA NoA GOA _,keA pb NoA 0 WO Wo Ln Ln ........... NaB GOA CD Wo ':A", GOA NeA NoA W6 NeA -4 0 Po Q!2) NeA NoA GOA Wo Wo fV GO( NoA (D @Aop- NeA A i 0 0 0 GOA Wo PC wo GOA w D SmA (n NoA GOA . . .... ........... @nA -Nr m Po Q07 @[email protected] wo KeB [email protected] 0 Ln 4' W Wo NeA 4" 0 0 Os 5" SfA swalq GOA Os Ln NeA e BnA 0 Ci GOA Ce Wo G o ID 0 0 0 0 0 [email protected]? Ln Wo 'p, c Go GOA GOA NoA 59 NoA Ln NoA GOA GOA NoA NoA PO GOA GOA T 0 GOA NeA [email protected] CA qoA NeA Wo NeA W. Ke GOA Po GOA ioA CA Po GOP, GOA Ln GOA n Wo 0 GpA Wo (Joins she HORRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA - SHE- ET NUMBER 5 12575000FEET B e Po Ku v Ru tmt5 s R 176 1 Ne GoA KeB NoA Go 4eA (D Ln NoA EmB GoA W o SfA N Ru LaB NeA e Ce Ru I [email protected] NeA NoA L w NoA NoA Go G C N Ive NeA (D Le Po GoA L Ru Po N-A NeA NeA NoA GoA Wo Le Le GoA Avo GoA KeB (D- (D .( Ru KeB u NoA KeB NeA po W, NoA Ce Wo Le NOA GoA xZ 'WO GoA GoA, Ln I NNI Ly ;14- NeA P. Ly Wo GoA CO NeA Ln GoA NoA NoA Ce P0 Ln Wo 0 u- -0 (D GoA Ln BIG BA Y GoA oA L* 0 z Wo uo Po NoA Co Ln Ru NeA GoA P o Ec Ru Le NoA GoA Po Co My& Ce GoA -LY Ce NoA wo NoA Ln, N A Ru 0 GoA Ru 0 NeA 10 Ce C-0 Ly GoA LaB Ly <D NoA Ly Ec LaB Ln 4D Ec Ru CD P0 GoA E.mB 0 C e Po KeB NeA L e NoA EmB 0 LaB NeA NeA W 0 k Wo Ln ,@G. A cedar NoA NoA P, KeB KeB Wo [email protected] KeB GoA Ln Ln NoA GoA * , oA Po NeA GoA Ne e-->,KeB GoA Wo rAA HORRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA - SHEET NUMBER 8 (8) (Joins sheet 5 KeB NeA [email protected] INOA N GoA @@KeBy [email protected]@ 0 IN eA Po NeA KeB G w [email protected] wo Wo IF Yo Ec LaB GoA (D Pd c 0 (L @.KeB Q Ec TW, eA NeA '-'Po NeA Ne x Ec Po Wo u- w 0 0 Le Ec KeB Ln GoA (D PO NeA Ec Ce Ce p NeA GoA u Po (D uj Yo NeA NeA o -Le yo GoA NeA Yo C e Le LaB Po L KeB Po NeA Ec GoA k 4. SfA Po 0 0 GoA NeA @GoA Ln in 0 Ec Le k 0 0 0 (D 01 Ce Ec Ce Ce PO SfA 0 0 4vl . Ku Ec PO Po i Ec Ln 0 0 C-4 GoA Ec Po 0 W6 m po cl Ru [email protected] 0 Fifteenmile GoA 0 Bay 0 -'P0 'NZ: 0 0 Ec 41 L e P0 KeB a Po ',Z,# Le Os tv "Bay Ec Ec Po NeA Ec (D (D Le"- Os Ru Ge Wo (D Ru Po Ru ce Ru Le NeA Ln (Joinssheet 13) 125750GOFEET HORRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA - SHEET NUMBER 7 550 Doo1w, P-li". [email protected] 4) Air Le Ec Le RmB Ru e LY ja RmE IRu Jo Jo Le c'o Le RmB Ru Le Ra Ly NL. Jo Ec N-, w Jo 7- oe Jo Ru Ce Ru RmS Le Ec Ec Ec Le Ce Ec Ru jo Ly Rmg Ec w Ec Jo Ce ce Ec Ly Ec Le Ru Ru Ce Mash Ly Ce J,ake Jo KeB Le Ec Le ik Ly Ly/ Ce Ru RmB Ru Nl Ly RmB RmS Ru Ec Ec Ce (D Le e Le Wo @Ly Jo ce ftme Ec Ce Ru Ru RmB RmB E Ly RmB Ec Le R 8 J F Ec Ru Ce Po Ec Le Ru we w (D /J. "ke 0 Le Ec Ec Le L. Rat Jo 16b LaB Ho ic Ec P-'\ HORRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SHEET NUMBER 10 (Joins mset, sheet 311 T N A- G.A Wo 7 7" GOA Po Wo p Ln GOA Wo Ln 7 41 Ln Wo wo 0 GOA GOA Wo PO Wo GOA U. Wo Ln Ln GOA Ln 0 GOA (D 0 (D 0 Wo Wo cl (D GOA Ln NoA GOA GOA Ln Ln Ln GOA NoA Wo 0 Wo GOA Ln GOA 0 Ln GOA (D GOA GOA L n GOA Ln Ln Wo A,- NoA eGOA 0 A W 0 G GOA NoA Ln NoA L KeB 01 Ln GOA Go 0 A7,, N t.OA w 0 0 Nv. 1 11 Ln OT a 0 KeB NoA NoA Wo N Ln [email protected] (D u (D cl) NoA GOA SmA GO KeB Ln GOA QoA GOA Ln L pf GOA GOA 0 40 Ln (D Go., h 04 Ln L NoA A "d 0 N GOA Wo 0 GOA GOA v Go/ .4oA Go Ln a) N?A NoA NoA 0 1 EmB NoA L 7 KeB KeB Ln a) Ln GOP K *K B G, oA GOA 0 EmB Wo Wo w YO Ln yo KeB BnA A 06 KeB 41 Fo Ln w Go Wo Wo P, GO Ln e wo Ln KeB KeB Wtche'@@ KeB YO NoA Wo 0 0 2N. A) Yo Wo NoA Ln oA Ln Wo 0 GOA -%[email protected] I ... [email protected]@ylo GO n Po eB KeB Ln Wo Wo -W 0 K @eB .19, 0. OEm KeS Wo aB oA 0 4A n GOA /Goi "I e-xr, eB NaIB Go ___JJomis sheet _15JJ2 625 000 FEET I K4B f HORRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SHEET NUMBER 9 12 600 000 FEET Wo Ln Wo Po \,G.A GOA Wo D KeB Wo NeA GOA e GOA po GOA GOA GOA 2 Wo 59 GOA Ln GOA No 0 Ln Ln oA GOA GA (D Wo GOA Ln Ln Ln (D 0 [email protected]@ CON GOA 0 W1 GOA z Ln GOA xw NoA A < wo 0 D Wo we NoA wo GOA (D Wo GOA Ln KeB GOA Wo p oA > n oA G G GOA NoA NoA GOA 0 GOA GOA a) Ln )G A A L GOA NK 4717i W6 GOA 0 Wo GOA NoA Wo (Go A (D Me NoA GOA (D GOA Me 0) G w Wo G A Fms GOA Wo (D < 4P, NoA [email protected]' Ln t [email protected] GOA GOA EmB (D Ln Me Ln -GOA Me GOA GOA Ln (D NoA GOA w EmB 1. EmB NoA co (D Wo NoA 0 Wo e. oA Mt Olive NoA Kel´┐Ż (eB, GOA GOA p EmB GOA NgA Nau NeA GOA w Me @yo Me NoA W&I - WO wo SfB Ln wt GOA EmB GOA NoA EMB Wo DA Ln 09 Me EmB me\ GOA NaB GOA GOA Wo Wo GOA r GoA Eme NoA 'I_n Ln (D NPA GOA NoA NaB Me A Me No Ln w Nam GOA GOA B me KeB Em KeB GOA Ln 0 L 11-11 A --- ---- KeB 0) wo w Wo A GOA GOA EmS GOA NoA NoA Wo Wo B 0 KeS 1-0) GOA Me GOA me EmB Wo 'Vo n GOA J1, GOA L Me Ln GOA 9 B 0 imB Wo GOA NoA GOA Ln EmB Wo SfA /Ln N % WO isox Wo HORRY COUNTY, SOUTH @CAROLINA SHEET NUMBER 12 (Joins si" 7) 1 JL. A0 Le N (B Ec [email protected] E c jo Hb Ec W, N $4 Ec RmB Lat% e v eA Le [email protected] U) Ce N% Ru Ce NeA NeA Ec Ec Ce "r e- 1-7 4 4., LaB Le NeA ee L woo r v LaS C e Po 1w- Le Ru NeA LaB C e ;Le'- :.Ly Ru Mill Bay NeA m Le Ai @Z a) [email protected]@ NeA 'JiG Ce p Le C e Le Le Ec NeA c%l BA NeA 0 Le 0 NeA NeA Le 0 -Ec NeA E c Ln NeA Ce ff LaB Ly r- a. L n GOA uptovin LaB [NeA Ly w Ho\ wo Ec E c e Ru LaB Ru HO GOA Ec 0 L GOA NeA LaS (D NeA He Ec (D Ln G.. A Ln Ho GOA BnA og Le KeB GOA og LaB Jo og Ln Jo Po JO 23 LJoins sheet 18) 12 550 DOC) FEET HORRY COUNTY, SOUTH [email protected] SHEET NUMBER 11 L 12 54 1 000 FEET All F W/ Jo N., Jo RmB 0 [email protected] INY Jo 4- Mash Lake Jo Ger Ly Gut jo L T'@ Jo eo T Jo RmB Ly jo 4:@ Fro) RmB a) Jo mB Ho RmB Gerald Lake Ye J. RmB jo Jo RmB 'z RmB (Jcyins upper right) 12546000FEET Ho 5000-FOOT GRID TICKS HORRY COUNTY, SOUTH ICAROLINA - SHEET NUMBER 14 (Joirm sheet 9) (3 1- 1 [email protected]" I Ae" KeB E,B GOA GOA GOA a N GbA a"'13 Wo GOA NoA EmB Vo [email protected] GOA GOA Wo ".7 Ln [email protected] A Gc Wo e., GOA 0 GOA u- Ln Wo NoA Me 8 En- co) ON- Ln Wo loA Wo lov Wo 4D 9, Wo Wo Wo GO 0 GOA GOA NoA GOA GOP, (D YO Me Wo YO Co Me YO (D Wo GOA Wo GOA EmB NoA EmB NoA Co Wo NoA Wo EmB 0 Go- GOA yo 0 @i EmB 0 o' 0' N.A EmB 0 Me Wo [email protected] GdA LII (e [email protected] Ln NoA GOA Me :Wo A" C 0 Co Wo u in, GOA GOA /-Q 0 GOA 0 Erne C) GOA 0 0 Wo GOA EmB 4 0- 0 0 D SfA Wo 6 Jo cli co EmB c NoA -0 GOP' 0 GOA 0 OLA L n 0 GOA EmB Ln GOA 0 water 0 1 GOA 10 917 Wo 0 SfA 4f GOA WO < [email protected] n cn Co Wo GOA 'WoA 0 EmB GOA k WO t Ln Jo GOA 0 NoA GOA Co GOA NoA (D NoA (D GOA GOA Yo EmB Ln Jo GOA co 0 Jo GOA Wo EmB NoA EmB EmB 41 oA Wo GOA Em 0 M Co nGOA 41 W.n [email protected] eet [email protected] 12 600 000 LE T HORRY COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA SHEET NUMBER 13 ET 2 575 000 FE A, L 4, (DIG A (GQ Ln E. 0 R [email protected] Q, ri 4 le, Ly, n KeB Ec E @,p C/, [email protected] Ly [email protected] 14 lqeA KU A IRE Le Ru eA @l v [email protected] NeA ;T NeA Po Lio V w @A v SfA NeA NeA NeA (D Ec @@ @07, V A 0 v 4y GoA jeA ce AL NeA Ly vv Ec `[email protected] ro v -i .......... 40