[Senate Report 117-39]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]


                                                       Calendar No. 129
                                                    

 117th Congress  }                                         {   Report
                                SENATE 
 1st   Session   }                                         {   117-39
                                                        
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     

                                                       

        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2022

                              R E P O R T

                         [TO ACCOMPANY S. 2792]

                                   ON

     TO AUTHORIZE APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2022 FOR MILITARY 
ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, FOR MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, AND 
   FOR DEFENSE ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, TO PRESCRIBE 
   MILITARY PERSONNEL STRENGTHS FOR SUCH FISCAL YEAR, AND FOR OTHER 
                                PURPOSES

                               ----------                              

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES
                          UNITED STATES SENATE
                          









  September 22 (legislative day, September 21), 2021.--Ordered to be 
                                printed
                                
                                
                                
                                
                                
                                

        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2022
        
        
        
        
        
        
                                                        Calendar No. 129
        
        
        
117th Congress  }                                             {   Report
                                   SENATE
 1st Session    }                                             {   117-39
                                                              
_______________________________________________________________________                                     

                                                       
 
        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2022

                              R E P O R T

                         [TO ACCOMPANY S. 2792]

                                   ON

     TO AUTHORIZE APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2022 FOR MILITARY 
ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, FOR MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, AND 
   FOR DEFENSE ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, TO PRESCRIBE 
   MILITARY PERSONNEL STRENGTHS FOR SUCH FISCAL YEAR, AND FOR OTHER 
                                PURPOSES

                               __________

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES

                          UNITED STATES SENATE





  September 22 (legislative day, September 21), 2021.--Ordered to be 
                                printed
                                
                                
                                
                                
                                
                             ______

              U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING OFFICE 
 45-585                WASHINGTON : 2021 
                                 


  

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES

                   JACK REED, Rhode Island, Chairman
JEANNE SHAHEEN, New Hampshire        JAMES M. INHOFE, Oklahoma
KIRSTEN E. GILLIBRAND, New York      ROGER F. WICKER, Mississippi
RICHARD BLUMENTHAL, Connecticut      DEB FISCHER, Nebraska
MAZIE K. HIRONO, Hawaii              TOM COTTON, Arkansas
TIM KAINE, Virginia                  MIKE ROUNDS, South Dakota
ANGUS S. KING, Jr., Maine            JONI ERNST, Iowa
ELIZABETH WARREN, Massachusetts      THOM TILLIS, North Carolina
GARY C. PETERS, Michigan             DAN SULLIVAN, Alaska
JOE MANCHIN III, West Virginia       KEVIN CRAMER, North Dakota
TAMMY DUCKWORTH, Illinois            RICK SCOTT, Florida
JACKY ROSEN, Nevada                  MARSHA BLACKBURN, Tennessee
MARK KELLY, Arizona                  JOSH HAWLEY, Missouri
                                     TOMMY TUBERVILLE, Alabama
                   Elizabeth L. King, Staff Director
                John A. Bonsell, Minority Staff Director

                                  (II)

  
                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
REPORT TO ACCOMPANY S. 2792
Purpose of the Bill..............................................     1
Committee Overview...............................................     2
Budgetary Effects of This Act (Sec. 4)...........................     3
Summary of Discretionary Authorizations and Budget Authority 
  Implication....................................................     3
DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AUTHORIZATIONS.................     5
TITLE I--PROCUREMENT.............................................     5
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................     5
        Authorization of appropriations (sec. 101)...............     5
    Subtitle B--Army Programs....................................     5
        Multiyear procurement authority for AH-64E Apache 
          helicopters (sec. 121).................................     5
        Multiyear procurement authority for UH-60M and HH-60M 
          Black Hawk helicopters (sec. 122)......................     5
        Report and limitations on acquisition of Integrated 
          Visual Augmentation System (sec. 123)..................     6
        Modification of deployment by the Army of interim cruise 
          missile defense capability (sec. 124)..................     6
    Subtitle C--Navy Programs....................................     6
        Extension of prohibition on availability of funds for 
          Navy port waterborne security barriers (sec. 131)......     6
        Analysis of certain radar investment options (sec. 132)..     7
        Extension of report on Littoral Combat Ship mission 
          packages (sec. 133)....................................     7
        Extension of procurement authorities for certain 
          amphibious shipbuilding programs (sec. 134)............     7
        Limitation on decommissioning or inactivating a battle 
          force ship before the end of expected service life 
          (sec. 135).............................................     7
        Acquisition, modernization, and sustainment plan for 
          carrier air wings (sec. 136)...........................     8
        Improving oversight of Navy contracts for shipbuilding, 
          conversion, and repair (sec. 137)......................     8
    Subtitle D--Air Force Programs...............................     8
        Required minimum inventory of tactical airlift aircraft 
          (sec. 141).............................................     8
        Extension of inventory requirement for Air Force fighter 
          aircraft (sec. 142)....................................     9
        Prohibition on use of funds for retirement of A-10 
          aircraft (sec. 143)....................................     9
        Requirements relating to reports on fighter aircraft 
          (sec. 144).............................................     9
        Prohibition on additional F-35 aircraft for the Air 
          National Guard (sec. 145)..............................    10
        Prohibition on availability of funds for reducing the 
          number of KC-135 aircraft of the Air National Guard 
          designated as primary mission aircraft inventory (sec. 
          146)...................................................    10
        Authority to divest 18 KC-135 aircraft (sec. 147)........    10
        Prohibition on use of funds for a follow-on tanker 
          aircraft to the KC-46 aircraft (sec. 148)..............    10
        Maintenance of B-1 bomber aircraft squadrons (sec. 149)..    10
    Subtitle E--Defense-Wide, Joint, and Multiservice Matters....    10
        Prohibition on duplication of efforts to provide air- and 
          space-based ground moving target indicator capability 
          (sec. 161).............................................    10
        Limitation on funds for Armed Overwatch aircraft (sec. 
          162)...................................................    11
        Transition of F-35 program sustainment from Joint Program 
          Office to Air Force and Navy (sec. 163)................    11
    Budget Items.................................................    11
        Army.....................................................    11
            Army unfunded requirements...........................    11
            CH-47 Cargo Aircraft modifications...................    12
            Paladin Integrated Management........................    12
            Multi-Domain Task Force All-Domain Operations Center 
              cloud pilot........................................    12
            Integrated Visual Augmentation System................    12
            Man-portable radiation detection systems.............    13
            Expeditionary Solid Waste Disposal System............    13
            Infantry Squad Vehicle...............................    13
        Navy.....................................................    13
            Navy and Marine Corps unfunded requirements..........    13
            CH-53K...............................................    14
            MQ-4 Triton..........................................    14
            Submarine industrial base development................    15
            Arleigh Burke-class destroyers.......................    15
            Arleigh Burke-class advance procurement..............    15
            Surface combatant supplier development...............    16
            LPD Flight II advance procurement....................    16
            LHA replacement......................................    16
            Expeditionary fast transport vessels.................    16
            Used sealift ships...................................    16
            Sonobuoys............................................    17
            Ground-launched anti-ship missiles...................    17
            Ground-launched long range fires.....................    17
        Air Force................................................    17
            Air Force and Space Force unfunded requirements......    17
            F-35 power modules...................................    17
            F-35A................................................    18
            MH-139A..............................................    18
            MQ-9.................................................    18
            B-52 training system.................................    19
            F-35 modifications...................................    19
            F-16 AESA radars.....................................    19
            Intercontinental Ballistic Missile fuze realignment 
              of funds...........................................    19
            Long Duration Propulsive National Security Space 
              Launch Secondary Payload Adapter Demonstration.....    19
            Radio equipment......................................    20
        Defense Wide.............................................    20
            Defense-wide Procurement unfunded requirements.......    20
            Combat diving advanced equipment acceleration........    20
            Modernized forward-look sonar........................    20
            Fused panoramic night vision goggles acceleration....    21
        Items of Special Interest................................
            Constellation-class frigate program..................    21
            San Antonio-class lethality and survivability 
              upgrades...........................................    21
            ``Digital Engineering'' capabilities.................    22
            Additional applications of unmanned technology.......    22
            Air Force airborne electronic attack systems.........    23
            Airborne advanced training...........................    23
            Amphibious ship acquisition strategy.................    24
            Army National Guard Airborne Tactical Extraction 
              Platform...........................................    25
            Army National Guard capabilities.....................    25
            Assessment of Armored Brigade Combat Team 
              modernization......................................    25
            Assessment on Air National Guard F-16 self-protection 
              capabilities.......................................    26
            Auxiliary power units for Army ground vehicles.......    26
            Aviation defense equipment report....................    27
            Brief on mixed-oxidant electrolytic disinfectant 
              generator water purification.......................    27
            Briefing on munitions procurement, stockage and 
              industrial base....................................    27
            CH-47F Block II funding restoration..................    28
            DDG(X) acquisition strategy..........................    28
            DDG-51 destroyer multi-year procurement..............    29
            Development of land-based long-range hypersonic 
              weapons............................................    29
            Extended Range Cannon Artillery acquisition report...    30
            Improved Turbine Engine Program......................    30
            Joint Surveillance and Target Attack Radar System 
              modifications......................................    30
            Long range strike....................................    31
            Machine gun capability gap study.....................    31
            Mobile Protected Firepower...........................    32
            Modernizing Army short-range air defense capabilities    32
            Multi-spectral sensor detection mitigation for body 
              armor and individual equipment.....................    33
            Paladin Integrated Management acquisition strategy...    33
            RC-135 Rivet Joint...................................    34
            Report on Agile Combat Employment....................    34
            Report on cryptographic modernization and resiliency 
              of communications systems..........................    35
            Report on enhanced night vision and visual 
              augmentation devices...............................    35
            Report on excess military equipment..................    36
            Report on personnel parachute and cargo management 
              inventory acquisition decisions....................    36
            Report on training of military pilots................    37
            Soldier Enhancement Program..........................    37
            Soldier load management strategy update..............    37
            Tactical and combat vehicle electrification..........    38
            U.S. Southern Command requirements...................    39
            Warm Isostatic Press for manufacture of body armor...    39
TITLE II--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION............    41
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................    41
        Authorization of appropriations (sec. 201)...............    41
    Subtitle B--Program Requirements, Restrictions, and 
      Limitations................................................    41
        Increase in allowable rate of basic pay for certain 
          employees of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency 
          (sec. 211).............................................    41
        Additional mission areas for mechanisms for expedited 
          access to technical talent and expertise at academic 
          institutions by Department of Defense (sec. 212).......    41
        Modification of other transaction authority for research 
          projects (sec. 213)....................................    41
        Artificial intelligence metrics (sec. 214)...............    42
        Modification of the Joint Common Foundation Program (sec. 
          215)...................................................    42
        Executive education on emerging technologies for senior 
          civilian and military leaders (sec. 216)...............    43
        Improvements relating to national network for 
          microelectronics research and development (sec. 217)...    44
        Activities to accelerate domestic quantum computing 
          capabilities (sec. 218)................................    44
        Pilot programs for passive telecommunications 
          infrastructure to facilitate installation 5G deployment 
          (sec. 219).............................................    45
        National Guard participation in microreactor testing and 
          evaluation (sec. 220)..................................    45
        Limitation on transfer of certain operational flight test 
          events and reduction in operational flight test 
          capacity (sec. 221)....................................    45
        Limitation on availability of funds for the High Accuracy 
          Detection and Exploitation System (sec. 222)...........    45
    Subtitle C--Codification and Technical Corrections...........    46
        Codification of direct hire authority at personnel 
          demonstration laboratories for advanced degree holders 
          (sec. 231).............................................    46
        Codification of authorities relating to Department of 
          Defense science and technology reinvention laboratories 
          (sec. 232).............................................    46
        Codification of requirement for Defense Established 
          Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (sec. 233)...    47
        Technical correction to pilot program for enhancement of 
          research, development, test, and evaluation centers of 
          Department of Defense (sec. 234).......................    47
    Subtitle D--Plans, Reports, and Other Matters................    47
        Study on efficient use of Department of Defense test and 
          evaluation organizations, facilities, and laboratories 
          (sec. 241).............................................    47
        Analysis of potential modifications to Department of 
          Defense unmanned aerial systems categorization (sec. 
          242)...................................................    47
        Digital development infrastructure plan and working group 
          (sec. 243).............................................    48
        Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle requirements analysis 
          (sec. 244).............................................    48
        Making permanent requirement for annual report by 
          Director of Operational Test and Evaluation (sec. 245).    49
    Budget Items.................................................    49
        Army.....................................................    49
            Smart thread data exchange...........................    49
            Unmanned aircraft systems propulsion research........    49
            University research programs.........................    50
            Ceramic material systems for extreme environments....    50
            Earthen structures research..........................    50
            Graphene applications for military engineering.......    50
            Polar research and testing...........................    51
            Verified inherent control............................    51
            Light detection and ranging technology...............    51
            Unmanned aerial systems sensor research..............    52
            Counter-unmanned aerial systems applied research.....    52
            High energy laser research...........................    52
            High energy laser support technology.................    52
            Kill chain automation for air and missile defense 
              systems............................................    53
            Secure computing capabilities........................    53
            Military footwear research...........................    53
            Pathfinder air assault technologies..................    53
            Additive manufacturing capabilities for austere 
              operating environments.............................    54
            Permafrost research..................................    54
            High Performance Computing Modernization Program.....    54
            Combat vehicle lithium battery development...........    55
            Cyber and connected vehicle integration research.....    55
            Robotics development.................................    55
            Command post modernization...........................    55
            Network technology research..........................    55
            Advanced guidance technology.........................    56
            Future Long Range Assault Aircraft...................    56
            Future vertical lift 20mm chain gun..................    56
            Army unfunded requirements...........................    56
            Development of anthropomorphic armor for female 
              servicemembers.....................................    56
            Synthetic Training Environment.......................    57
            Electric Light Reconnaissance Vehicle................    57
            Active Protection Systems for Bradley and Stryker....    57
            Cyber situational understanding......................    57
            Contract writing systems reduction...................    58
            CH-47 Chinook Cargo On/Off Loading System............    58
            Chinook T55-714C engine certification and integration    59
            Apache Future Development............................    59
            Abrams tank modernization............................    59
            Identity, credentialing and access management 
              reduction--Army....................................    59
        Navy.....................................................    59
            High-performance computation and data equipment......    59
            University research programs.........................    60
            Graphene electro-active metamaterials................    60
            Relative positioning of autonomous platforms.........    60
            Resilient innovative sustainable economies via 
              university partnerships............................    61
            Anti-corrosion nanotechnologies......................    61
            Humanoid robotics research...........................    61
            Undersea vehicle research academic partnerships......    62
            Undersea warfare applied research....................    62
            Navy and Marine Corps unfunded requirements..........    62
            Unmanned systems interoperability....................    62
            Naval prototypes.....................................    62
            Manned-Unmanned Experimentation......................    63
            Stratospheric balloon research.......................    63
            Advanced Sensors Application Program.................    63
            Contract writing systems reduction...................    64
            Strategic Weapon System Shipboard Navigation System 
              Modernization......................................    64
            Neural network algorithms on advanced processors.....    64
        Air Force................................................    64
            University research programs.........................    64
            Continuous composites 3D printing....................    65
            High energy synchrotron X-ray research...............    65
            Ground test and development of hypersonic engines....    65
            Hypersonic flight test services......................    66
            Low-cost small turbine engine research...............    66
            Skyborg..............................................    66
            Air Force integrated technology demonstrations.......    66
            Unmanned Adversary Air...............................    67
            B-52 engine pylon fairings increase..................    67
            Hypersonics materials manufacturing..................    67
            Sustainment and modernization research and 
              development program................................    68
            Advanced engine development..........................    68
            Tactical Datalink Waveform...........................    68
            Automatic target recognition.........................    69
            Academic technology transfer partnerships............    69
            Air Force operational energy increases...............    69
            Cold spray technologies..............................    70
            Coordination with private sector to protect against 
              foreign malicious cyber actors.....................    70
            Contract writing systems reduction...................    70
            Air Force combat training ranges.....................    70
            Degraded GPS Live Flight Training....................    71
            Gulf Test Range enhancements.........................    71
            Future tanker reduction..............................    71
            U.S. Strategic Command Nuclear Command, Control and 
              Communication Enterprise Center....................    71
            F-35 continuous capability development and delivery..    72
            Foreign material acquisition and exploitation........    72
            Over The Horizon Radar...............................    72
            Polar Over the Horizon Radar.........................    72
            Additive manufacturing...............................    72
            Identity, credentialing, and access management 
              reduction--Air Force...............................    73
            Weather forecasting using machine learning...........    73
            Battery cycle life improvements......................    73
            Radiation hardened microelectronics..................    73
            Air Force and Space Force unfunded requirements......    73
            Joint Space Rapid Experimentation and Demonstration..    74
            Maui Optical Site....................................    74
            Tactically Responsive Launch.........................    74
            Digital core services for distributed space test and 
              training...........................................    74
            Microelectronics research network....................    75
        Defense Wide.............................................    75
            Defense research sciences............................    75
            Defense Established Program to Stimulate Competitive 
              Research...........................................    75
            Minerva management and social science research.......    75
            Traumatic brain injury research......................    76
            Workforce development for defense laboratories.......    76
            Quantum computing acceleration.......................    76
            High speed flight experiment testing.................    77
            Certification-based workforce training programs for 
              manufacturing......................................    77
            Cybersecurity for industrial control systems.........    77
            Data analytics and visual system.....................    78
            Integrated silicon-based lasers......................    78
            High performance computing-enabled large-scale 
              advanced manufacturing.............................    78
            Steel performance initiative.........................    78
            Artificial intelligence research activities..........    79
            Deep water active technologies.......................    79
            Sensor technology....................................    79
            Survivability Planning and Intercept Evaluation Tool.    79
            Strategic capabilities research and prototyping......    80
            Increasing manufacturing readiness level for 
              thermionic energy harvesting technology............    80
            Joint affordable kill chain closure program..........    80
            Homeland Defense Radar--Hawaii.......................    81
            Joint All-Domain Command and Control experimentation.    81
            Laser communication ground terminals.................    81
            Space laser communications...........................    81
            Wave glider development..............................    82
            Systems engineering..................................    82
            Technical information services.......................    82
            Rare earth element separation technologies...........    83
            Demonstration program on domestic production of rare 
              earth elements from coal byproducts................    83
            Digital manufacturing................................    84
            Industrial skills training...........................    84
            Defense industrial skills and technology training 
              systems............................................    84
            Submarine construction workforce training pipeline...    84
            Workforce transformation cyber initiative pilot 
              program............................................    85
            Maritime scalable effects acceleration...............    85
            Information Systems Security Program.................    85
            Rapid Innovation Program.............................    85
            Joint test and evaluation............................    86
            Acquisition Innovation Research Center...............    86
            Domestic Comparative Testing Program.................    86
            Artificial intelligence applied research activities..    86
            Pilot program on public-private partnerships with 
              internet ecosystem companies to detect and disrupt 
              adversary cyber operations.........................    87
            Biomedical technologies..............................    87
            Information & communications technology..............    87
            Materials & biological technology....................    87
            Electronics technology...............................    87
            Advanced electronics technology......................    87
            Command, control, and communications systems.........    88
            Funding support for National Security Agency Defense.    88
            Industrial Base cybersecurity activities.............    88
            Fifth Generation Wireless Network Technology.........    88
            Defense-wide Research and Development unfunded 
              requirements.......................................    89
        Items of Special Interest................................    89
            Advanced engine development..........................    89
            Anti-malarial preventative measures..................    90
            Autonomously powered exoskeletons....................    90
            Bomber long-term roadmap.............................    90
            Comptroller General assessment of operational 
              security standards for microelectronics products 
              and services.......................................    91
            Comptroller General review of the Department of 
              Defense's directed energy development efforts......    92
            Employing ground-based systems at sea................    92
            Facial recognition and surveillance technologies.....    92
            Foreign military aviation training capacity..........    93
            Graphitic composites and foam for Next Generation 
              Combat Vehicle.....................................    93
            Graphitic composites and foam for special operations 
              forces communications and intelligence support 
              systems............................................    93
            High energy laser research...........................    94
            High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles rollover 
              mitigation.........................................    94
            Hypersonic research..................................    94
            Hypersonics test facilities..........................    95
            Joint All-Domain Testing and Training................    95
            Jointless hull development...........................    96
            KC-10 Divestiture....................................    96
            KC-46 basing.........................................    96
            Mobile compact high energy laser.....................    97
            MQ-9 Resiliency......................................    97
            Networked integrated controls kit and electronics 
              link in support of Next Generation Combat Vehicle 
              advanced technology................................    97
            Policies to support use of additive manufacturing 
              capabilities.......................................    97
            Radar and multi-function sensor capabilities.........    98
            Report on special access program administration......    98
            Study of injuries during aircraft ejections..........    98
            Support by manufacturing institutes for modernization 
              priorities.........................................    99
            Support Naval Power and Energy Systems Technology 
              Development Roadmap................................    99
            Wide-area motion imagery development.................    99
TITLE III--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE.............................   101
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................   101
        Authorization of appropriations (sec. 301)...............   101
    Subtitle B--Energy and Environment...........................
        Expansion of purposes of Sentinel Landscapes Partnership 
          program to include resilience (sec. 311)...............   101
        Maintenance of current analytical tools in evaluating 
          energy resilience measures (sec. 312)..................   101
        Military Aviation and Installation Assurance 
          Clearinghouse matters (sec. 313).......................   101
        Exemption from prohibition on use of open-air burn pits 
          in contingency operations outside the United States 
          (sec. 314).............................................   102
        Demonstration program on domestic production of rare 
          earth elements from coal byproducts (sec. 315).........   102
        Authority to transfer amounts derived from energy cost 
          savings (sec. 316).....................................   103
        Sense of Senate on energy independence and 
          diversification (sec. 317).............................   103
    Subtitle C--National Security Climate Resilience.............   103
        National Security Climate Resilience (secs. 331-335).....   103
    Subtitle D--Treatment of Perfluoroalkyl Substances and 
      Polyfluoroalkyl Substances.................................   104
        Treatment by Department of Defense of perfluoroalkyl 
          substances and polyfluoroalkyl substances (sec. 351)...   104
        Public disclosure of testing and results of Department of 
          Defense testing for perfluoroalkyl or polyfluoroalkyl 
          substances and additional requirements for testing 
          (sec. 352).............................................   104
        Extension of transfer authority for funding of study and 
          assessment on health implications of per- and 
          polyfluoroalkyl substances contamination in drinking 
          water by Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease 
          Registry (sec. 353)....................................   104
        Report on remediation of perfluoroalkyl substances and 
          polyfluoroalkyl substances at certain military 
          installations (sec. 354)...............................   104
        Report on schedule for completion of remediation of 
          perfluoroalkyl substances and polyfluoroalkyl 
          substances (sec. 355)..................................   104
    Subtitle E--Other Matters....................................   105
        Extension of temporary authority to extend contracts and 
          leases under the ARMS Initiative (sec. 371)............   105
        Incident reporting requirements for Department of Defense 
          regarding lost or stolen weapons (sec. 372)............   105
        Repeal of sunset for naval vessel examination report 
          (sec. 373).............................................   105
        Report on ammunition organic industrial base 
          modernization by Department of the Army (sec. 374).....   105
        Annual report by Secretary of the Navy on ship 
          maintenance (sec. 375).................................   105
    Budget Items.................................................   106
        Unfunded requirements....................................   106
        Critical organic industrial base production capacity.....   106
        Facilities Sustainment, Restoration and Modernization....   106
        U.S. Africa Command intelligence, surveillance, and 
          reconnaissance.........................................   107
        Training Improvements for Counter-small Unmanned Aerial 
          Systems................................................   107
        Army real estate inventory system........................   107
        United States Southern Command traditional intelligence, 
          surveillance, and reconnaissance.......................   107
        Army National Guard Weapons of Mass Destruction Civil 
          Support Teams Equipment Sustainment....................   108
        Identity, credentialing, and access management 
          reduction--Navy........................................   108
        Additional intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance 
          for United States Central Command......................   108
        A-10 force structure.....................................   108
        C-130 force structure....................................   109
        Office of Security Cooperation--Iraq reduction...........   109
        United States Space Command pathway to full operational 
          capability.............................................   109
        Joint Exercise Program...................................   109
        Modernized forward-look sonar............................   110
        Personal signature management acceleration...............   110
        Innovative Readiness Training increase...................   110
        STARBASE.................................................   111
        Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency analytic 
          tools for assessing FOCI...............................   111
        Troops-to-Teachers Program...............................   111
        milCloud 2.0 migration...................................   111
        Cybersecurity automation and orchestration for Joint 
          Force Headquarters, Department of Defense Information 
          Network................................................   112
        Hardening of Department of Defense Information Network 
          and security validation demonstration..................   112
        U.S. Africa Command international security cooperation 
          programs...............................................   112
        Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative...................   113
        Joint Combined Exchange Training.........................   113
        State Partnership Program................................   113
        Impact Aid...............................................   113
        Analytical tools in evaluating energy resilience measures   114
        Bien Hoa dioxin cleanup..................................   114
        Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Nation-wide 
          human health assessment................................   114
        Congressional Hearings and Reporting Requirements 
          Tracking System Modernization..........................   114
        Cost Assessment Data Enterprise..........................   115
        Defense Environmental International Cooperation program 
          increase...............................................   115
        Occupational license portability for military spouses 
          through interstate compacts............................   116
        Office of the Secretary of Defense civilian workforce....   116
        Personnel in the Office of Assistant Secretary of Defense 
          Sustainment and Environment, Safety, and Occupational 
          Health.................................................   116
        Secretary of Defense Strategic Competition Initiative....   117
        United States Special Operations Command management and 
          headquarters...........................................   117
        Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid...........   117
        Bulk fuel adjustment.....................................   117
        Foreign currency fluctuations............................   118
        Printing costs reduction.................................   118
        Unobligated balances.....................................   118
    Items of Special Interest....................................   118
        Aberdeen Proving Ground..................................   118
        Advanced human performance based small arms training.....   119
        Advanced materials processing briefing...................   120
        Agent Orange briefing....................................   120
        Air Force range prioritization and modernization.........   120
        Alternatively powered vehicles...........................   121
        Army organic industrial base modernization...............   122
        Army Pre-Positioned Stock readiness......................   123
        Augmented reality training to support aviation operations   123
        Autonomous robotic targets for small arms training ranges   123
        Briefing on reducing life cycle costs....................   124
        Center for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances...........   124
        Cooperative agreements for shared use of airspace near 
          United States southern border..........................   125
        Cost Assessment Data Enterprise..........................   125
        Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency 
          industrial security report.............................   125
        Demining the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's firing 
          ranges in Afghanistan..................................   126
        Distributed energy projects briefing.....................   127
        Encouraging the Army's integration of synthetic and live 
          training...............................................   127
        Energy savings performance contracts.....................   128
        Equipment procurement parity for operational reserves....   128
        Expansion of the ship depot maintenance pilot program....   128
        Ground Test Asset Board..................................   129
        High pressure advanced rapid deposition technology.......   130
        Knee and elbow protection................................   130
        Large-capacity batteries.................................   131
        Military installation resilience training................   131
        Military munitions program construction support..........   132
        Optimizing private sector fast attack submarine 
          maintenance............................................   132
        Pilot program to extract natural gas to develop energy 
          security and resilience................................   133
        Propulsion readiness.....................................   133
        Readiness and Environmental Protection Initiative........   134
        Recycling rare earth materials...........................   134
        Report on competitiveness in the defense industrial base.   134
        Review to reduce reporting requirements..................   135
        Shipyard Infrastructure Optimization Plan implementation.   135
        Staffing and resources...................................   137
        Study for enhancing ship readiness through digital 
          techniques.............................................   137
        Study of expanding ship repair capacity..................   138
        Survivable Airborne Operations Center....................   138
        Sustainable technology evaluation and demonstration......   139
        Sustainment of Army health and holistic fitness system 
          equipment..............................................   139
        U.S. Special Operations Command Preservation of the Force 
          and Families Program...................................   140
        Underwater cut and capture...............................   141
        Universal Robotic Controller project.....................   141
        Utilities Privatization..................................   141
        Vieques cleanup..........................................   142
        Water resource management................................   142
TITLE IV--MILITARY PERSONNEL AUTHORIZATIONS......................   145
    Subtitle A--Active Forces....................................   145
        End strengths for active forces (sec. 401)...............   145
        Authority with respect to authorized strengths for 
          general and flag officers within the Armed Forces for 
          emerging requirements (sec. 402).......................   145
        Additional authority to vary Space Force end strength 
          (sec. 403).............................................   145
        Temporary exemption from end strength grade restrictions 
          for the Space Force (sec. 404).........................   145
    Subtitle B--Reserve Forces...................................   146
        End strengths for Selected Reserve (sec. 411)............   146
        End strengths for Reserves on active duty in support of 
          the reserves (sec. 412)................................   146
        End strengths for military technicians (dual status) 
          (sec. 413).............................................   146
        Maximum number of reserve personnel authorized to be on 
          active duty for operational support (sec. 414).........   147
    Subtitle C--Authorization of Appropriations..................   147
        Military personnel (sec. 421)............................   147
    Budget Items.................................................   147
        Military personnel funding changes.......................   147
TITLE V--MILITARY PERSONNEL POLICY...............................   149
    Subtitle A--Officer Personnel Policy.........................   149
        Increase in authorized lieutenant commander billets in 
          the Navy (sec. 501)....................................   149
        Time in grade requirements (sec. 502)....................   149
    Subtitle B--General Service Authorities and Correction of 
      Military Records...........................................   149
        Part I--Selective Service Reform.........................   149
            Modernization of the Selective Service System (sec. 
              511)...............................................   149
            Report on exemptions and deferments for a possible 
              military draft (sec. 512)..........................   149
            Report on processes and procedures for appeal of 
              denial of status or benefits for failure to 
              register for Selective Service (sec. 513)..........   149
            Responsibilities for national mobilization; personnel 
              requirements (sec. 514)............................   150
            Enhancements to national mobilization exercises (sec. 
              515)...............................................   150
        Part II--Other Matters...................................   150
            Military service independent racial disparity review 
              (sec. 518).........................................   150
            Appeals to Physical Evaluation Board determinations 
              of fitness for duty (sec. 519).....................   150
            Extension of paid parental leave (sec. 520)..........   151
            Bereavement leave for members of the Armed Forces 
              (sec. 520A)........................................   151
    Subtitle C--Prevention and Response to Sexual Assault, 
      Harassment, and Related Misconduct, and Other Military 
      Justice Matters............................................   151
        DoD Safe Helpline authorization to perform intake of 
          official restricted and unrestricted reports for 
          eligible adult sexual assault victims (sec. 521).......   151
        Assessment of relationship between command climate and 
          the prevention and adjudication of military sexual 
          misconduct (sec. 522)..................................   151
        Policy for ensuring the annual report regarding sexual 
          assaults involving members of the Armed Forces includes 
          information on race and ethnicity of victims (sec. 523)   152
        Department of Defense tracking of allegations of 
          retaliation by victims of sexual assault or sexual 
          harassment and related persons (sec. 524)..............   152
        Special Victims Counsel representation of civilian 
          victims of sex-related offenses (sec. 525).............   152
        Notice to victims of further administrative action 
          following a determination not to refer to trial by 
          court-martial (sec. 526)...............................   153
        Recommendations on separate punitive article in the 
          Uniform Code of Military Justice on violent extremism 
          (sec. 527).............................................   153
        Determination and reporting of missing, absent unknown, 
          absent without leave, and duty status-whereabouts 
          unknown service members (sec. 528).....................   153
        Conduct unbecoming an officer (sec. 529).................   153
        Analysis of the use of non-judicial punishment (sec. 530)   153
        Sexual Assault Response Coordinator Military Occupational 
          Specialty (sec. 530A)..................................   154
        Implementation of recommendations of the Independent 
          Review Commission on Sexual Assault in the Military 
          (sec. 530B)............................................   154
    Subtitle D--Military Justice Reform and Sexual Assault 
      Prevention.................................................   154
        Part I--Military Justice Matters.........................   154
            Special victim prosecutors (sec. 531)................   154
            Policies with respect to special victim prosecutors 
              (sec. 532).........................................   155
            Definition of military magistrate, special victim 
              offense, and special victim prosecutor (sec. 533)..   155
            Clarification of applicability of domestic violence 
              and stalking to dating partners (sec. 534).........   155
            Clarification relating to who may convene courts-
              martial (sec. 535).................................   155
            Inclusion of sexual harassment as general punitive 
              article (sec. 536).................................   155
            Determinations of impracticability of rehearing (sec. 
              537)...............................................   155
            Plea agreements (sec. 538)...........................   156
            Opportunity to obtain witness and other evidence in 
              trials by court-martial (sec. 539).................   156
            Former jeopardy (sec. 540)...........................   156
            Advice to convening authority before referral for 
              trial (sec. 541)...................................   156
            Preliminary hearing (sec. 542).......................   156
            Detail of trial counsel (sec. 543)...................   156
            Sentencing reform (sec. 544).........................   156
            Uniform, document-based data system (sec. 545).......   157
            Primary prevention workforce (sec. 546)..............   157
            Annual primary prevention research agenda (sec. 547).   157
            Full functionality of certain advisory committees and 
              panels (sec. 548)..................................   157
            Military defense counsel parity (sec. 549)...........   157
            Resourcing (sec. 550)................................   157
            Applicability to the United States Coast Guard (sec. 
              551)...............................................   158
            Effective date (sec. 552)............................   158
        Part II--Military Justice Improvement and Increasing 
          Prevention Act.........................................   158
            Short title (sec. 561)...............................   158
            Improvement of determinations on disposition of 
              charges for certain offenses under UCMJ with 
              authorized maximum sentence of confinement of more 
              than one year (sec. 562)...........................   158
            Modification of officers authorized to convene 
              general and special courts-martial for certain 
              offenses under UCMJ with authorized maximum 
              sentence of confinement of more than one year (sec. 
              563)...............................................   159
            Discharge using otherwise authorized personnel and 
              resources (sec. 564)...............................   159
            Monitoring and assessment of modification of 
              authorities by Defense Advisory Committee on 
              Investigation, Prosecution, and Defense of Sexual 
              Assault in the Armed Forces (sec. 565).............   159
            Limitation on modifications to sexual assault 
              reporting procedures (sec. 566)....................   159
            Professionalization of military prosecutors (sec. 
              567)...............................................   159
            Increased training and education on military sexual 
              assault (sec. 568).................................   159
            Increasing the physical security of military 
              installations (sec. 569)...........................   159
            Effective date and applicability (sec. 570)..........   160
    Subtitle E--Member Education, Training, and Transition.......   160
        Modification of grant program supporting science, 
          technology, engineering, and math education in the 
          Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps to include 
          quantum information sciences (sec. 571)................   160
        Allocation of authority for nominations to the military 
          service academies in the event of the death, 
          resignation, or expulsion from office of a member of 
          Congress (sec. 572)....................................   160
        Troops-to-Teachers Program (sec. 573)....................   160
        Combating foreign malign influence (sec. 574)............   161
        Prohibition on implementation by United States Air Force 
          Academy of civilian faculty tenure system (sec. 575)...   161
    Subtitle F--Military Family Readiness and Dependents' 
      Education..................................................
        Certain assistance to local educational agencies that 
          benefit dependents of military and civilian personnel 
          (sec. 581).............................................   161
        Pilot program to establish employment fellowship 
          opportunities for military spouses (sec. 582)..........   162
    Subtitle G--Other Matters and Reports........................   162
        Amendments to additional Deputy Inspector General of the 
          Department of Defense (sec. 591).......................   162
        Inclusion of Senior Reserve Officers' Training Corps data 
          in diversity and inclusion reporting (sec. 592)........   162
        Modified deadline for establishment of special purpose 
          adjunct to Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery 
          test (sec. 593)........................................   162
        Reports on Air Force personnel performing duties of a 
          Nuclear and Missile Operations Officer (13N) (sec. 594)   162
        Reports on security force personnel performing protection 
          level one duties (sec. 595)............................   163
    Items of Special Interest....................................
        Active-Duty service obligations for graduates of 
          cybersecurity courses..................................   163
        Appointment of Chiropractors as Commissioned Officers....   164
        Asian American and Pacific Islander Medal of Honor Review   164
        Career Intermission Program..............................   164
        Comptroller General of the United States review of 
          certain professional development activities of 
          Department of Defense Education Activity employees.....   165
        Comptroller General of the United States review of 
          Department of Defense payroll system for employees of 
          the Department of Defense Education Activity...........   165
        Comptroller General review of military personnel policies 
          related to United States Indo-Pacific Command..........   166
        Comptroller General review of Senior Reserve Officers' 
          Training Corps program contributions to a diverse 
          officer corps..........................................   166
        Connecting certain servicemembers with community-based 
          organizations through state veterans agencies..........   167
        Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency briefing on recovery of 
          servicemembers' remains................................   167
        Department of Defense civilian workforce career 
          developmental programs.................................   168
        Department of Defense implementation of open Government 
          Accountability Office recommendations concerning sexual 
          harassment and sexual assault..........................   168
        Education in the Department of Defense...................   169
        Establish a Naval Community College......................   169
        Foreign language testing and tracking....................   169
        Increased capacity for servicemember childcare on 
          military installations.................................   171
        Issuance of prisoner-of-war medal........................   171
        Management policies for emerging technology qualified 
          officers...............................................   172
        Military Spouse Employment...............................   172
        Notice to servicemembers who separate before completion 
          of service obligation to transfer GI Bill benefits.....   173
        Parental rights at service academies.....................   173
        Promotion revision report................................   174
        Public schools on military installations program.........   174
        Public-private talent exchanges..........................   175
        Restructure of Army Criminal Investigation Command.......   175
        Servicemember workforce development......................   176
        Temporary promotion utilization..........................   176
        Unanimous verdicts for criminal convictions..............   176
        Updates to Fourth Quadrennial Quality of Life review.....   177
        Upfront use of DNA to identify remains of servicemembers 
          missing in action......................................   177
TITLE VI--MILITARY COMPENSATION..................................   179
    Basic needs allowance for members on active service in the 
      Armed Forces (sec. 601)....................................   179
    Equal incentive pay for members of the reserve components of 
      the Armed Forces (sec. 602)................................   179
    Extension of expiring travel and transportation authorities 
      (sec. 603).................................................   179
    Repeal of expiring travel and transportation authorities 
      (sec. 604).................................................   179
    One-year extension of certain expiring bonus and special pay 
      authorities (sec. 605).....................................   179
    Requirements in connection with suspension of retired pay and 
      retirement annuities (sec. 606)............................   180
    Items of Special Interest....................................   180
        Basic allowance for housing..............................   180
        Partial dislocation allowance for members ordered to 
          vacate housing provided by the United States...........   181
TITLE VII--HEALTH CARE PROVISIONS................................   183
    Subtitle A--Tricare and Other Health Care Benefits...........   183
        Addition of preconception and prenatal carrier screening 
          coverage as benefits under TRICARE program (sec. 701)..   183
        Coverage of overseas subacute and hospice care for 
          eligible overseas dependents of members of the 
          uniformed services (sec. 702)..........................   183
        Modification of pilot program on receipt of non-generic 
          prescription maintenance medications under TRICARE 
          pharmacy benefits program (sec. 703)...................   183
    Subtitle B--Health Care Administration.......................   183
        Revisions to TRICARE provider networks (sec. 721)........   183
        Implementation of an integrated TRICARE program through 
          effective market management (sec. 722).................   184
        Establishment of centers of excellence for enhanced 
          treatment of ocular injuries (sec. 723)................   184
        Mandatory training on health effects of burn pits (sec. 
          724)...................................................   184
        Removal of requirement for one year of participation in 
          certain medical and lifestyle incentive programs of the 
          Department of Defense to receive benefits under such 
          programs (sec. 725)....................................   185
        Authority of Secretary of Defense and Secretary of 
          Veterans Affairs to enter into agreements for planning, 
          design, and construction of facilities to be operated 
          as shared medical facilities (sec. 726)................   185
        Consistency in accounting for medical reimbursements 
          received by military medical treatment facilities from 
          other Federal agencies (sec. 727)......................   185
    Subtitle C--Reports and Other Matters........................   185
        Access by United States Government employees and their 
          family members to certain facilities of Department of 
          Defense for assessment and treatment of anomalous 
          health conditions (sec. 741)...........................   185
        Extension of authority for Joint Department of Defense-
          Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility 
          Demonstration Fund (sec. 742)..........................   186
        Comptroller General study on implementation by Department 
          of Defense of recent statutory requirements to reform 
          the military health system (sec. 743)..................   186
    Budget Items.................................................   186
        Anomalous health incidents...............................   186
    Items of Special Interest....................................   187
        Access to mental health care.............................   187
        Battlefield analgesia....................................   187
        Body composition standards...............................   188
        Briefing on impact of TRICARE copays on utilization of 
          certain healthcare services............................   188
        Comprehensive brain health and treatment for special 
          operations forces......................................   189
        Comptroller General assessment of Department of Defense 
          health care provider adverse privileging actions.......   189
        Continued collaboration between the Department of Defense 
          and Israeli institutions on medical research...........   189
        Continued study and research on post-traumatic stress 
          disorder and traumatic brain injury....................   190
        Continuity of care in TRICARE's Extended Care Health 
          Program................................................   190
        Development of oral, ultra-long-acting, sustained-release 
          hypertension and diabetes therapeutics.................   190
        Dietary supplement adverse event reporting...............   191
        Domestic active pharmaceutical ingredient manufacturing 
          report.................................................   191
        Electronic health record interoperability between the 
          Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs............   191
        Elimination of low-value healthcare......................   192
        Improvements to healthcare for Active-Duty women.........   193
        Integrated training for Army first responders and medical 
          professionals..........................................   194
        Integration of biometric synthetic training technologies 
          to support better health outcomes......................   194
        Market price generics program............................   194
        Medical necessity and prior authorization process for 
          non-covered drugs in the TRICARE program...............   195
        Mobile application to enable periodic health assessments 
          for National Guard members.............................   195
        Musculoskeletal injury prevention........................   196
        National Disaster Medical System Pilot Program...........   196
        National public health emergency and disaster medical 
          network model..........................................   196
        Non-helmet preventative devices for traumatic brain 
          injury.................................................   197
        Plasma-derived antibody products.........................   197
        Point-of-care ultrasound system in the tactical combat 
          casualty care environment..............................   197
        Pooled testing to promote bio-surveillance of disease 
          outbreaks..............................................   198
        Prevention of hemorrhagic death with next generation 
          freeze-dried platelets.................................   198
        Review of maternal deaths at military treatment 
          facilities.............................................   198
        Selected Reserve separation history and physical 
          examinations...........................................   199
        Synchronized procurement of combat medical kits..........   199
        Therapeutic research for traumatic brain injury..........   200
        Trauma and public health training........................   200
        TRICARE healthcare delivery demonstration project 
          contracting............................................   200
        TRICARE healthcare delivery demonstrations...............   201
        Trusted domestic vaccine supplier capability.............   201
        Virtual health expansion.................................   202
TITLE VIII--ACQUISITION POLICY, ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT, AND 
  RELATED MATTERS................................................   203
    Subtitle A--Acquisition Policy and Management................
        Repeal of preference for fixed-price contracts (sec. 801)   203
        Improving the use of available data to manage and 
          forecast service contract requirements (sec. 802)......   203
        Assessment of impediments and incentives to improving the 
          acquisition of commercial technology, products, and 
          services (sec. 803)....................................   204
        Pilot program on acquisition practices for emerging 
          technologies (sec. 804)................................   205
        Annual report on highest and lowest performing 
          acquisition programs of the Department of Defense (sec. 
          805)...................................................   205
        Systems engineering determinations (sec. 806)............   205
    Subtitle B--Amendments to General Contracting Authorities, 
      Procedures, and Limitations................................   206
        Recommendations on the use of other transaction authority 
          (sec. 811).............................................   206
        Modified condition for prompt contract payment 
          eligibility (sec. 812).................................   206
        Exclusion of certain services from intergovernmental 
          support agreements for installation-support services 
          (sec. 813).............................................   207
        Modification of prize authority for advanced technology 
          achievements (sec. 814)................................   207
        Cost or pricing data reporting in Department of Defense 
          contracts (sec. 815)...................................   207
        Authority to acquire innovative commercial products and 
          services using general solicitation competitive 
          procedures (sec. 816)..................................   207
        Reporting requirement for defense acquisition activities 
          (sec. 817).............................................   207
        Department of Defense contractor professional training 
          material disclosure requirements (sec. 818)............   208
        Report on place of performance requirements (sec. 819)...   208
        Multiyear contract authority for defense acquisitions 
          specifically authorized by law (sec. 820)..............   208
    Subtitle C--Industrial Base Matters..........................   209
        Addition of certain items to list of high priority goods 
          and services for analyses, recommendations, and actions 
          related to sourcing and industrial capacity (sec. 831).   209
        Prohibition on acquisition of personal protective 
          equipment from non-allied foreign nations (sec. 832)...   209
        Further prohibition on acquisition of sensitive materials 
          (sec. 833).............................................   209
        Requirement for industry days and requests for 
          information to be open to allied defense contractors 
          (sec. 834).............................................   209
        Assessment of requirements for certain items to address 
          supply chain vulnerabilities (sec. 835)................   209
        Requirement that certain providers of systems to 
          Department of Defense disclose the source of printed 
          circuit boards when sourced from certain countries 
          (sec. 836).............................................   209
        Employment transparency regarding individuals who perform 
          work in the People's Republic of China (sec. 837)......   210
    Subtitle D--Small Business Matters...........................   210
        Clarification of duties of Director of Small Business 
          Programs (sec. 841)....................................   210
        Data on Phase III Small Business Innovation Research and 
          Small Business Technology Transfer program awards (sec. 
          842)...................................................   210
        Pilot program to incentivize employee ownership in 
          defense contracting (sec. 843).........................   211
    Subtitle E--Other Matters....................................   211
        Technology protection features activities (sec. 851).....   211
        Independent study on technical debt in software-intensive 
          systems (sec. 852).....................................   211
        Determination with respect to optical fiber transmission 
          equipment for Department of Defense purposes (sec. 853)   212
        Two-year extension of Selected Acquisition Report 
          requirement (sec. 854).................................   212
        Military standards for high-hardness armor in combat 
          vehicle specifications (sec. 855)......................   212
        Revisions to the Unified Facilities Criteria regarding 
          the use of variable refrigerant flow systems (sec. 856)   213
    Items of Special Interest....................................   213
        Acquisition of synthetic graphite material...............   213
        Agile weapons system sustainment.........................   213
        Comptroller General review of flexible budget and 
          financial management authorities.......................   214
        Incentives to promote the use of energy efficient 
          manufacturing technologies.............................   214
        National technology and industrial base..................   214
        Past performance by subcontractors and predecessor 
          companies..............................................   215
        Policy modeling and testing..............................   215
        Report on contracting for procurement of body armor......   216
        Report on life cycle share-in-savings contracts..........   217
        Small Business Innovation Research and commercial item 
          purchasing program training............................   217
        Small Business Innovation Research and the Small Business 
          Technology Transfer programs...........................   218
        Submission of selected acquisition reports...............   218
        Support of fourth-party logistics program................   219
TITLE IX--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT......   221
        Change in eligibility requirements for appointment to 
          certain Department of Defense leadership positions 
          (sec. 901).............................................   221
        Renaming of Air National Guard to Air and Space National 
          Guard (sec. 902).......................................   222
        Joint Aviation Safety Council (sec. 903).................   222
        Assignments for participants in the John S. McCain 
          Strategic Defense Fellows Program (sec. 904)...........   222
        Alignment of Close Combat Lethality Task Force (sec. 905)   222
        Management innovation activities (sec. 906)..............   223
    Items of Special Interest....................................   224
        Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and 
          Low Intensity Conflict.................................   224
        Component content management systems.....................   225
        Personnel requirements for functions previously carried 
          out by the Chief Management Officer....................   225
        Remote work information technology.......................   225
        Workforce management training............................   226
TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS......................................   227
    Subtitle A--Financial Matters................................   227
        General transfer authority (sec. 1001)...................   227
        Commission on Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and 
          Execution Reform (sec. 1002)...........................   227
        Plan for consolidation of information technology systems 
          used in the planning, programming, budgeting, and 
          execution process (sec. 1003)..........................   228
    Subtitle B--Counterdrug Activities...........................   228
        Codification and expansion of authority for joint task 
          forces of the Department of Defense to support law 
          enforcement agencies conducting counter-terrorism, 
          counter-illicit trafficking, or counter-transnational 
          organized crime activities (sec. 1011).................   228
        Extension of authority to support a unified counterdrug 
          and counterterrorism campaign in Colombia (sec. 1012)..   228
    Subtitle C--Naval Vessels....................................   229
        Modification to annual naval vessel construction plan 
          (sec. 1021)............................................   229
        Navy battle force ship assessment and requirement 
          reporting (sec. 1022)..................................   229
    Subtitle D--Counterterrorism.................................   229
        Extension of prohibition on use of funds for transfer or 
          release of individuals detained at United States Naval 
          Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to the United States 
          (sec. 1031)............................................   229
        Extension of prohibition on use of funds to construct or 
          modify facilities in the United States to house 
          detainees transferred from United States Naval Station, 
          Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (sec. 1032).......................   229
        Extension of prohibition on use of funds for transfer or 
          release of individuals detained at United States Naval 
          Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to certain countries 
          (sec. 1033)............................................   229
        Extension of prohibition on use of funds to close or 
          relinquish control of United States Naval Station, 
          Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (sec. 1034).......................   230
        Report on medical care provided to detainees at United 
          States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (sec. 1035).   230
    Subtitle E--Miscellaneous Authorities and Limitations........   230
        Notification of significant Army force structure changes 
          (sec. 1041)............................................   230
        Extension of admission to Guam or the Commonwealth of the 
          Northern Mariana Islands for certain nonimmigrant H-2B 
          workers (sec. 1042)....................................   230
    Subtitle F--Studies and Reports..............................   231
        Report on implementation of irregular warfare strategy 
          (sec. 1051)............................................   231
        Optimization of Irregular Warfare Technical Support 
          Directorate (sec. 1052)................................   231
        Quarterly briefings on anomalous health incidents (sec. 
          1053)..................................................   231
    Subtitle G--Other Matters....................................   232
        Commission on the National Defense Strategy (sec. 1061)..   232
        Assessment of requirements for and management of Army 
          three-dimensional terrain data (sec. 1062).............   233
        Modification to Regional Centers for Security Studies 
          (sec. 1063)............................................   233
    Items of Special Interest....................................   234
        Access to Sensitive Compartmented Information............   234
        Appreciation for Department of Defense response to the 
          coronavirus pandemic...................................   234
        Arctic weather observations..............................   235
        Assessment of hostile respiratory diseases...............   235
        Assessment of hostile use of zoonotic diseases...........   235
        Assessment of missile salvo defense capabilities and 
          capacity...............................................   236
        Comparative assessment of naval shipbuilding costs.......   236
        Maritime domain information sharing......................   237
        Navy capabilities in the Arctic region...................   237
        Navy surface warfare training............................   238
        Overseas contingency operations budget exhibits..........   239
TITLE XI--CIVILIAN PERSONNEL MATTERS.............................   241
        Civilian personnel management (sec. 1101)................   241
        Consideration of employee performance in reductions in 
          force for civilian positions in the Department of 
          Defense (sec. 1102)....................................   241
        Enhancement of recusal for conflicts of personal interest 
          requirements for Department of Defense officers and 
          employees (sec. 1103)..................................   241
        Authority to employ civilian faculty members at the 
          Defense Institute of International Legal Studies (sec. 
          1104)..................................................   241
        Extension of temporary increase in maximum amount of 
          voluntary separation incentive pay authorized for 
          civilian employees of the Department of Defense (sec. 
          1105)..................................................   241
        One-year extension of temporary authority to grant 
          allowances, benefits, and gratuities to civilian 
          personnel on official duty in a combat zone (sec. 1106)   242
        One-year extension of authority to waive annual 
          limitation on premium pay and aggregate limitation on 
          pay for Federal civilian employees working overseas 
          (sec. 1107)............................................   242
        Pilot program on direct hire authority for spouses of 
          members of the uniformed services at locations outside 
          the United States (sec. 1108)..........................   242
        Civilian Cybersecurity Reserve pilot project at United 
          States Cyber Command (sec. 1109).......................   242
    Items of Special Interest....................................   242
        Limiting the number of local wage areas defined within a 
          pay locality...........................................   242
TITLE XII--MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS...................   245
    Subtitle A--Assistance and Training..........................   245
        Authority to build capacity for additional operations 
          (sec. 1201)............................................   245
        Administrative support and payment of certain expenses 
          for covered foreign defense personnel (sec. 1202)......   245
        Authority for certain reimbursable interchange of 
          supplies and services (sec. 1203)......................   245
        Extension and modification of Department of Defense 
          support for stabilization activities in national 
          security interest of the United States (sec. 1204).....   246
        Temporary authority to pay for personnel expenses of 
          foreign national security forces participating in the 
          training program of the United States-Colombia Action 
          Plan for Regional Security (sec. 1205).................   246
        Security cooperation strategy for certain combatant 
          commands (sec. 1206)...................................   246
        Plan for enhancing Western Hemisphere security 
          cooperation (sec. 1207)................................   247
        Pilot program to support the implementation of the Women, 
          Peace, and Security Act of 2017 (sec. 1208)............   247
        Limitation on support to military forces of the Kingdom 
          of Morocco for bilateral or multilateral exercises 
          (sec. 1209)............................................   247
    Subtitle B--Matters Relating to Afghanistan and Pakistan.....   247
        Extension and modification of authority for support for 
          reconciliation activities led by the Government of 
          Afghanistan and prohibition on use of funds for the 
          Taliban and other terrorist groups (sec. 1211).........   247
        Extension and modification of authority for reimbursement 
          of certain coalition nations for support provided to 
          United States military operations (sec. 1212)..........   248
        Afghanistan Security Forces Fund (sec. 1213).............   248
        Quarterly security briefings on Afghanistan (sec. 1214)..   248
        Sense of Senate and briefing on counterterrorism posture 
          of the United States after transition of United States 
          Armed Forces from Afghanistan (sec. 1215)..............   249
    Subtitle C--Matters Relating to Syria, Iraq, and Iran........   249
        Extension and modification of authority to provide 
          assistance to vetted Syrian groups and individuals 
          (sec. 1221)............................................   249
        Extension and modification of authority to support 
          operations and activities of the Office of Security 
          Cooperation in Iraq (sec. 1222)........................   249
        Extension and modification of authority to provide 
          assistance to counter the Islamic State of Iraq and 
          Syria (sec. 1223)......................................   249
    Subtitle D--Matters Relating to Europe and the Russian 
      Federation.................................................   250
        Extension of limitation on military cooperation between 
          the United States and the Russian Federation (sec. 
          1231)..................................................   250
        Extension of prohibition on availability of funds 
          relating to sovereignty of the Russian Federation over 
          Crimea (sec. 1232).....................................   250
        Extension of Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative (sec. 
          1233)..................................................   250
        Extension of authority for training for Eastern European 
          national security forces in the course of multilateral 
          exercises (sec. 1234)..................................   251
        Sense of Senate on the North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
          (sec. 1235)............................................   251
        Sense of Senate on continuing support for Estonia, 
          Latvia, and Lithuania (sec. 1236)......................   251
    Subtitle E--Matters Relating to the Indo-Pacific Region......   251
        Extension and modification of Indo-Pacific Maritime 
          Security Initiative (sec. 1241)........................   251
        Extension and modification of Pacific Deterrence 
          Initiative (sec. 1242).................................   252
        Extension of authority to transfer funds for Bien Hoa 
          dioxin cleanup (sec. 1243).............................   252
        Cooperative program with Vietnam to account for 
          Vietnamese personnel missing in action (sec. 1244).....   252
        Assessment of and plan for improving the defensive 
          asymmetric capabilities of Taiwan (sec. 1245)..........   252
        Annual feasibility briefing on cooperation between the 
          National Guard and Taiwan (sec. 1246)..................   252
        Defense of Taiwan (sec. 1247)............................   253
        Comparative analyses and report on efforts by the United 
          States and the People's Republic of China to advance 
          critical modernization technology with respect to 
          military applications (sec. 1248)......................   253
        Modification of annual report on military and security 
          developments involving the People's Republic of China 
          (sec. 1249)............................................   253
        Feasibility report on establishing more robust military-
          to-military crisis communications with the People's 
          Republic of China (sec. 1250)..........................   254
        Semiannual briefings on efforts to deter Chinese 
          aggression and military coercion (sec. 1251)...........   254
        Sense of Congress on defense alliances and partnerships 
          in the Indo-Pacific region (sec. 1252).................   254
    Subtitle F--Reports..........................................   254
        Report on security cooperation authorities and associated 
          resourcing in support of the Security Force Assistance 
          Brigades (sec. 1261)...................................   254
        Independent assessment with respect to Arctic region and 
          establishment of Arctic Security Initiative (sec. 1262)   255
        Annual report and briefing on Global Force Management 
          Allocation Plan (sec. 1263)............................   255
    Subtitle G--Others Matters...................................   255
        Modification of United States-Israel Operations-
          Technology cooperation within the United States-Israel 
          Defense Acquisition Advisory Group (sec. 1271).........   255
        Prohibition on support for offensive military operations 
          against the Houthis in Yemen (sec. 1272)...............   255
        Repeal of authorization of non-conventional assisted 
          recovery capabilities; modification of authority for 
          expenditure of funds for clandestine activities that 
          support operational preparation of the environment 
          (sec. 1273)............................................   256
        Extension and modification of authority for certain 
          payments to redress injury and loss (sec. 1274)........   256
        Secretary of Defense Strategic Competition Initiative 
          (sec. 1275)............................................   256
        Strategic competition initiative for United States 
          Southern Command and United States Africa Command (sec. 
          1276)..................................................   257
        Modification of notification requirements for sensitive 
          military operations (sec. 1277)........................   257
        Special Operations Forces joint operating concept for 
          competition and conflict (sec. 1278)...................   258
        Plan for provision of information support to commanders 
          of the combatant commands (sec. 1279)..................   258
        Independent review of and report on the Unified Command 
          Plan (sec. 1280).......................................   258
        Establishment of mission-oriented pilot programs to close 
          significant capabilities gaps (sec. 1281)..............   258
        Limitation on availability of certain funding for 
          operation and maintenance (sec. 1282)..................   259
    Items of Special Interest....................................   259
        Assessment of China-Russia Security Cooperation..........   259
        Briefing on efforts to provide credible options to 
          respond to the use of force by China to alter the 
          status quo with respect to Taiwan......................   260
        Comptroller General review of European Deterrence 
          Initiative.............................................   260
        Comptroller General review of logistics in the European 
          theater................................................   261
        Comptroller General review of the approval process for 
          contact between Department of Defense personnel and 
          Chinese government officials...........................   262
        Cyber cooperation with Vietnam, Thailand, and Indonesia..   262
        Defense cooperation with Taiwan..........................   263
        Developing country definition............................   263
        Distributed airfields and ports for dispersed operations.   263
        Ensuring the safety of America's Afghan allies...........   264
        Forward deployed naval forces in Europe..................   264
        Medical support for Ukrainian soldiers...................   265
        Military mobility in Europe..............................   265
        Operational support to Afghanistan National Defense and 
          Security Forces........................................   266
        Participation by Taiwan in multilateral security 
          dialogues and forums...................................   266
        Plan for maintaining oversight of funds and activities of 
          Afghanistan Security Forces Fund.......................   267
        Public reporting of Chinese military companies operating 
          in the United States...................................   267
        Support to Kurdish Peshmerga for counterterrorism and 
          border security operations.............................   268
        United States support to partner military medical 
          services...............................................   268
        United States--Greenland strategic relationship..........   269
TITLE XIII--COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION.........................   271
    Funding allocations; specification of Cooperative Threat 
      Reduction funds (sec. 1301)................................   271
    Items of Special Interest....................................   271
        Training for Weapons of Mass Destruction Civil Support 
          Teams..................................................   271
TITLE XIV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS..................................   273
    Subtitle A--Military Programs................................   273
        Working capital funds (sec. 1401)........................   273
        Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense (sec. 
          1402)..................................................   273
        Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-
          wide (sec. 1403).......................................   273
        Defense Inspector General (sec. 1404)....................   273
        Defense Health Program (sec. 1405).......................   273
    Subtitle B--Armed Forces Retirement Home.....................   273
        Authorization of appropriations for Armed Forces 
          Retirement Home (sec. 1411)............................   273
    Subtitle C--Other Matters....................................   274
        Authorization to loan materials in National Defense 
          Stockpile (sec. 1421)..................................   274
        Repeal of termination of biennial report on National 
          Defense Stockpile requirements (sec. 1422).............   274
        Authority for transfer of funds to joint Department of 
          Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility 
          Demonstration Fund for Captain James A. Lovell Health 
          Care Center, Illinois (sec. 1423)......................   274
TITLE XV--SPACE ACTIVITIES, STRATEGIC PROGRAMS, AND INTELLIGENCE 
  MATTERS........................................................   275
    Subtitle A--Space Activities.................................   275
        Delegation of authorities to Space Development Agency 
          (sec. 1501)............................................   275
        Modification to Space Development Agency (sec. 1502).....   275
        Disclosure of National Security Space Launch program 
          contract pricing terms (sec. 1503).....................   275
        Extension and modification of Council on Oversight of the 
          Department of Defense Positioning, Navigation, and 
          Timing Enterprise (sec. 1504)..........................   276
        Senior Procurement Executive authority (sec. 1505).......   276
        Modifications to Space Force Acquisition Council (sec. 
          1506)..................................................   276
        Modifications relating to the Assistant Secretary of the 
          Air Force for Space Acquisition and Integration (sec. 
          1507)..................................................   276
        Modification to transfer of acquisition projects for 
          space systems and programs (sec. 1508).................   277
        Extension and modification of certifications regarding 
          integrated tactical warning and attack assessment 
          mission of the Air Force (sec. 1509)...................   277
        Prohibition on Missile Defense Agency production of 
          satellites and ground systems associated with operation 
          of such satellites (sec. 1510).........................   277
        Continued requirement for National Security Space Launch 
          program (sec. 1511)....................................   278
        Limitation, report, and briefing on use of commercial 
          satellite services and associated systems (sec. 1512)..   278
        Study on commercial systems integration into, and support 
          of, Armed Forces space operations (sec. 1513)..........   278
        Space policy review (sec. 1514)..........................   279
        Annual briefing on threats to space operations (sec. 
          1515)..................................................   279
    Subtitle B--Defense Intelligence and Intelligence-Related 
      Activities.................................................   279
        Authority for Army counterintelligence agents to execute 
          warrants and make arrests (sec. 1521)..................   279
        Annual briefing by Director of the Defense Intelligence 
          Agency on electronic warfare threat to operations of 
          the Department of Defense (sec. 1522)..................   279
    Subtitle C--Nuclear Forces...................................   280
        Participation in United States Strategic Command 
          strategic deterrence exercises (sec. 1531).............   280
        Modification to requirements relating to nuclear force 
          reductions (sec. 1532).................................   280
        Modifications to requirements relating to unilateral 
          changes in nuclear weapons stockpile of the United 
          States (sec. 1533).....................................   281
        Deadline for reports on modification of force structure 
          for strategic nuclear weapons delivery systems (sec. 
          1534)..................................................   281
        Modification of deadline for notifications relating to 
          reduction, consolidation, or withdrawal of nuclear 
          forces based in Europe (sec. 1535).....................   281
        Congressional Commission on the Strategic Posture of the 
          United States (sec. 1536)..............................   281
        Revised Nuclear Posture Review (sec. 1537)...............   282
        Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent development program 
          accountability matrices (sec. 1538)....................   282
        Procurement authority for certain parts of Ground-Based 
          Strategic Deterrent cryptographic device (sec. 1539)...   283
        Mission-design series popular name for Ground-Based 
          Strategic Deterrent (sec. 1540)........................   283
        B-21 Raider nuclear capability and integration with Long-
          Range Standoff Weapon (sec. 1541)......................   283
        Comptroller General study and updated report on nuclear 
          weapons capabilities and force structure requirements 
          (sec. 1542)............................................   284
        Prohibition on reduction of the intercontinental 
          ballistic missiles of the United States (sec. 1543)....   285
        Limitation on use of funds until completion of analysis 
          of alternatives for nuclear sea-launched cruise missile 
          (sec. 1544)............................................   285
        Sense of the Senate on NATO security and nuclear 
          cooperation between the United States and the United 
          Kingdom (sec. 1545)....................................   286
        Sense of the Senate on maintaining diversity in the 
          nuclear weapons stockpile (sec. 1546)..................   286
        Sense of the Senate on the Ground-Based Strategic 
          Deterrent (sec. 1547)..................................   286
    Subtitle D--Missile Defense Programs.........................   286
        Authority to develop and deploy Next Generation 
          Interceptor for missile defense of the United States 
          homeland (sec. 1551)...................................   286
        Annual reliability testing for the Next Generation 
          Interceptor (sec. 1552)................................   287
        Next Generation Interceptor program accountability 
          matrices (sec. 1553)...................................   287
        Extension of period for transition of ballistic missile 
          defense programs to military departments (sec. 1554)...   287
        Iron Dome short-range rocket defense system and Israeli 
          cooperative missile defense program co-development and 
          co-production (sec. 1555)..............................   288
        Semiannual updates on meetings held by the Missile 
          Defense Executive Board (sec. 1556)....................   288
        Independent study of Department of Defense components' 
          roles and responsibilities relating to missile defense 
          (sec. 1557)............................................   288
    Items of Special Interest....................................   289
        Alternate position, navigation, and timing in space......   289
        Briefing on advanced missile defense technology 
          development............................................   289
        Briefing on Air Force efforts to facilitate 
          intercontinental ballistic missile movements during the 
          transition to the Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent.....   290
        Briefing on alignment of Missile Defense Agency's space 
          development activities.................................   290
        Briefing on protection of Air Force nuclear storage 
          facilities.............................................   290
        Commercial cloud computing in military space programs....   290
        Commercial Space Technologies............................   291
        Cybersecurity of Missile Defense Systems.................   291
        Detection Capability of Homeland Defense Radar--Hawaii...   292
        Geophysical detection of nuclear proliferation...........   293
        Integrated satellite communications strategy.............   293
        Laser threats to low earth orbit constellations..........   294
        Long-term oversight of the Department of Defense's 
          efforts to deploy Overhead Persistent Infrared space-
          based architectures....................................   294
        Mix of media study audit.................................   295
        Responsive launch prize..................................   296
        Review of Ballistic Missile Defense Readiness and 
          Sustainment............................................   296
        Space Force Combatant Commander Integrated Command and 
          Control System.........................................   297
        Tactical satellite commutations capability...............   297
        Tactically Responsive Space Launch.......................   298
        Use of commercial space-based Intelligence, Surveillance, 
          and Reconnaissance by the combatant commands...........   298
        B-52 Commercial Engine Replacement Program (CERP)........   299
        Multi-actor deterrence methodology.......................   299
        Intelligent electronic protection technologies...........   299
        Global Nuclear Landscape.................................   299
        Report on mitigating the impact of space debris..........   300
        National Security Space Launch emerging requirements.....   300
        High energy laser technology integration.................   301
        Leveraging commercial space domain awareness capability, 
          data, products and services............................   301
TITLE XVI--CYBERSPACE-RELATED MATTERS............................   303
        Matters concerning cyber personnel requirements (sec. 
          1601)..................................................   303
        Cyber data management (sec. 1602)........................   303
        Assignment of certain budget control responsibilities to 
          Commander of United States Cyber Command (sec. 1603)...   304
        Coordination between United States Cyber Command and 
          private sector (sec. 1604).............................   304
        Pilot program on public-private partnerships with 
          internet ecosystem companies to detect and disrupt 
          adversary cyber operations (sec. 1605).................   304
        Zero trust strategy, principles, model architecture, and 
          implementation plans (sec. 1606).......................   305
        Demonstration program for automated security validation 
          tools (sec. 1607)......................................   305
        Improvements to consortium of universities to advise 
          Secretary of Defense on cybersecurity matters (sec. 
          1608)..................................................   306
        Quarterly reports on cyber operations (sec. 1609)........   306
        Assessment of cybersecurity posture and operational 
          assumptions and development of targeting strategies and 
          supporting capabilities (sec. 1610)....................   307
        Assessing capabilities to counter adversary use of 
          ransomware tools, capabilities, and infrastructure 
          (sec. 1611)............................................   307
        Comparative analysis of cybersecurity capabilities (sec. 
          1612)..................................................   308
    Report on the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification 
      program (sec. 1613)........................................   308
    Report on potential Department of Defense support and 
      assistance for increasing the awareness of the 
      Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency of cyber 
      threats and vulnerabilities affecting critical 
      infrastructure (sec. 1614).................................   309
    Deadline for reports on assessment of cyber resiliency of 
      nuclear command and control system (sec. 1615).............   309
    Items of Special Interest....................................   309
        Advanced capabilities for Department of Defense red teams   309
        Application of commercial off-the-shelf solutions to 
          address intelligence and operations gaps...............   310
        Assessment of need for Cyber Intelligence Center and War 
          Game Center............................................   310
        Comptroller General assessment of the Department of 
          Defense information technology supply chain............   311
        Cybersecurity training at Critical Training Centers......   312
        Improving Department of Defense guidance for weapon 
          system acquisitions cybersecurity requirements.........   312
        Prioritizing cyber vulnerability remediations............   313
DIVISION B--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AUTHORIZATIONS.................   315
    Summary and explanation of funding tables....................   315
    Short title (sec. 2001)......................................   315
    Expiration of authorizations and amounts required to be 
      specified by law (sec. 2002)...............................   315
    Effective date (sec. 2003)...................................   316
TITLE XXI--ARMY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION............................   317
    Summary......................................................   317
    Authorized Army construction and land acquisition projects 
      (sec. 2101)................................................   317
    Family housing (sec. 2102)...................................   317
    Authorization of appropriations, Army (sec. 2103)............   317
    Extension of authorization of fiscal year 2017 project at 
      Wiesbaden Army Airfield (sec. 2104)........................   317
    Additional authority to carry out fiscal year 2018 project at 
      Fort Bliss, Texas (sec. 2105)..............................   318
    Modification of authority to carry out fiscal year 2021 
      project at Fort Wainwright, Alaska (sec. 2106).............   318
    Additional authority to carry out fiscal year 2022 project at 
      Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland (sec. 2107)..............   318
TITLE XXII--NAVY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION...........................   319
    Summary......................................................   319
    Authorized Navy construction and land acquisition projects 
      (sec. 2201)................................................   319
    Family housing (sec. 2202)...................................   319
    Improvements to military family housing units (sec. 2203)....   319
    Authorization of appropriations, Navy (sec. 2204)............   319
TITLE XXIII--AIR FORCE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION.....................   321
    Summary......................................................   321
    Authorized Air Force construction and land acquisition 
      projects (sec. 2301).......................................   321
    Family housing (sec. 2302)...................................   321
    Improvements to military family housing units (sec. 2303)....   321
    Authorization of appropriations, Air Force (sec. 2304).......   321
    Extension of authorizations of certain fiscal year 2017 
      projects (sec. 2305).......................................   322
    Extension of authorizations of fiscal year 2017 projects at 
      Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany (sec. 2306)..................   322
    Extension of authorization of fiscal year 2017 project at 
      Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts (sec. 2307)..........   322
    Modification of authority to carry out fiscal year 2018 
      project at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida (sec. 2308).....   322
    Modification of authority to carry out fiscal year 2020 
      projects at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida (sec. 2309)....   322
TITLE XXIV--DEFENSE AGENCIES MILITARY CONSTRUCTION...............   323
    Summary......................................................   323
    Authorized Defense Agencies construction and land acquisition 
      projects (sec. 2401).......................................   323
    Authorized Energy Resilience and Conservation Investment 
      Program projects (sec. 2402)...............................   323
    Authorization of appropriations, Defense Agencies (sec. 2403)   323
    Extension of authorization of fiscal year 2017 project at 
      Yokota Air Base, Japan (sec. 2404).........................   323
TITLE XXV--INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS................................   325
    Summary......................................................   325
    Subtitle A--North Atlantic Treaty Organization Security 
      Investment Program.........................................   325
        Authorized NATO construction and land acquisition 
          projects (sec. 2501)...................................   325
        Authorization of appropriations, NATO (sec. 2502)........   325
    Subtitle B--Host Country In-Kind Contributions...............   325
        Republic of Korea funded construction projects (sec. 
          2511)..................................................   325
    Republic of Poland provided infrastructure projects (sec. 
      2512)......................................................   325
    Authorization to accept contributions from the Republic of 
      Korea in the form of an irrevocable letter of credit (sec. 
      2513)......................................................   326
TITLE XXVI--GUARD AND RESERVE FORCES FACILITIES..................   327
    Summary......................................................   327
    Authorized Army National Guard construction and land 
      acquisition projects (sec. 2601)...........................   327
    Authorized Army Reserve construction and land acquisition 
      projects (sec. 2602).......................................   327
    Authorized Navy Reserve and Marine Corps Reserve construction 
      and land acquisition projects (sec. 2603)..................   327
    Authorized Air National Guard construction and land 
      acquisition projects (sec. 2604)...........................   327
    Authorized Air Force Reserve construction and land 
      acquisition projects (sec. 2605)...........................   328
    Authorization of appropriations, National Guard and Reserve 
      (sec. 2606)................................................   328
TITLE XXVII--BASE REALIGNMENT AND CLOSURE ACTIVITIES.............   329
    Summary and explanation of tables............................   329
    Authorization of appropriations for base realignment and 
      closure activities funded through Department of Defense 
      Base Closure Account (sec. 2701)...........................   329
    Prohibition on conducting additional base realignment and 
      closure (BRAC) round (sec. 2702)...........................   329
TITLE XXVIII--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AND GENERAL PROVISIONS.......   331
    Subtitle A--Military Construction Program....................   331
        Clarification of establishment of the Office of Local 
          Defense Community Cooperation as a Department of 
          Defense Field Activity (sec. 2801).....................   331
        Use of amounts available for operation and maintenance in 
          carrying out military construction projects for energy 
          resilience, energy security, or energy conservation 
          (sec. 2802)............................................   331
    Subtitle B--Military Family Housing..........................   331
        Command oversight of military privatized housing as 
          element of performance evaluations (sec. 2811).........   331
        Clarification of prohibition against collection from 
          tenants of privatized military housing units of amounts 
          in addition to rent and application of existing law 
          (sec. 2812)............................................   331
        Modification of calculation of military housing 
          contractor pay for privatized military housing (sec. 
          2813)..................................................   332
        Modification of requirements relating to window fall 
          prevention devices at military family housing (sec. 
          2814)..................................................   332
    Subtitle C--Land Conveyances.................................   332
        Land conveyance, St. Louis, Missouri (sec. 2821).........   332
        Land conveyance, Saint Joseph, Missouri (sec. 2822)......   332
        Land conveyance, Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, 
          North Carolina (sec. 2823).............................   333
        Land conveyance, Naval Air Station Oceana, Virginia 
          Beach, Virginia (sec. 2824)............................   333
    Subtitle D--Other Matters....................................   333
        Consideration of public education when making basing 
          decisions (sec. 2831)..................................   333
        Designation of facility at Rock Island Arsenal, Illinois 
          (sec. 2832)............................................   333
        Improvement of security of lodging and living spaces on 
          military installations (sec. 2833).....................   333
        Expansion of authority of Secretary of the Navy to lease 
          and license Navy museum facilities to generate revenue 
          to support museum administration and operations (sec. 
          2834)..................................................   333
        Pilot program on establishment of account for 
          reimbursement for use of testing facilities at 
          installations of the Department of the Air Force (sec. 
          2835)..................................................   334
    Items of Special Interest....................................   334
        Army mobilization and training infrastructure............   334
        Army National Guard readiness centers....................   335
        Army Training Land Retention Program.....................   336
        Briefing on feasibility of integrated project delivery 
          for military construction..............................   336
        Child development centers................................   336
        Comptroller General review of excess infrastructure......   337
        Comptroller General review of military barracks..........   338
        Disaster recovery at Offutt Air Force Base and Tyndall 
          Air Force Base.........................................   339
        Feasibility of relocating Yuma community site............   339
        Fleet Readiness Center East and Marine Corps Air Station.   339
        Cherry Point facilities brief............................   339
        General Mitchell International Airport pipeline project..   340
        Hawaii Infrastructure Readiness Initiative...............   341
        Improving budgeting for barracks and dormitory in failing 
          conditions.............................................   341
        Improving on-base housing waitlists......................   342
        Joint-use facilities briefing............................   343
        Massachusetts Institute of Technology Lincoln Lab........   343
        Engineering Prototyping Facility construction............   343
        Privatized lodging program...............................   344
        Realizing B-21 depot land acquisition savings............   344
        Report on improving Army Family Housing at Fort McNair, 
          Washington, D.C........................................   345
        Review of restricted use easements.......................   346
        Sustainable building materials...........................   347
        Unspecified Minor Military Construction..................   347
DIVISION C--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY AUTHORIZATIONS 
  AND OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS.......................................   349
TITLE XXXI--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAMS......   349
    Subtitle A--National Security Programs and Authorizations....   349
        National Nuclear Security Administration (sec. 3101).....   349
        Defense environmental cleanup (sec. 3102)................   349
        Other defense activities (sec. 3103).....................   349
        Nuclear energy (sec. 3104)...............................   349
    Subtitle B--Nuclear Weapons Stockpile Matters................   349
        Portfolio management framework for National Nuclear 
          Security Administration (sec. 3111)....................   349
        Reports on risks to and gaps in industrial base for 
          nuclear weapons components, subsystems, and materials 
          (sec. 3112)............................................   350
        Sense of Senate on oversight role of Congress in conduct 
          of nuclear weapons testing (sec. 3113).................   350
    Subtitle C--Defense Environmental Cleanup Matters............   351
        Part I--Environmental Management Liability Reduction and 
          Technology Development.................................   351
            Environmental management liability reduction and 
              technology development (secs. 3121-3125)...........   351
        Part II--Other Matters...................................   351
            Comprehensive strategy for treating, storing, and 
              disposing of defense nuclear waste resulting from 
              stockpile maintenance and modernization activities 
              (sec. 3131)........................................   351
    Subtitle D--Budget and Financial Management Matters..........   352
        Improvements to cost estimates informing analyses of 
          alternatives (sec. 3141)...............................   352
        Modification of requirements for certain construction 
          projects (sec. 3142)...................................   352
        Modification to terminology for reports of financial 
          balances for atomic energy defense activities (sec. 
          3143)..................................................   352
    Subtitle E--Other Matters....................................   352
        Extension of authority for appointment of certain 
          scientific, engineering, and technical personnel (sec. 
          3151)..................................................   352
        Extension of enhanced procurement authority to manage 
          supply chain risk (sec. 3152)..........................   353
        Extension of authority for acceptance of contributions 
          for acceleration of removal or security of fissile 
          materials, radiological materials, and related 
          equipment at vulnerable sites worldwide (sec. 3153)....   353
        Updates to Infrastructure Modernization Initiative (sec. 
          3154)..................................................   353
        Acquisition of high-performance computing capabilities by 
          National Nuclear Security Administration (sec. 3155)...   354
        Limitation on use of funds for naval nuclear fuel systems 
          based on low-enriched uranium (sec. 3156)..............   354
    Budget Items.................................................   355
        National Nuclear Security Administration Production 
          Modernization--depleted uranium modernization..........   355
        National Nuclear Security Administration Stockpile 
          Research, Technology and Engineering...................   355
        National Nuclear Security Administration Infrastructure 
          and Operations.........................................   356
        National Nuclear Security Administration Secure 
          Transportation Asset...................................   356
        National Nuclear Security Administration Defense Nuclear 
          Nonproliferation.......................................   356
        Department of Energy Environmental Management--Hanford 
          River Corridor and other cleanup operations............   356
        Department of Energy Environmental Management--Hanford 
          Office of River Protection Tank Farm Activities........   357
        Department of Energy Environmental Management National 
          Nuclear Security Administration Sites and Nevada 
          Offsite: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory excess 
          facility decontamination and decommissioning...........   357
        Department of Energy Environmental Management: Oak Ridge 
          Nuclear Facility Decontamination and Decommissioning...   357
        Department of Energy Environmental Management--Savannah 
          River Nuclear Materials Stabilization and Disposition..   357
        Department of Energy Environmental Management--Savannah 
          River Community and Regulatory Support.................   357
        Department of Energy Environmental Management--Uranium 
          Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund....   358
        Department of Energy Legacy Management--Formerly Utilized 
          Sites Remedial Action Program..........................   358
    Items of Special Interest....................................   358
        Acquisition planning and impacts of choice of contract 
          type on performance....................................   358
        Applying knowledge-based acquisitions framework to 
          weapons modernization programs.........................   359
        Assessment of Department of Energy's Office of 
          Environmental Management cleanup at Los Alamos National 
          Laboratory.............................................   360
        Briefing on options for accelerating the reestablishment 
          of domestic uranium enrichment capabilities............   360
        Continued oversight of lithium...........................   361
        Continuing Comptroller General evaluation of the Hanford 
          Waste Treatment Plant..................................   361
        Continuing Comptroller General oversight of Waste 
          Isolation Pilot Plant..................................   361
        Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management's 
          End State Contracting..................................   361
        Direct-feed high-level waste at the Hanford Site.........   361
        Greater-Than-Class C waste disposal......................   363
        Kansas City National Security Campus planning............   363
        Limitations to Nuclear Weapons Availability to the 
          Department of Defense..................................   364
        Long term support for the Nevada National Security Site..   365
        Minor construction projects of the Department of Energy..   365
        Performance of depleted uranium hexafluoride conversion 
          facilities.............................................   365
        Report on options for maintaining W80-4, W87-1, and W93 
          program schedules despite interruptions in strategic 
          materials availability.................................   366
        Review of Integrated Master Schedule and Program 
          Management Plan for Los Alamos pit production..........   367
        Review of plutonium infrastructure at the National 
          Nuclear Security Administration........................   368
        Space and Atmospheric Burst Reporting System.............   368
        Status of verification and monitoring capabilities.......   368
        Supply chain and quality assurance for the National 
          Nuclear Security Administration........................   369
        Ten-year infrastructure and facilities plan for inertial 
          confinement fusion program.............................   370
TITLE XXXII--DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD.............   371
    Authorization (sec. 3201)....................................   371
    References to chairperson and vice chairperson of Defense 
      Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (sec. 3202)................   371
TITLE XXXV--MARITIME ADMINISTRATION..............................   373
    Maritime Administration (sec. 3501)..........................   373
DIVISION D--FUNDING TABLES.......................................   375
    Authorization of amounts in funding tables (sec. 4001).......   375
TITLE XLI--PROCUREMENT...........................................   383
    Procurement (sec. 4101)......................................   384
    Procurement for overseas contingency operations (sec. 4102)..   429
TITLE XLII--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION..........   429
    Research, development, test, and evaluation (sec. 4201)......   430
    Research, development, test, and evaluation for overseas 
      contingency operations (sec. 4202).........................
TITLE XLIII--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE...........................   475
    Operation and maintenance (sec. 4301)........................   476
    Operation and maintenance for overseas contingency operations 
      (sec. 4302)................................................
TITLE XLIV--MILITARY PERSONNEL...................................   507
    Military personnel (sec. 4401)...............................   508
    Military personnel for overseas contingency operations (sec. 
      4402)......................................................
TITLE XLV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS..................................   509
    Other authorizations (sec. 4501).............................   510
    Other authorizations for overseas contingency operations 
      (sec. 4502)................................................
TITLE XLVI--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION................................   515
    Military construction (sec. 4601)............................   516
    Military construction for overseas contingency operations 
      (sec. 4602)................................................
TITLE XLVII--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAMS.....   539
    Department of Energy national security programs (sec. 4701)..   540
LEGISLATIVE REQUIREMENTS.........................................   552
    Departmental Recommendations.................................   552
    Committee Action.............................................   552
    Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate....................   555
    Regulatory Impact............................................   555
    Changes In Exsisting Law.....................................   555
    
    
    
    

                                                        Calendar No. 129
                                                       
                                                       
117th Congress  }                                              {   Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session    }                                              {   117-39

======================================================================


     TO AUTHORIZE APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2022 FOR MILITARY 
ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, FOR MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, AND 
   FOR DEFENSE ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, TO PRESCRIBE 
   MILITARY PERSONNEL STRENGTHS FOR SUCH FISCAL YEAR, AND FOR OTHER 
                                PURPOSES

                                _______
                                

  September 22 (legislative day, September 21), 2021.--Ordered to be 
                                printed

                                _______
                                

            Mr. Reed, from the Committee on Armed Services, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                         [To accompany S. 2792]

    The Committee on Armed Services reports favorably an 
original bill (S. 2792) to authorize appropriations for fiscal 
year 2022 for military activities of the Department of Defense, 
for military construction, and for defense activities of the 
Department of Energy, to prescribe military personnel strengths 
for such fiscal year, and for other purposes, and recommends 
that the bill do pass.

                          PURPOSE OF THE BILL

    This bill would:
          (1) Authorize appropriations for (a) procurement, (b) 
        research, development, test and evaluation, (c) 
        operation and maintenance and the revolving and 
        management funds of the Department of Defense for 
        fiscal year 2022;
          (2) Authorize the personnel end strengths for each 
        military active duty component of the Armed Forces for 
        fiscal year 2022;
          (3) Authorize the personnel end strengths for the 
        Selected Reserve of each of the reserve components of 
        the Armed Forces for fiscal year 2022;
          (4) Impose certain reporting requirements;
          (5) Impose certain limitations with regard to 
        specific procurement and research, development, test 
        and evaluation actions and manpower strengths; provide 
        certain additional legislative authority, and make 
        certain changes to existing law;
          (6) Authorize appropriations for military 
        construction programs of the Department of Defense for 
        fiscal year 2022; and
          (7) Authorize appropriations for national security 
        programs of the Department of Energy for fiscal year 
        2022.

                           COMMITTEE OVERVIEW

    Each year, the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) 
authorizes funding levels and provides authorities for the U.S. 
military and other critical defense priorities, ensuring our 
troops have the training, equipment, and resources they need to 
carry out their missions. On July 21, 2021, the Senate Armed 
Services Committee voted in bipartisan fashion, 23-3, to 
advance the NDAA for fiscal year 2022 to the Senate floor.
    The United States is engaged in a strategic competition 
with China and Russia, near-peer rivals that do not accept U.S. 
global leadership or the international norms that have helped 
keep the peace for the better part of a century. This strategic 
competition is likely to intensify due to shifts in the 
military balance of power and diverging visions of governance 
models between China and Russia and the West. At the same time, 
threats from other aggressors--rogue states like Iran and North 
Korea, which seek to destabilize and antagonize, and terrorist 
organizations, which threaten to re-emerge or expand not just 
in the Middle East but in Africa and other parts of the world--
persist. These challenges are unfolding amidst a global 
pandemic, environmental degradation, and the evolution of 
disruptive technologies. The interconnected nature of these 
threats will drive how the United States resources and 
transforms its tools of national power to respond to these 
complex security challenges.
    To that end, the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2022:
          (1) Strengthens the All-Volunteer Force and improves 
        the quality of life of the men and women of the total 
        force (Active Duty, National Guard, and Reserves), 
        their families, and Department of Defense civilian 
        personnel, while reinforcing the principles of a 
        strong, diverse, inclusive force; that force cohesion 
        requires a command climate that does not tolerate 
        extremism, sexual misconduct or sexual harassment; and 
        that quality health care is a fundamental necessity for 
        servicemembers and their families;
          (2) Supports the Department of Defense and provides 
        the resources needed by the combatant commands to carry 
        out the National Defense Strategy and ensure the United 
        States can out-compete, deter, and prevail against 
        near-peer rivals, with a focus on strengthening our 
        posture in the Indo-Pacific region;
          (3) Enhances deterrence by recapitalizing and 
        modernizing the U.S. nuclear triad; ensuring the 
        safety, security, and reliability of our nuclear 
        stockpile, delivery systems, and infrastructure; 
        increasing capacity in theater and homeland missile 
        defense; and strengthening nonproliferation programs;
          (4) Accelerates the modernization of the Department 
        across all domains and operational capabilities by 
        investing in research and development of cutting-edge 
        technologies and delivering them in a timely manner to 
        the force;
          (5) Improves the ability of our Armed Forces to 
        counter threats and promote U.S. freedom of action in 
        the information environment including by countering 
        information warfare, foreign malign influence, 
        competition below the level of direct conflict, and 
        hybrid warfare;
          (6) Improves efficiencies in resource allocation 
        within the Department through transformations of the 
        planning and budgeting process, acquisition process, 
        and management structure and culture;
          (7) Protects and strengthens our national security 
        industrial base by prioritizing supply chain security; 
        improving technology security; and investing in next-
        generation technologies that will ensure U.S. military 
        competitiveness; and
          (8) Strengthens existing U.S. alliances and 
        partnerships, builds mutually beneficial new 
        partnerships, and leverages opportunities in 
        international cooperation to ensure U.S. success in 
        competition against other great powers.
    Meeting the challenges before the United States will 
require bold and far-sighted national security decisions. The 
fiscal year 2022 NDAA ensures that we have the policies and 
resources to deter America's adversaries, reassure our allies, 
and provide our forces with the tools and capabilities to 
overcome threats around the globe.

                 BUDGETARY EFFECTS OF THIS ACT (SEC. 4)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
that the budgetary effects of this Act be determined in 
accordance with the procedures established in the Statutory 
Pay-As-You-Go Act of 2010 (title I of Public Law 111-139).

     SUMMARY OF DISCRETIONARY AUTHORIZATIONS AND BUDGET AUTHORITY 
                              IMPLICATION

    The administration's budget request for national defense 
discretionary programs within the jurisdiction of the Senate 
Committee on Armed Services for fiscal year 2022 was $752.9 
billion. Of this amount, $715 billion was requested for base 
Department of Defense (DOD) programs and $27.9 billion was 
requested for national security programs in the Department of 
Energy (DOE).
    The committee recommends an overall discretionary 
authorization of $777.9 billion in fiscal year 2022 including 
$740.3 billion for base DOD programs, $27.7 billion for 
national security programs in the DOE, and $9.9 billion for 
defense-related activities outside the jurisdiction of the 
NDAA.
    The table preceding the detailed program adjustments in 
Division D of this bill summarizes the direct discretionary 
authorizations in the committee recommendation and the 
equivalent budget authority levels for fiscal year 2022 defense 
programs. The table summarizes the committee's recommended 
discretionary authorizations by appropriation account for 
fiscal year 2022 and compares these amounts to the request.

            DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AUTHORIZATIONS

                          TITLE I--PROCUREMENT

              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


Authorization of appropriations (sec. 101)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for procurement activities at the levels 
identified in section 4101 of division D of this Act.

                       Subtitle B--Army Programs


Multiyear procurement authority for AH-64E Apache helicopters (sec. 
        121)

    The committee recommends a provision that would allow the 
Secretary of the Army to enter into a multiyear contract for 
AH-64E Apache helicopters beginning in fiscal year 2022 and 
extending through fiscal year 2025, subject to the availability 
of appropriations, with the potential for an additional fifth 
year subject to need. Based on current estimates, the proposed 
multiyear procurement (MYP) would provide cost saving 
opportunities of $234.0 million as compared to annual contracts 
and would facilitate industrial stability.
    The AH-64E is a core aviation program and is approved for 
full-rate production through the current future years defense 
program (fiscal years 2021-2025). The minimum need for the AH-
64E is not expected to decrease during the contemplated MYP 
period.
    The committee expects the Secretary to have an approved 
future years defense program prior to certification of any 
multiyear contract in accordance with requirements in section 
2306b of title 10, United States Code.

Multiyear procurement authority for UH-60M and HH-60M Black Hawk 
        helicopters (sec. 122)

    The committee recommends a provision that would allow the 
Secretary of the Army to enter into a multiyear contract for 
UH/HH-60M Black Hawk helicopters beginning in fiscal year 2022 
with an anticipated end in fiscal year 2026, subject to the 
availability of appropriations. The proposed multiyear 
procurement (MYP) would produce significant savings and 
facilitate industrial stability. The proposed MYP would likely 
result in a cost avoidance of $405.4 million or 16.0 percent 
when compared to using five annual contracts. Additionally, 
this proposal would stabilize the workforce and reduce 
administrative burden for both the Army and contractor, 
resulting in a greater efficiency in acquisition operations.
    The committee expects the Secretary to have an approved 
future years defense program prior to certification of any 
multiyear contract in accordance with requirements in section 
2306b of title 10, United States Code.

Report and limitations on acquisition of Integrated Visual Augmentation 
        System (sec. 123)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Army to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees not later than January 31, 2022, to 
supplement a related reporting requirement included in the 
William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283). The report would 
require validation of system reliability, network adequacy, 
power duration, terrain data sufficiency, operational basis-of-
issue, and plans for iterative improvements to the system over 
the acquisition period. The provision would prohibit the 
obligation of expenditure of more than 50 percent of fiscal 
year 2022 funds authorized for the Integrated Visual 
Augmentation System (IVAS) procurement until the required 
report is submitted.
    The committee believes that soldier-wearable technologies 
such as the IVAS are essential for U.S. close-combat warriors 
to maintain combat overmatch against future adversaries. The 
committee commends the Army for utilizing a soldier-centric 
approach and leveraging non-traditional industry partners in 
development of the IVAS. The committee notes the Army's plans 
for operational testing of the system at scope and scale to 
ensure operational suitability and soldier acceptability, and 
commends the Army for its soldier-centric acquisition approach. 
Furthermore, the committee believes that continuous iterative 
improvement of high-tech capabilities such as the IVAS is 
essential for maintaining technological advantage and combat 
overmatch of systems such as the IVAS.

Modification of deployment by the Army of interim cruise missile 
        defense capability (sec. 124)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify the 
requirement for deployment of an interim cruise missile defense 
capability required by section 112(b) of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232), as amended by section 111 of the William M. (Mac) 
Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2021 (Public Law 116-239). The provision would eliminate the 
requirement to procure the second two batteries of interim 
capability for the purpose of prioritizing resources to the 
enduring capability. The provision would not eliminate the 
requirement for the Army to deploy or forward station interim 
cruise missile defense capabilities.

                       Subtitle C--Navy Programs


Extension of prohibition on availability of funds for Navy port 
        waterborne security barriers (sec. 131)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
prohibition on availability of funds for Navy waterborne 
security barriers.
    The Navy has informed the committee of its intent to 
transfer management of the waterborne security barriers program 
to the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) and to establish a 
single program office within NAVSEA to manage acquisition of 
all waterborne security barriers for the Navy. The committee 
commends the Navy for taking positive steps to implement a 
proper acquisition structure for this important effort.

Analysis of certain radar investment options (sec. 132)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Director of the Office of Cost Assessment and Program 
Evaluation (CAPE) to conduct an independent review of the three 
radar systems supporting current Aegis combat systems of the 
Navy and the Missile Defense Agency in the fiscal year 2022 
through fiscal year 2027 timeframe. The Director would be 
required to submit a report on the results of that analysis not 
later than March 1, 2022, to the congressional defense 
committees.
    The committee recognizes that the rapid deployment of next-
generation maritime radar systems will be required to address 
existing and emerging gaps in integrated air and missile 
defense. To that end, the Navy intends to equip all new DDG-51 
destroyers and the DDG-X Large Surface Combatant with the AN/
SPY-6 Air and Missile Defense Radar. The AN/SPY-7 was chosen by 
the Missile Defense Agency to be the radar for Aegis Ashore 
applications.
    The committee supports efforts to leverage commonality 
among weapons systems and believes additional opportunities may 
be available to employ this approach in modernizing Aegis 
weapons systems aboard existing surface ships as well as in 
Aegis Ashore applications. Employing common radar systems could 
reduce risk and lower life cycle costs for the Department of 
Defense.
    To clarify the options, the provision would require CAPE to 
analyze the costs and capabilities of the current radars 
supporting Aegis combat systems.

Extension of report on Littoral Combat Ship mission packages (sec. 133)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend an 
annual report on Littoral Combat Ship mission packages through 
the fiscal year 2027 budget request.

Extension of procurement authorities for certain amphibious 
        shipbuilding programs (sec. 134)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
procurement authorities for certain amphibious shipbuilding 
programs to include fiscal year 2022.

Limitation on decommissioning or inactivating a battle force ship 
        before the end of expected service life (sec. 135)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the decommissioning or inactivation of a battle force ship 
before the end of such ship's expected service. The provision 
would allow the Secretary of the Navy to waive this prohibition 
if certain conditions are met.

Acquisition, modernization, and sustainment plan for carrier air wings 
        (sec. 136)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Navy to develop a 15-year acquisition, modernization, and 
sustainment plan for the entire carrier air wing (CVW), 
building off the requirement in the William M. (Mac) Thornberry 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public 
Law 116-283) to produce a fighter force structure acquisition 
strategy. The provision would require the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide the plan to the congressional defense committees not 
later than February 1, 2022.
    In order to meet the challenges of great power competition, 
the Navy's carrier air wings must have the right capabilities 
and sufficient aircraft inventories. Although smaller scale 
efforts have looked at components of the CVW, such as fighter 
force structure, a comprehensive plan based on current and 
projected requirements is necessary to maintain U.S. naval air 
superiority. The plan should:
          (1) Assess how well CVW capabilities and composition 
        meet National Defense Strategy requirements, and plan 
        to address known shortfalls such as tanker capacity and 
        strike fighter range;
          (2) Identify the role of autonomous aircraft in 
        future CVWs, to include the MQ-25 but also consider 
        other potential future capabilities and platforms;
          (3) Assess whether nine CVWs is the correct force 
        structure;
          (4) Consider whether the current composition of 
        aircraft and squadrons within a CVW is adequate;
          (5) Consider whether 10 CVWs, the current legal 
        requirement to be achieved by October 1, 2025, under 
        section 8062 of title 10, United States Code, is 
        adequate; and
          (6) Identify the appropriate modernization plan to 
        maximize operational use of current platforms, 
        particularly the EA-18G and E-2D, by leveraging 
        available technologies such as the Next Generation 
        Jammer.

Improving oversight of Navy contracts for shipbuilding, conversion, and 
        repair (sec. 137)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
establishment of the position of Deputy Commander of the Naval 
Sea Systems Command for the Supervision of Shipbuilding, 
Conversion, and Repair. The provision would also specify the 
duties of the Deputy Commander.

                     Subtitle D--Air Force Programs


Required minimum inventory of tactical airlift aircraft (sec. 141)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Air Force to maintain a total active aircraft 
inventory of 292 C-130 aircraft.

Extension of inventory requirement for Air Force fighter aircraft (sec. 
        142)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
requirement to maintain a minimum capacity of Air Force fighter 
aircraft.

Prohibition on use of funds for retirement of A-10 aircraft (sec. 143)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prevent the 
Secretary of the Air Force from retiring A-10 aircraft during 
fiscal year 2022, and would add specific information that would 
be required in the report on the comparison of A-10 and F-35 
aircraft in the close air support mission.
    The provision would also require the Secretary of the Air 
Force, not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment 
of this Act, to provide a report to the congressional defense 
committees on plans to review and maintain the current fleet of 
A-10 aircraft at sufficient levels of readiness.
    Furthermore, the provision would modify an existing 
required report on close air support capabilities to include 
the design of the test plan and metrics, along with details of 
execution including scenarios examined, number of sorties, time 
on station, and how the impact to ground forces was assessed.
    The committee is concerned that the Air Force may seek to 
proceed with divestment of additional A-10 aircraft before 
congressionally-directed, statutorily-required analyses have 
been completed or provided to the congressional defense 
committees. In fact, the budget request included a proposal to 
retire 42 A-10 aircraft in fiscal year 2022. Due to delays in 
the operational testing of the F-35 aircraft, a required 
comparative analysis of the A-10 and the F-35 for the close air 
support mission has not been conducted. As a result, the 
Congress has had to rely on third party reports that have 
raised concerns that required elements of the test may not be 
carried out as directed.
    The committee also believes that the Air Force should 
communicate plans for anticipated basing decisions that would 
follow retirement of any A-10 aircraft following the 
comparative test on close air support, including the 
anticipated timeline for adoption of any supplemental missions.

Requirements relating to reports on fighter aircraft (sec. 144)

    The committee recommends a provision that would remove the 
prohibition on submitting a report comparing, among other 
things, close air support capabilities of A-10 and F-35 
aircraft. Section 134 of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) required that the 
capabilities comparison be submitted with the report on initial 
operational test and evaluation (IOT&E) of the F-35. However, 
IOT&E for the F-35 has been delayed for reasons unrelated to 
the comparison of capabilities, and the committee wants the 
Department to release the report sooner than the F-35 IOT&E 
report would be available.

Prohibition on additional F-35 aircraft for the Air National Guard 
        (sec. 145)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
further equipping of Air National Guard (ANG) units with the F-
35 until the ratio of combat-coded F-35 aircraft of the Regular 
Air Force to combat-coded F-35 aircraft of the Air National 
Guard is greater than four to one.
    The committee supports the total force approach of the U.S. 
Air Force, but is concerned that the current mobility dwell 
times for the ANG potentially restrict availability of F-35 
aircraft for deployments to support combatant commander 
requirements. The ANG plays an extremely important role as a 
force in readiness and as a reserve. However, as F-35s have 
been fielded, a disproportionate share have been fielded to the 
Air reserve components, and mobility dwell limits for such 
units create an imbalance in force generation capability.

Prohibition on availability of funds for reducing the number of KC-135 
        aircraft of the Air National Guard designated as primary 
        mission aircraft inventory (sec. 146)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prevent the 
Air Force from reducing the number of KC-135 Air National Guard 
aircraft designated as primary mission aircraft inventory in 
fiscal year 2022. With the KC-46 behind schedule and unable to 
perform the full range of refueling missions, the committee 
believes that it would be unwise to place any additional Air 
National Guard KC-135 aerial refueling assets in backup status.

Authority to divest 18 KC-135 aircraft (sec. 147)

    The committee recommends a provision that would allow the 
Secretary of the Air Force to divest 18 KC-135 tankers during 
fiscal year 2022.

Prohibition on use of funds for a follow-on tanker aircraft to the KC-
        46 aircraft (sec. 148)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the Air Force from spending any funds for a follow-on tanker to 
the KC-46, the so-called Bridge Tanker, until the Remote Vision 
System version 2.0 has begun operational testing.

Maintenance of B-1 bomber aircraft squadrons (sec. 149)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
further reductions in B-1 bombers until such time as the B-21 
aircraft begins fielding.

       Subtitle E--Defense--Wide, Joint, and Multiservice Matters


Prohibition on duplication of efforts to provide air- and space-based 
        ground moving target indicator capability (sec. 161)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the duplication of effort across multiple programs to provide 
air- and space-based ground moving target indicator capability 
across multiple services and agencies until the Vice Chairman 
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, in consultation with the 
Secretaries of the military departments and applicable agency 
heads, provides to congressional defense committees a list of 
all procurement and research and development efforts funded 
with Department of Defense or other executive agency resources, 
as well as how those efforts will provide real-time information 
to the warfighter through the Joint All Domain Command and 
Control efforts of the Department.

Limitation on funds for Armed Overwatch aircraft (sec. 162)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the obligation or expenditure of funds authorized by this Act 
for the procurement of Armed Overwatch aircraft by U.S. Special 
Operations Command (SOCOM) in Procurement, Defense-wide, until 
15 days after the submission of the airborne intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance acquisition roadmap required 
by section 165(a) of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-
283).
    Additionally, the committee directs the Director, Cost 
Assessment and Program Evaluation, to review SOCOM's Armed 
Overwatch program and submit an independent assessment to the 
congressional defense committees at the same time as the 
submission of the President's budget request for fiscal year 
2023. At a minimum, the independent assessment shall evaluate 
the total number of Armed Overwatch aircraft necessary to 
fulfill the requirements of special operations forces in light 
of changes to global force posture and increasing threats to 
manned aircraft since the requirement for such aircraft was 
validated by the SOCOM Commander.

Transition of F-35 program sustainment from Joint Program Office to Air 
        Force and Navy (sec. 163)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require a 
transition over five years from the Joint Program Office-
managed sustainment effort to a service-led effort with the 
U.S. Air Force as the executive agent for F-35As and the U.S. 
Navy as the executive agent for F-35Bs and F-35Cs. The 
provision would require the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment, in consultation with the 
Secretaries of the Air Force and the Navy, to provide a 
transition plan to the congressional defense committees not 
later than February 1, 2022, that would fully transition 
sustainment responsibilities to the respective services not 
later than October 1, 2027.

                              Budget Items


                                  Army


Army unfunded requirements

    In accordance with section 222a of title 10, United States 
Code, the Chief of Staff of the Army submitted a list of 
unfunded requirements. The committee recommends an additional 
increase of $1.4 billion for items on this unfunded 
requirements list.

CH-47 Cargo Aircraft modifications

    The budget request included $9.9 million in line number 20 
of Aircraft Procurement, Army (APA) for CH-47 Cargo Helicopter 
Mods.
    The committee recognizes that retrofit of already fielded 
CH-47 cargo aircraft with Improved Vibration Control System 
(IVCS) improves mission performance and endurance by reducing 
vibration wear and crew fatigue. IVCS is installed in new CH-47 
at the aircraft manufacturing plant.
    The committee recommends an increase of $3.0 million in 
line number 20 of APA to facilitate IVCS retrofit in already 
fielded CH-47 aircraft.

Paladin Integrated Management

    The budget request included $446.4 million in line number 8 
of Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles (WTCV) 
for Paladin Integrated Management (PIM).
    The committee recognizes the critical importance of 
modernizing the Paladin as the Army's only armored self-
propelled howitzer within Armored Brigade Combat Teams. 
Returning to a higher programmed production rate and quantity 
permits the Army to stay on schedule to field two battalions 
per year, avoiding a 17 percent per-unit cost increase that 
imposes a penalty of nearly $50.0 million due to the reduced 
fiscal year 2022 budget request quantities. The PIM is also on 
the Chief of Staff of the Army's unfunded requirements list.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $199.5 
million in line number 8 of WTCV for Paladin Integrated 
Management.

Multi-Domain Task Force All-Domain Operations Center cloud pilot

    The budget request included $140.0 million in line number 
22 of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for the Signal 
Modernization Program.
    The committee supports rapid establishment of the Army 
Multi-Domain Task Force (MDTF) and recognizes the importance of 
secure, deployable computing resources to enable multi-domain 
operations. The Chief of Staff of the Army submitted an 
unfunded requirement of $2.5 million for an MDTF All-Domain 
Operations Center (ADOC) cloud pilot.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.5 
million in line number 22 of OPA for an MDTF ADOC cloud pilot.

Integrated Visual Augmentation System

    The budget request included $1.1 billion in line number 83 
of Other Procurement, Army (OPA) for Night Vision Devices, 
including the Integrated Visual Augmentation System (IVAS).
    The committee recognizes the importance of IVAS and 
supports expeditious initial fielding of this advanced 
capability to close combat soldiers but is concerned about the 
projected level of system development and ensuring iterative 
improvements between initial and full fielding. The committee 
believes that completion of robust operational testing and 
implementation of iterative improvements are warranted before 
proceeding to the production rate the Army is seeking in fiscal 
2022.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $269.8 
million in line number 83 of OPA for the Integrated Visual 
Augmentation System Heads Up Display.

Man-portable radiation detection systems

    The budget request included $55.6 million in line number 
120 of Other Procurement, Army (OPA) for CBRN [chemical, 
biological, radiological and nuclear] Defense.
    The committee notes that the Army National Guard is 
requesting an additional 15 man-portable radiation detection 
systems for use by the Army National Guard Civil Support Teams 
as an unfunded requirement.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $11.3 
million in line number 120 of OPA for CBRN Defense.

Expeditionary Solid Waste Disposal System

    The budget request included $32.4 million in line number 
176 of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for Other Support 
Equipment for modification of in-service equipment (OPA-3).
    The committee concurs with the Army's budget justification 
documents, which stated that the Expeditionary Solid Waste 
Disposal System (ESWDS) ``will reduce the use of burn pits by 
providing an environmentally responsible solution for onsite 
disposal of 1,000 pounds of solid waste per day. The ESWDS will 
also reduce Soldier, civilian, and local population exposure to 
pollutants from open air burn pits; reduce the amount of trash 
that must be backhauled, reducing Soldiers' exposure and 
attacks during convoy operations; reduce the waste held onsite 
[which] also deters potential vermin that could spread disease 
and disrupt mission[;] and eliminate the security risk from 
uncontrolled access to trash.'' However, despite this 
justification, the Army requested no funds for ESWDS. The 
committee notes that ESWDS could also provide a capability 
during pandemics to rapidly incinerate contaminated personal 
protective equipment, thereby decreasing exposure to 
servicemembers.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $15.9 
million in line number 176 of OPA for ESWDS in OPA-3.

Infantry Squad Vehicle

    The budget request included $29.8 million in line number 5 
of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for Infantry Squad Vehicles 
(ISV).
    The committee recommends an increase of $5.0 million in 
line number 5 of OPA for ISV.

                                  Navy


Navy and Marine Corps unfunded requirements

    In accordance with section 222a of title 10, United States 
Code, the Chief of Naval Operations and the Commandant of the 
Marine Corps each submitted a list of unfunded requirements. 
The committee recommends an additional increase of about $32.6 
million for items on these unfunded requirements lists.

CH-53K

    The budget request included $1.3 billion in line number 7 
of Aircraft Procurement, Navy (APN), for procurement of CH-53K 
helicopters.
    The Marine Corps' CH-53K King Stallion helicopter will 
replace the CH-53E. The CH-53K has been designed to improve 
aircraft, aircrew, and passenger survivability; increase 
reliability and maintainability; and significantly reduce 
operating and support costs. The committee believes that the 
CH-53K will play an important role in supporting expeditionary 
advanced base operations in a high-end, maritime fight in the 
Pacific.
    After a restructuring of the development program to allow 
time to correct problems identified in development testing, the 
CH-53K has demonstrated the potential to meet or exceed all Key 
Performance Parameters. The program achieved Milestone C in 
April 2017 and is in low rate initial production (LRIP), with 
27 aircraft in various stages of production. Initial 
Operational Test and Evaluation (IOT&E) should begin soon, to 
support the first deployment expected in 2023-2024.
    Decades of sustained combat operations and high operational 
tempo have left the legacy fleet of CH-53Es at alarmingly low 
readiness levels, which compromises the Marine Corps' ability 
to meet the demands of the National Defense Strategy. The 
committee recognizes that acceleration in the CH-53K production 
ramp would be necessary to decrease flyaway cost and stabilize 
the industrial base.
    The committee looks forward to successful completion of 
IOT&E and encourages the Marine Corps to maintain a dedicated 
test capability that will allow for meeting the current Initial 
Operational Capability schedule as well as consider an increase 
in yearly production rates for future years.
    The Marine Corps reduced the planned buy for fiscal year 
2022 from 11 to 9. Maintaining a predictable, stable, and 
growing production ramp is critical to ensuring suppliers are 
incentivized to reduce costs and keep parts production timely 
with the single biggest driver to reduce cost being aircraft 
volume. In addition, readiness rates, which are currently about 
65 percent for the legacy CH-53E fleet, will improve 
dramatically with the deployment of CH-53K aircraft. The Marine 
Corps needs this heavy lift capability delivered to the 
warfighter sooner rather than later.
    In the meantime, anticipating a successful result from 
IOT&E, the committee recommends an increase of $250.0 million 
to purchase two additional CH-53K helicopters.

MQ-4 Triton

    The budget request included $160.2 million in line number 
21 of Aircraft Procurement, Navy (APN), for procurement of MQ-4 
Triton.
    This reflects a production pause in fiscal year 2022 of the 
MQ-4C Triton unmanned air system (UAS) and re-starting 
procurement of multi-intelligence-configured aircraft in fiscal 
year 2023. The MQ-4C Triton UAS is integral to recapitalizing 
the Navy's maritime patrol and reconnaissance force, providing 
a persistent maritime and littoral intelligence, surveillance, 
and reconnaissance data collection and dissemination capability 
to the fleet.
    The committee believes that a production pause in the 
Triton program risks breaking the production line and incurring 
significant cost increases in the program.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $323.0 
million to purchase two MQ-4 Triton UAS.

Submarine industrial base development

    The budget request included $1.6 billion in line number 2 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for advance 
procurement for the Columbia-class submarine program.
    The nuclear shipbuilding industrial base continues to 
struggle to support the increased demand associated with the 
Navy's future shipbuilding plan. This presents significant risk 
to the Columbia-class submarine, the Virginia-class submarine 
with Virginia Payload Module, and aircraft carrier programs. It 
is critical to further develop existing industrial capacity and 
qualify new suppliers now, in advance of the increased demand.
    The committee believes additional funding is needed to 
increase capacity, qualify new suppliers, add resiliency and 
create competition for critical components, and identify points 
in the supply chain where shortfalls exist.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $130.0 
million in line number 2 of SCN for submarine industrial base 
supplier development efforts.

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers

    The budget request included $2.0 billion in line number 10 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN) for procurement of 
Arleigh Burke-class destroyers.
    The committee notes that funding a second Arleigh Burke-
class destroyer in fiscal year 2022 is the Chief of Naval 
Operations' top unfunded priority, supports completing a multi-
ship procurement contract, and increases Flight III destroyer 
multi-mission capability and capacity in the most demanding 
warfighting scenario.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $1.7 
billion for an additional Arleigh Burke-class destroyer in line 
number 10 of SCN.

Arleigh Burke-class advance procurement

    The budget request did not include funding in line number 
11 of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN) for advance 
procurement of Arleigh Burke-class destroyers.
    The committee notes the Navy intends to negotiate another 
Arleigh Burke-class multiyear procurement contract that would 
support Arleigh Burke-class procurement in future years. The 
committee believes procuring a third Arleigh Burke-class 
destroyer in fiscal year 2023 would provide additional 
warfighting capacity as well as greater stability in the 
shipbuilding industrial base.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $125.0 
million in line number 11 of SCN for advance procurement of 
Arleigh Burke-class destroyers.

Surface combatant supplier development

    The budget request did not include funding in line number 
11 of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN) for advance 
procurement for the DDG-51 destroyer program.
    The committee notes that elements of the surface combatant 
industrial base continue to struggle to support the demands of 
the Navy's future shipbuilding plan.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $50.0 
million in line number 11 of SCN for surface combatant supplier 
development efforts.

LPD Flight II advance procurement

    The budget request included no funding in line number 16 of 
Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN) for LPD Flight II 
advance procurement.
    The committee notes that additional funding could be used 
to maximize the benefit of amphibious multi-ship procurement 
authorities or procure long lead time material for LPD-32.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $250.0 
million in line number 16 of SCN.

LHA replacement

    The budget request included $68.6 million in line number 19 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN) for the LHA 
replacement amphibious assault ship.
    The committee notes that efficiencies could be gained by 
accelerating the construction of LHA-9, including steadier 
workflow with an improved learning curve, more predictable 
delivery contracts for material and equipment suppliers, and a 
more effective continuous improvement schedule.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $350.0 
million in line number 19 of SCN for the LHA replacement.

Expeditionary fast transport vessels

    The budget request included no funding in line number 20 of 
Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for expeditionary fast 
transport (EPF) vessels.
    The committee notes that EPF vessels are built with an 
inherent cargo handling capability and ability to deliver 
troops and equipment together in a manner that provides greater 
flexibility in how combatant commanders employ these and other 
naval vessels in theater.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $270.0 
million in line number 20 of SCN.

Used sealift ships

    The budget request included $299.9 million in line number 
30 of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN) to purchase five 
used vessels to recapitalize the Ready Reserve Force (RRF).
    The committee notes that the Congress provided funding for 
two vessels in fiscal year 2021 and that the Navy has been 
unable to successfully contract for those ships. The committee 
will need to see the Navy execute the fiscal year 2021 funds 
and the vessels in question inducted into the RRF before it can 
recommend additional funding for this program.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $299.9 
million in line number 30 of SCN.

Sonobuoys

    The budget request included $249.1 million in line number 
94 of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN) for the procurement of 
sonobuoys.
    The committee notes that the Chief of Naval Operations 
requested the procurement of additional sonobuoys as a fiscal 
year 2022 unfunded priority.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $54.4 
million in line number 94 of OPN.

Ground-launched anti-ship missiles

    The budget request included $67.5 million in line number 5 
of Procurement, Marine Corps (PMC) Artillery Weapons System.
    The committee recognizes the need to build the missile 
inventory in support of Marine Corps ground-launched anti-ship 
capability requirements and notes that the Commandant of the 
Marine Corps listed this ground-based anti-ship requirement as 
his top unfunded priority.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $57.8 
million in line number 5 of PMC for ground-launched anti-ship 
missiles.

Ground-launched long range fires

    The budget request included $67.5 million in line number 5 
of Procurement, Marine Corps (PMC) for Artillery Weapons 
System.
    The committee recognizes the need to build missile 
inventory in support of Marine Corps ground-launched long-range 
fires requirements and notes that the Commandant of the Marine 
Corps submitted this long-range fires capability as a top 
requirement on his unfunded priority list.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $96.0 
million in line number 5 of PMC for Long Range Fires.

                               Air Force


Air Force and Space Force unfunded requirements

    In accordance with section 222a of title 10, United States 
Code, the Chief of Staff of the Air Force and the Chief of 
Space Operations each submitted a list of unfunded 
requirements. The committee recommends an additional increase 
of about $1.2 billion for items on this unfunded requirements 
list.

F-35 power modules

    The budget request included $4.2 billion in line number 2 
of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for F-35A 
procurement.
    The committee agrees with the Air Force request for 
additional power modules for the F135 engine as requested on 
the unfunded priorities list submitted by the Chief of Staff of 
the Air Force.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $175 
million in line number 2 of APAF for the purchase 20 F135 power 
modules.

F-35A

    The budget request included $4.2 billion in line number 2 
of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF) for F-35A 
procurement.
    The committee is concerned that, after repeated 
congressional plus-ups and support for increased production, 
the Air Force still budgets for a quantity below the stated 
production objectives of the F-35 program. Further, the 
committee is concerned that the Air Force has squandered an 
opportunity to capitalize on advanced procurement 
appropriations by only budgeting for 48 aircraft this year 
instead of the 60 aircraft that were planned and that the 
advanced procurement was previously provided for by the 
Congress. The committee expects the Department to execute 
proper forecasting and propose appropriate budget requests 
rather than to continue to rely on congressional plus-ups.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $85.0 
million in line number 2 of APAF for the purchase of an 
additional F-35A.

MH-139A

    The budget request did not include funding in Aircraft 
Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for the MH-139 utility 
helicopter program. The MH-139A program will replace the Air 
Force fleet of 63 UH-1N aircraft that have significant 
capability gaps in the areas of speed, range, endurance, 
payload capacity, and aircraft self-protection. This program is 
an element of the Air Force's nuclear enterprise reform 
initiatives.
    The Air Force is not requesting to buy any helicopters in 
fiscal year 2022 since the MH-139A has not completed 
operational testing or Federal Aviation Administration 
certifications. However, the committee believes that there may 
be ways of accelerating the program, and, given the critical 
nature of the program, believes additional resources should be 
made available to the Air Force for this purpose.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $75.0 
million in line 12 of APAF for the MH-139A program.

MQ-9

    The budget request included $3.3 million in line number 21 
of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for procurement of 
MQ-9 Reapers.
    The MQ-9 Reaper is a critical component of efforts to fill 
current intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) 
requirements. Last year, the Commander, U.S. Central Command, 
included additional MQ-9 funding at the top of his unfunded 
priorities list. In April 2021, the commander told the 
committee of the importance of the MQ-9 and his need for more 
of them. The Air Force today still lacks the ISR capacity to 
meet combatant commanders' requirements contained in the 2018 
National Defense Strategy. Despite this, the Department of 
Defense has proposed stopping production of this platform, 
without a program of record to replace it.
    In fiscal year 2022, both the Commander, U.S. Southern 
Command, and Commander, U.S. Africa Command, included 
additional ISR capabilities in their unfunded priorities list.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $100.0 
million to buy up to 5 MQ-9 Reapers in fiscal year 2022.

B-52 training system

    The budget request included $75.0 million in line number 25 
of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF) for B-52 
modernization.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Air Force's 
efforts to modernize its bomber fleet and keep training systems 
compatible with operational aircraft.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $4.0 
million in line number 25 of APAF for the procurement of 
updated training equipment.

F-35 modifications

    The budget request included $304.1 million in line number 
33 of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for F-35 
modifications.
    The committee believes that the 338 F-35 aircraft purchased 
by the Air Force in Lots 1-13 need to be upgraded expeditiously 
to the Block 4 configuration with the technology refresh 3 
hardware.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $1.7 
billion in line number 33 of APAF for F-35 modifications.

F-16 AESA radars

    The budget request included $613.2 million in line number 
31 of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF) for F-16 
modernization.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Air Force's 
efforts to modernize its fourth generation fighter fleet and 
equip itself with the most advanced and capable radars in 
support of the National Defense Strategy. The committee is 
concerned about the quantity and timing of procurement of 
advanced radars for the entire F-16 fleet.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $25.0 
million in line number 31 of APAF for the procurement of 
additional radar sets across the entire F-16 fleet.

Intercontinental Ballistic Missile fuze realignment of funds

    The budget request included $47.8 million in line number 16 
of Missile Procurement, Air Force (MPAF), for Intercontinental 
Ballistic Missile (ICBM) Fuze Modernization Advance 
Procurement.
    The committee has been informed that updated program 
estimates require regular procurement instead of advance 
procurement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $12.3 
million in line number 16 of MPAF and an increase of $12.3 
million in line number 15 of MPAF, for ICBM Fuze Modernization.

Long Duration Propulsive National Security Space Launch Secondary 
        Payload Adapter Demonstration

    The budget request included $3.3 million in line number 5 
of Procurement, Space Force (PSF), for General Information 
Tech--Space.
    The committee notes the critical importance of a second 
geostationary earth orbit antenna for Long Duration Propulsive 
National Security Space Launch Secondary Payload Adapter 
mission Tetra and follow on Rapid On-Orbit Space Technology and 
Evaluation Ring missions; this is also a Space Force unfunded 
requirement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $8.0 
million in line number 5 of PSF for a secondary payload adapter 
demonstration.

Radio equipment

    The budget request included $14.2 million in line number 49 
of Other Procurement, Air Force (OPAF), for Radio Equipment.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Department 
of the Air Force's modernization efforts with respect to 
communications and supports the Space Force's unfunded 
requirement for additional funding of this capability.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $1.5 
million in line number 49 of OPAF for Radio Equipment.

                              Defense Wide


Defense-wide Procurement unfunded requirements

    In accordance with section 222a of title 10, United States 
Code, the service chiefs and combatant commanders each 
submitted a list of unfunded requirements. The committee 
recommends an additional increase of $298.1 million for 
Defense-wide Procurement items on these unfunded requirements 
lists.

Combat diving advanced equipment acceleration

    The budget request included $17.2 million in line number 66 
of Procurement, Defense-wide (PDW), for U.S. Special Operations 
Command (SOCOM) Underwater Systems.
    The committee supports prioritization of resources to 
address capability gaps, particularly those that ensure U.S. 
Special Operations Forces maintain superiority relative to near 
peer competitors and notes that the SOCOM Commander has 
identified the acceleration of combat diving advanced equipment 
as an unfunded requirement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.2 
million in line 66 of PDW, to accelerate fielding of combat 
diving advanced equipment.

Modernized forward-look sonar

    The budget request included $17.2 million in line number 66 
of Procurement, Defense-wide (PDW), for U.S. Special Operations 
Command (SOCOM) Underwater Systems.
    The committee supports prioritization of resources to 
address capability gaps, particularly those that ensure U.S. 
Special Operations Forces maintain superiority relative to near 
peer competitors, and notes that the SOCOM Commander has 
identified modernized forward look sonar as an unfunded 
requirement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $900,000 
in line number 66 of PDW for the fielding of modernized 
forward-look sonar.

Fused panoramic night vision goggles acceleration

    The budget request included $328.6 million in line number 
78 of Procurement, Defense-Wide (PDW) for U.S. Special 
Operations Command (SOCOM) Operational Enhancements.
    The committee supports prioritization of resources to 
address capability gaps, particularly those that ensure U.S. 
Special Operations Forces maintain superiority relative to 
near-peer competitors, and notes that the SOCOM Commander has 
identified the accelerated fielding of fused panoramic night 
vision goggles as an unfunded requirement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $28.0 
million in line number 78 of PDW for the accelerated fielding 
of fused panoramic night vision goggles by SOCOM.

                       Items of Special Interest


Constellation-class frigate program

    The committee expects that the new Constellation-class 
guided missile frigate (FFG-62) will have an important role in 
the Navy battle force. While the Navy required that offerors 
base their proposals on an existing hull design and mature 
technologies, concerns about this new ship class remain, 
including typical first-in-class design and production 
challenges. These concerns contributed to the enactment of 
section 125 of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) 
that required the Navy to implement a land-based testing 
program to reduce the technical risk of key engineering and 
electrical systems. Given the historical performance of the 
Navy and industry with the construction of early ships in new 
ship classes, the committee believes that the FFG-62 program 
could benefit from additional risk reduction efforts for other 
critical subsystems to further reduce technical risk prior to 
the delivery of FFG-62.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to submit a report to the congressional defense committees 
with the submission of the fiscal year 2023 budget request on 
how the Navy will expand risk reduction efforts to other 
aspects of the frigate program to address first-in-class 
construction challenges and increase confidence that ships in 
the class after FFG-62 will achieve the required capability 
upon delivery, on budget, and on schedule.

San Antonio-class lethality and survivability upgrades

    The committee understands the Navy and Marine Corps are 
reviewing lethality and survivability upgrades for San Antonio-
class amphibious ships to support Expeditionary Advanced Base 
Operations and Distributed Maritime Operations.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to submit, 
not later than February 1, 2022, a report to the congressional 
defense committees that describes courses of action to upgrade 
the sensors, weapons, and combat systems on current and future 
San Antonio-class ships.
    This report shall, at a minimum, evaluate the cost, 
schedule, and operational benefits of:
          (1) Upgrading the SPY-6(V)2 Enterprise Air 
        Surveillance Radar (EASR) rotating radar to the SPY-
        6(V)3 fixed-face EASR to better support: (a) air 
        traffic control; (b) air and missile defense-in-depth 
        for forces operating at sea; (c) air and missile 
        defense for forces operating ashore within radar range; 
        and (d) other offensive and defensive engagements;
          (2) Integrating at least a 16-cell Mark-41 Vertical 
        Launch System (VLS); and
          (3) Integrating the EASR and Mark-41 VLS options 
        identified in (1) and (2) with versions of the Tomahawk 
        Weapon Control System, Ship Self-Defense System, 
        Cooperative Engagement Capability including the variant 
        currently fielded on San Antonio-class ships, and Aegis 
        Combat System.
    Based on the courses of action evaluated, the Secretary 
shall identify the optimal approach in terms of cost, schedule, 
and operational benefits for upgrading the sensors, weapons, 
and combat system on current and future San Antonio-class 
ships.

``Digital Engineering'' capabilities

    The committee supports the Air Force's continued 
development of its advanced manufacturing techniques and 
processes to reduce the cost and time needed to develop and 
sustain new weapon systems. The committee is aware of the 
positive impact of Air Force use of e-Design ``digital 
engineering'' initiatives utilized on the T-7A, the B-21, the 
Next-Generation Air Dominance (NGAD) program and Ground Based 
Strategic Deterrence (GBSD) program. The committee believes e-
Design and advanced manufacturing processes and techniques 
could allow the Air Force to test and innovate using the 
digital environment, increasing speed and agility.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a report not later than February 15, 2022, to 
the congressional defense committees on the Air Force's ability 
to expand digital engineering capabilities to a wide range of 
aircraft programs, high-cost structural parts, systems, and 
subsystems, as well as how the Air Force plans to securely and 
effectively interchange data with operating locations to enable 
the local implementation of advanced manufacturing and 
sustainment operations. The committee also directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to address how the Air Force plans 
to acquire, manage, and perform configuration control on 
intellectual property and data rights needed to fully 
capitalize on the benefits of digital engineering while driving 
down total life cycle costs.

Additional applications of unmanned technology

    The National Defense Strategy identified modernization of 
the current fleet of vehicles and aircraft as a major priority 
for the United States to gain the technological edge over near-
peer adversaries. As the Department of Defense continues to 
identify areas of cost-savings throughout its budget, 
evaluating and expanding existing programs that have proven to 
be successful would reduce the costs and risks associated with 
developing and fielding new technologies. Focusing on one 
specific avenue of modernization efforts, it will be imperative 
for the Department to evaluate domestic, proven technologies 
currently being fielded to modernize and expand vehicle and 
aircraft capabilities. The Department should consider the 
potential for upgrading existing vehicles and aircraft with 
autonomous capability. Fielding such capability could have 
operational advantages and yield potential savings in personnel 
costs. However, the committee is aware that such advantages are 
not present in every case, and notes that the Air Force is 
proposing to shift from unmanned capability in the Battlefield 
Airborne Communications Node (BACN) program to manned aircraft.
    The committee believes that the Department of Defense 
should develop a template for engaging with the private sector, 
including with small businesses, for collaborating on potential 
upgrades for existing platforms with autonomous capability. 
Such collaboration could yield savings, while reducing 
burdensome requirements in expanding and modernizing overall 
capabilities. Applying unmanned capability could also extend 
the life cycle of current airframes.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to develop criteria and a template for evaluating potential use 
of commercial autonomous capability with existing vehicles and 
aircraft and to provide a report on the development of the same 
to the congressional defense committees with the budget request 
for fiscal year 2023. Such a template shall address potential 
costs and benefits of fielding such capabilities, and consider 
potential limitations of commercial systems to include: (1) 
Military requirements to operate outside of normal flight 
corridors for unmanned aerial vehicles or off-road for unmanned 
ground vehicles; and (2) Requirements relating to the safe 
conduct of aviation operations within the National Airspace 
System.

Air Force airborne electronic attack systems

    Section 128 of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-
283) required the Secretary of the Navy, in consultation with 
the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to provide a 
``strategy to ensure full spectrum electromagnetic superiority 
using the ALQ-249 Next Generation Jammer.''
    With renewed interest in offensive electronic attack 
capability by the Air Force, and in an effort to minimize 
duplicative efforts, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Air Force to provide a briefing to the congressional defense 
committees not later than December 15, 2021, that addresses the 
following: (1) The capability requirements and existing 
capacity gaps of operational Air Force airborne electronic 
attack systems; (2) A plan for how the Air Force will respond 
to threats or shortfalls identified in (1); (3) An assessment 
of the ability of the ALQ-249 Next Generation Jammer to meet 
current and projected enemy threats; and (4) An evaluation of 
the compatibility of the ALQ-249 Next Generation Jammer with 
Air Force aircraft.

Airborne advanced training

    The committee has been monitoring closely U.S. Air Force 
(USAF) pilot manning shortfalls for the past several years but 
remains concerned that little progress has been made addressing 
the issue, especially in increasing the number of highly 
skilled fighter pilots. Although initiatives such as Air 
Education and Training Command's Pilot Training Next and 
Undergraduate Pilot Training 2.5/3.0 leverage innovative 
technologies designed to train pilots faster and to a higher 
standard, they have not yet optimized innovative technologies 
for inflight training operations.
    The committee understands that airborne augmented reality 
technology currently under evaluation by the Air Force Research 
Laboratory, Air Combat Command, and Air Education and Training 
Command is demonstrating great promise at addressing this 
aspect of training. Further, the committee encourages the USAF 
to move more rapidly in developing and adopting airborne 
augmented reality technologies that contribute to improved 
training outcomes, reduce net training costs, and increase 
environmental sustainability.

Amphibious ship acquisition strategy

    The committee believes that a block buy, multi-ship, or 
multiyear procurement approach for LPD-17 Flight II-class 
amphibious transport ships and LHA 10 would provide substantial 
cost savings as well as needed stability and predictability for 
the shipbuilder and its vendor base.
    The committee notes section 124 of the William M. (Mac) 
Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2021 (Public Law 116-283) authorized multi-ship procurement 
authority for amphibious ships, which the Navy estimated would 
save 8 to 12 percent, or roughly $1.0 billion, for the multi-
ship procurement of these four ships as compared to four 
separate ship procurement contracts. The committee also notes 
that the Navy estimates that $4.0 billion will be saved using a 
block buy acquisition strategy for the procurement of CVN-80 
and CVN-81.
    While the committee supports the execution of the section 
124 authority as soon as possible and prefers this course of 
action, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees, not 
later than October 1, 2021, on the merits of pursuing a block 
buy, multi-ship, or multiyear procurement acquisition strategy 
for LPD-17 Flight II-class ships and LHA-10.
    This report shall include a business case analysis 
comparing the cost and schedule of single ship contracts with a 
multiple ship contract for the following groupings: (1) LPD-32, 
LPD-33, and LHA-10; (2) LPD-32, LPD-33, LPD-34, and LHA-10; and 
(3) Any other groupings identified by the Secretary. This 
report shall also include a description of other key 
considerations that the Secretary deems appropriate.
    If the business case analysis shows that pursuing a block 
buy, multi-ship, or multiyear procurement strategy for LPD-17 
Flight II-class ships and LHA-10 has merit, the committee 
strongly encourages the Secretary to include such a proposal in 
the Navy's budget request for fiscal year 2023.

Army National Guard Airborne Tactical Extraction Platform

    The committee is aware that multiple State units of the 
National Guard have a demonstrated need to purchase airborne 
tactical rescue equipment. One such device is the Airborne 
Tactical Extraction Platform (AirTEP). The committee is aware 
that the Alabama Army National Guard has indicated its intent 
to purchase the AirTEP with the sole purpose of performing 
quicker, safer, and more efficient helicopter rescues during 
natural disasters such as floods and hurricanes. The committee 
also understands that the Alabama, Mississippi, Arkansas, 
Georgia, and Kentucky Army National Guard units have submitted 
the AirTEP as their number three priority in capturing National 
Guard and Reserve Equipment Account funding for fiscal year 
2022.
    The committee has become aware of an obstacle to the 
further deployment of this device due to a delay in the U.S. 
Army PM-Utility Helicopter Office (Redstone Arsenal) publishing 
an Airworthiness Release (AWR). The committee understands that 
the AWR process is currently going through evaluation and is 
near completion but approval and publication are still pending 
based on the final evaluation by System Readiness Directorate 
(SRD).
    The committee requests that SRD and Redstone Arsenal issue 
a report to the Senate Armed Services Committee not later than 
January 15, 2022, as to the anticipated timeframe for 
completing the AWR process, and any technical, logistical, or 
funding challenges associated with completing the AWR.

Army National Guard capabilities

    The Army has chosen to accept differences between Active-
Duty unit force structure and that of the Army National Guard 
(ARNG). For example, the Army has chosen to omit MQ-1C units 
from ARNG combat aviation brigades (CABs). The committee needs 
to understand the impact of such differences on the ability of 
ARNG division headquarters to execute assigned missions and the 
ability to conduct multi-domain operations.
    The committee therefore directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than January 1, 2022, on how ARNG divisions will execute 
multi-domain operations, and how having capabilities not 
organic to the divisions will impact their ability to conduct 
multi-domain operations.

Assessment of Armored Brigade Combat Team modernization

    The committee notes with concern the substantially reduced 
investment proposed in the budget request for fiscal year 2022 
for the modernization of armored combat vehicles (ACV) that 
comprise the Army's Armored Brigade Combat Teams (ABCT). The 
committee is concerned about these reductions and that similar 
reduced procurement quantities in future years will further 
slow modernization of enduring ACVs, reduce the readiness of 
ABCTs as the current vehicles age, and damage the ACV 
industrial base.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to conduct an assessment of the investment strategy for 
modernization of ACVs and the impact of that strategy on 
modernization and readiness of ABCTs. The Secretary shall 
provide a briefing of the assessment to the Senate Armed 
Services Committee not later than 30 days after submission of 
the President's budget request for fiscal year 2023.
    The assessment and briefing shall include: (1) Procurement 
quantities and funding through the future years defense 
program; (2) Fielding plans through the future years defense 
program; (3) A comparison to fielding plans associated with the 
fiscal year 2021 budget request and future years defense 
program; (4) Projected age of ACV vehicle fleets for 20 years 
based on planned and projected investment and replacement; (5) 
Impact of the planned procurement quantities on the ability to 
meet the minimum sustainment rates of the ACV industrial base; 
and (6) Any other matters the Secretary believes appropriate.

Assessment on Air National Guard F-16 self-protection capabilities

    Potential adversaries around the world are proliferating 
anti-access/area denial (A2/AD) capabilities, with the prospect 
that they could soon exceed current F-16 capabilities to deal 
with them. The Air National Guard's F-16s currently rely on 
legacy expendable dispenser systems that have limited 
capabilities, including an inadequate expendable decoy 
capacity. This situation poses significant survivability 
challenges to F-16 aircrews and the aircraft's current and 
long-term combat effectiveness.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a report to the congressional defense 
committees, not later than February 15, 2022, on the Air 
National Guard's F-16 self-protection capabilities against 
existing and projected surface-to-air and air-to-air weapons. 
The report shall cover existing F-16 defensive systems 
capabilities; self-protection system requirements to defeat or 
mitigate current and future threats; and a schedule of planned 
testing and fielding of potential advanced expendable dispenser 
systems that could be easily integrated into Air National Guard 
F-16s with no impact on aircraft performance or weapons payload 
capacity.

Auxiliary power units for Army ground vehicles

    The committee understands that the Army is currently 
exploring innovative small form factor auxiliary power units 
(APUs) for use on Army ground vehicles. The committee 
understands that the APUs under development present significant 
improvements in size, weight, and fuel efficiency compared to 
other APU and power generation solutions currently available to 
the Department.
    The committee commends the Army for pursuing this 
capability, particularly given the growing power demands 
associated with the systems, sensors, and weapons being 
introduced to the ground vehicle fleet. The committee 
understands that many ground vehicles have difficulty 
generating the power necessary to support installed payloads. 
For example, according to a June 8, 2021, report from the 
Congressional Research Service, titled ``The Army's Optionally 
Manned Fighting Vehicle (OMFV) Program: Background and Issues 
for Congress'' (R45519), M2 Bradley vehicles deployed in Iraq 
routinely had to turn off certain electronic systems to gain 
enough power to employ their anti-roadside-bomb jammers. The 
committee strongly encourages the Army to continue to pursue 
new APUs to supplement existing on board vehicle power.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to provide a briefing to the Senate Armed Services 
Committee by January 31, 2022, on efforts to develop and field 
small form factor APUs for use on ground vehicles. This report 
shall include, at a minimum: an overview of current research 
and development efforts relating to small form factor auxiliary 
power units for Army ground vehicles; an assessment of which 
vehicle platforms stand to benefit the most from APUs currently 
in development; and any plans to field new APUs on Army ground 
vehicles.

Aviation defense equipment report

    The committee remains supportive of the procurement of 
longer range firearms for inclusion in the survival kits for 
combat aviators. However, the committee is concerned that, 
given the speed with which the Air Force pursued this program, 
cheaper and potentially more effective options may have been 
overlooked. Therefore the committee directs the Chief of Staff 
of the Air Force, not later than February 1, 2022, to provide a 
report to the congressional defense committees on the various 
commercial firearms that might meet the requirements of the 
current GAU-5A at a lower cost.

Brief on mixed-oxidant electrolytic disinfectant generator water 
        purification

    The committee notes the effective deployment of mixed-
oxidant electrolytic disinfectant generator water purification 
(MEDG) to replace bromination for water purification on U.S. 
Navy large-deck ship classes for nearly 20 years.
    The committee is interested in understanding whether broad 
application of MEDG technology would be worth the investment. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
provide a briefing, not later than April 15, 2022, to the 
congressional defense committees on the Navy's assessment of 
the costs and benefits of using MEDG technology on small- and 
medium-sized ships. The briefing shall also include an 
assessment of the water purification strategy for the 
Constitution-class frigate (FFG-62) program.

Briefing on munitions procurement, stockage and industrial base

    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army, as the 
Department of Defense executive agent for ammunition and 
explosives, to provide a briefing to the Senate Armed Services 
Committee not later than 30 days after submission of the 
President's budget request for fiscal year 2023. The committee 
notes with concern the significant reduction in munitions 
procurement quantities proposed in the President's budget 
request for fiscal year 2022. The committee is concerned about 
these reductions and that similar reduced procurement 
quantities in future years will further negatively impact 
ammunition wartime stocks, reduce the availability of 
ammunition for training, and damage the ammunition industrial 
base.
    The briefing shall contain an assessment of the impact of 
proposed munitions quantities requested in the fiscal year 2023 
budget request on required wartime stocks, availability of 
ammunition to conduct required training, and health of the 
defense organic ammunition industrial base. For purposes of the 
assessment and briefing, ``munitions'' shall include ammunition 
and missiles procured by the Department of the Army for itself 
or other entities within the Department of Defense.

CH-47F Block II funding restoration

    The committee is concerned by significant reductions to 
funding for procurement of enduring Army aircraft in the fiscal 
year 2022 budget request, and the impact that these reductions 
will have on Army aviation readiness, modernization, pilot and 
crew safety, and the helicopter industrial base. The committee 
appreciates that difficult choices were required of the Office 
of the Secretary of Defense (OSD) and Department of the Army 
due to budget priorities and constraints, but notes that the 
request for the CH-47F Block II Chinook helicopter program is 
inconsistent with the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021 
(Public Law 116-260) and Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2020 
(Public Law 116-93) with respect to expectations for the 
program.
    The Chief of Staff of the Army has previously certified the 
need for this capability and identified CH-47F Block II funding 
on the Army's unfunded priorities list for fiscal year 2022. 
Given the importance of the Chinook as the Army's only medium-
lift capability, the committee expects OSD to fund the CH-47F 
Block II program in the fiscal year 2023 budget request and 
future years defense program.

DDG(X) acquisition strategy

    The committee urges the Secretary of the Navy to implement 
an acquisition strategy for the next Large Surface Combatant, 
known as DDG(X), based on a collaborative design, development, 
and production approach between the Government and industry.
    The committee notes many recent Navy shipbuilding programs, 
including the DDG 1000 and Littoral Combat Ship programs, 
experienced significant cost increases, program delays, and 
reliability issues due to flaws in the earliest acquisition 
strategies.
    Accordingly, the committee believes it is critical that the 
Navy work closely with industry to ensure appropriate design 
and technical maturity in developing lead ship acquisition 
strategies. The committee further believes that the DDG(X) 
acquisition strategy should be modeled on and leverage the best 
practices of the Columbia-class Integrated Product and Process 
Development (IPPD) contract with integrated lines of effort in 
design, technology maturation, and construction. Furthermore, 
the committee views the technology maturation initiatives 
contained in section 124 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) as key elements in 
the DDG(X) acquisition strategy.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees with the fiscal 
year 2023 budget request that describes the extent to which the 
Navy will utilize an IPPD-type acquisition strategy for the 
DDG(X) program. This report shall describe the following lines 
of effort and how they will be integrated from fiscal year 2023 
through fiscal year 2040: (1) Ship design, including concept, 
preliminary, and detailed; (2) Hull form design and selection; 
(3) Combat systems, including lessons learned from DDG-125 
Combat Systems Ship's Qualification Trials; (4) Hull, 
mechanical and electrical systems, including the land-based 
testing required under section 131 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020; and (5) Construction, 
including the transition from production of the Flight III DDG-
51 program to the DDG(X) program.

DDG-51 destroyer multi-year procurement

    The committee continues to support the national policy of 
achieving at least a 355-ship fleet, as codified in the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public 
Law 115-91), which is integral to the National Defense Strategy 
and its emphasis on near-peer competition with Russia and 
China.
    The committee views DDG-51 destroyers as the backbone of 
the surface fleet, providing multi-mission flexibility and 
increasing capability with introduction of Flight III and the 
AN/SPY-6 radar. With plans for construction of a new class of 
Large Surface Combatants (LSCs) toward the end of this decade 
and the current multi-year procurement of DDG-51s ending in 
fiscal year 2022, the committee believes that it is imperative 
that the Navy award another DDG-51 multi-year contract 
beginning in fiscal year 2023. This contract is critical to 
ensuring that Flight III capability continues to be delivered 
to the fleet and the industrial base is maintained to support 
the LSC acquisition strategy.
    Accordingly, the committee urges the Secretary of Defense 
and the Secretary of the Navy to make all necessary plans to 
award another multi-year contract for DDG-51 Flight III 
destroyers in fiscal year 2023 and include the optimal 
associated funding profile for economic order quantity 
material, long lead time material, and full funding in the 
Department of Defense's fiscal year 2023 budget request.

Development of land-based long-range hypersonic weapons

    The committee is encouraged by the speed with which the 
Army is working to field an initial land-based long-range 
hypersonic weapons capability in fiscal year 2023. Options 
posed by the United States deploying long-range hypersonic 
strike capability in multiple domains present dilemmas to 
potential adversaries and can strengthen deterrence by 
injecting complexity and uncertainty into the decision 
processes of strategic competitors.
    The committee encourages the Army to accelerate development 
and fielding of the initial Long-Range Hypersonic Weapons 
(LRHW) batteries where possible, with the understanding that 
initial prototype-developed missiles that will be fielded will 
cost more than subsequently-acquired ones. To better understand 
future costs and inform future decisions, the committee directs 
the Army to refine the cost estimate for additional currently-
designed hypersonic glide body missiles that are to be 
acquired. Additionally, the committee directs the Army to 
assess alternatives to the current LRHW missile, to include 
lower-cost alternative glide bodies and air-breathing 
hypersonic technologies and to provide a briefing on the 
assessment to the Senate Armed Services Committee not later 
than January 15, 2022.

Extended Range Cannon Artillery acquisition report

    The committee supports the Army's efforts to increase the 
range and lethality of cannon artillery in order to address 
being outranged by currently fielded systems of strategic 
competitors. The committee notes that the Extended Range Cannon 
Artillery (ERCA) system incorporates a number of developmental 
technologies, including an extended range cannon tube and 
advanced munitions, grafted to a modified Paladin howitzer 
currently in production.
    As such, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army to 
provide a report, not later than February 28, 2022, to the 
Senate Armed Services Committee on ERCA acquisition. The report 
shall include an assessment and certification of platform 
mobility and survivability, cannon tube sustainability, and 
propellant and munition suitability to meet operational 
requirements under operational conditions. The report shall 
also include an assessment of the capability, capacity, and 
benefits of leveraging commercial defense industrial base 
infrastructure and expertise to assemble the ERCA platform.

Improved Turbine Engine Program

    The committee commends the Army's continued development of 
the Improved Turbine Engine Program. This program is designed 
to develop a more fuel efficient and powerful engine to upgrade 
and enhance the performance and operational readiness of the 
current Black Hawk and Apache helicopter fleets. Importantly, 
it will also serve as the Government-furnished engine for the 
Future Attack Reconnaissance Aircraft program, the Chief of 
Staff of the Army's priority Future Vertical Lift effort. This 
program represents a cost-effective approach to modernizing 
Army aviation, and the committee encourages the Army to pursue 
opportunities to accelerate the fielding of this capability.

Joint Surveillance and Target Attack Radar System modifications

    The Air Force intends to replace the capability now 
provided by the Joint Surveillance and Target Attack Radar 
System (JSTARS) with the Advanced Battle Management System, a 
component of the Combined Joint All Domain Command and Control, 
or CJADC2, a Department of Defense (DOD) effort to digitally 
connect all elements of the U.S. military--from sensors to 
shooters--across all five warfighting domains: air, land, sea, 
space, and cyberspace. The committee fully supports 
modernization of the JSTARS capability, but believes that the 
Air Force needs to maintain the current aircraft and make 
prudent upgrades to the current JSTARS systems until a 
replacement capability is available. The committee continues to 
be concerned by the Air Force's lack of progress on sustainment 
and modification of JSTARS. In a recent report to the 
congressional defense committees, the Air Force described plans 
for modernizing JSTARS. While those efforts would have fallen 
short of modernizing important systems, the budget request for 
fiscal year 2022 would not even execute those plans for 
ensuring that combatant commander requirements are met. Despite 
existing legislation to the contrary, the budget request 
proposes to retire four JSTARS aircraft and underfund 
modernization of the aircraft that would remain in service. In 
particular, the erratic funding profile for the Bandwidth 
Efficient Common Data Link (BE-CDL) and the flat funding 
profile of the Mobile User Objective System (MUOS) do not 
provide any confidence that a reasonable acquisition strategy 
is in place, nor do they satisfy mandated timelines. 
Furthermore, the report provides no plans to satisfy the DOD 
mandate to replace JSTARS' HAVE QUICK II radios with Second 
Generation Anti-Jam Tactical UHF Radio for NATO (SATURN) radios 
by October 1, 2024.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than November 30, 2021 with: (1) Funding profiles and 
associated schedules to implement these critical capabilities 
on the E-8C as expeditiously as possible; and (2) Any necessary 
changes to the E-8C program management structure to ensure 
those plans are executed.

Long range strike

    The committee remains supportive of a mix of options across 
multiple domains for combatant commanders in support of joint 
long range targeting and effects. The committee is concerned 
that the probability of decreasing budgets has the potential to 
drive Hobson's choices with respect to long range strike.
    Therefore, not later than March 15, 2022, the Secretary of 
Defense shall submit to the congressional defense committees a 
report assessing the long range strike capabilities of the 
Department of Defense on a cost-per-effect basis, including the 
ability to strike with precision over long ranges and providing 
the requisite volume of fires, for purposes of maximizing 
combat power within the overall defense budget. Additionally, 
the report shall provide a cost-informed strategy that 
addresses requirements for fires across domains and aligns with 
the Joint Warfighting Concept.

Machine gun capability gap study

    The committee is concerned that there is a gap in 
capability between current medium and heavy machine guns in 
terms of range, terminal effects, and weight, which anecdotal 
evidence from operational employment of currently fielded 
capabilities has highlighted. The committee supports Army 
efforts to address a similar gap in rifles and automatic rifles 
for close-combat formations through the development and 
fielding of the Next Generation Squad Weapon. The committee is 
aware of machine gun capability that exists between the current 
M240 medium and M2 heavy machine gun that may address range and 
lethality shortcomings of current medium machine guns at 
soldier-borne weight.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to conduct a comparative study of machine gun capability in 
this category of munitions. The study shall include, at a 
minimum, a comparative analysis between M2 .50 caliber, M240 
7.62mm, and .338 Norma Magnum capabilities, focused on the 
metrics of range, lethality, weight, cost, and ability to 
incorporate advanced optics. Where possible, the Army shall 
consider incorporating data yielded from testing by U.S. 
Special Operations Command to minimize duplication of effort. 
The Secretary shall provide a briefing on the study to the 
Senate Armed Service Committee not later than March 31, 2022.

Mobile Protected Firepower

    The committee understands the importance of the Army's 
efforts to procure a light tank for Infantry Brigade Combat 
Teams (IBCTs). The Army has recognized that IBCTs need 
dedicated large-caliber direct-fire weapons support in a 
lighter protected platform that offers greater tactical 
mobility and air transportability. The committee understands 
the Army is committed to the Mobile Protected Firepower (MPF) 
program as one of its signature modernization efforts because 
it significantly increases the lethality, survivability, and 
flexibility of infantry formations not organically equipped 
with Bradleys or Strykers.
    The committee notes that the Army's fiscal year 2022 budget 
request included the first year of procurement funding for the 
MPF program. Given the importance of the program, the committee 
encourages the Army to execute the program without delay.

Modernizing Army short-range air defense capabilities

    The committee continues to note the Army's efforts to 
reconstitute its short-range air defense (SHORAD) systems. Of 
the capabilities tested, the Army has decided on an Initial 
Maneuver SHORAD (IM-SHORAD) system consisting of a Stryker 
vehicle equipped with multiple air defense weapons, including 
legacy missiles. The Army plans to begin fielding IM-SHORAD 
vehicles in fiscal year 2021. While the committee applauds the 
Army's efforts to date, it remains concerned that potential 
adversaries, such as Russia and China, have developed new 
aircraft and unmanned aerial systems with operational speeds 
that can quickly close on U.S. ground forces. The committee 
believes that there is an unmet requirement to engage hostile 
air assets at greater ranges to protect U.S. and allied ground 
forces.
    The committee therefore directs the Secretary of the Army, 
not later than February 16, 2022, to provide a report to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives on the Army's efforts to reconstitute its 
SHORAD systems to meet current and future air threats to ground 
forces. This report shall be comprehensive and address issues 
including, but not limited to: (1) The Army's prioritization 
level for modernizing SHORAD systems; (2) Whether the Army is 
allocating sufficient funds for SHORAD systems; (3) How the 
Army's efforts will address emerging air threats, including an 
analysis of propulsion technologies available to extend the 
range of legacy missiles; and (4) Whether the planned force 
structure of IM-SHORAD units is sufficient to meet Army 
requirements.

Multi-spectral sensor detection mitigation for body armor and 
        individual equipment

    The committee notes that multi-spectral sensor detection is 
an emerging threat on the battlefield as near-peer competitors 
and non-state actors gain access to advanced thermal imagers. 
Given recent developments in sensor technologies, their 
increasing proliferation, and the incorporation of multi-
spectral sensor detection mitigation in combat uniforms, the 
committee is concerned the military services are not developing 
multi-spectral sensor detection mitigation capabilities in body 
armor and individual equipment.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army, 
in coordination with the Secretary of the Navy and the 
Secretary of the Air Force, to conduct a feasibility study on 
incorporating multi-spectral sensor detection mitigation 
technologies into body armor and individual equipment. The 
Secretary of the Army shall provide a briefing on the study to 
the congressional defense committees not later than December 1, 
2021.

Paladin Integrated Management acquisition strategy

    The committee is concerned by the substantially reduced 
modernization investment in enduring combat vehicle platforms 
that comprise the Army's Armored Brigade Combat Teams (ABCTs), 
including the Paladin Integrated Management (PIM) armored, 
self-propelled howitzer. Faced with difficult budgetary 
choices, the Army prioritized funding its highest modernization 
priority efforts at the expense of continuing timely 
modernization of enduring ABCT combat vehicle platforms, 
supporting tactical wheeled vehicles, and munitions.
    PIM, which is the Army's program to modernize ABCT organic 
artillery, was significantly impacted by this budget-driven 
approach. The President's budget request for fiscal year 2022 
reduced PIM production to nearly half the quantities programmed 
for in the fiscal year 2021 budget request. This reduction 
would not only slow modernization of ABCT organic artillery by 
nearly half, it would strain production lines and suppliers, 
and would increase the per vehicle-set cost of PIM by 17 
percent due to the reduced quantities.
    Elsewhere in this Act, the committee adds $199.5 million 
for PIM production to address the Chief of Staff of the Army's 
unfunded priorities list and achieve procurement quantities 
that avoid nearly $50.0 million in additional costs of ordering 
at the reduced budget request level. For future years, the 
committee is concerned that the Army may not program sufficient 
quantities to achieve its modernization plan and economic 
production rates that provide best value for the Army.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing, not later than February 15, 2022, on the planned 
acquisition strategy for PIM. The briefing shall include 
procurement quantities through the future years defense 
program, quantities required to complete planned modernization 
of both the Regular Army and National Guard units, quantities 
required to realize economic production rate savings, and 
quantities required to ensure industrial base minimum 
sustainment requirements. The briefing shall also include an 
assessment of the merits of requesting multiyear production 
authority and an assessment of how co-located production of 
Extended-Range Cannon Artillery with PIM production could help 
address industrial base minimum sustainment requirements and 
provide economic benefits to the Government.

RC-135 Rivet Joint

    The committee recognizes the RC-135 fleet's role in Great 
Power Competition and vital contributions to understanding 
adversary intent and capabilities across a range of military 
operations. The committee also acknowledges that the Air 
Force's report on unmet intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance (ISR) requirements in connection with the RC-135 
Rivet Joint aircraft and that combatant commanders' demand for 
the RC-135's unique capabilities exceeds the current fleet's 
capacity. Further, to increase RC-135 aircraft availability, 
the Air Force has been prioritizing the restoration of 
operational capabilities lost as a result of the March 2019 
Offut Air Force Base floods as the primary line of effort. The 
committee understands that replacing the current NC-135 test 
aircraft with an aircraft equipped in an operationally 
representative configuration could help reduce RC-135 depot 
maintenance timelines and materially improve overall aircraft 
availability. Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary 
of the Air Force to provide a briefing to the congressional 
defense committees, not later than February 1, 2022, on the 
costs and benefits of available options for replacing the NC-
135 test aircraft with an aircraft in an operationally 
representative configuration.

Report on Agile Combat Employment

    Agile Combat Employment (ACE) is an operational concept 
that is meant to leverage networks of well-established and 
austere air bases, multi-capable airmen, pre-positioned 
equipment, and airlift to rapidly deploy, disperse, and 
maneuver combat capability throughout a theater. Paired with 
aircraft fueling, arming, and limited maintenance activities, 
ACE expands the number of bases from which the U.S. military 
can generate combat sorties. The committee believes the Air 
Force needs to apply ACE to U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, U.S. 
European Command, and to operations within the United States. 
The United States used to have more options for operating and 
launching strategic forces, but many of those options have 
vanished due to base closures, neglect, and crumbling 
infrastructure. The few that remain viable will likely follow 
suit unless they are maintained and exercised. ACE exercises 
also provide more opportunities to train multi-capable airmen 
and exercise ACE planners without the added expense of and 
foreign dependence on an overseas exercise. There are locations 
within the continental United States (CONUS) and Alaska that 
have the necessary runway and infrastructure, but also have the 
absence of existing bomber or fighter units, thereby allowing 
austere training while mitigating risk. Additional ACE 
exercises in North America would ensure the ACE concept is 
actually executed proficiently, and not just talked about in 
academic settings.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force, in consultation with the Secretary of the Navy, to 
provide to the congressional defense committees not later than 
January 31, 2022, a report describing the feasibility of ACE 
exercises in the Pacific, Europe, and within the CONUS and 
Alaska. The report shall include any currently scheduled ACE 
exercises within the CONUS or elsewhere. The report shall also 
include a list of requirements for a base or location to be 
used in an ACE exercise, to include a breakdown of requirements 
for various types of exercises such as nuclear bomber 
exercises, conventional bomber exercises, and fighter 
exercises. Finally, the report shall include a list of those 
bases and locations currently meeting such requirements and 
those that could do so with minor modification.

Report on cryptographic modernization and resiliency of communications 
        systems

    The committee remains supportive of the Department of 
Defense's efforts to develop technology in support of Joint All 
domain Command and Control (JADC2). However, the committee is 
concerned with the budgeting and execution of the 
communications programs critical to the realization of JADC2. 
Specifically, the committee is concerned with the progress of 
the cryptographic modernization program effort across the 
entire Department and the broad use of commercial off-the-shelf 
technology that may not provide required capabilities when 
faced with a near-peer adversary. Therefore the committee 
directs the military service chiefs to provide a report, not 
later than February 1, 2022, to the congressional defense 
committees that details the cryptographic modernization 
strategy of each applicable program, including cost, schedule, 
and funded and unfunded requirements.
    Additionally, the report shall detail how all 
communications systems fielded or in development will meet the 
requirements of section 168 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for 2020 (Public Law 116-92), including how 
the Department's use of commercial off-the-shelf capability 
will achieve the resiliency required in that statute.

Report on enhanced night vision and visual augmentation devices

    The committee supports the continued development and 
fielding of advanced night vision devices and visual 
augmentation systems and recognizes these systems provide a 
critical capability to fight, rehearse, and train in all 
expected combat conditions. The committee further notes that 
the Army has several advanced night vision or visual 
augmentation devices in development or fielding, and that these 
devices have different capability with respect to optical 
acuity, visual augmentation, network integration, physical 
dexterity, and power consumption.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a report to the congressional defense committees, not later 
than February 28, 2022, on an updated assessment and 
distribution plan for enhanced night vision and visual 
augmentation devices, based on developmental outcomes, 
differing capabilities, and operational testing of these 
devices. The updated plan shall include: (1) The basis of issue 
of the devices within close-combat formations and supporting 
forces; (2) The rationale for the basis of issue based on 
anticipated mission requirements; (3) A battery management 
strategy based on assessed power consumption for anticipated 
missions; (4) Acquisition objectives and funding profiles based 
on the updated basis of issue and distribution; (5) Details on 
how the Army plans to ensure competition amongst night and 
augmented visual systems from multiple suppliers, to include 
both traditional and commercial suppliers; and (6) Any other 
matters the Secretary considers relevant.

Report on excess military equipment

    The committee recognizes the potential use of divested 
Department of Defense equipment to provide additional 
capabilities to foreign partners. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than March 15, 2022, 
regarding potential excess military equipment, particularly 
combat aircraft, scheduled for decommissioning that could be 
transferred under the Excess Defense Articles program of the 
Defense Security Cooperation Agency to foreign partners, 
including Taiwan.

Report on personnel parachute and cargo management inventory 
        acquisition decisions

    The committee remains concerned that the Army is developing 
an interim parachute management system that is slated to be 
replaced by a program of record in the 2027 timeframe. The 
committee acknowledges receipt of the report on Personnel 
Parachute and Cargo Management Inventory, required by the 
committee report accompanying H.R. 6395 (H. Rept. 116-442), the 
William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2021, as passed by the House of 
Representatives, which the Army provided to the committee on 
January 8, 2021. The report concluded that the existing paper-
based system used by parachute riggers is inadequate. The 
report then explained the Army's approach to addressing the 
shortcomings of the current system. The report states that the 
Army conducted market research on available systems and used 
the information to ``further define the future state 
considerations and capabilities.''
    The committee notes that the report only indicates that the 
Army conducted an ``informal assessment'' of available systems 
and that the report does not conclude that the commercially 
available systems do not meet the Army's requirements. The 
committee further notes that there are commercial off-the-shelf 
(COTS) systems being used in several military installations.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the congressional defense committees not later 
than February 28, 2022, that explains:
          (1) The projected cost of the Mobile Asset Tracker-
        Automated Parachute Management (MAT-APM);
          (2) How does the MAT-APM capability meet joint 
        service requirements;
          (3) Which Army organization is the proponent for the 
        requirement;
          (4) Whether the Army conducted a business case 
        analysis comparing the cost of developing a Government 
        solution and deploying an interim solution for 
        parachute management with the cost of a COTS system;
          (5) How the Army determined that currently available 
        commercial systems do not meet the Army's Enterprise 
        materiel asset tracking requirements at the tactical 
        level;
          (6) How the Army determined that a Government 
        development effort is necessary; and
          (7) Whether the Airborne Board was consulted before 
        the Army decided to embark on this development effort 
        and if the Board was informed that there is a program 
        of record slated to replace the interim system within a 
        few years.

Report on training of military pilots

    The committee is aware of various pilot shortfalls 
throughout the services and is concerned that the requirement 
to produce pilots may be driving multiple efforts across the 
services to increase production without ensuring that the 
quality of the pilot training graduates improves or at the very 
least remains unchanged.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force and the Secretary of the Navy to conduct a study and 
provide a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than June 1, 2022 on the efficacy and efficiency of the 
various pilot training initiatives and pilot programs being 
undertaken by the services with respect to the quality of 
graduates. Additionally, the study shall include whether the 
current number of pilot training bases are adequate for the 
required pilot production by service and an analysis of 
vertical takeoff and landing pilot training and provide 
recommendations on the most effective way to train pilots in 
these hybrid aircraft. The committee directs the Secretaries to 
provide an interim briefing to the congressional defense 
committees on the findings of the study not later than March 1, 
2022.

Soldier Enhancement Program

    Since the Congress created the program in 1990, the Soldier 
Enhancement Program (SEP) has served as an effective process 
designed to help the Army move at ``the speed of industry'' by 
evaluating existing prototypes or commercially available items 
that could enhance soldiers' ability to execute their combat 
mission. SEP continues to serve a unique and critical function 
in enabling the accelerated evaluation and procurement of off-
the-shelf items that have the potential to substantially 
improve weapons and support equipment that are focused on 
critical war-fighting functional areas of fires, mission 
command, movement and maneuver, sustainability, and protection. 
The committee notes that SEP has transitioned to Army Futures 
Command. The committee commends the Army for reestablishing 
committed funding in the fiscal year 2022 budget and encourages 
the Army to continue its commitment to this critical program.

Soldier load management strategy update

    The committee notes that fielding of advanced capabilities, 
such as enhanced night vision, visual augmentation systems, and 
associated networking radios and batteries, are adding weight 
to the soldier load. The weight and configuration of these 
advanced capabilities, when added to standard mission combat 
loads that include weapons, ammunition, armor, and other 
mission equipment, have the potential to negatively impact 
soldier performance and small unit effectiveness and soldier 
agility in contact. The committee recognizes the Army's prior 
holistic effort to manage soldier load but believes the 
proliferation of advanced technologies in close-combat units 
and emerging small-unit supporting platforms warrants re-
examination of soldier load.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the Senate Armed Services Committee not later 
than February 15, 2022, on an updated assessment and strategy 
for management of the combat load for close-combat units 
including load carrying equipment that is appropriate for the 
``last tactical mile'' and subterranean operations. The 
assessment shall describe how the U.S. Army Special Operations 
Command and U.S. Army Maneuver Center of Excellence are 
addressing the issue and provide a description and status of 
load carrying platforms the Army is examining and planned 
procurements and fielding or deployment of these platforms. The 
assessment shall address weights associated with advanced 
technologies, batteries, and peripheral equipment as well as 
incorporate anticipated weights and planned reductions for 
weapons, ammunition, armor, and other soldier items.

Tactical and combat vehicle electrification

    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the congressional defense committees by January 
31, 2022, on the status of the tactical and combat vehicle 
electrification (TaCV-E) initial capabilities document (ICD) 
and electric light reconnaissance vehicle (eLRV) rapid 
prototype program. The briefing shall include, but not be 
limited to: courses of action to accelerate eLRV to include 
funding requirements and engagement strategies with the 
commercial industrial base and how the Army and U.S. Special 
Operations Command (SOCOM) are communicating and coordinating 
on vehicle electrification technology development to include 
test and evaluation strategies.
    The committee understands the Army is currently developing 
a TaCV-E ICD that is expected to provide the operational 
requirements foundation for electrification of the Army's 
ground vehicle fleet. The committee understands the TaCV-E ICD 
will provide opportunities for new starts and electrification 
modification of existing vehicles. The committee also notes the 
Army's eLRV program is a rapid prototyping effort to facilitate 
the development of an all-electric tactical vehicle through the 
use of experimentation and soldier touch points that would also 
help inform the TaCV-E initiative.
    The committee supports the TaCV-E plan and the eLRV effort 
and encourages the Army to sufficiently fund these efforts. The 
committee is aware the automotive industry is aggressively 
moving forward with electrification of commercial automotive 
technologies to include advanced battery technology development 
and believes the Army should fully leverage these technologies 
through the appropriate use of acquisition reform initiatives 
to engage with non-traditional industry partners to help 
accelerate eLRV prototype development. The committee encourages 
the Army to also consider potential operational exportable 
power generation benefits of electrification modifications of 
existing tactical vehicles, such as the infantry squad vehicle, 
as part of the eLRV effort where operationally feasible and 
appropriate. In addition, the committee is also aware of 
similar efforts being considered by SOCOM.

U.S. Southern Command requirements

    The committee notes that U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) 
is responsible for deterring aggression, defeating threats to 
enhance U.S. security, and defending the U.S. Homeland and 
national interests. Although the SOUTHCOM area of 
responsibility (AOR) is important to national security, the 
Department of Defense is required to make difficult choices 
among the various combatant commands in allocating forces in 
peacetime through the Global Force Management Allocation Plan 
(GFMAP). The committee understands that SOUTHCOM does not 
always receive a high priority in the GFMAP allocation.
    The committee would like to better understand what 
additional resources might be required to support SOUTHCOM 
priority requirements. Therefore, the committee directs the 
following reports to be submitted to the congressional defense 
committees with the budget request for fiscal year 2023: (1) A 
report from the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff that 
identifies the range of forces that would be appropriate to 
allocate to SOUTHCOM were additional forces available; and (2) 
A report from the Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) that 
identifies options for assigning additional forces, such as 
ships and aircraft, to the SOUTHCOM naval component, the United 
States 4th Fleet. The CNO's assessment shall consider the 
potential use of ships and aircraft scheduled to be 
decommissioned and address specific needs to sustain the 
presence of Navy vessels assigned to the SOUTHCOM AOR.

Warm Isostatic Press for manufacture of body armor

    The committee recognizes that composite armor raw material 
performance has improved, but current industry manufacturing 
capabilities cannot maximize the capability of the advanced 
materials. The committee notes that using a Warm Isostatic 
Press (WIP), vice uni-axial presses currently in use, may have 
the potential to reduce the weight of body armor by nearly 30 
percent at the same ballistic protection level and permit 
manufacture of compound body armor shapes for differing human 
profiles.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to conduct an assessment of the utility and potential strategy 
for establishing a domestic WIP capability for the purpose of 
producing lighter weight, higher protection, lower profile body 
armor and lightweight aviation armor components. The assessment 
shall include, but not be limited to: an assessment of the 
potential benefits of using a WIP in the manufacture of body 
and lightweight aviation armor; potential strategies for 
establishing a domestic WIP capability for the production of 
body armor, including Government-funded and public-private 
shared funding approaches; and respective costs of the 
potential strategies. The Secretary shall provide the 
committee, not later than March 1, 2022, a briefing on the 
assessment.

         TITLE II--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION

              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations

Authorization of appropriations (sec. 201)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for research, development, test, and 
evaluation activities at the levels identified in section 4201 
of division D of this Act.

    Subtitle B--Program Requirements, Restrictions, and Limitations

Increase in allowable rate of basic pay for certain employees of 
        Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (sec. 211)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency 
(DARPA) to pay additional compensation to technical program 
managers to support DARPA's mission of funding and managing 
high-risk, high-reward research, development, and prototyping 
activities to support the National Defense Strategy. The 
committee notes that these individuals are uniquely qualified 
to develop and manage research programs in emerging sectors, 
such as artificial intelligence, biotechnology, robotics, and 
hypersonics. The committee further notes that the provision 
serves to also reduce the bureaucratic burden and complexity of 
the processes required to pay these individuals under current 
authorities, improving auditability and reducing the risk of 
errors.
Additional mission areas for mechanisms for expedited access to 
        technical talent and expertise at academic institutions by 
        Department of Defense (sec. 212)
    The committee recommends a provision that would add 
additional topics to the areas authorized for the Secretary of 
Defense and the Secretaries of the military departments to 
establish streamlined and expedited contracting mechanisms to 
better access critical talent. The committee notes that the 
National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence's Final 
Report highlighted the importance of research security and 
integrity.
Modification of other transaction authority for research projects (sec. 
        213)
    The committee recommends a provision that would remove the 
requirement for regulatory implementation of Other Transaction 
(OT) Authority for research projects under section 2371 of 
title 10, United States Code, and replace it with the more 
flexible option of Department of Defense (DOD) guidance.
    The committee notes that the existing regulatory 
requirement was established at a time when DOD was slow to 
issue any type of guidance to the workforce on the use of OTs. 
Since then, DOD has become much more proactive in its guidance. 
For example, the Office of the Director, Defense Pricing and 
Contracting, issued a comprehensive OT Guide in December 2018 
that it is currently in the process of updating; the Defense 
Acquisition University has been providing training and 
education materials online about the proper use of OTs; and the 
DOD Grants and Agreements Regulations Working Group under the 
Office of the Undersecretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering is developing a Research OT Guide to provide 
additional guidance on the unique aspects of OTs awarded under 
section 2371 of title 10, United States Code.
Artificial intelligence metrics (sec. 214)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to review, not later than 180 days after 
the date of the enactment of this Act, the potential 
applications of artificial intelligence (AI) and digital 
technology to Department of Defense platforms, processes, and 
operations. The provision would also require the establishment 
of performance objectives and accompanying metrics for the 
incorporation of AI and digital readiness into Department of 
Defense platforms, processes, and operations.
    The provision would also require the Secretary to direct 
the heads of the military departments and components of the 
Department to conduct a review of skill gaps in the fields of 
software development, software engineering, knowledge 
management, data science, and AI. Further, the provision would 
require the Secretary to develop performance objectives and 
accompanying metrics related to AI research and development; 
exercises, wargames, and experimentation; logistics and 
sustainment; innovation initiatives; and business AI 
applications.
    The provision would also require the Secretary to submit a 
report on the findings of the review as well as the performance 
objectives and accompanying metrics established to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 120 days after 
the completion of the review.
    The committee notes that the final report of the National 
Security Commission for Artificial Intelligence highlights the 
establishment of AI and digital readiness performance goals as 
an important step to achieving a state of military AI readiness 
by 2025. The committee believes that it is important for the 
Department to ensure that the workforce contains the skillsets 
required to adopt these emerging technologies.
Modification of the Joint Common Foundation Program (sec. 215)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to modify the Joint Common Foundation 
(JCF) program conducted by the Joint Artificial Intelligence 
Center (JAIC) to ensure that Department of Defense (DOD) 
Components can easily contract with leading commercial 
artificial intelligence (AI) companies to support the rapid and 
efficient development and deployment of applications and 
capabilities.
    The committee does not intend for the Secretary to halt or 
otherwise disrupt the ongoing JCF program that is already under 
contract. Rather, the intent is for the Secretary to establish 
parallel processes as necessary to ensure that leading 
commercial providers of AI platforms, services, tools, testing 
capabilities, and software algorithms and algorithm development 
capabilities are contractually available to DOD Components. The 
committee notes that commercial industry already provides a 
robust and competitive marketplace for supporting AI 
development and that this industry will continue to outstrip 
any custom solution that the DOD could build. Taking advantage 
of this vibrant, competitive commercial industry will save 
money and time, and ensure that DOD Components have access to 
the best technology available.
    The committee intends that the JCF's commercial 
participants are able, as necessary and appropriate according 
to the role they play in DOD Components' development 
activities, to participate in programs like PlatformOne to 
qualify as DevSecOps software factories certified for automatic 
authority to operate and continuous delivery.
    The committee furthermore intends that the JAIC JCF program 
office provide assistance to DOD Components to enable 
components to select and contract with the most suitable 
commercial vendors to support their AI initiatives. The JCF 
role should be to enable DOD Components to focus their 
attention and resources on the development of AI applications 
based on the components' domain expertise, data, and 
operational challenges.

Executive education on emerging technologies for senior civilian and 
        military leaders (sec. 216)

    The committee recommends a provision that would direct the 
Secretary of Defense to establish executive education 
activities on emerging technologies for appropriate senior 
civilian and military leaders. The provision would also require 
the Secretary to provide a report on the status of implementing 
such activities to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives not later than 3 years 
after the date of the enactment of this Act.
    The committee notes that section 248 of the William M. 
(Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) directed the Secretary of 
Defense to carry out a pilot program on self-directed training 
for Department of Defense civilians and military members in 
advanced technologies, such as artificial intelligence, data 
science, machine learning, fifth-generation telecommunications 
technology, and biotechnology. The committee believes that 
education on advanced technologies remains particularly useful 
for senior civilian and military leaders. The committee 
encourages the Department to take a comprehensive look at who 
should be required to complete this training to benefit people 
in non-technical positions whose functions are increasingly 
being affected by technological change.
    The committee also notes that the National Security 
Commission on Artificial Intelligence's Final Report highlights 
the need for senior civilian and military leaders to understand 
relevant technologies and how these technologies may be applied 
to military and business outcomes in the Department of Defense. 
The committee believes that increasing the awareness of 
emerging technologies and their applications to the warfighter 
is critical in building future warfighting concepts and that 
developing a short course to routinely inform senior decision 
makers is an important step towards increasing artificial 
intelligence capabilities within the Department.

Improvements relating to national network for microelectronics research 
        and development (sec. 217)

    The committee recommends a provision that would make 
improvements to the national network for microelectronics 
research and development originally authorized under the 
Creating Helpful Incentives to Produce Semiconductors for 
America (CHIPS) Act, Title XCIX, section 9903(b) of the William 
M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283). The provision would 
mandate the establishment of the microelectronics research 
network, given that the committee believes that the Department 
of Defense is reluctant to use the permissive authority 
provided in the CHIPS Act to establish the envisioned research 
network.
    The committee notes that while ongoing Department of 
Defense research activities, including the Defense Advanced 
Research Projects Agency Electronics Resurgence Initiative, are 
important elements of a comprehensive strategy to restore U.S. 
superiority in the development of next generation 
microelectronics capabilities and establish commercially viable 
microelectronics production capabilities in the United States, 
they are not completely responsive to the mandates of the CHIPS 
Act. The provision would clarify that the network be 
established with multiple geographically diverse entities, if 
possible. The committee stresses the importance of making the 
process of moving microelectronics research innovation from 
laboratories to fabrication facilities more effective.

Activities to accelerate domestic quantum computing capabilities (sec. 
        218)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish a set of activities to 
accelerate the development and deployment of a large-scale, 
dual-use quantum computing capability and to ensure the 
Department of Defense consistently has access to state-of-the-
art quantum computing capabilities. The provision would also 
require annual reports through December 31, 2026.
    The committee directs the Director of the Defense Advanced 
Research Projects Agency to develop an acquisition strategy 
ensuring that funding decisions are made considering technical 
merit and return on investment to both the Government and the 
private sector; encouraging private sector cost share of 
investment; and using a phased and gated development and 
procurement approach to manage and control technical risk. The 
committee directs the Director to provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees on the acquisition strategy 
not later than March 1, 2022.

Pilot programs for passive telecommunications infrastructure to 
        facilitate installation 5G deployment (sec. 219)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretaries of the military departments to establish pilot 
programs for the deployment of passive telecommunications 
infrastructure to facilitate the deployment of fifth-generation 
(5G) wireless telecommunications on military installations. The 
provision would also require the Secretaries of the military 
departments to submit regular reports on their respective pilot 
programs to the congressional defense committees.
    The committee expects that the infrastructure deployments 
will be financed by private sector partners and offered to 
carriers as a shared resource, which could become a model to 
reduce the cost and increase the pace of 5G wireless 
deployment.

National Guard participation in microreactor testing and evaluation 
        (sec. 220)

    The committee recommends a provision that would allow the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Director of the 
Strategic Capabilities Office and the Chief of the National 
Guard Bureau, to assemble a collection of National Guard units 
to participate in the testing and evaluation of a micro nuclear 
reactor program.

Limitation on transfer of certain operational flight test events and 
        reduction in operational flight test capacity (sec. 221)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the transfer of operational flight test events to nontest-
designated units until such time as the Director of Operational 
Test and Evaluation, in consultation with the Secretary of the 
Navy, has certified that the use of nontest-designated units to 
conduct flight testing will not have any appreciable effect on 
program cost or schedule, nor on the ability to complete 
testing effectively.

Limitation on availability of funds for the High Accuracy Detection and 
        Exploitation System (sec. 222)

    The committee recommends a provision that would limit Army 
obligations for the High Accuracy Detection and Exploitation 
System (HADES) portion of the Multi-Domain Sensing System 
(MDSS) pending certain certifications from the Vice Chairman of 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff.
    The committee notes that the Army is planning to develop 
and field a new intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance 
(ISR) system--the MDSS. The Army believes that the HADES 
portion of MDSS will provide advanced aerial ISR capabilities 
to support multi-domain operations against peer and near-peer 
adversaries. Initial MDSS development has focused on providing 
indications and warnings, electronic order of battle, patterns 
of life, and target development for Army multi-domain 
operations in both competition and conflict. Development 
efforts have also focused on ensuring MDSS is globally 
deployable and can operate at extended ranges to improve 
survivability against enemy air defenses in a conflict. The 
Army plan is to deploy the MDSS on higher altitude, longer 
endurance fixed-wing aircraft that can provide effective 
standoff from enemy anti-access/area denial systems. The Army 
believes these capabilities will enable ground commanders to 
detect, locate, identify, track, and target critical enemy 
assets on the ground, supporting Army tactical consumers like 
long-range precision fires.
    The committee supports Army efforts to modernize and 
reorganize for competition and, if necessary, conflict with 
strategic competitors and understands the need to support 
targeting of threat long-range fires and air defense systems. 
However, the committee has concerns about the ability of the 
manned, fixed-wing element of the MDSS to support operations in 
a hostile environment, and seeks assurance that a new, manned 
platform is the best way to achieve the Army's objectives in 
the pre-hostilities phase of operations.
    Therefore, the committee believes that, before spending a 
significant amount of resources on the MDSS, the Vice Chairman 
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff should determine whether: (1) The 
HADES is a critical component of the Army's Project Convergence 
and is consistent with the Department of Defense's Joint All 
Domain Command and Control strategy; and (2) The HADES would be 
able to operate and provide ISR to the ground component 
commander at standoff distances sufficient to survive against 
enemy air defenses, consistent with planned operational 
concepts of employment.

           Subtitle C--Codification and Technical Corrections


Codification of direct hire authority at personnel demonstration 
        laboratories for advanced degree holders (sec. 231)

    The committee recommends a provision that would codify the 
authority of the Defense laboratories to use direct hiring 
authorities to appoint qualified candidates with advanced 
degrees to work as scientists, engineers, and technical staff. 
The committee originally established this authority in the 
Duncan Hunter National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2009 (Public Law 110-417) and notes that it has been 
successfully used by the Defense laboratories to attract 
technical talent in areas including robotics, hypersonics, 
artificial intelligence, biotechnology, and other emerging 
technology areas.

Codification of authorities relating to Department of Defense science 
        and technology reinvention laboratories (sec. 232)

    The committee recommends a provision that would codify 
existing authority for the lab personnel demonstration 
activities that have been successfully used by Department of 
Defense laboratories to attract and retain an expert Federal 
Government technical workforce. The committee notes that these 
personnel authorities have enabled the laboratories to compete 
with the private sector for scientific and technical talent to 
execute the critical innovation missions assigned to the 
laboratories, especially in high priority modernization areas 
such as artificial intelligence, biotechnology, hypersonics, 
and robotics.

Codification of requirement for Defense Established Program to 
        Stimulate Competitive Research (sec. 233)

    The committee recommends a provision that would codify the 
requirement for the Secretary of Defense to execute the Defense 
Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research. The 
committee notes that the Department of Defense has used this 
program to award research funding to universities in states 
that traditionally receive less Department of Defense research 
funding, including establishing partnerships with defense 
laboratories, in order to expand the Department's research base 
and increase the pipeline of technical talent into the defense 
sector.

Technical correction to pilot program for enhancement of research, 
        development, test, and evaluation centers of Department of 
        Defense (sec. 234)

    The committee recommends a provision that would make a 
technical correction to a pilot program on improving 
organizational management practices executed by defense 
laboratories and test centers to reflect the removal of the 
legislative requirement for the appointment of a Chief 
Management Officer and reassignment of duties to the Deputy 
Secretary of Defense. This change would designate the Deputy 
Secretary as the approving official for management flexibility 
changes requested by the Director of the Defense Advanced 
Research Projects Agency. The committee notes that the pilot 
program, first authorized in the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328), has resulted in 
the military services reducing bureaucratic and other 
management burdens that have impeded the efforts of 
laboratories and test centers to support the modernization 
goals of the Department of Defense.

             Subtitle D--Plans, Reports, and Other Matters


Study on efficient use of Department of Defense test and evaluation 
        organizations, facilities, and laboratories (sec. 241)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Defense Science Board to report on options to improve the 
effectiveness of Department of Defense test and evaluation 
organizations, facilities, and laboratories.

Analysis of potential modifications to Department of Defense unmanned 
        aerial systems categorization (sec. 242)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to 
review the current categorization of unmanned aerial systems 
(UAS) to determine whether the Department of Defense (DOD) 
should make changes to the current categorization. Since the 
definition of categories as assigned by DOD may influence the 
differentiation in the treatment of these unmanned aerial 
systems under the International Traffic in Arms Regulations 
(ITAR) and the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR), the 
Under Secretary shall consult with the Secretary of State in 
reviewing the current UAS categorization.
    The DOD currently categorizes UAS into five classes based 
on speed, maximum gross take-off weight (MGTOW), and altitude 
capability. The DOD has developed policies regarding training, 
employment, and maintenance of UAS for each of these five 
categories.
    The committee understands that some believe the broad 
definition used by the DOD for Group 3 UAS (UAS between 55 and 
1,320 pounds MGTOW) results in applying rules to smaller 
systems that are overly burdensome and result in: (1) Increased 
cost of ownership of smaller UAS; (2) Limits on rapid fielding 
of smaller UAS; (3) Discouragement of industry investment 
developments; and (4) Forgone advancements in UAS technology 
that might allow smaller Group 3 UAS to be operated in the same 
manner as a Group 1 or Group 2 UAS.

Digital development infrastructure plan and working group (sec. 243)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish a working group on digital 
development infrastructure implementation. The provision would 
also require the Secretary, through the established working 
group, to develop a plan for the creation of a modern digital 
development infrastructure that supports state of the art tools 
and modern processes to enable development, testing, fielding, 
and continuous update of artificial intelligence-powered 
applications at speed and scale from headquarters to the 
tactical edge.
    Additionally, the provision would require the Secretary to 
provide a report to the congressional defense committees, not 
later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act, on the status of the plan as well as on progress 
assembling enterprise data sets. The committee notes that the 
National Security Commission for Artificial Intelligence's 
Final Report highlights the need for the Department of Defense 
to establish digital ecosystem leadership and governance. The 
committee believes that establishing and maintaining an open 
architecture, an evolving reference design, governance 
structure, and processes to include management and 
authorization for ecosystem functions and growth is an 
important step for the Department.

Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle requirements analysis (sec. 244)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require a 
report and briefing of analysis underpinning refined Optionally 
Manned Fighting Vehicle (OMFV) requirements prior to entering 
into a contract for physical prototyping of the OMFV. The 
report would include details of the analysis of organizational 
design, survivability, mobility, payload, and combat 
effectiveness in execution of the critical operational tasks 
required of fighting vehicle-equipped infantry within armor 
brigade combat teams.
    The committee supports Army prioritization of development 
of the OMFV as critically needed to replace the M2 Bradley 
Fighting Vehicle (BFV). The BFV has been in operational service 
for more than 30 years and lacks the needed growth capacity to 
achieve combat overmatch against advanced capabilities being 
fielded by strategic competitors. Furthermore, the committee 
supports the Army's efforts to ensure competition, assess 
advanced technologies, and refine requirements through the 
ongoing digital design phase.

Making permanent requirement for annual report by Director of 
        Operational Test and Evaluation (sec. 245)

    The committee recommends a provision that would reestablish 
a permanent requirement for an annual report from the Director 
of Operational Test and Evaluation.

                              Budget Items


                                  Army


Smart thread data exchange

    The budget request contained $67.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA), for PE 61103A 
for University Research Initiatives.
    The committee notes the potential of additive manufacturing 
to support Army modernization priorities and provide deployable 
capabilities to support the production, repair, and sustainment 
of Army systems. The committee notes that to realize the full 
potential of additive manufacturing capabilities, the Army 
needs to develop a secure network, as well as a data 
architecture that supports exchange of technical data for 
additive manufacturing systems, accounts for intellectual 
property rights management, and provides connectivity to 
systems designers.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $5.0 
million in RDA for PE 61103A to further the development of data 
exchange systems providing a secure digital engineering 
environment to promote use of additive manufacturing throughout 
the joint force.

Unmanned aircraft systems propulsion research

    The budget request included $297.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA), for PE 61103A 
Defense Research Sciences.
    The committee notes that the Army is increasingly employing 
unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) to perform critical missions, 
such as surveillance, reconnaissance, and deployment of counter 
measures that both augment manned systems and reduce risk to 
soldiers. Many current unmanned aircraft depend on foreign-made 
propulsion systems consisting of modified ground engines, which 
drive up cost while impacting performance and reliability. 
Research is needed to drive the design and development of next-
generation UAS propulsion systems and establish a robust, 
sustainable domestic industrial base that can meet the 
military's mission-specific needs.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $1.5 
million in RDA for PE 61103A for building a domestic research 
and industrial base for UAS propulsion.

University research programs

    The budget request included $67.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA), for PE 61103A 
University Research Initiatives.
    The committee recognizes it is crucial to adequately fund, 
resource, and structure the Department of Defense to conduct 
research, development, and testing activities for critical 
emerging technologies to stay ahead of United States 
adversaries, most notably Russia and China. Resources must be 
devoted and responsibly spent toward research and development 
in critical sectors, including artificial intelligence, quantum 
computing, hypersonics, directed energy, biotechnology, 
autonomy, cyber, space, 5G, microelectronics, and fully 
networked command, control, and communications technologies.
    The committee is concerned that the balance of science and 
technology research in the Army is trending away from basic 
research, and focusing on more near-term applied research.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $30.0 
million in RDA for PE 61103A to increase emphasis on the basic 
research activities performed by the Army to fuel the 
innovation of the Department for the future.

Ceramic material systems for extreme environments

    The budget request included $64.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 62141A 
Lethality Technology.
    The committee recognizes the critical threat posed by enemy 
hypersonic weapons. The committee notes that hypersonic 
interceptors experience extreme temperatures that would destroy 
most materials systems. As a result, ceramic materials, which 
have excellent high temperature performance, may be required 
for many hypersonic interceptor components.
    The committee recommends an additional $2.5 million in RDA 
for PE 62141A for the development of ceramic materials and 
associated manufacturing processes for materials designed for 
these extreme environments.

Earthen structures research

    The budget request included $56.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 62144A 
Ground Technology.
    The committee notes the need to develop new materials, such 
as biopolymers, that can be used to enhance military earthen 
structures to meet Army requirements and reduce the military's 
carbon footprint.
    To achieve this goal, the committee recommends an 
additional $3.0 million in RDA for PE 62144A for research 
partnerships with universities to support development of 
advanced biopolymers for military earthen structures.

Graphene applications for military engineering

    The budget request included $56.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 62144A 
Ground Technology.
    The committee notes that graphene materials show promise to 
support a number of defense applications including in ballistic 
armor and high energy density batteries. The committee notes 
the importance of efforts in graphene applications in multi-
functional materials for force protection, new materials for 
power projection infrastructure, and new materials that support 
innovations in expeditionary water treatment and environmental 
sensing technologies.
    Therefore, to support additional research for Army 
modernization priorities, the committee recommends an 
additional $2.0 million in RDA for PE 62144A for research on 
applications of graphene for military engineering.

Polar research and testing

    The budget request included $56.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 62144A 
Ground Technology.
    The committee notes that improving capabilities for Arctic 
operations is critical for national security missions. The 
committee notes the limited Federal investment in polar 
research, which results in a limited technical workforce with 
expertise on the environmental conditions that would impact 
personnel and equipment deployed to cold weather climates.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $4.0 
million in RDA for PE 62144A for the development of polar 
research and testing capabilities.

Verified inherent control

    The budget request included $56.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 62144A 
Ground Technology.
    The committee notes that the verification and control of 
the material properties of end products is critical for the 
trusted deployment of additive manufacturing systems to the 
warfighter given increasing supply chain threat and 
cybersecurity challenges.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $2.0 
million in RDA for PE 62144A to support cyber-hardening of 
additive manufacturing systems and equipment to support 
validation of 3D printed systems.

Light detection and ranging technology

    The budget request included $172.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 62145A 
Next Generation Combat Vehicle Technology.
    The committee notes that light detection and ranging 
(LiDAR) technology can be used to improve situational awareness 
and battlefield sensing and significantly enhance warfighter 
preparedness and mission execution against emerging threats. 
The committee notes that the Army Research Laboratory has 
developed a microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) mirror-based 
LiDAR sensor for manned and unmanned vehicle applications.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $2.5 
million in RDA for PE 62145A to support additional research on 
MEMS mirror-based LiDAR systems for Army applications.

Unmanned aerial systems sensor research

    The budget request included $84.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 62146A 
Network C3I Technology.
    The committee notes that the Department of Defense is 
exploring the use of multiple drones carrying different types 
of sensors to support precise target detection and 
discrimination capabilities in order to provide operational 
units with enhanced battlefield situational awareness.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $2.0 
million in RDA for PE 62146A for the development of 
multispectral sensors for unmanned aerial systems.

Counter-unmanned aerial systems applied research

    The budget request included $19.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 62150A Air 
and Missile Defense Technology.
    The committee recognizes that unmanned aerial systems (UAS) 
present an ever-increasing threat to U.S. troops and assets. 
The committee notes the need for research to evaluate counter-
UAS threats and develop mitigation technologies to support 
military operations.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDA for PE 62150A to continue supporting counter-UAS 
research activities.

High energy laser research

    The budget request included $19.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 62150A Air 
and Missile Defense Technology.
    The committee notes that the current National Defense 
Strategy identifies directed energy as a critical technology in 
defense modernization activities. The development of directed 
energy capabilities will require numerous technical advances, 
including enhancing modeling and simulation and technology 
integration capabilities; expanding lethality testing; and 
improving beam control and automated detection, track, and 
engagement of targets.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $5.0 
million in RDA for PE 62150A for additional high energy laser 
research.

High energy laser support technology

    The budget request included $19.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA), for PE 62150A 
Air and Missile Defense Technology.
    The committee notes that the Army has identified integrated 
air and missile defense as one of the six Army priorities for 
modernization. Incorporating high energy laser technology on 
mobile platforms holds promise to counter enemy indirect fire 
and missile capabilities, and can facilitate the protection of 
forward operating bases.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $5.0 
million in RDA for PE 62150A to support development and testing 
of mobile and transportable high energy laser systems.

Kill chain automation for air and missile defense systems

    The budget request included $19.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 62150A Air 
and Missile Defense Technology.
    The committee supports the Army's ongoing efforts to 
integrate its air and missile defense systems. In order to 
maintain an asymmetric advantage in future warfare, the 
committee also supports continued research and development of 
incorporating artificial intelligence (AI) to improve kill 
chain automation for Army air and missile defense systems.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $8.0 
million in RDA for PE 62150A to develop and demonstrate 
advanced kill chain automation using multi-sensor fusion for 
improved air and missile defense multi-target tracking, as well 
as AI and machine learning algorithms to improve target 
discrimination and defeat.

Secure computing capabilities

    The budget request included $19.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA), for PE 62150A 
Air and Missile Defense Technology.
    The committee notes that defense platforms and weapons 
systems rely heavily on automation, with electronic equipment 
and computer networks as their primary components. As these 
systems grow, their complexity and code size has created a 
larger attack surface that can be exploited by adversaries. The 
committee notes the Army is addressing these issues in part by 
demonstrating commercial software elements necessary to secure 
defense systems.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $5.0 
million in RDA for PE 62150A for development of secure 
computing and active cybersecurity capabilities.

Military footwear research

    The budget request included $11.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 62184A 
Soldier Applied Research.
    The committee is aware of the work being done by the Army 
Combat Capabilities Development Command Soldier Center in 
improving the protection, survivability, mobility, and combat 
effectiveness of military footwear. The committee is also aware 
of the current investment in new performance standards that 
will allow the industrial base to incorporate new materials and 
advanced manufacturing processes in the development and 
production of military footwear.
    Therefore, in order to ensure that the domestic military 
footwear industrial base can leverage new materials and 
innovation, the committee recommends an additional $2.5 million 
in RDA for PE 62184A to support additional investment in 
military footwear research.

Pathfinder air assault technologies

    The budget request included $11.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 62184A 
Soldier Applied Research.
    The committee notes the efforts of Army Futures Command to 
engage university researchers with soldiers to more efficiently 
transition research innovations into operational use.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $5.0 
million in RDA for PE 62184A to support Army-university 
research partnerships exploring next generation air assault 
technologies.

Additive manufacturing capabilities for austere operating environments

    The budget request included $23.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 63119A 
Ground Advanced Technology.
    The committee notes that the Army needs a capability to 
build crossings and repair infrastructure and roads using 
native materials in the theater of operations. This reduces 
logistical burdens and lightens the operational load of 
maneuver units. Additive manufacturing and autonomous 
construction technologies show promise in automating 
contingency construction activities for the Army and reducing 
the risk to soldiers.
    The committee recommends an additional $15.0 million in RDA 
for PE 63119A to continue studies and development of Army 
additive manufacturing capabilities for austere operating 
environments.

Permafrost research

    The budget request included $23.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 63119A for 
Ground Advanced Technology.
    The committee notes the value of research to test the 
mechanical properties of ice-rich soils to better understand 
the performance of materials, devices, systems, and 
infrastructure in cold weather and arctic conditions.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $3.0 
million in RDA for PE 63119A for permafrost research activities 
and to modernize permafrost research facilities.

High Performance Computing Modernization Program

    The budget request included $189.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 63461A 
High Performance Computing Modernization Program.
    The High Performance Computing Modernization Program 
provides high performance computing and advanced networking 
capabilities for research engineering needs of the Department 
of Defense. The program administers supercomputing centers run 
by the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Army Corps of Engineers in 
support of science and technology, test, and evaluation, and 
acquisition engineering activities, as well as other Government 
agencies and private sector users.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $5.0 
million in RDA for PE 63461A for the High Performance Computing 
Modernization Program.

Combat vehicle lithium battery development

    The budget request included $165.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 63462A for 
Next Generation Combat Vehicle Advanced Technology.
    The committee notes that meeting the Army's ground vehicle 
systems power goals requires investment in efficient 
manufacturing practices that are dual-use, automated, and 
flexible. The committee notes that next generation lithium 
battery technology can support improvements in the safety, fuel 
efficiency, systems reliability, lethality, and silent watch 
capability of ground vehicles.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $1.5 
million in RDA for PE 63462A for combat vehicle lithium battery 
development.

Cyber and connected vehicle integration research

    The budget request included $165.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 63462A 
Next Generation Combat Vehicle Advanced Technology.
    The committee notes the increasing threats to military 
cyber-physical systems, including combat vehicles.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $3.5 
million in RDA for PE 63462A to fund integrated academic, 
commercial, and Government research and testing activities to 
evaluate and secure vehicle systems.

Robotics development

    The budget request included $165.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 63462A 
Next Generation Combat Vehicle Advanced Technology.
    The committee notes that the Army is developing 
technologies for small unit ground robotic capabilities to 
support future Army missions.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $5.0 
million in RDA for PE 63462A to support these efforts and to 
better integrate robotics technology development with tactical-
level maneuver units and the appropriate training commands.

Command post modernization

    The budget request included $155.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 63463A 
Network C3I Advanced Technology.
    The committee notes that the modernization of command post 
systems and technologies is a priority of the Army.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $2.0 
million in RDA for PE 63463A for the development of advanced 
materials and technologies for next generation command post 
systems to enable more mobile and survivable forward deployed 
units.

Network technology research

    The budget request included $155.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 63463A 
Network C3I Advanced Technology.
    The committee is concerned about duplication among the 
services in efforts to develop battlefield networks, with 
limited coordination among organizations with respect to 
interoperability, technical standards, or considerations of the 
joint operating environment.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $15.0 
million in RDA for PE 63463A and directs the Undersecretary of 
Defense for Research and Engineering to improve the 
coordination and reduce the duplication between service and 
agency network research and development programs.

Advanced guidance technology

    The budget request included $93.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA), for PE 63464A 
Long Range Precision Fires Advanced Technology.
    The committee notes that current cannon artillery is 
limited in range and capability in contested environments.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $5.0 
million in RDA for PE 63464A to accelerate development and 
testing of advanced guidance technology for the Hypervelocity 
Projectile-Extended Range program.

Future Long Range Assault Aircraft

    The budget request included $179.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 63465A 
Future Vertical Lift Advanced Technology.
    As one of the Army's six modernization priorities, the 
Future Vertical Lift program is essentialto support future Army 
operations. The committee notes that the Future Long Range 
Assault Aircraft (FLRAA) is developing the next generation of 
affordable vertical lift tactical assault and utility aircraft 
for the Army.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $3.5 
million in RDA for PE 63465A to support FLRAA program risk 
reduction.

Future vertical lift 20mm chain gun

    The budget request included $179.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA), for PE 63465A 
for Future Vertical Lift Advanced Technology.
    The committee notes that future vertical lift is one of 
Army Future Command's six major modernization priorities.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $5.0 
million in RDA for PE 63465A to support development and 
demonstration of a 20mm medium caliber armament system for the 
Future Armed Reconnaissance Aircraft platform.

Army unfunded requirements

    In accordance with section 222a of title 10, United States 
Code, the Chief of Staff of the Army submitted a list of 
unfunded requirements. The committee recommends an additional 
increase of about $71.5 million for items on these unfunded 
requirements lists.

Development of anthropomorphic armor for female servicemembers

    The budget request included $17.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 63827A 
Soldier Systems--Advanced Development.
    The committee notes that ill-fitting personal protective 
equipment is a leading cause of injury among female 
servicemembers, which anthropomorphic design and prototyping of 
such equipment can help address.
    The committee recommends an increase of $2.9 million in RDA 
for PE 63827A Soldier Systems--Advanced Development, Project 
VS-4--Soldier Protective Equipment, for anthropomorphic body 
armor development and prototyping for female servicemembers.

Synthetic Training Environment

    The budget request included $194.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 64121A 
Synthetic Training Environment Refinement and Prototyping.
    The committee recommends an additional $4.6 million in RDA 
for PE 64121A for Multi-Sensor Terrain Data Capture and 
Processing for Synthetic Training Environment to use a 
commercial, off-the-shelf software system that can integrate 
the needed data from multiple sensor types (video, imagery, 
light detection and ranging) and process into high-resolution 
georeferenced three dimensional terrain models.

Electric Light Reconnaissance Vehicle

    The budget request included $2.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 64642A, 
Light Tactical Wheeled Vehicles.
    The Electric Light Reconnaissance Vehicle (eLRV) program 
effectively generates, stores, and distributes power, providing 
enhanced tactical and operational capabilities to the maneuver 
reconnaissance formation while reducing reliance on fossil 
fuels. The committee notes that the Chief of Staff of the Army 
submitted an unfunded requirement to allow for the purchase of 
prototypes to inform electrification performance parameters and 
accelerate fielding the eLRV capability.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an addition of $5.6 
million in RDA for PE 64642A for the eLRV program.

Active Protection Systems for Bradley and Stryker

    The budget request included $106.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 64852A 
Suite of Survivability Enhancement Systems--EMD.
    The committee supports an unfunded requirement that would 
continue to advance ongoing efforts to develop active 
protection systems (APS) for Bradley and Stryker vehicles.
    The committee recommends an additional $21.0 million in RDA 
for PE 64852A Suite of Survivability Enhancement Systems--EMD, 
in project FE8 Vehicle Protection Suite, for further 
development, characterization, and urgent material release of 
hard-kill APS solutions for Bradley and Stryker combat 
vehicles.

Cyber situational understanding

    The budget request included $18.9 million in line number 
131 of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA), 
for PE65041 for Defensive Cyber Tool Development.
    The committee recommends a decrease of $5.0 million in RDA 
for cyber situational understanding.
    In the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283), 
the committee expressed concern that the Army decided to 
develop a new system for tactical-level cyber situational 
understanding (CSU) instead of adapting the existing baseline 
capability for the Joint Cyber Command and Control (JCC2) 
program. That baseline is formulated on the technology 
developed over many years by the Defense Advanced Research 
Projects Agency under the PlanX program, and further 
enhancements funded by the Strategic Capabilities Office under 
the IKE program. The committee notes that using a common JCC2-
based system would provide interoperability and training 
benefits. The committee directed the Army to conduct an 
independent evaluation of the JCC2 program's ability to meet 
the Army's CSU requirements. That evaluation indicated that it 
would have been less costly to adapt JCC2 for the CSU 
capability, but the Army asserts that, due to the sunk costs 
already incurred on CSU, the cost to complete using the JCC2 
baseline would be more expensive. The committee notes, however, 
that the Army included a large amount of money in its estimate 
for adapting JCC2 for engineering that significantly exceeds 
what it expects to spend on the current path. The committee 
directs the Army to develop a detailed breakdown of costs to 
adapt JCC2 for Army CSU requirements, as well as to meet the 
cyber command and control requirements for the Multi-Domain 
Task Forces prior to obligation of fiscal year 2022 funding for 
CSU.

Contract writing systems reduction

    The budget request included $23.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 65047A 
Contract Writing System.
    The committee continues to be concerned about the 
multiplicity of contract writing systems that are being 
developed by the military services, without a clear plan for 
standards or data interoperability and sharing requirements 
that will drive better data analysis in the Department of 
Defense. The committee is also concerned that there is no clear 
plan for these systems to provide data to the Advana data 
analytics platform being developed by the Chief Data Officer 
and Undersecretary of Defense (Comptroller).
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $10.0 
million in RDA, for PE 65047A.

CH-47 Chinook Cargo On/Off Loading System

    The budget request included $52.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 67137A 
Chinook Product Improvement Program.
    The committee notes that integration of advanced ballistic 
protection system technologies with a standardized 
configuration cargo loading system provides a low cost weight 
reduction opportunity.
    The committee recommends an additional $8.0 million in RDA 
PE 67137A Chinook Product Improvement Program for development 
of the Chinook cargo on/off load system.

Chinook T55-714C engine certification and integration

    The budget request included $52.4 million in line 195 of 
Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA), for PE 
67137A Chinook Product Improvement Program.
    The committee recommends an increase of $10.0 million to 
support the qualification planning, certification, and initial 
integration of the enhanced CH-47 Chinook T55 engine.

Apache Future Development

    The budget request included $10.1 million in line number 
199 of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA), 
for PE 67145A Apache Future Development.
    The committee recommends an increase of $15.0 million in 
RDA for PE 67145A Apache Future Development to support 
necessary engineering analysis to accelerate future 
development.

Abrams tank modernization

    The budget request included $211.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) for PE 23735A 
Combat Vehicle Improvement Programs (CVIP).
    The committee notes the CVIP request includes $50.3 million 
in Project 330, Abrams Tank Improvement Program (ATIP), 
primarily focused on improving lethality of the M1A2 SEP 
Version 4 Abrams tank. However, there is not funding for the 
development of additional advanced technologies to 
significantly reduce weight and increase mobility, 
survivability and sustainability, and further improve 
lethality.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $64.1 
million in RDA for PE 23735A CVIP, Project 330, ATIP, toward 
the development of improvements, including an unmanned turret, 
autoloader, ammunition handling system, hydro-pneumatic 
suspension, integrated active protection, and hybrid electric 
drive.

Identity, credentialing and access management reduction--Army

    The budget request included $15.7 million in line number 
220 of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army (RDA) 
for PE 33140A Information Systems Security Program.
    The committee is concerned about the lack of integrated 
efforts to establish a common enterprise identity, 
credentialing and access management (ICAM) solution across the 
Department of Defense and encourages the Army to work with the 
Defense Information Systems Agency in migrating its ICAM 
approach to an enterprise solution. Therefore, the committee 
recommends a decrease of $5.0 million in RDA for this program.

                                  Navy


High-performance computation and data equipment

    The budget request included $117.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy (RDN) for PE 61103N 
University Research Initiatives.
    The committee notes that high-performance computing is a 
strategic resource for economic competitiveness, scientific and 
information technology leadership, and national security. Large 
investments are being made globally into high-performance 
computation resources to leverage innovations in artificial 
intelligence, machine learning, and large computer models to 
revolutionize nearly every area of science and engineering.
    To support university research capabilities in national 
security areas, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDN for PE 61103N for academic high-performance 
computation and data equipment capabilities.

University research programs

    The budget request included $117.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy (RDN) for PE 61103N 
Defense Research Sciences.
    The committee recognizes it is crucial to adequately fund, 
resource, and structure the Department of Defense to conduct 
research, development, and testing activities for critical 
emerging technologies to stay ahead of our adversaries, most 
notably Russia and China. Resources must be devoted and 
responsibly spent toward research and development in critical 
sectors, including artificial intelligence, quantum computing, 
hypersonics, directed energy, biotechnology, autonomy, cyber, 
space, 5G, microelectronics, and fully networked command, 
control, and communications technologies. The committee is 
concerned that the balance of science and technology research 
in the Navy is trending away from basic research and focusing 
on more near-term applied research.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $30.0 
million in RDN for PE 61103N to increase emphasis on the basic 
research activities performed by the Navy to steer the 
innovation of the Department for the future.

Graphene electro-active metamaterials

    The budget request included $23.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy (RDN) for PE 62114N 
Power Projection Applied Research.
    The committee notes that graphene-based electro-active 
metamaterials' properties can be tuned in a broad range of 
frequencies to meet specified performance requirements, 
including to act as radar absorbing materials for defense 
systems and platforms.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $3.0 
million in RDN for PE 62114N for research on graphene electro-
active metamaterials.

Relative positioning of autonomous platforms

    The budget request included $122.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy (RDN) for PE 62123N 
Force Protection Applied Research.
    The committee notes that the Navy is developing unmanned 
surface vehicles which can be supported by autonomous unmanned 
aerial vehicles to provide long-range and long-endurance 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance and strike 
capabilities. The committee notes that communication and 
maneuvering between unmanned systems, as well as docking of 
manned and unmanned vessels, is a complex problem that involves 
understanding the relative motion and positioning of each 
vehicle.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDN for PE 62123N to develop technologies to improve 
control of the relative positioning of autonomous platforms.

Resilient innovative sustainable economies via university partnerships

    The budget request included $122.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy (RDN) for PE 62123N 
Force Protection Applied Research.
    The committee recognizes the challenges facing isolated 
States, which limits their ability to develop research, 
innovation, and technology bases to support national security 
missions. The committee notes that academic research has led to 
technological innovations that have contributed significantly 
to national security and economic growth. The committee 
believes that leveraging universities to increase industrial 
diversification will support development of necessary economic 
infrastructure and potentially lead to useful defense 
technology and industrial capability.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million in RDN for PE 62123N to support efforts to work with 
universities on research, technology development, and 
industrial expansion efforts, consistent with Navy 
modernization priorities.

Anti-corrosion nanotechnologies

    The budget request included $70.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy (RDN) for PE 62236N 
Warfighter Sustainment Applied Research.
    The committee notes that the cost of corrosion on military 
equipment and infrastructure is a universal problem that is 
acute in the Asia-Pacific region.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $3.0 
million in RDN for PE 62236N to accelerate technology 
demonstration and show the feasibility of realizing operational 
and cost benefits of employing usable nanotechnology surface 
enhancements on military hardware and infrastructure.

Humanoid robotics research

    The budget request included $70.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy (RDN) for PE 62236N 
Warfighter Sustainment Applied Research.
    The committee recognizes the promise of autonomous legged 
robotics for both dangerous and repetitive jobs on ships. In 
particular, the Navy has identified shipboard disinfection and 
a number of shipboard maintenance tasks as ideal candidates for 
integrating the use of legged robots.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.5 
million in RDN for PE 62236N for research on the use of 
humanoid robotics in unstructured environments.

Undersea vehicle research academic partnerships

    The budget request included $57.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy (RDN) for PE 62747N 
Undersea Warfare Applied Research.
    The committee notes the value of establishing strong 
research and technology development partnerships between 
academic institutions, industry, and the Department of Defense 
to promote innovation in critical defense sectors.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $12.0 
million in RDN for PE 62747N to support the expansion of 
academic partnerships to support undersea vehicle research 
activities. The committee supports these activities, including 
a variety of research efforts ranging from fundamental research 
to prototyping of novel undersea vehicle components and 
systems.

Undersea warfare applied research

    The budget request included $57.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy (RDN) for PE 62747N 
Undersea Warfare Applied Research.
    The committee notes the importance of undersea warfare in 
the National Defense Strategy and the efforts of peer 
competitors to undercut the United States' current 
technological advantage in the undersea domain.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in RDN for PE 62747N to support additional research to 
modernize undersea warfare capabilities.

Navy and Marine Corps unfunded requirements

    In accordance with section 222a of title 10, United States 
Code, the Chief of Naval Operations and the Commandant of the 
Marine Corps each submitted a list of unfunded requirements. 
The committee recommends an additional increase of about $1.01 
billion for items on these unfunded requirements lists.

Unmanned systems interoperability

    The budget request included $224.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy (RDN) for PE 63640M 
U.S. Marine Corps Advanced Technology Demonstration.
    The committee notes that the Department of Defense 
``Unmanned Systems Integrated Roadmap for 2017-2042'' made a 
number of recommendations for accelerating unmanned systems 
capabilities by increasing interoperability and human-machine 
collaboration.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an additional $5.0 
million in RDN for PE 63640M to support efforts to enhance 
unmanned systems interoperability and systems for providing 
relevant data required for mission planning, mission rehearsal, 
post mission assessment, and simulation.

Naval prototypes

    The budget request included $133.8 million in Research, 
Development, Testing, and Evaluation, Navy (RDN) for PE 63801N 
Innovative Naval Prototypes Advanced Technology Development.
    The committee is concerned about reductions to traditional 
Navy basic research capabilities, the lack of investments in 
Navy lab and warfare infrastructure, and the lack of 
coordination between the growing number of prototyping 
activities across the Department of Defense.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $20.0 
million in RDN for PE 63801N to reduce funding for prototyping 
projects with limited transition possibilities to Navy programs 
of record.

Manned-Unmanned Experimentation

    The budget request included $16.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy (RDN), for PE 63128N 
Unmanned Aerial Systems.
    The committee supports the Marine Corps' efforts to develop 
medium-altitude, long-endurance (MALE) manned-unmanned 
experimentation (MUX) aircraft to begin operating in U.S. Indo-
Pacific Command by fiscal year 2023. The committee further 
supports the development of a runway-independent capability for 
MALE-MUX aircraft as a follow-on capability to support 
Expeditionary Advanced Base Operations.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $25.0 
million in RDN for PE 63128N Unmanned Aerial Systems for the 
development, procurement, and testing of runway-independent 
MALE-MUX prototypes.

Stratospheric balloon research

    The budget request included $46.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy (RDN) for PE 64378N 
Naval Integrated Fire Control--Counter Air Systems Engineering.
    The committee recognizes the increasing importance of 
stratospheric balloons in command, control, communications, 
computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance and 
missile defense missions. The committee is concerned that, as 
projects move from the Office of Secretary of Defense's Missile 
Defeat Project to elsewhere in the Department, transition of 
prior research will be insufficient. Specifically, the 
committee is concerned that stratospheric balloon research 
activities conducted by the Department still require testing 
and evaluation activities before systems can transition to the 
military services as a program of record.
    Therefore, to support efforts to transition this 
technology, the committee recommends an increase of $13.0 
million in RDN for PE 64378N for stratospheric balloon 
research.

Advanced Sensors Application Program

    The budget request included no funding in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy (RDN) for PE 64419N 
Advanced Sensors Application Program.
    The committee objects to the abrupt termination of this 
program that has longstanding congressional sponsorship and 
support.
    The committee recommends an increase of $15.0 million in 
RDN for PE 64419N in support of this program.

Contract writing systems reduction

    The budget request included $243.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy (RDN), for PE 65013N 
Information Technology Development.
    The committee continues to be concerned about the 
multiplicity of contract writing systems that are being 
developed by the military services, without a clear plan for 
standards or data interoperability and sharing requirements 
that will drive better data analysis in the Department of 
Defense. The committee is also concerned that there is no clear 
plan for these systems to provide data to the Advana data 
analytics platform being developed by the Chief Data Officer 
and Undersecretary of Defense (Comptroller).
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $10.0 
million in RDN, for PE 65013N.

Strategic Weapon System Shipboard Navigation System Modernization

    The budget request included $177.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy (RDN), for PE 11221N 
Strategic Sub & Weapons System Support.
    The committee notes the importance of completing the 
Velocity Fusion Development, accelerating gravimeter algorithm 
development and integration, initiating Fleet Transition, 
initiating Hydrophone Array Modernization, and establishing a 
Dynamic Concept of Operations framework within the Strategic 
Weapons System Shipboard Navigation Modernization program.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $8.0 
million in RDN, for PE 11221N for the Strategic Weapons System 
Shipboard Navigation Modernization program.

Neural network algorithms on advanced processors

    The budget request included $189.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy (RDN) for PE 24136N F/
A-18 Squadrons.
    The committee supports the incorporation of artificial 
intelligence (AI) to ensure continued relevancy of legacy 
platforms.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDN for PE 24136N for AI algorithms hosted on new 
hardware and to validate the suitability for warfighter 
application.

                               Air Force


University research programs

    The budget request included $162.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
61103F University Research Initiatives.
    The committee recognizes it is crucial to adequately fund, 
resource, and structure the Department of Defense to conduct 
research, development, and testing activities for critical 
emerging technologies to stay ahead of United States 
adversaries, most notably Russia and China. Resources must be 
devoted and responsibly spent toward research and development 
in critical sectors including artificial intelligence, quantum 
computing, hypersonics, directed energy, biotechnology, 
autonomy, cyber, space, 5G, microelectronics, and fully 
networked command, control, and communications technologies.
    The committee is concerned that the balance of science and 
technology research in the Air Force is trending away from 
basic research and focusing on more near-term applied research.
    As such, the committee recommends an increase of $30.0 
million in RDAF for PE 61103F to increase emphasis on the basic 
research activities performed by the Air Force to help set the 
course of innovation of the Department for the future.

Continuous composites 3D printing

    The budget request included $113.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
62102F Materials.
    The committee notes that the development of state-of-the-
art composite additive manufacturing processes may enable major 
cost reductions and increase the speed of delivery of new 
systems into operational use.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $7.0 
million in RDAF for PE 62102F for the development of additive 
manufactured composites to advance hypersonics, space, and next 
generation air, launch, and ground vehicles in support of the 
National Defense Strategy.

High energy synchrotron X-ray research

    The budget request included $113.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
62102F Materials.
    The committee notes the value of research using high-energy 
X-ray beamlines to support Air Force modernization needs. This 
research enhances understanding of high performance materials 
for tactical aircraft, metal fatigue processes, and materials 
produced using additive manufacturing technologies, and 
supports technical workforce development.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDAF for PE 62102F for high energy synchrotron X-ray 
research.

Ground test and development of hypersonic engines

    The budget request included $163.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
62201F Aerospace Vehicle Technologies.
    The committee notes the key role of hypersonics 
technologies in the Department of Defense's modernization 
strategy and future force posture. The committee notes that a 
barrier to the development and deployment of new hypersonic 
engine technologies is the lack of engine test equipment and 
infrastructure.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDAF for PE 62201F for investments in modern ground 
test activities for hypersonic engines.

Hypersonic flight test services

    The budget request included $163.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
62201F Aerospace Vehicle Technologies.
    The committee supports the Air Force's efforts to design 
and perform risk reduction demonstration testing in the 
hypersonic environment while leveraging commercial hypersonic 
flight test assets.
    To accomplish this goal, the committee recommends an 
increase of $5.0 million in RDAF for PE 62201F to support risk 
reduction and technology maturation through the demonstration 
of commercial hypersonic flight technologies to support the 
advancement of reusable hypersonic systems.

Low-cost small turbine engine research

    The budget request included $174.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
62203F Aerospace Propulsion.
    The committee notes that the need for low-cost small 
turbine engines is steadily increasing for use in cruise 
missiles and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). Addressing both 
emerging threats and near-peer competitors will likely dictate 
the use of tactics, like swarming and mass attacks, to confuse 
and overwhelm the defenses of potential adversaries. 
Unfortunately, due to a lack of investment and a limited 
industrial base, small engine technology and affordability have 
evolved only minimally over the past three decades.
    To increase the capabilities of small turbine engines, the 
committee recommends an increase of $7.0 million in RDAF for PE 
62203F for low-cost small turbine engine research to support 
flight test readiness activities, including airframe and engine 
integration testing.

Skyborg

    The budget request included $131.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
63032F Future AF Integrated Technology Demos.
    The committee supports the Air Force's Skyborg program but 
remains concerned regarding the rest of the Vanguard programs. 
Specifically, the committee recommends that the Air Force 
procure 12 more Valkyrie aircraft and encourages the Air Force 
to complete the transition to the Advanced Aircraft Capability 
Development activity.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $75.0 
million in RDAF for PE 63032F Future AF Integrated Technology 
Demos.

Air Force integrated technology demonstrations

    The budget request include $131.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
63032F Future Air Force Integrated Technology Demonstrations.
    The committee is concerned about the shift in emphasis of 
Department of Air Force research activities from support of 
early stage research that explores the frontiers of scientific 
knowledge to create next generation capabilities, to a more 
near-term focus that heavily emphasizes near-term delivery of 
mature systems. This approach may lead to a hollowing of the 
base of technological achievement that the Air Force has funded 
and developed in universities, industry, and the Air Force 
Research Laboratory that has resulted in the dominant air and 
space capabilities that are a critical element of the U.S. 
national security posture. In particular, the committee is 
concerned that increased funding for Air Force Vanguard 
programs are reducing resources available for more early stage 
and cross-cutting research efforts. Further, the committee 
notes that the Vanguard programs are not well coordinated with 
programs of other services and Defense Agencies to reduce 
duplication and leverage technological advances.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a reduction of $77.9 
million in RDAF for PE 63032F, of which $47.9 million is for a 
reduction in rocket cargo efforts, and recommends that the Air 
Force review its science and technology portfolio to ensure 
adequate balance between near and long term efforts.

Unmanned Adversary Air

    The budget request included $131.6 million in line number 
17 of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force 
(RDAF), for PE 63032F Future AF Integrated Technology Demos.
    The committee recognizes the importance of cost-effective 
adversary training and supports the Air Force's efforts on 
unmanned adversary air platforms to prototype and test the use 
of unmanned, low-cost, fighter-representative aircraft.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $125.0 
million in RDAF for PE 63032F to purchase low-cost unmanned 
aircraft and to begin testing and integration into the 
adversary air ecosystem.

B-52 engine pylon fairings increase

    The budget request included $70.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
63211F Aerospace Technology Dev/Demo.
    The committee notes that, where each of the eight engines 
of a B-52 attach to the wing of the aircraft, there is a strong 
aerodynamic shock that results in increased drag. Placement of 
a fairing to smooth airflow at this juncture can reduce drag. 
Specifically, initial computational fluid dynamics models 
estimate a 2.5 percent fuel efficiency savings for B-52 engine 
pylon fairings. Due to the simplicity of the fairings' design 
and low cost, return on investment is less than 18 months. The 
committee continues to support the Air Force's sound 
investments in operational energy improvements and views the 
cost and fuel saving benefits to warfighters as innovative 
solutions to meeting the demands of the National Defense 
Strategy.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million in RDAF for PE 63211F for B-52 engine pylon fairings.

Hypersonics materials manufacturing

    The budget request include $45.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
63680F Manufacturing Technology Program.
    The committee notes the need to improve advanced materials 
capabilities given the strength, weight, and heat resistance 
requirements of hypersonic missiles and vehicles. Development 
programs for hypersonic weapons and vehicles have a number of 
material and manufacturing challenges, including the need to 
produce large numbers of high-quality composite parts, improve 
the machining of aerospace parts, and improve the strength of 
materials made using additive manufacturing techniques.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million in RDAF for PE 63680F for hypersonic weapon and vehicle 
material manufacturing.

Sustainment and modernization research and development program

    The budget request included $45.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
63680F Manufacturing Technology Program.
    The committee notes that the Air Force logistics enterprise 
may be able to lower life cycle costs through software 
development processes and the application of data analytics and 
artificial intelligence to Air Force business operations; 
development of novel additive and advanced manufacturing 
processes; and development and deployment of advanced materials 
and high-performance coatings. Air Force sustainment missions 
will also be enhanced by providing innovative research-based 
education and workforce development programs targeting 
challenge areas, particularly in the Air Force organic 
industrial base.
    Therefore, to support these activities, the committee 
recommends an additional $7.0 million in RDAF, for PE 63680F 
for sustainment research and development.

Advanced engine development

    The budget request included $123.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
64004F Advanced Engine Development.
    The committee supports the Air Force's request to continue 
development of the advanced engine and acceleration of the 
prototype and testing.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $30.0 
million in RDAF for PE 64004F Advanced Engine Development.

Tactical Datalink Waveform

    The budget request included $82.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
64006F, Department of the Air Force Technical Architecture 
Design, Integration, and Evaluation.
    The committee supports the Air Force's efforts to quickly 
integrate and field resilient tactical datalink capability 
across the joint force utilizing existing radios and leveraging 
cryptographic modernization hardware to accelerate fielding. 
The ability to connect sensors, shooters, and weapons across 
multiple domains is a prerequisite to realizing the vision of 
Joint All-Domain Command and Control.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $80.0 
million in RDAF for PE 64006F to accelerate the Air Force's 
efforts to integrate and field resilient datalink capability.

Automatic target recognition

    The budget request included $23.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
64257F Advanced Technology and Sensors.
    The committee supports the Air Force's acceleration of 
automatic target recognition across multiple modalities as an 
enabler for Joint All Domain Command and Control.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDAF for PE 64257F Advanced Technology and Sensors.

Academic technology transfer partnerships

    The budget request included $15.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
64317F Technology Transfer.
    The committee notes that this program captures and manages 
intellectual property (IP) (e.g. patents and inventions) 
developed by the Air Force and leads efforts to transfer IP to 
the commercial sector to support transitioning technology to 
the warfighter.
    The committee recommends an increase of $7.5 million in 
RDAF for PE 64317F to expand academic partnerships to support 
Air Force technology transfer activities.

Air Force operational energy increases

    The budget request included $343.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
64858F Tech Transition Program.
    The committee notes that high fidelity computational fluid 
dynamics modeling and data analysis show an expected 5 percent 
efficiency increase when using KC-135 active winglets, which 
would equate to roughly $30.0 million per year in fuel savings 
based on the same amount of flying hours. Additionally, the 
shape of turbine engine compressor blades degrade over time, 
resulting in a fuel inefficiency. Improved compressor blade 
technology, commonly used by commercial airlines and optimized 
for an ideal balance of durability and fuel efficiency, allows 
compressor blades to maintain their optimal shape for a longer 
period of time. Engines with coated compressor blades can 
achieve roughly 2 percent fuel efficiency and yield observable 
net savings within 2 years. Cargo, tanker, and non-stealth 
bomber aircraft account for roughly 60 percent of the Air 
Force's total jet fuel consumption at about 1.2 billion gallons 
per year. Blended wing body (BWB) airframes for these aircraft 
from tube and wing BWB could yield a 30 percent increase in 
range and payload capabilities. This would equate to annual 
fuels savings of $900.0 million per year at current fuel 
prices. Lastly, building off work done with KC-135s, a new 
advanced winglet for the C-17 fleet could conservatively result 
in a 2.5 percent efficiency over the current first generation 
winglet. This would result in $25.0 million per year in fuel 
savings with the same annual flying hours. The committee 
continues to support the Air Force's sound investments in 
operational energy improvements and views the cost and fuel 
saving benefits to warfighters as innovative solutions to 
meeting the demands of the National Defense Strategy.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends the following 
increases: $10.0 million for KC-135 winglets, $2.0 million for 
engine compressor blade coatings, $15.0 million for BWB 
prototype phase 1, and $5.0 million for C-17 active winglets 
phase 1 in RDAF for PE 64858F Tech Transition Program.

Cold spray technologies

    The budget request included $343.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
64858F Tech Transition Program.
    The committee notes that a January 30, 2020, Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) report, titled ``Military Depots: 
DOD Can Benefit from Further Sharing of Best Practices and 
Lessons Learned'' (GAO-20-116), cited the potential benefits of 
the application of cold spray manufacturing technologies in 
sustainment activities across the Department of Defense.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDAF for PE 64858F Tech Transition Program.

Coordination with private sector to protect against foreign malicious 
        cyber actors

    The budget request included $242.5 million in line number 
62 of Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Air Force 
(RDAF), for PE 36250F Cyber Operations Technology Support. 
Elsewhere in this Act, the committee recommends a provision 
that would require the Commander, U.S. Cyber Command, to 
establish a voluntary process for engaging with commercial 
information technology and cybersecurity companies to explore 
and develop methods of assistance or coordination to protect 
against foreign malicious cyber actors.
    The committee recommends an increase of $15.0 million in 
RDAF PE 36250F to support this initiative.

Contract writing systems reduction

    The budget request included $20.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
91410F Contracting Information Technology System.
    The committee continues to be concerned about the 
multiplicity of contract writing systems that are being 
developed by the military services, without a clear plan for 
standards or data interoperability and sharing requirements 
that will drive better data analysis in the Department of 
Defense. The committee is also concerned that there is no clear 
plan for these systems to provide data to the Advana data 
analytics platform being developed by the Chief Data Officer 
and Undersecretary of Defense (Comptroller).
    The committee recommends a decrease of $10.0 million in 
RDAF for PE 91410F.

Air Force combat training ranges

    The budget request included $24.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
64735F Combat Training Ranges.
    The committee supports the Air Force's efforts to modernize 
the combat training ranges to a level 3 or level 4 threat 
representation.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $7.2 
million in RDAF for PE 64735F Combat Training Ranges.

Degraded GPS live flight training

    The budget request included $24.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
64735F Combat Training Ranges.
    The committee supports the Air Force's efforts to modernize 
the combat training ranges and support training for GPS denied 
and degraded operations.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDAF for PE 64735F Combat Training Ranges.

Gulf test range enhancements

    The budget request included $24.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
64735F Combat Training Ranges.
    The committee supports the Air Force's efforts to modernize 
the Gulf Test Range and ensure it is capable of supporting the 
full spectrum of development testing required for fifth and 
sixth generation weapon technology-based systems, including 
testing of hypersonic and autonomous systems, which are 
identified as critically important to current defense strategy.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDAF for PE 64735F Combat Training Ranges.

Future tanker reduction

    The budget request included $73.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
41221F KC-46A Tanker Squadrons.
    The committee is concerned that the Air Force's request 
looks to begin development of a tanker replacement prior to the 
KC-46 being fully operational.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $6.0 
million in RDAF for PE 41221F KC-46A Tanker Squadrons.

U.S. Strategic Command Nuclear Command, Control and Communication 
        Enterprise Center

    The budget request included $25.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF), for PE 
33255F for Command, Control, Communication, and Computers 
(C4)--STRATCOM.
    The committee notes the importance of developing new 
architectures and processes for a next generation Nuclear 
Command, Control and Communications system and the importance 
of the Rapid Engineering Architecture Collaboration Hub in 
achieving these goals.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDAF for PE 33255F for the Rapid Engineering 
Architecture Collaboration Hub.

F-35 continuous capability development and delivery

    The budget request included $985.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
64840F F-35 C2D2 [continuous capability development and 
delivery].
    The committee supports the robust modernization program and 
investment in critical test assets and infrastructure to 
support the size and the scale of the F-35 fleet.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $20.0 
million in RDAF for PE 64840F F-35 C2D2.

Foreign material acquisition and exploitation

    The budget request included $71.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
65117F Foreign Material Acquisition and Exploitation.
    The committee recommends a decrease of $5.0 million in RDAF 
for PE 65117F Foreign Material Acquisition and Exploitation.

Over The Horizon Radar

    The budget request included $99.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
12412F North Warning System.
    The committee notes the importance of having a capability 
to detect approaches to North America from the Northeast, 
Northwest, and Western directions. This is also a U.S. Northern 
Command unfunded requirement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $25.1 
million in RDAF for PE 12412F for the development of the over 
the horizon radar capability.

Polar Over the Horizon Radar

    The budget request included $99.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
12412F North Warning System.
    The committee notes the importance of having a capability 
to detect approaches from the far North of over 70 degrees 
latitude for Russian long-range aviation.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDAF for PE 12412F for the development of the Polar 
Over The Horizon Radar capability for far North detection.

Additive manufacturing

    The budget request included $103.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
27268F Aircraft Engine Component Improvement Program.
    The committee supports the Air Force's effort to leverage 
additive manufacturing.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDAF for PE 27268F Aircraft Engine Component 
Improvement Program.

Identity, credentialing, and access management reduction--Air Force

    The budget request included $8.0 million in line 242 of 
Research, Development, Test, & Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF), 
for PE33140F Information Systems Security Program.
    The committee is concerned about the lack of integrated 
efforts to establish a common enterprise identity, 
credentialing and access management (ICAM) solution across the 
Department of Defense and encourages the Air Force to work with 
the Defense Information Systems Agency in migrating its ICAM 
approach to an enterprise solution.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $5.0 
million in RDAF for this program.

Weather forecasting using machine learning

    The budget request included $26.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
35111F Weather Service.
    The committee notes the importance of using machine 
learning for improved weather forecasting and that forecasting 
and related geospatial data will support the Department of 
Defense's ability to exploit timely, accurate, and relevant 
weather information anytime and everywhere on the globe.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $1.0 
million in RDDW for PE 35111F for machine learning applied to 
weather forecasting.

Battery cycle life improvements

    The budget request included $175.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Space Force (RDSF), for PE 
1206601SF Space Technology.
    The committee supports the Space Force's request to improve 
battery cycle life.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDSF, for PE 1206601SF Space Technology.

Radiation hardened microelectronics

    The budget request included $175.8 million in funding in 
Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Space Force (RDSF) 
for PE 1206601SF for Space Technology.
    The committee notes the importance of developing 
capabilities for hardened microelectronics to withstand the 
radiation of a space environment.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDSF for PE 1206601SF for the development of 
microelectronics to withstand radiation in space.

Air Force and Space Force unfunded requirements

    In accordance with section 222a of title 10, United States 
Code, the Chief of Staff of the Air Force and the Chief of 
Space Operations each submitted a list of unfunded 
requirements. The committee recommends an additional increase 
of about $728.0 million for items on these unfunded 
requirements lists.

Joint Space Rapid Experimentation and Demonstration

    The budget request included $76.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Space Force (RDSF), for PE 
1206616SF Space Advanced Technology Development and 
Demonstration.
    The committee notes the importance of accelerating 
technology demonstrations and rapid prototyping and leveraging 
non-traditional space industry partners in order to produce 
fully informed joint space requirements by U.S. Space Command. 
As a result, this is also a Space Command unfunded requirement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in RDSF, for PE 1206616SF Space Advanced Technology 
Development and Demonstration.

Maui Optical Site

    The budget request included $123.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Space Force (RDSF) for PE 
1206425SF Space Situation Awareness Systems.
    The committee notes the critical importance of deep space 
domain awareness performed at the Maui Optical Site. This is 
also a Space Force unfunded requirement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $7.0 
million in RDSF for PE 1206425SF Space Situation Awareness 
Systems that furthers the capability of the Maui optical 
telescope and supporting systems.

Tactically Responsive Launch

    The budget request included $17.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Space Force (RDSF) for PE 
1206860SF for Rocket Systems Launch Program (SPACE).
    The committee notes the importance of developing 
capabilities and concepts of operations based on those 
capabilities for the Tactically Responsive Launch.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million for RDSF PE 1206860SF for the development of 
technologies and concepts of operations based on the 
technologies for the Tactically Responsive Launch.

Digital core services for distributed space test and training

    The budget request included $18.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Space Force (RDSF) for PE 
1203174SF Space Innovation, Integration and Rapid Technology 
Development.
    The committee notes the critical importance of distributed 
space test and training range capability across various test 
beds. This is also a Space Force unfunded requirement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $20.0 
million in RDSF for PE 1203174SF for Digital Core Services that 
enable distributed, configurable enterprise test and training 
activities, and lowers operational risk and facilities 
integration of test services at the Nevada Test and Training 
Range.

Microelectronics research network

    The budget request included $193.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF) for PE 
62204F Aerospace Sensors.
    The committee recommends an increase of $250.0 million in 
RDAF for PE 62204F to support the establishment of the network 
for microelectronics research established under the Creating 
Helpful Incentives to Produce Semiconductors Act (CHIPS Act), 
Title XCIX, section 9903(b) of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public 
Law 116-283). The committee notes the need to create 
partnerships between academic researchers, industry, and users 
of advanced microelectronics to drive the development of new 
dual use microelectronics capabilities which will be produced 
domestically. This will reduce the Department of Defense's 
reliance on the failed trusted foundry models that have been 
unsuccessfully attempted in the past. The network will also be 
able to better reflect activities designed to reflect future 
requirements of the military services for microelectronics 
systems.

                              Defense Wide


Defense research sciences

    The budget request included $395.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
61101E Defense Research Sciences.
    The committee recommends an increase of $15.0 million in 
RDDW for PE 61101E for Defense Advanced Research Projects 
Agency-funded university research activities.

Defense Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research

    The budget request included $39.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
6110D8Z Basic Research Initiatives.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Defense 
Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research 
(DEPSCoR). The program helps increase the number of university 
researchers and improve the capabilities of institutions of 
higher education in eligible jurisdictions to perform 
competitive research relevant to the Department of Defense.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in RDDW for PE 6110D8Z for DEPSCoR.

Minerva management and social science research

    The budget request included $39.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
61110D8Z Basic Research Initiatives.
    The committee notes that the Minerva Research Initiative 
serves as the Department of Defense's signature management and 
social science basic research program that funds university-led 
teams to address problems of strategic importance to the 
Department of Defense. The National Academies of Sciences, 
Engineering, and Medicine concluded that Minerva's 
accomplishments have made important contributions to national 
security. Additionally, the National Academies stated that 
Minerva's research has yielded a wealth of knowledge to support 
activities under the National Defense Strategy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $22.5 
million in RDDW for PE 61110D8Z for the Minerva Research 
Initiative.

Traumatic brain injury research

    The budget request included $76.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
61117E Basic Operational Medical Research Science.
    The committee notes that numerous servicemembers have been 
diagnosed with traumatic brain injuries over the last 15 years. 
These injuries are associated with a variety of long-term 
effects, including cognitive impairment, psychiatric disorders, 
neurodegenerative diseases, and chronic traumatic 
encephalopathy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDDW for PE 61117E for traumatic brain injury 
research.

Workforce development for defense laboratories

    The budget request included $112.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
61120D8Z National Defense Education Program.
    The committee recognizes that a pipeline of highly educated 
and trained engineering students is needed to meet the current 
and future needs of the defense research laboratory workforce. 
As such, the committee expects that the creation of a robust 
workforce pipeline, with a focus on diverse students engaged in 
advanced technology development projects intended to support 
fielding of systems for the warfighter, would be beneficial to 
Department of Defense (DOD) modernization efforts. This may 
include placing selected students in DOD laboratories that 
align with their academic studies to participate in relevant 
research programs.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $1.5 
million in RDDW for PE 61120D8Z and encourages the Secretary of 
Defense to collect data to inform decisions on the value of 
expanding the program over time.

Quantum computing acceleration

    The budget request included $430.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
62303E for Information and Communications Technology.
    The committee heard testimony from non-government 
technology experts who believe that the field of quantum 
computing is mature enough to warrant increased investment with 
the goal of developing functional and useful computing systems 
based on quantum computing within the next 5 to 10 years.
    The committee supports this initiative and recommends an 
additional $100.0 million in RDDW for PE 62303E for 
acceleration of the deployment of large-scale quantum computing 
systems to help ensure the United States remains the world 
leader in quantum computing capabilities. The committee directs 
the Director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency 
to use this increased funding to make one or more large awards 
to entities who present credible plans for development of 
functioning large scale quantum computing systems. The 
committee directs the Director to ensure that systems developed 
under this effort are available for use for both military and 
commercial applications.

High speed flight experiment testing

    The budget request included $21.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
63180C Advanced Research.
    The committee notes the importance of developing the 
ability to test interceptors for the defeat of hypersonic 
missiles using a rocket-based experimental approach for flight 
experiments for key high-speed technologies.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million for RDDW for PE 63180C for high speed flight testing 
using a rocket-based experimental approach for flight 
experiments for key high-speed technologies.

Certification-based workforce training programs for manufacturing

    The budget request included $134.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
63680D8Z Defense-Wide Manufacturing Science and Technology 
Program.
    The committee notes that the National Science and 
Technology Council's ``Strategy for American Leadership in 
Advanced Manufacturing'' has a strategic objective to ``attract 
and grow tomorrow's manufacturing workforce.'' The committee 
notes that priorities for this objective are manufacturing-
focused foundational science, technology, engineering, and 
mathematics education; manufacturing engineering education; and 
industry and academia partnerships.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDDW for PE 63680D8Z to support partnerships between 
manufacturing innovation institutes, industry, academia, and 
government to establish certification-based workforce training 
programs for manufacturing.

Cybersecurity for industrial control systems

    The budget request included $134.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
63680D8Z Defense-Wide Manufacturing Science and Technology 
Program.
    The committee believes that it is important to study the 
cybersecurity vulnerabilities of industrial and facility-
related control systems, such as those used on military 
installations. It is also important to expand the scope of 
current academic efforts to work with leading Federal 
laboratories on cybersecurity training and advanced control 
system technology implementation, especially in the area of 
virtual reality-enabled experimentation.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDDW for PE 63680D8Z for cybersecurity of industrial 
control systems.

Data analytics and visual system

    The budget request included $134.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense Wide (RDDW) for PE 
63680D8Z Defense-Wide Manufacturing Science and Technology 
Program.
    The committee notes that the National Science and 
Technology Council's ``Strategy for American Leadership in 
Advanced Manufacturing'' has a strategic objective to ``capture 
the future of intelligent manufacturing systems.''
    To support this objective, the committee recommends an 
increase of $3.0 million in RDDW for PE 63680D8Z to support the 
development and deployment of data analytics and visual systems 
to support advanced manufacturing.

Integrated silicon-based lasers

    The budget request included $134.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
63680D8Z Defense-Wide Manufacturing Science and Technology 
Program.
    The committee notes the importance of quantum computing and 
advance electronics to defense modernization priorities and the 
role that silicon-based optoelectronics will play in modern 
defense systems. The committee supports efforts to mature 
integrated silicon-based lasers for use in national security 
critical applications.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.5 
million in RDDW for PE 63680D8Z for improving the manufacturing 
of high-performance, low-cost integrated silicon-based lasers.

High performance computing-enabled large-scale advanced manufacturing

    The budget request included $37.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense Wide (RDDW) for PE 
63680S Manufacturing Technology Program.
    The committee notes that rapid prototyping is important as 
a tool to both speed defense development and acquisition 
processes as well as a means to improve outcomes through 
continuous experimentation. The committee notes that advanced 
computational resources can be applied to improve the fidelity 
of early-stage designs while simultaneously taking advantage of 
advanced manufacturing processes to speed prototype development 
and testing.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an additional $4.0 
million in RDDW for PE 63680S to support the development of 
high performance computing-enabled large-scale advanced 
manufacturing.

Steel performance initiative

    The budget request included $37.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
63680S Manufacturing Technology Program.
    The committee notes that China is the world's largest 
national steel producer and user, while the United States ranks 
fourth, after China, India, and Japan. The committee notes that 
the failure to consistently invest in steel technology for 
advanced weapons systems threatens U.S. leadership in 
commercial steel technology and defense equipment performance.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDDW for PE 63680S to continue efforts to support 
steel research to increase domestic production capacity and 
increased domestic production capacity in steel.

Artificial intelligence research activities

    The budget request included $584.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
63766E Network-Centric Warfare Technology.
    The committee recommends an increase of $100.0 million in 
RDDW for PE 63766E to support further development of artificial 
intelligence capabilities to help maintain United States 
technological superiority over China.

Deep water active technologies

    The budget request included $584.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
63766E Network-Centric Warfare Technology.
    The committee notes that the Navy and the Defense Advanced 
Research Projects Agency are collaborating on the development 
of deployable active sonar nodes and advanced communications 
systems to improve operational situational awareness.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDDW, for PE 63766E to support transition of such 
technologies to the Navy.

Sensor technology

    The budget request included $294.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
63767E Sensor Technology.
    The committee recommends a decrease of $35.0 million in 
RDDW for PE 63767E to reduce new program starts.
    The committee directs the Director of the Defense Advanced 
Research Projects Agency to review these programs for technical 
merit, military value, coordination with other service and 
Defense Agency activities, and likelihood of transition into 
operational use or service acquisition programs.

Survivability Planning and Intercept Evaluation Tool

    The budget request included $277.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
63881C Ballistic Missile Defense Terminal Defense Segment.
    The committee notes the importance of developing, 
designing, and testing a new Survivability Planning and 
Intercept Evaluation Tool architecture that will deploy to the 
Missile Defense Agency's classified network virtual enclave to 
support missile defense analysis.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million for RDDW for PE 63881C for the Survivability Planning 
and Intercept Evaluation Tool.

Strategic capabilities research and prototyping

    The budget request included $716.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
64250D8Z Advanced Innovative Technologies.
    The committee notes that, at the direction of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-
92), the Secretary of Defense established cross functional 
teams to support the efforts of the Director of the Strategic 
Capabilities Office (SCO). These teams are focused on improving 
the technical review of SCO projects and supporting the 
transition of successful SCO projects into acquisition programs 
or operational use. The committee notes that the SCO is 
performing important research and prototyping activities, 
particularly in the development of joint capabilities and in 
supporting cybersecurity missions. The committee notes that a 
number of SCO projects still reflect a lack of technical rigor 
or clear transition pathways and, in some cases, appear to be 
duplicating efforts in the military services and defense 
agencies.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $100.0 
million in RDDW for PE 64250D8Z and directs the Secretary of 
Defense and Director of the SCO to engage the cross-functional 
teams in continuously reviewing the SCO portfolio--including 
the Avatar, Sirena, Eclipse, and Shawshank projects--to ensure 
their technical merit and operational impact, coordination with 
other research and development programs, and to support the 
development of transition pathways into acquisition programs or 
operational use.

Increasing manufacturing readiness level for thermionic energy 
        harvesting technology

    The budget request included $716.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
64250D8Z Advanced Innovative Technologies.
    The committee recommends an increase of $15.0 million in 
RDDW for PE 64250D8Z to raise the manufacturing readiness level 
(MRL) of thermionic energy harvesting technology from MRL 3 to 
MRL 7.
    The committee notes that the Strategic Capabilities Office 
(SCO) in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Research and Engineering has funded the successful development, 
prototyping, and demonstration of thermionic energy harvesting 
technology able to generate electric power at ambient 
temperatures. The committee believes that energy densities 
achieved in prototype devices are impressive. The critical next 
step is to develop scalable and cost-effective manufacturing 
processes at optimum feature sizes. The committee directs the 
SCO to provide a briefing to the congressional defense 
committees biannually from the date of the submission of the 
fiscal year 2023 budget request until program completion or the 
end of calendar year 2023.

Joint affordable kill chain closure program

    The budget request included $103.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
64331D8Z Rapid Prototyping Program.
    The committee recommends a decrease of $50.0 million in 
RDDW for PE 64331D8Z due to efforts redundant to the Joint 
Affordable Kill Chain Closure program.

Homeland Defense Radar--Hawaii

    The budget request did not include funding in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW), for PE 
64672C Homeland Defense Radar--Hawaii (HDR-H).
    The committee notes the importance of having this phased 
array radar to protect the Homeland, given the configuration 
and distance of radars in the Pacific relative to existing 
threats. This is also a U.S. Indo-Pacific Command unfunded 
requirement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $76.0 
million in RDDW for PE 64672C for the development of the 
Homeland Defense Radar--Hawaii. Elsewhere in this Act $9.0 
million is authorized for military construction planning and 
design for this radar.

Joint All-Domain Command and Control experimentation

    The budget request included $17.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for 
PE64826J Joint C5 Capability Development, Integration and 
Interoperability Assessments.
    The committee notes the importance of prototyping, 
experimentation, and integration activities to advance the 
development, transition, fielding, and employment of 
technologies and concepts of operation developed by the 
services and Department of Defense science and technology 
community in support of Joint All-Domain Command and Control 
(JADC2). The committee believes that additional funds are 
necessary to accelerate the work of the JADC2 Cross-Functional 
Team.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $25.0 
million, for a total of $42.4 million, in RDDW for PE64826J for 
JADC2 experimentation to help support the objectives of the 
Pacific and European Deterrence Initiatives.

Laser communication ground terminals

    The budget request included $636.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
1206410SDA for Space Technology Development and Prototyping.
    The committee notes the importance of developing high speed 
anti-jam communications ground terminals and the utility of 
lasers for such resilient communications systems.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDDW for PE 1206410SDA for laser communication 
ground terminals.

Space laser communications

    The budget request included $636.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
1206410SDA Space Technology Development and Prototyping.
    The committee notes the importance of developing high-
speed, anti-jam communications in space with lasers.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $8.0 
million in RDDW for PE 1206410SDA for laser communications in 
space.

Wave glider development

    The budget request included $550.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
64940D8Z Central Test and Evaluation Investment Development.
    The committee notes the importance of at-sea ranges to 
develop new surface and undersea warfare systems and 
technologies.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $4.0 
million in RDDW for PE 64940D8Z to expand the prototype 
integration and modification of wave gliders to support real-
time collection and exchange of tactical signals used during 
range test events as well as increase the capacity of at-sea 
ranges.

Systems engineering

    The budget request included $40.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
65142D8Z Systems Engineering.
    The committee notes that numerous independent and internal 
assessments have highlighted the role that poor systems 
engineering practices play in contributing to program technical 
failures, cost and schedule overruns, and an inability of 
innovative technologies to transition into programs of record 
or operational use. These challenges continue to persist 
despite the resources committed over a number of years by the 
Undersecretary of Defense for Research and Engineering to 
support systems engineering activities. The committee directs 
the Undersecretary to review ongoing systems engineering 
activities within the services, Defense Agencies, and the 
Office of the Secretary of Defense, and to develop a 
comprehensive strategy for the coordinated application of 
limited resources and personnel to develop more systems 
engineering technical capabilities to support modernization 
activities under the National Defense Strategy. Until that 
analysis and strategy are developed, the committee is concerned 
that requested systems engineering activities are uncoordinated 
and disconnected from the real technical challenges facing the 
Department of Defense.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $15.0 
million in RDDW for PE 65142D8Z for systems engineering 
activities.

Technical information services

    The budget request included $61.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
65801KA Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC).
    The committee notes that the Department of Defense still 
struggles with the collection, analysis, and use of technical 
information to support operational missions, acquisition 
programs, and research activities. These challenges remain 
despite revolutionary advances in data analytics made in the 
commercial sector and an increased emphasis on data use by the 
Department of Defense. A May 2021 memo from the Deputy 
Secretary of Defense, which directed a set of actions to 
accelerate the Department's enterprise data activities, 
manifested the Department's commitment to improving data 
analytics. The committee is concerned that despite significant 
resources being applied to DTIC activities and contractors, the 
organization is not clearly linked in with the overall data 
strategy and activities of the Department. The committee also 
notes that the Department has yet to complete the independent 
assessment of DTIC activities mandated by the conference report 
(H. Rept. 116-617) accompanying the William M. (Mac) Thornberry 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public 
Law 116-283).
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $50.0 
million in RDDW for PE 65801KA.

Rare earth element separation technologies

    The budget request included $58.2 million for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) in PE 
67210D8Z for Industrial Base Analysis and Sustainment Support.
    The committee notes that the January 2021 ``Industrial 
Capabilities Report to Congress,'' required by section 2504 of 
title 10, United States Code, highlighted the challenges that 
the Department of Defense faces in obtaining reliable and 
secure sources of rare earth elements for defense systems.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $7.5 
million in RDDW for PE 67210D8Z to accelerate the application 
of cost-effective and commercially viable rare earth element 
separation technologies to support achieving U.S. independence 
from China suppliers.

Demonstration program on domestic production of rare earth elements 
        from coal byproducts

    The budget request included $58.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
67210D8Z Industrial Base Analysis and Sustainment Support 
(IBAS).
    Elsewhere in this Act, the committee recommends a provision 
that would authorize a temporary program to demonstrate the 
feasibility of separating critical minerals and rare earth 
elements from coal byproducts and acid mine drainage for the 
purpose of supplementing the Department of Defense's domestic 
supply of critical minerals. The provision includes $3.0 
million to fund this effort. The committee understands that 
multiple higher learning institutions have demonstrated this 
technology to date at a small scale. The committee's intent is 
for such a technology to produce at least 1.5 tons of rare 
earth elements per year and an equal amount of cobalt. Ideally, 
the full rate capacity would recover between 18 and 21 tons of 
rare earth elements per year. Lastly, the committee directs the 
Department to consult with the Department of Energy's National 
Energy Technology Lab as much as possible to avoid any 
duplication and incorporate any lessons learned to the maximum 
extent possible.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDDW for PE 67210D8Z for IBAS for the coal byproduct 
demonstration program.

Digital manufacturing

    The budget request included $58.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
67210D8Z Industrial Base Analysis and Sustainment Support.
    The committee notes that the Department of Defense's 
manufacturing innovation institutes are well poised to promote 
the development of innovative technologies across the defense 
industrial base by transitioning manufacturing technologies to 
major defense contractors.
    The committee recommends an increase of $1.5 million in 
RDDW for PE 67210D8Z to assist with transition costs and 
implementation of advanced digital manufacturing technologies 
to acquisition programs and the defense industrial base.

Industrial skills training

    The budget request includes $58.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
67210D8Z Industrial Base Analysis and Sustainment Support.
    The committee notes that there is a need to foster greater 
pathways from educational institutions to the defense 
industrial base. The committee further notes the need for a 
coordinated, multi-level effort to expand training facilities, 
growing the throughput of both high school and adult training 
programs; implement programs to recruit middle school students 
into pipelines; more effectively market advanced technical 
trades; and create equity and opportunity for underserved 
populations.
    The committee recommends an increase of $2.5 million in 
RDDW for PE 67210D8Z to improve industrial skills training 
efforts to support defense acquisition programs and the defense 
industrial base.

Defense industrial skills and technology training systems

    The budget request included $58.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
67210D8Z Industrial Base Analysis and Sustainment Support.
    The committee notes that the defense industrial base 
workforce requires modernized skills to augment traditional 
trade artisan expertise, including robotic programming and 
operations to increase automation, digitization of work, and 
increased use of virtual environments.
    The committee recommends an increase of $4.0 million in 
RDDW for PE 67210D8Z to continue efforts to enhance defense 
industrial skills and technology training to support the 
National Defense Strategy.

Submarine construction workforce training pipeline

    The budget request included $58.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
67210D8Z Industrial Base Analysis and Sustainment Support.
    The committee notes that over the next decade, the 
submarine shipbuilding industry must hire at least 18,000 new 
skilled workers to support the production of the Columbia-class 
ballistic missile submarine and the continued construction of 
the Virginia-class submarine. The submarine industry has worked 
closely with State and local governments, community colleges, 
high schools, and community-based non-profits for the past 
several years to establish new training pipelines to support 
these increased hiring needs. Thus far, such pipeline training 
programs have placed more than 2,500 people in submarine 
industry jobs.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $21.0 
million in RDDW for PE 67210D8Z to increase the throughput of 
these pipelines and to expand them into additional States in 
order to more adequately respond to the hiring demand.

Workforce transformation cyber initiative pilot program

    The budget request included $49.2 million for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW), for PE 
33140D8Z Information Systems Security Program.
    The committee supports the National Security Agency (NSA) 
National Cryptologic School pilot program to enable workforce 
transformation certificate-based courses on cybersecurity and 
artificial intelligence that are offered by Center of Academic 
Excellence (CAE) universities. The committee understands that 
this pilot program will develop courses and curricula with 
technology partners and also provide funding for select NSA CAE 
universities to offer these courses and receive tuition 
reimbursement for participation in the courses.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $20.0 
million in RDDW for PE 33140D8Z for the workforce 
transformation cyber initiative pilot program.

Maritime scalable effects acceleration

    The budget request included $78.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
1160431BB Warrior Systems.
    The committee supports prioritization of resources to 
address capability gaps, particularly those that ensure U.S. 
Special Operations Forces maintain superiority relative to near 
peer competitors, and notes that the Commander, U.S. Special 
Operations Command (SOCOM) has identified the acceleration of 
maritime scalable effects as an unfunded requirement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $4.2 
million in RDDW for PE 1160431BB for acceleration of SOCOM 
maritime scalable effects.

Information Systems Security Program

    The budget request included $423.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
33140G Information Systems Security Program of the National 
Security Agency.
    The committee recommends a decrease of $10.0 million in 
RDDW for PE 33140G Information Systems Security Program.

Rapid Innovation Program

    The budget request included $115.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
63338D8Z Defense Modernization and Prototyping.
    The committee recommends an increase of $75.0 million in PE 
63338D8Z for the Rapid Innovation Program.
    The committee notes that this program has been used to 
successfully transition research programs, including those 
funded under the Small Business Innovation Research program, 
into formal acquisition programs and operational use.

Joint test and evaluation

    The budget request included $42.6 million in line number 3 
of Operational Test and Evaluation (OTE) for PE 65814OTE 
Operational Test Activities and Analyses.
    The committee recommends an additional $20.0 million in OTE 
for PE 65814OTE for the Joint Test and Evaluation program.
    The committee notes that this program funds multi-service 
projects, coordinated with the Joint Staff, appropriate 
combatant commanders, and the services, in order to provide 
non-materiel solutions that improve: joint interoperability of 
service systems, technical and operational concepts; 
development and validation of joint test methodologies; and 
test data for validating models, simulations, and test beds.

Acquisition Innovation Research Center

    The budget request included $4.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
65151D8Z Studies and Analysis Support--OSD.
    The committee recommends an increase of $5.0 million for 
the Acquisition Innovation Research Center to continue 
acquisition research activities authorized under section 2361a 
of title 10, United States Code.

Domestic Comparative Testing Program

    The budget request included $25.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
63133D8Z Foreign Comparative Testing.
    The committee recommends an increase of $20.0 million for 
the Domestic Comparative Testing Program to support testing of 
advanced commercial technologies for possible insertion into 
acquisition programs, as authorized under section 882 of the 
William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283).

Artificial intelligence applied research activities

    The budget request included $430.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
62303E Information and Communications Technology.
    The committee recommends an increase of $200.0 million in 
RDDW for PE 62303E to support further development of artificial 
intelligence capabilities to help maintain the United States' 
technological superiority over China.

Pilot program on public-private partnerships with internet ecosystem 
        companies to detect and disrupt adversary cyber operations

    The budget request included $423.7 million in line number 
220 for Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Defense-
wide (RDDW) for PE 33140G Information Systems Security Program 
(ISSP).
    Elsewhere in this Act, the committee recommends a provision 
that would require the Secretary of Defense to establish and 
commence a pilot program to assess the feasibility and 
advisability of entering into voluntary public-private 
partnerships with internet ecosystem companies to facilitate 
actions by such companies to discover and disrupt the use of 
the platforms, systems, services, and infrastructure of such 
companies by malicious cyber actors.
    The committee recommends an increase of $25.0 million in 
RDDW for the ISSP to support this initiative.

Biomedical technologies

    The budget request included $108.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for 
62115E Biomedical Technology.
    The committee recommends an increase of $15.0 million in 
RDDW for PE 62115E Biomedical Technology.

Information & communications technology

    The budget request included $430.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for 
62303E Information & Communications Technology.
    The committee recommends an increase of $15.0 million in 
RDDW for PE 62303E Information & Communications Technology.

Materials & biological technology

    The budget request included $317.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
62715E Materials & Biological Technology.
    The committee recommends an increase of $15.0 million in 
RDDW for PE 62715E Materials & Biological Technology.

Electronics technology

    The budget request included $430.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
62716E Electronics Technology.
    The committee recommends an increase of $15.0 million in 
RDDW for PE 62716E Electronics Technology.

Advanced electronics technology

    The budget request included $116.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
63739E Advanced Electronics Technology.
    The committee recommends an increase of $15.0 million in 
RDDW for PE 63739E Advanced Electronics Technology.

Command, control, and communications systems

    The budget request included $251.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for 
63760E Command, Control, and Communications Systems.
    The committee recommends an increase of $15.0 million in 
RDDW for PE 63760E Command, Control, and Communications 
Systems.

Funding support for National Security Agency Defense Industrial Base 
        cybersecurity activities

    The budget request included $423.7 million in line number 
220, Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Defense-wide 
(RDDW) for PE 33140G for the Information Systems Security 
Program (ISSP).
    Section 1648 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) required the Department of 
Defense (DOD) to develop a comprehensive framework to enhance 
the cybersecurity of the defense industrial base. Although DOD 
initially focused too narrowly on the Cybersecurity Maturity 
Model Certification program, DOD now recognizes that it must 
address additional elements of the broader framework, and the 
National Security Agency's (NSA) newly re-established 
Cybersecurity Directorate must play an increased role.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $25.0 
million in RDDW for the NSA ISSP program to enhance defense 
industrial base cybersecurity.

Fifth Generation Wireless Network Technology

    The budget request included $374.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW) for PE 
64011D8Z Next Generation Information Communications Technology. 
This program element funds the acceleration of fifth generation 
(5G) wireless networking technology, both for at-scale 
prototyping and experimentation of advanced dual-use 
applications, and to mature and commoditize Open Radio Access 
Network virtualization technology. This program was initiated 
by congressional action in the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 
2020 (Public Law 116-93).
    The budget request also included $22.9 million in RDDW, PE 
62230D8Z for Defense Technology Innovation, which funds 
technology innovation for sixth generation (6G) and beyond 
wireless networks.
    The committee is encouraged by the Department of Defense's 
(DOD) 5G Strategy and associated Implementation Plan, which 
reflect the clear recognition of the critical role that the 5G 
ecosystem plays in U.S. military and economic competitiveness. 
The committee believes that DOD's 12 experimental sites and 
associated use cases present a uniquely valuable learning 
environment that will accelerate 5G advancement, to the benefit 
of both warfighters and U.S. citizens. The ability to rapidly 
develop and employ prototypes, at scale, offers an unparalleled 
resource to the nation, and creates a bridge between rapidly 
advancing basic research and production that will continue to 
be an essential link in the cycle of wireless technology 
innovation that the U.S. can, and must, lead. The committee 
expects that any departure from the recently issued strategy 
and implementation plan will be carefully considered, and that 
DOD will consult with the congressional defense committees 
prior to making any significant departures from the 5G Strategy 
and associated Implementation Plan.
    The committee is concerned that the fiscal year 2022 budget 
request for 5G represents a significant decline from the 
enacted fiscal year 2021 budget level. The committee believes 
that these activities need to be enhanced rather than scaled 
back. Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $100.0 
million in RDDW for PE 64011D8Z for 5G acceleration activities 
and an increase of $50.0 million in RDDW for PE 62230D8Z for 6G 
and beyond technology development.

Defense-wide Research and Development unfunded requirements

    In accordance with section 222a of title 10 United States 
Code, the service chiefs and combatant commanders each 
submitted a list of unfunded requirements. The committee 
recommends an additional increase of nearly $398.6 million for 
Defense-wide Research and Development items on these unfunded 
requirements lists.

                       Items of Special Interest


Advanced engine development

    The committee continues to support adaptive cycle engine 
research and development and encourages the Department of 
Defense (DOD) to transition this technology within the Advance 
Engine Technology Program (AETP) into engineering and 
manufacturing development activities at the soonest 
opportunity. Fighter propulsion is one of the few areas in 
which the United States maintains a clear advantage over near-
peer adversaries, specifically China and its threat to the 
Indio-Pacific region. The F-35 will be one of the key elements 
of the front-line fighter forces of the military services and 
U.S. allies and partners for decades to come. Failure to 
develop an adaptive cycle engine and make it available for 
production on the F-35 would constitute a missed opportunity to 
capitalize on more than $4.0 billion in research and 
development and open a door for U.S. adversaries to overtake 
fielded engine technology. The committee recognizes the 
importance of maintaining a strong industrial base, 
competition, and the role adaptive engine technology could play 
in supporting the National Defense Strategy.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide, as part of the Department's fiscal year 2023 
budget submission, details of an acquisition strategy and a 
plan for an engineering and manufacturing development (EMD) 
program to transition adaptive cycle engines into the F-35. The 
acquisition strategy shall include at least one course of 
action that would provide for executing an EMD contact in 
fiscal year 2023.
    Additionally, in order to preserve critical engineering and 
manufacturing resources, and preserve momentum toward an 
affordable EMD program, the committee recommends additional 
funding in fiscal year 2022 for use in continued progress 
toward maturation and risk-reduction of adaptive cycle engines 
for the F-35. The Air Force should emphasize support for 
achieving the AETP goals of an acquisition-level product design 
consistent with the Adaptive Engine Requirements Document 
statement of requirements and testing prototype engines that 
validate those designs.

Anti-malarial preventative measures

    The committee is concerned about the Department of 
Defense's reductions to investments in research and development 
of vaccines to prevent malaria. Since malaria remains the top 
infectious disease threat to servicemembers in the Indo-Pacific 
Command and Africa Command areas of responsibilities, a 
reduction in funding for anti-malarial preventive measures will 
imperil the mission readiness, health, and safety of 
servicemembers. Therefore, the committee encourages the 
Department to continue investment in research for 
chemoprophylaxis, surveillance, vaccine development, and other 
countermeasures for malaria by the Walter Reed Army Institute 
of Research and the Navy Medical Research Center.

Autonomously powered exoskeletons

    The committee is aware of the Department of Defense's 
ongoing efforts to explore the application of exoskeleton 
technology. Catalyzed by initial Defense Advanced Research 
Projects Agency investments over the last two decades, proof of 
concept of exoskeletons has been established and these 
integrated systems have been used in field experiments and 
simulated environments. The committee is also aware that 
further maturation of this technology is being addressed in: 
Army efforts to develop sufficient exoskeletons for 
comprehensive operational evaluation; Navy evaluation of 
industrial exoskeletons to manipulate heavy items and enhance 
workplace safety and efficiency in a shipyard environment; U.S. 
Special Operations Command test of a variant for helicopter 
logistics support to refuel, rearm, and repair; and Marines 
Corps evaluation of logistical operations such as loading and 
unloading pallets of gear and ammunition in the field. The 
committee understands this is a rapidly growing market that is 
fueled by industrial production needs and healthcare 
applications, and the committee encourages the Department to 
continue to leverage the use of full-body, autonomously powered 
exoskeletons and semi-autonomous or tele-operated single or 
dual-armed, human controlled robots used for heavy lift 
sustainment tasks.

Bomber long-term roadmap

    The Air Force and Global Strike Command have consistently 
stated that 225 bombers are necessary to ensure victory in a 
near-peer conventional war. However, the current bomber roadmap 
would leave the United States with only 175 bombers (100 B-21s 
and 75 B-52s) until 2050. After that, with the retirement of 
the B-52, and absent some effort to buy more bombers, the 
bomber fleet would consist of 100 B-21 bombers. The committee 
encourages the Department of Defense to consider multiple 
options for maintaining a 225 bomber force after 2050, to 
include procuring more B-21s or augmenting the B-21 fleet with 
a lower cost B-52 replacement. Pursuing a lower cost B-52 
replacement would be consistent with the Chief of Staff of the 
Air Force's comments earlier this year about the F-35 program 
and the need for the Air Force to invest in cheaper, more 
flexible platforms.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to conduct a study on options for maintaining 225 bombers 
after 2050 and to submit the results of the study to the 
congressional defense committees with the budget request for 
fiscal year 2023. The study shall include the following:
          (1) An assessment of the benefits and risks of 
        adopting a bomber fleet consisting of 225 B-21s;
          (2) An assessment of the cost differences between 
        acquiring 225 B-21s and replacing the B-52 with a low-
        cost, non-stealthy bomber;
          (3) An assessment of which missions, if any, for 
        which a lower-cost B-52 replacement might be more 
        appropriate than a B-21; and
          (4) A recommendation of how the Air Force should 
        acquire 225 bombers, to include a balance between cost 
        and mission effectiveness.

Comptroller General assessment of operational security standards for 
        microelectronics products and services

    The committee recognizes that the Department of Defense 
(DOD) is developing trusted supply chain and operational 
security standards for the purchase of microelectronic products 
and services. These standards, which are to be in place not 
later than January 1, 2023, are intended to protect the United 
States from intellectual property theft and to ensure national 
security and public safety in the application of new 
generations of wireless network technology. Given the high risk 
that microelectronics security threats pose to U.S. national 
security and public safety, the committee directs the 
Comptroller General of the United States to assess DOD's 
implementation effort, to include the status of DOD's efforts 
to:
          (1) Develop trusted supply chain and operational 
        security standards for the purchase of microelectronic 
        products and services;
          (2) Disseminate the standards throughout the 
        Department and train appropriate acquisition personnel 
        on the application of those standards;
          (3) Update acquisition regulations to reflect the 
        standards; and
          (4) Coordinate with commercial industry, allies, and 
        partners to ensure adoption of common standards to the 
        greatest extent practicable.
    The committee directs the Comptroller General to provide an 
initial briefing on the status of DOD's efforts to the 
congressional defense committees, not later than August 1, 
2022, and to provide periodic assessments of these efforts as 
well any others that the Comptroller General determines to be 
relevant during the course of the work.

Comptroller General review of the Department of Defense's directed 
        energy development efforts

    The committee recognizes that the Department of Defense 
(DOD) has spent decades researching, developing, and acquiring 
directed energy (DE) technologies and capabilities. As the 
range of potential applications for directed energy 
capabilities has expanded, the DOD's ability to develop, 
acquire, and field these capabilities in a timely manner is 
critical.
    Given DOD's investments in directed energy capabilities, 
the diversity of these capabilities, and their application in 
future conflict, the committee directs the Comptroller General 
of the United States to continuously monitor and report on: (1) 
DOD's DE efforts, including science and technology, research 
and development, test and evaluation, and formal acquisition 
programs; (2) The status of these efforts, including types of 
technologies, technology maturation, and technology transition 
strategies being used; (3) Efforts to build expertise and 
infrastructure within the DOD and industry to support the 
development, testing, and manufacturing of capabilities; and 
(4) Other issues the Comptroller General deems relevant to this 
review.
    This review shall be provided in the form of a briefing to 
the congressional defense committees not later than May 31, 
2022, with follow-on reporting to occur on mutually agreed upon 
dates.

Employing ground-based systems at sea

    The committee directs the Department of Defense, not later 
than April 1, 2022, to provide a briefing to the congressional 
defense committees on any experiments with employing ground-
based systems on sea-based platforms. The briefing shall cover 
the time period beginning January 1, 2018 and ending April 1, 
2022. The briefing shall also include relevant details on any 
experiments of this type planned after April 1, 2022.
    Ground-based systems of interest include, but are not 
limited to: the High Mobility Artillery Rocket System, Multiple 
Launch Rocket System, Autonomous Missile Launcher, Medium Range 
Capability, Precision Strike Missile, Maritime Strike Tomahawk/
Tactical Tomahawk, counter-unmanned aircraft systems, and 
Standard Missile-6.
    Sea-based systems of interest include, but are not limited 
to: L-class amphibious ships, Expeditionary Fast Transports, 
Expeditionary Transfer Dock/Expeditionary Sea Base, Combat 
Logistics Force ships, commercial fishing vessels, and barges.

Facial recognition and surveillance technologies

    The committee is greatly concerned by the growing use of 
surveillance and facial recognition technologies by some non-
democratic governments to surveil, track, and oftentimes 
repress their citizens. The committee understands that some 
foreign companies that have developed and are selling these 
technologies to countries of concern may have also participated 
in United States Government competitive prize programs. The 
committee believes that the Department of Defense should not 
enter into agreements with companies that have sold such 
products to such governments.

Foreign military aviation training capacity

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, not later 
than September 1, 2022, to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees on the Department of Defense's 
foreign military aviation training capabilities and capacity 
through 2030. The report shall be submitted in unclassified 
form, but may include a classified annex. The report shall 
assess the Department of Defense's ability to train adequate 
numbers of pilots, aircrew, and maintenance personnel to meet 
the backlog of U.S. military aviation requirements, while also 
meeting the training demand for training to support Foreign 
Military Sales and security assistance programs for allied and 
partner nation aviation forces.

Graphitic composites and foam for Next Generation Combat Vehicle

    The committee is pleased with the U.S. Army Ground Vehicle 
Systems Center's (GVSC) decision to develop lower cost, wider 
application of mesophase pitch-based graphitic composite and 
graphitic carbon foam components in support of the Next 
Generation Combat Vehicle (NGCV). The committee notes that 
graphitic composites used in parts, batteries, and fuel cells 
can reduce weight, increase strength, enhance mission 
capability, and extend service life of the NGCV. Graphitic 
carbon foam can dramatically reduce component heat signatures, 
improve heat dissipation from electronic devices and sensors, 
and cool electronic compartments in demanding environments. 
Graphitic carbon foam can also protect against blast energy, 
directed energy weapons, and electromagnetic pulse threats. The 
committee recognizes the versatility and broad application that 
graphitic composites and foam technology provides for the Armed 
Forces by reducing the weight of parts by over 50 percent 
against traditional metal components, while improving 
survivability and performance. The committee recommends that 
the GVSC continue to test, develop, and field low cost 
mesophase pitch based graphite composite and graphitic carbon 
foam components that can reduce weight, reduce energy 
consumption, extend service life, reduce component thermal 
signatures, dissipate heat, and improve equipment survivability 
for the NGCV.

Graphitic composites and foam for special operations forces 
        communications and intelligence support systems

    The committee understands U.S. Special Operations Command 
(SOCOM) is working to develop lower cost, wider application 
graphitic composite and graphitic foam components in support of 
special operations forces communications and intelligence 
support systems. The committee understands that graphitic 
composite and foam components may reduce weight, increase 
strength, enhance mission capability, and could extend service 
life for these programs. Additionally, graphitic foam may 
reduce component heat signatures, improve heat dissipation from 
electronic devices and sensors, cool electronic compartments in 
demanding environments, and could protect against blast energy, 
directed energy weapons, and electromagnetic pulse threats. The 
committee encourages SOCOM to continue its efforts to test, 
develop, and field low-cost carbon fiber and graphitic carbon 
foam in support of its programs, as appropriate.

High energy laser research

    The committee notes that directed energy laser weapons 
provide lethal effects to respond to rapidly emerging threats. 
The committee also notes that research and development efforts 
are needed to better understand system requirements and the 
effects of laser pulse duration on weapons capabilities. The 
committee urges the Secretary of Defense to continue to support 
research in these technology areas in partnership with 
industry, Federal laboratories, and academia.

High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles rollover mitigation

    The committee is concerned with the continued rollovers of 
High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWV), generally 
known as Humvees, and other combat vehicles but has been 
encouraged by the development of a rollover mitigation program 
funded in last year's budget. The committee understands that 
work began on this program and two recent proof of concept 
pilots at Red River Army Depot have been successful and shown 
that a retrofit approach works, thus removing any concern with 
quality, readiness, and cost. As there are 54,810 HMMWVs in the 
enduring and fielded fleet that are legacy vehicles, new, or 
have been modernized without the kits installed, this is of 
great concern to the committee. The President's budget request 
for fiscal year 2021 only provided funding for 9,480 vehicles 
in fiscal years 2021, 2022, and 2023.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide to the congressional defense committees, not later 
than January 31, 2022, a plan as to how it will fund the 
rollover mitigation retrofit for the remainder of the entire 
HMMWV fleet.

Hypersonic research

    The committee supports the continued development of 
hypersonic technology and encourages the development of 
hypersonic capabilities as a key element of the National 
Defense Strategy. These weapons represent an area of intense 
technological competition between the United States, People's 
Republic of China, and Russian Federation. The committee is 
concerned that there is a lack of focus on air-launched and 
air-breathing hypersonic capability, including the potential 
for rapid space launch capability facilitated by purpose-built 
hypersonic aircraft. The committee believes that the Department 
of Defense (DOD) needs to focus more attention on the 
expeditious development and maturation of key hypersonic flight 
technologies. In addition to the need to improve ground-based 
test facilities such as wind tunnels, the DOD also needs to 
increase its flight test rate to expedite the maturation and 
fielding of hypersonic technologies. The combination of ground-
based testing and flight testing is critical to fully maturing 
the fundamental technologies needed to field a hypersonic 
flight system. High-rate hypersonic flight test programs would 
help mature six critical technology areas: (1) Thermal 
protection systems and high temperature flight structures; (2) 
Seekers and sensors for hypersonic vehicles; (3) Advanced 
navigation, guidance, and control; (4) Communications and data 
links; (5) High speed aerodynamic characterization; and (6) 
Advanced avionics and vehicle communication systems for 
hypersonic vehicles.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Research and Engineering, in consultation with the 
Secretaries of the services, to provide an executable strategy 
and report to the congressional defense committees, not later 
than December 30, 2021, on the plan to field air-launched and 
air-breathing hypersonic weapons and the potential use for 
tactically responsive launch capabilities within 3 years. The 
strategy shall include required investment in testing and 
infrastructure to address the need for both flight and ground 
testing.

Hypersonics test facilities

    The committee remains supportive of hypersonic technology 
programs and a robust test infrastructure to support the 
burgeoning operational capability in development today. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
deliver a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than March 1, 2022. The report shall: (1) Identify each 
facility and resource of the Major Range and Test Facility Base 
that is primarily concerned with the test and evaluation of 
hypersonics technology; and (2) Recommend the optimal 
organization and coordination mechanisms to promote effective 
and efficient use of test resources to support hypersonics 
technology development.

Joint All-Domain Testing and Training

    The committee recognizes the critical need for the National 
Guard, as an essential component of the Joint Force, to conduct 
all-domain training and exercises in support of the National 
Defense Strategy (NDS). The committee notes the Joint Staff's 
development of the joint warfighting concept to support the 
NDS. The committee notes that in order to support the NDS, 
training capabilities can best be achieved within an all-domain 
training environment. Such a venue should be able to support 
training and exercises for aircraft; training in maritime and 
littoral environments; amphibious training; joint fire support; 
maneuver coordinated with fires and effects; multi-echelon 
sustainment; combined arms live-fire; decisive major combat 
operations scenarios; air mobility; cyber operations; space 
operations; electronic warfare spectrum availability; mission 
command; remotely piloted aircraft launch and recovery; and 
four seasons capabilities.
    The committee notes that the National All Domain 
Warfighting Center (NADWC), which includes the Alpena Combat 
Readiness Training Center, delivers a joint all-domain, four-
season training environment that is able to support its users 
in their efforts to achieve or sustain proficiency in 
conducting joint command and control, air, maritime, and ground 
maneuver integration, and the synchronization of kinetic and 
non-kinetic fires in a joint, multinational major combat 
operations environment that is scalable across unit resources 
levels. These capabilities are critical to the preparedness of 
the U.S. Armed Forces for future warfighting demands. 
Accessibility is critical to the ability of units and partners 
to be able to train with their equipment in a wide range of 
environments that mimic potential conflict zones. NADWC has 
multi-modal capabilities to train and exercise joint logistics 
and sustainment at operationally relevant distances. This also 
provides a training environment that addresses training gaps 
and builds readiness at multiple echelons with the scope and 
scale required to address emerging challenges of near-peer 
competitors.
    The committee encourages the Secretary of the Army and the 
Secretary of the Air Force to appropriately resource joint all-
domain training, exercises, test, and experimentation for the 
Army and Air National Guards to maximize readiness in an all-
domain training environment to the maximum extent practicable.

Jointless hull development

    The committee notes that as the Army seeks to revamp its 
ground vehicle portfolio in order to compete with near peer 
competitors, advanced breakthrough technologies are crucial 
enabling efforts. The Army's jointless hull development work 
within the Next Generation Combat Vehicle (NGCV) program is an 
important enabling program for developing and building lighter 
and better protected combat vehicles. The program's goal of 
creating a large additive manufacturing printer capable of 
producing hull sized components will not only benefit the NGCV 
program but will also allow the Army to print hull sized parts 
and components which can reduce part supply backlogs across the 
Army. Therefore, the committee encourages the Army to continue 
its research on jointless hull and additive manufacturing 
technology.

KC-10 Divestiture

    The committee remains concerned about the divestiture of 
the KC-10 aerial refueling tanker while the replacement KC-46 
Pegasus continues to display significant category 1 
deficiencies involving the Remote Vision System and the air 
refueling boom. Prior to any further divestment of the KC-10 in 
fiscal years 2022, 2023, and 2024, the committee directs the 
Commander, U.S. Transportation Command, and the Chief of Staff 
of the Air Force to provide a briefing to the congressional 
defense committees detailing tanking requirements and the 
metrics made in determining the size and makeup of the tanking 
fleet.

KC-46 basing

    The committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to 
provide a briefing to the congressional defense committees, not 
later than December 1, 2021, on the strategic basing process 
and resulting decisions related to the KC-46 beddown. The 
briefing shall cover the entirety of the basing timeline, 
supporting evidence that informed decisions, and a thorough 
explanation justifying any constraint to beddown KC-46 aircraft 
exclusively within the continental United States (CONUS).
    The briefing shall also encompass impacts to operational 
and contingency plans in theaters outside of CONUS resulting 
from a lack of overseas basing of the KC-46, how the U.S. Air 
Force plans to mitigate those impacts, and what risks are being 
imposed on combatant commanders due to the CONUS basing 
constraint.

Mobile compact high energy laser

    The committee recognizes that special operations forces 
(SOF) conduct missions that require stand-off counter sensor 
capabilities and understands that compact high energy laser 
systems that can be moved, assembled, and operated by small, 
dismounted teams could be beneficial to SOF operations. The 
committee encourages U.S. Special Operations Command to pursue 
the development of compact high energy laser capabilities, as 
appropriate.

MQ-9 Resiliency

    The committee understands the high demand for the MQ-9 
Reaper in current operations. The committee would like to 
understand what role the MQ-9 could play within a 21st century 
battle landscape. Some obstacles to MQ-9 survivability within a 
contested environment include a lack of command and control 
(C2) resiliency and lack of threat awareness.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a report, not later than April 15, 2022, to 
the congressional defense committees detailing: (1) The cost 
difference, potential savings, and operational impact 
associated with switching the MQ-9's C2 structure from SATCOM 
to Low Earth Orbit satellites; (2) The feasibility of 
autonomous MQ-9 operations without beyond line-of-sight or 
within line-of-sight C2; (3) An updated assessment of the 
Reaper Defensive Electronic Support System as a tool to remedy 
the MQ-9's current lack of threat awareness; and (4) What 
effect implementing these improvements would have on MQ-9 
survivability.

Networked integrated controls kit and electronics link in support of 
        Next Generation Combat Vehicle advanced technology

    The committee is encouraged by the U.S. Army Ground Vehicle 
Systems Center's (GVSC) efforts to develop a prognostic and 
predictive maintenance (PPMx) solution coupled with the ability 
to track and disable associated vehicles remotely via a common 
on-board electronic control unit should the requirement arise. 
This technology potentially could gather data and transmit 
securely from the vehicle to a cloud-based data management 
center, enable the control, location monitoring, and usage of 
each vehicle in support of PPMx, and provide increased 
security. The committee encourages the GVSC to continue to 
research, develop, test, and evaluate solutions that meet the 
Army's requirements to support PPMx and provide additional 
capabilities to the warfighter in deployed environments.

Policies to support use of additive manufacturing capabilities

    The committee is supportive of the use of additive 
manufacturing capabilities as a complement to traditional 
manufacturing techniques for use in defense supply chains. 
However, the committee is concerned about the Department of 
Defense (DOD)'s ability to use these capabilities to 
manufacture components of systems that are currently in 
development and have yet to be fielded.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the congressional defense committees, 
not later than March 1, 2022, on issues relating to licensing 
and use of technical data and intellectual property that may 
limit the DOD's ability to use additive manufacturing 
capabilities to produce systems components and parts as part of 
robust and responsive supply chains.

Radar and multi-function sensor capabilities

    The committee notes the significant commitment of the Army 
Research Laboratory to collaborate with academia in the 
development of new technologies in core mission areas. The 
committee notes that one of these technologies is distributed 
radar and multi-function sensors, which can provide: 
performance improvement in coverage, targeting, and engagement 
timeline; increased jamming power on target; new electronic 
warfare effects; and enhanced survivability of participating 
platforms.
    The committee further notes that investments in distributed 
radar and multi-function sensors, modeling and simulation of 
distributed radio frequency (RF) sensors, advanced antennas and 
RF electronics, and methods for timing and synchronization 
across large numbers of platforms, will accelerate the 
transformation of current sensor and effector architectures.
    Therefore, the committee supports research into the 
development of such technologies and directs the Secretary of 
the Army to leverage research with academic partners to support 
development of distributed radar and multi-function sensor 
capabilities.

Report on special access program administration

    The committee is aware of the disparate administration 
organizations in the Department of Defense and an ongoing 
discussion as to the most effective and efficient 
organizational structure to meet the requirements for special 
access program (SAP) administration. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the 
Secretaries of the military departments, not later than January 
31, 2022, to provide a report to the congressional defense 
committees on the current organizations for SAP administration 
across the services, as well as the rationale for the 
differences. Additionally, the report shall recommend the most 
effective organization and provide a strategy and timeline to 
align all service SAP administrators with the optimum 
organization. The committee also highly encourages the 
termination of all service reorganization efforts until such 
time as the committees receive the required report and strategy 
from the Secretary of the Defense.

Study of injuries during aircraft ejections

    The committee notes the evolving capabilities of high-
performance aircraft ejection seats and sees the need to ensure 
the capability of an ejected pilot to escape and evade 
potential capture or to engage in life-saving activities. The 
committee is concerned that current ejection seats may cause 
preventable injuries to pilots during ejection.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to conduct a study, to be completed not later than March 15, 
2022, of all pilot ejections from Department of Defense 
aircraft from 1985 to the present to examine injuries to 
pilots, determine mitigations to injury, and inform design of 
future ejection seat systems. The committee believes that the 
study's findings should be considered during the development 
and procurement of all future aircraft escape systems.

Support by manufacturing institutes for modernization priorities

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense (DOD) 
has established Manufacturing Innovation Institutes to support 
enhancing partnerships between industry, academia, and 
Government to develop advanced manufacturing capabilities in 
emerging technology sectors.
    The committee notes that the manufacturing institutes 
should play a role in developing reliable, low-cost, and modern 
production and industrial capabilities to support DOD's 
modernization priorities. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Undersecretary of Defense for Research and Engineering to 
provide a briefing to the congressional defense committees not 
later than October 1, 2022, on the support that the 
manufacturing institutes are providing to the technical and 
transition roadmaps developed for relevant modernization 
priorities.

Support Naval Power and Energy Systems Technology Development Roadmap

    The committee supports the recommendations in the recently 
updated Naval Power and Energy Systems Technology Roadmap for 
development of advanced power electronics, including silicon 
carbide power modules, which can reduce the size and weight of 
power conversion modules and other electronic systems needed to 
power advanced sensors and weapons systems.

Wide-area motion imagery development

    Wide-area motion imagery (WAMI) technology is a combat-
proven intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance system 
that has provided persistent, real-time intelligence for 
commanders in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility. 
The committee is pleased that prior year congressional funding 
has resulted in the development of a beyond-line-of-sight 
capability, artificial intelligence/machine learning-ready 
airborne processors/sensors, and multi-intelligence 
capabilities. The committee encourages the continued 
development into potential new uses for WAMI technology that 
will support anti-access/area denial operations against near-
peer adversaries.

                  TITLE III--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations
Authorization of appropriations (sec. 301)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for operation and maintenance activities at 
the levels identified in section 4301 of division D of this 
Act.
Subtitle B--Energy and Environment
Expansion of purposes of Sentinel Landscapes Partnership program to 
        include resilience (sec. 311)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 317 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) to clarify that the 
Sentinel Landscape Partnership program is also authorized to 
address concerns of military installation resilience in 
addition to conservation efforts.
Maintenance of current analytical tools in evaluating energy resilience 
        measures (sec. 312)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2911 of title 10, United States Code, to direct the 
Department of Defense to develop a process to ensure that when 
evaluating energy resilience measures, analytical tools are 
accurate and effective in determining life cycle costs and 
performance measures.
Military Aviation and Installation Assurance Clearinghouse matters 
        (sec. 313)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 183a(c) of title 10, United States Code, to clarify a 
notice of presumed risk. The provision would also direct the 
Department of Defense to develop a strategy to test and 
integrate wind turbine interference mitigation technologies 
into radars and the air surveillance command and control 
architecture.
    The committee is aware that compatibility concerns between 
wind turbines and radars in the energy projects must be 
balanced with proper radar siting. The committee also 
understands there are mitigation options available today to 
address wind turbine and radar issues. The committee strongly 
urges the Department to accelerate efforts to develop, test, 
and deploy mitigation options, including infill radar, which 
can provide supplemental coverage to an existing radar. Infill 
radar has been tested over a multi-year period by the Air Force 
at Travis Air Force Base and demonstrated improved detection 
capabilities while reducing impacts from turbines. The 
committee understands the Air Force provided funding to the 
Federal Aviation Administration to establish performance 
requirements and develop a pathway to certify infill radars for 
use in the national airspace system. The committee understands 
there has not yet been testing of the integration of infill 
radars with North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD)'s 
surveillance command and control system known as Battle Command 
System--Fixed (BCS-F). Given the promise of infill radars, the 
committee strongly urges the Department to move forward with 
field testing integration of infills with the NORAD BCS-F, 
including fusing of radar data prior to delivery to NORAD to 
solve a potential barrier with the architecture of the BCS-F.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the Senate Armed Services Committee 
not later than March 1, 2022, outlining: (1) The available 
mitigation options by radar type, including infill radars; (2) 
Potential mitigation options the Department is actively 
investigating and the remaining steps and timeline to validate 
and deploy such mitigation options if they are successfully 
tested, including plans for testing integration of infill 
radars with NORAD's system; (3) Mitigation options the 
Department is not considering but could with additional 
resources; and (4) Mitigation options the Department has 
considered but rejected along with an explanation of why the 
option(s) is not considered viable. For (2) and (3) above, the 
briefing shall include an assessment of the resources necessary 
to develop, test, validate, and deploy the individual 
mitigation options, including opportunities for industry 
financing under section 183a of title 10, United States Code. 
The briefing shall acknowledge the role of other agencies in 
the process, as appropriate.
Exemption from prohibition on use of open-air burn pits in contingency 
        operations outside the United States (sec. 314)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 317 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-84) to prohibit the use of 
open-air burn pits in contingency operations outside the United 
States unless waived by the Secretary of Defense. If a waiver 
occurs, the committee directs the Secretary to report to the 
committee, not later than 30 days after granting an exemption, 
the location of the open-air burn pit, the number of personnel 
assigned to the location, the size and expected duration of 
use, the need for the burn pit, and the specific rationale for 
granting the exemption. Such a report may be classified.
Demonstration program on domestic production of rare earth elements 
        from coal byproducts (sec. 315)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize a 
temporary program to demonstrate the feasibility of separating 
critical minerals and rare earth elements from coal byproducts 
and acid mine drainage for the purpose of supplementing the 
Department of Defense's domestic supply of critical minerals. 
The committee understands that multiple higher learning 
institutions have demonstrated this technology to date at a 
small scale. The committee's intent is for such a technology to 
produce at least 1.5 tons of rare earth elements per year and 
an equal amount of cobalt. Ideally, the full rate capacity 
would recover between 18 and 21 tons of rare earth elements per 
year. Lastly, the committee directs the Department to consult 
with the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Lab 
as much as possible to avoid any duplication and incorporate 
any lessons learned to the maximum extent possible.
Authority to transfer amounts derived from energy cost savings (sec. 
        316)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2912 of title 10, United States Code, to clarify that 
the Secretary of Defense may transfer amounts derived from 
energy cost savings to other funding accounts of the Department 
of Defense to be used for the purposes previously outlined in 
statute.
    The committee strongly supports the actions to reduce fuel 
costs and use taken by the military departments' operational 
and installation energy offices. Specifically, the committee 
notes that the Navy has realized at least $20.4 million to date 
in operational energy savings, while the Navy, Army, and Air 
Force have saved $45.0 million, $36.0 million, and $34.0 
million in installation energy savings, respectively. The 
committee's expectation going forward is for the military 
services to continue sharing best practices and improve cost 
recovery mechanisms to further realize savings, improve 
warfighter capabilities, and reduce fuel use.
    The committee remains concerned that the Department has 
failed to appropriately use the authority amended in fiscal 
years 2020 and 2021 due to apparent internal disputes over 
which colors of money can be used via section 2912 of title 10, 
United States Code. Accordingly, the committee's intent for 
this provision is to ensure that the Department exercise this 
authority to realize cost savings across all accounts and for 
the uses previously outlined in this section.
Sense of Senate on energy independence and diversification (sec. 317)
    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate that the United States should remain energy 
independent to enhance national security.

            Subtitle C--National Security Climate Resilience

National Security Climate Resilience (secs. 331-335)
    The committee recommends a series of provisions (secs. 331-
335) that would direct the Secretary of Defense to fully 
consider and make needed adjustments to account for current and 
emerging climate and environmental challenges and to ensure the 
climate resilience of assets and capabilities of the Department 
of Defense. The provision would also direct the Secretary to 
conduct a mission impact assessment on climate resilience in 
order to identify the full spectrum of climate risks that 
currently or could impact the Department. Additionally, the 
provision would require the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff to submit to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives a report on the broader 
strategic and operational impacts of extreme weather on the 
Department.

Subtitle D--Treatment of Perfluoroalkyl Substances and Polyfluoroalkyl 
                               Substances

Treatment by Department of Defense of perfluoroalkyl substances and 
        polyfluoroalkyl substances (sec. 351)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish a task force to improve 
testing for and treatment of per- and polyfluoroalkyl 
substances by the Department of Defense; require preliminary 
assessment and site inspection testing to be completed within 2 
years to provide a preliminary basis for additional response 
actions; and provide a status report on testing conducted at 
all military installations and facilities of the National 
Guard.

Public disclosure of testing and results of Department of Defense 
        testing for perfluoroalkyl or polyfluoroalkyl substances and 
        additional requirements for testing (sec. 352)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to disclose testing and results of testing 
for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances within 10 days of 
receipt of validated testing results and to provide additional 
requirements regarding testing for such substances.

Extension of transfer authority for funding of study and assessment on 
        health implications of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances 
        contamination in drinking water by Agency for Toxic Substances 
        and Disease Registry (sec. 353)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 316 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91), as most recently amended 
by section 337 of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-
283), to extend the authorization and funding transfer by 2 
years for the ongoing study and assessment on human health 
impacts of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances in drinking 
water by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Report on remediation of perfluoroalkyl substances and polyfluoroalkyl 
        substances at certain military installations (sec. 354)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to the Congress a report 
identifying the status of efforts to remediate per- and 
polyfluoroalkyl substances at 50 military installations and 
National Guard locations by not later than 60 days after the 
date of the enactment of this Act.

Report on schedule for completion of remediation of perfluoroalkyl 
        substances and polyfluoroalkyl substances (sec. 355)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives a 
report detailing a proposed schedule for the completion of 
remediation of perfluoroalkyl substances and polyfluoroalkyl 
substances by not later than 270 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act.

                       Subtitle E--Other Matters


Extension of temporary authority to extend contracts and leases under 
        the ARMS Initiative (sec. 371)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 343 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92) and extend the lease 
authority until November 25, 2025.

Incident reporting requirements for Department of Defense regarding 
        lost or stolen weapons (sec. 372)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to the congressional defense 
committees a report on security, control, thefts, losses, and 
recoveries of sensitive conventional arms, ammunition, and 
explosives of the Department of Defense. Additionally, the 
provision would require the Secretary of Defense to report a 
confirmed theft, loss, or recovery of a sensitive conventional 
arm, ammunition, or explosive within 72 hours to the National 
Crime Information Center and local law enforcement.
    The committee notes the provision would only require the 
report to Congress requirement for the next three fiscal years.

Repeal of sunset for naval vessel examination report (sec. 373)

    The committee recommends a provision that would strike 
subsection (d)(3) of section 8674 of title 10, United States 
Code, in order to retain an annual report relating to 
examinations of naval vessels.

Report on ammunition organic industrial base modernization by 
        Department of the Army (sec. 374)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Army to submit to the congressional defense 
committees a report, not later than March 15, 2022, on 
ammunition organic industrial base modernization by the 
Department of the Army. The provision would also require the 
Secretary to, as part of the annual budget submission by the 
President under section 1105(a) of title 31, United States 
Code, for fiscal years 2023 through 2027, submit to the 
congressional defense committees a report describing the 
progress made in establishing and implementing the master plan 
for each arsenal of the Department of the Army and an updated 
strategy planned for each arsenal of the Department of the 
Army.

Annual report by Secretary of the Navy on ship maintenance (sec. 375)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Navy to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees, not later than October 15 of each year, 
setting forth:
          (1) A description of all ship maintenance planned for 
        the fiscal year in which the report is submitted by 
        hull;
          (2) The estimated cost of the maintenance;
          (3) A summary of all ship maintenance conducted by 
        the Secretary during the previous fiscal year;
          (4) Details of any ship maintenance that was deferred 
        during the previous fiscal year; and
          (5) Details of planned ship maintenance that was 
        canceled during the previous fiscal year and a summary 
        of the reasons for the decision.

                              Budget Items


Unfunded requirements

    In accordance with section 222a of title 10, United States 
Code, the service chiefs and combatant commanders each 
submitted a list of unfunded requirements. The committee 
recommends an additional increase of about $6.2 billion for 
Operation and Maintenance items on these unfunded requirements 
lists.

Critical organic industrial base production capacity

    The budget request included $54.6 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), of which $4.1 billion was for SAG 132 
Facilities Sustainment, Restoration, and Modernization.
    The committee notes that the Chief of Staff of the Army's 
unfunded priorities list included a request for additional 
funds to assist in the critical Organic Industrial Base (OIB) 
production capacity at McAlester Army Ammunition Plant, 
Anniston Army Depot, and Red River Army Depot.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $7.4 
million in OMA, for SAG 132 for the above projects to support 
critical OIB production capacity.

Facilities Sustainment, Restoration and Modernization

    The budget request included $4.1 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA) for SAG 132 Facilities, Sustainment, 
Restoration and Modernization; $3.0 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy (OMN), for SAG BSM1 Sustainment, Restoration 
and Modernization; $1.2 billion in Operation and Maintenance, 
Marine Corps (OMMC), for SAG BSM1 for Sustainment, Restoration 
and Modernization; and $3.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force (OMAF), for Facilities Sustainment, 
Restoration and Modernization.
    The committee understands that additional funds would 
alleviate current challenges in maintaining facilities to 
better support existing readiness levels, while increased 
sustainment funding would also prevent disproportionate 
restoration and modernization backlog growth.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends the following 
increases: $829.0 million in OMA for SAG 132, $575.0 million in 
OMN for SAG BSM1, $224.0 million in OMMC for SAG BSM1, and 
$774.0 million in OMAF for SAG 011R.

U.S. Africa Command intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance

    The budget request included $54.6 billion for Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), of which $384.8 million was requested 
for SAG 141 U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM).
    The committee notes that AFRICOM is currently able to meet 
30 percent of its Joint Staff-validated intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) requirements in its area 
of responsibility and has identified the need to sustain this 
level of ISR support in fiscal year 2022 as an unfunded 
requirement.
    The committee recommends an increase of $67.0 million in 
OMA for SAG 141 for ISR support to AFRICOM.

Training Improvements for Counter-small Unmanned Aerial Systems

    The budget request included $54.6 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), of which $488.5 million was for SAG 
431 Administration.
    The committee supports the efforts of the Joint Counter-
Small Unmanned Aerial Systems Office (JCO), with the U.S. Army 
as the executive agent, in advancing Counter-small Unmanned 
Aerial Systems (C-sUAS) capabilities, technology, tactics, and 
training. The committee understands the urgent need to expedite 
training of a cadre of servicemembers in utilizing and 
leveraging C-sUAS technologies.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $4.0 
million in OMA for SAG 431 Administration for expedited C-sUAS 
training.

Army real estate inventory system

    The budget request included $54.6 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), of which $269.0 million was for SAG 
437 Real Estate Management.
    The committee notes that in the William M. (Mac) Thornberry 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public 
Law 116-283), the conferees authorized the Secretary of the 
Army to develop a pilot program to improve real estate 
inventory and utilization. The committee also notes that the 
pilot program will help to enhance current efforts by the U.S. 
Army to inventory the space they now have available to find 
potential savings and efficiencies consistent with the National 
Defense Strategy. The committee further notes that additional 
funding could be used to build additional capabilities into the 
online tool like artificial intelligence and machine learning 
capabilities to enhance information.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in OMA for SAG 437 Real Estate Management to further 
the development of the Army's real estate prototype inventory 
system.

United States Southern Command traditional intelligence, surveillance, 
        and reconnaissance

    The budget request included $2.0 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA) for SAG 411 Security Programs, of which 
$30.9 million is for U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) 
operations.
    The committee notes that SOUTHCOM is currently able to meet 
15 percent of its Joint Staff-validated ISR requirements in its 
area of responsibility and has identified the need to sustain 
this level of ISR support in fiscal year 2022 as an unfunded 
requirement.
    The committee recommends an increase of $18.0 million in 
OMA for traditional SOUTHCOM ISR requirements.

Army National Guard Weapons of Mass Destruction Civil Support Teams 
        Equipment Sustainment

    The budget request included $7.6 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army National Guard (OMANG), of which $704.8 
million was requested for SAG 121 Force Readiness Operations 
Support.
    The committee notes the importance of training the Weapons 
of Mass Destruction Civil Support Teams at Dugway Proving 
Ground and other similar facilities. Further, the Army National 
Guard Civil Support Teams listed this training shortfall as an 
unfunded requirement.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in OMANG for SAG 121 Force Readiness Operations 
Support.

Identity, credentialing, and access management reduction--Navy

    The budget request included $60.4 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy (OMN), of which $565.9 million was requested 
for SAG 1CCY Cyberspace Activities.
    The committee is concerned about the lack of integrated 
efforts to establish a common enterprise identity, 
credentialing, and access management (ICAM) solution across the 
Department of Defense and encourages the Navy to work with the 
Defense Information Agency in migrating its ICAM approach to an 
enterprise solution.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease in OMN of 
$5.0 million for SAG 1CCY.

Additional intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance for United 
        States Central Command

    The budget request included $53.9 billion for Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force (OMAF), of which $2.4 billion was for 
SAG 011C Combat Enhancement Forces.
    U.S. Central Command identified $53.0 million in an 
unfunded requirement for MQ-9s to support operations in the 
command's area of responsibility.
    The committee recommends an increase of $53.0 million in 
OMAF for SAG 011C Combat Enhancement Forces in support of this 
request.

A-10 force structure

    The budget request included $5.6 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force (OMAF) for SAG 011Y Flying Hour Program.
    Elsewhere in this Act, there is a provision that would 
prohibit the Air Force from retiring any of the A-10 aircraft 
in the force structure, rather than retiring 42 aircraft as 
proposed in the budget request.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $272.0 
million in the OMAF SAG 011Y Flying Hour Program, of which the 
committee notes $156.0 million is for contract work 
maintainers.

C-130 force structure

    The budget request included $5.6 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force (OMAF) for SAG 011Y Flying Hour Program.
    Elsewhere in this Act, there is a provision that would 
require the Air Force to maintain 292 C-130 aircraft in the 
force structure, rather than a force level of 279 aircraft as 
proposed in the budget request.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $83.0 
million in OMAF for SAG 011Y Flying Hour Program.

Office of Security Cooperation-Iraq reduction

    The budget request included $372.4 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force (OMAF) for SAG 015F US CENTCOM, of which 
$30.0 million was for the Office of Security Cooperation-Iraq 
(OSC-I).
    The committee expects the OSC-I to further continue its 
transition to a normalized security cooperation office, 
including by transitioning funding for its operations to the 
Foreign Military Financing Administrative Fund and the Foreign 
Military Sales Trust Fund Administrative Surcharge Account.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a reduction of $5.0 
million in OMAF SAG 015F US CENTCOM for the OSC-I. The 
committee notes that there is a corresponding legislative 
provision elsewhere in this Act.

United States Space Command pathway to full operational capability

    The budget request included $53.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force (OMAF), of which $272.6 million was 
requested for SAG 015X Combatant Command Mission Operations--
U.S. Space Command (SPACECOM).
    The committee notes the importance of accelerating the 
stand up of SPACECOM operational capability and that the 
Commander, SPACECOM submitted this as an unfunded requirement.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $26.8 
million in OMAF for SAG 015X Combatant Command Mission 
Operations--U.S. Space Command.

Joint Exercise Program

    The budget request included $407.2 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 1PL1 Joint Chiefs of 
Staff, of which no funds were requested for the Chairman of the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff Joint Exercise Program.
    The committee is concerned about sequential cuts to the 
Joint Staff suite of joint exercise programs, including the 
Joint Exercise Program, the Combatant Commander's Exercise, 
Engagement, and Training Transformation Program, and others 
across multiple accounts, even amid the increased salience of 
such activities.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $50.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 1PL1 to accelerate high-priority joint 
training and experimentation activities in fiscal year 2022.

Modernized forward-look sonar

    The budget request included $9.4 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW) for U.S. Special Operations 
Command (SOCOM), of which $1.1 billion was requested for SAG 
1PL7 Special Operations Command Maintenance.
    The committee supports prioritization of resources to 
address capability gaps, particularly those that ensure U.S. 
Special Operations Forces maintain superiority relative to near 
peer competitors, and notes that the SOCOM Commander has 
identified modernized forward-look sonar as an unfunded 
requirement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $900,000 
in OMDW for SAG 1PL7 to support modernized forward-look sonar 
capabilities for SOCOM.

Personal signature management acceleration

    The budget request included $9.4 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW) for U.S. Special Operations 
Command (SOCOM), of which $1.1 billion was for SAG 1PL7 Special 
Operations Command Maintenance.
    The committee supports prioritization of resources to 
address capability gaps, particularly those that ensure U.S. 
Special Operations Forces maintain superiority relative to 
near-peer competitors, and notes that the SOCOM Commander has 
identified the acceleration of personal signature management 
capabilities as an unfunded requirement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.4 
million in OMDW SAG 1PL7 for acceleration of SOCOM personal 
signature management capabilities.

Innovative Readiness Training increase

    The budget request included $44.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $137.3 million was 
for SAG 4GT3 Civil Military Programs.
    The committee notes that $13.1 million of the request for 
Civil Military Programs was for the Innovative Readiness 
Training (IRT). The committee is aware that the military 
services continue to face readiness challenges due to budgetary 
constraints. The committee continues to recognize the value of 
the IRT, which affords the military services realistic joint 
training opportunities for National Guard, Reserve, and Active-
Duty servicemembers.
    The committee understands that the IRT offers complex and 
challenging training opportunities for domestic and 
international crises. The committee is also aware that Alaska, 
Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Indiana, 
Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, 
Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, 
North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, and 
Wyoming all use the IRT.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GT3 Civil Military Programs.

STARBASE

    The budget request included $44.9 billion for Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $137.3 million was 
for SAG 4GT3 Civil Military Programs.
    The committee notes that the Science and Technology 
Academies Reinforcing Basic Aviation and Space Exploration 
(STARBASE) program is an effective program that improves the 
knowledge and skills of students in kindergarten through 12th 
grade in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $15.0 
million for SAG 4GT3 Civil Military Programs for the STARBASE 
program.

Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency analytic tools for 
        assessing FOCI

    The budget request included $44.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide (OMDW), of which $941.5 million was 
requested for SAG 4GTE, Defense Counterintelligence and 
Security Agency (DCSA).
    The committee understands that to fulfill its 
responsibilities under section 847 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92), the 
DCSA requires data analytic tools for assessing, continuously 
monitoring, and mitigating risks associated with the foreign 
ownership, control, and influence (FOCI) of current and 
prospective contractors and subcontractors in the Defense and 
Federal industrial base. DCSA provided a request for increased 
analytic tools as an unfunded priority.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTE for analytic tools for DCSA.

Troops-to-Teachers Program

    The budget request included $44.9 billion for Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $816.2 million was 
for SAG 4GT8 Defense Human Resources Activity.
    Since its inception, the Troops-to-Teachers program has 
successfully placed many veterans in teaching positions 
throughout the country, especially in high need school 
districts. The committee notes that two years ago the 
Department of Defense ended support for the program without 
sufficient data to assess its effectiveness and its benefit to 
separating servicemembers and veterans. Elsewhere in this Act, 
the committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to restart the Troops-to-Teachers program 
for a period of four years, with the requisite data collection 
and reporting.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase in OMDW of 
$15.0 million for SAG 4GT8 Defense Human Resources Activity.

milCloud 2.0 migration

    The budget request included $44.9 billion for Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $1.9 billion was for 
SAG 4GT9 Defense Information Systems Agency.
    The committee notes that previously scheduled cloud 
migration efforts at select fourth-estate agencies have been 
repeatedly delayed by funding shortfalls, including shortfalls 
created by reprioritization of funds toward immediate COVID-19 
related teleworking information technology improvements. The 
committee understands that the Agencies involved desire to 
migrate to milCloud 2.0 as soon as possible, as required by the 
Department of Defense Chief Information Office memorandum dated 
May 2018.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $42.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GT9 Defense Information Systems Agency 
for milCloud 2.0 migration efforts.

Cybersecurity automation and orchestration for Joint Force 
        Headquarters, Department of Defense Information Network

    The budget request included $44.9 billion in Operations and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $530.8 million was 
requested for SAG 4GU9, for the Defense Information Systems 
Agency.
    Congress directed the Department of Defense to conduct 
technology demonstrations of automated orchestration and 
interoperability of cybersecurity systems and applications in 
the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283). Section 1733 of 
the same Act created a pilot program to use speed-based metrics 
to measure performance and efficacy of the Department's 
cybersecurity service providers and security operations 
centers.
    The committee recommends an increase in OMDW of $25.0 
million for SAG 4GU9 to support these mandated cybersecurity 
demonstrations and pilot activities.

Hardening of Department of Defense Information Network and security 
        validation demonstration

    The budget request included $44.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $530.3 million was 
requested in SAG 4GU9 Defense Information Systems Agency--
CYBER.
    The unfunded requirements list submitted by the Commander, 
U.S. Cyber Command, requested additional funding for hardening 
Department of Defense networks. Elsewhere in this committee 
report, the committee directs the Department to create a 
security validation demonstration program. Accordingly, the 
committee recommends an increase of $60.1 million in OMDW, for 
SAG 4GU9, of which $20.0 million is for a security validation 
demonstration program.

U.S. Africa Command international security cooperation programs

    The budget request included $44.9 billion for Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide (OMDW), of which $2.1 billion was 
requested for SAG 4GTD Defense Security Cooperation Agency 
(DSCA), and of which $1.1 billion is for the International 
Security Cooperation Programs (ISCP) account.
    The committee notes that U.S. Africa Command identified 
maintaining its annual security cooperation program as an 
unfunded requirement. The committee also notes that elsewhere 
in this report the committee is recommending a Strategic 
Competition Initiative for U.S. Africa Command and U.S. 
Southern Command.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $60.0 
million to OMDW, for SAG 4GTD DSCA for U.S. Africa Command 
security cooperation programs and activities within the ISCP 
account.

Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative

    The budget request included $44.9 billion for Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $2.1 billion was 
requested for SAG 4GTD Defense Security Cooperation Agency 
(DSCA) and of which $250.0 million was requested for the 
Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative.
    The committee recommends an increase of $50.0 million to 
OMDW for SAG 4GTD DSCA for the Ukraine Security Assistance 
Initiative.

Joint Combined Exchange Training

    The budget request included $3.2 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 1PLR Special 
Operations Command Theater Forces, of which $48.0 million was 
requested for the Joint Combined Exchange Training (JCET) 
program.
    The committee notes the growing importance of U.S. 
interoperability with partners and allies in unconventional 
warfare and foreign internal defense missions.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.2 
million in OMDW for SAG 1PLR to restore the JCET program to 
fiscal year 2021 enacted levels.

State Partnership Program

    The budget request included $77.0 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army National Guard (OMARNG), for SAG 431 
Administration.
    This SAG resources the State Partnership Program (SPP), 
which supports the combatant commanders' security cooperation 
goals and helps build the capabilities of partner security 
forces.
    The committee notes that the Fiscal Year 2022 Justification 
for Security Cooperation Program and Activity Funding indicates 
a reduction in funding for SPP from fiscal year 2021 to fiscal 
year 2022 of $23.7 million.
    To restore SPP to fiscal year 2021 funding levels, the 
committee recommends an increase of $23.7 million in OMARNG for 
SAG 431 for the SPP.

Impact Aid

    The budget request included $44.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $3.1 billion was for 
SAG 4GTJ, Department of Defense Education Activity. The amount 
authorized to be appropriated for OMDW includes the following 
changes from the budget request. The provisions underlying 
these changes in funding levels are discussed in greater detail 
in title V of this committee report.

                    [Changes in millions of dollars]
 
 
 
Impact aid for schools with military dependent                     +50.0
 students.............................................
Impact aid for children with severe disabilities......             +20.0
                                                       -----------------
    Total.............................................             +70.0
 

Analytical tools in evaluating energy resilience measures

    The budget request included $1.7 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW) for SAG 4GTN Office of the 
Secretary of Defense, of which no funds were provided for 
instituting a process to ensure that the Department of Defense, 
when evaluating energy resilience measures, uses analytical 
tools that are accurate and effective in projecting the costs 
and performance of such measures.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN for the maintenance of analytical 
tools in evaluating energy resilience measures in the Office of 
the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Energy, Installations, 
and Environment.

Bien Hoa dioxin cleanup

    The budget request included $1.8 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW) for SAG 4GTN Office of the 
Secretary of Defense, of which no funds were proposed for Bien 
Hoa dioxin cleanup in Vietnam.
    The committee recommends an increase of $15.0 million in 
OMDW for SAG 4GTN for Bien Hoa dioxin cleanup. The committee 
notes that elsewhere in this Act, the committee recommends a 
provision that would extend the authority of the Secretary of 
Defense to transfer up to $15.0 million to the Secretary of 
State for Bien Hoa dioxin cleanup in Vietnam through fiscal 
year 2022.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Nation-wide human health 
        assessment

    The budget request included $44.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $1.8 billion was for 
SAG 4GTN Office of the Secretary of Defense, of which no funds 
were proposed for the ongoing Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention (CDC) Nation-wide human health assessment related to 
contaminated sources of drinking water from per- and poly-
fluoroalkyl substances.
    The committee continues to support the ongoing human health 
assessment. Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase 
of $15.0 million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN for the ongoing CDC 
assessment.

Congressional Hearings and Reporting Requirements Tracking System 
        Modernization

    The budget request included $44.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $1.8 billion was 
requested for SAG 4GTN Office of the Secretary of Defense.
    The committee notes that the Office of the Secretary of 
Defense for Legislative Affairs (OASD(LA)) catalogues all 
congressional reporting requirements in their Congressional 
Hearings and Reporting Requirements Tracking System (CHARRTS). 
Unfortunately, CHARRTS is an antiquated system with network 
security issues, and the Department of Defense has recommended 
that it be replaced with a modern cloud-based system. However, 
the Department has not prioritized funding for this effort, 
even though it could help streamline the congressional tracking 
and reporting process, which is a high priority for both the 
Congress and the Department.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN to support modernization of 
CHARRTS.

Cost Assessment Data Enterprise

    The budget request included $1.8 billion in Operations and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTN Office of the 
Secretary of Defense, of which $28.5 million was for Director, 
Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation.
    The committee commends the initiative of the Cost 
Assessment Data Enterprise (CADE) to create a unified effort to 
ensure the strategic collection, curation, and use of 
acquisition, cost, and technical data for improved analysis and 
decision making. In the past decade, CADE has advanced 
capabilities for digitizing data collection, storage, and 
sharing to expedite availability for analysis of acquisition 
programs and contract spending; strategically planning and 
collecting data; and reducing the reporting burden on 
contractors while improving data quality and insight for 
analysis. The committee is concerned that without adequate 
funding, CADE cost data and software initiative will slow, 
efficient availability of up-to-date data will decrease, and 
the lack of strategic planning will cause irreparable data gaps 
in the future.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.5 
million in SAG 4GTN Office of the Secretary of Defense for 
CADE's cost data and software efforts.

Defense Environmental International Cooperation program increase

    The budget request included $1.8 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW) for SAG 4GTN Office of the 
Secretary of Defense, of which no funds were provided for the 
Defense Environmental International Cooperation (DEIC) program.
    The committee continues to note that the Army National 
Guard and other military units are frequently called upon to 
respond to humanitarian assistance and disaster relief (HA/DR) 
crises around the world. The DEIC program enables the Army 
National Guard to share best practices and lessons learned from 
its own HA/DR missions with U.S. allies. This important program 
promotes and develops allied HA/DR capability for a relatively 
small amount of money. In addition, illegal trafficking can 
threaten the stability and economies of nations of strategic 
importance to the United States, particularly in Africa and the 
Indo-Pacific, and often become a key source of funding for 
extremist groups. The DEIC program can be used by geographic 
combatant commanders to engage with U.S. allies, partners, and 
other nations around the globe to assist them in addressing 
these impacts that might undermine national and regional 
stability.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million to SAG 4GTN for the purpose of reviving and broadening 
the DEIC program.

Occupational license portability for military spouses through 
        interstate compacts

    The budget request included $44.9 billion for Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $1.8 billion was for 
SAG 4GTN Office of the Secretary of Defense.
    The committee remains concerned about the lack of 
portability of employment licenses and credentials across State 
lines, which hinders military spouse employment. Due to the 
delays and expense involved in re-licensure and re-
credentialing, many military spouses decide not to practice 
their professions. This becomes a financial and career choice 
issue for military families, impacting servicemembers' desire 
to stay in the military.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $4.0 
million in OMDW, for SAG 4GTN for the activities outlined in 
section 575 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92), which required the 
Secretary of Defense to enter into cooperative agreements with 
the Council of State Governments to assist with the funding and 
development of interstate compacts on licensed occupations.

Office of the Secretary of Defense civilian workforce

    The budget request included $44.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $1.8 billion was 
requested for SAG 4GTN Office of the Secretary of Defense.
    The committee is concerned about decreased funding for the 
civilian workforce within the Office of the Secretary Defense. 
The committee understands that this has resulted in a reduction 
of civilian billets in critical components including the Office 
of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, the Office of the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, and 
the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $25.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN to support the civilian workforce.

Personnel in the Office of Assistant Secretary of Defense Sustainment 
        and Environment, Safety, and Occupational Health

    The budget request included $44.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $1.8 billion was 
requested for SAG 4GTN Office of the Secretary of Defense, of 
which no funds were provided for sufficient numbers of 
personnel in the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
for Sustainment in Environment, Safety, and Occupational Health 
(ESOH).
    The committee recognizes the challenges facing the 
Department of Defense in the Office's remit, ranging from per- 
and polyfluoroalkyl substances to the Military Housing 
Privatization Initiative.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in OMDW for ESOH personnel in the Office of the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Energy, Installations, and 
Environment.

Secretary of Defense Strategic Competition Initiative

    The budget request included $44.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $1.8 billion was 
requested for SAG 4GTN Office of the Secretary of Defense.
    The committee notes the establishment elsewhere in this Act 
of the Secretary of Defense Strategic Competition Initiative, 
which will support Department of Defense activities and 
programs that advance United States national security 
objectives in the strategic competition with near-peer rivals 
China and Russia.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase in OMDW 
of $20.0 million for SAG 4GTN for the Secretary of Defense 
Strategic Competition Initiative.

United States Special Operations Command management and headquarters

    The budget request included $9.4 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for U.S. Special Operations 
Command (SOCOM).
    The committee is concerned by the continued management, 
headquarters, civilian personnel, and contractor growth within 
the SOCOM enterprise and believes additional resources should 
be better prioritized to address capability gaps, particularly 
those that ensure our special operations forces maintain 
superiority relative to near peer competitors.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an undistributed 
decrease of $28.7 million in OMDW for SOCOM. The committee 
notes that these funds have been applied to unfunded 
requirements identified by the SOCOM Commander elsewhere in 
this Act.

Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid

    The budget request included $110.0 million in SAG 4GTD, 
Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid (OHDACA).
    The committee notes that the OHDACA program has been the 
primary source of funding for the Department of Defense 
contributions to COVID-19 pandemic support to partners and 
allies to include assistance to aid testing, diagnostic 
support, infection control, personal protective equipment, and 
contact tracing. Despite increased demands, the budget request 
decreased from prior years.
    The committee recommends an increase of $25.0 million in 
4GTD OHDACA for additional OHDACA programming.

Bulk fuel adjustment

    The budget request included $6.6 billion across the 
Operation and Maintenance accounts for the purchase of bulk 
fuel.
    Analysis conducted by the Government Accountability Office 
(GAO) using the most recent data indicates that the Department 
of Defense has overstated its refined fuel costs by $319.5 
million in fiscal year 2022. The committee commends GAO for its 
work in analyzing bulk fuel prices to assist Congress in 
decision-making given the unique uncertainty of the current 
fuel markets.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease in the 
Operation and Maintenance accounts of $319.5 million to account 
for likely overstated bulk fuel purchases.

Foreign currency fluctuations

    The budget request included $290.5 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance.
    The committee notes that the Government Accountability 
Office has repeatedly issued recommendations for the Department 
of Defense to analyze its Foreign Currency Fluctuations, 
Defense account balance given historical trends and managerial 
usage of the account.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an undistributed 
decrease of $300.0 million across the Operation and Maintenance 
accounts.

Printing costs reduction

    The budget request included $290.4 billion across the 
Operation and Maintenance accounts.
    The committee notes that the Government Accountability 
Office found in its latest review of Department of Defense 
document services that the Department averaged $608.0 million 
per year in printing costs.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $25.5 
million across the Operation and Maintenance accounts of the 
active components and Defense-wide agencies for printing costs.

Unobligated balances

    The budget request included $290.4 billion across the 
Operation and Maintenance accounts.
    The committee notes that the Government Accountability 
Office has repeatedly issued recommendations for the Department 
of Defense to analyze its unobligated balances given historical 
trends and managerial usage of the account.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $1.6 
billion across the Operation and Maintenance accounts of the 
active and reserve components and a decrease of $577.2 million 
in Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide.

                       Items of Special Interest


Aberdeen Proving Ground

    The committee understands that Aberdeen Proving Ground, 
Edgewood Area, contained 63 remnant production plant slabs and 
50-year-old laboratories that are inactive and mostly vacant. 
These facilities were formerly used by Edgewood Chemical 
Biological Center and the Medical Research Institute of 
Chemical Defense (MRICD). The committee is encouraged by the 
Department of Defense's inclusion of specific funding to remove 
these contaminated facilities, which includes decommissioning, 
decontamination, and demolition through a phased approach under 
the Contaminated Building Demolition Program. The Department 
has already obligated funds, begun demolition, and programmed 
additional funds for future years to continue these efforts. 
The committee encourages the Department to continue these 
funding efforts to ensure demolition activities continue, 
particularly with significant progress already underway. 
Demolition of these facilities will result in cost savings on 
infrastructure, maintenance, and security of these unusable 
buildings and reduce the risk of contamination. The reduction 
of these facilities will have a positive impact on the 
surrounding missions, including the new MRICD facility, the 
United States Army's Research, Development and Engineering 
Command Advanced Chemistry Laboratory, and the Army Public 
Health facility.

Advanced human performance based small arms training

    The committee is aware of small arms synthetic training 
capabilities within the Department of Defense (DOD) that have 
received independent agency validation that demonstrate the 
ability to increase readiness and lethality while improving 
cognitive load management and emotional modulation to address 
lawful and proportional application of force training and 
implicit bias instruction, within the Department's small arms 
training and readiness model. The committee commends the Marine 
Corps Operational Test and Evaluation Activity-Quantico 
(MOCTEA) for its diligence in testing and evaluating methods to 
improve combat marksmanship and lethality by replicating the 
physical, ocular, and cognitive challenges of combat utilizing 
an Advanced Small Arms Lethality Trainer (ASALT). An 
independent agency study demonstrated that the ASALT-trained 
shooters outperformed all other training categories, with a 
significant increase in individual marine's lethal efficiency 
percentage, while also scoring higher on cognitive-based 
decisions than their live-fire counterparts and reducing 
resource requirements for combat marksmanship training, 
delivering a far higher warfighter training return on 
investment.
    In light of these results, the committee strongly urges the 
DOD to continue to prioritize and properly resource each 
service's transition from less effective and efficient legacy 
small arms simulation systems to advanced human performance 
training platforms that integrate wearable biosensors and data 
collection software capable of collecting and analyzing 
individual servicemember data to track improvements, 
degradation, and remediation requirements in weapon competency, 
lethality, and the management of cognitive load and emotional 
modulation throughout their military careers, pre- and post-
deployment, as validated by the MOCTEA study.
    The committee also directs the Department to provide, not 
later than March 1, 2022, a briefing that includes: (1) The 
status of each service's integration of advanced human-
performance based small arms synthetic training systems; (2) A 
description of the program or system's ability to utilize 
Internet of Things-based biosensor and training data to track 
and validate increased lethality, the impact and management of 
cognitive load, and the ability to modulate emotions to address 
implicit bias and cognitive-based decision making; (3) The 
independent agency studies that validated the system's 
capabilities and results; (4) A sampling of the individual and 
unit readiness data outcomes; and (5) An assessment of how 
small arms synthetic training systems that incorporate 
biosensor and big data collection tools could assist in the 
pre-and-post deployment health assessments and rehabilitation 
of warfighters.

Advanced materials processing briefing

    The committee remains concerned that the United States 
relies heavily upon foreign imports for a number of processed 
critical minerals, including rare earth elements. The committee 
believes the Defense Logistics Agency should conduct a review 
of the resiliency of the domestic defense industrial base and, 
based upon the concern surrounding resiliency in the critical 
minerals industrial base, brief the Senate Armed Services 
Committee, not later than March 1, 2022, on whether it is 
beneficial to establish advanced materials processing hubs that 
can partner with industry and universities to facilitate 
advanced materials processing and research and development in 
order to increase resiliency across the defense industrial 
base.

Agent Orange briefing

    The committee notes that under Operation Red Hat, the 
Department of Defense (DOD) imported Agent Orange to be used as 
a herbicide on military bases in Okinawa. Agent Orange was 
stored at the bases and used on public spaces in the 1980s 
through 2013. There has been widespread medical evidence 
linking Agent Orange and multiple health conditions.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the Senate Armed Services Committee, 
not later than March 1, 2022, on the use and storage of 
herbicides on present and former military installations on the 
island of Okinawa. The briefing shall discuss the shipment of 
herbicides to Johnston Island under Operation Red Hat, the 
excavation of suspected herbicide containers at Marine Corps 
Air Station Futenma in 1981, the Okinawa City soccer pitch in 
2013, and Kadena Air Base; and other suspected locations of 
herbicide. The briefing shall address any test results by the 
DOD and the Government of Japan showing the presence of the 
chemical components of herbicide-2,4,5-Trichlorophenoxyacetic 
acid, 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and 2,3,7,8-
Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin. The Secretary shall consult with 
appropriate organizations who represent veterans of Okinawa in 
preparing this briefing.

Air Force range prioritization and modernization

    The committee supports the Air Force's intention to 
prioritize and accelerate investments to develop and upgrade 
certain training ranges to attain threat matrix framework level 
4 capability, such as peer threat, by not later than fiscal 
year 2026. To that end, the committee supports Air Force 
investment in advanced radar threat systems, live mission 
operations capability common architecture, infrastructure, 
advanced integrated air defense systems, air combat maneuvering 
instrumentation modernization, global positioning jamming 
suites, contested-degraded operations jamming suits, higher 
fidelity targets with more advanced characteristics, modernized 
weapons scoring systems, and secure-live-virtual-constructive 
advanced air combat training systems. To continue this 
investment effort, the committee made funding available 
elsewhere in the bill.

Alternatively powered vehicles

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense (DOD) 
has indicated some concern as to what authority it might use to 
obtain alternatively fueled vehicle (AFV) charging or refueling 
stations on its installations. Not only may the Department use 
authorities under sections 2805 and 2912 of title 10, United 
States Code, to fund such facilities, as well as funding under 
the Energy Resilience and Conservation Investment Program, but 
the Department may also use section 2913(d) of title 10, United 
States Code, authority to enter into agreements with utilities 
to provide and operate such facilities. The committee's intent 
is that the Department may authorize contracting officers to 
use current non-DOD funding mechanisms, such as energy savings 
performance contracts, utility energy services contracts 
(UESC), and others, for transportation projects to modernize 
installations, given it is unlikely that the Department will 
have enough resources on its own to modernize through direct 
appropriations. Similarly, the committee's intent is for the 
Department to authorize contracting officers to use UESCs and 
other non-DOD-funded mechanisms for the deployment of AFVs, as 
defined in section 321 of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public 
Law 116-283), along with its related charging or refueling 
infrastructure.
    As the Department continues to use AFVs, the Department 
should start its preparations now, ensuring the designs allow 
for expansion as commercial and Government demand increases 
over time. The committee also notes that Division Z, Title I, 
section 1002, subsection (b) of the Consolidated Appropriations 
Act, 2021 (Public Law 116-260) changed the definition of 
``Energy Conservation Measures'' to include ``energy consuming 
devices and required support structures,'' under which AFV 
charging or refueling infrastructure would certainly apply. The 
committee notes that the military services also are able to use 
the current Government Services Administration blanket purchase 
agreements to effectively pursue AFV charging or refueling 
infrastructure whether through the procurement of, or 
installation by, non-DOD funded agreement, in locations that 
are covered by one of the area-wide contracts without 
additional legislative authority. The committee also encourages 
the Department to explore the concept of charging or refueling 
as a service that would obviate the need for the Department to 
procure, operate, and maintain AFV infrastructure.
    Lastly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the Senate Armed Services Committee not 
later than March 1, 2022, including: (1) A determination of the 
optimum inventory for non-tactical fleet vehicles with an 
emphasis on eliminating unnecessary or non-essential vehicles, 
as well as a determination by the Department of how much of the 
non-tactical fleet should consist of AFVs or other vehicle 
types; (2) The need for an executive agent for the development 
of alternatively powered tactical vehicles; (3) The long-term 
availability of internal combustion engines and spare parts for 
such engines; (4) The relative tactical benefits and 
limitations of each type of propulsion, such as speed, 
acceleration, noise production, time to refuel or recharge, and 
range and operational duration across the scope of mission 
profiles; (5) The relative tactical benefits and limitations of 
each type of propulsion with regard to providing support to 
other tactical systems requiring electricity; (6) How 
electrical and other alternatively powered propulsion systems 
might be fueled on the battlefield and what investments might 
be necessary to provide such a fueling system; (7) The relative 
vulnerability to personnel and to interruption in the supply 
chain of fuel sources for each type of propulsion system; (8) A 
projected timeline of when a possible conversion to 
alternatively powered tactical vehicles could reasonably occur 
without causing a significant impact on readiness of the Armed 
Forces; (9) The projected cost of converting or replacing and 
sustaining alternatively powered tactical vehicles, to include 
training; (10) Any national security implications related to 
the use of and supply chain of AFVs and their source materials; 
and (11) Any other element the Secretary deems appropriate.
    The committee further requests that the Secretary identify 
the types of tactical vehicles considered in the above analysis 
and notes that the term ``alternatively powered,'' with respect 
to a vehicle or a propulsion system for a vehicle, means a fuel 
or power source described in the first sentence of section 
241(2) of the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 7581(2)) or propane.

Army organic industrial base modernization

    The committee encourages the Army to consider the 
operational and performance benefits of potentially adopting 
commercial best practices in manufacturing throughout 
installations comprising the Army's organic industrial base 
(OIB) as part of their strategic framework for long-term OIB 
modernization. The committee notes this could result in 
significant improvements not only for legacy weapon system 
sustainment but also next-generation weapon system sustainment. 
The committee also notes that the Army has indicated a 
modernized OIB must include emerging technology, such as 
robotics and artificial intelligence, and visionary plant and 
process layouts, and machine programming. The committee is 
aware of emerging commercial manufacturing and repair 
technology to include fixture-less assembly manufacturing, 
automated fabrication, laser cutting, and a number of 
techniques for cutting, forming, and shaping components that 
could potentially help inform modernization efforts in the 
Army's OIB to improve upon manufacturing efficiencies and 
capabilities.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to brief the committee on courses of action to facilitate 
engagement and coordination with the commercial industrial 
base, to include non-traditional defense contractors regarding 
OIB modernization, not later than March 1, 2022. The briefing 
shall include: (1) An update on efforts to modernize aging 
capital equipment; (2) An update on plans to include emerging 
technology, to include fixture-less assembly manufacturing, 
automated fabrication, robotics, and visionary plant and 
process layouts and machine programming; and (3) The 
advisability and feasibility of initiating pilot programs 
between the industrial base and the Army's OIB related to 
experimentation and demonstrations of commercial advanced 
manufacturing techniques to help accelerate organic industrial 
base modernization.

Army Pre-Positioned Stock readiness

    The committee recognizes Army Pre-Positioned Stock (APS) 
materiel is the cornerstone of the Army's ability to rapidly 
project power. APS also includes war reserve stocks for allies, 
which are stocks owned and funded by the United States, to be 
released to supported allied forces under the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961 (Public Law 87-195). As such, the 
readiness and preparedness of APS sites are paramount in the 
era of great power competition. The committee acknowledges 
increases in ship use cost rates and the need to execute dry 
dock maintenance at APS-3 (Afloat). The committee recognizes 
failure to address required APS-3 (Afloat) fleet maintenance 
adds unnecessary risk and uncertainty to U.S. and allied 
nations' strategic logistics readiness and encourages the 
Department of Defense to seek solutions to mitigate this risk.

Augmented reality training to support aviation operations

    The committee is encouraged by the steps the Department of 
Defense has taken to support necessary training and sustainment 
activities that continue to enhance military operations, 
especially in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Focus must 
remain on providing the warfighter with the needed tools to 
properly support their ongoing training for mission readiness.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to fully evaluate and consider deployment of commercial-off-
the-shelf virtual reality platforms that support aircraft 
maintenance, operations training, and advanced pilot training 
across all military services, specifically those dealing with 
the MQ-9, C-130J, and F-16. The Secretary shall provide a 
briefing to the Senate Armed Services Committee on the results 
of its evaluation not later than March 1, 2022.

Autonomous robotic targets for small arms training ranges

    The committee is aware of increasing Marine Corps 
operational force demand for small arms training range 
autonomous robotic targets to improve soldier lethality, team 
performance, and marksmanship. The committee understands that 
this technology provides marines with an unpredictable and 
dynamic training adversary, improves warfighter readiness, and 
expands the useful-life of existing small arms ranges. The 
committee also understands that within the Marine Corps, 
operational units, as well as one training unit, have generated 
two directive universal needs statements since 2008 for rapid, 
widespread adoption of autonomous robotic targets, including 
urgent requests from the Combat Marksmanship Program. These 
requests resulted in six favorable studies and internal 
assessments, including a year-long 2018 End User Evaluation 
conducted by the Marine Corps Warfighter Lab that determined 
autonomous robotic targets were a ``vast improvement to 
training modality over existing systems and was value added in 
all training events/scenarios.''
    The committee also notes that this technology was 
previously favorably reviewed by the Army Asymmetric Warfare 
Group and Army Research Institute for small arms training and 
has been utilized by select Army units for improved training 
and soldier performance evaluation. Finally, the committee 
understands that while this technology has shown promise to 
deliver additional capability to the Marine Corps, the Marine 
Corps Training and Education Command has thus far not initiated 
a full capability development document as a precursor to a 
program of record.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to provide a briefing to the Senate Armed Services 
Committee by not later than March 1, 2022, on an assessment of 
whether a program of record for autonomous robotic targets to 
address the needs for both formal schools and operational 
forces is needed. If the determination is that a program of 
record is needed, the briefing should include a timeline for 
implementation.
    Additionally, the committee encourages the Army to 
accelerate more rapid deployment of autonomous robotic targets 
and to leverage end-user evaluations, existing logistics 
support, and lessons learned from similar Marine Corps training 
exercises in order to hasten potential adoption.

Briefing on reducing life cycle costs

    The committee is encouraged by the efforts of the Office of 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Sustainment (ASD 
Sustainment) to improve readiness and control life cycle costs.
    Accordingly, the committee encourages the ASD Sustainment 
to expand these efforts across the Department of Defense (DOD) 
to support modeling complex defense systems, performing 
simulation, and analytically optimizing readiness and life 
cycle cost outcomes. This should reliably redefine readiness 
not as a single measure but rather as a cost-optimized curve to 
provide the Congress and the Department with multiple support 
options across an array of budgetary scenarios. These scenarios 
should help the Department better understand the current state 
of readiness and the steps required to reduce life cycle costs 
and improve system performance.
    Additionally, the committee directs the ASD Sustainment to 
provide a briefing, not later than January 15, 2022, to the 
Senate Armed Services Committee on efforts to standardize 
readiness modeling for major weapon systems across the 
Department's enterprise.

Center for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances

    The committee notes that per- and polyfluoroalkyl 
substances (PFAS) are persistent in the environment and may 
adversely affect human health at certain levels. The committee 
believes that a whole-of-government approach should be pursued 
to address these substances and that a center is needed where 
knowledge is compiled, correlated, and where best practices can 
be shared. A multidisciplinary PFAS center would bring together 
all levels of Government, universities, research institutions, 
and private industry to support multidisciplinary and cross-
institutional projects and gather an index of existing 
information in order to identify data gaps, guide approaches, 
and inform policy decisions. The committee encourages the 
Department of Defense to work with other Federal agencies to 
consider this approach.

Cooperative agreements for shared use of airspace near United States 
        southern border

    The committee urges the Secretary of Defense to consult 
with the Secretary of State, and the heads of other Federal 
departments and agencies as appropriate, regarding the 
feasibility and desirability of initiating negotiations with 
Mexico on shared use agreements for airspace near the United 
States-Mexico border to meet the increasing demand for airspace 
at U.S. military training ranges including the Barry M. 
Goldwater Range.
    The committee supports the Department's exploration of 
appropriate shared use agreements with Mexico and directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a report and briefing to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives not later than March 1, 2022, on the 
feasibility and benefits of entering into a shared use 
agreement with Mexico to extend range airspace.

Cost Assessment Data Enterprise

    The committee believes that the complexity and scope of 
cost estimation work at the Department of Defense continues to 
expand, as departmental senior leadership and congressional 
staff, among others, seek additional cost estimation 
information on a growing list of programs of all sizes and 
types. The Cost Assessment Data Enterprise within the Cost 
Assessment and Program Evaluation office remains crucial to 
ensuring that the accuracy and responsiveness of cost estimates 
continues to improve at the Department of Defense. However, the 
committee is concerned that funding for the Cost Assessment 
Data Enterprise has fallen nearly 25 percent since the fiscal 
year 2018 level of $8.0 million, even as the office's 
requirements continue to grow and the necessity of lessening 
data burdens on contractors increases in importance. Funding 
decreases are evident in the Cost Assessment and Program 
Evaluation office's own contribution to the Cost Assessment 
Data Enterprise, as well as the contributions of other offices.
    Therefore, the committee encourages the Deputy Secretary of 
Defense to program for real growth in the Cost Assessment Data 
Enterprise budget to accelerate modernization of cost 
estimation and acquisition data across the Department of 
Defense.
    The committee directs the Deputy Secretary to provide a 
briefing to the congressional defense committees, not later 
than March 1, 2022, on the Cost Assessment Data Enterprise, 
including a description of its use in execution of CAPE 
missions, identification of resources made available to the 
enterprise, and a discussion of the role of the Cost Assessment 
Data Enterprise within the Department's overall strategy to 
improve the use of data in decision making.

Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency industrial security 
        report

    The committee notes the significant expansion of the 
Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency (DCSA) mission 
pursuant to section 847 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) and recognizes the 
need for DCSA to have the proper resources to implement the 
National Industrial Security Program (NISP) given its expanded 
mission. In particular, the committee notes the national 
security imperative that the DCSA successfully execute 
comprehensive assessments of foreign ownership, control, or 
influence for the NISP.
    As such, the committee directs the Director of the Defense 
Counterintelligence and Security Agency, not later than by 
March 1, 2022, to submit to the congressional defense 
committees and the congressional intelligence committees a 
report on DCSA implementation of the NISP, to include a 
description of the purpose, authorities, and resources 
associated with the DCSA's administration of the NISP and other 
industrial security programs. The report shall additionally 
address the DCSA's path forward in overseeing the NISP, 
including:
          (1) The anticipated resources, workforce 
        authorizations, and authorities required by the DCSA to 
        perform its NISP and other industrial security programs 
        administered by the DCSA;
          (2) Any anticipated and proposed additional 
        industrial security responsibilities to be carried out 
        by the DCSA on behalf of the Department of Defense, 
        including--
                  (a) the DCSA's role in the implementation of 
                the assessment and mitigation of risks related 
                to Foreign Ownership, Control, or Influence of 
                contractors and subcontractors doing business 
                on behalf of the Department of Defense, to 
                include those conducting work on behalf of the 
                Agency, per section 847 of the National Defense 
                Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020; and
                  (b) the Controlled Unclassified Information 
                program, established by Executive Order 13556, 
                on behalf of the Department of Defense; and
          (3) the resources, workforce authorizations, and 
        authorities required to perform any anticipated and 
        proposed responsibilities on behalf of the Department 
        of Defense.

Demining the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's firing ranges in 
        Afghanistan

    The committee acknowledges the humanitarian threat 
presented by North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) firing 
ranges in Afghanistan and encourages the Department of Defense, 
in coordination with the Department of State, NATO, and other 
members of the international coalition, to assess the 
advisability and feasibility of clearing these areas of 
explosive contamination, particularly in light of the planned 
departure of international security contractors. The committee 
further notes the important role that humanitarian demining 
organizations play in both undertaking demining work and 
supporting security and stability for Afghan nationals. The 
committee encourages the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to 
partner with humanitarian demining organizations where 
practicable to complete such work.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of State, and the 
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, to provide a briefing to the 
Senate Armed Services Committee regarding the assessment, 
including the feasibility of partnering with humanitarian 
demining organizations, not later than September 1, 2022.

Distributed energy projects briefing

    The committee is aware of Department of Defense (DOD) 
initiatives on energy resilience as outlined in DOD Instruction 
4170.11, Installation Energy Management, and commends the 
Department for its efforts to date to mitigate the impact of 
energy disruptions on military installations that could 
threaten mission accomplishment. The committee continues to 
encourage the Department to procure, operate, maintain, test, 
and upgrade energy resilient systems for critical energy 
requirements on its military installations. The use of 
alternative or distributed energy offers significant promise in 
achieving energy resilience and meeting the renewable energy 
goal of 25 percent by 2025 for the Department. However, the 
committee is interested in exploring how the Department can 
better address barriers to development of additional 
distributed energy projects to support military installation 
energy needs. The committee encourages the Department, in 
coordination with the military services, to standardize, 
wherever possible, the policies and processes that guide 
distributed energy projects.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, in coordination with the Secretaries of the military 
departments, to provide a briefing to the Senate Armed Services 
Committee, not later than March 1, 2022, on the following: (1) 
The average time elapsed from project initiation to completion 
for non-DOD funded distributed energy projects; (2) Areas that 
the DOD and the military services can standardize items such as 
consent agreements, power purchase agreements, site licenses, 
ground and roof-top leases and subleases, and memos of 
aforementioned documents; (3) An analysis of whether any 
actions, including more flexible contract terms, could increase 
incentives for project developers; (4) Measures that would 
increase incentives for battery storage on military 
installations; (5) An analysis and comparison of the cost-
effectiveness of the various projects and technologies; and (6) 
An analysis determining whether net-metering arrangements 
between developers and installations that provide electricity 
under utility service agreements are subject to Federal 
Acquisition Rules.

Encouraging the Army's integration of synthetic and live training

    The committee agrees with senior Army leaders' stated 
desire to accelerate live training efforts within the Synthetic 
Training Environment (STE) program such that this critical 
element reaches initial operating capability before fiscal year 
2026, as originally planned. The committee believes the Army 
must continue STE-Live Training System (LTS) and STE Soldier 
Virtual Trainer (SVT) development and is supportive of 
leveraging additional STE program funding in this effort.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to provide a briefing to the Senate Armed Services 
Committee, not later than December 15, 2021, on efforts to 
accelerate the live training element of STE. The briefing shall 
include, but not be limited to, a detailed description of STE-
LTS and SVT development to date, an assessment of benefits 
accrued from incorporating live training within STE, and any 
plans for accelerating synthetic live training environment into 
a program of record.

Energy savings performance contracts

    The committee is aware of significant delays occurring 
within U.S. Army Installation Management Command's (IMCOM's) 
utilization of energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs) and 
utility energy service contracts (UESCs). For example, the 
committee notes that investment grade audits (IGAs) for pending 
projects are being delayed significantly at IMCOM without 
substantive reason being provided. As a result, installation 
resilience needs are going unaddressed while private sector 
partners are waiting months for proposal feedback. While the 
committee recognizes that due diligence must be completed to 
ensure performance contracts are a positive investment for the 
Government and taxpayers, a decision on whether to proceed with 
a contract must be made expeditiously at each phase of the 
process.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to provide a briefing to the committee, not later than 
March 1, 2022, on the average processing times of ESPCs and 
UESCs, any actions the Department of Defense has taken to 
reduce these timelines, the standard timeline for providing 
feedback to the contractor on submitted IGAs, how often this 
timeline has been exceeded in the past 3 years and who 
currently has the authority to terminate the project after 
review of the IGA, what the timeline is for providing the 
decision to terminate the project to the installation commander 
and the contracting officer, and how often has this timeline 
been exceeded in the past 3 years.

Equipment procurement parity for operational reserves

    The committee notes the continued importance of reserve 
component units to fulfill critical operational and manning 
requirements in support of combatant commands. As the military 
services continue to develop, procure, and issue new non-
aircraft equipment necessary to compete with near-peer 
adversaries in support of the National Defense Strategy, it is 
imperative that new non-aircraft equipment is distributed 
between the active, National Guard, and Reserves based on the 
operational need of the combatant commander. The committee is 
concerned that aging older-model platforms in the Guard and 
Reserves present operational and readiness risks to units that 
are consistently deployed. Reliance by Guard and Reserves units 
on older non-aircraft equipment that is less capable, 
maintenance-intensive, and hamstrung by increasingly scarce 
repair parts hampers unit readiness and reduces the capability 
units provide to combatant commanders when deployed. The 
committee encourages the military services to work with the 
combatant commands to consider the age of non-aircraft 
equipment in Guard and Reserves units as they prioritize and 
field new equipment sets to the force.

Expansion of the ship depot maintenance pilot program

    The committee notes that the budget request for fiscal year 
2022 includes a continuation and expansion of the ongoing ship 
depot maintenance pilot program. This program utilizes funds 
from the Other Procurement, Navy (OPN) account to improve 
maintenance outcomes through an extended funding obligation 
period for private contracted ship maintenance in the U.S. 
Pacific Fleet.
    The committee further notes this pilot program has been in 
effect since fiscal year 2020, with $1.0 billion in OPN funds 
in fiscal year 2020, $1.2 billion in OPN funds in fiscal year 
2021, and $1.3 billion in OPN funds requested in fiscal year 
2022.
    The committee believes this pilot program has demonstrated 
the value of using the OPN account to improve ship depot 
maintenance outcomes through improved industrial base stability 
in ship repair scheduling, improved ability to horizontally 
group availabilities, improved ability to extend contract 
awards across fiscal years, reduced potential for poor quality 
obligations late in a fiscal year, and an opportunity to 
establish and capitalize on best practices and improve ship 
maintenance agility.
    The committee recommends that the Congress support 
continuation of this pilot program during fiscal year 2022, 
including expanding the pilot program to include the U.S. Fleet 
Forces Command.

Ground Test Asset Board

    The committee understands that the Ground Test Asset Board 
(GTAB) is a new Air Force Test Center (AFTC) presentation that 
is intended to replicate the Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) 
``Fleet Board'' briefing to quickly bring awareness to the 
capacity and demographics of specific AFTC test/test support 
facilities. AFTC is currently developing the GTAB to provide 
information to stakeholders as to the capacity and limitations 
for selected test facilities. The committee understands that 
the GTAB brings together capacity, demand, capability 
description, and demographics such as age, Plant Replacement 
Value (PRV), current assessment, and future needs. The 
committee notes this is different from the traditional 
Facilities, Sustainment, Restoration, and Modernization (FSRM) 
model and could provide a more comprehensive picture of the 
total sustainment needs of certain facilities.
    As the AFTC works to achieve 2 percent PRV, the committee 
recognizes the importance of the quantitative and qualitative 
information provided by the GTAB in order to ensure the 
capabilities, constraints, and needs of test/test support 
facilities across its enterprise. The committee understands 
that this new concept may better depict preventive maintenance 
funding levels for installations such as the AFTC. The 
committee notes that while PRV gives a rough estimate for 
replacement of subject facility, it may not be a complete view 
of requirements for research, development, test, and evaluation 
facilities. The committee understands that the AFTC is instead 
developing Equipment Replacement Value (ERV), which are systems 
not covered by PRV, the ``missionized'' portion of the 
facility. When combining PRV and ERC, a valuation of Capability 
Replacement Value (CRV) may better provide estimates to replace 
a research, development, test, and evaluation ``capability'' 
vice the empty facility.
    The committee believes there are disconnects in financial 
resourcing for Air/Ground Test Infrastructure, and CRV 
development through the GTAB could help determine the adequacy 
of FSRM funding. Additionally, as reflected in 2018 and 2021 
Secretary of the Air Force AFTC assessments, the AFTC is not 
property resourced to comply with the 2018 National Defense 
Strategy/Chief of Staff of the Air Force direction to 
``Accelerate change, or lose.''
    The committee believes that the GTAB could increase 
external awareness of crucial ground test assets by adopting 
the ``Fleet Board'' presentation measuring capacity and 
capability.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the Senate Armed Services 
Committee not later than January 1, 2022, on the GTAB's ability 
to better inform FSRM resourcing decisions. The briefing shall 
include, but not be limited to:
          (1) The current status of standing up the GTAB;
          (2) Planned milestones to measure success;
          (3) Any known gaps in funding resources for AFTC 
        test/test support facilities, as well as for non-AFTC 
        test/test support facilities;
          (4) An explanation of how the development of FSRM 
        funding requirements through use of the CRV informs Air 
        Force FSRM funding allocation decisions; and
          (5) Information on how the GTAB could inform 
        Sustainment Management System Builder, to which all 
        services, including the Air Force, will be 
        transitioning.

High pressure advanced rapid deposition technology

    The committee recognizes that repairs using high pressure 
advanced rapid deposition (HPARD) technology for maintenance, 
repair, and overhaul is a proven technology for repairs 
performed by depots and deployed forces as evidenced by the 
services' use of this technology for repairs to submarines, 
other vessels, aircraft, and ground vehicles. These repairs 
have resulted in significant cost savings as compared to 
procuring new parts or sourcing obsolescent parts.
    Accordingly, the committee encourages procurement of HPARD 
technology systems for maintenance and repairs of the types of 
systems cited above and further exploration by the Department 
of Defense of applications for this cost saving technology in 
order to enable greater service life extension as well as 
leverage operations and maintenance cost savings for investment 
in research, development, test, and evaluation, and 
procurement. Additionally, the committee encourages the 
Department to institutionalize annual funding for further 
development and procurement of HPARD technology in order to 
assure stabilized and predictable funding levels.

Knee and elbow protection

    The committee commends the U.S. Marine Corps Systems 
Command (MARCORSYSCOM) for being proactive to improve knee and 
elbow protection for marines. As musculoskeletal injuries 
remain a top disability claim for servicemembers transitioning 
to Veterans Administration healthcare, the Marine Corps has 
made the modernization of knee and elbow protection a priority. 
The committee understands that through the Marine Corps 
Equipping Challenge, MARCORSYSCOM has identified commercially 
available and field validated solutions that provide 
significantly improved comfort, impact protection, and operator 
acceptance while maintaining mobility and range of motion.
    Accordingly, the committee encourages MARCORSYSCOM 
leadership to advance these improvements through timely 
acquisition to ensure that all Marine Corps personnel in combat 
and training environments are provided with the most effective 
knee and elbow protection available to improve combat 
capability and the long-term health of marines.

Large-capacity batteries

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense has a 
strategic vulnerability due to its heavy reliance on certain 
foreign mineral imports necessary for large-capacity batteries 
such as lithium, cobalt, graphite, manganese, and nickel. As a 
result of this supply and production issue, and consistent with 
the identification of the criticality of ``large-capacity 
batteries''' in Executive Order 14017 of February 24, 2021, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to assess whether 
lithium-ion battery materials, such as lithium, cobalt, 
manganese, graphite, and nickel, and the domestic supply chains 
that mine, refine, recover, recycle, and process them should be 
eligible to receive a Presidential Determination as Defense 
Production Act Title III materials, given that these materials 
are required for a growing list of weapons platforms to include 
unmanned aerial aircraft, special operations forces missions, 
and other applications across the Department. The Secretary 
shall provide a briefing to the Senate Armed Services Committee 
regarding the results of this assessment not later than March 
31, 2022.

Military installation resilience training

    The committee recognizes that the Department of Defense 
(DOD) is setting ambitious goals for military installation 
resilience and energy innovation to strengthen combat 
capabilities and make installations more resilient. To ensure 
that the DOD meets these goals in a timely and effective 
manner, the committee directs the Department to add military 
installation resilience curricula to DOD education and training 
programs for officers assigned to be installation commanders to 
build competency on the risks, challenges, and opportunities 
that a variable climate brings to the national security 
enterprise. The DOD has world-class education and training 
programs, but curriculum priorities largely do not touch on 
approaches to resiliency. The committee notes that building 
military installation resilience knowledge would be especially 
useful in forums like pre-command courses where those assuming 
command of, for example, a large military installation, may 
face extreme weather impacts and environmental 
responsibilities. The Joint Staff J-7 has a key role to play as 
part of its Joint Professional Military Education governance 
and accreditation responsibilities.
    The committee notes that DOD offers several foreign 
military training program opportunities. For example, the 
International Military and Training (IMET) program was 
established to enhance regional stability through mutually 
beneficial military-to-military relations and enhanced 
interoperability between DOD and its allies. IMET and similar 
programs provide a tremendous opportunity to enhance 
interoperability for responding to natural disasters, as well 
as to build a common base of knowledge on military installation 
resilience, environmental security risks, and best practice 
solutions and to share experiences and lessons learned. DOD 
should also consider using existing fiscal authorities to 
conduct and pay for joint security training exercises on these 
issues with partner militaries and security forces to achieve 
interoperability that advances American interests in strategic 
areas of the world that are particularly vulnerable to extreme 
weather events that might generate DOD military involvement. 
Training might address mass migration and instability triggered 
by water and food shortages, traditional humanitarian relief 
exercises simulating natural disasters, as well as more 
technical exercises around construction of natural and built 
infrastructure to increase resilience. Because of the detailed 
nature of this matter, it is the committee's view that it is 
best left to the DOD to develop the training and that statutory 
direction is not needed at this time. However, the committee is 
also concerned that the DOD is currently unable to access 
innovative energy and military installation resilience 
technologies or deploy technologies and new business models at 
the scale, speed, and cost-effectiveness required to meet these 
challenges.
    Accordingly, the committee encourages the Department to 
create and/or partner with a consortium of industry, academic, 
and national laboratory partners dedicated to military 
installation resilience and energy innovation pursuant to 
sections 2371, 2371b, and 2373 of title 10, United States Code. 
Lastly, the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and 
Sustainment shall provide a briefing to the Senate Armed 
Services Committee on its progress in developing a consortium 
dedicated to military installation resilience and energy 
innovation, as well as the other DOD education and training 
programs mentioned above, not later than March 1, 2022.

Military munitions program construction support

    The committee recognizes that construction support 
activities are an effective and cost-efficient way to reduce 
risks associated with the potential presence of unexploded 
ordnance (UXO) in instances where property owners are 
conducting ground-disturbing activities. However, the committee 
is aware that construction support has been inconsistently 
deployed and strongly urges the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to 
develop consistent guidance on how construction support can be 
used to assist landowners in order to regain more productive 
use of properties known or suspected to contain UXO munitions.
    The committee is also concerned that extreme weather 
events, including heavy rain and flooding, have caused UXO to 
rise to the surface in Formerly Used Defense Sites where 
surface-level cleanup has occurred, including at the Waikoloa 
Maneuver Area. The committee strongly urges the U.S. Army Corps 
of Engineers to institute a process whereby a subsurface 
cleanup could be undertaken concurrently, as a Time Critical 
Removal Action, should it be required in the interest of public 
safety, particularly at sites where future development or 
activities are planned.

Optimizing private sector fast attack submarine maintenance

    The committee notes the budget request for fiscal year 2022 
includes a continuation and expansion of fast attack submarine 
depot maintenance availabilities contracted with private 
shipyards that had previously been performed at Navy public 
shipyards.
    The committee believes fast attack submarine depot 
maintenance contracted with private shipyards has the potential 
to reduce overloading issues at public shipyards, provide 
workforce and workload stability at private shipyards, and 
increase the operational availability of fast attack submarines 
for fleet commanders. However, the committee is concerned that 
recent fast attack submarine depot maintenance availabilities 
contracted with private shipyards have significantly exceeded 
initial cost and schedule estimates.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees, not 
later than February 1, 2022, on options to improve outcomes in 
contracting with private shipyards for fast attack submarine 
depot maintenance availabilities. This report shall identify 
courses of action that evaluate different scopes of work, 
periods of performance, and intervals between availabilities at 
each private shipyard currently capable of performing such 
work. One such course of action shall be to evaluate the 
repeated contracting with private shipyards for the first 
drydock availability for Virginia-class submarines, with one 
such submarine in planning and one such submarine in 
maintenance at any given time. Based on the courses of action 
evaluated, the Secretary shall identify the optimal approach 
for contracting with private shipyards for fast attack 
submarine depot maintenance availabilities in terms of cost, 
schedule, and performance.

Pilot program to extract natural gas to develop energy security and 
        resilience

    The committee directed the Department of Defense, in the 
Senate Report accompanying S. 1376 (S. Rept. 114-49) of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016, to 
provide an analysis of major Department of Defense 
installations with likely gas and oil reserves, the expected 
quality of those reserves, the estimated cost and savings of 
producing gas and oil at such installations, the statutory and 
regulatory challenges to implementing such energy development 
projects, potential mission and environmental impacts from such 
energy development projects, and recommendations for which 
installations, if any, may benefit from such development.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to review and update this analysis and provide a briefing to 
the Senate Armed Services Committee, not later than March 1, 
2022, with the updated analysis. The briefing shall include a 
recommendation for a pilot site to initiate a pilot program to 
use on-site mineral reserves to enhance the installation's 
energy resilience and security, with the objective of providing 
the installation with on-site energy production, light 
refining, storage, and onsite generation to maintain critical 
operations during intentional or unintentional grid outages.

Propulsion readiness

    The committee recognizes the criticality of aircraft engine 
readiness across the Department of Defense (DOD) and notes the 
impacts of system age, supply chain viability, industrial base 
dynamics, and workload on the DOD's ability to modernize and 
sustain propulsion systems across the life cycle. The committee 
is encouraged by the DOD's actions to maintain the readiness of 
the overall propulsion fleet. However, the committee is 
concerned about funding levels to ensure long-term engine 
readiness and continued propulsion dominance over near-peer 
competitors.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary 
of Defense for Readiness to provide a briefing to the Senate 
Armed Services Committee, not later than February 1, 2022, on 
systemic factors impacting propulsion readiness and 
effectiveness. The briefing shall include, but not be limited 
to, a discussion on: (1) Engine system age; (2) Leveraging 
capability from the commercial industrial base; (3) Industrial 
base viability and the process to balance workload between the 
public and private sectors; (4) Funding sufficiency to address 
research, modernization, and sustainment requirements; and (5) 
Impediments to speed in development and sustainment.

Readiness and Environmental Protection Initiative

    The budget request included $1.8 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide, for SAG 4GTN Office of the Secretary 
of Defense, of which $150.0 million was for the Readiness and 
Environmental Protection Initiative (REPI). The committee has 
long recognized that the REPI program has proven to be highly 
effective in addressing encroachment and in maintaining and 
improving military installation resilience. The committee 
appreciates the success that the REPI program has achieved in 
addressing encroachment and resiliency problems and encourages 
the Department to continue its support of the program in future 
budget requests.

Recycling rare earth materials

    The committee is encouraged by the Department of Defense's 
actions in the previous year to establish and maintain a 
secure, domestic supply of neodymium iron boron rare earth 
permanent magnets. The committee encourages the Department to 
continue using the Defense Production Act to create needed 
industrial capabilities when gaps in critical supply chains are 
identified. The committee is aware that the Department has 
significant quantities of end-of-life equipment, such as hard 
drives, that contain appreciable amounts of rare earth 
materials. These materials can be recovered and recycled into 
useful products, including permanent magnets, thereby reducing 
the need to import rare earth materials from China.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to brief the committee, 
not later than March 1, 2022, on the ability of the Department 
to identify rare earth-containing end-of-life items, to sell or 
barter such end-of-life items to rare earth recycling 
manufacturers, and to ensure that recovered rare earth and 
other critical materials are retained in the United States.

Report on competitiveness in the defense industrial base

    The committee supports a more competitive defense 
industrial base and efforts to ensure the Department of Defense 
is making decisions with full awareness of the competitive 
implications of corporate mergers and acquisitions. The 
committee notes the recent July 2021 Executive Order 14036 on 
Promoting Competition in the American Economy has implications 
for mergers and acquisitions within the defense industrial 
base.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to submit to the 
congressional defense committees a report, not later than March 
1, 2022, that includes: (1) Actions being taken within the 
Department of Defense to comply with the Executive Order, 
including those related to mergers and acquisitions, and (2) A 
detailed assessment of the state of competition within the 
defense industrial base, including areas where a lack of 
competition may be a concern, and any recommendations for 
changes in defense acquisition processes to improve outcomes.

Review to reduce reporting requirements

    The committee continues to be interested in reducing the 
number of Department of Defense reports required to be sent to 
the Congress. Accordingly, the committee directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to 
evaluate its existing statutory and congressional reporting 
requirements in its areas of responsibility in order to 
identify any overlap, duplication, and opportunities for 
streamlined reporting. The Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment shall provide a briefing on the 
findings of the evaluation to the Senate Armed Services 
Committee not later than February 1, 2022. The briefing shall 
include recommendations to reduce, combine, or streamline 
specific reports while retaining reports that are essential to 
enabling long-term tracking and informing policymaking.

Shipyard Infrastructure Optimization Plan implementation

    The committee recognizes the critical strategic and 
logistics role our public shipyards play in the security of our 
Nation. To address chronically unmet infrastructure needs at 
the shipyards, the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) directed the Department of 
Defense to create and implement a Shipyard Infrastructure 
Optimization Plan (SIOP). The committee strongly supports the 
SIOP, which will revitalize the Nation's four public shipyards 
and equip them with the facilities needed to meet the 
requirements of the naval fleet into the future. The public 
shipyards are American institutions of shipbuilding and 
maintenance that, in some cases, date back more than two 
hundred years. They employ a highly skilled workforce that 
performs critical repair and maintenance work on complex Navy 
ships and submarines in order to maintain the fleet's 
operational readiness needed to respond to national security 
requirements. The committee believes continued investment in 
the public shipyards is a national security imperative, and the 
SIOP must remain on schedule.
    The committee is very concerned that the Navy's SIOP is 
falling behind schedule because details on multiple projects 
that are needed to properly assess and evaluate this critical 
recapitalization effort have not been timely and fully provided 
to the committee. While unforeseen challenges arise during the 
execution of large and complicated construction projects, they 
can often be mitigated with prudent planning and foresight. 
This heightens concerns whether the Navy can maintain its 
current operational depot-level maintenance schedule as dry 
docks are temporarily unavailable when they are upgraded and 
replaced, whether adequate resourcing has been provided to the 
managing program office to mitigate the risk of construction 
cost increases, and how the Navy will meet its commitment to 
its budget for these projects. The committee urges the Navy to 
incorporate these concerns into the detailed planning process 
for planned implementation.
    The recently revealed cost overrun of more than 150 percent 
for the multi-mission dry dock project at the Portsmouth Naval 
Shipyard (PNSY) not only costs finite resources, it risks 
unacceptable delays for a project that is essential for 
maintaining the submarine force. Furthermore, delays in 
commencing or completing dry dock modernization will have a 
great impact on our Nation's national security. In the case of 
Joint Base Pearl Harbor (JBPH), the older Dry Dock 3 will be 
filled in during the construction of the newer and larger Dry 
Dock 5. The committee is concerned that with the last scheduled 
availability for Dry Dock 3 in 2023 and with Dry Dock 5 not 
scheduled for completion until 2028, there will be a 
significant lack of facilities to maintain fleet readiness.
    The committee is also concerned that the SIOP may not 
sufficiently account for the differences between the Nation's 
four historical public shipyards. Each shipyard has a unique 
history, design, and local workforce with valuable knowledge of 
its respective facilities that can help ensure the proper 
modernization and optimization of these facilities. Rather than 
relying solely on a one-size-fits-all approach that is 
centralized without fully considering local conditions, the 
committee urges the Navy's SIOP program office to seek more 
input and engagement from these local workforces and their 
installation leadership to efficiently and effectively build 
and maintain shipyards that can sustain the fleet for 
generations to come.
    In order to ensure the Navy is appropriately managing the 
PNSY multi-mission dry dock project, future JBPH dry dock, and 
the overall SIOP, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to provide a briefing to the congressional defense 
committees not later than October 1, 2021. The briefing shall 
include:
          (1) A description of the cause(s) of the cost overrun 
        at PNSY;
          (2) Analysis on measures that could have mitigated 
        the cause(s) of the overrun;
          (3) A discussion on the need to revise cost and 
        schedule projections for future SIOP projects in light 
        of the overrun;
          (4) What steps the Navy is taking to incorporate the 
        lessons learned from the overrun to apply to future 
        SIOP work;
          (5) The impact of the current military construction 
        timelines on JBPH shipyard availabilities in each of 
        the fiscal years from 2023 through 2029;
          (6) A detailed plan of the construction timeline for 
        JBPH Dry Dock 5 and accompanying water front production 
        facilities; and
          (7) The planned utilization of the Pearl Harbor Naval 
        Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility 
        workforce during this same period if Dry Dock 5 is not 
        completed before the closure of Dry Dock 3.

Staffing and resources

    The committee remains concerned that the Department of 
Defense has failed to adequately staff and resource several 
offices and elements under the purview of the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Energy, Installations, and 
Environment. For example, past reductions to headquarters 
elements resulted in the Army eliminating at least thirty 
percent of its personnel who oversaw privatized housing. The 
committee recognizes the litany of challenges facing the 
Department, including the contamination by per- and 
polyfluoroalkyl substances, the Military Housing Privatization 
Initiative, operational and installation energy programs, 
energy and military installation resilience, among others. The 
committee's intent is for the Department to be able to 
effectively navigate all of these challenges and ensure they 
are appropriately staffed and resourced so the workforce is not 
unduly overburdened.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary 
of Defense for Energy, Installations, and Environment to 
provide a briefing to the Senate Armed Services Committee, not 
later than March 1, 2022, on the staffing and resourcing of the 
aforementioned offices, including current and projected 
staffing levels, which should include budget information for 
fiscal year 2022 and 2023; recommendations on potential changes 
to hiring authorities or policies that might yield a more 
robust workforce; and any other aspects the Department deems 
appropriate.

Study for enhancing ship readiness through digital techniques

    The committee believes that the readiness of our Navy's 
surface combatant and auxiliary fleets is a critical issue that 
deserves enhanced attention. The committee continues to support 
efforts to enhance the readiness of Military Sealift Command 
(MSC) vessels through a condition-based approach. This approach 
has improved availability planning, operational availability, 
and readiness of MSC vessels, with potential long-term cost 
avoidance in maintenance and repair of such vessels. The 
committee believes that the use of similar commercial standards 
and developmental approaches can be of significant benefit to 
the Navy and would be compatible with the Navy's existing 
program of record known as Condition-Based Maintenance Plus 
(CBM+).
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to assess the potential of using a condition-based maintenance 
approach similar to CBM+, utilizing digital techniques to 
support other classes of surface naval vessels. The Secretary 
of the Navy shall provide a briefing to the Senate Armed 
Services Committee on the results of the assessment not later 
than April 1, 2023. The briefing shall include a description 
of: (1) Options to integrate CBM+ and other commercially-
developed condition-based program standards for ship 
maintenance on other classes of Navy vessels, including the 
associated costs, and (2) What would be required to deploy CBM+ 
or other commercially-developed condition-based program 
standards for ship maintenance to other classes of Navy surface 
vessels, including the associated costs, schedule, and 
equipment requirements.

Study of expanding ship repair capacity

    The committee is concerned the Navy is facing a fleet 
sustainment predicament without clear solutions. Congressional 
and Navy leaders believe that the United States needs a fleet 
of 355 or more battle force ships. However, the Navy has been 
unable to maintain and modernize the fleet, which has had 300 
or fewer ships, over the past 5 years due to affordability 
challenges; the number of shipyards able to perform maintenance 
and modernization work; and limitations within shipyards, 
including a paucity of dry docks. The Navy has been executing a 
plan to modernize the Navy's public shipyards called the 
Shipyard Infrastructure Optimization Program (SIOP). While the 
SIOP effort is sorely needed, it will not yield substantial 
increases in capacity sufficient to handle a larger fleet. 
Furthermore, the committee is unaware of any Navy-identified 
alternatives on the scale required to expand overall ship 
repair capacity to sustain a fleet of 355 or more ships.
    Accordingly, the committee believes that the Navy needs to 
investigate more expansive and, perhaps, non-traditional 
options for expanding the Nation's ship repair capacity. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
conduct an analysis of options for increasing ship repair 
capacity that would be necessary to support a fleet of 355 or 
more ships comprised of the optimal mix of ship types, 
including addressing the costs and benefits of the following 
options:
          (1) Expanding plant capacity at existing naval 
        shipyards beyond the current SIOP effort;
          (2) Building new or re-opening closed naval 
        shipyards;
          (3) Investing in modernization or expansion of 
        private repair yard infrastructure;
          (4) Modifying or relaxing restrictions on overseas 
        maintenance of Navy vessels;
          (5) Changing ship repair practices or processes to 
        enhance existing capacity;
          (6) Increasing technical competence of current naval 
        shipyard workforce;
          (7) Increasing or expanding the use of rolling 
        admission for multiple-award maintenance contracts;
          (8) Increasing or expanding private repair activities 
        at Navy bases; and
          (9) Any other options the Secretary may identify.
    The committee directs the Secretary to submit a report on 
this analysis not later than March 1, 2022, including 
recommendations for implementation and funding and any 
associated legislative changes.

Survivable Airborne Operations Center

    The committee is encouraged by increased investment in the 
Survivable Airborne Operations Center (SAOC) program to 
accelerate overdue replacement of the Air Force's E-4B National 
Airborne Operations Center. Given the E-4B's critical role in 
the National Military Command System, the committee views this 
as a high-priority recapitalization in support of a no-fail 
mission. The E-4B fleet is approaching 50 years in service and 
is facing capability gaps, diminishing manufacturing sources, 
increased maintenance costs, and parts obsolescence as it 
approaches the end of its serviceable life. The committee 
understands the SAOC weapon system will be comprised of a 
commercial derivative aircraft, mission system, and ground 
support systems. The committee has expressed concern that E-4B 
recapitalization has been under consideration since at least 
2008 with limited progress and expects the Air Force to execute 
fiscal year 2022 funds on-plan and budget for future years 
appropriately to support a planned Milestone B decision and the 
start of engineering, manufacturing, and development in early 
fiscal year 2023. The committee is aware that the SAOC program 
is informed by prior relevant Air Force and Department of 
Defense analyses and encourages the Air Force to pursue an 
acquisition approach that appropriately reflects the urgency of 
this effort and delivers the best value for the taxpayer.

Sustainable technology evaluation and demonstration

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense (DOD) 
and civilian Federal agencies are directed by Federal 
acquisition regulations and Federal statutes to implement 
sustainable technologies and products when availability, 
performance, and cost savings meet or exceed non-sustainable 
products. The recently established DOD Sustainable Technology 
Evaluation and Demonstration (STED) Program demonstrates 
sustainable technologies and products against Government 
performance requirements at DOD installations to validate 
performance, compatibility, mission benefits, and cost savings. 
The STED Program provides valued and centralized support to the 
installations while reducing duplication of effort across the 
services.
    The committee commends the Office of the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Sustainment (ASD Sustainment) for 
implementing the STED Program and conducting initial successful 
sustainable technology demonstrations that: (1) Reduce health 
and safety impacts to the warfighter; (2) Decrease energy 
requirements; and (3) Lessen waste and environmental impacts to 
our installations and bases. However, the committee believes 
that more should be done to create broader awareness and 
increase acceptance of sustainable alternatives that improve 
maintenance, operations, training, and mission objectives.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the ASD Sustainment to 
provide a briefing to the Senate Armed Services Committee not 
later than December 1, 2021, on its current activities and any 
long-term plans to expand the STED Program and participation 
across all the military departments.

Sustainment of Army health and holistic fitness system equipment

    The committee notes that the U.S. Army's shift to a 
Holistic Health and Fitness (H2F) system is designed as the 
Army's primary investment in soldier readiness, lethality, 
optimal physical and non-physical performance; to reduce injury 
rates; improve rehabilitation after an injury; decrease 
attrition; and increase the effectiveness and deployability of 
the total Army.
    The committee notes equipment and facilities are essential 
elements of the H2F system and that the Soldier Performance 
Readiness Center (SPRC) is an integral part of the H2F 
programming, as it provides a supportive, individually focused 
fitness training environment that delivers comprehensive, 
integrated, and immersive physical and non-physical 
programming. The committee further notes that, in addition to 
the SPRC, the Army has used Army Combat Fitness Test lane 
equipment, Gyms-in-a-Box (GiaBs), container gyms, and other 
commercial, off-the-shelf fitness equipment and technological 
solutions to help improve solider health, fitness, and 
performance.
    The committee also notes that the H2F system was designed 
under a single governance structure to enable commanders to 
improve soldier health and fitness, including an initial phase 
and a sustaining phase. The committee understands, however, 
that this governance structure has not been fully staffed or 
resourced. Additionally, the equipment and facilities required 
for the H2F system are actively being acquired, yet the 
acquisition and contracting process, funding, authority, 
operations, and sustainment responsibility have not been 
unified under one command.
    Accordingly, not later than March 1, 2022, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Army, in coordination with the 
Commander, Army Training and Doctrine Command, to provide a 
briefing to the Senate Armed Services Committee outlining the 
necessary staffing and resourcing for the Soldier Performance 
Center of Excellence to provide oversight on governance, 
requirements generation, and capabilities assessment. The 
briefing should also include an assessment of the need to 
designate a Program Executive Office as well as the planned 
sustainment activities for SPRC, GiaBs, and any other equipment 
utilized for H2F.

U.S. Special Operations Command Preservation of the Force and Families 
        Program

    The committee recognizes the short and long-term physical, 
mental, and emotional effects of continuous operations in high-
stress environments experienced by special operations forces 
(SOF). As articulated by the Commander, U.S. Special Operations 
Command (SOCOM), SOCOM represents 2 percent of the Department 
of Defense's (DOD) budget and 3 percent of DOD personnel, but 
has sustained more than half of the combat casualties across 
DOD in recent years. The committee notes that many more special 
operators suffer from psychological trauma long after their 
deployments. Despite the exceptional sacrifices by our SOF 
servicemembers and their families, 72 percent of wounded SOF 
have been retained in military service, with 61 percent 
returning to duty inside their original occupational specialty. 
This remarkable achievement has been significantly enabled by 
the SOCOM Preservation of the Force and Families (POTFF) 
Program.
    The committee strongly supports all aspects of the POTFF 
initiative, to include efforts to support the psychological 
health and cognitive performance of SOF. Efforts to guarantee 
access to such care and eliminate the stigma associated with 
seeking help are vital. The committee encourages SOCOM to 
continue to prioritize the POTFF program while seeking to 
measure the effectiveness of the program, institutionalize best 
practices, and evolve care to meet the needs of special 
operators and their families.

Underwater cut and capture

    The committee understands underwater munitions continue to 
pose environmental and safety threats for the Department of 
Defense. High-pressure water jet technology systems have proven 
their capability to safely demilitarize munitions on land and 
have demonstrated the ability to demilitarize munitions 
underwater as well. The committee remains concerned that 
underwater munitions pose a threat that has not been 
sufficiently addressed. Accordingly, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to continue to expand the use of water jet 
technology systems for the removal of explosive constituents in 
underwater munitions.

Universal Robotic Controller project

    The committee is encouraged by the Air Force's development 
of artificial intelligence robotic technologies with adaptive 
autonomous intelligence, referred to as the Universal Robotic 
Controller project, in order to lower growing sustainment costs 
for aging and advanced complex weapon systems and increase 
warfighter readiness. As such, the committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Air Force to continue the development and 
deployment of this technology to lessen workforce development 
challenges and to provide increased capability, greater 
productivity, and safer work environments.

Utilities Privatization

    The committee continues to enthusiastically support the 
successful utilities privatization (UP) efforts that have been 
underway within the Department of Defense (DOD) for the past 25 
years. The UP program has succeeded because of the continuing 
support and robust oversight of the military departments.
    The committee sees UP as a key enabler for the Department 
and the services to achieve energy resilience, sustainability, 
and mission readiness on military installations that can also 
leverage and integrate advances in technology and grid 
modernization in an efficient and cost-effective way. As DOD 
implements efficiency standards in the coming years, it should 
look to the UP program as an effective, scalable solution to 
drive this change, which will provide the broader capability to 
implement emerging technologies.
    Because of the UP program's continuing success and cost-
effective performance, the committee strongly encourages the 
DOD to continue to maximize use of the UP program as an 
effective, integrated solution to construct, repair, modernize, 
maintain, or replace an installation's utility system to 
achieve energy reliability and resilience. The committee 
further encourages the DOD to use additional resilience metrics 
and performance-based calculations, which are currently 
captured on UP installations and routinely reported to base 
energy managers, to assess the performance outcomes and the 
cost-effectiveness of the program.
    The committee has been concerned with the lack of movement 
by the Department in advancing UP contracting opportunities and 
urges that it resume this process and leverage existing 
authorities to modernize and upgrade installation 
infrastructure. Accordingly, the committee directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, in 
coordination with the Assistant Secretaries of the military 
departments with responsibility for energy, installations, and 
environment, to provide a briefing to the congressional defense 
committees not later than March 1, 2022, outlining the 
Department's plans to continue the implementation of the UP 
program.

Vieques cleanup

    The committee notes that from the 1940s until 2003, the 
U.S. Navy conducted bombing exercises and other live-fire 
training activities on the Island of Vieques, which is located 
off the coast of Puerto Rico. The Navy ceased its operations on 
Vieques in 2003 but remains responsible for environmental 
cleanup. Since 2005, Vieques has been included on the 
Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Priorities 
List of contaminated sites. The Atlantic Fleet Weapons Training 
Area--also encompassing waters surrounding parts of Vieques--
includes large amounts of unexploded ordnance and remnants of 
exploded ordnance. According to the EPA, hazardous substances 
at the site ``may include mercury, lead, copper, magnesium, 
lithium, perchlorate, TNT, napalm, depleted uranium, PCBs, 
solvents, and pesticides.'' The committee is concerned that the 
contamination may have contributed to significant health 
problems for the island's population of approximately 9,000 
U.S. citizens. Hurricanes Irma and Maria in 2017 exacerbated 
the public health problems on the island. On March 26, 2021, 
the Government Accountability Office (GAO) published a report, 
titled ``Efforts at Former Military Sites on Vieques and 
Culebra, Puerto Rico, Are Expected to Continue through 2032'' 
(GAO-21-268), which stated that the ``U.S. Navy estimate[s] 
that cleanup efforts will continue through fiscal year 2032.'' 
Given how long the cleanup already has been ongoing, and the 
risk that each passing day could contribute to the population's 
health problems, this newly revealed timetable is disappointing 
and worrying.
    Accordingly, the committee urges the Navy to accelerate 
with all possible speed the cleanup without creating major 
negative environmental or health impacts. The committee also 
directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide annual updates on 
the Navy's progress to the Senate Armed Services Committee in 
the form of a briefing. The annual updates shall include any 
authorities, tools, or resources the Navy estimates are needed 
to accelerate the cleanup. The Secretary shall provide the 
first briefing not later than March 1, 2022.

Water resource management

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense has 
consistently cited drought as a major current and projected 
adverse impact on military installation resilience. Many 
military installations, particularly in the West, rely in whole 
or in part on groundwater for water supplies, and the committee 
notes the ongoing and concerning depletion of many of the 
aquifers from which this groundwater is drawn. The committee 
applauds the significant progress that the services and 
individual installations have made in reducing groundwater use. 
Further, the committee notes the growing recognition of 
groundwater recharge as an important element of a strategy to 
address this depletion and that groundwater recharge is 
currently part of a water management strategy at a number of 
military installations. One military installation in 
particular--Fort Huachuca, Arizona--has played a major role in 
collaborative inter-governmental and public-private efforts 
both to reduce groundwater usage on and off the installation 
and to recharge the supporting aquifer. This effort at Fort 
Huachuca involved actions under the Readiness and Environmental 
Protection Integration (REPI) program. Section 2684a of title 
10, United States Code, was amended by section 315(b) of the 
William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) to clarify: (1) That 
maintaining and improving military installation resilience is a 
major purpose of the REPI program; and (2) That the interagency 
collaboration authority under the REPI program pursuant to 
subsection (h) of section 2684a of title 10, United States 
Code, was broadened to include both the conservation and 
resilience program of any Federal agency, which includes the 
groundwater recharge and other water resilience programs of the 
Bureau of Reclamation. The committee also notes that section 
2815 of title 10, United States Code, was amended by section 
315(a) of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 to extend the authority 
for the construction of military installation resilience 
projects, such as groundwater recharge facilities, to projects 
located both on and outside of a military installation.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, in preparing the report required by subsection 2827(e) 
of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021, to include an 
assessment of: (1) The potential for greater interagency and 
public-private collaboration using these and other authorities 
both to reduce the use of groundwater and to recharge aquifers 
as an element of a regionalized strategy to manage water 
resources; and (2) The potential for construction of 
groundwater recharge facilities as elements of a strategy as 
defined in subsection 2827(f) of such Act, at military 
installations relying in whole or in part on groundwater 
resources. The committee encourages the Secretary in responding 
to this requirement to consult with other regional 
stakeholders, including the Western States Water Council, 
academia, the Bureau of Reclamation, the U.S. Geological 
Survey, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
regional partners, and entities in defense communities that 
manage water resources.

              TITLE IV--MILITARY PERSONNEL AUTHORIZATIONS

                       Subtitle A--Active Forces

End strengths for active forces (sec. 401)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
Active-Duty end strengths for fiscal year 2022, as shown below:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     FY 2022                  Change from
                                                  FY 2021  -----------------------------------------------------
                    Service                     Authorized                              FY 2022       FY 2021
                                                             Request   Recommendation   Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army..........................................     485,900    485,000         485,000          0            -900
Navy..........................................     347,800    346,200         346,200          0          -1,600
Marine Corps..................................     181,200    178,500         178,500          0          -2,700
Air Force.....................................     333,475    328,300         329,220       +920          -4,255
Space Force...................................         n/a      8,400           8,400          0          +8,400
                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------
    DOD Total.................................   1,348,375  1,346,400       1,347,320       +920          -1,055
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The committee has taken a cautious approach to the end strength authorization for active forces. This provision
  would authorize end strength levels within existing variance authority for the Army, Navy, Air Force, and
  Marine Corps.
For the first time, in acknowledgment of the rapidly growing Space Force within the Department of the Air Force,
  the committee has recommended a specific authorization level for the Space Force. The committee's
  recommendation is 8,400 for the Space Force, which is in line with the Department's request. The new, separate
  line for Space Force personnel authorization accounts for much of the decrease in the Air Force end strength
  as well as the ongoing growth of the Space Force.

  Authority with respect to authorized strengths for general and flag 
 officers within the Armed Forces for emerging requirements (sec. 402)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to reallocate a limited number of 
general and flag officer authorizations among the military 
departments in response to emerging requirements, as needed.

    Additional authority to vary Space Force end strength (sec. 403)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of the Air Force to vary U.S. Space Force end 
strength by a greater degree than is otherwise permitted for 
the Armed Forces in order to give the Secretary additional 
discretion to build and establish the U.S. Space Force.

Temporary exemption from end strength grade restrictions for the Space 
                            Force (sec. 404)

    The committee recommends a provision that would temporarily 
exempt the Space Force from the grade restrictions in sections 
517 and 523 of title 10, United States Code.

                       Subtitle B--Reserve Forces

End strengths for Selected Reserve (sec. 411)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
end strengths for Selected Reserve personnel for fiscal year 
2022, as shown below:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     FY 2022                  Change from
                                                  FY 2021  -----------------------------------------------------
                    Service                     Authorized                              FY 2022       FY 2021
                                                             Request   Recommendation   Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard...........................     336,500    336,000         336,000          0            -500
Army Reserve..................................     189,800    189,500         189,500          0            -300
Navy Reserve..................................      58,800     58,600          58,600          0            -200
Marine Corps Reserve..........................      38,500     36,800          36,800          0          -1,700
Air National Guard............................     108,100    108,300         108,300          0            +200
Air Force Reserve.............................      70,300     70,300          70,300          0               0
Coast Guard Reserve...........................       7,000      7,000           7,000          0               0
                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------
    DOD Total.................................     809,000    806,500         806,500          0          -2,500
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

End strengths for Reserves on active duty in support of the reserves 
        (sec. 412)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
full-time support end strengths for fiscal year 2022, as shown 
below:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     FY 2022                  Change from
                                                  FY 2021  -----------------------------------------------------
                    Service                     Authorized                              FY 2022       FY 2021
                                                             Request   Recommendation   Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard...........................      30,595     30,845          30,845          0             250
Army Reserve..................................      16,511     16,511          16,511          0               0
Navy Reserve..................................      10,215     10,293          10,293          0              78
Marine Corps Reserve..........................       2,386      2,386           2,386          0               0
Air National Guard............................      25,333     26,662          25,333     -1,329               0
Air Force Reserve.............................       5,256      6,003           6,003          0             747
                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------
    DOD Total.................................      90,296     92,700          91,371     -1,329           1,075
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The committee is concerned that the Department of Defense has gone too far in requesting increases in Active
  Guard Reserve authorizations in the Air National Guard (ANG) at the expense of military technician
  authorizations in the ANG. The committee is concerned about the impact of such changes on the readiness of the
  U.S. Air Force.

End strengths for military technicians (dual status) (sec. 413)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
military technician (dual status) end strengths for fiscal year 
2022, as shown below:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     FY 2022                  Change from
                                                  FY 2021  -----------------------------------------------------
                    Service                     Authorized                              FY 2022       FY 2021
                                                             Request   Recommendation   Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard...........................      22,294     22,294          22,294          0               0
Army Reserve..................................       6,492      6,492           6,492          0               0
Air National Guard............................      10,994      9,885          10,994     +1,109               0
Air Force Reserve.............................       7,947      7,111           7,111          0            -836
                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------
    DOD Total.................................      47,727     45,782          46,891     +1,109            -836
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The provision would also establish limits on the number of temporary technicians authorized to be employed
  within the end strengths set forth by this section to not more than 25 percent of the total authorized
  strength for each component.
The committee is concerned that the Department of Defense has gone too far in reducing military technician
  authorizations in favor of Active Guard Reserve authorizations. The committee is concerned about the impact of
  such changes on the readiness of the U.S. Air Force.
Finally, the provision would also prohibit under any circumstances the coercion of a military technician (dual
  status) by a State into accepting an offer of realignment or conversion to any other military status,
  including as a member of the Active, Guard, and Reserve program of a reserve component. The provision would
  further specify that if a technician declines to participate in such a realignment or conversion, no further
  action may be taken against the individual or the individual's position.

Maximum number of reserve personnel authorized to be on active duty for 
        operational support (sec. 414)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
end strengths for reserve personnel on Active Duty for 
operational support for fiscal year 2022, as shown below:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     FY 2022                  Change from
                                                  FY 2021  -----------------------------------------------------
                    Service                     Authorized                              FY 2022       FY 2021
                                                             Request   Recommendation   Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard...........................      17,000     17,000          17,000          0               0
Army Reserve..................................      13,000     13,000          13,000          0               0
Navy Reserve..................................       6,200      6,200           6,200          0               0
Marine Corps Reserve..........................       3,000      3,000           3,000          0               0
Air National Guard............................      16,000     16,000          16,000          0               0
Air Force Reserve.............................      14,000     14,000          14,000          0               0
                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------
    DOD Total.................................      69,200     69,200          69,200          0               0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

              Subtitle C--Authorization of Appropriations


Military personnel (sec. 421)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for military personnel activities at the 
levels identified in section 4401 of division D of this Act.

                              Budget Items


Military personnel funding changes

    The amount authorized to be appropriated for military 
personnel programs includes the following changes from the 
budget request:

                    [Changes in millions of dollars]
 
 
 
Military personnel underexecution.....................            -950.7
Army UFR--JTIMS exercise support......................              67.4
Army UFR--Reserve Component EDI for Rotational Forces.              56.0
Army UFR--Reserve Component Homeland Security Ops.....             228.4
CNGB UFR--CBRN Response Forces........................               9.2
A-10/F-35 Active duty maintainers.....................              93.0
                                                       -----------------
    Total.............................................            -496.6
 

    The committee recommends a total reduction in the Military 
Personnel (MILPERS) appropriation of $496.6 million to reflect 
the Government Accountability Office's most recent assessment 
of expected MILPERS under-execution for fiscal year 2022, 
additional funding to address a number of unfunded requirements 
of the Department, and additional funding to address A-10/F-35 
active duty maintainers.

                   TITLE V--MILITARY PERSONNEL POLICY

                  Subtitle A--Officer Personnel Policy

Increase in authorized lieutenant commander billets in the Navy (sec. 
        501)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 605(g)(4)(B) of title 10, United States Code, to 
increase the number of temporary promotions to the grade of 
lieutenant commander in the Navy from 325 to 350.
Time in grade requirements (sec. 502)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 619(a) of title 10, United States Code, to authorize 
the Secretary of the military department concerned to prescribe 
a shorter period of service in grade, but not less than 2 
years, for eligibility for consideration for promotion, in the 
case of certain officers designated for limited duty.

  Subtitle B--General Service Authorities and Correction of Military 
                                Records


                    Part I--Selective Service Reform


Modernization of the Selective Service System (sec. 511)

    The committee recommends a provision that would make 
numerous amendments to the Military Selective Service Act (50 
U.S.C. section 3801 et seq.) to expand registration 
requirements under that Act to all Americans and to restate the 
purpose and solemnity of selective service. The expansion of 
registration to all Americans would take effect 1 year after 
the date of the enactment of this Act.

Report on exemptions and deferments for a possible military draft (sec. 
        512)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Director of Selective Service, in consultation with the 
Secretary of Defense and Secretary of Homeland Security, to 
submit a report to the Congress reviewing exemptions and 
deferments from registration, training, and service under the 
Military Selective Service Act (50 U.S.C. 3801 et seq.), 
together with proposed revisions to such exemptions and 
deferments.

Report on processes and procedures for appeal of denial of status or 
        benefits for failure to register for Selective Service (sec. 
        513)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Director of Selective Service, in consultation with the 
Secretary of Homeland Security, the Secretary of Education, and 
the Director of the Office of Personnel Management, to submit 
to the appropriate committees of the Congress a report on the 
processes and procedures for appeal of denial of status or 
benefits for failure to register for selective service.

Responsibilities for national mobilization; personnel requirements 
        (sec. 514)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish within the Office of the 
Secretary of Defense an Executive Agent for National 
Mobilization. The provision would require the Secretary, within 
one year of the date of the enactment of this Act, to submit to 
the Congress a plan for obtaining inductees as part of a 
mobilization timeline for the Selective Service System.
    This provision addresses a recommendation of the National 
Commission on Military, National, and Public Service.

Enhancements to national mobilization exercises (sec. 515)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 10208 of title 10, United States Code, to require that 
major mobilization exercises required annually by that section 
periodically include the processes of the Selective Service 
System in preparation for the induction of personnel into the 
Armed Forces under the Military Selective Service Act (50 
U.S.C. 3801 et seq.).
    This provision addresses a recommendation of the National 
Commission on Military, National, and Public Service.

                         Part II--Other Matters


Military service independent racial disparity review (sec. 518)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
each Secretary of a military department to conduct an 
assessment of racial disparity in military justice and 
discipline processes and military personnel policies, as they 
pertain to minority populations, and to submit to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives a report detailing the results of the 
assessment. Finally, the provision would require the 
Comptroller General of the United States to assess each 
assessment and compare racial disparity in the military justice 
system to racial disparity in civilian criminal justice systems 
in the United States.

Appeals to Physical Evaluation Board determinations of fitness for duty 
        (sec. 519)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, not later than 90 days after the date of 
the enactment of this Act, to incorporate a formal appeals 
process into the policies and procedures of the Integrated 
Disability Evaluation System. The provision would ensure that 
servicemembers may submit a formal appeal regarding a fitness 
for duty determination to a physical evaluation board of the 
military department concerned.

Extension of paid parental leave (sec. 520)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 701 of title 10, United States Code, to authorize 12 
weeks of paid military leave for servicemembers that have 
newborn, newly-adopted, and newly placed minor children. This 
leave would ordinarily be used within 1 year of the birth, 
adoption, or foster care placement of the minor child. This 
provision would permit the Secretary of Defense to authorize 
servicemembers to use this parental leave beyond the first year 
in the event that operational requirements, professional 
military education needs, or other circumstances the Secretary 
deems reasonable would prevent the servicemember from taking 
such leave within the first year.

Bereavement leave for members of the Armed Forces (sec. 520A)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 701 of title 10, United States Code, to create a new 
category of leave for military personnel that would permit 
servicemembers to take up to 2 weeks of leave in connection 
with the death of a spouse or child.
    Under this provision, bereavement leave would be available 
to all servicemembers regardless of tenure and would only be 
charged for servicemembers who have 30 or more days of 
accumulated leave, and only until such members' balances drop 
below 30 days of leave. Any remaining bereavement leave taken 
by servicemembers whose leave balances drop below 30 days would 
be non-chargeable.

Subtitle C--Prevention and Response to Sexual Assault, Harassment, and 
         Related Misconduct, and Other Military Justice Matters


DoD Safe Helpline authorization to perform intake of official 
        restricted and unrestricted reports for eligible adult sexual 
        assault victims (sec. 521)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 584 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2012 (Public Law 112-81) to authorize the 
Department of Defense Safe Helpline to receive sexual assault 
reports in both unrestricted and restricted forms, and to 
provide support to victims making such reports.

Assessment of relationship between command climate and the prevention 
        and adjudication of military sexual misconduct (sec. 522)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to require the Secretaries of the military 
departments to conduct no fewer than six independent reviews at 
military installations under the control of the Secretary 
concerned assessing the command climate at such installations, 
to include a review of that installation's programs to prevent 
and respond to sexual assault and sexual harassment, 
organizational climate, gender discrimination, and support of 
survivors. The provision would require the Secretaries 
concerned to conduct the assessments at three installations 
with the highest risk of sexual assault and three installations 
with the lowest risk of sexual assault, as defined by the 
Secretary of Defense, for that military department.
    The provision would require the assessments required under 
this section to be completed not later than 18 months after the 
date of the enactment of this Act and for the assessments to be 
transmitted by the Secretary of Defense to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
not later than 30 days after each assessment's completion.

Policy for ensuring the annual report regarding sexual assaults 
        involving members of the Armed Forces includes information on 
        race and ethnicity of victims (sec. 523)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to include in the annual Sexual Assault 
Prevention and Response Office report information on the race 
and ethnicity of victims and accused individuals to the maximum 
extent practicable, allowing for exclusion of such information, 
if necessary, based on privacy concerns, impacts on 
accountability efforts, or other matters of importance, as 
determined by the Secretary.

Department of Defense tracking of allegations of retaliation by victims 
        of sexual assault or sexual harassment and related persons 
        (sec. 524)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to designate a component within the Office 
of the Secretary of Defense to document and track allegations 
of retaliation submitted by a victim of a sexual assault or 
sexual harassment, an individual charged with providing 
services or support to a victim, a witness or bystander to 
sexual assault or sexual harassment, or any other person 
associated with an allegation of sexual assault or sexual 
harassment.
    The committee understands that retaliation related to a 
sexual assault or sexual harassment can take the form of 
reprisal or restriction, cruelty or maltreatment, or ostracism, 
and that allegations of same may be investigated by the 
Department of Defense Inspector General, another inspector 
general, a military criminal investigative organization or 
other law enforcement, a commander, or another organization, 
officer, or employee of the Department.
    The committee believes that centralizing the documentation 
and tracking of all such allegations of retaliation in a single 
office in the Office of the Secretary of Defense will both 
improve the fidelity of annual reports on retaliation required 
by section 543 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) and provide more accurate 
data to inform the Department's development, execution, and 
evaluation of retaliation prevention and response programs.

Special Victims Counsel representation of civilian victims of sex-
        related offenses (sec. 525)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1044e(a)(2) of title 10, United States Code, to 
authorize special victim's counsel representation for civilian 
victims of alleged sex-related offenses committed by 
individuals subject to the jurisdiction of the Uniform Code of 
Military Justice.

Notice to victims of further administrative action following a 
        determination not to refer to trial by court-martial (sec. 526)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 549 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) to clarify that the 
provision of information required by that section is not 
subject to the provisions of the Privacy Act of 1974 (5 U.S.C. 
552a). Section 549 requires a commander, who has determined not 
to refer an allegation of sexual assault to trial by court-
martial, to keep the victim in such a case periodically 
informed of the status of such further administrative action 
that may be taken against the accused.

Recommendations on separate punitive article in the Uniform Code of 
        Military Justice on violent extremism (sec. 527)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives a 
report containing such recommendations as the Secretary 
considers appropriate with respect to the establishment of a 
separate punitive article in the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice (chapter 47 of title 10, United States Code) on violent 
extremism. The report would be required to be submitted not 
later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act.

Determination and reporting of missing, absent unknown, absent without 
        leave, and duty status-whereabouts unknown service members 
        (sec. 528)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to instruct the Secretary of each military 
department to conduct a comprehensive review of that 
Department's policies and procedures for determining and 
reporting servicemembers as missing, absent unknown, absent 
without leave, or duty status-whereabouts unknown.
    The provision would further require a review and update of 
installation-level procedures, with a focus on force 
protection, enhanced security for servicemembers living on a 
military installation, and prioritization of protocols for 
reporting at the earliest practicable time to local and Federal 
law enforcement when a servicemember is determined to be 
missing, absent unknown, absent without leave, or duty status-
whereabouts unknown.

Conduct unbecoming an officer (sec. 529)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
Article 133 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. 
933) by striking the words ``and a gentleman'' from the title 
and text of the current article prohibiting conduct unbecoming 
an officer and a gentleman.

Analysis of the use of non-judicial punishment (sec. 530)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to conduct statistical analysis on non-
judicial punishments with respect to race, ethnicity, gender, 
rank, and grade.

Sexual Assault Response Coordinator Military Occupational Specialty 
        (sec. 530A)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees not later than 180 days after the date of 
the enactment of this Act on various elements concerning a 
military occupational specialty for Sexual Assault Response 
Coordinators.

Implementation of recommendations of the Independent Review Commission 
        on Sexual Assault in the Military (sec. 530B)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to implement the recommendations of the 
Independent Review Commission (IRC) contained within Lines of 
Effort 2, 3, and 4, as reflected in the IRC's 2021 report 
entitled ``Hard Truths and the Duty to Change: Recommendations 
from the Independent Review Commission on Sexual Assault in the 
Military.''

   Subtitle D--Military Justice Reform and Sexual Assault Prevention


                    Part I--Military Justice Matters


Special victim prosecutors (sec. 531)

    The committee recommends a provision that would add a new 
article 24a to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ), 
codified at section 824a of title 10, United States Code, that 
would require the Secretaries of the military departments to 
detail commissioned officers to serve as special victim 
prosecutors and assistant special victim prosecutors. The 
provision would require that such prosecutors be certified by 
the Judge Advocate General of the armed force concerned to be 
qualified by reason of education, training, experience, and 
temperament for such duty.
    The provision would grant exclusive authority to 
prosecutors detailed under this provision to determine whether 
a reported offense is a special victim offense for the purposes 
of the section and to exercise authority over any such offense 
under the UCMJ. The provision would authorize prosecutors 
detailed pursuant to the section to exercise authority over any 
reported offense that the prosecutor determines to be related 
to the special victim offense or committed by a person alleged 
to have committed a special victim offense.
    The provision would grant exclusive authority to 
prosecutors detailed under the section to: (1) Dismiss charges 
and specifications or make a motion to dismiss charges and 
specifications; (2) Refer charges and specifications for trial 
by special or general court-martial; (3) Enter into a plea 
agreement; and (4) Determine if an ordered rehearing is 
impracticable.
    Finally, the provision would authorize a convening 
authority to exercise any of the authorities granted to 
convening authorities under the UCMJ, notwithstanding the 
exclusive authority granted to prosecutors detailed under the 
section, in the event such prosecutors decline to exercise 
authority granted to them under the section.

Policies with respect to special victim prosecutors (sec. 532)

    The committee recommends a provision that would add a new 
section 1044f to title 10, United States Code, and require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish policies with respect to the 
appropriate mechanisms and procedures that the Secretaries of 
the military departments shall establish and carry out relating 
to the activities of special victim prosecutors.

Definition of military magistrate, special victim offense, and special 
        victim prosecutor (sec. 533)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 801 of title 10, United States Code, to add definitions 
to the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) for ``military 
magistrate,'' ``special victim offense,'' and ``special victim 
prosecutor.'' The provision would define special victim offense 
as an offense under Articles 117a, 120, 120b, 120c, 128b, 130, 
or 132 of the UCMJ (10 U.S.C. 917a, 920, 920b, 920c, 928b, 930, 
or 932); conspiracy, solicitation, or attempt to commit such 
offense under Articles 81, 82, or 80 of the UCMJ (10 U.S.C. 
881, 882, or 880); and the standalone offenses of sexual 
harassment and child pornography under Article 134 of the UCMJ 
(10 U.S.C. 934).

Clarification of applicability of domestic violence and stalking to 
        dating partners (sec. 534)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
Articles 128b and 130 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice 
(10 U.S.C. 928b and 10 U.S.C. 930) to add dating partners to 
the victims covered by those articles (criminalizing domestic 
violence and stalking).

Clarification relating to who may convene courts-martial (sec. 535)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
Article 22 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. 
822) to clarify that a commanding officer shall not be 
considered an accuser in a general or special court-martial to 
which charges and specifications were referred by a special 
victim prosecutor.

Inclusion of sexual harassment as general punitive article (sec. 536)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
President to amend the Manual for Courts-Martial to include 
sexual harassment as a standalone offense under article 134 of 
the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. 934).

Determinations of impracticability of rehearing (sec. 537)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
Article 65 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. 
865) to provide exclusive authority to a special victim 
prosecutor to make a determination on behalf of the Government 
that a rehearing authorized by a military justice appellate 
authority in a special victim case is impracticable and, if so, 
to dismiss any affected charge.

Plea agreements (sec. 538)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
Article 53a of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. 
853a) to provide exclusive authority, in special victim cases, 
to special victim prosecutors to enter into plea agreements on 
behalf of the United States.

Opportunity to obtain witness and other evidence in trials by court-
        martial (sec. 539)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
Article 46 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. 
846) to authorize special victim prosecutors to issue pre-
referral investigative subpoenas.

Former jeopardy (sec. 540)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
Article 44 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. 
844) to clarify that jeopardy attaches when a special victim 
prosecutor dismisses charges or otherwise terminates a court-
martial in certain cases.

Advice to convening authority before referral for trial (sec. 541)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
Article 34 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. 
834) to provide a special victim prosecutor with exclusive 
authority to refer charges alleging special victim offenses for 
trial by a special or general court-martial.

Preliminary hearing (sec. 542)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
Article 32 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. 
832) to authorize a special victim prosecutor to convene a 
preliminary hearing and to receive the preliminary hearing 
officer's report. The provision would also require that the 
preliminary hearing officer in a special victim case be a 
military judge or military magistrate.

Detail of trial counsel (sec. 543)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
Article 27 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. 
827) to require that for each general and special court-martial 
for which charges and specifications were referred by a special 
victim prosecutor, that a special victim prosecutor or 
assistant special victim prosecutor be detailed as trial 
counsel for such case. The provision would also specify 
authority to detail assistant trial counsel in such cases.

Sentencing reform (sec. 544)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
Articles 53, 53a, 56, and 66 of the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice (10 U.S.C. 853, 853a, 856, and 866) to require military 
judge-alone sentencing in non-capital courts-martial subject to 
the President's establishment of sentencing parameters and 
criteria. The provision would also provide that, for capital 
cases, panel members would determine whether the sentence would 
include death or life without parole, or such other lesser 
punishment as may be determined by the military judge, and that 
the military judge would then sentence the accused in 
accordance with the determination of the panel members.

Uniform, document-based data system (sec. 545)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish a single mechanism and 
process into and through which records, data, and information 
would be collected, tracked, and maintained regarding the 
reporting, investigation, processing, adjudication, and final 
disposition of all offenses under the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice arising in any component of the Department of Defense.

Primary prevention workforce (sec. 546)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish a Primary Prevention 
Workforce to provide a comprehensive and integrated program 
across the Department of Defense for the prevention of sexual 
assault, sexual harassment, domestic violence, child abuse and 
maltreatment, problematic juvenile sexual behavior, suicide, 
workplace violence, and substance misuse.

Annual primary prevention research agenda (sec. 547)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to annually publish a Department of 
Defense research agenda for that fiscal year focused on the 
prevention of sexual assault, sexual harassment, domestic 
violence, child abuse and maltreatment, problematic juvenile 
sexual behavior, suicide, workplace violence, and substance 
misuse.

Full functionality of certain advisory committees and panels (sec. 548)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to reconstitute the Defense Advisory 
Committee on the Investigation, Prosecution, and Defense of 
Sexual Assault in the Armed Forces, the Defense Advisory 
Committee for the Prevention of Sexual Misconduct, and the 
Military Justice Review Panel.

Military defense counsel parity (sec. 549)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to ensure parity of resources between 
military prosecutors and military defense counsel, and that 
military defense counsel in special victim cases possess 
sufficient training and experience.

Resourcing (sec. 550)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives a 
report, not later than March 1, 2022, detailing the resourcing 
necessary to implement this part of this subtitle.

Applicability to the United States Coast Guard (sec. 551)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to consult and enter into an agreement 
with the Secretary of Homeland Security to apply the provisions 
of this subtitle to the U.S. Coast Guard when it is operating 
as a service in the Department of Homeland Security.

Effective date (sec. 552)

    The committee recommends a provision that would establish 
an effective date for the provisions contained in this subtitle 
of not later than 2 years after the date of enactment of this 
Act.

  Part II--Military Justice Improvement and Increasing Prevention Act


Short title (sec. 561)

    The committee recommends a provision that would establish a 
short title for the series of provisions in this part of this 
subtitle as ``Military Justice Improvement and Increasing 
Prevention Act of 2021''.

Improvement of determinations on disposition of charges for certain 
        offenses under UCMJ with authorized maximum sentence of 
        confinement of more than one year (sec. 562)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
that the determination on whether to cause charges to be 
preferred on an accused or to refer charges for certain 
offenses to general or special courts-martial be made by trial 
counsel in the grade of O-6 or above, appointed by the chiefs 
of the military services for this purpose, rather than by 
convening authorities as they are currently defined under the 
Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ). The provision would 
require that these officers not be in the victim's or accused's 
chain of command. The provision would apply to the following 
articles of the UCMJ: 93a, 117a, 118, 119, 119a, 119b, 120, 
120a, 120b, 120c, 121, 121a, 121b, 122, 124, 124a, 124b, 125, 
126, 127, 128(b) and (c), 128a, 128b, 130, 131, 131a, 131b, 
131c, 131d, 131e, 131f, 131g, and 132. The provision would also 
apply to the standalone offenses of child pornography, 
negligent homicide, indecent conduct, indecent language, and 
pandering and prostitution under general article 134 of the 
UCMJ. Finally, the provision would apply to the offenses of 
conspiracy, solicitation, and attempt to commit an offense 
listed above under articles 81, 82, and 80 of the UCMJ.

Modification of officers authorized to convene general and special 
        courts-martial for certain offenses under UCMJ with authorized 
        maximum sentence of confinement of more than one year (sec. 
        563)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
Article 22 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) (10 
U.S.C. 822) to modify the officers authorized to convene 
general and special courts-martial for certain offenses under 
the UCMJ with maximum sentences of confinement of more than 1 
year.

Discharge using otherwise authorized personnel and resources (sec. 564)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretaries of the military departments and the Secretary of 
Homeland Security (with respect to the U.S. Coast Guard) to 
implement the provisions contained in this part of this 
subtitle using personnel, funds, and resources otherwise 
authorized by law.

Monitoring and assessment of modification of authorities by Defense 
        Advisory Committee on Investigation, Prosecution, and Defense 
        of Sexual Assault in the Armed Forces (sec. 565)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Defense Advisory Committee on Investigation, Prosecution, and 
Defense of Sexual Assault in the Armed Forces to monitor the 
implementation of the provisions contained in this part of this 
subtitle.

Limitation on modifications to sexual assault reporting procedures 
        (sec. 566)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the Secretary of Defense from amending section 4 of enclosure 4 
of Department of Defense Instruction 6495.02, relating to 
Sexual Assault Prevention and Response Program Procedures.

Professionalization of military prosecutors (sec. 567)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to increase training to certain 
prosecutors on the proper conduct, presentation, and handling 
of sexual assault and domestic violence cases.

Increased training and education on military sexual assault (sec. 568)

    The committee recommends a provision that would increase 
training and education on military sexual assault for certain 
officers, senior enlisted personnel, officer candidates, and 
cadets and midshipmen at the military academies and in the 
Reserve Officer Training Corps.

Increasing the physical security of military installations (sec. 569)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to conduct a survey of lodging and living 
spaces on military installations to assess various physical 
security measures in place and to develop and carry out a 
program to increase physical security at military installations 
based on the survey.

Effective date and applicability (sec. 570)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
that the provisions contained in this part of this subtitle 
become effective 180 days after the date of the enactment of 
this Act.

         Subtitle E--Member Education, Training, and Transition


Modification of grant program supporting science, technology, 
        engineering, and math education in the Junior Reserve Officers' 
        Training Corps to include quantum information sciences (sec. 
        571)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
chapter 102 of title 10, United States Code, to add quantum 
information sciences to the list of covered subjects for the 
program to support science, technology, engineering, and math 
education in the Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps.

Allocation of authority for nominations to the military service 
        academies in the event of the death, resignation, or expulsion 
        from office of a member of Congress (sec. 572)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
chapters 753, 853, and 953 of title 10, United States Code, to 
allocate unused nominations to the military service academies 
resulting from the death, resignation, or expulsion from office 
of a Member of Congress to the remaining Senator or Senators 
from the same State as the departed Member.

Troops-to-Teachers Program (sec. 573)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1154 of title 10, United States Code, to require the 
Secretary of Defense to carry out the Troops-to-Teachers 
Program. The provision would sunset the program for new 
entrants on July 1, 2025, unless subsequently extended. 
Finally, the provision would require annual reports from the 
Secretary on a number of performance and outcome metrics.
    The committee directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to conduct an assessment of the Troops-to-Teachers 
Program authorized by section 1154 of title 10, United States 
Code, since that program's inception. The assessment shall 
include: (1) The numbers of teachers placed; (2) The quality of 
teachers; (3) Placements, especially at ``high need'' schools; 
(4) Diversity of teachers placed; (5) The duration of their 
employment; (6) The satisfaction of the gaining local education 
agencies; (7) The budgetary resources expended; and (8) The 
overall effectiveness of the program in producing highly 
qualified teachers from separating members of the Armed Forces 
and placing them in local educational agencies with 
demonstrated need for teachers.
    Finally, the assessment shall include data provided by the 
Department by the annual reports required by the provision. The 
Comptroller General shall provide a report on this assessment 
to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives not later than March 1, 2023.

Combating foreign malign influence (sec. 574)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 589E of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-
283) to create a working group to assist the official 
designated to coordinate and integrate the training program 
mandated under this section. The working group would assist in 
identifying mediums and themes used by covered foreign 
countries in foreign malign influence campaigns directed 
against servicemembers and Department of Defense civilian 
employees. The provision would also require the working group 
to assist in coordinating and integrating the training program 
in order to enhance and strengthen servicemember and Department 
of Defense civilian employee awareness of and defenses against 
foreign malign influence, including by bolstering information 
literacy.

Prohibition on implementation by United States Air Force Academy of 
        civilian faculty tenure system (sec. 575)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the Secretary of Defense from implementing a civilian faculty 
tenure system for the United States Air Force Academy until a 
report explaining the purpose and detailed plans for the 
proposed system is delivered to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives.

    Subtitle F--Military Family Readiness and Dependents' Education


Certain assistance to local educational agencies that benefit 
        dependents of military and civilian personnel (sec. 581)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
$50.0 million in Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide, for 
continuation of the Department of Defense (DOD) assistance 
program to local educational agencies impacted by enrollment of 
dependent children of military members and DOD civilian 
employees.
    The provision would also authorize $10.0 million in 
Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide, for impact aid 
payments for children with disabilities as enacted by the Floyd 
D. Spence National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2001 (Public Law 106-398), using the formula set forth in 
section 363 of the Floyd D. Spence National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001, for continuation of 
Department of Defense assistance to local educational agencies 
that benefit eligible dependents with severe disabilities. 
Subsection (b)(2) of the provision would authorize the 
Secretary of Defense to use an additional $10.0 million for 
payments to local educational agencies determined by the 
Secretary to have higher concentrations of military children 
with severe disabilities. Subsection (b)(3) of the provision 
would require the Secretary to brief the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives by 
March 31, 2022, on the Department's evaluation of each local 
educational agency with higher concentrations of military 
children with severe disabilities and its subsequent 
determination of the amounts of impact aid each such agency 
should receive.

Pilot program to establish employment fellowship opportunities for 
        military spouses (sec. 582)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to establish a pilot program to 
provide employment for military spouses through a fellowship 
with employers across a variety of industries.

                 Subtitle G--Other Matters and Reports


Amendments to additional Deputy Inspector General of the Department of 
        Defense (sec. 591)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 554 of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) 
that established an additional Deputy Inspector General to 
improve oversight of diversity and inclusion programs of the 
Department of Defense, as well as programs designed to prevent 
and respond to incidents of extremism within the Armed Forces. 
The provision would clarify that this official would report to 
the Inspector General of the Department of Defense.

Inclusion of Senior Reserve Officers' Training Corps data in diversity 
        and inclusion reporting (sec. 592)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 113 of title 10, United States Code, to include in 
reports on diversity and inclusion required by that section, 
information pertaining to graduates of the Senior Reserve 
Officers' Training Corps program.

Modified deadline for establishment of special purpose adjunct to Armed 
        Services Vocational Aptitude Battery test (sec. 593)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 594 of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) to 
modify the deadline for establishment of the special purpose 
adjunct to the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery 
required by that section.

Reports on Air Force personnel performing duties of a Nuclear and 
        Missile Operations Officer (13N) (sec. 594)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Air Force to report on the Nuclear and Missile 
Operations Officer (13N) career field through fiscal year 2027. 
The committee notes that the 13N career field has often been 
over-stressed in terms of work hours and deployments inside the 
United States, with the COVID-19 pandemic impacting the career 
field particularly hard. The committee commends the Air Force 
for recognizing this challenge early and programming additional 
resources for additional officers in the 13N field. However, 
the committee believes, especially given the transition to the 
Ground Based Strategic Deterrent, that further oversight of the 
health of the 13N career field is required.

Reports on security force personnel performing protection level one 
        duties (sec. 595)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Air Force to provide to the congressional 
defense committees a report annually for fiscal years 2023 
through 2027 on the status of Air Force security forces 
dedicated to the defense of protection level one (PL-1) assets. 
The report would include the numbers of such personnel, mission 
and installation breakdowns of such personnel, retention rates, 
training details, and the status of vehicle replacements at PL-
1 installations.
    The role of the security forces in intercontinental 
ballistic missile fields are of particular concern to the 
committee. Much progress has been made to ensure that arming 
and use-of-force fitness standards can be used instead of the 
Personal Reliability Program, and that the security forces are 
rotated through the missile fields and other PL-1 installations 
on a regular basis. However, issues remain, such as replacing 
the BearCat and high-mobility multipurpose wheeled vehicles 
(currently used by the security forces) with alternatives more 
suitable to the long distances and off-road conditions 
encountered in the missile field security mission.

                       Items of Special Interest


Active-Duty service obligations for graduates of cybersecurity courses

    The committee remains interested in the recruitment and 
retention of military personnel trained in cybersecurity. The 
Department of Defense (DOD) invests in a number of incentives 
and training to develop cybersecurity personnel with valuable 
qualifications. Given the substantial demand for personnel with 
these qualifications in the private sector, the committee is 
concerned about DOD's ability to retain trained military 
cybersecurity personnel. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Comptroller General of the United States to review DOD 
recruitment and retention of cybersecurity military personnel.
    The Comptroller General shall provide a briefing with 
preliminary observations of this review to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
not later than March 7, 2022, followed by a report to be 
delivered on a mutually agreeable date. This review shall 
include: (1) The extent to which the DOD met overall 
cybersecurity-related staffing targets; (2) A discussion of 
recruitment and retention of the military cybersecurity 
workforce; and (3) The extent to which DOD has utilized 
business case analyses to explore the use of increased Active-
Duty service obligations and other policies to improve 
recruiting and retention of the military cybersecurity 
workforce. In addition, the report should include any other 
related information the Comptroller General determines to be 
appropriate.

Appointment of Chiropractors as Commissioned Officers

    Section 505 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 1993 (Public Law 102-484) authorized the military 
departments to appoint ``chiropractors who are qualified under 
regulations'' issued by the military departments as 
commissioned officers in the Army Medical Specialist Corps, 
Navy Medical Service Corps, or Air Force Biomedical Service 
Corps. Since enactment of section 505, servicemembers have 
experienced decades of deployment-related musculoskeletal 
injuries that can limit their combat effectiveness.
    The committee is aware that over 80 civilian chiropractors 
provide care to Active-Duty servicemembers at 51 military 
medical treatment facilities in the United States and overseas. 
These practitioners can offer non-surgical alternative 
treatments and therapies to help servicemembers recover more 
quickly from musculoskeletal injuries. The Department of 
Defense has no capability, however, to provide chiropractic 
services in deployed environments to address the effects of 
such injuries there. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives, 
not later than March 1, 2022, that assesses the feasibility of 
using the Department's statutory authority to commission 
chiropractors as military officers. The assessment shall 
include: (1) Any combatant commander requirements for 
chiropractors as part of operating or generating forces; (2) 
The potential role of military chiropractors in deployed 
medical units; (3) The conditions under which the Department 
would deem military chiropractors as a critical wartime medical 
specialty; and (4) Any recommendations, as may be required, for 
the committees to clarify related authorities or adjust end-
strength allowances for the commissioning of chiropractors as 
military officers.

Asian American and Pacific Islander Medal of Honor Review

    Section 586 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) required the Secretaries 
of the military departments to conduct a review of the service 
records of each Asian American and Native American Pacific 
Islander war veteran who was awarded the Distinguished-Service 
Cross, the Navy Cross, or the Air Force Cross during the Korean 
War or the Vietnam War. The committee understands that the 
services have completed their reviews and submitted 
recommendations to the Department of Defense. After the 
Department finalizes its review of the recommendations of the 
military departments, but not later than March 1, 2022, the 
Secretary of Defense shall provide a briefing to the Committees 
on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives on its findings, to include the number of 
affected veterans recommended for an upgrade to the Medal of 
Honor.

Career Intermission Program

    The committee supports the Career Intermission Program 
(CIP) and continued efforts to expand and improve upon the 
accessibility of this program across the Department of Defense. 
CIP helps the Armed Forces retain talented, capable, and 
diverse servicemembers. The committee urges the military 
departments to establish flexible options for CIP to further 
expand access to this unique retention tool. Decreasing the 
lead time necessary to apply for the program and expanding 
enrollment eligibility may be easy ways to make the program 
more attractive to servicemembers. The committee encourages the 
military departments to establish appropriate public affairs 
outreach to ensure that servicemembers are aware of the 
program.

Comptroller General of the United States review of certain professional 
        development activities of Department of Defense Education 
        Activity employees

    The committee directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to conduct an assessment of professional development 
activities offered or required by the Department of Defense 
Education Activity (DODEA) of teacher and other school-level 
employees, including an assessment of how useful and effective 
DODEA school-level employees find this professional 
development. The report shall also include a comparative review 
of DODEA's professional development activities for school-level 
employees and a representative sample of such activities in 
school districts in the United States, as selected by the 
Comptroller General. Finally, the report shall include an 
assessment of the utility of DODEA's requirement that certain 
school-level employees perform 24 hours of uncompensated 
professional development activities each school quarter outside 
of normal working hours.
    The committee directs the Comptroller General to provide a 
report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives on the results of this assessment 
not later than April 1, 2022.

Comptroller General of the United States review of Department of 
        Defense payroll system for employees of the Department of 
        Defense Education Activity

    The Department of Defense (DOD) Education Activity (DODEA) 
is a DOD Field Activity that operates DOD's school system. A 
February 4, 2021, Government Accountability Office (GAO) 
report, titled ``K-12 Education: U.S. Military Families 
Generally Have the Same Schooling Options as Other Families and 
Consider Multiple Factors When Selecting Schools'' (GAO-21-80), 
observed that the majority of DODEA's 160 accredited schools 
were located on overseas installations. Educators and other 
specialized DODEA employees, particularly overseas employees, 
are entitled to certain allowances and differentials not 
applicable to similar DODEA employees inside the United States. 
Payroll accounting for DODEA employees is part of the DOD 
civilian payroll system and is processed by the Defense Finance 
and Accounting Service (DFAS). Given that auditors have 
identified numerous internal control deficiencies in the DOD 
and DFAS's accounting systems, the committee is concerned about 
the ability of the DOD payroll system to adequately process and 
provide pay for these DODEA employees.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to provide a report to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives, 
not later than October 1, 2022, on the DOD payroll system as it 
pertains to DODEA. The report shall include the following 
elements:
          (1) The extent to which DOD has implemented prior 
        directives to improve its payroll system for DODEA, 
        particularly for overseas employees;
          (2) The extent to which DODEA overseas employees' pay 
        is provided in a timely manner and calculated properly 
        to include base pay and any additional allowances and 
        differentials; and
          (3) Any other matters the Comptroller General deems 
        appropriate.

Comptroller General review of military personnel policies related to 
        United States Indo-Pacific Command

    The committee supports the current Department of Defense 
(DOD) effort to evaluate and revise various personnel-related 
policies to focus more on the security challenges posed by 
China. This review process should include a consideration of 
the need to emphasize the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM) 
area of responsibility in preparing servicemembers for future 
armed conflict.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to review the Department's efforts to focus 
professional military education and promotion policies to 
ensure military personnel have adequate education, exposure, 
and expertise in the Indo-Pacific theater and the countries and 
territories contained therein.
    The Comptroller General shall provide a briefing with 
preliminary observations of this review to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
not later than May 1, 2022, followed by a report to be 
delivered on a mutually agreeable date. The review shall 
include: (1) The extent to which current promotion boards 
consider service in INDOPACOM and the other combatant commands 
as part of the board process; (2) A discussion of current DOD 
efforts to re-orient professional military education toward the 
security challenges posed by China; and (3) Any related 
information the Comptroller General determines to be 
appropriate.

Comptroller General review of Senior Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
        program contributions to a diverse officer corps

    The Senior Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) program 
is critical for producing officers from the Nation's colleges 
and universities to meet the leadership and readiness needs of 
the military services. ROTC units have a geographically diverse 
presence at hundreds of colleges and universities throughout 
the United States and its territories, which is intended to 
help produce officers that reflect the communities they serve. 
However, the committee is concerned about the extent to which 
this is currently being achieved.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to provide preliminary observations to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives by February 24, 2022, on the extent to which 
ROTC programs are contributing to a racially, ethnically, and 
socioeconomically diverse and representative military, with a 
report to follow on an agreed upon date. The report shall 
address the following elements:
          (1) Trends in the racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic 
        makeup of military officers commissioned through ROTC 
        programs;
          (2) The extent to which the current distribution of 
        ROTC units across U.S. colleges and universities 
        contributes to the military services' desire for a 
        diverse and representative officer corps;
          (3) The extent to which the military services 
        periodically review and, as necessary, modify ROTC 
        programs to help ensure that they are maximizing 
        opportunities to recruit individuals who will 
        contribute to a diverse and representative officer 
        corps; and
          (4) Any other areas that the Comptroller General 
        considers relevant to the review.

Connecting certain servicemembers with community-based organizations 
        through state veterans agencies

    Section 570F of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) required the Secretary of 
Defense and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to seek to enter 
into memorandums of understanding or other agreements with 
State veterans agencies or related entities to connect retiring 
and separating servicemembers with benefits or services 
provided by community-based organizations. The committee notes 
the significant, helpful contribution this section could have 
for servicemembers undergoing retirement, discharge, or release 
from the Armed Forces. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives, 
not later than June 1, 2022, on the Department of Defense's 
efforts to implement section 570F. The briefing shall include a 
description of any modifications to form DD-2648 that would 
allow a servicemember to provide contact information 
voluntarily to State veterans agencies. Additionally, the 
briefing shall provide the number and types of memorandums of 
understanding or other agreements completed with such agencies 
(or related entities) to facilitate communication of available 
services and benefits with certain servicemembers.

Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency briefing on recovery of 
        servicemembers' remains

    As the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) works to 
account for missing servicemembers, the committee believes that 
there is particular urgency in addressing field recoveries 
since those remains are most at risk. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Director, DPAA, to provide a briefing to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives, not later than February 1, 2022, outlining a 
detailed plan and timeline describing how DPAA will account for 
remains other than those from graves of the unknown. The plan 
shall also address the extent to which DPAA will collaborate 
with external partners to maximize recoveries of such remains.

Department of Defense civilian workforce career developmental programs

    The committee notes that skill gaps in hiring, development, 
and retention of personnel in Science, Technology, Engineering, 
Mathematics, and Manufacturing (STEMM), Cyber, Artificial 
Intelligence, acquisition workforce, financial management and 
other critical functional areas required by the National 
Defense Strategy (NDS) persist, even after numerous legislative 
initiatives that provided greater flexibility in setting the 
terms and conditions of employment. Each military department 
has created its own separate career program brands for the same 
kinds of skills, often with their own separate developmental 
paths and certification and training requirements that create a 
cumbersome application process and may at times impede 
consideration of otherwise qualified candidates for civilian 
jobs. The committee believes that this fragmented approach does 
not meet the needs of the Department.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives not later than January 
1, 2022, on its plan to streamline civilian personnel 
management across the Department of Defense (DOD) with the goal 
of further developing the skills the Department needs to meet 
the priorities of the NDS while maintaining an apolitical 
civilian workforce. The plan should at least address the 
following elements:
          (1) Emphasis on competitive hiring using objective 
        assessments of qualifications in lieu of rigid tools 
        for classification;
          (2) Promoting innovative management of the Federal 
        workforce;
          (3) Using data analytics to establish a systematic 
        process to ensure the current and future DOD workforce 
        is aligned with the current and future mission of the 
        Department;
          (4) Use of subject matter expert hiring panels to 
        limit rigid assessments of qualifications;
          (5) Recognition of alternative developmental paths to 
        establish qualifications required for positions;
          (6) Emphasis on diversity and inclusion;
          (7) Increasing use of standing registers of qualified 
        applicants to fill open positions;
          (8) Emphasis on active recruitment methods through 
        visits to high schools, trade schools, colleges, 
        universities, job fairs, and community groups rather 
        than passive recruitment through job postings;
          (9) Utilizing standardized and uniform Government-
        wide job classification;
          (10) Reducing cumbersome application processes, 
        including removing the requirement to use Federal 
        resumes; and
          (11) Legislative proposals required to achieve these 
        outcomes.

Department of Defense implementation of open Government Accountability 
        Office recommendations concerning sexual harassment and sexual 
        assault

    According to information provided to the committee by the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO), since 2006, GAO has 
issued 18 reports containing 130 recommendations that address 
the continuum of unwanted sexual behavior in the military. Of 
these 130 recommendations, a significant number remain open and 
unresolved by the Department of Defense (DOD). These unresolved 
matters include high priority recommendations, as characterized 
by GAO, concerning the incorporation into the Department's 
sexual harassment policies principles contained in the Center 
for Disease Control's framework for sexual violence prevention; 
the requirement that DOD's Office of Diversity Management and 
Equal Opportunity develop and aggressively implement an 
oversight framework to guide the Department's efforts to 
prevent and address incidents of sexual harassment involving 
servicemembers; and the requirement that the Department develop 
a strategy for holding individuals in positions of leadership 
accountable for promoting, supporting, and enforcing the 
Department's sexual harassment programs and policies.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, not later 
than December 31, 2021, to implement the open and unresolved 
GAO recommendations cited above, or, if the Secretary 
determines that implementing one or more recommendations by 
that date is impracticable, to notify GAO of that 
determination, and provide a briefing to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
not later than February 1, 2022, on the reasons and status of 
such open recommendations.

Education in the Department of Defense

    The committee is aware that servicemembers often face the 
competing demands of work, education, and family needs, and 
that it can be difficult to keep all three in balance. 
Education remains important for developing military personnel 
for greater responsibility and eventual promotion. The 
committee encourages the Department to take any steps it deems 
necessary to ensure that servicemembers are well-equipped to 
balance these competing demands adequately as they continue to 
serve in the Armed Forces.

Establish a Naval Community College

    The committee is supportive of the efforts by the 
Department of the Navy to establish a Naval Community College 
(USNCC), the primary function of which is to provide post-
secondary, lower division education programs and the attendant 
support services to enlisted personnel of the Navy and Marine 
Corps. As the Navy conducts its initial USNCC pilot to 
determine the feasibility of process, the committee remains 
interested in the educational direction and benchmarks of the 
USNCC. The committee directs the Assistant Secretary of the 
Navy (Manpower and Reserve Affairs) to provide a briefing to 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives not later than 30 days after the completion of 
the pilot program on the primary competencies gained by sailor 
participants, with a focus on high-skilled competencies.

Foreign language testing and tracking

    Foreign language skills, regional expertise, and cultural 
knowledge are critical competencies for ensuring global 
operational readiness. The committee is interested in better 
understanding how the Department of Defense (DOD) identifies 
and tracks foreign language proficiency resident in the force 
and the extent to which initial entry servicemembers who have 
indicated foreign language proficiency are able to gain access 
to screening. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a report to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives by September 1, 
2022, on the Department's administration and tracking of the 
screening and testing of military recruits with self-professed 
language proficiency in accordance with Department of Defense 
Instruction (DODI) 5160.71 DOD Language Testing Program.
    The report shall include the following elements:
          (1) The total number of initial entry servicemembers 
        from January 1, 2019 to January 1, 2022, who self-
        profess proficiency in a foreign language described in 
        subsection (a), broken down by service and Strategic 
        Language List category for each year;
          (2) The total number of Defense Language Proficiency 
        Tests or Oral Proficiency Interviews administered per 
        year to those initial entry servicemembers with self-
        professed proficiency in a foreign language from 
        January 1, 2019 to January 1, 2022, broken down by 
        service and Strategic Language List category;
          (3) The average amount of time between when initial 
        entry servicemembers with self-professed knowledge of a 
        foreign language were identified and when they were 
        tested, broken down by service, Strategic Language List 
        category, and year;
          (4) A description of each military service's 
        procedures to screen and track all newly commissioned 
        officer personnel for language aptitude or capability 
        as outlined in DODI 5160.71 Enclosure 1, paragraph 9, 
        section f;
          (5) A description of each military service's 
        procedures to administer the Defense Language 
        Proficiency Test to military recruits or enlisted 
        personnel who have a self-professed knowledge of a 
        foreign language during their first term of enlistment 
        as outlined in DODI 5160.71 Enclosure 1, paragraph 9, 
        section m; and
          (6) Any additional resources that would support the 
        timely administration of the Defense Language 
        Proficiency Test or Oral Proficiency Interview to 
        recruits, enlisted personnel, and newly commissioned 
        officer candidates who profess to have language 
        proficiency as early in the term of service as 
        possible.
    The committee encourages the Department of Defense to 
continue to place a high priority on foreign language 
proficiency programs to ensure warfighters and national 
security professionals receive the language and culture 
training needed to complete their missions effectively, to 
include partnerships with K-12 schools and universities.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the Senate Armed Services Committee 
not later than January 1, 2022, on the viability and utility of 
establishing a comprehensive plan for the development and 
maintenance of advanced foreign language skills and training 
for DOD personnel. The briefing shall include consideration of 
whether there is a need to establish an Executive Agent for the 
program and whether there is a need for investment in 
commercially available foreign language training to maintain 
access to language training after linguists transition from 
education or training environments to operational environments.

Increased capacity for servicemember childcare on military 
        installations

    The committee is aware that servicemembers frequently face 
low availability and high costs of childcare, and that this 
issue negatively impacts servicemember readiness and military 
spouse employment. This childcare issue further forces parents 
to make difficult choices and adds stress to military families.
    The committee encourages the military services to seek out 
creative solutions to solve this childcare availability crisis, 
including exploring options to create public-private 
partnerships if they would increase capacity and availability 
of quality childcare for servicemembers and their dependents. 
The committee commends the Navy's efforts to expand capacity in 
the Southern California area and encourages the other military 
services to consult with the Navy about its approach in 
devising creative childcare solutions.

Issuance of prisoner-of-war medal

    The committee is concerned about inequities across the 
services in applying prisoner-of-war medal eligibility 
requirements under section 1128(b) of title 10, United States 
Code, as amended by the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2013 (Public Law 112-239). Specifically, the 
Department of the Army has implemented regulatory hurdles that 
are difficult for servicemembers and next-of-kin to clear, 
whereas the other services have implemented the Act's updates 
in a much more direct and streamlined fashion.
    Section 584 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2013 authorized the Secretaries concerned to issue 
the prisoner-of-war medal to any person who, while serving in 
any capacity with the Armed Forces, was held captive under 
circumstances in which the Secretary concerned finds were 
comparable to those circumstances under which persons have 
generally been held captive by enemy armed forces during 
periods of armed conflict. The intent of this law was to 
broaden eligibility for the prisoner-of-war medal to those who, 
for reasons of law and not fact, were not eligible for the 
medal because they were not in a conflict or taken prisoner and 
held captive by a party whose legal status met the criteria 
under subsection (a) of the aforementioned statute. Nothing in 
the law required or encouraged the Secretaries concerned to 
limit servicemembers' eligibility under subsection (b) to those 
members held captive by individuals or groups that were 
included on any official or published list of hostile actors. 
The law's intent was to give discretion to the Secretaries to 
balance the equities and use discretion in appropriate cases.
    The committee encourages the services to eschew any policy 
that would make the consultation of published lists of bad 
actors dispositive in determining whether a member is eligible 
for a prisoner-of-war medal.
    Not later than March 1, 2022, the Secretaries of the 
military departments shall provide a briefing to the Committees 
on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives on the process by which they will consider 
applications for the prisoner-of-war medal under section 
1128(b) of title 10, United States Code.

Management policies for emerging technology qualified officers

    Emerging technologies will reshape future warfare. The 
military most able to build a cadre of officers who understand 
the potential of new technologies will likely be best 
positioned for success. The National Security Commission on 
Artificial Intelligence (NSCAI) final report stated, ``It is 
crucial that the [Department of Defense] incentivize and 
increase the skill needed to introduce and field emerging and 
disruptive technologies within the military officer corps.''
    The NSCAI report recommends creating a management system 
modeled on the joint qualification process for officers 
qualified in emerging technologies. Officers qualified in 
emerging technologies could be useful to their respective 
military departments in a number of ways, including: ``1) 
Assisting with acquisition of emerging technology; 2) Helping 
integrate technology into field units; 3) Developing 
organizational and operational concepts; and 4) Developing 
training and education plans.''
    The committee encourages the Secretaries of the military 
departments to review the NSCAI recommendations. Many of the 
recommendations may be implemented with new or updated 
policies. If a recommendation cannot be implemented using 
current authority, the committee encourages the Secretary of 
Defense to submit proposals that would amend current law to 
enable the Department of Defense to better prepare officers to 
understand and take advantage of emerging technologies.

Military Spouse Employment

    The committee notes that the well-being and economic 
stability of the Nation's military families--and the Nation's 
military spouses--is directly linked to the national security 
interests of the United States and the long term strength and 
viability of the Armed Forces. It is imperative that the Armed 
Forces retain and develop their personnel. The committee 
remains concerned that the services may be prematurely losing 
highly trained personnel as military families are confronted 
with the choice of discontinuing a successful business or 
gainful employment for a spouse in advance of an overseas 
relocation. Other provisions in this Act aim to address these 
issues, through a direct hire pilot program within the 
Department; however, more avenues of employment must be 
explored. As such, the committee urges the Secretary of Defense 
to work with the Department of State to address and ameliorate 
provisions in future Status of Forces Agreements that restrict 
military spouse employment.
    The committee recognizes that the COVID-19 pandemic has 
changed the manner in which we work, creating greater 
opportunities for military spouses globally. The committee 
commends the Department for its ongoing efforts to support 
military spouse remote work and entrepreneurship, including the 
Military Spouse Employment Partnership to better equip military 
spouses to navigate the array of regulatory and administrative 
challenges they face. Section 560 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) 
authorized the Secretary to create a public-private pilot 
program for telework facilities for military spouses on 
military installations outside the United States. Pursuant to 
that text, this program should conclude not later than December 
12, 2021.
    Additionally, not later than March 1, 2022, the Secretary 
of Defense shall provide the Committees on Armed Services of 
the Senate and the House of Representatives a briefing on the 
status and, if complete, the outcome of the pilot program 
enacted under section 560 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2018.

Notice to servicemembers who separate before completion of service 
        obligation to transfer GI Bill benefits

    The committee has heard concerns that some servicemembers 
who have completed substantially all of their service 
obligation for transferring GI bill benefits to dependents are 
losing eligibility for those benefits because their official 
date of separation occurs prior to the completion of their 
Active-Duty service obligation. In some cases, the military 
departments have approved final separation dates for 
servicemembers within weeks or months of satisfying their 
obligation, resulting in a devastating loss of benefits for the 
servicemember's family.
    Accordingly, not later than March 1, 2022, the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness shall provide 
a briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate 
and the House of Representatives detailing what notice, if any, 
the military departments provide to servicemembers whose final 
separation dates fall prior to the completion of their GI Bill 
transfer service obligation that their benefits will be 
affected by their early discharge from service. The briefing 
shall also include findings on any deficiencies that exist in 
providing such notice and what steps the Department is taking 
to address those deficiencies. Finally, the briefing shall 
include any efforts the Department is making to ensure that, 
when possible, servicemembers are permitted to complete their 
service obligation so that they do not lose their benefits, 
especially in cases when the final date of separation is within 
90 days of completing such service obligation.

Parental rights at service academies

    The committee understands that every year the military 
service academies experience instances of cadets and midshipmen 
who become parents during their period of enrollment. The 
unique demands of attending a service academy make it 
impossible for cadet or midshipmen parents to care for or 
financially support dependents. Therefore, the committee 
understands the long-standing policies prohibiting persons with 
dependents from enrolling or remaining in our service 
academies.
    While small in number, these cases present difficult 
decisions for cadet and midshipmen parents who deserve the 
utmost care by service academy leadership. Academy policies 
seem to vary in this area and the committee is concerned about 
any policy that would require cadets and midshipmen to choose 
between surrendering all parental rights and continuing their 
enrollment at a service academy.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Personnel and Readiness to provide a briefing to 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives on the following issues not later than January 
30, 2022:
          (1) Current policies for cadets and midshipmen who 
        have children while enrolled at the various service 
        academies;
          (2) The justification for any policy requiring cadets 
        and midshipmen to surrender all parental rights before 
        returning to a service academy after the birth of a 
        child;
          (3) Recommendations for a uniform policy that would 
        allow cadets and midshipmen who have children while 
        enrolled at a service academy to return to such service 
        academy without requiring them to surrender all 
        parental rights; and
          (4) Recommendations for legal or other resources that 
        may be provided to affected cadets and midshipmen to 
        provide assistance for decisions related to parental 
        rights, custody, and benefits that are available to 
        commissioned officers.
    The committee encourages the Department of Defense to 
consult with the Department of Homeland Security and the 
Department of Transportation in developing its recommendations.

Promotion revision report

    The committee notes that the John S. McCain National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-
232) included numerous provisions that provided flexibility to 
military officer personnel policy. At the same time, the law 
requiring an ``up-or-out'' system for officer promotion was 
retained. The committee remains supportive of the long-standing 
requirement for most officers to continue promoting through the 
ranks in order to be retained on Active Duty. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel 
and Readiness to provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives, not 
later than December 1, 2021, that includes the following items:
          (1) Military department policies related to Active 
        Duty service obligations following a promotion;
          (2) Military department selective continuation rates 
        for officers not selected for promotion to the grades 
        of O-4 through O-6; and
          (3) Military department utilization of constructive 
        credit, temporary promotion, alternative promotion, and 
        other recently enacted officer management authorities.

Public schools on military installations program

    There are over 160 public schools located within the 
boundaries of military installations. Many of these schools 
have not had significant facility improvements in years; they 
are outdated, operating at or above capacity, and functionally 
inadequate. The committee believes that the Department of 
Defense and local school districts should prioritize facility 
improvements for schools in the Public Schools on Military 
Installations (PSMI) program to ensure that military children 
are taught in safe, secure environments conducive to learning. 
Such schools should also mirror the best local standards 
established for other public schools within a particular school 
district.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of 
the Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than 
April 1, 2022, on the PSMI program. The briefing shall include: 
(1) An update on progress made by the program to improve school 
facilities on military installations; (2) Recommendations on 
how to speed up renovation or new construction of school 
facilities in the program; (3) An analysis regarding whether 
the PSMI list of prioritized construction projects should 
undergo a more frequent, regular review; and (4) An assessment 
of whether a school on such prioritized list should affect the 
overall family support ranking of a military installation.

Public-private talent exchanges

    The committee notes that in the William M. (Mac) Thornberry 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public 
Law 116-283), the conferees authorized the enhancement of 
public-private talent exchange programs in the Department of 
Defense (DOD) to ``carry out exchanges of personnel with 
private sector entities that are working on the modernization 
priorities of the DOD.'' The committee considers artificial 
intelligence (AI) to be a modernization priority of the DOD and 
therefore directs the Secretary of Defense, when carrying out 
the enhancement and expansion of these programs, to seek out 
private sector entities on the forefront of AI development.

Restructure of Army Criminal Investigation Command

    The Fort Hood Independent Review Committee (FHIRC) 
conducted a comprehensive assessment of the Fort Hood command 
climate and culture, and its impact on the safety, welfare, and 
readiness of soldiers and units. Among other findings, the 
FHIRC found that the Fort Hood Criminal Investigation Division 
(CID) special agent workforce was unstable, under-experienced, 
over-assigned and under-resourced, leading to inefficiencies 
that had an adverse impact on investigations, especially in 
complex cases involving sex crimes and soldier deaths.
    The committee is pleased to learn that the Army has taken 
action to address this finding by restructuring the CID with 
enhanced capabilities and capacity. The restructured CID will 
be led by a civilian member of the Senior Executive Service 
with criminal investigative experience and will have a higher 
ratio of civilian criminal investigators to military special 
agents to increase investigative experience and grow effective 
partnerships with local and regional law enforcement agencies. 
The committee will carefully monitor the implementation and 
effectiveness of this reorganization and its impact on the 
quality and timeliness of Army criminal investigations.

Servicemember workforce development

    The committee recognizes the importance of supporting 
servicemembers as they transition from Active Duty to the 
civilian workforce. Servicemembers develop knowledge, skills, 
and abilities (KSAs) within their military occupational 
specialties (MOSs) that could satisfy the requisite KSAs 
associated with civilian occupations. The committee encourages 
efforts to improve transitioning servicemembers' prospects for 
employment within the civilian workforce by matching 
servicemembers' MOSs and potential civilian occupations more 
accurately and believes that the U.S. Department of Labor 
civilian occupation surveys provide useful means to collect 
data that could support those efforts.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in consultation with the Secretaries of Labor and Veterans 
Affairs, to assess the feasibility of integrating such surveys 
into the Department of Defense's Transition Assistance Program 
(TAP). The assessment shall also consider the feasibility of 
expanding the scope of those surveys to incorporate the 20 most 
populous MOSs in each military department and any additional 
data the Secretary deems appropriate. The Secretary shall 
provide a briefing on the results of this assessment to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives not later than December 31, 2022.

Temporary promotion utilization

    Section 503 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) 
authorized each military department to award temporary 
promotions to the grade of O-3 for officers with critical 
skills. Based on feedback from organizations within the 
Department of Defense, this authority is designed to serve as a 
modest incentive to highly qualified junior officers. To date, 
none of the military departments have utilized spot promotion 
authority to the grade of O-3, despite continuing to struggle 
to retain junior officers who possess valuable skill sets. The 
committee directs the Director of the Defense Digital Service 
(DDS) to provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than 
December 1, 2021, on the potential benefits of utilizing spot 
promotion authority for officers selected for an assignment to 
the DDS.

Unanimous verdicts for criminal convictions

    In Ramos v. Louisiana, 590 U.S. ___ (2020), the U.S. 
Supreme Court held that the Sixth Amendment to the U.S. 
Constitution requires unanimous verdicts for criminal 
convictions in State criminal trials. Article 52 of the Uniform 
Code of Military Justice (UCMJ) (10 U.S.C. 852) requires only 
concurrence of three-fourths of the members present to convict 
an accused of a non-capital offense.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to conduct a 
legal review of Article 52 of the UCMJ, to determine whether 
that Article is constitutional in light of this recent Supreme 
Court decision. The committee directs the Secretary to provide 
a briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate 
and House of Representatives, not later than February 1, 2022, 
on the results of this legal review and on the feasibility and 
advisability of revising the UCMJ to require unanimous verdicts 
to be consistent with Federal and State civilian practices, 
even if not legally required to do so.

Updates to Fourth Quadrennial Quality of Life review

    Under section 118a of title 10, United States Code, the 
Secretary of Defense is required to conduct a comprehensive 
examination of the quality of life of servicemembers, to result 
in determinations and foster policies and actions that reflect 
the priority given to the quality of life of servicemembers as 
a primary concern of the Department of Defense leadership.
    The committee received the Fourth Quadrennial Quality of 
Life Review and is disappointed with the lack of thorough 
assessment given to the programs of the Department as they 
relate to servicemembers and the quality of life of their 
families. By statute, the review should identify actions that 
are needed in order to provide servicemembers with the quality 
of life necessary to encourage the successful execution of the 
full range of their missions. As currently constituted, the 
Fourth Quadrennial Review does not comprehensively address the 
considerations required by section 118a(c) of title 10, United 
States Code, nor does it include determinations on policies or 
actions to undertake to improve the quality of life for 
servicemembers and their families.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to review 
the statutory requirements in section 118a of title 10, United 
States Code, and to update the report to comply with the 
comprehensive requirements of Federal law not later than March 
1, 2022. Additionally, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to submit any requested changes to section 118a of 
title 10, United States Code, to ensure that the Department has 
sufficiently detailed statutory guidance to comply with this 
quadrennial review requirement.

Upfront use of DNA to identify remains of servicemembers missing in 
        action

    The committee continues its long-standing concern for the 
accounting of missing servicemembers from past conflicts and 
encourages the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency (DPAA) to 
explore new and innovative means to identify servicemembers' 
remains. Therefore, the committee directs the DPAA to assess 
the feasibility and desirability of the use of DNA samples 
under its control for comparison to samples in public or 
private DNA databases. Such an assessment shall include a 
description of laws, policies, systems, training, personnel, 
facilities, infrastructure, information technology, and 
stakeholder engagement relevant to potential forensic genetic 
genealogical DNA analysis. The committee directs the Director 
of the DPAA to provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives on the 
results of the assessment not later than January 1, 2022.

                    TITLE VI--MILITARY COMPENSATION

Basic needs allowance for members on active service in the Armed Forces 
        (sec. 601)
    The committee recommends a provision that would create an 
allowance for servicemembers whose gross household income falls 
below 130 percent of the Federal poverty guidelines of the 
Department of Health and Human Services. This provision is 
intended to ensure that all servicemembers can meet the basic 
needs of their families, particularly for food expenses.
Equal incentive pay for members of the reserve components of the Armed 
        Forces (sec. 602)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
subchapter II of chapter 5 of title 37, United States Code, to 
require the Secretary concerned to pay equal monthly incentive 
pays to eligible members of the reserve components and regular 
components.
Extension of expiring travel and transportation authorities (sec. 603)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 12604 of title 10, United States Code, and sections 451 
and 452 of title 37, United States Code, to extend certain 
travel and transportation authorities that would otherwise 
expire at the end of the year. The amendments would extend 
authorizations for travel and transportation payments for: (1) 
Lodging in kind for reserve component members performing 
training; (2) Mandatory pet quarantine fees for household pets; 
(3) Travel for certain dependent children to obtain formal 
secondary, undergraduate, or vocational education; and (4) 
Dependent transportation incident to ship construction, 
inactivation, and overhauling.

Repeal of expiring travel and transportation authorities (sec. 604)

    The committee recommends a provision that would repeal 
travel and transportation authorities in subchapter III of 
chapter 8 of title 37, United States Code. These authorities 
were replaced by subchapter I of chapter 8 of title 37, United 
States Code, and are set to expire on December 31, 2021. The 
committee recommends that the expiring provisions be repealed 
so as to eliminate confusion about the controlling law after 
December 31, 2021.

One-year extension of certain expiring bonus and special pay 
        authorities (sec. 605)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
through December 31, 2022, various expiring bonus and special 
pay authorities for military personnel. The provision would 
extend special pay and bonus authority for reserve personnel, 
military healthcare professionals, and nuclear officers and 
consolidated pay authorities for officer and enlisted 
personnel. The provision would also extend the authority to 
provide temporary increases in the rate of Basic Allowance for 
Housing in certain circumstances.

Requirements in connection with suspension of retired pay and 
        retirement annuities (sec. 606)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the Defense Finance and Accounting Service (DFAS) from 
suspending military retired pay or a military retirement 
annuity until 90 days after the provision of written notice to 
a military retiree, annuitant, or their designated 
representative of the basis for such proposed suspension, along 
with other relevant information.
    The provision would also require the Secretary of Defense 
to develop, within 180 days of the date of the enactment of 
this Act, a single annual eligibility determination procedure 
for determinations of continued eligibility for military 
retired pay or annuity as a replacement for the current 
procedures in connection with the ``Certificate of 
Eligibility'' and ``Report of Existence'' for military retirees 
and annuitants.
    Finally, the provision would require the Secretary of 
Defense, in consultation with the Secretaries of Veterans 
Affairs and Homeland Security, to provide a report to the 
appropriate committees of the Congress not later than one year 
after the date of the enactment of this Act on the process by 
which notifications of the death of a military retiree or 
annuitant may be shared among such Secretaries for the purpose 
of determining the termination of eligibility for benefits 
administered by such Secretaries.

                       Items of Special Interest


Basic allowance for housing

    A recent Government Accountability Office (GAO) report 
published January 25, 2021, ``Military Housing: Actions Needed 
to Improve the Process for Setting Allowances for 
Servicemembers and Calculating Payment for Privatized Housing 
Projects'' (GAO 21-137), made several concerning findings. The 
Committee is particularly concerned about the finding that the 
process for determining basic allowance for housing (BAH) rates 
often does not include a sample size with the minimum number of 
rental units needed to estimate the total housing cost for 
certain locations and housing types. The report found that ``44 
percent of locations and housing types had fewer than the 
minimum sample-size target.'' This finding reveals a 
significant risk of BAH rates not accurately reflecting the 
actual cost of housing for servicemembers and their families.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Personnel and Readiness to provide a briefing to 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives not later than December 31, 2021, with a 
detailed explanation of the following items:
          1) How the Department of Defense can utilize other 
        Government housing data to better assess the accuracy 
        of BAH rates;
          2) The methodology used to establish appropriate 
        housing ``anchor points'' for given ranks;
          3) How the Department calculates the difference 
        between the ``with dependent'' and ``without 
        dependent'' BAH rates in a given housing area;
          4) Why the Department of Defense prefers to utilize 
        the BAH national average to calculate the BAH 
        reductions authorized in recent legislation;
          5) Whether and how the Department will begin using 
        cost data from recently rented properties to increase 
        the sample size for BAH rate-setting;
          6) Actions under consideration to monitor and reduce 
        potential bias within local military housing offices as 
        part of the BAH rate-setting process; and
          7) Any other matters the Under Secretary considers 
        relevant.

Partial dislocation allowance for members ordered to vacate housing 
        provided by the United States

    The committee is concerned that the Department of Defense 
has not updated the Joint Travel Regulation to account for 
changes to sections 477(f)(1) and 452(c) of title 37, United 
States Code, in the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92). These changes, to both 
the ``old law'' and the ``new law'' pertaining to travel and 
transportation allowance, expanded eligibility for partial 
dislocation allowance to members ordered to vacate barracks and 
dormitory-style housing in addition to family housing. Section 
477(f)(1) struck the word ``family'' from the ``old law'', and 
section 452(c) added an entitlement to the ``new law'' to allow 
for such an allowance to be paid to any member ordered to 
vacate any housing provided by the United States. In spite of 
these changes, the Joint Travel Regulation still limits 
eligibility for a partial dislocation allowance to those 
members ordered to vacate ``family-type'' housing.
    The committee has heard concerns about financial pressures 
placed on junior enlisted members being ordered to vacate 
barracks and dormitory-style housing. Under the existing law, 
they would be eligible for a partial dislocation allowance, but 
the Department has not authorized such payments. The committee 
encourages the Department to expand eligibility for the partial 
dislocation allowance to those members being ordered to vacate 
any type of housing provided by the United States, including 
barracks and dormitory-style housing, and especially for those 
members in the grades E-4 and below with fewer than 3 years of 
service.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, not later 
than March 1, 2022, to provide a briefing on this issue to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives.

                   TITLE VII--HEALTH CARE PROVISIONS

Subtitle A--Tricare and Other Health Care Benefits
Addition of preconception and prenatal carrier screening coverage as 
        benefits under TRICARE program (sec. 701)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1079(a) of title 10, United States Code, to authorize 
coverage of preconception and prenatal carrier screening tests 
for certain medical conditions under the TRICARE program. The 
provision would authorize an eligible covered beneficiary to 
one test per condition per lifetime.

Coverage of overseas subacute and hospice care for eligible overseas 
        dependents of members of the uniformed services (sec. 702)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
sections 1074j(b) and 1079(a)(15) of title 10, United States 
Code, to authorize the Secretary of Defense to provide coverage 
of subacute (skilled nursing and home health care services) and 
hospice care for eligible overseas dependents of members of the 
uniformed services who are on Active Duty for a period of more 
than 30 days.

Modification of pilot program on receipt of non-generic prescription 
        maintenance medications under TRICARE pharmacy benefits program 
        (sec. 703)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 706 of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) to 
require the Secretary of Defense to conduct a 3-year pilot 
program under which covered TRICARE beneficiaries could elect 
to receive certain non-generic prescription maintenance 
medications either through military treatment facility 
pharmacies, the TRICARE mail order pharmacy program, or retail 
network pharmacies, if the Secretary determines that the total 
cost to the Department of Defense would not exceed the total 
cost for providing these prescriptions through the TRICARE mail 
order pharmacy program. The provision would also provide that 
reimbursement of retail pharmacies for prescriptions provided 
under the pilot program may not exceed the amount of 
reimbursement that would have been paid for prescriptions 
dispensed through the TRICARE mail order pharmacy program.

                 Subtitle B--Health Care Administration


Revisions to TRICARE provider networks (sec. 721)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
sections 1075 and 1097a of title 10, United States Code, to 
authorize multiple provider networks in the same geographical 
area under TRICARE Select and TRICARE Prime.

Implementation of an integrated TRICARE program through effective 
        market management (sec. 722)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, acting through the Director of the 
Defense Health Agency, to implement integration of the direct 
care and purchased care components of the TRICARE program 
through effective management of geographic markets. The 
provision would prescribe the elements of market integration 
that would include a responsibility to ensure: (1) The medical 
readiness of the Armed Forces; and (2) Provision of health care 
services in military medical treatment facilities to maintain 
the critical wartime medical readiness skills and core 
competencies of health care providers in the Armed Forces. In 
addition, the provision would require a streamlined, effective 
patient referral system for TRICARE beneficiaries and a 
continued enrollment operation for such beneficiaries in 
geographic markets.

Establishment of centers of excellence for enhanced treatment of ocular 
        injuries (sec. 723)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, acting through the Director of the 
Defense Health Agency (DHA), to establish, not later than 
October 1, 2022, at least four regional centers of excellence 
(COEs) for the enhanced treatment of ocular wounds or injuries 
and vision dysfunction related to ocular wounds or injuries and 
traumatic brain injury. Each COE would be located at a military 
medical center that provides graduate medical education in 
ophthalmology and its related subspecialties. Regional COEs 
would be the primary referral centers for providing specialized 
medical services for vision of servicemembers located in each 
center's region.
    The provision would also require the DHA to publish 
policies on a publicly available internet web site for the 
referral of eligible beneficiaries of the Department of Defense 
to such centers. To address staffing of the COEs, the provision 
would require the Secretaries of the military departments, in 
conjunction with the Joint Staff Surgeon and the DHA Director, 
to identify specific medical personnel billets essential for 
the evaluation and treatment of ocular sensory injuries and to 
ensure that the COEs are staffed to provide the enduring 
medical support of each center.
    Finally, the provision would require the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than 
December 31, 2022, that: (1) Describes the establishment of 
each COE and the referral policy published by the DHA; (2) 
Identifies the medical personnel billets required to staff the 
COEs; and (3) Provides a plan for staffing the COEs.

Mandatory training on health effects of burn pits (sec. 724)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to train Department of Defense medical 
providers on the potential health effects of burn pits.

Removal of requirement for one year of participation in certain medical 
        and lifestyle incentive programs of the Department of Defense 
        to receive benefits under such programs (sec. 725)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 729 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) to remove the requirement 
for 1 year of participation in certain medical and lifestyle 
incentive programs before an eligible beneficiary could receive 
benefits under such programs. This provision would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to offer incentives earlier to 
encourage beneficiaries to change their behaviors to improve 
their health.

Authority of Secretary of Defense and Secretary of Veterans Affairs to 
        enter into agreements for planning, design, and construction of 
        facilities to be operated as shared medical facilities (sec. 
        726)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs 
to enter into agreements to plan, design, and construct 
facilities to be operated as shared medical facilities. The 
provision would prescribe how funds could be transferred and 
merged between the Department of Defense and the Department of 
Veterans Affairs.

Consistency in accounting for medical reimbursements received by 
        military medical treatment facilities from other Federal 
        agencies (sec. 727)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1085 of title 10, United States Code, to provide 
consistency in accounting for medical reimbursements received 
by the Department of Defense for inpatient and outpatient 
medical or dental care provided to beneficiaries of another 
Federal agency and for reimbursements from third-party 
insurance companies.

                 Subtitle C--Reports and Other Matters


Access by United States Government employees and their family members 
        to certain facilities of Department of Defense for assessment 
        and treatment of anomalous health conditions (sec. 741)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to provide certain U.S. Government 
employees and their family members who are experiencing 
symptoms of anomalous health conditions, as defined by the 
Secretary for the purposes of this provision, timely access for 
medical assessment, subject to space availability, to the 
National Intrepid Center of Excellence, an Intrepid Spirit 
Center, or an appropriate military medical treatment facility.
    The provision would also require the Secretary to furnish 
treatment to any such individual diagnosed with an anomalous 
health condition or related affliction, subject to space 
availability, at the National Intrepid Center of Excellence, an 
Intrepid Spirit Center, or an appropriate military medical 
treatment facility.
    The provision would further require the Secretary, in 
consultation with the heads of appropriate Federal agencies, to 
develop a process by which employees of those agencies and 
their family members are afforded timely access to the National 
Intrepid Center of Excellence, an Intrepid Spirit Center, or an 
appropriate military medical treatment facility, pursuant to 
subsection (a) by not later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act.
    Finally, the provision would require the Secretary of 
Defense to include certain demographic data on these anomalous 
health conditions in the Department of Defense Trauma Registry, 
subject to agreement by the employing agency and the consent of 
the employee.

Extension of authority for Joint Department of Defense-Department of 
        Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration Fund (sec. 742)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1704(e) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-84), as amended by section 732 
of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 
(Public Law 116-92), to extend the authority for the Joint 
Department of Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs 
Demonstration Fund from September 30, 2021, to September 30, 
2023.

Comptroller General study on implementation by Department of Defense of 
        recent statutory requirements to reform the military health 
        system (sec. 743)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Comptroller General of the United States to conduct a study on 
the Department of Defense's implementation of statutory 
requirements to reform the military health system. The 
provision would prescribe the elements of such study and 
require the Comptroller General to brief the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
on the status of the study not later than May 1, 2022. The 
Comptroller General would then submit a report on the study to 
the same committees not later than May 1, 2023.

                              Budget Items


Anomalous health incidents

    The budget request included $35.6 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for the Defense Health 
Program, of which $9.7 billion was for line number 1 In-House 
Care.
    The committee recommends an increase in OMDW of $30.0 
million for line number 1 In-House Care to address the threat 
characterization and treatment of certain uniformed members, 
Federal civilian employees, and their family members affected 
by anomalous health incidents. The provision underlying this 
change in funding levels is discussed in greater detail in 
title VII of this committee report.

                       Items of Special Interest


Access to mental health care

    The challenges associated with military life, including 
frequent deployments, repeated moves, and spouse unemployment, 
put servicemembers and their families at increased risk of 
mental and behavioral health concerns. It is essential that the 
military health system (MHS) ensures that servicemembers and 
their families have access to timely, high quality mental 
health care.
    However, an August 2020 report by the Department of Defense 
Inspector General (DOD IG), titled ``Evaluation of Access to 
Mental Health Care in the Department of Defense'' (DODIG-2020-
112), revealed significant barriers to accessing mental health 
care. The DOD IG concluded that thousands of Active-Duty 
servicemembers and their families may have experienced delays 
in obtaining mental health care. These delays may have involved 
numerous beneficiaries not being able to see the right provider 
at the right time, obtain mental health care at all, or receive 
timely follow-up treatment. All of these types of delays in 
mental health care increase the risk of jeopardizing patient 
safety and affecting the readiness of the force. The DOD IG 
also found that more than 5 percent of those referred for 
mental health treatment in the purchased care system never 
received the prescribed care.
    The committee is concerned by these findings and directs 
the Secretary of Defense to brief the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and House of Representatives not later 
than February 1, 2022, on actions taken to address these 
shortfalls. The committee expects the DOD to develop a plan to 
ensure that when beneficiaries are referred for mental health 
care they receive direct assistance in identifying appropriate 
mental health providers within the direct care system or 
TRICARE network, confirming the availability of the service 
with a particular provider within access to care standards, and 
securing the initial appointment for the beneficiary.

Battlefield analgesia

    In a battlefield environment, wounded servicemembers may 
receive either inadequate or no pain treatment following severe 
traumatic injury. Studies of U.S. and international Armed 
Forces report that only 19 percent to 39 percent of combat 
casualties receive adequate pain treatment at the point of 
injury. Typically, combat medics accomplish pain management on 
a far-forward battlefield by administering opioid analgesics, 
but opioids can lead to respiratory depression, further 
complicating treatment, and in certain cases, hasten a 
servicemember's death.
    In the United States, medical professionals in emergency 
medicine departments commonly use ketamine, a general 
anesthetic agent, in analgesic (low) doses as an alternative to 
opioid medications because ketamine has no deleterious 
hemodynamic or respiratory effects. In fact, the Department of 
Defense's Committee on Tactical Combat Casualty Care recommends 
intravenous (IV) or intraosseous (IO) ketamine to treat 
moderate to severe pain in wounded patients experiencing 
hemorrhagic shock and/or respiratory depression. Unfortunately, 
IV and IO modes of ketamine administration may be impractical 
in a highly contested combat environment, and thus, effective 
pain management may be delayed until the patient has been 
transported to a field hospital.
    The committee is aware that the Food and Drug 
Administration (FDA) has approved intranasal ketamine for 
certain medical conditions. The committee believes that 
intranasal ketamine could be easily administered in a far-
forward combat environment and could result in better pain 
management as the patient moves from the battlefield to a field 
hospital. Therefore, the committee recommends that the 
Department of Defense conduct the necessary pre-clinical 
testing and clinical trials of intranasal ketamine such that 
the results may be used to facilitate FDA approval of 
intranasal ketamine for acute pain management.

Body composition standards

    Currently, military body composition standards are based on 
archaic, homogeneous data and standards that can be 
discriminatory. These standards appear to be based on the goal 
of ensuring a ``military appearance.'' Attempts to comply with 
body composition standards frequently contribute to unhealthy 
eating disorders that can be hazardous in career fields where 
focus and attention to detail can be impacted by the disorder.
    The committee commends the Army Research Institute of 
Environmental Medicine and the Marine Corps' Human Performance 
Branch on partnering to conduct the most technologically 
advanced study of body composition standards since the 1980s. 
Participants in this study will receive high-tech body scans 
and special X-rays that may lead to military-wide updates to 
body composition standards, which have long been criticized as 
outdated. The committee expects this study to lead to 
enlightened body composition standards for all servicemembers.

Briefing on impact of TRICARE copays on utilization of certain 
        healthcare services

    The committee is concerned about the potential impact of 
TRICARE copay increases on utilization of healthcare services 
for mental health care, physical therapy, speech therapy, and 
occupational therapy by some TRICARE beneficiaries. These 
services often require multiple therapy sessions to address an 
underlying medical condition, and higher copays may dissuade 
some beneficiaries from seeking care.
    As a result, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to conduct an analysis of the impact of TRICARE copay increases 
on utilization of outpatient mental health and on physical, 
speech, and occupational therapy visits by TRICARE Group A 
beneficiaries. The analysis shall compare utilization rates of 
these services in 2016 and 2017 to utilization rates of these 
services in 2018 and 2019. Utilization may be measured by 
variables such as unique users, average number of visits per 
user, distribution of users across the number of visits (one 
visit only, 2-3 visits, 4-6 visits, 7-9 visits, 10-12 visits, 
and more than 12 visits) or other measures the Secretary deems 
appropriate. For TRICARE Prime beneficiaries where the data are 
available, the analysis shall assess the percent of patients 
referred for these services who actually accessed care. The 
analysis shall cross-tabulate data for each beneficiary sponsor 
category and TRICARE Plan (Prime vs. Select) given that copays 
vary across these groups. The Secretary shall submit a briefing 
of such analysis, not later than February 1, 2022, to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives.

Comprehensive brain health and treatment for special operations forces

    The committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
support academic medical centers carrying out comprehensive 
brain health and treatment programs. These programs provide 
coordinated, integrated, evidenced-based and/or evidence-
informed care, multidisciplinary specialist evaluations, 
treatment initiation, nursing case management, and aftercare 
coordination to members of Special Operations Forces and other 
servicemembers impacted by traumatic brain injury and other 
associated health factors that influence long-term brain health 
and performance.

Comptroller General assessment of Department of Defense health care 
        provider adverse privileging actions

    Not later than December 1, 2022, the Comptroller General of 
the United States shall complete an assessment and provide a 
report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives on the Department of Defense's 
implementation and oversight of clinical quality management 
procedures, including: (1) Procedures for taking adverse 
privileging action against health care providers on the basis 
of quality and safety concerns; and (2) Procedures for 
reporting such actions to the National Practitioner Data Bank, 
State licensing boards, and other regulatory agencies.

Continued collaboration between the Department of Defense and Israeli 
        institutions on medical research

    The conference report (H. Rept. 116-617) accompanying the 
William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) directed the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
on military health research collaboration between the United 
States and Israel on technical areas such as military trauma, 
infectious disease surveillance, and diagnostics and treatment 
for traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic stress disorder. 
The Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs provided 
a briefing to such committees in April 2021. The briefing 
highlighted multiple collaborative research efforts in each of 
the technical areas by the Department of Defense (DOD) and 
Israel. Since 2016, the DOD and Israeli research institutions 
have completed 12 research projects, and 10 projects are 
ongoing. Additionally, the DOD and Israel have broad-scope 
intergovernmental agreements in place that foster continued 
collaboration, support access to Israeli medical research 
advances, and provide for contracts and grants to engage 
Israeli institutions in the DOD's medical research efforts. The 
committee encourages the DOD to continue its successful 
collaboration with Israeli institutions to make further 
advances in military medical research.

Continued study and research on post-traumatic stress disorder and 
        traumatic brain injury

    The committee notes the significant effect that post-
traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and traumatic brain injury 
(TBI) have had on servicemembers. The committee has been 
encouraged by the valuable research conducted through 
Department of Defense-sponsored consortia that has enhanced 
understanding of the causes, treatments, and recovery protocols 
for PTSD and TBI. As these medical conditions are the signature 
injuries of the Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts, they will 
likely have an enduring impact on military personnel in the 
future. Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary of 
Defense to continue robust study and research into the causes 
of, and the treatments for, PTSD and TBI.

Continuity of care in TRICARE's Extended Care Health Program

    The committee remains concerned that certain military 
family members registered in the Department of Defense's 
Extended Care Health Option (ECHO) under its Exceptional Family 
Member Program (EFMP) are unable to receive timely medical 
specialty care referrals when they move to a new permanent 
change of station (PCS) location. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Director of the Defense Health Agency to provide a 
briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives, not later than March 1, 2022, 
that:
          (1) Assesses the feasibility of continuing certain 
        ECHO services initiated at the previous duty station 
        for up to 6 months without authorization and referral 
        after servicemembers execute a PCS;
          (2) Assesses the degree to which the Department 
        prioritizes or fast-tracks specialty care referrals 
        after a PCS to ensure continuity of care;
          (3) Assesses the feasibility of using virtual health 
        services as a method by which ECHO case managers can 
        better provide continuity of care services to military 
        families;
          (4) Describes the average wait-time for an ECHO 
        family to receive a medical specialty care referral 
        after a PCS move; and
          (5) Describes any barriers that may exist that delay 
        an EFMP enrollee from receiving timely medical 
        specialty care.

Development of oral, ultra-long-acting, sustained-release hypertension 
        and diabetes therapeutics

    The committee is concerned about the increase of type II 
diabetes and hypertension in Active-Duty, Reserve, and National 
Guard personnel that may impact unit readiness. Advances in the 
development of oral, ultra-long-acting drug delivery methods 
have potential for significant health improvement, increased 
readiness, and cost savings for the Department of Defense 
(DOD). The committee supports accelerated development of 
sustained-release oral medications for the treatment of type II 
diabetes and hypertension and encourages DOD to include oral, 
ultra-long-acting, sustained-release drug platforms as a 
priority focus area in its medical research portfolio.

Dietary supplement adverse event reporting

    The committee commends the Department of Defense (DOD) for 
its efforts to educate servicemembers on safe dietary 
supplement use through the Operation Supplement Safety Program. 
The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) adverse events 
reporting data show that certain dietary supplements are more 
likely to cause severe medical problems than vitamins or 
minerals. The committee acknowledges the FDA's existing adverse 
event reporting system and recognizes the military health 
system's need to track adverse events data. Therefore, the 
committee recommends that the DOD include adverse event 
reporting for dietary supplements within military electronic 
health records and share these data with the FDA's adverse 
events tracking system.

Domestic active pharmaceutical ingredient manufacturing report

    The committee remains concerned about the Department of 
Defense's (DOD's) reliance on foreign nations, especially 
adversarial nations like China, for active pharmaceutical 
ingredients and finished pharmaceutical products. To ensure 
resiliency in the DOD's medical products supply chain, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in consultation 
with other appropriate Federal officials, to submit a report to 
the congressional defense committees, not later than March 1, 
2022, on the feasibility of establishing a pilot project to 
increase the capacity of the United States to manufacture 
active pharmaceutical ingredients and finished pharmaceutical 
products identified in such assessment as required to enable 
combat readiness and protect the health of the Armed Forces. 
The report shall include an assessment of:
          (1) The drugs and active pharmaceutical ingredients, 
        including oral solid dose medicines, that such a pilot 
        program should prioritize for manufacture, based on the 
        importance of the drugs for combat readiness and their 
        existing domestic and international manufacturing 
        capacity;
          (2) The existing domestic manufacturing capacity, 
        specifically current active contracts procuring 
        medications, for the drugs and active pharmaceutical 
        ingredients identified in subparagraph (1);
          (3) The existing international manufacturing capacity 
        in the potential partners identified in section 
        713(b)(E) of subtitle B of title VII of the William M. 
        (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act 
        (Public Law 116-283) for the drugs and active 
        pharmaceutical ingredients identified in (1);
          (4) The financial resources necessary for the pilot 
        program to ensure an uninterrupted supply from domestic 
        manufacturers of the drugs and active pharmaceutical 
        ingredients identified in (1) for use by the Department 
        of Defense; and
          (5) The length of time necessary for such a pilot 
        program.

Electronic health record interoperability between the Departments of 
        Defense and Veterans Affairs

    A Government Accountability Office (GAO) report released on 
February 11, 2021, titled ``Electronic Health Records: VA Has 
Made Progress in Preparing for New System, but Subsequent Test 
Findings Will Need to Be Addressed'' (GAO-21-224), described 
implementation challenges faced by the Department of Veterans 
Affairs (VA) prior to its initial electronic health record 
(EHR) deployment. Those challenges are similar to ones 
experienced by the Department of Defense (DOD) as it deployed 
its EHR--problems with system configuration and workflows, 
capability development and documentation, system interfaces, 
end user training, and resolution of critical and high severity 
test findings. In its report, the GAO recommended the VA 
postpone new EHR deployments until it resolved its problems. 
Continued deployment of the VA's EHR without fully resolving 
known problems could lead to deployment of a system that fails 
to perform as intended, negatively impacting patient care and 
hurting user adoption. Additionally, if problems remain, the 
committee is concerned that there will be greater risk to 
seamless interoperability between DOD and VA EHRs in the 
future.
    The DOD's operational testing of its fielded electronic 
health record system, MHS Genesis, helped to identify and 
address similar problems. The Department's Office of Testing 
and Evaluation (DOT&E) has more than 3 years of experience 
operationally testing MHS Genesis at military treatment 
facilities that are using the same EHR platform as the VA. 
During this period, DOD's operational testers learned many 
important lessons about testing EHR systems in an operational 
environment. The committee believes that the VA should tap this 
vast source of knowledge and extensive experience within DOD so 
that the VA can address known and unknown EHR problems quickly.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to offer an operational test and evaluation of the VA's EHR 
modernization program to the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, not 
later than 60 days following deployment to the VA's first 
medium or large hospital. If the Secretary of Veterans Affairs 
accepts that test and evaluation offer, and after performing 
such test and evaluation, the DOT&E shall provide a report, not 
later than 180 days following such deployment, to the 
Secretaries with copies of the report provided to the 
Committees on Armed Services and Veterans' Affairs of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives.

Elimination of low-value healthcare

    The American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation created 
the Choosing Wisely initiative to ``promote conversations 
between clinicians and patients'' that would help patients 
select the best course of medical treatment for themselves--
treatment free from harm, necessary, evidence-based, and not 
duplicative. According to the Choosing Wisely web site, 
numerous medical specialty societies have published more than 
550 recommendations of overused tests and treatments, including 
five recommendations from the American Dental Association, that 
clinicians and patients should discuss. These discussions 
between physicians or dentists and their patients will often 
lead to lower healthcare costs by limiting the number of 
unnecessary, low-value healthcare services delivered to 
patients.
    While the Defense Health Agency (DHA) has taken certain 
small steps to eliminate the delivery of low-value healthcare 
services in the military health system (MHS), it has not 
conducted a comprehensive analysis of those services provided 
by its direct and purchased care components. A thorough 
analysis by the DHA would help the MHS better understand how to 
use Choosing Wisely initiatives more fully and effectively. 
Without such analysis, the committee believes that the 
Department of Defense (DOD) may be wasting healthcare dollars 
on low-value services that often yield little results for 
patients. The committee understands that Humana Military, 
TRICARE's East Region managed care support contractor, 
estimates that incorporation of the top five Choosing Wisely 
initiatives into its region could save the DOD approximately 
$13.0 million annually. Therefore, the committee directs the 
DHA to leverage best practices from commercial health plans to 
eliminate low-value services from the MHS by incorporating 
Choosing Wisely initiatives into its TRICARE managed care 
support contracts and the TRICARE Dental Program.

Improvements to healthcare for Active-Duty women

    In November 2020, the Defense Health Board (DHB), a Federal 
Advisory Committee to the Secretary of Defense, published a 
report on Active-Duty women's (ADW) healthcare services. In the 
report, the DHB provided its findings and submitted 
recommendations to improve access to care, the quality of care, 
and the medical readiness of women servicemembers. In 
preparation for publishing the report, a DHB subcommittee 
conducted a review of the current women's health services 
provided in the military health system, evaluated the 
Department of Defense's and foreign militaries' policies and 
practices on women's healthcare, and studied relevant peer-
reviewed scientific literature. Disturbingly, the DHB found 
that ``decades of findings and recommendations concerning ADW's 
health have not led to sustained improvements.'' Of note, the 
DHB highlighted that ``DOD's traditional male norms and 
attitudes contribute to the variability in the knowledge of 
ADW's health needs'' and determined that women's health 
improvements ``should be implemented proactively using a life 
cycle perspective, rather than reacting to isolated episodes or 
incidents.'' Additionally, the report recognized that women's 
healthcare improves when women are ``empowered to perform self-
care and be equal partners in their care.''
    The committee recognizes the far-reaching importance of 
this report and believes that the Office of the Secretary of 
Defense and the military departments must firmly commit to 
prioritize women's health by introducing health information 
technology solutions that specifically serve the needs of women 
in garrison and while deployed. Furthermore, the Department 
must: (1) Standardize the scope of healthcare services given to 
ADW throughout their careers; (2) Provide options for self-
treatment of common medical conditions unique to women, 
especially in a deployed or field environment; (3) Apply 
uniform post-partum fitness-for-duty standards across the 
services; (4) Develop an outcomes-based dashboard that gives 
specific data on the medical readiness of ADW; and (5) Provide 
customized equipment to ADW to minimize injuries during 
training or during deployments.
    Finally, the committee believes that the Department must 
place greater emphasis on advancing evidence-based healthcare 
services for ADW by standardizing the delivery of such services 
in its medical treatment facilities and in the TRICARE provider 
network. The committee deems the Defense Health Agency (DHA) 
uniquely qualified, under its enhanced execution authority, to 
lead this effort. Therefore, the committee encourages the DHA 
to implement the DHB recommendation to establish an office 
``with a clear charter to approve recommendations necessary to 
improve ADW's health, fitness, safety, and performance'' during 
each phase of their careers.

Integrated training for Army first responders and medical professionals

    The committee applauds the Department of Defense's (DOD) 
support to the U.S. national pandemic response and recognizes 
that DOD may be required to provide future support to a whole-
of-government response to mass casualty events caused by 
chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) weapons.
    The Army's CBRN first responders and medical professionals, 
including physicians, nurses, physician assistants, and combat 
medics, will play a key role in any DOD response to such 
events. The committee is aware, however, that these first 
responders and medical professionals do not currently train 
together in an institutional setting to respond together during 
CBRN events. This training gap may limit the ability to deliver 
a prompt and well-coordinated operational medical response to 
CBRN mass casualty events. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Army to provide a briefing to the Committees 
on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives not later than April 1, 2022, that describes 
the Army's plans to establish integrated training for the 
Army's CBRN first responders and its medical professionals.

Integration of biometric synthetic training technologies to support 
        better health outcomes

    The committee is aware that the U.S. Army Health Center at 
Vicenza, Italy, has demonstrated promising results from the use 
of a small arms human performance-based synthetic training 
system to assist in the diagnosis, assessment, and 
rehabilitation of military personnel recovering from mild 
traumatic brain injury (mTBI) and post-traumatic stress 
disorder (PTSD). This system allows medical personnel to 
collect and analyze hundreds of biometric and human performance 
data points, establishing detailed cognitive and physical 
baselines to track patient rehabilitation progress more 
effectively. Therefore, the committee encourages the Department 
of Defense to conduct a pilot program to explore how human 
performance synthetic training systems can be further used to 
establish and monitor cognitive and physical baselines for 
servicemembers throughout their careers to aid in the 
assessment and diagnosis of mTBI and PTSD.

Market price generics program

    The committee has received reports of disruptions in 
pharmacy access for some beneficiaries due to inadequate 
supplies of medications provided by the Defense Logistics 
Agency (DLA) to the TRICARE Mail Order Pharmacy. When DLA is 
unable to provide the medications required to serve 
beneficiaries, mail order pharmacy beneficiaries are referred 
to the TRICARE retail pharmacy program, leading to potentially 
higher costs for the beneficiary and the Government. To address 
this problem, the Defense Health Agency (DHA) established the 
Market Price Generics Program (MPGP) that authorizes DHA to 
rely on alternate sources of supply to serve the pharmaceutical 
needs of its beneficiaries.
    The committee commends DHA's efforts to address this 
problem. However, the committee is concerned that the program 
is underutilized due to the MPGP's processes that result in 
delays to beneficiaries' access to prescribed drugs. Therefore, 
the committee encourages DHA to streamline MPGP processes, 
continue expansion of MPGP utilization, and use additional 
tools to ensure beneficiaries have access to prescribed 
medications when using the TRICARE Mail Order Pharmacy.

Medical necessity and prior authorization process for non-covered drugs 
        in the TRICARE program

    Section 702 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) authorized the Secretary 
of Defense to exclude from the TRICARE pharmacy program any 
pharmaceutical agent that the Secretary determines provides 
very little or no clinical effectiveness over other covered 
drugs. These drugs are known as Tier 4 (non-covered), and the 
Secretary may exclude their coverage when alternative 
medications are available on the TRICARE drug formulary.
    There is no specific process, however, for TRICARE 
beneficiaries to request medical necessity coverage and prior 
authorization of a Tier 4 drug when other formulary medications 
are ineffective or less effective. Beneficiaries must, 
therefore, file a formal reconsideration request with the 
TRICARE mail order pharmacy contractor, and the contractor has 
up to 60 days to issue a determination. Upon denial of such 
request by the contractor, a beneficiary may file a formal 
review request, in writing, to the Defense Health Agency (DHA). 
The DHA may then take up to 90 days to issue a formal review 
determination. Throughout this lengthy process, beneficiaries 
may be without medications that more effectively manage their 
specific medical conditions. Therefore, the committee directs 
the Director of the Defense Health Agency to establish a 
medical necessity and prior authorization process whereby a 
beneficiary may request coverage of a Tier 4 drug at the same 
co-pay or cost-share as a Tier 3 non-formulary drug, and to 
brief the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the 
House of Representatives on this appeal process not later than 
February 1, 2022.

Mobile application to enable periodic health assessments for National 
        Guard members

    The committee encourages the Chief of the National Guard 
Bureau to implement a mobile application, fully compliant with 
Department of Defense information security protocols that would 
enable National Guard members to complete certain portions of 
the annual Periodic Health Assessment on a smartphone, tablet 
computer, or other handheld mobile device. The committee 
recommends that the application incorporate a flexible 
interface that allows users to adopt it with minimal effort and 
resources. Additionally, the committee believes that such 
application should incorporate standardized approaches to 
handle data definition and mapping, cybersecurity, device 
protocols, data format, and quality assurance testing and 
support.

Musculoskeletal injury prevention

    The committee recognizes that preventable musculoskeletal 
injuries negatively impact servicemembers' health and military 
readiness. Musculoskeletal injuries account for almost 25 
percent of all military injuries, and investing in injury 
prevention education and human performance programming can 
greatly reduce the number of injuries. Therefore, the committee 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to expand current programs 
addressing musculoskeletal injury prevention and to include 
research that will identify risk factors for musculoskeletal 
injuries among members of the Armed Forces. Additionally, the 
committee supports partnerships between the Department of 
Defense and institutions of higher education with existing 
injury prevention and human performance education programs to 
support data collection and research regarding musculoskeletal 
injuries to improve servicemembers' health and force readiness.

National Disaster Medical System Pilot Program

    The committee continues to support the National Disaster 
Medical System Pilot Program authorized in section 740 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public 
Law 116-92), as amended by section 741 of the William M. (Mac) 
Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2021 (Public Law 116-283).
    The committee notes the Department of Defense's decision to 
select Washington D.C.; San Antonio, TX; Sacramento, CA; Omaha, 
NE; and Denver, CO as pilot program sites, and the Department's 
plan to commence the pilot after September 30, 2021. The 
committee expects to be informed periodically on the progress 
of the program throughout its duration.

National public health emergency and disaster medical network model

    The committee commends the U.S. Army's Telemedicine and 
Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC) for the rapid 
development and deployment of the National Emergency Tele-
Critical Care Network (NETCCN). In response to the COVID-19 
pandemic, TATRC quickly established a cloud-based, low-
resource, stand-alone telehealth information management system 
capable of providing flexible, mobile, and scalable virtual 
critical care capabilities to healthcare facilities, field 
hospitals, and other locations lacking the critical care 
expertise and resources necessary to provide health care to 
critically ill patients. The committee recognizes the NETCCN's 
competitive innovative approach and its derived technology 
platform as a model for future clinically guided telemedicine 
technology procurements. Therefore, the committee encourages 
the Defense Health Agency to fully leverage this Federal 
investment by adopting relevant modules of this highly 
configurable technology portfolio to accelerate current and 
future digital health and telehealth applications throughout 
the military health system.

Non-helmet preventative devices for traumatic brain injury

    Although the Department of Defense (DOD) has spent 
approximately $1.8 billion over the last 10 years on research 
and development related to traumatic brain injury (TBI), a 
recent assessment by the Congressional Research Service found 
that DOD has pursued only a few projects focused on non-helmet 
TBI preventative devices. The committee is concerned that DOD's 
research and development efforts have not included a study of 
these devices that could help prevent TBI. The committee 
believes that evaluation of such devices should be a key 
component of the Department's holistic effort to prevent TBI in 
training and combat environments. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing on TBI 
prevention to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate 
and the House of Representatives not later than January 31, 
2022. This briefing shall include, at a minimum: (1) An 
analysis of the number and types of traumatic brain injuries 
experienced by servicemembers over the previous 10 years; (2) 
An assessment of types of commercially available non-helmet 
preventive devices cleared by the Food and Drug Administration; 
and (3) A plan to study the effectiveness of such devices to 
prevent TBIs in training and combat environments.

Plasma-derived antibody products

    The committee recognizes the importance of plasma-derived 
antibody therapies for the temporary protection from infectious 
diseases affecting warfighters at home and abroad. Plasma-
derived antibody therapies allow for military personnel to 
obtain naturally-occurring antibodies until more specific 
therapeutics, vaccines, or other medical countermeasures are 
available. The committee understands the threat that emerging 
infectious diseases, such as coronavirus, pose to our national 
security, and thus, encourages the Department of Defense to 
study the use of Food and Drug Administration-approved pooled 
plasma-derived antibody products developed in the United States 
to prevent or treat disease caused by new or emerging disease 
pathogens.

Point-of-care ultrasound system in the tactical combat casualty care 
        environment

    The committee notes that timely diagnostic imaging that 
supports sound clinical decisions can improve battlefield 
injury survival. By using whole-body single transducer 
ultrasound systems, advanced diagnostic imaging capabilities 
can now be available to medical personnel from the moment of 
battlefield injury through casualty evacuation and subsequent 
transport to a tertiary care center. Equipped with machine 
learning tools and a simple user interface on a mobile device, 
such relatively inexpensive systems incorporate secure image 
storage and can facilitate reach-back consultation from combat 
casualty locations directly to trauma specialists. Therefore, 
the committee encourages the Department of Defense to implement 
a point-of-care ultrasound system in the tactical combat 
casualty care environment.

Pooled testing to promote bio-surveillance of disease outbreaks

    The committee recognizes that COVID-19 outbreaks have had a 
dramatic effect on the medical readiness of the Armed Forces. 
Regular, population-level bio-surveillance through pooled or 
aggregate testing in the military could help thwart disease 
outbreaks that may harm national security. Implementing this 
testing capability now, during the COVID-19 pandemic, could 
establish a viable bio-surveillance capability for the military 
in the future. Therefore, the committee encourages the 
Secretary of Defense to conduct a 6-month pilot program to 
expand pooled COVID-19 testing of asymptomatic servicemembers 
at recruit training depots using commercial-off-the-shelf test 
kits that could serve as a proof-of-concept for broader 
implementation throughout the Department of Defense.

Prevention of hemorrhagic death with next generation freeze-dried 
        platelets

    Uncontrolled bleeding is the major cause of preventable 
death on the battlefield for military forces. The Department of 
Defense estimates that 976 deaths (or 90 percent of preventable 
deaths) caused by hemorrhage from 2001 to 2011 in Afghanistan 
and Iraq were potentially survivable if bleeding could have 
been stopped. The committee understands the future battlefield 
will require prolonged field care and that next generation 
lyophilized blood products for hemorrhage control must be 
immediately available at all levels of care. Furthermore, 
austere environments have changed battlefield medical logistics 
and may require ruggedized packaging of freeze-dried plasma and 
platelets with greater capabilities than currently deployed 
systems. Therefore, the committee encourages the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs and the Defense Health 
Agency to fund clinical trials of freeze-dried hemostatic 
products, especially platelet-derived products, and the 
development of unique packaging for use by deployed forces.

Review of maternal deaths at military treatment facilities

    The committee commends the Department of Defense for its 
efforts to address maternal mortality and severe morbidity 
among servicemembers.
    The committee recognizes that continued efforts to improve 
the standardization of data and review processes related to 
U.S. maternal mortality are a necessary step in an effort to 
eliminate disparities and preventable maternal deaths. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than 
February 1, 2022, on the Department's efforts to review 
maternal deaths at military treatment facilities, as well as 
details on the Department's efforts to implement 
recommendations presented in the Department's June 10, 2019, 
report to the Congress titled ``Maternal and Infant Mortality 
Rates in the Military Health System.'' The committee also 
directs the Department to include in the report information on: 
(1) The extent to which reviews of each death are conducted by 
a multidisciplinary group of experts; (2) The extent to which 
the Department seeks input from physicians, epidemiologists, 
patient advocates, civilians with experience with reviews of 
maternal mortality records, and other experts; (3) Measures 
taken to ensure data collection is transparent, consistent, and 
comprehensive; (4) Measures to ensure confidentiality 
protections and de-identification of any information specific 
to a maternal mortality case or severe maternal morbidity case; 
(5) Efforts to facilitate data and records sharing with State 
maternal mortality review committees; and (6) The Department's 
process for accessing National Death Index data and State death 
certificate data at the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention. The report shall also include information on the 
Department's meaningful participation in quality improvement 
programs, including the Alliance for Innovation on Maternal 
Health program, a perinatal quality collaborative, or similar 
maternal health quality improvement initiatives.

Selected Reserve separation history and physical examinations

    The committee understands that the Departments of Defense 
and Veterans Affairs (VA) are working to develop a single, 
comprehensive separation history and physical examination 
(SHPE), which will include a mental health examination for 
servicemembers leaving Active-Duty service. The committee 
encourages the Departments to extend the SHPE to members of the 
National Guard and Reserves who otherwise qualify as veterans 
eligible for benefits from the VA, including members of the 
Selected Reserve who have not supported a contingency operation 
for a period of more than 30 days.
    Not later than January 31, 2022, the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, shall 
review a statistically significant sample of records of former 
members of the Selected Reserve and submit to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives a 
briefing addressing the following: (1) The total number of 
individuals qualified for VA benefits who separated from the 
Selected Reserve during the 1-year period preceding the 
submittal of the report; (2) The number of such individuals who 
received a SHPE at a military medical treatment facility; and 
(3) The number of such individuals who applied for VA benefits, 
enrolled in the VA health system, or received other VA 
benefits.

Synchronized procurement of combat medical kits

    Reducing the number of preventable deaths on the 
battlefield is a top priority for the committee. Individual 
first aid kits (IFAKs) and combat life saver kits (CLSKs) 
contain products designed to improve lifesaving performance by 
every servicemember. These products target the leading causes 
of preventable combat deaths--massive hemorrhage, airway 
obstruction, respiration, circulation, head wounds, and 
hypothermia--and simplify tactical medicine from the point-of-
injury through evacuation from the battlefield.
    The current logistics systems used to procure such 
products, however, are not synchronized. For example, 
procurement of IFAKs/CLSKs for one combat brigade requires 
extensive management of approximately 180,000 single items, 
from depots down to the individual soldier level, and each 
product has its own expiration date and manufacturer lot 
number. Additionally, the current patchwork procurement 
process, involving nearly a dozen different supply chains, may 
often be performed by facilities not registered by the Food and 
Drug Administration and not ISO: 13485 compliant. This 
inefficient process can lead to extensive delays in product 
delivery that can result in medical products, particularly 
sterilized products, with shortened shelf lives when they reach 
the end user. Therefore, the committee believes that a 
simplified supply chain, with synchronized manufacturing for 
combat medical products, could lead to supply chain 
efficiencies and cost savings to the Department of Defense 
while ensuring that servicemembers have the best medical 
products available to treat combat injuries.

Therapeutic research for traumatic brain injury

    The committee continues to support the Department of 
Defense's efforts to evaluate and treat servicemembers for 
acute traumatic brain injury (TBI). The committee is aware of 
recent advances in the development of therapeutics designed to 
stimulate nerve regeneration and to promote brain plasticity. 
These therapeutics hold great promise for recovery from TBI, 
Alzheimer's disease, multiple sclerosis, and spinal cord 
injury. Therefore, the committee encourages the Department to 
continue investments in the development of therapeutics to 
promote brain plasticity following TBI and other nervous system 
disorders.

Trauma and public health training

    The committee recognizes the valuable support universities 
and hospitals provide to National Guard trauma and public 
health training. Through civilian-based emergency response 
trauma/critical care and public health training, the National 
Guard is better prepared to face future medical challenges. 
These public-private training collaborations help to sustain 
the trauma and public health capabilities of the National Guard 
Enhanced Response Forces Packages, National Guard Homeland 
Response Forces, and National Guard Civil Support Teams.

TRICARE healthcare delivery demonstration project contracting

    The Congress has enacted provisions that require the 
Department of Defense to adopt a new private sector healthcare 
delivery acquisition model to: (1) Foster innovation; (2) 
Utilize value-based reimbursement methods; (3) Incorporate 
local and regional health plans to provide greater beneficiary 
choice; and (4) Improve healthcare quality and beneficiaries' 
experience of care. The Defense Health Agency (DHA) has 
conveyed to the committee its shared intent to achieve these 
goals.
    The committee recognizes, however, that there may be 
contracting impediments to the entrance of new health system or 
plan entrants into TRICARE that may inhibit adoption of value-
based reimbursement methods. The DHA should explore flexible 
acquisition approaches to enable broader participation in its 
purchased care programs. Therefore, the committee encourages 
the Secretary of Defense to utilize authorities for direct 
contracts with regional and local health care systems, payers, 
and providers to incentivize participation in value-based 
healthcare demonstrations. The committee further directs the 
Secretary to utilize, for the purposes of demonstration 
projects, acquisition methods that would safeguard the 
Government's interests while providing greater contracting 
flexibility.

TRICARE healthcare delivery demonstrations

    The committee understands that the Defense Health Agency 
(DHA) plans to implement healthcare delivery demonstrations, 
separate from the upcoming TRICARE T-5 contract, to test a 
multiple contract/multiple provider network approach to help 
expand TRICARE beneficiary enrollment choices. A more localized 
market approach to healthcare delivery may allow private sector 
health plans and providers to better address the unique needs 
of beneficiaries with innovative, value-based healthcare plan 
options.
    The committee is aware that the DHA plans to implement 
these demonstrations soon after it awards a separate 
administrative contract for management of TRICARE's 
eligibility, enrollment, and encounter (EEE) processes. The 
committee agrees with this construct and encourages the DHA to 
time the award of an EEE contract and implementation of 
demonstrations to coincide with transition to the T-5 
contracts. Such timing would allow a more equitable comparison 
of patient choice, healthcare quality, innovation, and cost 
within these demonstrations to T-5 contracts.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing not later than September 1, 2021, to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives that describes a plan to implement a 
simultaneous acquisition strategy for the T-5 contracts, an EEE 
contract, and independent healthcare demonstrations. The 
briefing shall include a detailed description regarding how the 
DHA intends to compare healthcare delivery models, including 
the outcome measures that will be used to determine the 
performance of various models.

Trusted domestic vaccine supplier capability

    The committee is concerned about the availability of key 
starting materials (KSMs), such as plasmid DNA and mRNA, 
antibodies, and enzymes that are critical components in the 
rapid production of important medical countermeasures against 
biologic threats. Domestic manufacturing of KSMs can limit 
dependence on foreign supplies and improve the response to 
national health emergencies caused by pandemics. Therefore, the 
committee recommends that the Department of Defense, through 
the Defense Logistics Agency Strategic Materials division, 
include KSMs as strategic materials in the National Defense 
Stockpile. Long-term domestic storage of KSMs would facilitate 
the swift development and allocation of medical countermeasures 
against biologic threats, both to servicemembers and the 
general public.

Virtual health expansion

    The committee recognizes the important role that virtual 
health and telemedicine services have played in advancing 
health outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic and acknowledges 
that such services are increasingly relevant in deployed 
environments or at remote and isolated military installations. 
The committee supports the expansion of these services to 
promote safe, accessible, and high quality medical care to all 
servicemembers and their families.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Director of the 
Defense Health Agency to provide a briefing not later than 
December 1, 2021, on its efforts to increase and improve 
virtual health and telemedicine services available to 
servicemembers and their families and the resources needed to 
make those services more readily available. The briefing shall 
include lessons learned and virtual health and telemedicine 
best practices captured by the Department of Defense and 
private sector health care systems during the global pandemic. 
Additionally, the committee recognizes that such services are 
highly dependent on reliable, high capacity broadband, which 
may be limited or unavailable at many remote and isolated 
military installations. The briefing shall include any 
recommendations on resources required to ensure that 
servicemembers and their families stationed at such 
installations can fully utilize those services. These resources 
shall include, but not be limited to, access to broadband 
internet and personal computers.

  TITLE VIII--ACQUISITION POLICY, ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT, AND RELATED 
                                MATTERS

             Subtitle A--Acquisition Policy and Management

Repeal of preference for fixed-price contracts (sec. 801)
    The committee recommends a provision that would repeal the 
preference for fixed-price contracts, previously established by 
section 829 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328).
    The committee notes that the preference for fixed-price 
contracts was originally established as an effort to control 
cost growth on large acquisition programs and to incentivize 
contractors to actively manage costs. While the committee 
remains concerned about acquisition cost growth, it recognizes 
that the fixed-price contract type may not be suitable for all 
acquisitions. With the repeal of the preference for fixed-price 
contracts, the committee expects the Department of Defense to 
select contract types and negotiate contract terms that are 
appropriate for the product or service being acquired and that 
effectively account for an acquisition program's risks, 
requirements, and cost and schedule goals.
    The committee also notes that the Department has used 
fixed-price type contracts for the majority of major defense 
acquisition program obligations fairly consistently over the 
last several years.
    The committee further notes that fixed-price type contracts 
can be used to encourage better cost and schedule performance. 
Fixed-price type contracts also are appropriate when 
requirements are stable and technical and technology risks are 
minimal and understood. Fixed-price contracts also remain 
appropriate when the Department is purchasing commercial items.
Improving the use of available data to manage and forecast service 
        contract requirements (sec. 802)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
statutes governing the management and oversight of the 
procurement of services and would require the Secretary of 
Defense, Secretary of the Navy, and Secretary of the Air Force 
to review and implement recommendations of the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO), in a report published February 18, 
2016, titled, ``DOD Service Acquisition: Improved Use of 
Available Data Needed to Better Manage and Forecast Service 
Contract Requirements'' (GAO-16-119), with respect to the 
oversight and management of service contracts, or provide 
rationale to the congressional defense committees for not 
implementing such recommendations.
    The committee notes that both sections 2329 and 235 of 
title 10, United States Code, create requirements that the 
Secretary of Defense must implement in managing the procurement 
of services. To streamline reporting requirements and improve 
the ability to understand trends and reduce duplication in such 
contracting efforts, the committee recommends a provision that 
would clarify the existing reporting requirements, make 
technical corrections within section 2329 of title 10, United 
States Code, and instruct the Secretary of Defense to issue 
guidance to standardize service contract reviews across the 
Department of Defense (DOD).
    The committee also notes that the GAO has previously 
recommended that the Secretary of Defense and military 
departments revise project objective memorandum guidance, 
coordinate efforts to forecast services, and fully comply with 
statutory budget reporting requirements. The committee notes 
that DOD concurred with the GAO recommendation on budget 
reporting but did not identify actions it would take to address 
the recommendations for revised guidance or coordination.
    The committee notes that the DOD is making significant 
progress in improving its data collection and analysis 
capabilities for these types of management and oversight 
functions through the Advana platform. The committee expects 
that this effort will play a major role in improving the 
effectiveness and efficiency of the oversight and management of 
service contracting. The committee encourages the Secretary to 
continue working with the Congress to improve budgetary 
transparency, including related to contracting for services.
Assessment of impediments and incentives to improving the acquisition 
        of commercial technology, products, and services (sec. 803)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment and 
the Chairman of the Joint Requirements Oversight Council to 
jointly assess impediments and incentives to fulfilling the 
goals of sections 1906, 1907, and 3307 of title 41, United 
States Code, and sections 2375-2377 of title 10, United States 
Code, regarding preferences for commercial products and 
services. The objective of the assessment is to enhance the 
innovation strategy of the Department of Defense (DOD) to 
compete effectively against peer adversaries by rapidly 
adopting commercial technology advances.
    DOD leaders consistently emphasize the critical importance 
in the current great power competition of capitalizing quickly 
on commercial technology advances in such areas as artificial 
intelligence and machine learning, cloud computing, cloud-based 
enterprise services, and software products and services. 
However, the committee is concerned that, too often, DOD 
components choose to contract for the development of custom 
solutions when mature commercial capabilities exist that will 
save time and money and provide better performance. The 
committee is aware of instances where custom developments are 
justified as ``open source'' or on the grounds that commercial 
licenses are expensive. The committee is also aware that some 
DOD officials view commercial software as untrustworthy and 
argue that DOD should control the technical baseline through 
in-house software development. The committee is further aware 
that the requirements process, without careful attention, can 
be used to effectively foreclose on commercial solutions even 
before market research is conducted. Since DOD must have wide 
discretion to pursue non-commercial solutions to most military 
requirements, successful protests are rare, even when the 
underlying facts support a commercial acquisition.
    The committee recognizes that DOD must maintain technical 
expertise in order to be a smart buyer, to manage programs 
effectively, and in some cases, to undertake in-house 
development. It is also important when weighing acquisition 
options to consider sustainment requirements. Balancing these 
factors appropriately requires leadership and unbiased 
processes.
Pilot program on acquisition practices for emerging technologies (sec. 
        804)
    The committee recommends a provision that would establish a 
pilot program to develop and implement unique contracting 
mechanisms for emerging technologies that seek to increase the 
speed, flexibility, and competition of the Department of 
Defense (DOD) acquisition process.
    The committee notes that in testimony on February 23, 2021, 
the Chairman of the National Security Commission on Artificial 
Intelligence recommended that the Congress appoint a joint 
committee to identify four DOD acquisition projects and apply 
radically different procurement approaches to those projects to 
explore options to improve DOD acquisition outcomes.
    While the committee has worked to improve DOD acquisition 
processes in recent years, the committee believes more work is 
required to improve DOD acquisition outcomes.
Annual report on highest and lowest performing acquisition programs of 
        the Department of Defense (sec. 805)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to identify the highest and lowest 
performing acquisition programs with significant expenditures 
within the Department of Defense, according to criteria 
developed by the Department. The provision would also direct 
the decision authority for the lowest performing programs to 
provide a report that outlines the factors behind the program's 
performance and steps being taken to improve program 
performance.
Systems engineering determinations (sec. 806)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
systems engineering determinations for transactions entered 
into under certain legal authorities.
    The committee notes that companies that develop emerging 
technologies, are non-traditional, and/or are small businesses 
have increasing opportunities to conduct initial demonstrations 
and other activities with the Department of Defense but are 
challenged in transitioning these products into programs-of-
record.
    The committee believes the role of systems engineering 
commands (SECs) (e.g., Naval Warfare Centers; Army Combat 
Capabilities Development Command Centers; Air Force Research 
Laboratory) should include the activities necessary to 
transition promising technologies from a successful initial 
demonstration to a program-of-record within the SEC's area of 
expertise, including working with the product company and the 
desired program executive officer (PEO) to develop and execute 
a systems engineering plan (SEP) necessary to achieve 
transition to the PEO.
    The committee envisions the scope of each SEP being 
tailored to the needs of each covered product, which may 
include resolution of: interfaces, data rights, technical 
warrant holder requirements, specific platform technical 
integration, software development, subsystem prototyping, 
reliability improvements, scale models, technical manuals, life 
cycle sustainment needs, and PEO-identified needs.
    The committee believes the benefits to the Government of 
this provision should include SEC technical experts and test 
equipment better able to: (1) Keep pace with emerging 
technology; (2) Support covered products in-service; (3) Make 
more informed recommendations to PEOs and other DOD leaders; 
and (4) Provide greater clarity and accountability on the steps 
necessary to transition covered products to programs-of-record.
    The committee also believes the benefits to companies of 
this provision should include greater clarity on the steps 
necessary to transition a covered product to a program-of-
record, the Government's technical partners at the SEC and the 
associated SEP, and identification of the associated funding.

Subtitle B--Amendments to General Contracting Authorities, Procedures, 
                            and Limitations


Recommendations on the use of other transaction authority (sec. 811)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to review the current use, authorities, 
regulations, and policies relative to the use of other 
transaction authorities and make recommendations to the 
Congress on possible modifications to the authorities. The 
committee notes that the use of the other transaction authority 
has increased significantly over the last few years and that 
industry and independent experts have proposed a number of new 
proposals for possible adjustments to the authorities. The 
committee also is concerned about the differing interpretations 
by Department of Defense counsels on the flexibilities 
currently authorized, resulting in inconsistent application of 
the authority and significant confusion among industry and 
Government personnel.

Modified condition for prompt contract payment eligibility (sec. 812)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify the 
conditions set forth in section 2307 of title 10, United States 
Code, under which certain prime contractors are eligible for 
accelerated payment timeframes. The committee reiterates its 
expectation that prime contractors will flow accelerated 
payments down to their subcontractors, particularly those 
subcontractors that are small businesses.

Exclusion of certain services from intergovernmental support agreements 
        for installation-support services (sec. 813)

    The committee recommends a provision that would make a 
clarifying amendment to section 2679 of title 10, United States 
Code.

Modification of prize authority for advanced technology achievements 
        (sec. 814)

    The committee recommends a provision that would clarify 
that the technology prize authority under section 2374a of 
title 10, United States Code, can be used for the awarding of 
procurement agreements. The committee notes that this 
authority, originally established by the committee in the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000 (Public 
Law 106-65), has been used successfully within the Department 
of Defense to promote technological advancements in robotics, 
space launch, spectrum technologies, biomedical technologies, 
and other areas. The committee believes that it can be used to 
more seamlessly and rapidly move successful technologies into 
operational use.

Cost or pricing data reporting in Department of Defense contracts (sec. 
        815)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 2306a of title 10, United States Code, to make 
conforming changes consistent with section 814 of the William 
M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283).

Authority to acquire innovative commercial products and services using 
        general solicitation competitive procedures (sec. 816)

    The committee recommends a provision that would permanently 
authorize the Department of Defense to use what are commonly 
known as Commercial Solutions Openings to solicit and acquire 
innovative commercial items, technologies, or services.
    The committee notes that this authority was originally 
established in section 879 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) and 
that it has been successfully used by the Department to 
establish agreements with small businesses in technology areas 
relevant to supporting the National Defense Strategy. The 
committee also notes that this authority has been used 
successfully by the Defense Innovation Unit and the Air Force 
to support efforts to work with commercial sector firms, as 
well as to support COVID-19 response activities.

Reporting requirement for defense acquisition activities (sec. 817)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish procedures to identify all 
agreements awarded to entities through the use of an Other 
Transaction (OT) consortia, OTs, individual task orders awarded 
under a task order contract, and individual task orders issued 
to a federally funded research and development center. For 
example, the committee notes that the Department of Defense 
(DOD) Inspector General found that ``the [DOD] did not properly 
track and could not readily account for all OTs awarded through 
consortiums'' in an April 2021 report (DODIG-2021-077). 
Additionally, the committee is concerned about the lack of 
transparency on these types of awards. As such, the provision 
would also require the Secretary to establish mechanisms to 
publicize awards, similar to those currently in place for 
contracts.

Department of Defense contractor professional training material 
        disclosure requirements (sec. 818)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to require all Department of Defense 
contractors to disclose certain training materials for review.

Report on place of performance requirements (sec. 819)

    The committee recommends a provision that would direct the 
Secretary of Defense to improve contract place of performance 
data and report on its use. The committee notes that the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) raised concerns about 
the consistency in the interpretation and entry of place of 
performance contract data in a report, published November 8, 
2017, titled, ``OMB, Treasury, and Agencies Need to Improve 
Completeness and Accuracy of Spending Data and Disclose 
Limitations'' (GAO-18-138). The committee directs the Secretary 
of Defense to review its guidance, policies, and training to 
ensure consistency in place of performance data. The committee 
also notes that the COVID-19 pandemic has changed the manner in 
which the Federal Government and the Department of Defense 
conduct business. With an increased focus on remote work, the 
committee believes an assessment of the Department of Defense's 
use of place of performance clauses is necessary.

Multiyear contract authority for defense acquisitions specifically 
        authorized by law (sec. 820)

    The committee recommends a provision that would add an 
additional criterion to the certifications required for 
approving a multiyear procurement contract.
    The committee notes the budget request would breach a 
multiyear contract for Arleigh Burke-class destroyers entered 
into under authority provided in section 2306b of title 10, 
United States Code. The committee believes such an action would 
set an unacceptable precedent and undermine future confidence 
in entering into these highly cost effective and stabilizing 
contractual agreements.
    Accordingly, this provision would require the Secretary of 
Defense to certify, as part of an existing certification 
required under section 2306b of title 10, United States Code, 
that the Department of Defense will not reduce the quantity of 
end items that would be procured with a multiyear contract in 
each fiscal year of the future years defense program planned at 
the time of contract award without prior approval from the 
congressional defense committees.

                  Subtitle C--Industrial Base Matters


Addition of certain items to list of high priority goods and services 
        for analyses, recommendations, and actions related to sourcing 
        and industrial capacity (sec. 831)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 849 of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) by 
adding U.S. producers as a category for the Department of 
Defense to consider for potential restricted procurement and 
items to the list of high priority goods and services for 
analyses, recommendations, and actions.

Prohibition on acquisition of personal protective equipment from non-
        allied foreign nations (sec. 832)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the Secretary of Defense from procuring personal protective 
equipment (PPE) manufactured in China, Russia, North Korea, or 
Iran. It would authorize limited waivers to the prohibition for 
small purchases, for the use of PPE outside the United States, 
and for cases in which satisfactory PPE cannot be purchased 
from other sources at reasonable cost or to meet requirements.

Further prohibition on acquisition of sensitive materials (sec. 833)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2533c of title 10, United States Code, to add covered 
companies to the existing prohibition of sensitive materials 
from non-allied foreign nations.

Requirement for industry days and requests for information to be open 
        to allied defense contractors (sec. 834)

    The committee recommends a provision that would make, to 
the maximum extent practicable, industry days and requests for 
information open to defense contractors from the national 
technology and industrial base.

Assessment of requirements for certain items to address supply chain 
        vulnerabilities (sec. 835)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to assess the Department of Defense's 
requirements for dual-use items covered by section 2533a of 
title 10, United States Code. The provision would also require 
the Secretary to submit a report of the Department's findings 
to the congressional defense committees not later than October 
1, 2022.

Requirement that certain providers of systems to Department of Defense 
        disclose the source of printed circuit boards when sourced from 
        certain countries (sec. 836)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
that certain providers of systems to the Department of Defense 
disclose the source of printed circuit boards when sourced from 
certain countries.

Employment transparency regarding individuals who perform work in the 
        People's Republic of China (sec. 837)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to require defense contractors to disclose 
their use of workforce and facilities in the People's Republic 
of China in the performance of certain defense contracts.

                   Subtitle D--Small Business Matters


Clarification of duties of Director of Small Business Programs (sec. 
        841)

    The committee recommends a provision that would clarify 
that the duties of the Department of Defense's (DOD) Director 
of Small Business Programs include strengthening the small 
businesses in the national technology and industrial base. The 
committee notes that small businesses represent an important 
element of the defense industrial base, including acting as key 
suppliers of defense products and services; serving as key 
subcontractors on major acquisition programs; and developing 
and delivering advanced and innovative technologies to the 
warfighter.
    The committee notes that the Director of Small Business 
programs within the Department of Defense reports to the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Industrial Base Policy, 
which is a different reporting chain than other Federal 
agencies, which are mandated to make the Directors report to 
Cabinet secretaries. The committee further notes that the title 
``Director'' is not consistent with typical position titles 
within DOD and that the successful Small Business Innovation 
Research program is not managed by the Director of Small 
Business Programs but instead by the Office of the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering. These 
reporting arrangements, titles, and organizational assignments 
may have both positive and negative impacts on the execution of 
small business programs.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the congressional defense committees, not later 
than March 1, 2022, assessing these issues; providing 
justification for the current status of the title, reporting, 
and authorities of the Director of Small Business Programs; 
outlining any changes to these that would benefit defense 
missions; and making recommendations for any statutory changes 
that are needed to effect such changes.

Data on Phase III Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business 
        Technology Transfer program awards (sec. 842)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretaries of the military departments to collect data on 
Phase III awards under the Small Business Innovation Research 
and Small Business Technology Transfer programs and submit such 
data to the President for inclusion in the budget submitted to 
the Congress under section 1105 of title 31, United States 
Code.

Pilot program to incentivize employee ownership in defense contracting 
        (sec. 843)

    The committee recommends a provision that would permit the 
Secretary of Defense to carry out a 5-year pilot program that 
allows for the use of noncompetitive procedures for follow-on 
contracts to qualified businesses wholly owned by an Employee 
Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP). The Department of Defense may 
benefit from the workforce talent attracted by businesses that 
are owned entirely by an ESOP. However, as a June 18, 2020, 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) study, titled ``Defense 
Contracting: DOD Contracts with Companies Having Employee Stock 
Ownership Plans'' (GAO-20-514R), showed, there are no readily 
available data to determine what percent of an entity is owned 
by an ESOP. Therefore, a pilot program will provide the 
Department with information to understand the potential use and 
benefits of allowing such noncompetitive procedures and whether 
these procedures create incentives for qualified businesses to 
continue working with the Department.
    In addition, the provision would require the Comptroller 
General of the United States to submit a report to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives on the Department's use of the pilot not later 
than 3 years after the date of the enactment of this Act.

                       Subtitle E--Other Matters


Technology protection features activities (sec. 851)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2357 of title 10, United States Code, to allow the 
contractor's share of costs for the technology protection 
features activities for certain designated systems to be 
treated as allowable independent research and development. The 
committee notes that these technology protection features make 
it possible for defense contractors to export appropriate 
technologies to allied and friendly nations, with resultant 
economic and national security benefits. The committee believes 
that these kinds of activities will facilitate greater 
cooperation between industry and the Department of Defense in 
achieving the National Defense Strategy goal of deepening 
interoperability between the United States and partner nations.

Independent study on technical debt in software-intensive systems (sec. 
        852)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to enter into an agreement with a 
federally funded research and development center to perform a 
study on defense software-intensive systems that can identify 
and assess technical debt and make recommendations on best 
practices for the Department of Defense to employ to manage 
technical debt. The committee notes that in the course of 
developing software-intensive systems in the Department of 
Defense, accumulation of ``technical debt'' is common. 
``Technical debt'' in software systems reflects the use of 
design approaches that are expedient and lower cost in the 
short term, but that create a system that increases costs to 
sustain and maintain the systems over time. This also leads to 
increasing delays in delivering new features and an inability 
to fix software defects, vulnerabilities, and design issues due 
to increasing and often unintended system complexity.

Determination with respect to optical fiber transmission equipment for 
        Department of Defense purposes (sec. 853)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require a 
review and determination with respect to optical fiber 
transmission equipment for Department of Defense (DOD) 
purposes.
    The committee notes the DOD expressed concern regarding 
China's industrial strategy for international communications 
and concluded that China is poised to be a leader and a 
standard-setter in 5G by dominating the global fiber optic 
market through a heavily state-supported system in its December 
2020 ``Report Evaluating the Risk to the Supply Chain for Fiber 
and Related Telecommunications Components'' in response to the 
explanatory statement accompanying the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2020 (Public Law 116-93).
    The committee is concerned China may use trade protection, 
discriminatory procurement, and forced technology transfer 
policies to dispose of surplus optical fiber transmission 
equipment in a manner that would be contrary to the national 
security interests of the United States.

Two-year extension of Selected Acquisition Report requirement (sec. 
        854)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
requirement for Selected Acquisition Reports, as established 
under section 2432 of title 10, United States Code, through 
fiscal year 2023, and require a demonstration of the 
replacement reporting system that includes the Department of 
Defense's plan for implementing such a system.
    The committee recognizes that the Secretary of Defense is 
in the process of developing an alternate approach for 
reporting on defense acquisition programs, pursuant to section 
830 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2020 (Public Law 116-92). The committee supports these ongoing 
efforts and notes the importance of replacing the Selected 
Acquisition Report requirement with an updated reporting 
construct for all acquisition programs that can be tailored to 
the acquisition pathways of the Department of Defense's new 
Adaptive Acquisition Framework. However, until these efforts 
are fully developed and implemented, the committee believes the 
requirement for Selected Acquisition Reports should be 
maintained to ensure the Congress continues to receive critical 
information about the cost, schedule, performance, and other 
challenges of the Department of Defense's largest acquisition 
programs.

Military standards for high-hardness armor in combat vehicle 
        specifications (sec. 855)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Army to provide a report to the congressional 
defense committees, not later than January 31, 2022, on its 
establishment of military standards for high-hardness armor and 
its strategy for incorporating those standards into combat 
vehicle specifications.

Revisions to the Unified Facilities Criteria regarding the use of 
        variable refrigerant flow systems (sec. 856)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Department of Defense to publish any proposed revision to the 
Unified Facilities Criteria regarding the use of variable 
refrigerant flow systems in the Federal Register and specify a 
comment period of at least 60 days.
    The committee encourages the Department to pursue the use 
of variable refrigerant flow systems in its facilities to 
maximize efficiency along with reducing costs and energy use.

                       Items of Special Interest


Acquisition of synthetic graphite material

    The committee notes that section 849 of the William M. 
(Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) directed the Department of 
Defense to analyze sourcing and industrial capacity for 
synthetic graphite and other strategic materials. In addition, 
section 848 instructed the Department to acquire strategic and 
critical materials from sources within the United States prior 
to purchasing from key allies. The committee believes that 
creating domestic demand for synthetic graphite will bolster 
the existing industry to ensure it can provide the Department, 
industry, and civilian needs with a secure supply of synthetic 
graphite.
    Accordingly, the committee urges the Secretary of Defense, 
to the maximum extent practicable, to acquire synthetic 
graphite material, which is a strategic and critical material 
for defense, industrial, and civilian needs, in the following 
order of preference: (1) From sources domestically owned and 
produced; (2) From sources located within the United States or 
the national technology and industrial base; (3) Suppliers in 
other allied nations; or (4) From other sources, as 
appropriate.

Agile weapons system sustainment

    The committee understands that increasingly complex and 
software-reliant weapons systems have challenged some existing 
sustainment and modernization practices. While recognizing 
safeguards are needed to protect intellectual property, the 
committee also believes weapons systems need agile sustainment 
and modernization methods in order to maximize the combat power 
available to operational commanders.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of each 
military department to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees, not later than March 1, 2022, on weapons 
systems intellectual property safeguards and approaches to 
agile sustainment and modernization. This report shall include 
the following elements for at least five illustrative weapons 
systems within the military department:
          (1) The types of technical data needed to sustain or 
        increase readiness and gain sustainment efficiencies;
          (2) Steps or actions the department has taken to 
        obtain the technical data needed to sustain or increase 
        readiness and gain sustainment efficiencies;
          (3) Obstacles that inhibit or may inhibit the ability 
        of the department to obtain the technical data needed 
        for readiness and sustainment; and
          (4) Other matters the Secretary deems appropriate.

Comptroller General review of flexible budget and financial management 
        authorities

    The committee notes that the Congress has provided the 
Department of Defense (DOD) some flexibility in the budgeting, 
financial management, and expenditure of funds over the years, 
especially in order to support research, development, and other 
innovation and modernization activities. For example, the 
Congress has provided special authority for a new research, 
development, test, and evaluation budget activity to support 
software development programs, allowed for some flexibility in 
the expenditure of funds under rapid acquisition and fielding 
programs to support accelerated development and deployment of 
new technologies, and created special authorities to support 
certain military construction projects both at defense labs and 
test ranges and at other DOD facilities. The committee is 
interested in understanding how the Department has used these 
authorities and their effect on acquisition.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to conduct a comprehensive assessment of 
these and other similar special authorities, to include a 
review of the extent of their use and their effectiveness in 
furthering defense innovation and military missions. The 
Comptroller General shall submit this review to the Committees 
on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives not later than March 1, 2022.

Incentives to promote the use of energy efficient manufacturing 
        technologies

    The Secretary of Defense shall provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees not later than January 1, 
2023, analyzing the possible use of incentives to promote the 
adoption of energy efficient manufacturing technologies by the 
defense industrial base, including: (1) The organic industrial 
base; (2) The feasibility of the Department in implementing 
such incentives; (3) The costs and benefits of using such 
incentives; (4) The costs and benefits of such adoption to the 
efficient and effective execution of Defense missions; and (5) 
Policies that would support the participation of small 
businesses in the development and adoption of such 
technologies.

National technology and industrial base

    The committee is concerned about the pace of implementation 
of policies and procedures necessary to enhance the national 
technology and industrial base (NTIB) consistent with section 
881 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2017 (Public Law 114-328). The intended seamless integration of 
the industrial bases of the countries that comprise the NTIB, 
to include the United States, United Kingdom, Australia, and 
Canada, has yet to occur as a result of the expansion of the 
NTIB in that Act. As the United States seeks to address the 
threat from China, these countries will become even more 
important to the national security strategies of the United 
States. There is a need for greater industrial information 
sharing and the harmonization of allied plans and policies for 
foreign investment review, export control, and the movement of 
critical supplies and materials that are currently being 
manufactured in China. This harmonization and industrial base 
integration must occur within a community of nations where the 
United States has its highest level of intelligence information 
sharing and cooperation to establish the pathway for broader 
industrial partnerships with other allies who share the common 
national security goal of the United States while protecting 
the viability of U.S. suppliers or producers and with 
consideration to existing agreements.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to assess the current state of the 
implementation and effectiveness of the plan required by 
section 881 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 and provide a briefing to the congressional 
defense committees on its preliminary findings not later than 
October 1, 2022, and to submit a report to the committees on an 
agreed-upon date. Specifically, the Comptroller General shall 
review progress made in reducing the barriers to the seamless 
integration between the persons and organizations that comprise 
the NTIB, as defined by section 2500 of title 10, United States 
Code, and recommend actions necessary to fully implement the 
plan.

Past performance by subcontractors and predecessor companies

    The committee notes that Federal contracting regulations 
require that contracting officials consider past performance 
when evaluating contract proposals and describe the scope of 
that performance in their evaluations. The regulations also 
include guidance that contractor evaluations should take into 
account past performance information regarding predecessor 
companies, key personnel who have relevant experience, or 
subcontractors that will perform major aspects of the 
requirement when such information is relevant to the 
acquisition. The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the congressional defense committees, not 
later than March 1, 2022, providing a summary of the Federal 
and Department of Defense policies related to consideration of 
past performance by subcontractors and predecessor companies at 
both the prime and subcontractor level; the guidance provided 
to acquisition workforce and industry relating to these 
considerations; and any challenges that the Department has in 
collecting, performing analyses on, or using this information.

Policy modeling and testing

    The committee notes the work that the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment has done in 
establishing the Acquisition Innovation Research Center (AIRC) 
as mandated by section 2361a of title 10, United States Code. 
The committee also notes that this effort will allow world-
leading academic researchers to study and make recommendations 
on addressing the myriad policy and practice challenges facing 
the Department of Defense as it seeks to modernize acquisition 
efforts to support the National Defense Strategy.
    The committee understands that the Under Secretary has 
engaged with many university experts on a broad range of 
engineering, business, social science, and management 
disciplines, as well as acquisition experts within the 
Department to identify key challenges that can be addressed by 
activities of the AIRC. The committee recommends that the Under 
Secretary continues to work to fully establish the AIRC and 
expand its programs.
    The committee notes that the last decade has seen a surge 
in efforts to reform acquisition. Numerous new policies and 
pilot programs have been mandated by the Congress or 
established by the Department with the intent of improving 
acquisition practices to meet the needs of the acquisition 
programs and operational users.
    The committee notes that, unlike the hardware, systems, and 
software communities, acquisition policymakers have little 
capability to test and model proposed acquisition policy 
changes in the equivalent of computer simulations or ``test 
ranges.'' Poorly designed and tested policy changes have a 
negative effect on both Government and industry, create 
bureaucratic process problems, and lead to confusion in the 
acquisition community.
    The committee believes that a robust policy modeling and 
testing capability would refine analyses of new policy 
proposals to improve their effectiveness in positively 
reforming acquisition practices. The committee directs the 
Under Secretary to engage the AIRC on an activity to develop a 
capability to model and test proposed policy changes to better 
assess the effectiveness and suitability for use prior to 
changes being made to law, regulation, or acquisition 
practices.

Report on contracting for procurement of body armor

    The committee notes that the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) and the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91) placed restrictions on the use of lowest priced technically 
acceptable (LPTA) contracting for personal protective 
equipment. As of October 1, 2019, Defense regulations prohibit 
the Department of Defense's use of LPTA when procuring personal 
protective equipment for which the level of quality or failure 
of the equipment or item could result in combat casualties.
    The committee recognizes the importance of obtaining high-
quality personal protective equipment and avoiding the use of 
LPTA contracting for the procurement of body armor. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment to provide a briefing, not later 
than January 31, 2022, on the Department's contracting for body 
armor. The briefing shall include: (1) A description of the 
methods of contracting being used to procure body armor; (2) An 
assessment of the compliance of the contracting methods being 
used with the law promulgated by the National Defense 
Authorization Acts for fiscal years 2017 and 2018; and (3) An 
assessment of whether the use of ``fair opportunity to 
compete'' for the procurement of body armor circumvents the 
intent of the restrictions on the use of LPTA contracting to 
procure body armor.

Report on life cycle share-in-savings contracts

    The committee understands that Federal agencies have 
successfully implemented share-in-savings contracting related 
to energy savings performance contracts (ESPC) pursuant to 
section 8287 of title 42, United States Code. The committee 
believes greater use of these types of contracts, as applied to 
operations and sustainment technologies and missions, could 
enable the Department of Defense to realize savings while 
improving military readiness with appropriate contract 
performance incentives.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide 
the congressional defense committees a report on the 
Department's assessment of the potential to use share-in-
savings contracts to reduce weapon system life cycle costs. The 
report shall be submitted not later than November 1, 2022, in 
unclassified form but may include a classified annex.
    The report shall include, at a minimum:
          (1) Analysis of current statutory and policy 
        obstacles to share-in-savings contracting to reduce 
        life cycle costs, and proposed policy changes to create 
        incentives for private sector investments in 
        technologies that would reduce life cycle costs;
          (2) Recommendations for processes for documenting 
        auditable cost savings accruing to the Government based 
        on application of new technologies intended to reduce 
        life cycle costs;
          (3) Recommendations for processes for determining the 
        contractor's share in these auditable savings;
          (4) Quantitative measures of readiness that could 
        serve as required performance measures to be sustained 
        or improved under share-in-savings contracts;
          (5) Acquisition strategies that will facilitate 
        multiyear share-in-savings contracts;
          (6) Best practices for negotiating performance 
        requirements, both initially and at specific points 
        over the course of the contract;
          (7) Assessment of benefits accruing to the Government 
        beyond cost reductions, such as improved agility for 
        accommodating technological improvements; and
          (8) Other related matters the Secretary deems 
        appropriate.

Small Business Innovation Research and commercial item purchasing 
        program training

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to establish 
training activities for contracting officers and the Department 
of Defense (DOD) acquisition workforce to ensure that such 
individuals are fully aware of flexibilities designed to 
streamline contracting methods to improve the Department's 
ability to work with innovative small businesses. The committee 
notes that the training topics should include market research, 
commercial item preferences, the missions and authorities of 
the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR), the use of SBIR 
Phase III funding to transition innovative technologies to DOD 
acquisition programs and for operational use, and the use of 
Other Transactions and other flexible contracting authorities 
to support small business participation in the defense 
industrial base.

Small Business Innovation Research and the Small Business Technology 
        Transfer programs

    The committee appreciates the importance of an expeditious 
contracting process for small businesses working with the 
Department of Defense under the Small Business Innovation 
Research (SBIR) and the Small Business Technology Transfer 
(STTR) programs. Section 864 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) 
provided for other transaction authority for small businesses 
participating in SBIR or STTR, allowing for further flexibility 
for the Department and small businesses. The committee 
understands that there are additional authorities that may be 
useful to decrease the burden on small businesses to work with 
the Department. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary 
of Defense to provide a briefing, not later than March 1, 2022, 
on the benefits and drawbacks of using simplified acquisition 
procedures for SBIR and STTR contracts in excess of the 
simplified acquisition threshold.

Submission of selected acquisition reports

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense is not 
producing Selected Acquisition Reports (SARs) in fiscal year 
2022 as statutorily required by section 2430 of title 10, 
United States Code.
    The committee also notes that while it is not uncommon in 
the first year of a new administration to exclude a future 
years defense program (FYDP), the last administration included 
an FYDP with its budget in its first year and produced SARs, 
albeit late, as statutorily required.
    Without the benefit of an FYDP, the Congress and the 
defense committees will not have visibility into the cost, 
schedule, and performance changes of the largest and costliest 
defense acquisition programs. In addition, the Secretaries of 
the Army, Navy, and Air Force and the military service chiefs 
cannot certify the health of these programs, including that 
funding is stable and adequate to meet cost, schedule, and 
performance objectives.
    The committee is concerned that without SARs submitted on a 
quarterly basis during the fiscal year, the Congress will not 
have insight into programs entering and exiting the major 
defense acquisition pathways, programs experiencing unit cost 
increases of at least 15 percent, schedule delays of at least 6 
months, or programs that rebaselined cost or schedule at major 
milestone decisions.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
March 1, 2022, that details options to provide the Congress 
information as statutorily required in future first years of 
administrations or in years during which an FYDP is not 
developed.

Support of fourth-party logistics program

    The committee acknowledges that the Department of Defense 
(DOD) has successfully used the General Services 
Administration's (GSA's) Retail Operations, which provides 
fourth-party logistics solutions, to obtain crucial industrial 
supplies and services for the U.S. military. Using GSA's Retail 
Operations, the DOD has leveraged GSA's acquisition expertise 
to help meet the military services' logistics and supply needs 
in the United States and around the world. The committee 
supports the DOD's efforts to leverage other agencies' 
capabilities and innovative acquisition practices to meet its 
logistics and supply needs.

      TITLE IX--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

Change in eligibility requirements for appointment to certain 
        Department of Defense leadership positions (sec. 901)
    The committee recommends a provision that establishes a 
requirement for the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special 
Operations and Low Intensity Conflict (ASD SOLIC) to not be 
within seven years relieved from Active Duty as a commissioned 
officer of a regular component of an armed force in order to be 
appointed to the position. The provision would also amend 
sections 7013, 8013, and 9013 of title 10, United States Code, 
to provide consistency in the requirements for persons 
appointed to the position of a secretary of a military 
department with other civilians appointed to senior leadership 
positions within the Department of Defense.
    The committee notes that the ASD SOLIC has ``service 
secretary-like'' responsibilities for exercising authority, 
direction, and control of all special operations-peculiar 
administrative matters relating to the organization, training, 
and equipping of special operations forces. However, unlike a 
secretary of a military department, there is no statutory 
requirement for an individual to be relieved from Active-Duty 
service for a specified period of time before being appointed 
as the ASD SOLIC. In addition, civilians appointed to be a 
secretary of a military department are required to be only five 
years separated from Active-Duty service. This conflicts with 
the seven-year requirement for civilians who serve in senior 
civilian leadership positions within the Office of the 
Secretary of Defense, to include the Deputy Secretary of 
Defense or an Under Secretary of Defense.
    Earlier this year, the committee held a hearing on civilian 
control of the Armed Forces. The committee heard expert 
testimony that a seven-year waiting period strengthened 
civilian control of the military because it ``allows a minimum 
of two rotations for military deployments and assignments, 
which means that allows time for the command relationships and 
the people in those command positions to change significantly 
from the time that the recently retired officer was in a 
position of commands.'' Furthermore, another expert witness 
testified ``that Congress has also strengthened the norm in 
other ways, in particular by, in recent years, extending the 
statutory cooling-off period to key civilian appointments 
within the Department of Defense. So the Congress appears to 
have started to look at civilian control of the military and 
its expression in these appointments more holistically across 
the Department and across these different positions.''
    Prior military service is not a disqualifying factor for 
serving in a senior civilian position in the Department of 
Defense. In fact, many former members of the Armed Forces have 
served their country with distinction as civilians after 
leaving military service. However, it is important that there 
is a diversity of opinion when crafting policy and making 
decisions that are critical to U.S. national defense. As such, 
creating a uniform threshold for service for the secretaries of 
the military departments and ASD SOLIC may enhance the advice 
provided to the Secretary of Defense, and ultimately to the 
President, and would send a strong signal that the principle of 
civilian control of the military is essential to the American 
democratic system of government.
Renaming of Air National Guard to Air and Space National Guard (sec. 
        902)
    The committee recommends a provision that would change the 
name of the Air National Guard to the Air and Space National 
Guard to account for the creation of the Space Force in the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public 
Law 116-92). The committee believes this is the most efficient 
use of scarce funding based on the number of personnel 
performing space missions in the existing Air National Guard 
and the size of the Space Force. The provision would also 
require the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees, not later than 180 days after 
the date of the enactment of this Act, on a plan and any 
necessary changes in law to implement this section.
Joint Aviation Safety Council (sec. 903)
    The committee recommends a provision that would establish, 
within the Office of the Secretary of Defense, a Joint Aviation 
Safety Council to advise the Secretary of Defense and the 
Secretaries of the military departments on aviation safety 
issues. The provision would also recommend an increase of $4.0 
million in Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide SAG 4GTN, 
for the Council.
Assignments for participants in the John S. McCain Strategic Defense 
        Fellows Program (sec. 904)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 932 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) to 
provide more flexibility in the assignment of fellows 
participating in the John S. McCain Strategic Defense Fellows 
Program. The provision would also authorize the Secretary of 
Defense to require a minimum service obligation for 
participants in exchange for receipt of certain education loan 
repayment benefits.
Alignment of Close Combat Lethality Task Force (sec. 905)
    The committee recommends a provision that would direct the 
Secretary of Defense to return the Close Combat Lethality Task 
Force (CCLTF) to its initial alignment and status as a direct 
reporting activity to the Secretary of Defense, including its 
designation as a Cross Functional Team (CFT) under section 911 
of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
(Public Law 114-328), until such time the Secretary provides a 
report on an alternative alignment of the CCLTF. The report 
would require details of the proposed alternative alignment and 
supporting analysis, including: how the alternative alignment 
would facilitate the effective pursuit of, and support for, 
both material and non-material initiatives; how the alternative 
alignment would maintain benefits similar to designation as a 
CFT and alignment as a direct-reporting activity to the 
Secretary of Defense; how the alternative alignment would 
ensure collaboration and support from, the primary CCLTF 
stakeholders, the U.S. Army, the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC), and 
U.S. Special Operations (SOCOM) Command; and how the 
alternatively-aligned CFT would be funded and gain appropriate 
resourcing for CFT initiatives supported by the Secretary of 
Defense.
    As previously expressed in the Senate report accompanying 
S. 1790 (S. Rept 116-48) of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2020, the committee remains concerned about 
the ability of the CCLTF to affect its charter of dramatically 
improving the effectiveness and survivability of close combat 
formations through a combination of materiel and non-materiel 
means. Established in March 2018 as a direct report to the 
Secretary of Defense, the CCLTF was designated a Cross 
Functional Team (CFT) under section 911 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 to be able to leverage 
the critical enabling authorities of that law.
    In March 2020, the Secretary of Defense directed the 
transfer of the CCLTF to the Secretary of the Army with a 
tasking to determine alignment of the CCLTF within the Army. 
This transfer effectively ended the CCLTF's status as a direct 
reporting activity to the Secretary of Defense and its 
designation as a CFT under section 911. Since the transfer, the 
Army has failed to gain support from the primary CCLTF 
partners, SOCOM and the USMC, for its alignment within the 
Army, and the organization has lost manning, lost leadership 
support, and become essentially ineffective in executing its 
charter.
Management innovation activities (sec. 906)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish a set of management 
innovation activities, with a goal of incorporating appropriate 
private sector management practices and technologies and 
enhancing the capabilities of the Defense management workforce.
    The committee received testimony from management expert 
witnesses who made a series of recommendations to improve the 
Department of Defense's ability to manage its multi-billion 
dollar business operations enterprise, which includes some of 
the world's largest financial, logistics, education and 
training, healthcare, and data systems resident in any single 
organization. Despite this vast business and management 
mission, and the fact that defense reform is a pillar of the 
National Defense Strategy, senior leaders in the Department of 
Defense often view management reform as being limited to 
efforts to cut civilian workforce or weapons programs and 
reduce spending on information technology (IT) and data 
modernization. The committee notes that the management 
challenges identified by the witnesses and annually by the 
Comptroller General of the United States as part of the High 
Risk list and countless reports are not ``back office'' issues 
but are critical to executing defense missions. Even seemingly 
minor improvements in management and business processes can 
have outsized effects at the scale of the Department of 
Defense.
    Management inefficiencies and a culture of bureaucratic 
stasis use valuable resources and time by creating unnecessary 
waste. They slow the delivery of new and needed capabilities to 
deployed forces at a time when technological change is 
happening at accelerated rates while stifling the creativity of 
uniformed, civilian, and contractor personnel. Over time, they 
drive high-performing personnel out of public service due to 
frustration, further exacerbating the downward spiral of 
mismanagement.
    The committee notes that, unlike other areas where the 
Department makes focused efforts on innovation and 
modernization, there is little focused effort on management 
innovation activities with a goal to improving processes and 
practices. Unlike the identified modernization priorities of 
the Department, there are no robust, established systems of 
leveraging commercial management innovation and expertise to 
support Department missions; there are no serious efforts by 
the senior officials responsible for acquisition, technology, 
and research to improve practices and technologies to support 
management modernization, such as in data analytics, policy 
research, or prototyping of new business processes; and there 
are no strong ties, such as research programs or personnel 
exchanges, established to the innovation and talent resident at 
world-leading business, management, and public administration 
universities. Further, there are no systems to test new 
management concepts or experiment with new management 
techniques appropriate for the unique and idiosyncratic 
bureaucratic and cultural norms of the Department of Defense, 
and there is no equivalent to the Defense Advanced Research 
Projects Agency or Defense Innovation Unit to develop and 
pioneer the defense management practices of the future.

                       Items of Special Interest

Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity 
        Conflict
    The committee strongly supports the issuance of Department 
of Defense guidance on May 5, 2021, that clearly articulates 
the role of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special 
Operations and Low Intensity Conflict (ASD SOLIC) in the 
oversight of and advocacy for U.S. Special Operations Command. 
Though long overdue, the committee believes this guidance is a 
meaningful signal of the Department's commitment to fully 
implement the ASD SOLIC reforms mandated by the Congress.
    The committee looks forward to continuing to work with the 
Department to institutionalize the ``service secretary-like'' 
responsibilities of the ASD SOLIC as the Principal Staff 
Assistant reporting directly to the Secretary of Defense and 
the civilian official tasked with exercising of authority, 
direction, and control of all special operations-peculiar 
administrative matters relating to the organization, training, 
and equipping of special operations forces. The committee 
appreciates the commitment of the Department to ensure the ASD 
SOLIC is included in senior leader fora and maintains dedicated 
resources and grows to a level commensurate with its increased 
responsibilities.
    Lastly, the committee directs the Department to conduct an 
updated manpower study to validate the number and types of 
personnel necessary to support the activities of the 
Secretariat for Special Operations and consider the issuance of 
additional agreements, understandings, arrangements, and 
similar instruments necessary to formalize the ``service 
secretary-like'' role of the ASD SOLIC.
Component content management systems
    The committee is concerned that the Department of Defense's 
approach to managing technical data and artifacts is outdated. 
The Department uses millions of pages of technical data, 
regulations, guidance, and other artifacts that are often 
manually updated and transmitted within the Department. Current 
methods for content management at the Department are so 
outdated and byzantine that the Department has developed 
specialized search engines to find content within its own 
environment.
    The committee recognizes that commercial technological 
advances have revolutionized how content is created, protected, 
organized, and securely disseminated. The Department of Defense 
could significantly reduce costs by adopting modern component 
content management software and commercial best practices to 
drastically lower organizational friction, reduce manual 
content management costs, and improve efficiency throughout the 
organization.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of 
the Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than 
March 1, 2022, on the applicability of component content 
management software to the Department's content management 
challenges and on any plans to increase the usage of such 
software to modernize content management capabilities.
Personnel requirements for functions previously carried out by the 
        Chief Management Officer
    The committee looks forward to reviewing the report from 
the Secretary of Defense on the future of functions previously 
carried out by the Chief Management Officer, as required by 
section 901 of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283). 
The committee understands that the former Deputy Secretary of 
Defense issued a memorandum in January 2021 recommending 
interim reassignment of certain functions previously carried 
out by the Chief Management Officer to organizations within the 
Department of Defense. The committee encourages the Secretary 
of Defense to seriously consider the sufficiency of the 
capacity and capability of existing organizations and their 
workforces in deciding where to permanently relocate these 
functions within the Department.
Remote work information technology
    The committee notes that COVID-related work-from-home 
arrangements and growing cyber threats have only increased the 
imperative that the Department of Defense realize the dramatic 
operational, security, and cost improvements from modern 
information, networking, and communications technologies, 
including cloud computing. The committee strongly urges the 
Department to emphasize technology modernization and cloud 
migration efforts while balancing security requirements, to 
include incorporating appropriate commercial information 
technology solutions, with a goal of improving workforce 
productivity through remote work arrangements.
Workforce management training
    The committee supports the Department of Defense's 
dedication to professional and workforce development, however 
it notes continued challenges associated with enterprise 
management. The committee is concerned these management 
inefficiencies can easily impact dozens of organizations, 
thousands of employees, cost tens of millions of dollars, and 
undermine the effectiveness of key warfighter support 
functions. To that end, the committee believes the Department 
can enhance relationships between Department educational 
institutions and civilian colleges and universities to improve 
management training. Therefore, the committee urges the 
Secretary of Defense to identify and develop relationships with 
private sector colleges and universities for the purposes of 
enhancing the Department's management training efforts. The 
committee also directs the Secretary to provide a briefing to 
the congressional defense committees on: (1) Existing 
management training initiatives at Department educational 
institutions, and (2) Opportunities for enhanced collaboration 
between Department educational institutions and colleges and 
universities on management training not later than July 1, 
2022.

                      TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS

                     Subtitle A--Financial Matters

General transfer authority (sec. 1001)
    The committee recommends a provision that would allow the 
Secretary of Defense to transfer up to $6.0 billion of fiscal 
year 2022 funds authorized in division A of this Act to 
unforeseen higher priority needs in accordance with normal 
reprogramming procedures. Transfers of funds between military 
personnel authorizations would not be counted toward the dollar 
limitation in this provision.
Commission on Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution Reform 
        (sec. 1002)
    The committee recommends a provision that would establish a 
Commission on Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution 
(PPBE) Reform tasked with providing an independent review and 
assessment of the PPBE process of the Department of Defense 
(DOD).
    The PPBE process was first designed and implemented by 
Secretary Robert McNamara 60 years ago, with little change in 
the intervening years. The committee has heard from a variety 
of experts and DOD officials who have suggested that aspects of 
the PPBE process need to be modernized to reflect the speed of 
21st century programs and technologies that evolve faster than 
the current cycle of the PPBE process, as well as to respond to 
the complexity of threats DOD faces today. To inform the 
committee and the Department on those aspects in need of 
reform, this commission would assess the efficacy and 
efficiency of all phases of the PPBE process and provide its 
recommendations to the Secretary of Defense and to the 
Congress.
    The committee notes that there are obstacles in the 
programming and budgeting processes to the rapid development 
and integration of new war-fighting capabilities and directs 
the Commission to analyze these obstacles and make 
recommendations to overcome them. The committee notes that 
these obstacles may involve acquisition policies and practices 
for emerging technologies; the inefficient use and sharing of 
data across DOD organizations; and DOD bureaucratic and 
programmatic risk tolerance and risk management practices.
    The committee expects the Department of Defense to fully 
cooperate with the Commission established under this provision 
during its review of the PPBE process and ensure it has the 
support necessary to fulfill its mandate.
Plan for consolidation of information technology systems used in the 
        planning, programming, budgeting, and execution process (sec. 
        1003)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller), in consultation with 
the Chief Information Officer and the Chief Data Officer, to 
submit to the congressional defense committees, not later than 
180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, a plan to 
consolidate the information technology (IT) systems used to 
manage data and support the planning, programming, budgeting, 
and execution (PPBE) process of the Department of Defense. Such 
a plan for consolidation should incorporate those systems used 
by the military departments as well as those used by the 
Defense-wide Agencies, and should address the retirement or 
elimination of such systems.
    The committee notes that, in response to a direction in the 
Senate report accompanying S. 4049 (S. Rept. 116-236) of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021, the 
Office of the Deputy Chief Financial Officer submitted a report 
to the committee on October 1, 2020, outlining the results of 
its review of the IT systems used to manage data. The report 
concluded that there are 132 unique systems across the 
Department of Defense that support planning, programming, and 
budgeting decisions. The committee acknowledges that the 
Departments of the Army, Air Force, and Navy have developed 
initial retirement and consolidation plans for their general 
ledger financial management systems and urges these military 
departments to expeditiously complete and implement these 
plans. The committee encourages the Department of Defense to 
use IT systems that improve the sharing of data and the 
efficiency of decision-making across organizations.

                   Subtitle B--Counterdrug Activities

Codification and expansion of authority for joint task forces of the 
        Department of Defense to support law enforcement agencies 
        conducting counter-terrorism, counter-illicit trafficking, or 
        counter-transnational organized crime activities (sec. 1011)
    The committee recommends a provision that would codify in 
title 10, United States Code, the authority of section 1022 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2004 
(Public Law 108-136), as amended, for the Secretary of Defense 
to use funds for counter-drug activities to enable joint task 
forces that support law enforcement agencies engaged in 
counter-drug activities to also support law enforcement 
activities for countering terrorism and countering 
transnational criminal organizations. The provision would also 
clarify that Department of Defense support that may be provided 
under this section would be available for law enforcement 
activities for countering illicit trafficking, whether 
conducted by a transnational criminal organization or a state 
actor.
Extension of authority to support a unified counterdrug and 
        counterterrorism campaign in Colombia (sec. 1012)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
through fiscal year 2023 the authority under section 1021 of 
the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2005 (Public Law 108-375), as most recently amended 
by section 1021 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92), to support Colombia's 
unified counterdrug and counterterrorism campaign.

                       Subtitle C--Naval Vessels

Modification to annual naval vessel construction plan (sec. 1021)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
inclusion of naval vessel expected service lives in the annual 
naval vessel construction plan.
Navy battle force ship assessment and requirement reporting (sec. 1022)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
Navy battle force ship assessment and requirement reporting 
when a covered event occurs.

                      Subtitle D--Counterterrorism

Extension of prohibition on use of funds for transfer or release of 
        individuals detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
        Bay, Cuba, to the United States (sec. 1031)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
through December 31, 2022, the prohibition on the use of funds 
provided to the Department of Defense to transfer or release 
individuals detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
Bay, Cuba, to the United States.
Extension of prohibition on use of funds to construct or modify 
        facilities in the United States to house detainees transferred 
        from United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (sec. 
        1032)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
until December 31, 2022, the prohibition on the use of funds 
provided to the Department of Defense to construct or modify 
facilities in the United States to house detainees transferred 
from United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
Extension of prohibition on use of funds for transfer or release of 
        individuals detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
        Bay, Cuba, to certain countries (sec. 1033)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
through December 31, 2022, the prohibition on the use of funds 
provided to the Department of Defense to transfer or release 
individuals detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
Bay, Cuba, to Libya, Somalia, Syria, and Yemen.
Extension of prohibition on use of funds to close or relinquish control 
        of United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (sec. 
        1034)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
through the end of fiscal year 2022 the prohibition on the use 
of funds provided to the Department of Defense to: (1) Close or 
abandon United States Naval Station, Guantanamo; (2) Relinquish 
control of Guantanamo Bay to the Republic of Cuba; or (3) 
Implement a material modification to the Treaty between the 
United States of America and Cuba signed at Washington, D.C., 
on May 29, 1934, which modification would constructively close 
United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.
Report on medical care provided to detainees at United States Naval 
        Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (sec. 1035)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Chief Medical Officer of the United States Naval Station, 
Guantanamo Bay, to submit, not later than 120 days after the 
date of the enactment of this Act, a detailed report to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives on the provision of medical care to detainees 
at Guantanamo. The report is to be submitted in classified 
form.

         Subtitle E--Miscellaneous Authorities and Limitations

Notification of significant Army force structure changes (sec. 1041)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense or Secretary of the Army to notify the 
congressional defense committees of plans to make significant 
changes to Army force structure, including the establishment or 
stationing of new or experimental units of significance.
    The committee supports Army efforts to modernize and 
reorganize for competition and, if necessary, conflict with 
strategic competitors. Given the critical role that Army forces 
serve in all theaters of operation, the Congress has an 
inherent oversight responsibility with respect to the size of 
the Army, Army force structure, and its capability and capacity 
to meet the requirements of the National Defense Strategy.
Extension of admission to Guam or the Commonwealth of the Northern 
        Mariana Islands for certain nonimmigrant H-2B workers (sec. 
        1042)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 6(b)(1)(B) of the Joint Resolution titled ``A Joint 
Resolution to approve the `Covenant to Establish a Commonwealth 
of the Northern Mariana Islands in Political Union with the 
United States of America', and for other purposes'' (48 U.S.C. 
1806(b)(1)(B)), approved March 24, 1976, by extending the 
deadline for certain non-immigrant H-2B workers. The committee 
notes that this provision would support the realignment of U.S. 
forces to Guam by addressing limited workforce availability on 
Guam.

                    Subtitle F--Studies and Reports

Report on implementation of irregular warfare strategy (sec. 1051)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to the congressional defense 
committees, not later than 180 days after the date of enactment 
of this Act and annually through fiscal year 2027, a report on 
the activities and programs of the Department of Defense to 
implement the irregular warfare strategy consistent with the 
2019 Irregular Warfare Annex to the National Defense Strategy.
Optimization of Irregular Warfare Technical Support Directorate (sec. 
        1052)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low 
Intensity Conflict, in coordination with the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Research and Engineering, the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, and the service 
secretaries, to submit a plan to improve the Irregular Warfare 
Technical Support Directorate's (IWTSD) support to military 
requirements and a Department of Defense Instruction to better 
define the IWTSD's role in the Department of Defense research, 
development, and acquisition enterprise.
    The committee notes that section 264 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-
92) directed an independent study by a federally funded 
research and development center on optimizing resources 
allocated to the Combating Terrorism Technical Support Office, 
which was renamed the IWTSD in November 2020. The independent 
study made a number of recommendations to improve the 
effectiveness and efficiency of the IWTSD, which are reflected 
in the recommended provision.
Quarterly briefings on anomalous health incidents (sec. 1053)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, not later than 90 days after the date of 
the enactment of this Act and every 90 days thereafter for 2 
years, to provide the congressional defense committees a 
briefing on Department of Defense (DOD) efforts to address 
anomalous health incidents.
    The committee notes that, since at least 2016, U.S. 
Government personnel have reported anomalous health incidents 
at diplomatic missions across the world. Some of those impacted 
by such incidents are facing permanent, life-altering effects 
that have disrupted lives and ended careers.
    The committee believes anomalous health incidents are a 
matter of urgent concern and deserve the full attention of the 
U.S. Government. In particular, personnel afflicted by such 
anomalous health incidents deserve equitable, accessible, and 
high-quality medical assessment and care, regardless of their 
employing agency. Furthermore, information sharing and 
interagency coordination is essential for the comprehensive 
investigation, attribution, and mitigation of such incidents in 
the future. To that end, the committee urges the President to 
designate an appropriate senior administration official to lead 
an interagency working group for the purposes of coordinating 
the U.S. Government response to anomalous health incidents.
    Additionally, the committee believes that relevant 
departments and agencies should seek to provide the Congress 
and the American public with informative and, to the extent 
possible, unclassified updates on anomalous health incidents 
and the threat posed to U.S. Government personnel. The 
committee is concerned that at-risk U.S. Government personnel 
have not been adequately informed about this threat, due in 
part to a lack of internal workforce guidance across Federal 
agencies. Therefore, the committee urges the Secretary of 
Defense to ensure appropriate guidance is developed and 
disseminated to civilian and uniformed personnel on the threat, 
known defensive measures, and processes to report suspected 
incidents. Lastly, the committee believes the perpetrators of 
attacks on U.S. Government personnel that result in anomalous 
health incidents should be publicly identified and held 
accountable.
    Given the seriousness and urgency associated with this 
threat, not later than October 15, 2021, the committee directs 
the Secretary of Defense to provide the congressional defense 
committees a briefing on DOD efforts to address anomalous 
health incidents. At a minimum, the briefing shall include:
          (1) An explanation of DOD efforts to investigate, 
        attribute, and mitigate the cause of anomalous health 
        incidents, including any additional resources or 
        authorities needed to enhance such efforts;
          (2) A description of the process used to ensure 
        timely assessment and treatment of U.S. Government 
        personnel that have suffered from an anomalous health 
        incident, including any additional resources or 
        authorities necessary to ensure adequate care for such 
        personnel and their families;
          (3) An articulation of efforts to improve training of 
        personnel most at risk of experiencing anomalous health 
        incidents and to encourage reporting of such incidents 
        when they occur;
          (4) Any other matters deemed relevant by the 
        Secretary.

                       Subtitle G--Other Matters

Commission on the National Defense Strategy (sec. 1061)
    The committee recommends a provision that would establish a 
Commission on the National Defense Strategy (NDS), which would 
be tasked with providing an independent review and assessment 
of the forthcoming NDS. The provision would replicate the same 
structure of the last NDS commission with minor changes.
    The 2018 Commission on the National Defense Strategy, which 
was authorized by the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328), has been a crucial 
resource for this committee. Specifically, the commission's 
report, ``Providing for the Common Defense,'' provided 
bipartisan and independent analysis that has aided the 
committee as it conducts oversight of the NDS issued in 2018. 
Furthermore, the commission's work identified additional policy 
areas that required attention from senior leadership within the 
Department of Defense, including the development of new 
operational concepts and the need to reinvigorate civil-
military relations.
    In addition, the provision would authorize the commission 
to draw on an independent, non-governmental institution to 
augment the analytical capability available to the commission. 
The committee notes the use of the United States Institute of 
Peace as a coordinating agent of commission reports over the 
last decade. In selecting a potential facilitator for the 
commission under this provision, the Department should give 
full consideration to the past performance of independent 
entities and relevant expertise in national security and 
military affairs.
    Finally, in light of the valuable contribution of the 
previous commission, the committee expects the Department to 
fully cooperate with the commission that would be established 
under this provision during its review of the next NDS and 
ensure it has the support necessary to fulfill its mandate.
Assessment of requirements for and management of Army three-dimensional 
        terrain data (sec. 1062)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require an 
assessment of joint force requirements for three-dimensional 
(3D) terrain data to achieve Combined Joint All-Domain Command 
and Control, a determination of whether One World Terrain 3D 
geospatial data meets requirements for precision targeting, and 
a determination of the optimum management and funding structure 
for 3D terrain data. The provision would also require the Vice 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Intelligence and Security, and the Secretary of the 
Army to provide a briefing to the congressional defense 
committees not later than 180 days after the enactment of this 
Act on the assessment and determinations.

Modification to Regional Centers for Security Studies (sec. 1063)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 342(b)(2) and section 2611(a)(2) of title 10, United 
States Code, related to regional centers for security studies. 
The committee notes that section 1089 of the William M. (Mac) 
Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2021 (Public Law 116-283) directed the Secretary of Defense to 
submit to the congressional defense committees a plan to 
establish a Department of Defense Regional Center for Security 
Studies for the Arctic, also known as the Ted Stevens Center 
for Arctic Security Studies, and, not earlier than 30 days 
after the submission of such plan and subject to the 
availability of appropriations, authorized the Secretary to 
establish and administer the Center. The committee notes that 
the Secretary made a determination in 2021 to establish the Ted 
Stevens Center for Arctic Security Studies. The committee 
believes the authority pursuant to subsection (b) of section 
1089, specifically the authority of the Secretary to establish 
and administer such a Center, includes the authority to hire or 
appoint personnel necessary to establish and administer the 
Center in a timely manner, to include the hiring or appointment 
of an interim Director.

                       Items of Special Interest


Access to Sensitive Compartmented Information

    The committee notes that, under current Senate policy, 
members of a Senator's personal staff are not eligible for 
access to Sensitive Compartmented Information (SCI). The 
committee believes that access to highly classified information 
is an important part of fulfilling a Senator's legislative and 
oversight responsibilities. Accordingly, the committee 
recommends that the Office of Senate Security review the Senate 
Security Manual and consider revisions that would allow one 
member of each Senator's personal office to be granted access 
to SCI and establish procedures and arrangements with executive 
branch departments and agencies to conduct these personnel 
security clearance investigations and adjudications.

Appreciation for Department of Defense response to the coronavirus 
        pandemic

    The committee expresses its deep condolences for the tragic 
loss of hundreds of thousands of American lives due to the 
devastating impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. This deadly 
disease profoundly affected our lives as individuals, as a 
Nation, and as part of the international community.
    The committee expresses its sincere appreciation for the 
Department of Defense's (DOD) significant contributions to the 
response to COVID-19. As part of this response, over 47,000 
National Guard members mobilized to staff testing centers, 
deliver food, and provide medical and vaccination support. The 
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers constructed 38 new alternate care 
facilities, adding over 17,000 hospital beds to handle the 
surge in patients. DOD personnel assigned to the 
Countermeasures Acceleration Group (CAG), formerly known as 
Operation Warp Speed, and General Gustave F. Perna, who 
provided critical leadership of that group, worked with the 
private sector to scale up the research, development, testing, 
production, and distribution of vaccines throughout the entire 
U.S. population.
    By supporting the production of COVID-19 vaccines and 
expediting their distribution, the CAG's unprecedented efforts 
were critical to ensuring that more than 370 million COVID-19 
vaccine doses were distributed within 6 months of the vaccines' 
emergency use authorizations, saving many thousands of American 
lives. Indeed, as of June 2021, more than half of all American 
adults were fully vaccinated, including more than 75 percent of 
all senior citizens. From the peak of the pandemic in early 
January 2021 through mid-June 2021, COVID-19 case numbers 
dropped by nearly 95 percent nationwide.
    The committee recognizes the efforts of the U.S. Army 
Contracting Command and the Joint Program Office for Chemical, 
Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense (JPEO-CBRND), 
which procured the vaccines that are now being administered 
across the United States.
    The committee further recognizes that there is still more 
work to be done, including inoculating more Americans, 
responding to viral variants, and helping other nations 
suppress the virus. Nevertheless, due to the efforts of the 
Department and, in particular, the CAG significant progress has 
been made and Americans are beginning to return to more 
familiar daily routines.
    The committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
appropriately and fully recognize the extraordinary 
contributions of the personnel of the Department of Defense to 
the COVID-19 response, including the National Guard, the U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers, the Army Contracting Command, the 
JPEO-CBRND, the personnel assigned to the CAG, and General 
Perna for his leadership of that group.

Arctic weather observations

    The committee notes that the 2020 Air Force Arctic Strategy 
highlighted that domain awareness can be improved by expanding 
environmental observations in areas of sparse coverage. To 
achieve this in a cost-effective manner in the domestic Arctic, 
the committee strongly encourages the Air Force to join the 
interagency efforts to enhance and sustain observation of long-
term environmental changes with the Arctic Observing Network-
USArray network partnership.

Assessment of hostile respiratory diseases

    The committee is concerned about the potential threat from 
adversaries seeking to use respiratory diseases in an effort to 
harm servicemembers and civilians. Weaponized respiratory 
diseases are effective at low dosage, have a short incubation 
period in a population of low immunity, are difficult to treat, 
can easily be produced in bulk, are stable in terms of storage, 
and are easily disseminated. Some examples that are frequently 
mentioned include smallpox, tularemia, pneumonic plague, and 
coronaviruses. Additionally, clustered regularly interspaced 
short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) gene-editing technology has 
been available since 2012 and can be used to edit DNA in order 
to enhance the infectivity or lethality of viruses, making 
viruses such as influenza potential weapons as well.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the congressional defense committees 
not later than March 31, 2022. The briefing shall focus on the 
threats associated with the weaponization of respiratory 
diseases in an attempt to cause serious harm to servicemembers 
and their families, both at home and abroad, and the role of 
the Department of Defense in responding to such threats.

Assessment of hostile use of zoonotic diseases

    The committee is concerned about the potential threat from 
adversaries seeking to use foot-and-mouth disease or other 
zoonotic diseases in an effort to disrupt the food supply and 
harm servicemembers and civilians. The committee notes that the 
Army's Veterinary Corps, which is one the Nation's largest 
provider of veterinarians to agencies such as the Department of 
Agriculture in an emergency, is responsible for maintaining 
food safety and animal control at all Department of Defense 
bases. In some overseas locations, the Veterinary Corps 
conducts regular sampling of food and water for monitoring and 
detection of the intentional introduction of diseases. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Secretary of Agriculture and the 
Secretary of Homeland Security, to provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees, not later than March 31, 
2022. The briefing shall focus on the threats associated with 
the intentional introduction of foot-and-mouth disease, or 
other zoonotic or biological pathogens, into the food supply, 
in an attempt to cause serious harm to servicemembers and their 
families, both at home and abroad, and the role of the 
Department of Defense in responding to such threats.

Assessment of missile salvo defense capabilities and capacity

    The committee remains concerned about the threat of high-
volume missile salvo attacks on Joint force critical fixed 
sites and high-value assets. Complex, high-volume, advanced 
missiles salvo attacks are one of the greatest threats to U.S. 
military forces. Strategic competitors are aggressively 
investing in advanced ballistic, supersonic, and hypersonic 
missiles and continue to expand their already large stockpiles 
of these munitions.
    The committee directs the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff, in coordination with the military service chiefs and 
the Commanders of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM) and 
U.S. European Command (EUCOM), to conduct an assessment of 
Joint force capability and capacity to defend against 
anticipated complex, high-volume, advanced missiles salvo 
attacks. The assessment shall be based on a fully informed 
threat assessment of strategic competitor current and emerging 
advanced missiles of anticipated types, numbers, and concepts 
of employment against critical fixed sites, and high-value 
land-based and naval assets.
    Joint force capabilities to be considered in the assessment 
shall include current and developmental missile defense systems 
and advanced emerging capabilities including the hypervelocity 
gun weapon systems, electronic warfare systems, and directed 
energy. The assessment shall analyze specific cases in both the 
INDOPACOM and EUCOM theaters of operation in the context of the 
emerging global Joint Warfighting Concept and the respective 
theater's Joint operational concept. The Vice Chairman shall 
provide a briefing to the Senate Armed Services Committee on 
the assumptions, conduct, and conclusions of the assessment not 
later than January 15, 2022.

Comparative assessment of naval shipbuilding costs

    The committee believes that one aspect of defense strategy 
implementation is a detailed understanding of the relative 
purchasing power for similar weapons systems among the great 
power competitors. To this end, the committee desires a better 
understanding of the comparative costs of naval shipbuilding in 
the United States, China, and Russia.
    Therefore the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to submit, not later than March 1, 2022, a report to the 
congressional defense committees on the comparative costs of 
naval shipbuilding in the United States, China, and Russia. The 
report shall include a comparison of the following costs in the 
United States, China, and Russia:
          (1) The approximate end cost to construct an aircraft 
        carrier, attack submarine, ballistic missile submarine, 
        large surface combatant, small surface combatant, and 
        amphibious ship. For each category of vessel, a 
        description of the key quantitative and qualitative 
        differences of the vessels being assessed with 
        associated cost implications shall be included;
          (2) The approximate cost of key commodities used in 
        naval shipbuilding, including one ton of steel;
          (3) The approximate cost of key labor resources used 
        in naval shipbuilding, including one production labor 
        hour, one electrician labor hour, and one design labor 
        hour;
          (4) The approximate cost of key combat subsystems 
        used in naval vessels, including air and missile 
        defense radars, electronic warfare suites, anti-
        submarine capabilities, and shipboard combat system 
        software. For each category of subsystem, a description 
        of the key quantitative and qualitative differences of 
        the subsystems being assessed with associated cost 
        implications shall be included;
          (5) The approximate cost of key hull, mechanical, and 
        electric subsystems used in naval vessels, including 
        main engines, electrical generators, shafting, and air 
        conditioning systems. For each category of subsystem, a 
        description of the key quantitative and qualitative 
        differences of the subsystems being assessed with 
        associated cost implications shall be included; and
          (6) Other cost drivers in naval shipbuilding, as 
        identified by the Secretary, with the associated costs.
    The report shall be submitted in unclassified form and may 
include a classified annex.

Maritime domain information sharing

    The committee understands that the Department of Defense 
may possess maritime and oceanographic information that may be 
useful to other executive branch agencies. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a report 
to the congressional defense committees, not later than April 
1, 2022, on the extent to which: (1) The Department is sharing 
maritime domain awareness and oceanographic information with 
other executive branch agencies; (2) There are additional 
opportunities to share such information, including on a routine 
basis; and (3) The Congress could provide additional 
authorities to allow greater sharing of information.

Navy capabilities in the Arctic region

    In the January 2021 strategic blueprint for the Arctic, 
titled ``A Blue Arctic,'' the Department of the Navy noted, 
``Without sustained American naval presence and partnerships in 
the Arctic Region, peace and prosperity will be increasingly 
challenged by Russia and China, whose interests and values 
differ dramatically from ours.''
    The committee therefore directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a briefing to the Senate Armed Services Committee on 
the capabilities of the Navy in the Arctic region not later 
than December 1, 2021. The briefing should include: (1) An 
analysis of the naval capabilities of the Department of Defense 
in the Arctic, with a particular emphasis on surface 
capabilities; (2) An analysis of any gaps that exist between 
the Navy's existing capabilities and the ability of the 
Department to fully execute its strategy for the Arctic region; 
(3) An analysis of any gaps in existing naval capabilities that 
require ice-hardening of existing vessels or the construction 
of new vessels to preserve freedom of navigation in the Arctic 
region; (4) An analysis and recommendation regarding which 
naval vessels could be ice-hardened to effectively preserve 
freedom of navigation in the Arctic region, where necessary; 
and (5) An analysis, with particular focus on Navy surface 
ships undergoing design, of the cost increases or schedule 
adjustments that may result from ice-hardening naval vessels.

Navy surface warfare training

    The committee continues to believe that the Navy should 
replace the six YP-676 class yard patrol (YP) craft slated for 
disposal with upgraded YP-703 class craft that incorporate 
modernization, training, and habitability improvements in order 
to increase training opportunities for surface warfare officer 
candidates from all accession sources. Accordingly, the 
committee urges the Secretary of the Navy to release a request 
for proposals for the detail design and construction of 
upgraded YP-703 class craft not later than fiscal year 2023.
    Additionally, the committee believes that significant 
training value may be derived through establishing surface 
warfare training squadrons in fleet concentration areas on the 
East and West Coasts. Accordingly, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to submit to the congressional defense 
committees, not later than February 1, 2022, a report comparing 
potential costs and benefits of establishing such training 
squadrons in Norfolk, Virginia, and San Diego, California. This 
report shall include the following elements:
          (1) An overview of current methods for training 
        surface warfare officers and sailors in shiphandling, 
        navigation, and seamanship skills, with particular 
        focus on the current balance between simulated and 
        real-world experiences during individual (e.g., Basic 
        and Advanced Division Officer Courses), basic, 
        intermediate, and advanced training phases;
          (2) An analysis of the advantages and limitations of 
        the Navy's current preference for simulators for formal 
        training courses in shiphandling, navigation, and 
        seamanship skills;
          (3) A cost estimate, including procurement, 
        operations, and maintenance costs, for each of the 
        following options for increasing real-world experience 
        during surface warfare officer training:
                  (a) re-designating warships scheduled for 
                decommissioning as training vessels;
                  (b) shifting some YP craft from Annapolis, 
                Maryland, to Norfolk, Virginia, and San Diego, 
                California; and
                  (c) new platforms designed specifically to 
                serve as training vessels.
          (4) A cost estimate for establishing one or more 
        training squadrons dedicated to providing shiphandling, 
        navigation, and seamanship training for each of the 
        options described in (3)(a), (3)(b), and (3)(c); and
          (5) Recommendations on how to improve the balance 
        between simulated and real-world training evolutions 
        during the various surface warfare training phases.

Overseas contingency operations budget exhibits

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense (DOD) 
did not include the Overseas Contingency Operations account in 
the budget request for fiscal year 2022 and instead requested 
funding for direct and enduring war-related costs in the base 
budget. This resulted in difficulties in preparing the annual 
congressional justification books due to uncertainty regarding 
the presentation of funding lines previously delivered in the 
Overseas Contingency Operations budget. The inclusion of both 
direct and enduring war-related costs organized by 
appropriation account in the justification books does not 
provide the Congress and the public with the appropriate level 
of detail and transparency regarding war-related costs.
    Therefore, the committee encourages the Under Secretary of 
Defense (Comptroller) to provide separate budget exhibits for 
direct war-related costs and for enduring war-related costs, 
not separated by appropriations account, as the Department of 
Defense prepares the budget request for fiscal year 2023.

                  TITLE XI--CIVILIAN PERSONNEL MATTERS

Civilian personnel management (sec. 1101)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 129 of title 10, United States Code, to make technical 
clarifications concerning the management of civilian personnel 
of the Department of Defense.
Consideration of employee performance in reductions in force for 
        civilian positions in the Department of Defense (sec. 1102)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1597 of title 10, United States Code, to require that 
employee performance be among the factors considered by the 
Department of Defense in the case of employee reductions, 
rather than the primary factor.
Enhancement of recusal for conflicts of personal interest requirements 
        for Department of Defense officers and employees (sec. 1103)
    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
Department of Defense officers and employees from participating 
personally and substantially in matters that the officer or 
employee knows, or reasonably should know, is likely to have a 
direct and predictable effect on the financial interests of (1) 
Any organization for which the officer or employee has served 
in the past 4 years; (2) A former direct competitor or client 
of any organization for which the officer or employee has 
served in the past 4 years; or (3) Any employer with whom the 
officer or employee is seeking employment.
Authority to employ civilian faculty members at the Defense Institute 
        of International Legal Studies (sec. 1104)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1595 of title 10, United States Code, to authorize the 
Secretary of Defense to employ and pay faculty at the Defense 
Institute of International Legal Studies as the Secretary 
considers necessary.
Extension of temporary increase in maximum amount of voluntary 
        separation incentive pay authorized for civilian employees of 
        the Department of Defense (sec. 1105)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1107 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) to extend the temporary 
increase in the maximum amount of voluntary separation 
incentive pay authorized to be paid to civilian employees of 
the Department of Defense.
One-year extension of temporary authority to grant allowances, 
        benefits, and gratuities to civilian personnel on official duty 
        in a combat zone (sec. 1106)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend by 1 
year the discretionary authority of the head of a Federal 
agency to provide allowances, benefits, and gratuities 
comparable to those provided to members of the Foreign Service 
to the agency's civilian employees on official duty in a combat 
zone.
One-year extension of authority to waive annual limitation on premium 
        pay and aggregate limitation on pay for Federal civilian 
        employees working overseas (sec. 1107)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1101 of the Duncan Hunter National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 (Public Law 110-417), as 
most recently amended by section 1105 of the William M. (Mac) 
Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2021 (Public Law 116-283), to extend through 2022 the authority 
of heads of executive agencies to waive the limitation on the 
aggregate of basic and premium pay of employees who perform 
work in an overseas location that is in the area of 
responsibility of the Commander, U.S. Central Command 
(CENTCOM), or in a location that was formerly in CENTCOM but 
has been moved to the area of responsibility of the Commander, 
U.S. Africa Command, in support of a military operation or an 
operation in response to a declared emergency.
Pilot program on direct hire authority for spouses of members of the 
        uniformed services at locations outside the United States (sec. 
        1108)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to conduct a pilot program to appoint, 
without regard to the provisions of subchapter I of chapter 33 
of title 5, United States Code (other than sections 3303 and 
3328 of such chapter), certain dependents of members of the 
uniformed services stationed at a duty station outside of the 
United States to a competitive position within the Department 
of Defense.
Civilian Cybersecurity Reserve pilot project at United States Cyber 
        Command (sec. 1109)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Commander, U.S. Cyber Command, to conduct a temporary pilot 
program establishing a civilian cybersecurity reserve, to 
include the exercise of alternative employment authority, not 
subject to the Office of Personnel Management, to establish 
qualification requirements for, recruitment of, and appointment 
to positions, and classifying positions.

                       Items of Special Interest

Limiting the number of local wage areas defined within a pay locality
    The committee notes that the Office of Personnel Management 
(OPM) is responsible for overseeing the implementation and 
administration of the Federal Wage System (FWS) in consultation 
with other agencies, appropriate labor organizations, and the 
advice of the Federal Prevailing Rate Advisory Committee 
(FPRAC). Since 2010, the FPRAC has voted three times to 
recommend that OPM align FWS wage areas with General Schedule 
locality pay areas across the country. OPM has not implemented 
these recommendations. The committee encourages the 
administration and OPM to address this longstanding issue as 
soon as possible.

             TITLE XII--MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS

                  Subtitle A--Assistance and Training

Authority to build capacity for additional operations (sec. 1201)
    The committee recommends a provision that would modify the 
authority under section 333 of title 10, United States Code, to 
clarify that the purposes for which security assistance may be 
provided include building the capacity of foreign national 
security forces to conduct counter-illicit trafficking 
operations.
    The committee notes the potential impact of extreme weather 
and changing environmental conditions on building and 
sustaining partner capacity and encourages the Department of 
Defense to take environmental resiliency into consideration in 
the development and execution of small-scale construction 
programs under the section 333 authority.
Administrative support and payment of certain expenses for covered 
        foreign defense personnel (sec. 1202)
    The committee recommends a provision that would add a new 
section 334 to title 10, United States Code, to authorize the 
Secretary of Defense to provide administrative services and 
support to foreign personnel assigned to the United Nations 
Command in the Republic of Korea.
Authority for certain reimbursable interchange of supplies and services 
        (sec. 1203)
    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 2571 of title 10, United States Code, for purposes of 
providing assistance to a foreign partner under certain 
specified security cooperation authorities. Existing law under 
section 2571 allows a department or organization within the 
Department of Defense (DOD) to perform work or services for, or 
furnish supplies to, any other DOD department or organization, 
without reimbursement or transfer of funds. The provision would 
allow for the interchange of supplies and services under 
section 2571 with reimbursement for purposes of providing 
assistance to a foreign partner pursuant to section 333 or 
section 345 of title 10, United States Code, and such a 
reimbursable order would be deemed an obligation in the same 
manner as an order placed under section 6307 of title 41, 
United States Code.
Extension and modification of Department of Defense support for 
        stabilization activities in national security interest of the 
        United States (sec. 1204)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
through December 31, 2023, the authority under section 1210A of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 
(Public Law 116-92) for Department of Defense support to 
stabilization activities in the national security interest of 
the United States. The provision would also modify the section 
1210A authority to allow the Department of Defense to provide 
support to stabilization activities in countries or regions 
that were prioritized under the Global Fragility Act of 2019.
Temporary authority to pay for personnel expenses of foreign national 
        security forces participating in the training program of the 
        United States-Colombia Action Plan for Regional Security (sec. 
        1205)
    The committee recommends a provision that would 
temporarily, for fiscal year 2022, authorize the Secretary of 
Defense to pay the personnel expenses of foreign national 
security forces to participate in the training program of the 
United States-Colombia Action Plan (USCAP) for Regional 
Security conducted at institutions in Colombia.
    The committee notes that the USCAP for Regional Security 
has contributed to U.S. national security interests by building 
the capacity of friendly foreign security forces to conduct 
missions for countering transnational criminal organizations. 
By covering the costs for foreign security forces to attend 
Colombian training programs, the Department of Defense is able 
to leverage these partner institutions to certify the 
capabilities of third country forces at lower cost than if the 
United States were undertaking the training of these forces 
itself.
    The Commander, U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM), has 
indicated that the Department of Defense currently lacks a 
permanent authority to pay the expenses of foreign security 
forces to attend training programs at non-U.S. institutions. 
While this provision would temporarily address this gap for the 
USCAP, the committee urges the Department to consult with the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives on how to address this situation in the 
SOUTHCOM area and potentially in other geographic combatant 
commands as well.
Security cooperation strategy for certain combatant commands (sec. 
        1206)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of 
State, to develop and implement security cooperation strategies 
for each geographic combatant command. Each security 
cooperation strategy would include: (1) A statement of 
strategic objectives; (2) The primary lines of effort of the 
combatant command; (3) The key authorities of the Department of 
Defense (DOD) used for each line of effort; (4) The 
institutional capacity-building programs and activities within 
the combatant command; and (5) A description of how the 
development, planning, and implementation of DOD security 
cooperation programs are being coordinated and deconflicted 
with the security assistance authorities of the Department of 
State and other civilian agencies. The initial security 
cooperation strategies would be submitted to the appropriate 
committees of the Congress 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, and then submitted annually through 
2027, concurrently with the report required pursuant to section 
386(a) of title 10, United States Code.
Plan for enhancing Western Hemisphere security cooperation (sec. 1207)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require, 
not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act, that the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the 
Secretary of State, submit to the appropriate committees of the 
Congress a detailed plan for enhancing security cooperation in 
the Western Hemisphere.
Pilot program to support the implementation of the Women, Peace, and 
        Security Act of 2017 (sec. 1208)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Secretary of 
State, to carry out a pilot program to conduct assessments on 
the barriers and opportunities with respect to strengthening 
recruitment, employment, development, retention, and promotion 
of women in the military forces of various partner countries 
during the course of security assistance activities.
Limitation on support to military forces of the Kingdom of Morocco for 
        bilateral or multilateral exercises (sec. 1209)
    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the use of Department of Defense funds to support the 
participation of the military forces of the Kingdom of Morocco 
for bilateral or multilateral exercises, unless the Secretary 
determines and certifies to the congressional defense 
committees that the Kingdom of Morocco has taken steps to 
support a final peace agreement with Western Sahara. The 
provision would also include the authority for the Secretary to 
waive the limitation, if such participation is determined to be 
important to the national security interests of the United 
States.

        Subtitle B--Matters Relating to Afghanistan and Pakistan

Extension and modification of authority for support for reconciliation 
        activities led by the Government of Afghanistan and prohibition 
        on use of funds for the Taliban and other terrorist groups 
        (sec. 1211)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authorization for the Department of Defense to provide support 
for Government of Afghanistan-led reconciliation activities. 
The provision would modify the existing authority to allow for 
covered support to be provided both inside Afghanistan and in 
Afghanistan's near abroad if the Secretary of Defense 
determined in coordination with the Secretary of State that it 
was in the national security interests of the United States. 
The provision modifies reporting with regards to the authority 
to be initiated only if the covered support is provided.
Extension and modification of authority for reimbursement of certain 
        coalition nations for support provided to United States 
        military operations (sec. 1212)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authority for reimbursement of certain coalition nations for 
support provided to U.S. military operations through December 
31, 2022.
Afghanistan Security Forces Fund (sec. 1213)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriation of funds for the Afghanistan Security Forces 
Fund for fiscal year 2022. The committee believes that 
continued support for the Afghan security forces, even beyond 
the transition of United States and coalition nations from the 
country, is vital to achieving stability and security in 
Afghanistan and preventing another major terrorist attack 
emanating from Afghanistan. The committee further recommends 
that the Secretary of Defense report to the congressional 
defense committees regarding plans for providing support to the 
Afghan security forces once United States and coalition partner 
nations transition from the country. In addition, the provision 
would require that not more than $1.0 billion of the funds 
authorized be expended until the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the heads of other appropriate agencies, 
reports on certain metrics regarding the delivery of assistance 
and that not more than $2.5 billion of assistance be expended 
until indicators of progress are certified.
    The committee notes its strong support for the Special 
Immigrant Visa (SIV) program for Afghans and is concerned about 
the safety and security of applicants once United States forces 
transition from the country. The committee is further concerned 
about ensuring the military has the capability to conduct 
evacuations of Afghans who are vulnerable because of their 
association with the United States if security conditions 
deteriorate rapidly. The committee recommends that, if it is 
determined to be necessary, the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretary of State, should have the 
authority to provide transportation, security, and life 
support, or to reimburse coalition or partner nations for the 
provision of such support and services to certain Afghan 
citizens and their dependents who have been targeted as a 
result of their association with the United States or a 
coalition partner.
Quarterly security briefings on Afghanistan (sec. 1214)
    The committee recommends a provision that would direct the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Policy to provide quarterly 
briefings on the security situation in Afghanistan and the 
Department of Defense's efforts to counter terrorist groups 
beginning not later than January 15, 2022.
Sense of Senate and briefing on counterterrorism posture of the United 
        States after transition of United States Armed Forces from 
        Afghanistan (sec. 1215)
    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate on the United States' presence in the 
region after the transition of United States and coalition 
forces from Afghanistan and would require the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a briefing regarding additional 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance requirements in 
order to continue to conduct counterterrorism operations beyond 
September 11, 2021, by January 15, 2022.

         Subtitle C--Matters Relating to Syria, Iraq, and Iran


Extension and modification of authority to provide assistance to vetted 
        Syrian groups and individuals (sec. 1221)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authority to provide assistance to vetted Syrian groups through 
2022 under section 1209 of the Carl Levin and Howard P. 
``Buck'' McKeon National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291), as amended. The provision would 
also further streamline reporting by eliminating the 
requirement upon meeting each 25 percent threshold expenditure 
increment.

Extension and modification of authority to support operations and 
        activities of the Office of Security Cooperation in Iraq (sec. 
        1222)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authorization for the Office of Security Cooperation in Iraq 
through fiscal year 2022. The committee expects to see 
continued progress on the Office of Security Cooperation in 
Iraq's efforts to transition to a normalized security 
cooperation office and directs the Department of Defense to 
provide an update on progress in implementing this transition 
before obligating or expending more than $10.0 million. The 
committee notes the intent to transition to a normalized 
security cooperation office is consistent with the decrease in 
funding levels in fiscal years 2021 and 2022.

Extension and modification of authority to provide assistance to 
        counter the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (sec. 1223)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authority to provide assistance to Iraq to counter the Islamic 
State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) through December 31, 2022. The 
committee supports continued assistance to the Iraqi Security 
Forces, including the Counter Terrorism Service (CTS) and the 
Ministry of Peshmerga, in order to continue operations to 
ensure the lasting defeat of ISIS.

   Subtitle D--Matters Relating to Europe and the Russian Federation


Extension of limitation on military cooperation between the United 
        States and the Russian Federation (sec. 1231)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 1232(a) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) to extend through fiscal 
year 2022 the limitation on military cooperation between the 
United States and the Russian Federation.

Extension of prohibition on availability of funds relating to 
        sovereignty of the Russian Federation over Crimea (sec. 1232)

    The committee recommends a provision that would state that 
none of the funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act for 
fiscal year 2022 for the Department of Defense may be obligated 
or expended to implement any activity that recognizes the 
sovereignty of the Russian Federation over Crimea.

Extension of Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative (sec. 1233)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
through December 31, 2024, the authority under section 1250 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 
(Public Law 114-92), as amended by section 1244 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-
92), for the Secretary of Defense, with the concurrence of the 
Secretary of State, to provide security assistance, including 
defensive lethal assistance, and intelligence support to 
military and other security forces of the Government of 
Ukraine. The provision would authorize up to $300.0 million in 
fiscal year 2022 to provide security assistance to Ukraine, of 
which $75.0 million would be available only for lethal 
assistance.
    The committee continues to believe that defense 
institutional reforms are critical to sustaining capabilities 
developed using security assistance provided under this and 
other authorities. Moreover, defense institutional reforms will 
ultimately enable a more effective defense of Ukraine's 
sovereignty and territorial integrity and allow Ukraine to 
achieve its full potential as a strategic partner of the United 
States. Therefore, the provision would prohibit the obligation 
or expenditure of 50 percent of the funds authorized to be 
appropriated in fiscal year 2022 under this authority until the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of 
State, certifies that Ukraine has taken substantial action to 
make defense institutional reforms.
    The committee notes that Ukraine has significant organic 
capabilities in its defense industrial base, which should be 
leveraged and enhanced for the purposes of providing for 
Ukraine's self-defense. The committee believes that, in 
developing a program of security assistance for Ukraine, more 
consideration should be given to striking the appropriate 
balance between capabilities that are resident or could be 
developed within Ukraine's organic industrial base and those 
that are most appropriate for United States and other 
multinational partners to provide. As such, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a report by March 
31, 2022, on the Department's approach to whether and how 
consideration is given to the organic sourcing of defense 
articles necessary for Ukraine's security via the Ukrainian 
defense industrial base and, in those instances in which the 
determination was made to provide United States-funded articles 
for which there are the same or equivalent items resident in 
the Ukrainian defense industrial base, the process and the 
criteria by which such determinations were made.

Extension of authority for training for Eastern European national 
        security forces in the course of multilateral exercises (sec. 
        1234)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
through December 31, 2024, the authority provided in section 
1251 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2016 (Public Law 114-92), as amended by section 1247 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public 
Law 116-92), for the Secretary of Defense, with the concurrence 
of the Secretary of State, to provide multilateral or regional 
training, and pay the incremental expenses of participating in 
such training, for countries in Eastern Europe that: (1) Are 
signatories to the Partnership for Peace Framework Documents 
but not members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
(NATO); or (2) Became NATO members after January 1, 1999.

Sense of Senate on the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (sec. 1235)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate that the United States' commitment to the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization is ironclad and would 
emphasize the importance of expanding cooperation on shared 
security challenges.

Sense of Senate on continuing support for Estonia, Latvia, and 
        Lithuania (sec. 1236)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate that the United States should continue to 
prioritize support for the Baltic states of Estonia, Latvia, 
and Lithuania as they build and invest in critical security 
areas. The committee encourages the Department of Defense to 
continue to assess whether any statutory changes, such as the 
authorization of a Baltic Security Initiative, would be 
advisable to address priority capability gaps.

        Subtitle E--Matters Relating to the Indo-Pacific Region


Extension and modification of Indo-Pacific Maritime Security Initiative 
        (sec. 1241)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authority provided by section 1263 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92), as 
amended, known as the Indo-Pacific Maritime Security 
Initiative, through 2027. The provision would also make various 
modifications to the authority intended to focus activities and 
support provided under the authority on multilateral maritime 
security cooperation and maritime domain awareness.

Extension and modification of Pacific Deterrence Initiative (sec. 1242)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
Pacific Deterrence Initiative (PDI), authorized by section 1251 
of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283), 
through fiscal year 2022.
    The committee reiterates its strong support for the PDI as 
means to prioritize Department of Defense efforts in support of 
enhancing U.S. deterrence and defense posture, reassuring 
allies and partners, and increasing readiness and capability in 
the Indo-Pacific region, primarily west of the International 
Date Line. The committee notes that the PDI budget request for 
fiscal year 2022 was overly focused on platforms, including the 
DDG-51, T-AO fleet oiler, and F-35, as opposed to improving the 
joint posture and enabling capabilities necessary to enhance 
deterrence in the Indo-Pacific region. The committee looks 
forward to continuing to work with the Department of Defense to 
ensure congressional intent is more appropriately reflected in 
future budget requests.

Extension of authority to transfer funds for Bien Hoa dioxin cleanup 
        (sec. 1243)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authority of the Secretary of Defense to transfer up to $15.0 
million to the Secretary of State for the Bien Hoa dioxin 
cleanup in Vietnam through fiscal year 2022.

Cooperative program with Vietnam to account for Vietnamese personnel 
        missing in action (sec. 1244)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the heads of 
other relevant Federal departments and agencies, to carry out a 
cooperative program with the Government of Vietnam to assist in 
accounting for Vietnamese personnel missing in action. The 
authority to carry out such a program would expire on October 
1, 2026.

Assessment of and plan for improving the defensive asymmetric 
        capabilities of Taiwan (sec. 1245)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the heads of other 
relevant Federal departments and agencies, to provide the 
appropriate committees of the Congress an assessment of 
Taiwan's defensive asymmetric capabilities and a plan for 
assisting Taiwan with the improvement of such capabilities.

Annual feasibility briefing on cooperation between the National Guard 
        and Taiwan (sec. 1246)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to provide the congressional defense 
committees with an annual briefing on the feasibility and 
advisability of enhanced cooperation between the National Guard 
and Taiwan.

Defense of Taiwan (sec. 1247)

    The committee recommends a provision that would state that 
it shall be the policy of the United States to maintain the 
ability of the United States Armed Forces to deny a fait 
accompli against Taiwan in order to deter the People's Republic 
of China from using military force to unilaterally change the 
status quo with Taiwan.

Comparative analyses and report on efforts by the United States and the 
        People's Republic of China to advance critical modernization 
        technology with respect to military applications (sec. 1248)

    The committee recommends a provision that would direct the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering to: (1) 
Develop procedures to enable the Department of Defense to 
establish comparative analysis capabilities; and (2) Complete a 
comparative analysis assessment of critical modernization 
technology in five specified areas.
    The committee believes that development of critical 
technologies with military applications is a key component of 
strategic competition with China. Furthermore, the committee 
believes that a comparative analysis of United States and 
Chinese efforts to determine whether the United States has a 
competitive advantage, or alternatively a competitive 
disadvantage, as it relates to efforts of research, 
development, and application of critical technologies for 
military applications will help to underpin Department of 
Defense efforts and investments in this critical dimension of 
competition with China.
    The committee notes the expertise of the Strategic 
Intelligence Analysis Cell (SIAC) within the office of the 
Deputy Director for Engineering in conducting technological 
comparative analyses. The committee also believes the Office of 
Net Assessment, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, and 
federally funded research development and engineering centers 
have relevant experience and expertise to support this effort.
    The committee understands there are cultural and 
organizational constraints to the execution of such an analysis 
and intends for the directed reports to be an initial effort in 
what should be a longer-term effort of continuous evaluation.
    The committee acknowledges the difficulty of fully 
assessing such a comprehensive topic, but believes the value of 
a comparative analysis to help inform future efforts is 
critical to winning the strategic competition with China. The 
committee recognizes in-depth comparative analysis may require 
additional resources for proper execution over the longer term.

Modification of annual report on military and security developments 
        involving the People's Republic of China (sec. 1249)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
requirement for the Secretary of Defense to produce an annual 
report on military and security developments involving the 
People's Republic of China, established by section 1202(a) of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000 
(Public Law 106-65), as amended, through January 31, 2027, and 
streamline the elements of the required report.

Feasibility report on establishing more robust military-to-military 
        crisis communications with the People's Republic of China (sec. 
        1250)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the heads of other 
relevant Federal departments and agencies, to provide the 
appropriate committees of Congress a report, not later than 180 
days after the date of the enactment of this Act, on the 
feasibility and advisability of establishing more robust 
military-to-military communications with China to enable clear 
transmission of messages, avoid misunderstandings, reduce the 
possibility of miscalculation, and manage potential escalation 
in crisis situations.

Semiannual briefings on efforts to deter Chinese aggression and 
        military coercion (sec. 1251)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, not later than January 15, 2022, and 
every 180 days thereafter through 2024, to provide a briefing 
to the congressional defense committees on Department of 
Defense (DOD) efforts to deter Chinese aggression and military 
coercion.
    The committee notes that the DOD announced a new directive 
implementing the recommendations of the DOD China Task Force on 
June 9, 2021. The committee supports changes by the Department 
to better focus its efforts to counter Chinese aggression and 
military coercion and more effectively contribute to the whole-
of-government strategy. The committee looks forward to working 
collaboratively with the Department on these efforts.

Sense of Congress on defense alliances and partnerships in the Indo-
        Pacific region (sec. 1252)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Congress on the importance of defense alliances 
and partnerships in the Indo-Pacific region.

                          Subtitle F--Reports


Report on security cooperation authorities and associated resourcing in 
        support of the Security Force Assistance Brigades (sec. 1261)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit, not later than 90 days after 
the date of the enactment of this Act, to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives a 
report assessing the adequacy of existing Department of Defense 
security cooperation authorities and associated resources for 
supporting the ability of the Army's Security Force Assistance 
Brigades to meet the security cooperation requirements of the 
combatant commands, and identifying any gaps in those 
authorities or associated resourcing.

Independent assessment with respect to Arctic region and establishment 
        of Arctic Security Initiative (sec. 1262)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require, 
not later than February 15, 2022, an assessment with respect to 
the activities and resources required to integrate and 
implement the Department of Defense-wide and military service-
specific strategies with respect to the Arctic region. The 
provision would also require the Secretary of Defense to submit 
a plan for the establishment of an Arctic Security Initiative 
(ASI) to support such strategies, and to establish an ASI not 
later than fiscal year 2023.

Annual report and briefing on Global Force Management Allocation Plan 
        (sec. 1263)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to provide an annual classified report 
summarizing the Global Force Management Allocation Plan for the 
year in which the report is submitted. The provision would also 
require an annual classified briefing describing the major 
modifications to global force allocation for each fiscal year. 
The provision would require the Secretary to submit the report 
and provide the briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of 
the Senate and the House of Representatives not later than 
October 31, 2022, and annually thereafter through 2024.

                       Subtitle G--Others Matters


Modification of United States-Israel Operations-Technology cooperation 
        within the United States-Israel Defense Acquisition Advisory 
        Group (sec. 1271)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1299M of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-
283) to require the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with 
the Secretary of State, to take actions within the United 
States-Israel Defense Acquisition Advisory Group to provide a 
standing forum in which the United States and Israel can share 
intelligence, identify military capability requirements common 
to the Department of Defense and the Ministry of Defense of 
Israel, assist defense suppliers in the United States and 
Israel, develop combined United States-Israel plans for weapon 
systems and military capabilities, and seek ways to broaden 
Israeli cooperation with signatories to the Abraham Accords, 
Egypt, and Jordan.

Prohibition on support for offensive military operations against the 
        Houthis in Yemen (sec. 1272)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
support for the Saudi-led coalition's offensive operations 
against Ansar Allah, generally known as the Houthis, in Yemen, 
including for coalition strikes, which is consistent with 
President Biden's February 2021 announcement ending all 
American support for offensive operations in the war in Yemen. 
The committee also condemns Ansar Allah's destabilizing tactics 
including the use of missiles and unmanned aerial vehicles 
against the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and their military assault 
on Marib. The provision would ensure that the President 
maintains the authority to support counterterrorism efforts in 
Yemen by Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, as well as 
the authority to protect civilians, including United States 
citizens, from attacks. The provision would also require a 
report on the role of both Ansar Allah and Saudi Arabia in the 
obstruction of humanitarian aid in Yemen.

Repeal of authorization of non-conventional assisted recovery 
        capabilities; modification of authority for expenditure of 
        funds for clandestine activities that support operational 
        preparation of the environment (sec. 1273)

    The committee recommends a provision that would repeal 
section 943 of the Duncan Hunter National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2009 (Public Law 110-417), as amended, on 
December 31, 2022, and require a plan for transitioning the 
funding for non-conventional assisted recovery capabilities to 
the authority provided by section 127f of title 10, United 
States Code, for activities that support operational 
preparation of the environment.
    The committee continues to support the requirement for non-
conventional assisted recovery activities by the geographic 
combatant commands but believes the authority provided by 
section 127f of title 10, United States Code, is more 
appropriate for such purposes. Furthermore, the committee 
believes a deliberate transition of such activities to a 
standing title 10 authority will provide the Department of 
Defense with more predictability and improve congressional 
oversight of the range of activities contributing to 
operational preparation of the environment. The committee 
expects that regular reporting on non-conventional assisted 
recovery activities will continue unchanged, including the 
level of specificity required by section 943 of the Duncan 
Hunter National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009.

Extension and modification of authority for certain payments to redress 
        injury and loss (sec. 1274)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
section 1213 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) through December 31, 2023, 
and require the Secretary of Defense to establish procedures to 
receive, evaluate, and respond to allegations of civilian harm 
not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act.
    As the Department of Defense works to establish such 
procedures, the committee encourages the Secretary to continue 
the past practice of robust engagement with nongovernmental 
organizations that focus on addressing civilian harm in 
conflict. The Secretary should also consider whether there is a 
need for a federally funded research and development center to 
study past practices and assess options for the U.S. response 
to incidents of civilian harm.

Secretary of Defense Strategic Competition Initiative (sec. 1275)

    The committee recommends a provision that would establish 
an initiative, to be known as the Secretary of Defense 
Strategic Competition Initiative, that the Secretary of Defense 
may use to fund Department of Defense (DOD) activities and 
programs that advance U.S. national security objectives in the 
strategic competition with near-peer rivals China and Russia. 
The purpose of the initiative is to support DOD efforts to 
compete at the strategic level across domains with near-peer 
rivals, including emergent or unanticipated requirements; 
counter coercion by near-peer rivals targeting U.S. allies and 
partners in competition short of armed conflict; and integrate 
with, support, and enable other Federal departments and 
agencies to advance U.S. influence and interests.
    The committee notes that elsewhere in this Act is a 
recommended increase of $20.0 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide, for the Office of the Secretary of 
Defense for the Secretary of Defense Strategic Competition 
Initiative.

Strategic competition initiative for United States Southern Command and 
        United States Africa Command (sec. 1276)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to develop and carry out an initiative 
to support programs and activities for long-term strategic 
competition with near-peer rivals the People's Republic of 
China and the Russian Federation in the areas of responsibility 
of U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) and U.S. Africa Command 
(AFRICOM). The provision would require the Secretary of 
Defense, in consultation with the Commanders of SOUTHCOM and 
AFRICOM, to develop and submit to the congressional defense 
committees a plan for the initiative. The initiative would be 
implemented through the Department's security cooperation and 
other existing authorities.

Modification of notification requirements for sensitive military 
        operations (sec. 1277)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify the 
notification requirements for sensitive military operations 
contained in section 130f of title 10, United States Code, to 
include operations conducted by the Armed Forces to free an 
individual from the control of hostile foreign forces.
    The committee appreciates the Department of Defense's 
efforts to refine and improve the process required for 
notification of sensitive military operations to the Congress. 
The committee intends to continue to work with the Department 
to balance the need for timely and substantive notifications of 
sensitive military operations with operational and personnel 
limitations. The committee notes that sensitive military 
operations in Afghanistan, Iraq, and Syria remain exempt from 
the notification requirements under section 130f of title 10, 
United States Code. However, given changes to the nature and 
pace of operations and force levels in Afghanistan, Iraq, and 
Syria, the committee believes that the Department should 
provide notifications for significant sensitive military 
operations in such countries that are consistent with the 
requirements of 130f of title 10, United States Code. Examples 
of significant sensitive military operations include those 
intended to kill or capture high value individuals, to free 
individuals from the control of hostile foreign forces, or high 
operational tempo events to disrupt identified threats.

Special Operations Forces joint operating concept for competition and 
        conflict (sec. 1278)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low 
Intensity Conflict and the Commander of U.S. Special Operations 
Command to jointly submit to the congressional defense 
committees a special operations forces joint operating concept 
for competition and conflict not later than 180 days after the 
date of enactment of this Act.

Plan for provision of information support to commanders of the 
        combatant commands (sec. 1279)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require, 
not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act, the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence and 
Security, in coordination with the Director of National 
Intelligence, to develop a plan for more effectively fulfilling 
the intelligence and information requirements of the combatant 
commands in support of efforts to expose and counter foreign 
malign influence, coercion, and subversion. The provision would 
also require the Comptroller General of the United States, 
within 45 days of the submission of the required plan, to 
conduct an assessment of the sufficiency of the plan for 
meeting the requirements of the combatant commands.

Independent review of and report on the Unified Command Plan (sec. 
        1280)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to provide for an independent review of 
the current Unified Command Plan. The review shall consider 
current and anticipated threats and an evaluation of the 
missions and responsibilities of each geographic and functional 
combatant command. The Secretary shall submit the review to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives not later than October 1, 2022.

Establishment of mission-oriented pilot programs to close significant 
        capabilities gaps (sec. 1281)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish, within the Strategic 
Capabilities Office, mission integration pilot programs with 
the objective of closing significant capabilities gaps by 
synchronizing and integrating missions across services and 
Field agencies. The pilot programs would be aligned to high 
importance operational challenges for U.S. European Command and 
U.S. Indo-Pacific Command and would be designed to leverage 
industry cost sharing, including private equity and venture 
capital, to develop underlying technology and overall 
capability for delivery to the joint force within 5 years. The 
provision would require the head of the Strategic Capabilities 
Office to provide reports every 180 days, beginning 10 days 
after the date of the enactment of this Act, to the 
congressional defense committees on the pilot programs. 
Finally, the provision would require the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a recommendation to the congressional defense 
committees with respect to continuing or expanding the pilot 
program not later than 2 years after the date of the enactment 
of this Act and would allow the Secretary to transition 
responsibility for the pilot programs to another organization 
beginning in fiscal year 2025.

Limitation on availability of certain funding for operation and 
        maintenance (sec. 1282)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the obligation or expenditure of more than 75 percent of the 
funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act for the Office 
of the Secretary of Defense until 15 days after the Secretary 
submits the following to the congressional defense committees:
          (1) The report on the comprehensive Department of 
        Defense policy on collective self-defense required by 
        section 1754 of the National Defense Authorization Act 
        for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92);
          (2) The first quarterly report on Department of 
        Defense Execute Orders required by section 1744 of the 
        National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
        2020; and
          (3) The report on the policy of the Department of 
        Defense relating to civilian casualties resulting from 
        U.S. military operations required by section 936 of the 
        John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for 
        Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232).

                       Items of Special Interest


Assessment of China-Russia Security Cooperation

    The committee directs the Director of the Defense 
Intelligence Agency, in coordination with the heads of other 
relevant Federal departments and agencies, to complete a 
qualitative and, to the degree practicable, a quantitative 
assessment of the extent to which China and Russia have engaged 
in security cooperation over the last five years.
    Additionally, the committee directs the Director of the 
Defense Intelligence Agency to provide the congressional 
defense and intelligence committees a briefing on the results 
of the required assessment not later than April 1, 2022. At a 
minimum, the required briefing shall include an analysis of:
          (1) The size and duration of combined military 
        exercises involving both Chinese and Russian forces;
          (2) Sales of arms and provision of military services 
        between China and Russia;
          (3) Exchanges of military personnel or attendance at 
        professional education courses or training facilities;
          (4) Cooperative research and development on 
        technologies with military applications;
          (5) Defense planning at the strategic, operational, 
        or tactical level;
          (6) The results of any security dialogues or 
        agreements, including any notable changes in 
        information sharing or troop posture;
          (7) The expected general trajectory of security 
        cooperation between China and Russia over the next five 
        years and the objectives of such security cooperation 
        for each nation; and
          (8) Any other matters the Director deems appropriate.

Briefing on efforts to provide credible options to respond to the use 
        of force by China to alter the status quo with respect to 
        Taiwan

    The committee believes that the Department of Defense has 
appropriately identified China as the pacing threat for the 
U.S. military. The committee also believes the U.S. military 
should be appropriately postured and possess capabilities 
required to deter and, if necessary, respond to the use of 
force by China to alter the status quo with respect to Taiwan, 
including to prevent a so-called ``fait accompli'' scenario. 
Given the rapid pace of Chinese investment in advanced military 
technology and technology with significant military 
applications, the Department of Defense must develop and field 
the capabilities necessary to maintain a qualitative edge with 
respect to China, deter aggression, and provide credible 
response options in the event of a contingency with respect to 
Taiwan.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
not later than October 1, 2021, to provide the congressional 
defense committees a briefing on Department of Defense efforts 
to deter and, if necessary, provide the President with credible 
options to respond to the use of force by China to alter the 
status quo with respect to Taiwan. At a minimum, the briefing 
shall include:
          (1) An explanation of current U.S. military force 
        posture in the Indo-Pacific region west of the 
        International Date Line and planned enhancements that 
        will improve the resilience of U.S. forces to Chinese 
        aggression, including through dispersal and 
        disaggregation, while preserving options to respond;
          (2) An evaluation of the adequacy of the combat 
        capability and capacity of extant and planned major 
        U.S. weapons system platforms to compete against 
        current and anticipated Chinese weapons systems between 
        now and 2035;
          (3) An assessment of the current logistics 
        capabilities and capacities that identifies any gaps or 
        vulnerabilities, including in the areas of:
                  (a) pre-positioned forward stocks of 
                munitions;
                  (b) pre-positioned forward stocks of fuel as 
                well as storage and distribution;
                  (c) distributed maintenance; and
                  (d) logistics command and control; and
          (4) Any other matters the Secretary deems 
        appropriate.

Comptroller General review of European Deterrence Initiative

    The committee remains strongly in support of the objectives 
of the European Deterrence Initiative (EDI), which include: 
enhancing the United States' deterrence posture, increasing the 
readiness and responsiveness of U.S. forces in Europe, 
supporting the collective defense and security of North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) allies, and bolstering the 
security and capacity of U.S. allies and partners. The 
committee notes that it has been 7 years since the EDI was 
first proposed and believes it is appropriate to review the 
Initiative's progress in fulfilling its mission and 
programmatic objectives. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Comptroller General of the United States to conduct a review of 
the EDI. At a minimum, the review should:
          (1) Outline the EDI's stated objectives, including 
        any changes in those stated objectives over the course 
        of the Initiative;
          (2) Assess the extent to which EDI funding has 
        aligned with those objectives and describe the extent 
        to which the stated objectives have been fulfilled;
          (3) Describe changes to U.S. military posture in 
        Europe since 2014 and evaluate the extent to which the 
        Department of Defense (DOD)'s planning for posture 
        initiatives funded under the EDI adequately estimates 
        their long-term costs and communicates their estimated 
        costs to the Congress;
          (4) Describe the mechanisms, if any, the DOD has 
        established to maintain oversight of funding for EDI 
        efforts in the event of the transition from Overseas 
        Contingency Operations funding to base budget funding;
          (5) Assess the extent to which DOD programming under 
        the EDI has shifted to account for the reemergence of 
        long-term strategic competition with China and Russia; 
        and
          (6) Any other matters deemed relevant by the 
        Comptroller General.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
brief the Senate Armed Services Committee on the results of the 
review not later than March 1, 2022, and issue a report to 
follow at a time agreed to subsequent to the briefing.

Comptroller General review of logistics in the European theater

    The committee notes that in the event of a conflict in 
Europe, it will be necessary to rapidly move reinforcements and 
materiel from the United States or elsewhere to the European 
theater. The joint force will likely be called upon to open 
ports or airfield locations; establish staging bases; conduct 
reception, staging, onward movement, and integration operations 
(RSOI) for forces entering the theater; and coordinate with 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) allies and partners 
for transit and synchronization of transportation assets. In 
September 2019, NATO established a new Joint Support and 
Enabling Command (JSEC) in Ulm, Germany, responsible for 
coordinating and safeguarding the movement of Allied forces and 
equipment across European borders. However, the committee is 
concerned that further work is necessary to build, train, and 
integrate these capabilities. Therefore, the committee directs 
the Comptroller General of the United States to conduct a 
review of plans, training, and integration of efforts to ensure 
fast and efficient movement of forces and equipment to and 
within the European theater. At a minimum, the review should 
assess:
          (1) The extent to which the Department of Defense has 
        integrated its planning and operations with the new 
        NATO JSEC;
          (2) Any actions the Department is taking to address 
        concerns about the availability of transportation 
        assets, to include contracted commercial trucking, in 
        the event of a conflict in Europe;
          (3) The Army's current capacity to meet potential 
        wartime demands for port opening and RSOI missions;
          (4) The Army's efforts to increase the overall 
        readiness of its early deploying sustainment forces 
        since fiscal year 2018, in particular for port opening, 
        RSOI, and other missions performed early in a conflict;
          (5) The extent to which early deploying sustainment 
        forces train to perform wartime missions under 
        conditions reflecting high intensity combat, including 
        training on functions required early in combat;
          (6) The planning, training, and equipping across the 
        joint force for deploying a combat force through 
        austere ports or airfield locations; and
          (7) Any other matters deemed relevant by the 
        Comptroller General.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide an interim briefing to the Senate Armed Services 
Committee on the results of the review not later than May 1, 
2022, and issue a report to follow at a time agreed to 
subsequent to the briefing.

Comptroller General review of the approval process for contact between 
        Department of Defense personnel and Chinese government 
        officials

    The committee directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to review the process used by the Department of Defense 
(DOD) to evaluate, and approve or deny, proposals for contact 
between DOD personnel and Chinese government officials. At a 
minimum, the review shall include:
          (1) An identification of the laws and policies 
        governing contacts between DOD personnel and Chinese 
        government officials, including those contacts made in 
        pursuit of official responsibilities and under any 
        other circumstances;
          (2) An articulation of the current process used by 
        the Department of Defense to evaluate, approve, or deny 
        proposals for contact between Department of Defense 
        personnel and Chinese government officials; and
          (3) Any other matters deemed relevant by the 
        Comptroller General.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
brief the congressional defense committees on the results of 
the review, not later than March 1, 2022, and issue a report to 
follow at a time agreed to subsequent to the briefing.

Cyber cooperation with Vietnam, Thailand, and Indonesia

    The committee notes that the William M. (Mac) Thornberry 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public 
Law 116-283) authorized the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Secretary of State, to establish a pilot 
program in Vietnam, Thailand, and Indonesia to enhance their 
cyber security, resilience, and readiness through December 31, 
2024. Additionally, the committee understands that U.S. Indo-
Pacific Command (INDOPACOM) is working with the Defense 
Security Cooperation Agency (DSCA) and the Department of State 
to design and implement this program. The committee continues 
to believe this pilot project is a worthwhile endeavor and 
opportunity to strengthen bilateral and multilateral engagement 
with partners in the Indo-Pacific region. Lastly, the committee 
notes that the budget request includes more than $2.0 billion 
for this and other security cooperation activities administered 
by DSCA, and the committee looks forward to continued 
engagement with the Department of Defense as spending 
priorities are established for these funds.

Defense cooperation with Taiwan

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, not later 
than March 1, 2022, to provide a briefing to the congressional 
defense committees on the advisability and feasibility of 
increasing United States defense cooperation with Taiwan, 
including increasing Taiwan's military readiness through the 
participation of Taiwan military personnel in joint military 
exchanges and exercises including, but not limited to, 
humanitarian assistance and disaster relief; enhancing academic 
and professional military education opportunities; supporting 
key leader engagements and senior leader visits; and other 
efforts deemed relevant by the Secretary.

Developing country definition

    The National Defense Strategy highlights strengthening 
alliances and partnerships as a critical element of the U.S. 
approach to long-term strategic competition with near-peer 
rivals. A critical tool for building these security 
relationships is the set of Department of Defense (DOD) 
security cooperation authorities, including military-to-
military engagements, professional military education, and 
joint training and exercises. The committee understands that 
concerns have been raised within DOD that the definition of 
``developing country'' traditionally used to determine country 
eligibility for assistance under certain security cooperation 
authorities may be outdated. The committee notes that under 
chapter 16 of title 10, United States Code, the Secretary of 
Defense has broad latitude to prescribe and revise the term's 
meaning for purposes of DOD security cooperation authorities. 
The committee is concerned that the current definition overly 
constrains the flexibility of the combatant commanders to build 
defense relationships with key security partners that lack the 
resources to cover the incremental costs of participating in 
security cooperation activities. The committee urges the 
Secretary of Defense to review the current definition of 
``developing country'' and its impact on DOD security 
cooperation programs and activities, and determine whether 
revising that definition would be better aligned with U.S. 
strategic objectives in building alliances and partnerships for 
strategic competition. The Secretary of Defense should consult 
closely with the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives in conducting this review.

Distributed airfields and ports for dispersed operations

    The committee notes that U.S. military access to 
distributed basing locations, airfields, and ports in the Indo-
Pacific region will be critical to operations under the 
developing Joint Warfighting Concept. A network of 
infrastructure with the capability and capacity to support 
military operations is both supported by and reinforces 
bilateral partnerships and alliances that remain a critical 
comparative advantage for the United States over China in long-
term strategic competition.
    Therefore, the committee expects that future investments 
under the Pacific Deterrence Initiative in airfields, ports, 
and other operating locations, including fuel and munitions 
storage and distribution capacity, will be designed to 
facilitate dispersed operations. Furthermore, the committee 
believes investments in distributed military infrastructure 
should also be complemented by other non-military 
infrastructure and development investments using all financing 
options available. These investments would help to counter 
predatory infrastructure development practices of the People's 
Republic of China that seek to undermine the United States' 
network of allies and partners.

Ensuring the safety of America's Afghan allies

    The committee notes the valuable and courageous 
contributions of many Afghan civilians and officials who 
supported United States counterterrorism and stability efforts 
in Afghanistan since 2001. Their efforts saved the lives of 
many U.S. servicemembers and diplomatic personnel, and the 
committee is eternally grateful to them and eager to ensure 
their safety after the withdrawal of U.S. troops.
    The committee is deeply concerned that America's Afghan 
allies will face retaliation after the drawdown is completed. 
There are already reports of Taliban threats targeting those 
who helped the United States, and these threats cannot be 
ignored. As such, the committee encourages and supports the 
Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) program for Afghans. This critical 
program has already brought to the United States over 15,500 
Afghans who served with bravery and honor alongside United 
States troops in support of United States missions in 
Afghanistan.
    In order to best protect the Afghans whose lives remain at 
risk, the committee urges the Biden Administration to implement 
a strategy for ensuring the safety of America's Afghan allies 
as soon as possible, whether through the SIV program or through 
other authorities.

Forward deployed naval forces in Europe

    The committee continues to support additional forward-
basing of U.S. Navy destroyers in Rota, Spain. The ships 
currently stationed in Spain are among the most dynamically-
employed assets of U.S. global maritime presence--performing 
ballistic missile defense missions; carrying out strikes in 
Syria; boosting U.S. presence across the European theater in 
support of allies and partners; and monitoring increasing 
Russian naval activities. At the same time, these ships have 
maintained some of the highest readiness rates of ships in the 
Navy, in part due to rigorous maintenance practices.
    The committee is concerned that increasing Russian naval 
activity in the European theater, which is at its highest level 
since the Cold War, presents a significant challenge to the 
implementation of the National Defense Strategy in the European 
theater. The committee is also aware of the significant 
advances in Russian naval capability, especially in undersea 
warfare.
    Due in part to these developments, the Commander, U.S. 
European Command, testified to the committee in February 2020 
that he supports increasing from four to six the number of 
destroyers based in Rota, Spain. The Commander said that, based 
on the European Deterrence Initiative investments, Rota, Spain, 
facilities could support two more destroyers immediately. He 
also said that the two ships would ``improve our ability to get 
indications and warnings in the potential battle space and also 
dramatically improve our ability to better command and 
control.'' In March 2020, the Chief of Naval Operations also 
endorsed the additional naval presence before the committee. 
The committee finds the arguments of senior defense leadership 
to increase naval presence in Europe, and the mission 
flexibility it would provide, compelling.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Chief of Naval 
Operations and the Commander, U.S. European Command, not later 
than 15 days after the fiscal year 2023 budget request is 
submitted to the Congress, to provide a briefing to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives on the plan to base two additional destroyers 
at Rota, Spain. This brief shall include a detailed 
explanation, by fiscal year, of actions and the associated 
funding that will lead to the forward stationing of six 
destroyers based in Rota as soon as practicable.

Medical support for Ukrainian soldiers

    Section 1234 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) expanded the use of the 
Secretarial Designee Program to provide for Ukrainian soldiers' 
receipt of treatment at Department of Defense military 
treatment facilities when the necessary care cannot be provided 
in Ukraine.
    The committee notes that implementation issues persist with 
regard to covering non-medical expenses in connection with such 
treatment. Such expenses include, but are not limited to, the 
cost of transportation, lodging, meals, and incidentals for the 
wounded and associated caregivers. The committee urges the 
Secretary of Defense to coordinate with the Secretary of State, 
Administrator of United States Agency for International 
Development, relevant non-governmental organizations, and 
senior Ukrainian officials to resolve these non-medical funding 
issues.
    Further, the committee encourages the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with the Secretary of State, to continue 
efforts to develop Ukraine's capacity to care for wounded 
members of the Ukrainian Armed Forces within Ukraine, including 
building on notable progress in the areas of point-of-injury 
care, medical evacuation, and the establishment of a combat 
medic training program.
    The Department of Defense should continue to consider 
Secretarial Designee Program requests to provide specialized 
care in U.S. military medical treatment facilities in the areas 
of polytrauma, amputations, burn treatment, prosthetics, and 
rehabilitation on a case-by-case basis.

Military mobility in Europe

    The committee recognizes the importance of U.S. military 
mobility in Europe. It supports the ability of North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization and European partner forces to respond 
swiftly to crises and thereby undergird the Alliance's credible 
deterrent.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Commander, U.S. European Command and the 
Supreme Allied Commander Europe, to submit to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
not later than December 1, 2022, a report on U.S. military 
mobility in Europe. The report shall include an analysis of:
          (1) Efforts thus far to implement a coherent approach 
        to military mobility-related practices with European 
        allies and partners with respect to regulations, 
        funding, and training;
          (2) Opportunities to harmonize legal and regulatory 
        standards and risk-management practices to support and 
        enhance military mobility;
          (3) How Chinese investment in critical 
        infrastructure, to include ports, railways, and 
        roadways may impede or otherwise influence military 
        mobility in Europe;
          (4) Efforts the United States has undertaken with 
        European partners and allies to incorporate military 
        requirements into civilian infrastructure projects, 
        including an identification of priority dual-use 
        projects;
          (5) The existing capacity of communications and 
        energy infrastructure as well as potential choke points 
        and vulnerabilities in a contested environment; and
          (6) Any other matter the Secretary of Defense deems 
        relevant.

Operational support to Afghanistan National Defense and Security Forces

    The committee notes that the transition of U.S. and 
coalition military personnel from Afghanistan by mid-September 
2021 does not constitute an end to counterterrorism operations 
in Afghanistan. The United States, working together with allies 
and partner nations, must continue to take actions to ensure 
that Afghanistan does not become a location from which the 
planning or projection of terrorist attacks against the 
Homeland or around the globe once again occurs. The committee 
expects that the Secretary of Defense will continue to provide 
operational support to the Afghanistan National Defense and 
Security Forces (ANDSF), including funding, equipment, military 
advice, intelligence support, and fire support in connection 
with:
          (1) Counterterrorism operations against the Islamic 
        State of Iraq and Syria, al-Qaeda, or other terrorist 
        organizations in accordance with existing law and 
        Department of Defense policy; or
          (2) The collective self-defense of the ANDSF.
    The committee directs the Secretary to provide a briefing 
on its plan to provide such support to the ANDSF to the 
congressional defense committees not later than November 15, 
2021.

Participation by Taiwan in multilateral security dialogues and forums

    The committee believes that it is the common interest of 
the United States and its allies and partners to strive for a 
Indo-Pacific region that is free, open, inclusive, resilient, 
anchored by democratic values, and unconstrained by coercion. 
The committee also believes the United States should work 
closely with allies and partners to respond to the most urgent 
of global challenges, including economic and health impacts of 
COVID-19, as well as issues associated with cyberspace, 
critical technologies, humanitarian assistance and disaster 
relief, and the maritime domain. Lastly, the committee believes 
that Taiwan is a vital part of the free and open Indo-Pacific 
region based on rules-based order and democratic values, and it 
is in the political, security and economic interests of the 
United States to advocate for Taiwan's meaningful participation 
and contributions to multilateral dialogues and forums on 
issues of global concern.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
not later than January 15, 2022, to provide the congressional 
defense committees a briefing on Department of Defense efforts 
to meaningfully engage Taiwan in multilateral dialogues or 
forums that shall, at a minimum, include:
          (1) The feasibility and advisability of including 
        Taiwan in various security dialogues or forums;
          (2) An assessment of opportunities for increasing 
        Taiwan's participation in multilateral security 
        dialogues or forums related to specific issues, 
        including:
                  (a) humanitarian assistance and disaster 
                relief;
                  (b) supply chain security;
                  (c) cybersecurity; and
                  (d) maritime security; and
          (3) Any other matters the Secretary deems 
        appropriate.

Plan for maintaining oversight of funds and activities of Afghanistan 
        Security Forces Fund

    The committee notes the critical importance of continuing 
support to the Afghan National Defense and Security Forces, 
while conducting appropriate oversight of funds authorized 
after the transition of United States and coalition partner 
nation forces from Afghanistan. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing not 
later than December 15, 2021, regarding the plan to execute 
funds and activities authorized in the Afghan Security Forces 
Fund beyond the transition of United States forces from 
Afghanistan.

Public reporting of Chinese military companies operating in the United 
        States

    The committee notes that section 1260H of the William M. 
(Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) directs the Secretary of Defense 
to identify each entity the Secretary determines, based on the 
most recent information available, is operating directly or 
indirectly in the United States, or any of its territories and 
possessions, that is a Chinese military company.
    The committee directs the Secretary, in implementing 
section 1260H of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021, to ensure due 
consideration is given to Chinese major technology companies 
that are operating directly or indirectly in the United States 
or any of its territories and possessions.

Support to Kurdish Peshmerga for counterterrorism and border security 
        operations

    The committee strongly supports assistance to the Iraqi 
Security Forces including Kurdish Peshmerga forces, for the 
purposes authorized in the Counter Train and Equip Fund (CTEF), 
including for defending Iraq, its people, allies, and partner 
nations from the threat posed by the Islamic State of Iraq and 
Syria (ISIS) and groups supporting ISIS and securing the 
territory of Iraq. The committee commends the efforts of the 
Kurdish Peshmerga in ensuring the lasting defeat of ISIS and 
strongly supports continued efforts to sustain and build upon 
their partnership with other Iraqi Security Forces and the 
United States. As the campaign to counter ISIS moves into a new 
phase, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, not 
later than November 1, 2021 to report on:
          (1) An assessment of gaps in the capabilities of 
        Iraqi Security Forces, including Kurdish Peshmerga 
        forces, to conduct counterterrorism and border security 
        operations in Iraq;
          (2) Plans to provide Kurdish Peshmerga forces 
        training and assistance focused on building 
        counterterrorism and border security operations in 
        coordination with the Government of Iraq; and
          (3) A plan to support the Kurdish Peshmerga in 
        coordination with the Government of Iraq, whether 
        through CTEF, other authorities, or a memorandum of 
        understanding.

United States support to partner military medical services

    The committee recognizes that certain partner foreign 
security forces participating in U.S.-led coalition operations 
have a critical need to build their medical capacity to care 
for military and civilian personnel wounded in military 
operations in line with obligations under the law of armed 
conflict. The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives, not later than January 31, 2022, 
a report on Department of Defense (DOD) programs and activities 
to support and enhance the medical capacity of foreign national 
security forces receiving DOD assistance or support. The report 
shall include the following elements:
          (1) A description of DOD programs and activities that 
        currently support foreign medical corps capacity 
        building, including a list of forces that have received 
        such medical service capacity building support in the 
        past 24 months and a description of such support 
        provided to each recipient;
          (2) An assessment of whether programs and activities 
        currently authorized to support foreign medical corps 
        capacity building are sufficient to provide combat 
        casualty care treatment and equipment that meets or 
        exceeds DOD treatment standards, including those 
        recommended by the Committee on Tactical Combat 
        Casualty Care;
          (3) An assessment of the efficacy of DOD programs to 
        support the medical capacities of foreign national 
        security forces receiving DOD assistance or support and 
        any recommendations on whether further authorities or 
        resources are needed to reach DOD standards; and
          (4) A summary assessment of the capacity and key gaps 
        within the military medical corps of Afghanistan and 
        Iraq, with a focus on their ability to provide 
        battlefield medical care to soldiers and wounded 
        civilians in line with obligations under the law of 
        armed conflict. The report shall be in unclassified 
        form but may include a classified annex.

United States-Greenland strategic relationship

    The committee notes the strategic importance of Greenland, 
a semi-autonomous territory within the Kingdom of Denmark, 
including its geostrategic location astride the transatlantic 
lines of communication, key role in the Arctic, hosting of 
Thule Air Base, and potential importance to rare earth material 
supply chains. The committee also notes the increase in 
activity of the People's Republic of China in the Arctic 
region. These geopolitical dynamics highlight the importance of 
United States investments in Greenland as evidenced by the 
September 17, 2018 ``Statement of Intent on Defense Investments 
in Greenland.''
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
not later than December 15, 2021, to provide the Senate Armed 
Services Committee a briefing on Department of Defense 
activities, plans, and investments related to Greenland. At a 
minimum, the briefing shall include a detailed description of:
          (1) The current United States military force posture 
        in Greenland and plans for future force posture 
        changes;
          (2) United States military and North Atlantic Treaty 
        Organization military rotations of forces to Greenland 
        conducted in the last 2 years and any planned rotations 
        in the next 2 years;
          (3) United States-funded infrastructure projects 
        being executed or planned at Thule Air Base and other 
        locations on the island, including projects associated 
        with the 2018 ``Statement of Intent on Defense 
        Investments in Greenland'';
          (4) Whether current base operations and maintenance 
        support arrangements at Thule Air Base are meeting 
        mission requirements and what impact any anticipated 
        changes to such arrangements would have on the ability 
        to meet such requirements going forward; and
          (5) Any other matters the Secretary deems 
        appropriate.

                TITLE XIII--COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION

Funding allocations; specification of Cooperative Threat Reduction 
        funds (sec. 1301)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
$239.84 million for the Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) 
program, define the funds as authorized to be appropriated in 
section 301 of this Act, and authorize CTR funds to be 
available for obligation for fiscal years 2022, 2023, and 2024.

                       Items of Special Interest

Training for Weapons of Mass Destruction Civil Support Teams
    The committee emphasizes the importance of regular training 
for weapons of mass destruction civil support teams (WMD-CSTs) 
to maintain readiness. The committee recognizes that such 
training opportunities are often only offered at facilities 
that are located at unreasonably far distances from National 
Guard units' home stations. The committee assesses that units 
may incur prohibitively high costs for the travel associated 
with participating in such training, which may risk diminishing 
units' activities and effectiveness. The committee thus 
determines that the Department of Defense and the Department of 
Energy may lack sufficient capacity to regularly train WMD-CSTs 
to a degree that maintains readiness.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Chief of the National Guard Bureau and 
the Secretary of Energy, to study the feasibility of increasing 
training capacity for WMD-CSTs, including through the creation 
of new facilities and programs and through the augmentation of 
extant facilities and programs to provide such training. The 
study shall estimate the costs associated with increasing 
training capacity for WMD-CSTs and shall identify prospective 
facilities and programs that could provide such training. The 
Secretary shall provide a report on the study to the 
congressional defense committees not later than December 31, 
2022.

                    TITLE XIV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS

                     Subtitle A--Military Programs

Working capital funds (sec. 1401)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for the defense working capital funds at the 
levels identified in section 4501 of division D of this Act.
Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense (sec. 1402)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for Chemical Agents and Munitions 
Destruction, Defense, at the levels identified in section 4501 
of division D of this Act.
Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-wide (sec. 1403)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for Drug Interdiction and Counter-drug 
Activities, Defense-wide, at the levels identified in section 
4501 of division D of this Act.
Defense Inspector General (sec. 1404)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for the Office of the Inspector General of 
the Department of Defense at the levels identified in section 
4501 of division D of this Act.
Defense Health Program (sec. 1405)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
appropriations for the Defense Health Program activities at the 
levels identified in section 4501 of division D of this Act.

                Subtitle B--Armed Forces Retirement Home

Authorization of appropriations for Armed Forces Retirement Home (sec. 
        1411)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
an appropriation of $75.3 million from the Armed Forces 
Retirement Home Trust Fund for fiscal year 2022 for the 
operation of the Armed Forces Retirement Home.

                       Subtitle C--Other Matters

Authorization to loan materials in National Defense Stockpile (sec. 
        1421)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 98e of title 50, United States Code, to authorize the 
loan of National Defense Stockpile materials to the Department 
of Energy or the military departments if certain criteria are 
met. The committee remains concerned that the National Defense 
Stockpile is still not agile enough to acquire and dispose of 
strategic and critical materials, including rare earth 
elements, in order to meet rapidly changing military 
requirements.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Director of the 
Defense Logistics Agency to provide a briefing to the Senate 
Armed Services Committee not later than March 1, 2022, on a 
plan to transition National Defense Stockpile acquisitions and 
disposals to a direct appropriations process.
Repeal of termination of biennial report on National Defense Stockpile 
        requirements (sec. 1422)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1061(i) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) to ensure Congress 
continues to receive the biennial report on the National 
Defense Stockpile.
Authority for transfer of funds to joint Department of Defense-
        Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration 
        Fund for Captain James A. Lovell Health Care Center, Illinois 
        (sec. 1423)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to transfer $137.0 million from the 
Defense Health Program to the Joint Department of Defense-
Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration 
Fund, established by section 1704 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-84), for 
the operation of the Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health 
Care Center.

   TITLE XV--SPACE ACTIVITIES, STRATEGIC PROGRAMS, AND INTELLIGENCE 
                                MATTERS

                      Subtitle A--Space Activities

Delegation of authorities to Space Development Agency (sec. 1501)
    The committee recommends a provision that would, to the 
extent practicable, ensure delegation from the Secretary of the 
Air Force, through the Service Acquisition Executive for Space 
(SAE Space), to the Space Development Agency of head of 
contracting authority and milestone decision authority for 
middle tier acquisition programs. Elsewhere in this Act, the 
committee recommends delegation of Senior Procurement Executive 
authority to the SAE Space. In doing so, the committee stresses 
the importance of ensuring that as the SAE Space develops broad 
procurement policies consistent with the SAE Space's role as 
the Senior Procurement Executive across Space Force acquisition 
components and that SAE Space ensures the unique attributes of 
the Space Development Agency are accounted for in these 
policies.
    In that regard, not later than 60 days after the formal 
transition of the Space Development Agency to the Space Force, 
the committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to provide 
a report to the congressional defense committees on elements of 
the actions taken by the SAE that enable the Space Development 
Agency to perform its unique mission. These authorities will 
remain in place post transfer to Space Force.
Modification to Space Development Agency (sec. 1502)
    The committee recommends a provision that would exempt the 
Space Development Agency (SDA) from the Joint Capabilities and 
Integration Development System process. Additionally, the 
provision would direct the SDA Director to convene a Combatant 
Commander and Warfighter Council at least twice annually to 
establish capability plans and recommend priorities for the 
SDA.

Disclosure of National Security Space Launch program contract pricing 
        terms (sec. 1503)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Air Force to provide the congressional defense committees with 
the pricing terms for any award to launch a national security 
payload under the National Security Space Launch program. Such 
data would be protected, as required by law under section 1905 
of title 18, United States Code.

Extension and modification of Council on Oversight of the Department of 
        Defense Positioning, Navigation, and Timing Enterprise (sec. 
        1504)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2279b of title 10, United States Code, to include 
oversight of alternative positioning, navigation, and timing by 
the Council on Oversight of the Department of Defense 
Positioning, Navigation, and Timing Enterprise, consistent with 
section 1611 of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-
283). The provision would also modify the Council's date of 
termination.

Senior Procurement Executive authority (sec. 1505)

    The committee recommends a provision that would provide the 
Secretary of the Air Force the authority to delegate to the 
Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Space Acquisition and 
Integration duties and authorities of the Senior Procurement 
Executive that relate to space systems and programs. The 
committee notes that elsewhere in this Act it recommends a 
provision that would transfer space acquisition projects from 
the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Space Acquisition 
and Integration to the Service Acquisition Executive for Space 
not later than October 1, 2022. The committee notes that the 
Secretary currently has a similar delegation authority for the 
Service Acquisition Executive of the Air Force.

Modifications to Space Force Acquisition Council (sec. 1506)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 9021 of title 10, United States Code, to change the 
name of the Space Force Acquisition Council to the Space 
Acquisition Council.

Modifications relating to the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for 
        Space Acquisition and Integration (sec. 1507)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 9021(c) of title 10, United States Code, to modify the 
role of the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Space 
Acquisition and Integration to include broader responsibilities 
for acquisition integration of space architectures across the 
Department of Defense (DOD). These responsibilities would 
transfer not later than October 1, 2022, when the Assistant 
Secretary of the Air Force for Space Acquisition and 
Integration becomes the Service Acquisition Executive for the 
Space Force. The provision would further ensure that the 
Assistant Secretary is responsible for overseeing all 
architecture and integration of DOD space programs with respect 
to their acquisition. The committee interprets the word 
``oversee'' to mean ``to see to officially, as one in charge of 
work done by others; or to have overall responsibility for.'' 
The provision would also designate the Chief of Space 
Operations as the force design architect for the Department's 
space programs.
    The provision would additionally modify the role of the 
Space Force Acquisition Council to include certification of 
architecture determinations made by the Assistant Secretary. 
Upon certification, which would be forwarded to the 
congressional defense committees, no further action could be 
taken for 60 days. The Secretary of Defense may waive this 
condition if they determine there is an exigent national 
security condition--a justification of which must be submitted 
to the congressional defense committees.
    A principal aim of the creation of the Space Force was to 
establish an integrated and consolidated approach across the 
Department for the development of space architectures for the 
Department's satellite constellations performing national 
security missions. This was made clear in the report language 
accompanying the establishment of the Space Force in the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020. The 
report language (H. Rept. 116-333) accompanying the subtitle in 
question stated that ``The amendment would rename the Principal 
Assistant to the Secretary of the Air Force for Space as the 
Assistant Secretary for Space Acquisition and Integration 
(ASAF/SP), who would report directly to the Secretary of the 
Air Force and serve as the senior architect for space systems 
and programs across the Department of Defense.'' In the absence 
of the Department's action, this provision would implement that 
intent.

Modification to transfer of acquisition projects for space systems and 
        programs (sec. 1508)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify the 
required transfer of space acquisition projects to the 
Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Space Acquisition and 
Integration from October 1, 2022, to not later than October 1, 
2022.

Extension and modification of certifications regarding integrated 
        tactical warning and attack assessment mission of the Air Force 
        (sec. 1509)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
section 1666 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328), as amended by section 
1604 of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283), 
through fiscal year 2026 and require the certification be made 
in consultation with the commanders of U.S. Strategic Command 
and U.S. Northern Command. The committee emphasizes that the 
ability to determine with high confidence whether an attack on 
the Homeland would involve a nuclear weapon should be one of 
the highest priorities for U.S. Space Command.

Prohibition on Missile Defense Agency production of satellites and 
        ground systems associated with operation of such satellites 
        (sec. 1510)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the Missile Defense Agency from entering into a program of 
record to develop and field operational satellite constellation 
and ground systems. The provision would permit the Missile 
Defense Agency to field prototype satellites meeting Missile 
Defense Agency unique requirements. The committee has learned 
that the Missile Defense Agency cannot implement section 1645 
of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 
(Public Law 116-92) for hypersonic and ballistic missile 
tracking, which requires the Missile Defense Agency to place 
its Medium Field of View sensor on a Space Development Agency 
satellite, due to a misalignment of orbit requirements between 
those of the Space Development Agency and the Missile Defense 
Agency. This misalignment now requires the Missile Defense 
Agency to field two prototype satellites for hypersonic and 
ballistic missile tracking. The committee is acutely concerned 
that the Missile Defense Agency, which reports to the 
Undersecretary of Defense for Research and Engineering, could 
be fielding a program of record of satellite constellations and 
ground systems. The reason why the Congress created the Space 
Force was explicitly to consolidate space functions of the 
Department of Defense into the Space Force. Accordingly, the 
provision prohibits the Missile Defense Agency from developing 
satellite constellations and ground systems beyond a prototype 
stage. The Space Force will design, field, and operate the 
required program of record satellite constellation and ground 
systems for ballistic missile and hypersonic missile tracking.

Continued requirement for National Security Space Launch program (sec. 
        1511)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
Launch Services providers to continue to meet Federal 
requirements, with respect to payload to reference orbits, for 
Phase Two National Security Space Launch.

Limitation, report, and briefing on use of commercial satellite 
        services and associated systems (sec. 1512)

    The committee recommends a provision that would ensure that 
critical defense functions do not solely rely on commercial 
satellite services and associated systems. These functions 
typically consist of nuclear command, control, and 
communications to disseminate Emergency Action Messages, 
Integrated Warning and Attack Assessment, mission- and time-
critical targeting, and certain senior leadership 
communications associated with continuity of government.
    The provision would also require the Secretary of Defense, 
on at least a quarterly basis, to provide to the congressional 
defense committees a report and briefing on the Department of 
Defense's reliance on commercial services and associated 
systems to provide capability and additional capacity and would 
detail certain required elements of the report and briefing.

Study on commercial systems integration into, and support of, Armed 
        Forces space operations (sec. 1513)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Air Force to enter into an arrangement with a 
federally funded research and development center (FFRDC) to 
conduct an assessment on the extent of reliance by the 
Department of Defense on commercial satellite systems.
    The committee understands the importance of the use of 
commercial systems for communications, as well as other forms 
of sensor operations. It is not understood to what degree the 
Department should rely on such commercial systems. It should be 
well understood that critical functions such as emergency 
action messages to direct nuclear forces should have, at their 
core, a system managed by the Department of Defense but 
complemented by commercial communications for the broadest form 
of resilience. Unknown is what risks this reliance poses to the 
Department and to the investors of the commercial companies, 
especially during a time of conflict. Further, the committee 
finds a lack of understanding on the risk of a commercial 
entity becoming a combatant, and whether that risk is 
represented to insurers and investors. It is essential that the 
Department and commercial entities understand this risk so that 
the Department can ascertain whether it obtained a fair and 
reasonable price for the services it is relying on now, rather 
than at some later date. The committee expects the Secretary 
and the FFRDC to obtain the widest set of viewpoints, including 
the national security community, commercial space companies, 
insurers, and a legal analysis of combatant and non-combatant 
status. This assessment would be due to the congressional 
defense committees not later than 270 days after the date of 
the enactment of this Act in unclassified form, with a 
classified annex if required.

Space policy review (sec. 1514)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Director of 
National Intelligence, to conduct reviews of the space policy 
of the Department of Defense to be submitted concurrently with 
the President's budget for fiscal years 2024 through 2026. The 
provision would detail required elements of each review, to 
include an assessment of recommended changes and supported 
funding over the succeeding 5 years.

Annual briefing on threats to space operations (sec. 1515)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Chief of Space Operations, in consultation with the Director of 
the Defense Intelligence Agency, to provide an annual briefing 
through 2026 to the congressional defense and intelligence 
committees on the threats posed by the Russian Federation, the 
People's Republic of China, and any other relevant country to 
the conduct of United States operations in space.

  Subtitle B--Defense Intelligence and Intelligence-Related Activities


Authority for Army counterintelligence agents to execute warrants and 
        make arrests (sec. 1521)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 7377 of title 10, United States Code, to authorize Army 
counterintelligence civilian special agents to serve warrants 
and make arrests when conducting counterintelligence 
investigations.

Annual briefing by Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency on 
        electronic warfare threat to operations of the Department of 
        Defense (sec. 1522)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency to provide to the 
congressional defense and intelligence committees an annual 
briefing on the electronic warfare threats posed to the U.S. 
military from Russia, China, and other relevant nations through 
2026.

                       Subtitle C--Nuclear Forces


Participation in United States Strategic Command strategic deterrence 
        exercises (sec. 1531)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
involvement from a number of senior civilian and military 
officials in nuclear command, control, and communications 
exercises, as well as the decision making with respect to them. 
The provision does not mandate complete involvement for the 
entire duration of the exercise, but sufficient involvement to 
assure familiarity with the processes, the systems in place, 
and the outcome of the decision process so that it can be 
improved. While the committee believes and hopes that such an 
exercise lies at the extreme end of the escalation spectrum, 
senior leaders must participate in the exercise so the outcomes 
and improvements in the quality of the decision making can 
impart lessons learned into more common escalation scenarios 
affecting the national security and well-being of the Nation. 
The committee notes that many of these same systems serve as a 
crisis communications backbone in the more common escalation 
scenarios referenced, hence the importance of using them in the 
most stressed scenarios. Finally, the committee believes that 
involving senior leaders in these exercises will import to them 
the importance of a robust, resilient and user oriented 
decision system in future acquisition planning the Department 
is responsible for, and the timely generation and fulfillment 
of the requirements associated with future senior leader 
communications and decision systems.

Modification to requirements relating to nuclear force reductions (sec. 
        1532)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 494 of title 10, United States Code, to extend the 
existing timeline for notifying Congress prior to any 
reductions in the number of deployed U.S. nuclear weapons; 
eliminate the previous sunset on a conditional net assessment 
by the Commander, U.S. Strategic Command, of the capability of 
the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile to deter global nuclear 
threats; and update the date of effect for any changes to the 
U.S. stockpile. The provision would also adjust the existing 
requirements for the Secretary of Defense to include submission 
of an assessment to the congressional defense committees of 
whether any proposals by the President to reduce the size of 
the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile would result in the size of 
the U.S. stockpile becoming a number less than that of the 
intelligence community's high-confidence assessment of the size 
of the Russian Federation's and the People's Republic of 
China's nuclear weapons stockpiles. The provision would further 
clarify that non-permanent reductions in the U.S. nuclear 
weapons stockpile--to ensure the safety, security, reliability, 
and credibility of U.S. nuclear forces--would not trigger the 
requirement for a net assessment. Finally, the provision would 
eliminate the Presidential certification and notification 
requirements relating to recommendations to reduce the size of 
the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile.

Modifications to requirements relating to unilateral changes in nuclear 
        weapons stockpile of the United States (sec. 1533)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 498 of title 10, United States Code, to clarify that 
nuclear force reductions pursuant to a treaty, to which the 
Senate has provided its advice and consent, are exempted from 
the existing reporting requirement. The provision would also 
expand the categories of covered changes to include the total 
number of deployed nuclear weapons as well as the total nuclear 
weapons stockpile; reduce the triggering threshold for 
reductions that require a Nuclear Posture Review to 15 percent; 
and make a conforming edit to the requirement for transmitting 
such Nuclear Posture Review to the Congress prior to enacting 
said reductions.

Deadline for reports on modification of force structure for strategic 
        nuclear weapons delivery systems (sec. 1534)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 493 of title 10, United States Code, to extend the 
existing timeline for prior notification to the Congress of any 
modification of the force structure for the strategic nuclear 
weapons delivery systems of the United States.

Modification of deadline for notifications relating to reduction, 
        consolidation, or withdrawal of nuclear forces based in Europe 
        (sec. 1535)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 497 of title 10, United States Code, to extend the 
existing timeline for prior notification to the Congress of any 
reduction, consolidation, or withdrawal of the nuclear forces 
of the United States based in Europe.

Congressional Commission on the Strategic Posture of the United States 
        (sec. 1536)

    The committee recommends a provision that would create a 
congressional commission of 12 members to evaluate developments 
in the international security environment since the completion 
of the 2009 Congressional Commission on Strategic Posture 
report to the Congress, assess a variety of factors relating to 
U.S. nuclear weapons policies and factors shaping strategic 
stability, make recommendations as the committee deems 
necessary, and submit a report of its findings, conclusions, 
and recommendations to the President and the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives, 
not later than December 31, 2022.
    The provision would also require the Department of Defense 
(DOD), the Department of Energy, the Department of State, and 
the Office of the Director of National Intelligence to provide 
the Commission with analyses, briefings, and other information 
necessary for the fulfillment of its responsibilities.
    Over the previous decade, the Russian Federation, which 
maintains the world's largest nuclear arsenal, has modernized 
more than 80 percent of its strategic nuclear forces, has 
expanded its already extensive theater-range nuclear 
capabilities, and is working to develop a wide array of novel 
nuclear weapons systems unlike any currently fielded. The 
People's Republic of China is in the midst of the world's most 
aggressive modernization and expansion of nuclear forces and 
nuclear weapons production capabilities. By the mid-2020s, the 
People's Republic of China is anticipated to complete its own 
strategic nuclear triad, and will continue its rapid 
modernization and expansion efforts as it seeks to be a 
strategic peer to the United States, possibly within the next 
decade. North Korea, while currently possessing a relatively 
modest nuclear arsenal when compared to the Russian Federation 
or the People's Republic of China, continues to pursue publicly 
announced plans to develop miniaturized nuclear warheads, 
tactical nuclear weapons, multiple independently targetable 
nuclear reentry vehicles for missiles, solid-fuel ballistic 
missiles of varying ranges, nuclear propulsion systems for 
submarines, and hypersonic boost-glide vehicles to threaten the 
United States and its allies in the region. Conversely, the 
U.S. is in the early stages of an effort to reestablish a 
complete nuclear weapons production capability and replace its 
existing nuclear forces, and has no plans to expand the size of 
its stockpile nor to develop a suite of exotic nuclear weapons 
systems.
    The conclusions of the 2018 Nuclear Posture Review 
recognized the changes in the security environment and the 
risks of instability resulting from an international landscape 
where the United States must contend with two nuclear peers 
with modernized and diverse arsenals. As the Biden 
Administration begins its review of U.S. nuclear policies and 
works to craft its own approach to this complex and dangerous 
new reality, it is imperative that the Congress reestablish the 
Congressional Commission on the Strategic Posture of the United 
States to examine the developments in the international 
security environment since the last assessment in 2009 and to 
ensure the Administration has access to the recommendations of 
some of the most respected and esteemed experts in matters of 
strategic deterrence that the United States has to offer.

Revised Nuclear Posture Review (sec. 1537)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, acting through the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Policy and the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff, to conduct a comprehensive review of U.S. nuclear 
posture for the next 5 to 10 years. The provision details the 
contents to be included in such a review, and would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report on the results of the 
review to Congress in 2022, along with the national defense 
strategy required under section 113(g) of title 10, United 
States Code.

Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent development program accountability 
        matrices (sec. 1538)

    The committee recommends a provision that would establish 
accountability matrices for the Ground-Based Strategic 
Deterrent (GBSD) program, similar to those required for the B-
21 bomber program under section 238 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328).
    The committee notes that the GBSD program is a complex 
Major Defense Acquisition Program. The use of this report 
format early in the program, combined with concurrent 
assessments by the Comptroller General of the United States, 
will establish the necessary congressional oversight of this 
program to ensure it is being executed as described by the 
Department of Defense in budget documents to the congressional 
defense committees.

Procurement authority for certain parts of Ground-Based Strategic 
        Deterrent cryptographic device (sec. 1539)

    The committee recommends a provision that would provide the 
Secretary of the Air Force the authority to use Air Force 
procurement funds to purchase Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) 
parts qualified for use in the Ground Based Strategic 
Deterrent's nuclear command and control cryptographic device 
(KS-75) supporting the life of the KS-75 program. This 
provision would provide authority for a single fiscal year 2022 
life-of-type buy (LOTB) request for the KS-75 cryptographic 
device in the amount of $10.0 million. The committee notes that 
procurement of these parts in quantities to support production 
and spares is necessary to support the qualification, test, and 
National Security Agency (NSA) certification of COTS parts 
operating in the nuclear command and control environment. The 
Government's qualification and certification is limited to 
specific production lots due to variations in supplier 
processes and materials that can significantly change 
electronics performance. Parts available from the supplier in 
subsequent production lots or from other suppliers are required 
to undergo a delta or complete recertification process 
(depending on severity of design change) to obtain NSA approval 
for use in nuclear command and control weapon systems. If re-
design is required, the parts would require a new part number 
and separate supply chain management activities associated with 
a second KS-75 configuration.

Mission-design series popular name for Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent 
        (sec. 1540)

    The committee recommends a provision that would direct the 
Secretary of the Air Force, in coordination with the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, to 
establish a mission-design series popular name for the Ground-
Based Strategic Deterrent not later than 30 days after the date 
of the enactment of this Act. The provision would also require 
the Secretary of the Air Force to notify the congressional 
defense committees of the completion of the requirement not 
later than 10 days after completion.

B-21 Raider nuclear capability and integration with Long-Range Standoff 
        Weapon (sec. 1541)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Air Force to ensure that the Long-Range 
Standoff Weapon is fully integrated with the B-21 not later 
than 2 years after the Long-Range Standoff Weapon achieves 
initial operational capability.
    The committee believes that the B-21 Raider bomber 
represents a valuable future addition to the U.S. nuclear 
deterrent, one that, when paired with the Long-Range Standoff 
Weapon, will ensure the continued effectiveness of the air leg 
of the strategic triad.

Comptroller General study and updated report on nuclear weapons 
        capabilities and force structure requirements (sec. 1542)

    The committee recommends a provision that would direct the 
Comptroller General of the United States to conduct a study on 
the nuclear capabilities, force structure, employment policy, 
and targeting requirements of the Department of Defense. The 
provision would further detail the contents of the report and 
direct the Comptroller General to provide a briefing on 
preliminary findings to the congressional defense committees 
not later than March 31, 2022, with the final report to follow 
on a date agreed upon by the Comptroller General and the 
congressional defense committees.
    Following the completion of the Department of Defense's 
(DOD) 2010 Nuclear Posture Review, the administration concluded 
that the United States could reduce the role of nuclear weapons 
in the U.S. security strategy. At the time, the United States 
was believed to be facing a more benign nuclear threat 
environment, having recently concluded the New START Treaty 
with the Russian Federation. The administration also expected 
to continue to substantially reduce the size of its nuclear 
weapons stockpile, as had been the case since the end of the 
Cold War, and would need to adjust its targeting and planning 
requirements accordingly.
    To better understand the implications of such changes in 
the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile and to future targeting and 
planning requirements, the Congress directed the Comptroller 
General of the United States to update a September 27, 1991, 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) report on the nuclear 
weapons targeting process, titled ``Strategic Weapons: Nuclear 
Weapons Targeting Process'' (GAO/NSIAD-91-319FS), in section 
1047 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2012 (Public Law 112-81). The resulting GAO report, published 
July 31, 2012, titled, ``Strategic Weapons: Changes in the 
Nuclear Weapons Targeting Process Since 1991'' (GAO-12-786R), 
found that the fundamental objectives of U.S. nuclear 
deterrence policy had remained largely consistent since 1991, 
even as the threat environment and size of the stockpile had 
changed.
    Since GAO's 2012 report, the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile 
has been further reduced in response to New START Treaty 
provisions, which were achieved in February 2018, and were 
recently extended through February 4, 2026. However, as noted 
in the 2018 Nuclear Posture Review, the global nuclear threat 
environment has become more complex and has deteriorated 
significantly over the past decade, as Russia, China, and North 
Korea took steps to add new nuclear capabilities to their 
arsenals and increase reliance on nuclear forces in their 
strategies and plans.
    As the Department of Defense and the National Nuclear 
Security Administration continue their multi-decade effort to 
modernize the Nation's nuclear forces and preserve the existing 
deterrent capabilities, it is important that the Congress 
understand how the development of nuclear force requirements 
has evolved and how these requirements inform investment 
decisions on the resulting programs.
    Accordingly, the study recommended by the committee in the 
provision would, at a minimum, update the GAO's 2012 report, 
including any changes to:
          (1) How the Department of Defense has assessed 
        threats and modified its nuclear deterrence policy;
          (2) Targeting and employment guidance from the 
        President, the Secretary of Defense, the Chairman of 
        the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Commander, U.S. 
        Strategic Command;
          (3) Nuclear weapons planning and targeting, including 
        categories and types of targets;
          (4) Strategic nuclear forces, including the 
        stockpile, force posture, and modernization;
          (5) The level of civilian oversight;
          (6) The relationship between targeting and 
        requirements; and
          (7) Any other matters considered appropriate by the 
        Comptroller General.
    Finally, the committee notes that the Government 
Accountability Office's statutory right of access encompasses 
the information required for this review, including 
information, guidance, and other documentation related to 
nuclear planning, targeting, capabilities, and operations. 
Accordingly, the committee expects the Secretary of Defense, 
the Secretary of Energy, and the Administrator for Nuclear 
Security to provide the Comptroller General with full 
cooperation and access to appropriate officials, guidance, and 
other documentation.

Prohibition on reduction of the intercontinental ballistic missiles of 
        the United States (sec. 1543)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the obligation or expenditure of fiscal year 2022 funds to 
reduce deployed U.S. intercontinental ballistic missiles' 
responsiveness, alert level, or quantity to fewer than 400. The 
provision would provide an exception to this prohibition for 
activities related to maintenance, sustainment, and 
replacement, or activities to ensure safety, security, or 
reliability.

Limitation on use of funds until completion of analysis of alternatives 
        for nuclear sea-launched cruise missile (sec. 1544)

    The committee recommends a provision that would limit the 
amount obligated or expended for the operations of the Office 
of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Strategy, Plans, and 
Capabilities to not more than 90 percent of the amount 
authorized by this Act until the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Policy provides a briefing on the analysis of alternatives for 
the nuclear sea-launched cruise missile. The provision would 
also require the Chairman of the Nuclear Weapons Council to 
provide a briefing to the congressional defense committees on 
the planned management structure for the joint missile and 
warhead development program not later than April 1, 2022.

Sense of the Senate on NATO security and nuclear cooperation between 
        the United States and the United Kingdom (sec. 1545)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate that the independent nuclear deterrents of 
the United States, the United Kingdom, and the French Republic 
are the supreme guarantee of the security of the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization (NATO). The provision would further express 
the sense of the Senate that the United States and the United 
Kingdom face similar challenges in modernizing their aging 
nuclear deterrents and that continued nuclear cooperation 
between the United States and the United Kingdom is in the 
national security interests of the United States.

Sense of the Senate on maintaining diversity in the nuclear weapons 
        stockpile (sec. 1546)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate that a technologically diverse nuclear 
weapons stockpile that reduces the impact of technical issues 
in any single weapon type is in the national security interest 
of the United States and that the United States should maintain 
no fewer than two distinct types of deployed nuclear weapons 
per leg of the nuclear triad.

Sense of the Senate on the Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent (sec. 1547)

    The committee recommends a provision that would outline a 
series of findings relating to the need to pursue the Ground-
Based Strategic Deterrent (GBSD) program to replace the 
Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missile weapon system 
and express the sense of the Senate that intercontinental 
ballistic missiles are a critical component of the U.S. nuclear 
deterrent; the continued development of the GBSD system is 
needed; modernization programs may increase opportunities for 
effective arms control; and that prioritizing execution of the 
GBSD program prior to the retirement of the Minuteman III 
system is in the national security interest of the United 
States.

                  Subtitle D--Missile Defense Programs


Authority to develop and deploy Next Generation Interceptor for missile 
        defense of the United States homeland (sec. 1551)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Director of the Missile Defense Agency, subject to the 
availability of appropriations, to develop a highly reliable 
missile defense interceptor for the Ground-based Midcourse 
Defense system using sound acquisition practices. The Director 
would also be required to develop a funding plan addressing 
certain features of the program, submit a report on the funding 
profile necessary for the program with the fiscal year 2023 
budget request, and notify the Congress within 30 days of any 
final decisions to cancel the program.
    The committee recognizes that the threat of long-range 
missile attacks against the United States continues to 
increase, with growing risks from adversary acquisition of 
greater numbers of more complex systems with the capability to 
hold the U.S. Homeland at risk. In order to pace this threat, 
the capabilities of the United States' Ground-based Midcourse 
Defense system must continue to evolve, even as the United 
States works to develop future defensive technologies.

Annual reliability testing for the Next Generation Interceptor (sec. 
        1552)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Director of the Missile Defense Agency, to develop and execute 
a plan for conducting annual reliability testing for the Next 
Generation Interceptor (NGI) within 5 years of a declaration of 
initial operational capability and ensure at least one test a 
year is performed in an operational setting for the ground 
based mid-course missile defense. The provision would also 
require the Director to provide a report, not later than the 
date of approval for the NGI program to enter the production 
phase of its acquisition process, to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives on the 
estimated costs for conducting said tests, including 
procurement of sufficient assets to accommodate testing of one 
interceptor per year over the life of the system.

Next Generation Interceptor program accountability matrices (sec. 1553)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Director of the Missile Defense Agency to submit annually, with 
the President's budget request, a matrix that identifies, in 6-
month increments, key milestones, development events, specific 
performance goals, cost tracking, and independent reviews for 
the technology and product development phases of the Next 
Generation Interceptor (NGI) program. The provision would also 
require the Director to update these annual matrices not later 
than 180 days after each submission and would direct the 
Comptroller General of the United States to review the annually 
submitted matrices and brief the congressional defense 
committees within 60 days of receipt. The requirements of the 
provision would terminate 1 year after the NGI achieves initial 
production.

Extension of period for transition of ballistic missile defense 
        programs to military departments (sec. 1554)

    The committee recommends a provision that would adjust the 
date on which the Secretary of Defense should transfer the 
acquisition authority and the total obligation authority for 
each missile defense program from the date on which the 
President's budget request for fiscal year 2023 is submitted 
under section 1105 of title 31, United States Code, to October 
1, 2023.
    The committee notes that the Department of Defense has a 
troubled track record of transitioning missile defense 
acquisition programs to the military services. However, 
successfully ensuring these programs efficiently move from 
Missile Defense Agency-led research and development to service-
led system acquisition is crucial to the long term viability of 
the missile defense enterprise. The committee expects the 
Department to address this issue within the context of the 
administration's review of U.S. missile defense policies over 
the coming months.

Iron Dome short-range rocket defense system and Israeli cooperative 
        missile defense program co-development and co-production (sec. 
        1555)

    The committee recommends a provision that would provide 
funding for the procurement of the Iron Dome short-range rocket 
defense system, David's Sling Weapon System, and Arrow 3 Upper 
Tier Interceptor Program as outlined under the Memorandum of 
Agreement between the United States and the Government of 
Israel for cooperative missile defense programs.

Semiannual updates on meetings held by the Missile Defense Executive 
        Board (sec. 1556)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Under Secretaries of Defense for Research and Engineering and 
Acquisition and Sustainment, as co-chairs of the Missile 
Defense Executive Board, to provide a semiannual update to the 
congressional defense committees on the meetings and decisions 
of the Board not later than March 1 and September 1 of each 
year. The co-chairs would not be required to provide an update 
on decisions of the Board relating to the budget of the 
President for a fiscal year if the budget for that fiscal year 
has not been submitted to the Congress as of the date of the 
semiannual update.
    The co-chairs may submit the update to the committees as 
either a briefing or a written report.

Independent study of Department of Defense components' roles and 
        responsibilities relating to missile defense (sec. 1557)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to enter into a contract with the National 
Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) to provide a report to 
the congressional defense committees that assesses missile 
defense roles and responsibilities within the Department of 
Defense (DOD), identifies inefficiencies and opportunities for 
improvement in organizational relationships, and makes 
recommendations for improvements.
    The provision would also require the Secretary to submit a 
separate report to the congressional defense committees on 
DOD's views on the findings of the NAPA report not later than 
120 days after the date on which the NAPA report is submitted.
    The committee notes that development of an effective, 
multi-tier missile defense capability to protect the United 
States, its allies, and U.S. forces in theater is a critical 
national security priority. Managing this capability, which 
requires a complex interplay of space-based, airborne, 
terrestrial, and maritime sensors, communications networks, and 
kinetic and non-kinetic defenses, is further complicated by the 
vast array of options available to adversaries for attacking 
U.S. and allied territory and assets. In order to be 
successful, all organizations that contribute to the missile 
defense mission must have a clear understanding of one 
another's roles and responsibilities, and confidence that all 
such organizations are effectively executing said roles. Absent 
a clear understanding of missile defense roles and 
responsibilities, inefficiencies begin to inevitably plague the 
system, resulting in redundant or unproductive investments, 
unclear lines of authority, degradations in mission 
performance, and parochialism--all of which are unacceptable 
for such an important mission. As the Department of Defense 
undertakes a review of missile defense policies and strategies, 
whether as part of a stand-alone Missile Defense Review or as 
part of a larger assessment of defense strategy, the Department 
should thoroughly review its organizational structures for the 
missile defense mission, clarify roles and responsibilities 
across its components, and establish clear management 
relationships and processes.
    In order to ensure a comprehensive assessment, the 
committee expects that the Office of the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Policy will serve as the focal point for 
facilitating DOD cooperation with NAPA in executing this 
independent assessment and ensuring robust participation by all 
DOD components. The committee also expects the Office of the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, in coordination with 
Washington Headquarters Services, to expedite the conclusion of 
DOD's contractual arrangements with NAPA not later than 
February 1, 2022. Finally, the committee expects the Secretary 
to promptly notify the committee if the DOD will be unable to 
conclude a contract with NAPA by said timeline.

                       Items of Special Interest


Alternate position, navigation, and timing in space

    Given the concern about the vulnerability of jamming of 
Global Positioning System (GPS) satellites, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Air Force to provide a briefing to 
the congressional defense committees, not later than March 31, 
2022, on an alternate Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (PNT) 
constellation that provides the capabilities for the rapid 
deployment of alternate PNT satellites to address emerging 
threats to GPS jamming and spoofing.

Briefing on advanced missile defense technology development

    The committee believes that while the current kinetic hit 
to kill interceptor construct represents the most capable, 
cost-effective missile defense option in the near to mid-term, 
pursuing this approach alone is unlikely to remain a cost 
effective solution for protecting the U.S. Homeland, allies, 
and U.S. forces abroad from increasing missile threats. As 
such, the committee is concerned by the Missile Defense 
Agency's lack of sufficient investment in the fiscal year 2022 
request for exploring and developing future, cost-effective 
missile defense technologies to address the range of hypersonic 
glide, ballistic, cruise missile, and shorter range rocket 
concerns.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Research & Engineering and the Director of the 
Missile Defense Agency to provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees, not later than April 15, 
2022, on Department of Defense efforts to prioritize 
development of new communication technologies and sensors 
critical to hypersonic, cruise, and ballistic missile 
strategies; adopt agile commercial-sector practices in 
developing next-generation missile-defense systems while 
incorporating proven technologies and methodologies into the 
warfighter integration process; incorporate directed energy 
technology on a transportable and/or mobile platforms; and 
provide the chief architect of the Missile Defense Agency with 
threat development and modeling and simulation tools that 
provide timely dynamic and reactive threat representations 
required for architecture assessment and design.

Briefing on Air Force efforts to facilitate intercontinental ballistic 
        missile movements during the transition to the Ground-Based 
        Strategic Deterrent

    The committee recognizes that the Ground-Based Strategic 
Deterrent (GBSD) program is a complex undertaking, and the 
successful completion of which will require a large number of 
intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) movements across the 
Malmstrom, Minot, and F.E. Warren Air Force Bases to facilitate 
the successful transition from the existing Minuteman III 
weapon system. Such efforts will necessarily require the use of 
civilian roads and highways in adjacent communities in addition 
to on-base infrastructure. As such, the committee encourages 
the Air Force to closely consult with local civic leaders and 
community stakeholders as it finalizes planning for updating 
the ICBM force.
    Further, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the congressional defense 
committees, not later than March 1, 2022, on the status of its 
plans for managing ICBM movements during the transition from 
Minuteman III to the GBSD, including any expected roadway 
improvements required to facilitate the safe transport of ICBMs 
in and around the communities adjacent to the three ICBM bases.

Briefing on alignment of Missile Defense Agency's space development 
        activities

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the congressional defense committees on whether 
those personnel and programmatic activities performing space 
functions within the Missile Defense Agency should be aligned 
under the Space Force given that the development of such 
payloads is inherently a space mission. The briefing shall be 
due not later than March 31, 2022.

Briefing on protection of Air Force nuclear storage facilities

    The committee notes that the Air Force is commencing 
recapitalization of nuclear weapons storage and generation 
facilities at select Air Force bases. The security of these 
storage facilities is paramount. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Air Force to brief the 
congressional defense committees on the security technology and 
associated procedures utilized on these planned facilities not 
later than March 31, 2022.

Commercial cloud computing in military space programs

    The committee recognizes the importance of the collection, 
transport, processing, and dissemination of large quantities of 
data for space operations as well as the range of challenges 
associated with these activities. The committee further 
recognizes and commends the efforts of the U.S. Space Force to 
build itself as a digital service, embracing the best of 
commercial and government technologies to remain a quick, agile 
organization. The committee believes that the use of commercial 
cloud services for military space programs merits further study 
and, as appropriate, rapid adoption.
    Therefore, the committee directs the U.S. Space Force Chief 
Technology and Innovation Officer, in coordination with the 
Commander of the Space and Missile Systems Center and the 
Department of Defense Chief Information Officer, to provide a 
briefing to the congressional defense committees, not later 
than October 1, 2021, on how the Space Force will leverage 
modern cloud computing technologies for space programs and 
systems. The plan should include:
          (1) An inventory of current space programs with a 
        description of how the activities do or do not leverage 
        cloud-based technologies;
          (2) Opportunities to increase modern commercial cloud 
        technology adoption, including full and open 
        competitions for industry providers;
          (3) Challenges or impediments related to adoption of 
        such technology;
          (4) Timelines and resources required to execute the 
        plan for cloud-technology adoption for space programs; 
        and
          (5) Challenges and risks associated with relying on 
        such commercial cloud technology for critical space 
        systems.

Commercial Space Technologies

    The committee recognizes that U.S. commercial remote 
sensing capabilities serve an important national security 
function for the Department of Defense and the Intelligence 
Community. Timely, accurate geospatial intelligence (GEOINT) 
and satellite imagery is integral to the safety and 
effectiveness of our Nation's warfighters. The committee 
supports programs and exercises that leverage commercial GEOINT 
satellites and automatic target recognition systems using the 
latest artificial intelligence capabilities. As such, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense, not later than 
March 31, 2022, to provide a briefing to the congressional 
defense committees that provides an assessment of opportunities 
to enhance the integration of commercial capabilities into 
current and planned Sensor-to-Shooter programs.

Cybersecurity of Missile Defense Systems

    The committee believes that it is extremely important that 
the Department of Defense (DOD) is ensuring that the missile 
defense system is ready for warfighter use and is maintained in 
such a manner as to maximize day to day readiness in the event 
of an attack against the United States.
    Operational cybersecurity testing is intended to identify 
cyber vulnerabilities, examine potential attack paths, evaluate 
operational cyber defense capabilities, and identify the 
potential operational mission effects (e.g., loss of critical 
operational capability) in a cyber-threat environment while 
conducting operational missions. Persistent Cyber Operations 
(PCO) consist of emulation of adversarial cyberattacks 
conducted by National Security Agency-certified cyber red teams 
over the lifetime of a system or network in order to find and 
fix mission critical cyber vulnerabilities. PCO assessments 
have found a number of previously undetected critical 
vulnerabilities, resulting in fixes that have reduced the 
potential for adverse mission effects.
    The Missile Defense Agency (MDA) completed all fiscal year 
2020 Operational Capability Baseline decisions without 
information from operational cybersecurity testing. 
Additionally, some elements of the Ballistic Missile Defense 
System (BMDS) have not undergone persistent cyber operations 
once fielded. Absent a clear understanding of the cyber 
vulnerabilities and potential operational mission effects of a 
cyberattack, the MDA cannot be certain that the system can 
successfully accomplish its mission in the hands of the 
warfighter under realistic cyber-threat conditions.
    The Government Accountability Office, the DOD's Director of 
Operational Test and Evaluation (DOT&E), and the BMDS 
Operational Test Agency team (OTA) have previously identified 
shortfalls in MDA's cybersecurity testing for both planned and 
currently deployed capabilities. DOT&E and BMDS OTA have made 
recommendations to address shortfalls in MDA's cyber testing. 
The committee believes it is extremely important that these 
valuable national security assets are adequately protected 
against cyber-threats, and that the current cybersecurity 
testing approach is insufficient to ensure operational 
assurance. The committee strongly encourages the MDA to rectify 
these shortfalls in identifying and addressing cybersecurity 
vulnerabilities.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Director of the MDA, 
in consultation with the DOT&E, to provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees, not later than November 30, 
2021, on the MDA's plan to conduct persistent cyber operations 
across all networks and systems supporting the BMDS, and to 
complete operational cybersecurity testing prior to the 
declaration of a new missile defense operational capability 
baseline. The plan shall include:
          (1) An inventory of all networks and systems that 
        support the BMDS;
          (2) A strategy for coordinating with the applicable 
        combatant commands on persistent cyber operations, and 
        to have the DOT&E monitor and review these operations 
        and provide independent assessments of their adequacy 
        and sufficiency;
          (3) A strategy to ensure that operational capability 
        baseline decisions incorporate results from operational 
        cybersecurity testing;
          (4) How the MDA will respond to cybersecurity testing 
        recommendations made by DOT&E and BMDS OTA; and
          (5) The timeline required to execute the plan.

Detection Capability of Homeland Defense Radar-Hawaii

    The committee directs the Director of the Missile Defense 
Agency, in consultation with the Commander, U.S. Indo-Pacific 
Command, to provide a briefing not later than January 31, 2022, 
to the congressional defense committees on the current threats, 
future threats, and the capability that Homeland Defense Radar-
Hawaii provides against future threats.

Geophysical detection of nuclear proliferation

    The committee notes that there are four primary nuclear 
explosion monitoring technologies: radionuclide collection and 
seismic, hydroacoustic, and infrasound waveform detection and 
identification. Waveform data are derived from recording the 
movement of energy that certain events generate and propagate 
as seismic, hydroacoustic, or acoustic waves through the Earth, 
oceans, or atmosphere. Sensors are deployed globally and in 
strategic configurations to target specific regions of the 
Earth and atmosphere.
    To escape international nuclear explosion monitoring 
detection, potential proliferators may explosively test smaller 
nuclear yields that remain below current monitoring detection 
thresholds in buried and sealed chambers that largely prevent 
radionuclide collection and definitive attribution. Ongoing 
efforts to detect lower yields often overwhelm existing data 
processing systems and human analytical capabilities, 
particularly with the incorporation of machine learning and 
``big data.'' Aside from nuclear explosions monitoring, sensors 
also typically process and analyze earthquake, volcanic 
activity, and other natural geophysical sources. Most other 
man-made seismic and acoustic detections are eliminated from 
the dataset as ``noise,'' despite the potential of these 
datasets to help detect and identify relevant aircraft, 
missiles, and, potentially, vehicle traffic. Uncertainty 
associated with the detection and characterization of seismic 
acoustic events is also poorly understood, yet critical for 
successful implementation.
    The committee therefore directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Nuclear, Chemical and Biological Defense Programs 
to provide a report on enhancing U.S. global nuclear detection 
capabilities to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate 
and the House of Representatives, not later than September 30, 
2022. The report should explore the following:
          (1) Using new or existing local or regional seismic 
        acoustic networks to increase detection probability and 
        characterization of low-yield nuclear detonations;
          (2) Developing artificial intelligence and machine 
        learning tools to assist with data management and 
        increase event analysis accuracy, specificity, and 
        speed;
          (3) Creating automated seismic acoustic detection and 
        analytical solution linkages to existing and developing 
        domain awareness and command and control systems; and
          (4) Developing waveform catalogues that facilitate 
        the detection, location, and characterization of global 
        non-nuclear tactical or strategic events of interest.

Integrated satellite communications strategy

    The committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to 
provide to the congressional defense committees a briefing on 
the integrated satellite communications enterprise strategy 
integrating commercial and military satellite communications 
architectures to be submitted with the budget request for 
fiscal year 2023. The briefing on the enterprise strategy shall 
be provided to the committees not later than March 31, 2022. 
The briefing should outline requirements for an integrated 
commercial and military satellite communications infrastructure 
including:
          (1) A quantifiable assessment of the requirements and 
        capabilities commercial satellite providers must meet 
        to supplement fixed military bandwidth needs and plans 
        to institutionalize these requirements in future years;
          (2) The Department of Defense's plans to ensure 
        efficient acquisition of commercial satellite 
        communications and incentivize commercial industry and 
        international partners in their partnerships with the 
        Department, including a review of which requirements 
        can be met by commercial providers, or revised to allow 
        commercial participation, in compliance with section 
        2377 of title 10, United States Code;
          (3) A comparative evaluation of non-traditional or 
        innovative methods for buying satellite communication 
        capabilities based on demand. Such an evaluation shall 
        consider both:
                  (a) Prior inefficiencies resulting from the 
                Department's historical and inefficient 
                practice of contracting with commercial 
                providers on an ad hoc basis; and
                  (b) Various alternative satellite 
                communications acquisition methods, including 
                consumption-based models, as examined by 
                previous pilot programs and pathfinders; and
          (4) An investment plan across the future years 
        defense program to implement the strategy, including 
        ground infrastructure modernization.

Laser threats to low earth orbit constellations

    The committee believes that stakeholders in the national 
security community need a coordinated strategy to counter the 
threat of lasers against space assets in low earth orbit (LEO) 
in order to secure the benefits of those assets. Accordingly, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in consultation 
with the Director of National Intelligence and supported by the 
Space Force, National Reconnaissance Office, and other 
stakeholders as may be identified, to provide a briefing, not 
later than March 31, 2022, to the congressional defense and 
intelligence committees that identifies: (1) Plans to collect, 
consolidate, and characterize laser activity data of potential 
U.S. adversaries; and (2) Plans to mitigate the effects of that 
activity to LEO space architectures.

Long-term oversight of the Department of Defense's efforts to deploy 
        Overhead Persistent Infrared space-based architectures

    Through fiscal year 2025, the Space Force plans to spend 
over $14.0 billion to acquire a follow-on to the Space Based 
Infrared System, called Next Generation Overhead Persistent 
Infrared (OPIR). The Air Force plans to use an accelerated 
middle-tier acquisition process to rapidly develop an initial 
block (Block 0) of five Next Generation OPIR satellites and 
associated ground capabilities, with fielding to begin in 
fiscal year 2025. Development of these satellites is to focus 
on core strategic missile warning requirements. The Space Force 
plans for a follow-on block (Block 1) that would begin fielding 
satellites in the 2030s, in a yet-to-be determined 
architecture, to enhance and provide additional capabilities. 
Moreover, the Space Development Agency, Missile Defense Agency, 
and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency are pursuing the 
development of low Earth orbit satellites with OPIR sensors 
that could detect and track additional threats, such as 
hypersonic missiles, with initial satellites to be launched 
over the next several years. Analysis is currently underway on 
integrating these efforts into the follow-on Block 1 
architecture.
    The Government Accountability Office (GAO) published a 
report on June 3, 2020, titled ``Defense Acquisitions Annual 
Assessment: Drive to Deliver Capabilities Faster Increases 
Importance of Program Knowledge and Consistent Data for 
Oversight'' (GAO-20-349), that stated the Block 0 Next 
Generation OPIR system is at high risk of schedule delays and 
consequent cost increases. Given the high cost of developing 
and fielding OPIR systems and the importance of the missions 
these systems are to support, it is important for the committee 
to understand the extent to which the Department of Defense 
(DOD) is effectively coordinating and executing its OPIR 
acquisition efforts, including how DOD is addressing risks that 
imperil meeting cost, schedule, and performance goals.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to periodically review: (1) The status of DOD 
OPIR programs to determine the extent to which they are on-
track for delivering needed capabilities and meeting schedule 
milestones and cost estimates; and (2) How DOD is identifying 
and mitigating risks within and across the efforts to help 
ensure mission success. To facilitate GAO's reviews, DOD shall 
provide to the Comptroller General quarterly, or other timely, 
periodic component, systems, or program-wide risk assessments 
for each OPIR program, to include risk items the program is 
tracking; risk likelihood and consequence ratings; and risk 
mitigation and specific plans, schedules, and updates for 
addressing, mitigating, or resolving these risks. To mitigate 
any burden this may pose, the Department is encouraged to work 
with the Comptroller General, or designee, to identify existing 
documentation that can be shared to meet these purposes. For 
each review, the Comptroller General shall provide GAO's 
findings to the congressional defense committees in a briefing 
on a date mutually agreed on by the Comptroller General and the 
congressional defense committees and, as deemed appropriate, 
provide a report to the congressional defense committees.

Mix of media study audit

    The Department of Defense (DOD) relies on satellite 
communications (SATCOM) to support a variety of critical 
mission needs such as surveillance performed by unmanned aerial 
vehicles and communications between commanders and field units. 
DOD meets its SATCOM needs through a mix of military and 
commercial SATCOM to support land, sea, air, and space 
operations. In 2014, the Defense Information Systems Agency 
completed a SATCOM Mix-of-Media (MoM) study to examine the 
planned mix of wideband, narrowband, protected, and commercial 
SATCOM to meet user requirements in the 2018-2030 time frame 
and to inform future investments. This was a follow-up to a 
prior MoM study completed in 2010. Given changes in the DOD's 
planned SATCOM needs since 2014, it is unclear whether data 
resulting from the 2014 study are still relevant in helping the 
DOD prioritize SATCOM investments and plan for future 
requirements. Further, it is unknown whether the DOD has plans 
to update the previous study with more recent SATCOM usage and 
requirements inputs to reflect current and anticipated 
warfighter needs.
    The committee believes it is important for the DOD to have 
an accurate representation of current and planned SATCOM 
capabilities and estimates of warfighter needs to enable the 
DOD to determine how best to satisfy such needs. Consequently, 
the committee directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to: (1) Determine the extent to which the DOD uses data 
from its 2014 study and whether such data remain relevant for 
the DOD's SATCOM planning efforts; (2) Identify whether the DOD 
has plans to update the existing study or use other forecasting 
methodologies in its place, and if so, review the planned 
inputs and rationales the DOD plans to use in its update; and 
(3) Review any other relevant issues the Comptroller General 
deems appropriate.
    The committee directs the Comptroller General to brief 
preliminary observations to the congressional defense 
committees not later than March 31, 2022, with final report to 
be delivered on a date agreed upon with the committees.

Responsive launch prize

    The committee directs the Chief of Space Operations to 
provide a briefing to the congressional defense committees, not 
later than February 28, 2022, on the feasibility of using the 
prize authority found under section 2374a of title 10, United 
States Code, for launch responsiveness to replace key national 
security satellites and reconstitute essential constellations 
during a conflict. The briefing shall include options that push 
existing launch capabilities to the technological limit in 
areas of payload size, number of payloads, and launch sites, 
with an emphasis on varied and survivable locations.

Review of Ballistic Missile Defense Readiness and Sustainment

    For over half a century, the Department of Defense (DOD) 
has funded efforts to defend the United States from ballistic 
missile attacks. From 2002 to 2019, the Missile Defense Agency 
(MDA) received approximately $162.0 billion to develop the 
Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS). The BMDS--recently 
renamed the Missile Defense System (MDS)--consists of diverse 
and highly complex land-, sea-, and space-based systems and 
assets located across the globe. For years, the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) has annually reviewed the cost, 
schedule, testing, and performance of the BMDS and its varied 
elements. However, it has been more than 10 years since GAO 
last assessed the sustainment and readiness of the BMDS.
    The committee believes that it is extremely important that 
the DOD is ensuring that the MDS is ready for warfighter use 
and has been maintained in such a manner as to maximize day to 
day readiness in the event of an attack against the United 
States.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to undertake a review of MDA programs and 
activities for sustaining the MDS and maintaining system 
readiness. At a minimum, the Comptroller General's review shall 
address the following questions:
          (1) To what extent has DOD identified and addressed 
        readiness challenges affecting the MDS;
          (2) To what extent has DOD identified and addressed 
        sustainment challenges with major elements of its MDS; 
        and
          (3) To what extent has DOD identified, addressed, and 
        budgeted for the maintenance and sustainment of its 
        future MDS force structure needs?
    The Comptroller General shall provide a briefing to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives on the status of this review not later than 
June 1, 2022, with a report to be provided at a time mutually 
agreed upon by the committees and the Comptroller General.

Space Force Combatant Commander Integrated Command and Control System

    The Space Force's Combatant Commanders' Integrated Command 
and Control System (CCIC2S) was a program intended to modernize 
and integrate existing and legacy systems for air, missile, and 
space warning capabilities. These capabilities are critical to 
ensuring the safety and security of the U.S. Homeland. Started 
in 2000, the CCIC2S program experienced significant challenges 
leading to large cost increases and performance shortfalls, 
similar to challenges faced by programs that were predecessors 
to CCIC2S. More recently, the Space Force has been planning how 
to modernize and enhance the CCIC2S capabilities, including 
conducting an analysis of alternatives to help determine the 
best way forward.
    Considering the Department of Defense's past challenges in 
modernizing its command and control system capabilities, the 
committee directs the Comptroller General of the United States 
to review: (1) The status of planning for and implementing 
efforts to modernize and enhance CCIC2S capabilities; (2) Key 
challenges these efforts face and how the Space Force is 
addressing them; and (3) How the U.S. Space Command is 
validating the requirements and planning efforts of the Space 
Force to modernize and enhance CCIC2S capabilities. The 
committee directs the Comptroller General to brief its 
preliminary observations to the congressional defense 
committees not later than March 31, 2022.

Tactical satellite commutations capability

    The committee recognizes that space is an increasingly 
contested domain and that large geostationary satellites are 
vulnerable to interference or destruction. The committee is 
encouraged that the Department of Defense is researching and 
developing tactical satellite communications capabilities that 
are resilient, inexpensive, and can provide high-throughput 
communications across a wide range of frequencies on demand. 
The committee encourages the U.S. Space Force to consider the 
development and deployment of small, flexible communications 
satellites that meet connectivity and reconstitution 
objectives.

Tactically Responsive Space Launch

    The committee continues to emphasize the critical need for 
the Department of Defense (DOD) to develop an enduring, robust 
program to execute tactically responsive space launch. The 
committee notes that in the William M. (Mac) Thornberry 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public 
Law 116-283), the Congress directed DOD to establish a 
Tactically Responsive Space Launch program to enable space 
responsiveness and to fund it over the future years defense 
program. To facilitate the implementation of tactically 
responsive launch operations, the committee recommends the 
Department implement and conduct multiple tactically responsive 
launch demonstrations missions to support both unclassified and 
classified mission areas that would benefit from rapid space 
reconstitution, space augmentation, and the ability to launch 
without dependence on fixed launch sites.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense and the 
Director of National Intelligence, not later than January 31, 
2022, to provide a briefing to the congressional defense and 
intelligence committees on a plan, including an acquisition 
strategy, to operationalize the ability of the United States to 
rapidly respond to threats to satellites, launch sites, and 
launch systems within operational timeframes, leveraging the 
commercial launch and space industry in support of national 
security space objectives. Additionally, the briefing shall 
include manufacturing capabilities necessary to integrate 
tactically responsive space launch with large-scale digital 
manufacturing techniques capable of producing rapid, on demand 
custom solutions.

Use of commercial space-based Intelligence, Surveillance, and 
        Reconnaissance by the combatant commands

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and 
the U.S. Space Force Chief of Space Operations, to provide to 
the congressional defense committees, not later than March 31, 
2022, a detailed briefing on the commercial space-based 
Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) needs of 
the combatant commands including through various weather 
phenomenon. The briefing shall include, but not be limited to: 
(1) A description of current space-based ISR requirements of 
the combatant commands and what subset of the requirements 
could be met with commercial capability; (2) An analysis of how 
the Department is or will be leveraging commercial space-based 
solutions to meet combatant commanders' requirements over the 
next 5 years; (3) What in the Department's strategy to address 
these needs is similar to the Mix-of-Media Study performed for 
the purchase of commercial satellite communications (SATCOM); 
(4) An assessment of risks of over-reliance on commercial 
space-based ISR in a time of conflict in space and other 
domains; (5) An assessment of combatant commands' ability to 
directly task space-based ISR for their respective areas of 
interests; and (6) An assessment as to whether the Chief of 
Space Operations of the Space Force, in consultation with the 
Commander of U.S. Space Command, can economically and 
competitively make bulk purchases of commercial spaced-based 
ISR for the combatant commands similar to bulk purchases of 
commercial SATCOM.

B-52 Commercial Engine Replacement Program (CERP)

    The committee is aware that the B-52H bomber fleet's TF33-
09PW-103 engines are becoming increasingly difficult to sustain 
due to obsolete technologies and will become unsustainable by 
2030. Accordingly, replacing the engines with a modern system 
is necessary to achieve the Air Force's long-term plans for the 
B-52 to remain in service through 2050. Moreover, the 
installation of new engines and subsystems will improve 
reliability, maintainability, and supply additional electrical 
power generation capabilities with application for emerging 
requirements. Additionally, while the replacement engines are 
expected to have similar size, weight, and thrust 
characteristics, the incorporation of modern technology will 
provide operational benefits, including extended range and 
loiter capabilities as well as increased fuel efficiency. The 
committee expects the Air Force to keep it fully informed of 
developments relating to cost, schedule, and program execution 
for this effort.

Multi-actor deterrence methodology

    As the global security landscape becomes more challenging, 
competitive, and characterized by multipolarity, the committee 
believes new methodologies and models to assess complex multi-
actor interactions will be of increasing value and have 
particular application to deterrence frameworks. Further, the 
committee is aware of a growing body of academic work in this 
field that could benefit policymakers. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than March 31, 2022, 
on the development of new tools to enhance the Department's 
ability to assess and understand multi-actor relationships 
related to deterrence, including the use of, where appropriate, 
university affiliated research centers with expertise in this 
area.

Intelligent electronic protection technologies

    The committee notes that ensuring reliable and resilient 
positioning, navigation, and timing systems is critical to 
national security. The committee encourages the Secretary of 
the Army to continue to leverage artificial intelligence and 
machine learning to provide real time situational awareness 
data to maintain operational capabilities.

Global Nuclear Landscape

    The committee believes the Defense Intelligence Agency's 
(DIA's) 2018 Global Nuclear Landscape report provides unique 
value as an unclassified summary of foreign nations' nuclear 
weapons-related capabilities. Additionally, the committee notes 
with concern the rapid changes occurring in foreign nuclear 
weapons programs and believes there is a sustained need for 
unclassified assessments in this regard. Accordingly, the 
committee directs the Director of the DIA to submit to the 
congressional defense committees and congressional intelligence 
committees, not later than December 1, 2022, and biennially 
thereafter for the following 6-year period, an unclassified 
report on the nuclear weapons-related capabilities, programs, 
infrastructure, and doctrine of the Russian Federation, the 
People's Republic of China, and the Democratic People's 
Republic of Korea, as well as any other nations the Director 
deems appropriate.

Report on mitigating the impact of space debris

    In 2007, China conducted an anti-satellite test against an 
inoperable Chinese satellite in low earth orbit (below 1,000 
Km) generating over 3,000 pieces of debris, some of which will 
remain in orbit for centuries. In 2013, one of the pieces of 
debris collided with a Russian satellite severely damaging it. 
In 2017, another piece of debris passed within 6 Km of the 
International Space Station. In 2009, a Russian military 
communications satellite collided with an Iridium satellite at 
11,700 meters per second, generating over 2,000 pieces of 
debris greater than 10 cm into a low earth orbit. On March 24, 
2012, one of those pieces of debris passed within 120 meters of 
the International Space Station causing six crew members to 
take refuge inside the two docked Soyuz rendezvous spacecraft. 
During a May 26, 2021, Strategic Forces Subcommittee hearing on 
``space force, military space operations, policy and 
programs,'' the Acting Assistant Secretary of Defense for Space 
Policy stated that while most countries respond to inquiries 
for possible space conjunction, ``there are two countries that 
often do not pick up the phone or answer the email, and what we 
are trying to focus on is your basic safety.'' When asked which 
two countries did not pick up the phone, the answer was ``our 
good friends Russia and China.''
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in consultation with other elements of the Executive Branch, as 
needed, to report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than April 31, 2022, on efforts to ensure adequate 
communications are present between the United States and Russia 
and China to mitigate future conjunctions on a timely basis. 
The report shall include actions by both official and non-
governmental efforts to date with recommendations that can be 
taken in the short and long term to avoid conjunctions and in 
particularly U.S. national security satellites.

National Security Space Launch emerging requirements

    Over the past 10 years the committee has worked with the 
Department of Defense and the Air Force in particular to re-
structure what was once a sole source program into one that is 
competitive and consistent with the foundations of section 2273 
of title 10, United States Code, ``Policy regarding assured 
access to space national security payloads,'' which requires 
``at least two space launch vehicles (or families of space 
launch vehicles) capable of delivering into space any payload 
designated by the Secretary of Defense or the Director of 
National Intelligence as a national security payload.'' This 
has resulted in two phases of the National Security Space 
Launch program with hundreds of millions of dollars in savings 
to the taxpayer for inserting critical national security 
payloads into space with high mission assurance. Based on the 
Phase II National Security Space Launch Program, the Department 
of the Air Force is now developing a Phase III launch 
solicitation in the 2025 timeframe. Accordingly, the committee 
believes it is important for the Department to consider the 
next steps in transformational heavy launch based on the 
lessons and success--and savings to the taxpayer of Phases I 
and II of the National Security Space Launch Program.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force submit to the congressional defense committees a report, 
not later than April 30, 2022, detailing the following 
elements: an analysis of the benefits of competing national 
security space launches to accelerate the rapid development and 
on-orbit deployment of the technologies required to address 
emerging requirements that include new payloads larger than 
currently deployed under Phase II; innovative solutions to 
accelerate national security space launch heavy-lift 
capability; satellite ride-sharing or mixed manifest payloads; 
other new missions outside the parameters of the existing nine 
design reference missions in Phase II; and other requirements 
the Secretary of the Air Force considers appropriate. In 
addition, the report shall include a discussion on potential 
acquisition frameworks to enable a path that could allow new 
launch providers to seek national security launch 
certification; promote open and sustainable competition for 
Phase III of an acquisition strategy for the National Security 
Space Launch Program; and reduce the timeline for capability 
development and on-orbit deployment by prioritizing processes 
that encourage smart risk taking. Finally, the report shall 
include an analysis of the extent to which the Phase III 
program would contribute to a continued reduction in the cost 
per launch of national security payloads.
    The committee notes that the heavy lift launch market is 
now undergoing a transformational shift and expects the Air 
Force and the Department of Defense as a whole to promote this 
transformation and reap the benefits that are occurring now and 
in the future. The committee hopes that this report will lay 
the ground work for the path the Air Force will begin to 
undertake as it shapes the Phase III National Security Space 
Launch Program.

High energy laser technology integration

    The committee recognizes that the Department of Defense is 
making gains in the use of various high energy laser 
technologies such as fiber and slab lasing mediums for high 
power coherent beams. Given these recent improvements in lasing 
technologies, and the concomitant potential for improving the 
cost effectiveness of future air and missile defense systems--
particularly in counter-raid scenarios--the committee believes 
that the Secretary of Defense should emphasize, where 
appropriate, the integration of high-energy laser technology in 
carrying out the planning for, and execution of, research and 
development activities for future air and missile defense 
systems.

Leveraging commercial space domain awareness capability, data, products 
        and services

    The committee notes that with the rapid increase in 
commercial activities in space, there has been a corresponding 
increase in the commercial capability to track objects in 
space. Previous National Defense Authorization Acts have 
provided direction to leverage these commercial space domain 
awareness capabilities. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Commander, U.S. Space Command, to provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees, not later than March 31, 
2022, on progress made to use commercial space domain awareness 
capabilities.

                 TITLE XVI--CYBERSPACE-RELATED MATTERS

Matters concerning cyber personnel requirements (sec. 1601)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to conduct an assessment to determine the 
overall cyber and information operation civilian and military 
personnel and education requirements of the Department of 
Defense. The provision would require a briefing not later than 
November 1, 2022, and a report not later than January 1, 2023, 
to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives on the findings of the assessment required 
by the provision, an implementation plan to achieve the 
civilian and military personnel requirements of the Department, 
such recommendations as the Secretary may have for meeting 
personnel needs in the cyber and information operation domain, 
and such legislative or regulatory action as the Secretary 
considers necessary to meet personnel requirements.
Cyber data management (sec. 1602)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, acting through the Principal Cyber 
Advisor to the Secretary and the Department of Defense (DOD) 
Chief Information Officer, to develop a cyber data management 
strategy not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act. The strategy would cover data acquired 
from DOD intelligence and counterintelligence components, 
including the National Security Agency and U.S. Cyber Command 
(CYBERCOM), as well as DOD cybersecurity service providers, 
cyber threat information from industry and other Government 
agencies, and data gathered from comprehensive collection 
within the DOD Information Network (DODIN). The provision would 
require the Secretary to develop processes or operating 
procedures governing the ingest, structuring, and storage of 
such intelligence data, cyber threat information and DODIN 
sensor, tool, routing infrastructure, and endpoint data in Big 
Data Platform instances, relevant Cyber Operations Force 
systems, relevant CYBERCOM commercial cloud enclaves, and other 
DOD data lakes containing information pertinent to CYBERCOM 
missions. The Secretary would also be required to develop a 
strategy for piloting efforts, operational workflows, and 
tactics, techniques, and procedures for the operational use of 
mission data by the Cyber Operations Force.
    In addition, the provision would require the Secretary to 
establish, not later than 270 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, the specific roles and responsibilities 
of DOD officials and components in implementing each of the 
provision's enumerated tasks and to provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 300 days after 
the date of the enactment of this Act.
Assignment of certain budget control responsibilities to Commander of 
        United States Cyber Command (sec. 1603)
    The committee recommends a provision that would assign to 
the Commander, U.S. Cyber Command, responsibility for directly 
controlling and managing the planning, programming, budgeting, 
and execution of the resources to train, equip, operate, and 
sustain the Cyber Mission Forces, subject to the authority, 
direction, and control of the Principal Cyber Advisor of the 
Department of Defense. The provision would not assign to the 
Commander responsibility for military pay and allowances and 
funding for facility support provided by the military services. 
The provision would also require various elements of the 
Department to develop an implementation plan for the transition 
of budgetary responsibilities described in the provision to the 
Commander, U.S. Cyber Command. Finally, the provision would 
require the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees on the implementation plan, 
not later than 90 days after the enactment of this Act or the 
date on which the implementation plan is completed, whichever 
is earlier.

Coordination between United States Cyber Command and private sector 
        (sec. 1604)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Commander, U.S. Cyber Command, to establish a voluntary process 
for engaging with the commercial information technology and 
cybersecurity companies to explore and develop methods of 
assistance or coordination to protect against foreign malicious 
cyber actors. The provision would require the Commander to 
provide briefings, at least annually through March 1, 2026, on 
the status of any activities conducted under this section to 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives.

Pilot program on public-private partnerships with internet ecosystem 
        companies to detect and disrupt adversary cyber operations 
        (sec. 1605)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish and commence a pilot program 
to assess the feasibility and advisability of entering into 
voluntary public-private partnerships with internet ecosystem 
companies to facilitate actions by such companies to discover 
and disrupt the use of the platforms, systems, services, and 
infrastructure of such companies by malicious cyber actors. The 
provision would also require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide two briefings, not later than 1 year and 540 days, 
respectively, to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate 
and the House of Representatives on the pilot program.
    The committee is concerned that foreign cyber actors and 
major cyber criminal organizations are operating with near 
impunity on cyber infrastructure and services provided by U.S. 
internet and information technology companies. The committee 
notes that components of the Department of Defense (DOD) have 
unique and extensive technical and operational expertise 
regarding the ways in which such threat actors utilize such 
platforms and services to threaten the Department of Defense, 
the Government as a whole, and critical infrastructure 
supporting national security. The committee also believes that 
the companies providing this information technology 
infrastructure and services are also quite sophisticated in 
their understanding of the ways in which their platforms and 
services are being utilized for malicious cyber activities. The 
committee believes that partnerships between the Department and 
leading service providers could substantially improve the 
Nation's cybersecurity by making it much harder for foreign 
cyber actors to conduct operations on this infrastructure. The 
committee stresses that the DOD's role would be limited to 
sharing information and technical insights with partner 
companies.

Zero trust strategy, principles, model architecture, and implementation 
        plans (sec. 1606)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Chief Information Officer (CIO) of the Department of Defense 
(DOD) and the Commander, Joint Forces Headquarters-Department 
of Defense Information Network (JFHQ-DODIN), to jointly develop 
a zero trust strategy and a model architecture for the DODIN, 
including classified networks, operational technology, and 
weapon systems.
    The provision would also require the heads of the military 
departments and DOD Components to develop detailed 
implementation plans for the zero trust strategy and model 
architecture and submit the plans to the DOD CIO and the 
Commander, JFHQ-DODIN, for certification.
    The provision would also require briefings on the zero 
trust architecture and strategy and implementation plans to the 
congressional defense committees and updates on the 
implementation of zero trust architecture by the DOD and 
service CIOs during the annual cybersecurity budget review 
briefings.
    The committee remains concerned about the Department's slow 
adoption of zero trust principles and supports efforts to 
engender a Department-wide cybersecurity paradigm shift towards 
embracing critical elements of a zero trust architecture, 
including identity, credential, and access management; macro 
and micro network segmentation; least privilege access 
controls; and endpoint cybersecurity.

Demonstration program for automated security validation tools (sec. 
        1607)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Chief Information Officer (CIO) of the Department of Defense 
(DOD), acting through the Director of the Defense Information 
Systems Agency, to complete a demonstration program to 
demonstrate and assess an automated security validation 
capability to assist the DOD by: (1) Mitigating cyber hygiene 
challenges; (2) Supporting DOD efforts to assess weapon system 
resiliency; (3) Quantifying enterprise security effectiveness 
of enterprise security controls to inform future acquisition 
decisions; (4) Assisting portfolio managers with balancing 
capability costs and coverage; and (5) Supporting the DOD 
Cybersecurity Analysis and Review threat framework. The 
provision would also require the CIO to provide briefings to 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives on the demonstration pilot. The committee 
encourages the Department to build advanced capabilities to 
test the cybersecurity vulnerabilities of the DOD information 
networks.

Improvements to consortium of universities to advise Secretary of 
        Defense on cybersecurity matters (sec. 1608)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1659 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) to designate the National 
Defense University College of Information and Cyberspace as the 
administrative chair of the consortium to advise the Secretary 
of Defense on cybersecurity matters and allow the Secretary to 
form an executive committee for the consortium.
    The provision would also require the Secretary to consult 
with the consortium not less than twice annually, or as 
regularly as agreed by the Secretary and the consortium, and 
the provision makes conforming amendments.
    The committee commends the Department of Defense on its 
efforts to advance the University Consortium for Cybersecurity 
as required by the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020. The committee believes that the Department 
has made significant progress on a path forward to achieve the 
committee's intent for the Department to leverage the 
capabilities of academic institutions to help gain and maintain 
cutting edge cybersecurity information and products. The 
committee encourages the Department to continue progress on its 
envisioned use of a university consortium to leverage the 
broadest possible subset of academic institutions in support of 
Department cybersecurity requirements, to include its 
envisioned use of a university to perform consortium support 
activities.
    The committee continues to recognize that an increase in 
national cybersecurity education, training, and workforce 
development efforts is necessary to counter the growing threats 
posed by advanced persistent cyber actors. The committee 
strongly supports the education and research programs in 
cybersecurity and critical infrastructure protection that exist 
at the academic institutions that have been designated as Cyber 
Centers of Academic Excellence for cyber operations, cyber 
research, and cyber defense. The committee believes that these 
institutions can provide a diverse workforce pipeline to meet 
the Nation's cybersecurity needs and encourages the Department 
of Defense to continue looking for opportunities to utilize 
these academic institutions further.

Quarterly reports on cyber operations (sec. 1609)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 484 of title 10, United States Code, to require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a quarterly report, in addition 
to a quarterly briefing, on all offensive and significant 
defensive military operations in cyberspace carried out by the 
Department of Defense to the congressional defense committees.
    The committee believes that the ability to conduct regular 
and continuous oversight of sensitive military cyber operations 
rests on timely and appropriately detailed information from the 
Department. Recent quarterly operations briefings have covered 
only a portion of the information required in section 484 of 
title 10, United States Code. As a result, the committee 
believes that receiving an accompanying report containing all 
of the required information is necessary to enable the 
committee to understand the risks, benefits, and consequences 
of sensitive military operations.

Assessment of cybersecurity posture and operational assumptions and 
        development of targeting strategies and supporting capabilities 
        (sec. 1610)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require an 
assessment, not later than 1 year after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, by the Commander, U.S. Cyber Command, 
Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, and the Under Secretary 
of Defense for Intelligence and Security of the current and 
emerging offensive cyber posture of adversaries of the United 
States and the current operational assumptions and plans of the 
military services for offensive cyber operations during 
potential crises or conflict.
    The provision would also require the Commander to develop 
targeting strategies, supporting capabilities, and operational 
concepts and to provide a briefing to the congressional defense 
committees, not later than 30 days after completing the 
activities. Finally, the provision would require, not later 
than 1 year after the previous activities are completed, 
country-specific access strategies for the Russian Federation, 
the People's Republic of China, the Democratic People's 
Republic of Korea, and the Islamic Republic of Iran. The 
Commander would provide briefings of these strategies to the 
Deputy Secretary of Defense, the Vice Chairman of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff, and the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives.

Assessing capabilities to counter adversary use of ransomware tools, 
        capabilities, and infrastructure (sec. 1611)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to conduct a comprehensive assessment of 
the policy, capacity, and capabilities of the Department of 
Defense (DOD) to diminish and defend the United States from 
ransomware threats. The provision would also require a briefing 
to the congressional defense committees on the results of the 
assessment not later than April 1, 2022.
    The committee notes that the 2018 DOD Cyber Strategy states 
``the Department seeks to preempt, defeat, or deter malicious 
cyber activity targeting U.S. critical infrastructure that 
could cause a significant cyber incident regardless of whether 
that incident would impact DoD's warfighting readiness or 
capability. Our primary role in this homeland defense mission 
is to defend forward by leveraging our focus outward to stop 
threats before they reach their targets. The Department also 
provides public and private sector partners with indications 
and warning (I&W) of malicious cyber activity, in coordination 
with other Federal departments and agencies.'' The committee 
encourages DOD to think broadly about how its expansive cyber 
capabilities could be applied to the growing ransomware threat.

Comparative analysis of cybersecurity capabilities (sec. 1612)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Principal Cyber Advisor to the Secretary of Defense and the 
Director of Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation, in 
consultation with the Chief Information Officers and Principal 
Cyber Advisors of each of the military departments, to jointly 
sponsor a comparative analysis, conducted by the Director of 
the National Security Agency and the Director of the Defense 
Information Systems Agency, of various tools, applications, and 
capabilities offered as options on enterprise software 
agreements for cloud-based productivity and collaboration 
suites compared to similar tools, applications, and 
capabilities currently deployed in Department of Defense (DOD) 
Components or required under the DOD zero trust reference 
model. The provision would also specify a set of criteria for 
the comparative analysis and require a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees not later than 30 days after 
the completion of the assessment.

Report on the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification program (sec. 
        1613)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report, not later than January 
15, 2022, to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives on the plans of the Secretary for 
the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification program in 
consideration of the recent internal review of the program and 
recent efforts by the Secretary to improve the cybersecurity of 
the defense industrial base.
    The committee is concerned that previous efforts of the 
Department of Defense to improve Defense Industrial Base (DIB) 
cybersecurity have focused primarily on assessing the 
compliance of the DIB companies with standards, while devoting 
insufficient attention and resources on other essential actions 
required to improve DIB cybersecurity. The committee continues 
to encourage the Department to adopt a comprehensive approach 
to DIB cybersecurity, as required by section 1648 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public 
Law 116-92), particularly in addressing how to improve the 
cybersecurity of small and medium businesses. The committee 
believes that approaches to improve DIB cybersecurity should 
take into account the mission-critical supply chains that 
require the highest level of cybersecurity.
    The committee also believes that the approach should 
address methods to assist DIB companies with improving their 
cybersecurity protections, including assistance with the 
development, deployment, and operation of automated 
cybersecurity tools suitable for actively monitoring their 
networks, systems and data. The committee notes in this regard 
the Army's prototype cybersecurity operations center that is 
directly helping a large cross-section of DIB suppliers for 
critical Army programs.

Report on potential Department of Defense support and assistance for 
        increasing the awareness of the Cybersecurity and 
        Infrastructure Security Agency of cyber threats and 
        vulnerabilities affecting critical infrastructure (sec. 1614)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives, 
not later than 270 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act, that provides recommendations on how the Department of 
Defense can improve support and assistance to the Cybersecurity 
and Infrastructure Security Agency to increase awareness of 
threats and vulnerabilities affecting domestic networks that 
are critical infrastructure, including infrastructure that is 
critical to the Department and to the defense of the United 
States.

Deadline for reports on assessment of cyber resiliency of nuclear 
        command and control system (sec. 1615)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 499(c) of title 10, United States Code, to clarify the 
submission process and timeline of the required reports.

                       Items of Special Interest


Advanced capabilities for Department of Defense red teams

    The committee believes that it is important for the 
Department of Defense (DOD) to build advanced capabilities to 
test the cybersecurity vulnerabilities of the Department 
through the use of cyber red teams. The committee is also aware 
that there is a current shortage of appropriately skilled cyber 
red teams within the Department to meet the growing needs for 
these vulnerability assessments. Therefore, the committee 
believes that the Department should take actions to increase 
the supply of qualified cyber red team operators to meet the 
needs of the Department.
    The committee is aware of the findings and recommendations 
identified by the Department from the assessment required by 
section 1660 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92). The provision required 
the Department to conduct a joint assessment of cyber red team 
capabilities, capacity, demand, and future requirements that 
affect the Department's ability to develop, test, and maintain 
secure systems. The committee encourages the Department to 
ensure that the findings and associated recommendations from 
the assessment are quickly adopted.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the DOD Principal Cyber 
Advisor and the Principal Cyber Advisors of each military 
department to provide a briefing to the congressional defense 
committees, not later than March 1, 2022, on the status of the 
actions taken to address the recommendations from the 
assessment. The briefing should also include an update from 
each military department providing: (1) Plans to improve the 
capabilities of their respective cyber red teams; (2) Plans to 
sustain and grow their cyber red teams, as necessary; and (3) A 
complete breakout of all funding designated for cyber red team 
efforts within their department, including funding for 
development and training of cyber red teams.

Application of commercial off-the-shelf solutions to address 
        intelligence and operations gaps

    The committee is encouraged by Joint Force Headquarters--
Department of Defense Information Network's (JFHQ-DODIN) rapid 
adoption of a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) solution for the 
continuous monitoring and management of DOD internet-facing 
systems and assets and the rapid discovery of anomalies in or 
threats to their activities on the internet. The COTS solution 
enabled JFHQ-DODIN to observe DOD networks from the outside as 
assets communicate on the internet, enabling network managers 
to understand what their external attack surfaces look like and 
how elements of their networks behave externally. This has 
significantly contributed to JFHQ-DODIN's abilities to conduct 
defensive cyber operations and secure the DODIN.
    The committee notes that U.S. Cyber Command (CYBERCOM) 
lacks a similar capability for continuous, near real-time 
visibility and attribution of foreign adversary internet-
connected systems and assets and their activities. This lack of 
visibility limits CYBERCOM's ability to effectively plan, 
prepare, and conduct cyber operations. COTS solutions, like 
those adopted by JFHQ-DODIN and the U.S. Navy's Fleet Cyber 
Command, could immediately provide CYBERCOM with the 
situational awareness to continuously enumerate the cyber 
infrastructure of foreign adversaries and enable CYBERCOM to 
plan and conduct operations to disrupt, deny, or degrade 
adversary operations as necessary. These COTS solutions can 
provide continuously refreshed internet landscape data and 
machine learning-enabled graphing algorithms to attribute the 
cyber infrastructure with the adversary organizations to which 
they belong. The committee encourages CYBERCOM to explore the 
further application of these COTS solutions across the 
command's mission space as a solution for rapidly addressing 
urgent intelligence and operations gaps.

Assessment of need for Cyber Intelligence Center and War Game Center

    The committee is concerned that the cyberspace domain, 
unlike the well-established land, maritime, air, and space 
warfighting domains, does not have a dedicated technical 
intelligence center nor a principal joint wargaming center. 
Regarding the potential need for a dedicated entity to gather 
and analyze foundational and scientific and technical (S&T) 
intelligence for cyberspace, the committee notes that the 
cyberspace domain is as technically complex as other domains 
and remains less understood. With respect to wargaming, the 
lessons of history suggest that without imaginative war gaming 
and exercises, new warfighting means, such as armored vehicles, 
carrier aviation, and submarines, have often been mistakenly 
applied to supporting existing forces and operational concepts 
rather than perceived as the basis for new types of independent 
operations.
    The Cyber Mission Force (CMF) requires intelligence and 
analysis support to enable access development. The committee 
believes that a Cyberspace Technical Intelligence Center could 
provide the resources for order of battle development, target 
system analysis, and vulnerability analysis for targets that 
use or are wholly located within the cyberspace domain. Unlike 
other domains, which have dedicated intelligence organizations, 
intelligence production required to support global and regional 
Department of Defense cyberspace operations is distributed 
amongst numerous intelligence and analysis centers. Each center 
suffers from competing priorities for resources to meet the 
requirements of its respective service, service acquisition 
customers, combatant commands, and Defense and national-level 
policy-makers. As adversaries continue to take advantage of new 
technology, the committee is concerned that the distributed 
production of cyberspace intelligence and analysis is limiting 
the Department's ability to understand and take action in the 
global and regional security environment.
    There are a large number of wargaming centers across the 
military departments' war colleges and intelligence and 
research and development laboratories, the Office of the 
Secretary of Defense, and the federally funded research and 
development centers and university-affiliated research centers. 
Many of these existing centers conduct war games with various 
aspects of cyberspace operations based on the war game sponsor. 
The committee is concerned about duplication of effort and 
believes that the Department of Defense may need to establish a 
center of gravity for joint cyberspace and information warfare 
wargaming, modeling, and simulations that will better inform 
future cyberspace operations forces design and development.
    The committee, therefore, directs the Deputy Secretary of 
Defense and the Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to 
assess and make recommendations on whether there is a need to 
(1) Establish a cyberspace foundational and S&T intelligence 
center; (2) Focus the Department's cyberspace wargaming 
activities and capabilities; and (3) Enhance the Department's 
cyberspace operations models and simulations. In conducting 
these assessments, the Deputy Secretary and the Vice Chairman 
shall consult with the offices of the Under Secretaries of 
Defense for Policy, Intelligence and Security, Acquisition and 
Sustainment, and Personnel and Readiness; the Commander of U.S. 
Cyber Command; the Chief Information Officer, and the Director 
of Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation. The Deputy Secretary 
and the Vice Chairman shall provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense and intelligence committees on the 
conclusions and recommendation of the assessments not later 
than January 31, 2022.

Comptroller General assessment of the Department of Defense information 
        technology supply chain

    The committee notes that recent cyber incidents adversely 
impacting government and private sector networks demonstrate 
the serious threat that sophisticated adversaries pose to the 
supply chains associated with information and communications 
technology (ICT) products and services, including software 
updates.
    The committee understands that supply chain risk management 
(SCRM) is the process of identifying, assessing, and mitigating 
the risks associated with the global and distributed nature of 
ICT product and service supply chains. In December 2020, the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) released a report, 
titled ``Federal Agencies Need to Take Urgent Action to Manage 
Supply Chain Risks'' (GAO-21-171), that found non-DOD Federal 
agencies had not implemented foundational practices for 
managing ICT supply chain risks. In March 2021, GAO also issued 
a report, titled ``Federal Government Needs to Urgently Pursue 
Critical Actions to Address Major Cybersecurity Challenges'' 
(GAO-21-288), on 5G national security issues, to include 5G 
supply chain issues.
    In view of recent cyber incidents and GAO's findings for 
non-Department of Defense (DOD) agencies, the committee is 
concerned about the extent to which DOD is addressing ICT 
supply chain risks in a timely manner. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Comptroller General of the United States to provide 
the congressional defense committees with an assessment of 
DOD's efforts to address ICT supply chain risks. The assessment 
shall:
          (1) Identify and highlight threats and risks to DOD's 
        ICT supply chain;
          (2) Assess the extent to which DOD is implementing 
        foundational ICT SCRM practices;
          (3) Assess the extent to which DOD is leading or 
        supporting government-wide efforts to protect the ICT 
        supply chain; and
          (4) Include any other matters the Comptroller General 
        determines to be relevant.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the congressional defense committees on 
preliminary findings not later than June 15, 2022, and to 
submit a final report to the congressional defense committees 
at a date agreed to at the time of the briefing.

Cybersecurity training at Critical Training Centers

    The committee recognizes the critical role that the Army 
Interagency Training and Education Center (AITEC) plays in 
training both military and civilian personnel in protecting 
critical infrastructure. The committee also recognizes that 
cyber is part of the Nation's critical infrastructure. With the 
increase of cyber threats, the Department of Defense must 
utilize all available resources to enhance cybersecurity 
efforts, which includes bolstering the role that the National 
Guard plays in this field. The committee encourages the 
Department to examine expanding the role of existing critical 
infrastructure training centers, such as AITEC, to include 
cybersecurity in their training program. It is important that 
the Department continues to further the cybersecurity 
capabilities and training of the National Guard in order to 
help mitigate and prevent cyber-attacks on domestic soil.

Improving Department of Defense guidance for weapon system acquisitions 
        cybersecurity requirements

    The committee believes that strengthening the cybersecurity 
of Department of Defense (DOD) weapon systems in the face of 
increasingly sophisticated cyber threats is critical to the 
DOD's ability to achieve its mission across all warfighting 
domains. The committee is aware that in December 2020, the DOD 
issued a new acquisition policy, DOD Instruction 5000.90, that 
outlines cybersecurity requirements for acquisition programs 
across the DOD's acquisition pathways and directs DOD 
organizations to ensure that cybersecurity requirements are 
incorporated throughout an acquisition program's life cycle, 
from high-level capabilities to detailed specifications.
    While this policy is an important component of the DOD's 
efforts to strengthen the cybersecurity of its weapon systems 
and acquisition programs, the committee is aware of a 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) report, titled ``Weapon 
System Cybersecurity: Guidance Would Help DOD Programs Better 
Communicate Requirements to Contractors'' (GAO-21-179), 
published March 4, 2021, that indicated that more detailed 
instruction is needed to assist acquisition program offices in 
meeting these requirements. The report found that the DOD 
lacked specificity on how weapon systems acquisition programs 
should develop cybersecurity requirements and incorporate them 
in acquisition contracts and recommended that the DOD include 
in its acquisition program contracts well-defined cybersecurity 
requirements with clear criteria and mechanisms for how the 
Government will verify that a system meets its needs.
    Based on GAO's findings and the critical need to protect 
DOD weapon systems from cyber threats, the committee is 
concerned that existing cybersecurity and requirements guidance 
for acquisition program officials is insufficient. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to establish a 
working group to review and propose updates to DOD and 
component acquisition policy and guidance on cybersecurity 
requirements for weapon systems acquisitions. The working group 
shall be chaired by the Office of the Under Secretary Defense 
for Acquisition and Sustainment and include representatives 
from the DOD's operational and developmental testing 
organizations and military service acquisition and 
cybersecurity organizations. Consistent with GAO's findings, 
the working group should propose updates that would assist 
weapon systems acquisition programs in determining how to 
incorporate cybersecurity requirements, acceptance criteria, 
and verification processes in contracts. These updates should 
seek to define a baseline level of consistency, while ensuring 
components have flexibility to tailor policies and guidance to 
the needs of their acquisition communities. The Secretary of 
Defense shall provide a report to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives not 
later than December 31, 2021, on the status of these efforts, 
including specific proposals for updating policy and guidance.

Prioritizing cyber vulnerability remediations

    The Department of Defense (DOD) continuously monitors its 
networks to detect known vulnerabilities, associated with a 
known set of severity criteria, in hosts, nodes, systems, and 
applications. DOD also has tools: to discover assets on its 
networks and determine their patching and configuration status; 
for quarantining devices and applications that are not in 
compliance; and for remediating non-compliant assets. However, 
the pace of discovery of vulnerabilities exceeds the 
Department's capacity for remediation, and the Department lacks 
an effective capability for judging the relative importance of 
its network assets to enable risk-based decisions about 
remediation priorities.
    The committee believes that network mapping and mission 
thread analyses are essential for situational awareness and to 
make risk-based decisions about vulnerability remediation. 
However, the committee understands that the DOD does not 
routinely perform either of these activities. The committee is 
aware that commercial network management tools are available to 
map networks and to trace packets, while identifying devices 
and assets and their latency encountered on network paths. The 
committee believes that such capabilities could materially 
assist in mission thread definition and asset prioritization.
    The committee directs the Commander, of Joint Force 
Headquarters, DOD Information Network (JFHQ-DODIN), who serves 
simultaneously as the Director of the Defense Information 
Systems Agency (DISA), to identify and partner with the head of 
a DOD component whose network enclave can access commercial 
network management tools such as those described above for 
network mapping and mission path traceroute. The Commander 
JFHQ-DODIN/Director DISA and the participating component head 
shall jointly assess the utility and cost-benefits of using 
these capabilities to make risk-based vulnerability remediation 
decisions, identify key cyber terrain and assets, identify 
single-node mission dependencies, and monitor for changes in 
mission thread execution.
    The committee directs that the Commander/Director to 
provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives on the plan for the 
assessment by September 30, 2021, and on the commencement of 
the assessment by November 4, 2021. The Commander/Director and 
the participating component head shall jointly brief the 
committees on the results of the assessment by February 1, 
2022.

            DIVISION B--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AUTHORIZATIONS

Summary and explanation of funding tables
    Division B of this Act authorizes funding for military 
construction projects of the Department of Defense (DOD). It 
includes funding authorizations for the construction and 
operation of military family housing as well as military 
construction for the reserve components, the Defense Agencies 
and Field Activities, and the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization Security Investment Program. It also provides 
authorization for the base closure accounts that fund military 
construction, environmental cleanup, and other activities 
required to implement the decisions made in prior base closure 
rounds. It prohibits any future base realignment closure 
rounds.
    The tables contained in this Act provide the project-level 
authorizations for the military construction funding authorized 
in division B of this Act and summarize that funding by 
account.
    The fiscal year 2022 budget requested $9.8 billion for 
military construction and housing programs. Of this amount, 
$7.9 billion was requested for military construction, $1.4 
billion for the construction and operation of family housing, 
$284.6 million for base closure activities, and $205.9 million 
for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Security Investment 
Program.
    The committee recommends the authorization of 
appropriations for military construction, housing programs, and 
base closure activities totaling $9.8 billion. The total amount 
authorized for appropriations reflects the committee's 
continued commitment to investing in the recapitalization of 
DOD facilities and infrastructure.
Short title (sec. 2001)
    The committee recommends a provision that would designate 
division B of this Act as the ``Military Construction 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2022.''
Expiration of authorizations and amounts required to be specified by 
        law (sec. 2002)
    The committee recommends a provision that would establish 
the expiration date for authorizations in this Act for military 
construction projects, land acquisition, family housing 
projects and facilities, and contributions to the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization Security Investment Program as 
October 1, 2024, or the date of the enactment of an Act 
authorizing funds for military construction for fiscal year 
2025, whichever is later.

Effective date (sec. 2003)

    The committee recommends a provision that would provide an 
effective date for titles XXI through XXVII of October 1, 2021, 
or the date of the enactment of this Act, whichever is later.

                 TITLE XXI--ARMY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION

Summary
    The budget request included authorization of appropriations 
of $834.7 million for military construction and $398.8 million 
for family housing for the Army for fiscal year 2022.
    The committee recommends authorization of appropriations of 
$910.4 million for military construction for the Army and 
$398.8 million for family housing for the Army for fiscal year 
2022.
    Further details on projects authorized can be found in 
section 2101 and section 4601 of this Act.
Authorized Army construction and land acquisition projects (sec. 2101)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
military construction projects for the active component of the 
Army for fiscal year 2022. The committee recognizes the 
Department of Defense's significant unfunded military 
construction requirements and has included an additional $753 
million for many of these projects here. The authorized amount 
is listed on an installation-by-installation basis.
Family housing (sec. 2102)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
new construction, planning, and design of family housing units 
for the Army for fiscal year 2022. This provision would also 
authorize funds for facilities that support family housing, 
including housing management offices, housing maintenance, and 
storage facilities.
Authorization of appropriations, Army (sec. 2103)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
appropriations for the active component military construction 
and family housing projects of the Army authorized for 
construction for fiscal year 2022. This provision would also 
provide an overall limit on the amount authorized for military 
construction and family housing projects for the active 
component of the Army. The state list contained in this report 
is the binding list of the specific projects authorized at each 
location.
Extension of authorization of fiscal year 2017 project at Wiesbaden 
        Army Airfield (sec. 2104)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authorization contained in section 2101(b) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) for a project at Wiesbaden Army Airfield, Germany, until 
October 1, 2023, or the date of the enactment of an Act 
authorizing funds for military construction for fiscal year 
2024, whichever is later.
Additional authority to carry out fiscal year 2018 project at Fort 
        Bliss, Texas (sec. 2105)
    The committee recommends a provision that would allow the 
Secretary of the Army to carry out a military construction 
project to construct a defense access road at Fort Bliss, 
Texas, using funds appropriated under section 131 of the 
Military Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Act, 2018 (title I of division J of Public Law 
115-141) for the Defense Access Road Program.
Modification of authority to carry out fiscal year 2021 project at Fort 
        Wainwright, Alaska (sec. 2106)
    The committee recommends a provision that would modify the 
authorization contained in section 2101(a) of the William M. 
(Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) for the construction of an 
unaccompanied enlisted personnel housing building at Fort 
Wainwright, Alaska, to include 104,300 square feet to 
incorporate a modified standard design as well as an outdoor 
recreational shelter, sports fields and courts, a barbecue and 
leisure area, and fitness stations associated with the 
unaccompanied enlisted personnel housing.

Additional authority to carry out fiscal year 2022 project at Aberdeen 
        Proving Ground, Maryland (sec. 2107)

    The committee recommends a provision that would allow the 
Secretary of the Army to carry out a military construction 
project to construct a 6,000-square-foot recycling center to 
meet the requirements of a qualified recycling program at 
Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The provision would allow 
the Secretary to use funds generated pursuant to section 2667 
of title 10, United States Code, as well as funds appropriated 
for unspecified minor military construction.

                 TITLE XXII--NAVY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION

Summary
    The budget request included authorization of appropriations 
of $2.4 billion for military construction and $435.0 million 
for family housing for the Department of the Navy for fiscal 
year 2022.
    The committee recommends authorization of appropriations of 
$2.3 billion for military construction for the Navy and $435.0 
million for family housing for the Navy for fiscal year 2022.
    Further details on projects authorized can be found in 
section 2201 and section 4601 of this Act.
Authorized Navy construction and land acquisition projects (sec. 2201)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
Navy and Marine Corps military construction projects for fiscal 
year 2022. The committee recognizes the Department of Defense's 
significant unfunded military construction requirements and has 
included an additional $1.7 billion for many of these projects 
here. The authorized amounts are listed on an installation-by-
installation basis.
Family housing (sec. 2202)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
new construction, planning, and design of family housing units 
for the Navy for fiscal year 2022. This provision would also 
authorize funds for facilities that support family housing, 
including housing management offices, housing maintenance, and 
storage facilities.
Improvements to military family housing units (sec. 2203)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of the Navy to improve existing family housing 
units of the Department of the Navy in an amount not to exceed 
$71.9 million.
Authorization of appropriations, Navy (sec. 2204)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
appropriations for the active component military construction 
and family housing projects of the Department of the Navy 
authorized for construction for fiscal year 2022. This 
provision would also provide an overall limit on the amount 
authorized for military construction and family housing 
projects for the active components of the Navy and the Marine 
Corps. The state list contained in this report is the binding 
list of the specific projects authorized at each location.

              TITLE XXIII--AIR FORCE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION

Summary
    The budget request included authorization of appropriations 
of $2.1 billion for military construction and $441.2 million 
for family housing for the Air Force in fiscal year 2022.
    The committee recommends authorization of appropriations of 
$2.0 billion for military construction for the Air Force and 
$441.2 million for family housing for the Air Force for fiscal 
year 2022.
    Further details on projects authorized can be found in 
section 2301 and section 4601 of this Act.
Authorized Air Force construction and land acquisition projects (sec. 
        2301)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
Air Force military construction projects for fiscal year 2022. 
The committee recognizes the Department of Defense's 
significant unfunded military construction requirements and has 
included an additional $538.3 million for many of these 
projects here. The authorized amounts are listed on an 
installation-by-installation basis.
Family housing (sec. 2302)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
new construction, planning, and design of family housing units 
for the Air Force for fiscal year 2022. This provision would 
also authorize funds for facilities that support family 
housing, including housing management offices, housing 
maintenance, and storage facilities.
Improvements to military family housing units (sec. 2303)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of the Air Force to improve existing family 
housing units of the Department of the Air Force in an amount 
not to exceed $105.3 million.
Authorization of appropriations, Air Force (sec. 2304)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
appropriations for the active component military construction 
and family housing projects of the Air Force authorized for 
construction for fiscal year 2022. This provision would also 
provide an overall limit on the amount authorized for military 
construction and family housing projects for the active 
component of the Air Force. The state list contained in this 
report is the binding list of the specific projects authorized 
at each location.
Extension of authorizations of certain fiscal year 2017 projects (sec. 
        2305)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authorization contained in section 2301 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) for 
seven projects until October 1, 2023, or the date of the 
enactment of an Act authorizing funds for military construction 
for fiscal year 2024, whichever is later.
Extension of authorizations of fiscal year 2017 projects at Spangdahlem 
        Air Base, Germany (sec. 2306)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authorization contained in section 2902 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) for 
two projects at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany, until October 1, 
2023, or the date of the enactment of an Act authorizing funds 
for military construction for fiscal year 2024, whichever is 
later.
Extension of authorization of fiscal year 2017 project at Hanscom Air 
        Force Base, Massachusetts (sec. 2307)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authorization contained in section 2301 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) for 
a project at Hanscom Air Force Base, Massachusetts, until 
October 1, 2022, or the date of the enactment of an Act 
authorizing funds for military construction for fiscal year 
2023, whichever is later.
Modification of authority to carry out fiscal year 2018 project at 
        Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida (sec. 2308)
    The committee recommends a provision that would modify the 
authority contained in section 2301(a) of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) for 
the construction of a fire station at Tyndall Air Force Base, 
Florida, to include up to 3,588 square meters of crash rescue 
or structural fire station.
Modification of authority to carry out fiscal year 2020 projects at 
        Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida (sec. 2309)
    The committee recommends a provision that would modify the 
authorization contained in section 2912(a) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-
92) for the construction of certain projects at Tyndall Air 
Force Base, Florida.

           TITLE XXIV--DEFENSE AGENCIES MILITARY CONSTRUCTION

Summary
    The budget request included authorization of appropriations 
of $2.0 billion for military construction for the Defense 
Agencies for fiscal year 2022.
    The committee recommends authorization of appropriations of 
$2.0 billion for military construction for the Defense Agencies 
for fiscal year 2022.
Authorized Defense Agencies construction and land acquisition projects 
        (sec. 2401)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
military construction projects for the Defense Agencies for 
fiscal year 2022. The committee recognizes the Department of 
Defense's significant unfunded military construction 
requirements and has included an additional $66.0 million for 
many of these projects here. The authorized amounts are listed 
on an installation-by-installation basis.

Authorized Energy Resilience and Conservation Investment Program 
        projects (sec. 2402)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to carry out energy conservation 
projects. The committee recognizes the Department of Defense's 
significant unfunded military construction requirements and has 
included an additional $161.7 million for many of these 
projects here. The authorized amounts are listed on an 
installation-by-installation basis.

Authorization of appropriations, Defense Agencies (sec. 2403)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
appropriations for the military construction and family housing 
projects of the Defense Agencies authorized for construction 
for fiscal year 2022. This provision would also provide an 
overall limit on the amount authorized for military 
construction and family housing projects for the Defense 
Agencies. The state list contained in this report is the 
binding list of the specific projects authorized at each 
location.

Extension of authorization of fiscal year 2017 project at Yokota Air 
        Base, Japan (sec. 2404)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authorization contained in section 2401 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) for 
a project at Yokota Air Base, Japan, until October 1, 2023, or 
the date of the enactment of an Act authorizing funds for 
military construction for fiscal year 2024, whichever is later.

                   TITLE XXV--INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS

Summary
    The Department of Defense requested authorization of 
appropriations of $599.1 million for military construction in 
fiscal year 2022 for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
Security Investment Program and in-kind contributions from the 
Republic of Korea and the Republic of Poland. The committee 
recommends authorization of appropriations for the requested 
amount.

  Subtitle A--North Atlantic Treaty Organization Security Investment 
                                Program

Authorized NATO construction and land acquisition projects (sec. 2501)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to make contributions to the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization Security Investment Program in an 
amount equal to the sum of the amount specifically authorized 
in section 2502 of this title and the amount of recoupment due 
to the United States for construction previously financed by 
the United States.
Authorization of appropriations, NATO (sec. 2502)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
appropriations of $205.9 million for the U.S. contribution to 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Security 
Investment Program (NSIP) for fiscal year 2022.
    This provision would also allow the Department of Defense 
construction agent to recognize the NATO project authorization 
amounts as budgetary resources to incur obligations when the 
United States is designated as the host nation for the purposes 
of executing a project under the NSIP.

             Subtitle B--Host Country In-Kind Contributions

Republic of Korea funded construction projects (sec. 2511)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to accept five military construction 
projects totaling $356.2 million from the Republic of Korea as 
in-kind contributions.
Republic of Poland provided infrastructure projects (sec. 2512)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to accept two military construction 
projects totaling $37.0 million from the Republic of Poland as 
in-kind contributions.
Authorization to accept contributions from the Republic of Korea in the 
        form of an irrevocable letter of credit (sec. 2513)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to accept contributions from the 
Republic of Korea in the form of an irrevocable letter of 
credit for the construction of the Black Hat Intelligence 
Fusion Center, Camp Humphreys, Republic of Korea, and for other 
military construction projects within the Republic of Korea.

            TITLE XXVI--GUARD AND RESERVE FORCES FACILITIES

Summary
    The Department of Defense requested authorization of 
appropriations of $670.0 million for military construction in 
fiscal year 2022 for facilities for the National Guard and 
reserve components.
    The committee recommends authorization of appropriations of 
$806.1 million for military construction in fiscal year 2022 
for facilities for the National Guard and reserve components. 
The detailed funding recommendations are contained in the state 
list table included in this report.
    Further details on projects authorized can be found in the 
tables in this title and section 4601 of this Act.
Authorized Army National Guard construction and land acquisition 
        projects (sec. 2601)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
military construction projects for the Army National Guard for 
fiscal year 2022. The committee recognizes the Department of 
Defense's significant unfunded military construction 
requirements and has included an additional $182.3 million for 
many of these projects here. The authorized amounts are listed 
on an installation-by-installation basis.
Authorized Army Reserve construction and land acquisition projects 
        (sec. 2602)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
military construction projects for the Army Reserve for fiscal 
year 2022. The committee recognizes the Department of Defense's 
significant unfunded military construction requirements and has 
included an additional $58.4 million for one project. The 
authorized amounts are listed on an installation-by-
installation basis.

Authorized Navy Reserve and Marine Corps Reserve construction and land 
        acquisition projects (sec. 2603)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
military construction projects for the Navy Reserve and Marine 
Corps Reserve for fiscal year 2022. The authorized amounts are 
listed on an installation-by-install