[House Report 117-118]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]


 117th Congress }                                      { Report
                       HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
   1st Session  }                                      { 117-118
                                                      
___________________________________________________________________


        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2022

                               ----------                              

                              R E P O R T

                                 OF THE

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                                   ON

                               H.R. 4350

                             together with

                    ADDITIONAL AND DISSENTING VIEWS

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]


                                     
            [GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]

                                     


 September 10, 2021.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed



                                      

        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2022
        
        
        
        
        
 117th Congress }                                      { Report
                       HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
   1st Session  }                                      { 117-118
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     


        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2022

                               __________

                              R E P O R T

                                 OF THE

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES

                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                                   ON

                               H.R. 4350

                             together with

                    ADDITIONAL AND DISSENTING VIEWS

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

                                     
             [GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]
                                     

 September 10, 2021.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed
            
            
                            __________

               
                  U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE            

45-492                   WASHINGTON : 2021            
            
            
            
            
            
            
                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES
                    One Hundred Seventeenth Congress

                    ADAM SMITH, Washington, Chairman

JAMES R. LANGEVIN, Rhode Island      MIKE ROGERS, Alabama
RICK LARSEN, Washington              JOE WILSON, South Carolina
JIM COOPER, Tennessee                MICHAEL R. TURNER, Ohio
JOE COURTNEY, Connecticut            DOUG LAMBORN, Colorado
JOHN GARAMENDI, California           ROBERT J. WITTMAN, Virginia
JACKIE SPEIER, California            VICKY HARTZLER, Missouri
DONALD NORCROSS, New Jersey          AUSTIN SCOTT, Georgia
RUBEN GALLEGO, Arizona               MO BROOKS, Alabama
SETH MOULTON, Massachusetts          SAM GRAVES, Missouri
SALUD O. CARBAJAL, California        ELISE M. STEFANIK, New York
ANTHONY G. BROWN, Maryland,          SCOTT DesJARLAIS, Tennessee
RO KHANNA, California                TRENT KELLY, Mississippi
WILLIAM R. KEATING, Massachusetts    MIKE GALLAGHER, Wisconsin
FILEMON VELA, Texas                  MATT GAETZ, Florida
ANDY KIM, New Jersey                 DON BACON, Nebraska
CHRISSY HOULAHAN, Pennsylvania       JIM BANKS, Indiana
JASON CROW, Colorado                 LIZ CHENEY, Wyoming
ELISSA SLOTKIN, Michigan             JACK BERGMAN, Michigan
MIKIE SHERRILL, New Jersey           MICHAEL WALTZ, Florida
VERONICA ESCOBAR, Texas              MIKE JOHNSON, Louisiana
JARED F. GOLDEN, Maine               MARK E. GREEN, Tennessee
ELAINE G. LURIA, Virginia, Vice      STEPHANIE I. BICE, Oklahoma
    Chair                            C. SCOTT FRANKLIN, Florida
JOSEPH D. MORELLE, New York          LISA C. McCLAIN, Michigan
SARA JACOBS, California              RONNY JACKSON, Texas
KAIALI'I KAHELE, Hawaii              JERRY L. CARL, Alabama
MARILYN STRICKLAND, Washington       BLAKE D. MOORE, Utah
MARC A. VEASEY, Texas                PAT FALLON, Texas
JIMMY PANETTA, California
STEPHANIE N. MURPHY, Florida
STEVEN HORSFORD, Nevada

                     Paul Arcangeli, Staff Director
                     
                     
                     
                     
                     
                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page

Purpose of the Legislation.......................................     1
Rationale for the Committee Bill.................................     2
Hearings.........................................................     2
Committee Position...............................................     3
Explanation of the Committee Amendments..........................     3
Relationship of Authorization to Appropriations..................     3
Summary of Discretionary Authorizations in the Bill..............     4
Budget Authority Implication.....................................     4

DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AUTHORIZATIONS.................     5
TITLE I--PROCUREMENT.............................................     5
    Aircraft Procurement, Army...................................     5
      Items of Special Interest..................................     5
        Assured Communications on Tactical Unmanned Aerial 
          Systems in Highly Contested Environments...............     5
        Litter Load Stability Technology.........................     5
    Missile Procurement, Army....................................     6
      Items of Special Interest..................................     6
        Extended Range Air Defense...............................     6
    Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army.....     6
      Items of Special Interest..................................     6
        Armored plate technical performance specifications.......     6
        M240 medium machine gun..................................     7
    Procurement of Ammunition, Army..............................     7
      Items of Special Interest..................................     7
        Conventional ammunition demilitarization.................     7
        Medium caliber ammunition................................     8
    Other Procurement, Army......................................     8
      Items of Special Interest..................................     8
        Army modular open systems architecture...................     8
        Enhanced Night Vision Goggle-Binocular...................     8
        Firefighting equipment modernization.....................     9
        High frequency radio infrastructure......................     9
        High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle rollover 
          mitigation.............................................    10
        Joint Light Tactical Vehicle Acquisition Strategy........    10
        Magazine acquisition for the Next Generation Squad Weapon    11
        Rifle Integrated Controller..............................    11
        Soldier Enhancement Program..............................    11
        Synthetic Training Environment...........................    12
    Aircraft Procurement, Navy...................................    12
      Items of Special Interest..................................    12
        CMV-22...................................................    12
        Nacelle Improvement......................................    12
        Naval adversary aircraft recapitalization................    13
        Navy tactical fighter aircraft force structure...........    13
        P-8 aircraft.............................................    14
        Survivability systems for Navy, Marine Corps, and Air 
          Force rotary-wing aircraft.............................    14
        T-45 Program Report......................................    15
        V-22 Nacelle Improvement Program.........................    15
    Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy............................    16
      Items of Special Interest..................................    16
        Aegis radar..............................................    16
        Analysis of the Costs and Benefits of the Littoral Combat 
          Ship Program...........................................    16
        Astern refueling on Expeditionary Sea Based platforms....    17
        Comptroller General review of enabling technologies for 
          unmanned systems.......................................    18
        DDG-51 multiyear procurement.............................    18
        Improving Safe and Secure Cyber-Enabled Navy Vessels.....    19
        National Security Hospital Vessel........................    19
        Report on large surface combatant production transition..    20
        Sentinel-class Fast Response Cutter......................    21
        SPY-1D capability improvements...........................    21
        Virginia Class Submarine Spare Parts.....................    21
    Other Procurement, Navy......................................    22
      Items of Special Interest..................................    22
        Joint force tiltrotor training...........................    22
        Maritime Augmented Guidance with Integrated Controls for 
          Carrier Approach and Recovery Precision Enabling 
          Techniques.............................................    23
        Mine-hunting capabilities from Expeditionary Sea Base 
          platforms..............................................    23
        Tactical aircraft training telemetry system 
          recapitalization.......................................    23
        Underwater ranges........................................    24
    Procurement, Marine Corps....................................    24
      Items of Special Interest..................................    24
        High Mobility Engineer Excavator.........................    24
    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force..............................    25
      Items of Special Interest..................................    25
        A-10 Wing Replacement Program............................    25
        A-10C Threat Warning System Modernization................    25
        Airlift tactical data link...............................    25
        Bridge Tanker............................................    26
        C-130H propellers/engines................................    26
        Degraded visual environment system for Air Force combat 
          search and rescue helicopter fleet.....................    26
        EC-37B Compass Call Replacement..........................    27
        HH-60W Combat Search and Rescue helicopter...............    28
        Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System............    28
        KC-135 modernization.....................................    28
        KC-135R Cooling Capability...............................    29
        MH-139 conversion........................................    29
        MH-139A Grey Wolf Aircrew Exposure Protection............    30
        Propeller blades.........................................    30
        Survivable Airborne Operations Center....................    30
        V-22 nacelle improvement program.........................    31
    Other Procurement, Air Force.................................    31
      Items of Special Interest..................................    31
        Bomber fleet hypersonic weapons integration..............    31
        Commercial best practices................................    32
        Standardization for Full Motion Video Dissemination......    32
        Transfer of U.S. Coast Guard HC-130H Aircraft to the 
          State of California....................................    32
    Procurement, Defense-Wide....................................    33
      Items of Special Interest..................................    33
        Comptroller General review of tactical fighter aircraft 
          capacity shortfalls and capability gaps................    33
        F-35.....................................................    34
        National Guard and Reserve Equipment Account.............    35
        Persistent Airborne Intelligence Surveillance & 
          Reconnaissance.........................................    35
        Radio Integration System program upgrade.................    36
        Review of Armed Overwatch aircraft systems...............    36
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................    37
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................    37
      Section 101--Authorization of Appropriations...............    37
    Subtitle B--Army Programs....................................    37
      Section 111--Multiyear Procurement Authority for AH-64E 
        Apache Helicopters.......................................    37
      Section 112--Multiyear Procurement Authority for UH-60M and 
        HH-60M Black Hawk Helicopters............................    37
      Section 113--Continuation of Soldier Enhancement Program...    37
      Section 114--Strategy for the Procurement of Accessories 
        for the Next Generation Squad Weapon.....................    37
    Subtitle C--Navy Programs....................................    37
      Section 121--Extension of Procurement Authority for Certain 
        Amphibious Shipbuilding Programs.........................    37
      Section 122--Inclusion of Basic and Functional Design in 
        Assessments Required Prior to Start of Construction on 
        First Ship of a Shipbuilding Program.....................    38
      Section 123--Multiyear Procurement Authority for Arleigh 
        Burke Class Destroyers...................................    38
      Section 124--Incorporation of Advanced Degaussing Systems 
        into DDG-51 Class Destroyers.............................    38
    Subtitle D--Air Force Programs...............................    38
      Section 131--Contract for Logistics Support for VC-25B 
        Aircraft.................................................    38
      Section 132--Limitation on Availability of Funds for the B-
        52 Commercial Engine Replacement Program.................    38
      Section 133--Inventory Requirements and Limitations 
        Relating to Certain Air Refueling Tanker Aircraft........    38
      Section 134--Minimum Inventory of Tactical Airlift Aircraft 
        and Limitation on Modification of Air National Guard 
        Tactical Airlift Flying Missions.........................    38
      Section 135--Procurement Authority for Certain Parts of the 
        Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent Cryptographic Device....    39
    Subtitle E--Defense-Wide, Joint, and Multiservice Matters....    39
      Section 141--Implementation of Affordability, Operational, 
        and Sustainment Cost Constraints for the F-35 Aircraft 
        Program..................................................    39
      Section 142--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Aircraft Systems for the Armed Overwatch Program.........    39
      Section 143--Major Weapon Systems Capability Assessment 
        Process and Procedure Review and Report..................    39
      Section 144--Reports on Exercise of Waiver Authority with 
        Respect to Certain Aircraft Ejection Seats...............    39
TITLE II--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION............    40
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army............    40
      Items of Special Interest..................................    40
        40mm Training Ammunition Analysis of Alternatives........    40
        Advanced ammunition material and manufacturing 
          technologies...........................................    40
        Advanced combat engine...................................    41
        Autonomous robotic targets for small arms live fire 
          training ranges........................................    41
        Auxiliary power units for Army combat and tactical 
          vehicles...............................................    41
        Battery charging for electric vehicles in tactical 
          environments...........................................    42
        Carbon fiber and graphite foam applications for combat 
          and tactical vehicles..................................    43
        Electrification of combat and tactical vehicles..........    43
        Extended range cannon artillery rate of fire.............    44
        Future Long Range Assault Aircraft.......................    45
        Future Vertical Lift.....................................    45
        Helicopter Vertical Tail Boom Modification...............    46
        Improving Ground Vehicle System Center Modeling and 
          Simulation.............................................    46
        Modernization of mobile X-ray systems....................    47
        Modular approach to combat vehicle lethality.............    47
        Report on the Universal Robotics Controller (URC) Program    47
        Request for Briefing on Vehicle Cyber Security Research 
          Center.................................................    48
        Thermal imaging and intrusion detection technology.......    48
        Vehicle protection systems against unmanned aerial 
          systems................................................    49
        Wearable Gesture Control Technology......................    49
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy............    49
      Items of Special Interest..................................    49
        Accelerating supercavitating ammunition..................    49
        Advanced Low Cost Munition Ordnance......................    50
        Assessment of the Naval Air Warfare Center Division......    50
        Implementation of the National Security Innovation 
          Partnerships and Integration of the Future of Defense 
          Center and Naval Tech Bridges..........................    51
        MH-60 Service Life Extension Program and modernization...    52
        Next Generation Jammer high band.........................    53
        Shipboard High Energy Laser..............................    53
        Silicon carbide power modules............................    54
        Transformational Reliable Acoustic Path System...........    54
        Virtualization Technology................................    54
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force.......    55
      Items of Special Interest..................................    55
        Adaptive Engine Transition Program propulsion system.....    55
        Advanced Battle Management System........................    55
        Air Force Sensor Open Systems Architecture Standard 
          initiative.............................................    56
        Airborne augmented reality for Air Force pilot training..    57
        Common Armament Tester Fighters (CAT-F)..................    58
        Digital engineering design and manufacturing expansion...    58
        Enhanced connectivity with RC-135 aircraft...............    59
        Report on the Agility Prime program of the U.S. Air Force    59
        T-7 review and program risk assessment...................    60
        Teamable Attritable Air Vehicles.........................    61
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Space Force.....    61
      Items of Special Interest..................................    61
        Space Force higher education strategy....................    61
        University Consortium for Space Technology Development...    62
    Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-Wide....    62
      Items of Special Interest..................................    62
        5G Open Radio Access Network.............................    62
        Advanced Development of Chemical and Biological Detection 
          Media..................................................    63
        Advanced electronic warfare capabilities.................    63
        Advancing Gaming, Exercising, Modeling, and Simulation 
          capabilities...........................................    64
        Aircraft ejection seat spinal injuries assessment........    64
        Artificial intelligence for Small Unit Maneuver..........    65
        Comptroller General Report on STEM and AI Workforce 
          Development............................................    66
        Counter Unmanned Aerial Systems (C-UAS) Development, 
          Testing and Fielding...................................    66
        Critical Shortage of STEM Professionals..................    67
        Data storage capabilities for special operations forces..    68
        Defense Innovation Unit assessment.......................    68
        Development of High Mach and Hypersonic Aircraft.........    69
        Digital Engineering Infrastructure and Workforce 
          Development............................................    69
        Digital twin assessment and agile verification processes.    70
        Emerging Tech Adoption Training..........................    71
        Establishing a National Network for Microelectronics 
          Research and Development...............................    71
        F-35 breathing system disruptions........................    72
        Fielding of Counter-Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems 
          across the Joint Force.................................    72
        High Energy Laser System Power and Thermal Management....    73
        Mobile Compact High Energy Laser.........................    73
        Naval aviation dedicated operational test capacity 
          reductions.............................................    74
        Prioritizing retrofit of the C-130 with autonomous flight 
          capabilities...........................................    74
        Report on flexible funding for transitioning science and 
          technology.............................................    75
        Solid rocket motors......................................    76
        Strengthening the Diversity of the Science, Technology, 
          Research, and Engineering Workforce....................    76
        Support for Department of Defense-wide SBIR and STTR 
          Transition Education Program...........................    77
        Sustained human performance and resilience...............    77
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................    78
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................    78
      Section 201--Authorization of Appropriations...............    78
    Subtitle B--Program Requirements, Restrictions, and 
        Limitations..............................................    78
      Section 211--Duties and Regional Activities of the Defense 
        Innovation Unit..........................................    78
      Section 212--Modification of Mechanisms for Expedited 
        Access to Technical Talent and Expertise at Academic 
        Institutions to Support Department of Defense Missions...    79
      Section 213--Modification of Mechanisms for Expedited 
        Access to Technical Talent and Expertise at Academic 
        Institutions.............................................    79
      Section 214--Minority Institute for Defense Research.......    79
      Section 215--Test Program for Engineering Plant of DDG(X) 
        Destroyer Vessels........................................    79
      Section 216--Consortium to Study Irregular Warfare.........    80
      Section 217--Development and Implementation of Digital 
        Technologies for Survivability and Lethality Testing.....    80
      Section 218--Pilot Program on the Use of Intermediaries to 
        Connect the Department of Defense with Technology 
        Producers................................................    81
      Section 219--Assessment and Correction of Deficiencies in 
        the F-35 Aircraft Pilot Breathing System.................    81
      Section 220--Identification of the Hypersonics Facilities 
        and Capabilities of the Major Range and Test Facility 
        Base.....................................................    81
      Section 221--Requirement to Maintain Access to Category 3 
        Subterranean Training Facility...........................    82
      Section 222--Prohibition on Reduction of Naval Aviation 
        Testing and Evaluation Capacity..........................    82
      Section 223--Limitation on Availability of Funds for 
        Certain C-130 Aircraft...................................    82
      Section 224--Limitation on Availability of Funds for VC-25B 
        Aircraft Program Pending Submission of Documentation.....    82
    Subtitle C--Plans, Reports, and Other Matters................    82
      Section 231--Modification to Annual Report of the Director 
        of Operational Test and Evaluation.......................    82
      Section 232--Adaptive Engine Transition Program Acquisition 
        Strategy for the F-35A Aircraft..........................    82
      Section 233--Advanced Propulsion System Acquisition 
        Strategy for the F-35B and F-35C Aircraft................    82
      Section 234--Assessment and Report on Airborne Electronic 
        Attack Capabilities and Capacity.........................    83
      Section 235--Strategy for Autonomy Integration in Major 
        Weapon Systems...........................................    83
TITLE III--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE.............................    83
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................    83
    Budget Request Adjustments...................................    83
      Nucleated Foam Engine Wash.................................    83
    Energy Issues................................................    84
      Enhancing Base Resiliency through Ocean Thermal Energy.....    84
      Fuel Visibility and Management.............................    84
      Installation Energy Resilience.............................    85
      Micro-reactor Support of Installation Energy Resiliency....    85
      Mobile, High-Density Hybrid Power Delivery.................    86
      Operational Energy.........................................    86
    Logistics and Sustainment Issues.............................    87
      Addressing Out-of-Pocket Cost Disparities for Military 
        Uniform..................................................    87
      Air Force Mobility Sustainment and Modernization...........    88
      Air Logistics Complex Capital Equipment Requirements.......    88
      Army Futures Command Depot-Level Maintenance...............    88
      C-130 Depot Maintenance Capacity...........................    89
      Data Analytics Driving On-Time Ship Maintenance Deliveries.    89
      Defense-Wide Working Capital Fund Cash Management Actions..    90
      Depot Capital Investment...................................    90
      Efficiency in in the Field of Logistics Management.........    91
      F-35 Organic Maintenance Capability........................    91
      Ground Combat Vehicle Maintenance Modernization Report.....    92
      Ground Tactical Vehicles for Special Operations Forces.....    92
      Implementation of Improvements to F-35 Sustainment.........    93
      Landing Gear System Management.............................    94
      Predictive Maintenance.....................................    94
      Report on Navy Dry Dock Strategy for Ship Maintenance and 
        Repair...................................................    94
      Space Resources (Propellant) National Reserve..............    95
      Sustainment Competition in the F-35 Program................    96
    Readiness Issues.............................................    96
      Air Force briefing on delivery of emergency services by 
        firefighters.............................................    96
      Army Enterprise Resource Planning..........................    96
      Assessment of Low-Level Military Training Routes...........    97
      Body-Worn Cameras for Military Law Enforcement.............    97
      Continuation of Waterjet Technology Systems for Removal of 
        Underwater Explosive Munitions...........................    98
      Eglin Gulf Test and Training Range.........................    98
      Foreign Military Flight Training Program Assessment........    98
      Impacts of Tijuana River Sewage on the Ability of Training 
        Ranges to Meet Joint Force Training Requirements.........    99
      Implementation of the Navy Common Readiness Model..........    99
      Minimizing Large Transport Fleet Fuel Burn.................    99
      Mission Training Complex...................................   100
      National All-Domain Warfighting Center.....................   100
      Navy Optimized Fleet Response Plan.........................   101
      Next Generation 911........................................   102
      Parachute Management System................................   103
      Pilot Training Next--Advanced (PTN-A)......................   103
      Preserving Military Training Routes........................   104
      Readiness Modeling.........................................   104
      Review of Mitigation Options for Potential Wind Turbine 
        Interference on Radars...................................   105
      Study and Report on Feasibility of Permanent Basing Air 
        Force Flying Unit/s on Guam..............................   106
      T-7A Red Hawk Predictive Analytics.........................   106
      Use of Fitness Wearables to Measure and Promote Readiness..   106
      Wind Turbine Mitigation Technology.........................   107
    Other Matters................................................   107
      Briefing on Progress of Cleanup Actions Related to 
        Department of Defense-Caused Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl 
        Substances Contamination.................................   107
      Briefing on Southern Resident Killer Whale Interagency 
        Working Group............................................   108
      Chemicals Used for Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting 
        Operations at Civilian and Joint Use Airport Operations..   108
      Continuing Foreign Language Education......................   109
      Feasibility and Relative Toxicity of Bio-Based Corrosion 
        Control..................................................   109
      Fire Detection and Monitoring..............................   109
      Planning Tool for Assessing Drought, Water Scarcity, and 
        Fire Risk................................................   110
      Reducing the Risk of Flash Fire............................   111
      Report on Existing Use of Virtual Reality Technology in 
        Hard Skills and Soft Skills Training.....................   111
      Report on Incorporation of Disinfecting Technologies Like 
        Antimicrobial, Antiviral, Antifungal in Department of 
        Defense Issued Clothing and Individual Equipment.........   112
      Report on the Status of PFAS Remediation...................   112
      Research and Development of New and Emerging Technologies 
        for the Remediation and Disposal of PFAS.................   114
      Study and Report to Congress on DoD Logistics and Potential 
        Benefits of Carsharing...................................   114
      Sufficiency of Current Special Operations Force Language 
        Capabilities to Meet Great Power Competition Challenges..   115
      Waikoloa Maneuver Area.....................................   116
      Water Banking to Support Installation Resiliency...........   117
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   117
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................   117
      Section 301--Authorization of Appropriations...............   117
    Subtitle B--Energy and Environment...........................   117
      Section 311--Inclusion of Impacts on Military Installation 
        Resilience in the National Defense Strategy and 
        Associated Documents.....................................   117
      Section 312--Modification of Authorities Governing Cultural 
        and Conservation Activities of the Department of Defense.   117
      Section 313--Modification of Authority for Environmental 
        Restoration Projects of National Guard...................   118
      Section 314--Prohibition on Use of Open-Air Burn Pits in 
        Contingency Operations outside the United States.........   118
      Section 315--Maintenance of Current Analytical Tools for 
        Evaluation of Energy Resilience Measures.................   118
      Section 316--Energy Efficiency Targets for Department of 
        Defense Data Centers.....................................   118
      Section 317--Modification of Restriction on Department of 
        Defense Procurement of Certain Items Containing 
        Perfluorooctane Sulfonate or Perfluorooctanoic Acid......   118
      Section 318--Temporary Moratorium on Incineration by 
        Department of Defense of Perfluoroalkyl Substances, 
        Polyfluoroalkyl Substances, and Aqueous Film Forming Foam   118
      Section 319--Public Disclosure of Results of Department of 
        Defense Testing of Water for Perfluoroalkyl or 
        Polyfluoroalkyl Substances...............................   119
      Section 320--PFAS Testing Requirements.....................   119
      Section 321--Standards for Response Actions with Respect to 
        PFAS Contamination.......................................   119
      Section 322--Review and Guidance Relating to Prevention and 
        Mitigation of Spills of Aqueous Film-Forming Foam........   119
      Section 323--Budget Information for Alternatives to Burn 
        Pits.....................................................   119
      Section 324--Establishment of Emissions Control Standard 
        Operating Procedures.....................................   119
      Section 325--Long-Duration Demonstration Initiative and 
        Joint Program............................................   119
      Section 326--Pilot Program on Use of Sustainable Aviation 
        Fuel.....................................................   120
      Section 327--Joint Department of Defense and Department of 
        Agriculture Study on Bioremediation of PFAS Using 
        Mycological Organic Matter...............................   120
    Subtitle C--Logistics and Sustainment........................   120
      Section 341--Mitigation of Contested Logistics Challenges 
        of the Department of Defense through Reduction of 
        Operational Energy Demand................................   120
      Section 342--Global Bulk Fuel Management and Delivery......   120
      Section 343--Comptroller General Annual Reviews of F-35 
        Sustainment Efforts......................................   120
      Section 344--Pilot Program on Biobased Corrosion Control 
        and Mitigation...........................................   120
      Section 345--Pilot Program on Digital Optimization of 
        Organic Industrial Base Maintenance and Repair Operations   120
      Section 346--Pilot Program on Implementation of Mitigating 
        Actions to Address Vulnerabilities to Critical Defense 
        Facilities and Associated Defense Critical Electric 
        Infrastructure...........................................   121
      Section 347--Report and Certification Requirements 
        regarding Sustainment Costs for F-35 Aircraft Program....   121
    Subtitle D--Risk Mitigation and Safety Improvement...........   121
      Section 351--Treatment of Notice of Presumed Risk Issued by 
        Military Aviation and Installation Assurance 
        Clearinghouse for Review of Mission Obstructions.........   121
      Section 352--Establishment of Joint Safety Council.........   121
      Section 353--Mishap Investigation Review Board.............   121
      Section 354--Implementation of Comptroller General 
        Recommendations on Preventing Tactical Vehicle Training 
        Accidents................................................   121
      Section 355--Pilot Program for Tactical Vehicle Safety Data 
        Collection...............................................   121
    Subtitle E--Reports..........................................   122
      Section 361--Inclusion of Information regarding Borrowed 
        Military Manpower in Readiness Reports...................   122
      Section 362--Annual Report on Missing, Lost, and Stolen 
        Weapons, Large Amounts of Ammunition, Destructive 
        Devices, and Explosive Material..........................   122
      Section 363--Annual Report on Material Readiness of Navy 
        Ships....................................................   122
      Section 364--Strategy and Annual Report on Critical 
        Language Proficiency of Special Operations Forces........   122
      Section 365--Report and Briefing on Approach for Certain 
        Properties Affected by Noise from Military Flight 
        Operations...............................................   122
      Section 366--Study on Use of Military Resources to 
        Transport Certain Individuals and Effect on Military 
        Readiness................................................   122
    Subtitle F--Other Matters....................................   123
      Section 371--Budget Justification for Operation and 
        Maintenance..............................................   123
      Section 372--Improvements and Clarifications Related to 
        Military Working Dogs....................................   123
      Section 373--Management of Fatigue among Crew of Naval 
        Surface Ships and Related Improvements...................   123
      Section 374--Authority to Establish Center of Excellence 
        for Radar Systems and Complementary Workforce and 
        Education Programs.......................................   123
      Section 375--Pilot Program on Military Working Dog and 
        Explosives Detection Canine Health and Excellence........   123
TITLE IV--MILITARY PERSONNEL AUTHORIZATIONS......................   123
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   123
    Subtitle A--Active Forces....................................   123
      Section 401--End Strengths for Active Forces...............   123
      Section 402--Revisions in Permanent Active Duty End 
        Strength Minimum Levels..................................   124
    Subtitle B--Reserve Forces...................................   124
      Section 411--End Strengths for Selected Reserve............   124
      Section 412--End Strengths for Reserves on Active Duty in 
        Support of the Reserves..................................   125
      Section 413--End Strengths for Military Technicians (Dual 
        Status)..................................................   126
      Section 414--Maximum Number of Reserve Personnel Authorized 
        To Be on Active Duty for Operational Support.............   127
      Section 415--Accounting of Reserve Component Members 
        Performing Active Duty or Full-Time National Guard Duty 
        towards Authorized End Strengths.........................   129
    Subtitle C--Authorization of Appropriations..................   129
      Section 421--Military Personnel............................   129
TITLE V--MILITARY PERSONNEL POLICY...............................   129
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   129
      Arlington National Cemetery Burial Policy..................   129
      Army Aviation Retention Study..............................   129
      Artificial Intelligence and Personnel Talent Management....   130
      Award of the Prisoner of War Medal.........................   130
      Briefing on Efforts of Extremist Organizations to Recruit 
        Members of the Armed Forces..............................   131
      Briefing on Implementation of U.S. Special Operations 
        Command Diversity and Inclusion Strategic Plan...........   131
      Career Intermission Program Evaluation.....................   131
      Comptroller General Review of Navy Ship Manning............   131
      Defense Prisoner of War and Missing in Action Accounting 
        Agency Forensic Laboratory...............................   132
      Demographics of Drug Testing and Evaluation Programs.......   133
      Enhancing Readiness to Department of Defense Workforce 
        through Technology.......................................   133
      Enhancing Recruitment and Opportunities for Military 
        Service..................................................   134
      Identifying the Remains of the Casualties of the USS 
        Arizona..................................................   134
      Media Literacy Training....................................   135
      Military Criminal Investigative Training...................   135
      National Guard Active Guard Reserve Program................   135
      National Guard Drill Periods...............................   136
      National Guard Force Apportionment.........................   136
      Report on a Digital Technical Skills in the Department of 
        Defense..................................................   137
      Report on Data Compromise and Payday Lending...............   138
      Reserve Component Command-Directed Investigations of Sexual 
        Assault..................................................   138
      ROTC Scholarship Funding...................................   139
      Service Commitments for Graduates of Military Service 
        Academies and Professional Athletics.....................   139
      Small Unit Leadership Training.............................   140
      Training for Military Prosecutors..........................   140
      Using Commercially Available Technology for Sexual Assault 
        Reporting................................................   141
      Wargaming at War Colleges and Military Postgraduate 
        Education Institutions...................................   141
      Women's Military History Day...............................   142
      World War I Medal of Honor Recipients Report...............   142
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   142
    Subtitle A--Reserve Component Management.....................   142
      Section 501--Grade of Certain Chiefs of Reserve Components.   142
      Section 502--Grade of Vice Chief of the National Guard 
        Bureau...................................................   143
      Section 503--Prohibition on Private Funding for Interstate 
        Deployment of National Guard.............................   143
      Section 504--Requirement of Consent of the Chief Executive 
        Officer for Certain Full-Time National Guard Duty 
        Performed in a State, Territory, or the District of 
        Columbia.................................................   143
      Section 505--Continued National Guard Support for FireGuard 
        Program..................................................   143
      Section 506--Study on Reapportionment of National Guard 
        Force Structure Based on Domestic Responses..............   143
      Section 507--Report on Feasibility and Advisability of 
        Including Cybersecurity Operations and Missions to 
        Protect Critical Infrastructure by Members of the 
        National Guard in Connection with Training or Other Duty.   143
      Section 508--Access to Tour of Duty System.................   143
    Subtitle B--General Service Authorities and Military Records.   144
      Section 511--Prohibition on Commissioning or Enlistment in 
        the Armed Forces of an Individual Convicted of a Felony 
        Hate Crime...............................................   144
      Section 512--Reduction in Service Commitment Required for 
        Participation in Career Intermission Program of a 
        Military Department......................................   144
      Section 513--Modernization of the Selective Service System.   144
      Section 514--Improvements to Military Accessions in Armed 
        Forces under the Jurisdiction of the Secretaries of the 
        Military Departments.....................................   144
      Section 515--Authorization of Permissive Temporary Duty for 
        Wellness.................................................   144
      Section 516--Required Staffing of Administrative Separation 
        Boards...................................................   144
      Section 517--Administrative Separation: Miscellaneous 
        Authorities and Requirements.............................   144
      Section 518--Prohibition on Algorithmic Career Termination.   145
      Section 519--Prohibition on Discipline against a Member 
        Based on Certain Social Media............................   145
      Section 519A--Command Oversight of Military Privatized 
        Housing as Element of Performance Evaluations............   145
      Section 519B--Feasibility Study on Establishment of Housing 
        History for Members of the Armed Forces Who Reside in 
        Housing Provided by the United States....................   145
      Section 519C--Seaman to Admiral-21 Program: Credit towards 
        Retirement...............................................   145
      Section 519D--Progress Report on Implementation of GAO 
        Recommendations Regarding Career Paths for Surface 
        Warfare Officers of the Navy.............................   145
      Section 519E--Independent Assessment of Retention of Female 
        Surface Warfare Officers.................................   146
    Subtitle C--Military Justice and Other Legal Matters.........   146
      Section 521--Rights of the Victim of an Offense under the 
        Uniform Code of Military Justice.........................   146
      Section 522--Commanding Officer's Non-Judicial Punishment..   146
      Section 523--Selection Process for Members to Serve on 
        Courts-Martial...........................................   146
      Section 524--Petition for DNA Testing under the Uniform 
        Code of Military Justice.................................   146
      Section 525--Punitive Article on Violent Extremism.........   146
      Section 526--Clarifications of Procedure in Investigations 
        of Personnel Actions Taken against Members of the Armed 
        Forces in Retaliation for Protected Communications.......   146
      Section 527--Activities to Improve Family Violence 
        Prevention and Response..................................   147
      Section 528--Mandatory Notification of Members of the Armed 
        Forces Identified in Certain Records of Criminal 
        Investigations...........................................   147
      Section 529--Authority of Military Judges and Military 
        Magistrates to Issue Military Court Protective Orders....   147
      Section 529A--Countering Extremism in the Armed Forces.....   147
      Section 529B--Reform and Improvement of Military Criminal 
        Investigative Organizations..............................   147
      Section 529C--Measures to Improve the Safety and Security 
        of Members of the Armed Forces...........................   147
      Section 529D--Distribution of Information on the 
        Availability of Civilian Victim Services.................   147
      Section 529E--Report on Mandatory Restitution..............   148
    Subtitle D--Implementation of Recommendations of the 
        Independent Review Commission on Sexual Assault in the 
        Military.................................................   148
      Section 531--Short Title...................................   148
     Part 1--Special Victim Prosecutors and Special Victim 
        Offenses.................................................   148
      Section 532--Special Victim Prosecutors....................   148
      Section 533--Department of Defense Policies with Respect to 
        Special Victim Prosecutors and Establishment of Offices 
        of Special Victim Prosecutors within Military Departments   148
      Section 534--Definitions of Military Magistrate, Special 
        Victim Offense, and Special Victim Prosecutor............   148
      Section 535--Clarification Relating to Who May Convene 
        Courts-Martial...........................................   149
      Section 536--Detail of Trial Counsel.......................   149
      Section 537--Preliminary Hearing...........................   149
      Section 538--Advice to Convening Authority before Referral 
        for Trial................................................   149
      Section 539--Former Jeopardy...............................   149
      Section 539A--Plea Agreements..............................   149
      Section 539B--Determinations of Impracticality of Rehearing   149
      Section 539C--Punitive Article on Sexual Harassment........   150
      Section 539D--Clarification of Applicability of Domestic 
        Violence and Stalking to Dating Partners.................   150
      Section 539E--Effective Date...............................   150
     Part 2--Sentencing Reform...................................   150
      Section 539F--Sentencing Reform............................   150
     Part 3--Reports and Other Matters...........................   150
      Section 539G--Report on Modification of Disposition 
        Authority for Offenses Other than Special Victim Offenses   150
      Section 539H--Report on Implementation of Certain 
        Recommendations of the Independent Review Commission on 
        Sexual Assault in the Military...........................   150
      Section 539I--Report on Implementation of Recommendations 
        and Other Activities to Address Racial, Ethnic, and 
        Gender Disparities in the Military Justice System........   151
    Subtitle E--Other Sexual Assault-Related Matters.............   151
      Section 541--Independent Investigation of Complaints of 
        Sexual Harassment........................................   151
      Section 542--Modification of Notice to Victims of Pendency 
        of Further Administrative Action Following a 
        Determination Not to Refer to Trial by Court-Martial.....   151
      Section 543--Modifications to Annual Report Regarding 
        Sexual Assaults Involving Members of the Armed Forces....   151
      Section 544--Civilian Positions to Support Special Victims' 
        Counsel..................................................   151
      Section 545--Feasibility Study on Establishment of 
        Clearinghouse of Evidence-Based Practices to Prevent 
        Sexual Assault, Suicide, and Other Harmful Behaviors 
        among Members of the Armed Forces and Military Families..   151
    Subtitle F--Member Education, Training, and Transition.......   152
      Section 551--Training on Consequences of Committing a Crime 
        in Preseparation Counseling of the Transition Assistance 
        Program..................................................   152
      Section 552--Participation of Members of the Reserve 
        Components of the Armed Forces in the SkillBridge Program   152
      Section 553--Expansion and Codification of Matters Covered 
        by Diversity Training in the Department of Defense.......   152
      Section 554--Expansion of Junior Reserve Officers' Training 
        Corps Program............................................   152
      Section 555--Defense Language Institute Foreign Language 
        Center...................................................   152
      Section 556--Allocation of Authority for Nominations to the 
        Military Service Academies in the Event of the Death, 
        Resignation, or Expulsion from Office of a Member of 
        Congress.................................................   152
      Section 557--Votes Required to Call a Meeting of the Board 
        of Visitors of a Military Service Academy................   152
      Section 558--United States Naval Community College.........   153
      Section 559--Codification of Establishment of United States 
        Air Force Institute of Technology........................   153
      Section 559A--Clarifications regarding Scope of Employment 
        and Reemployment Rights of Members of the Uniformed 
        Services.................................................   153
      Section 559B--Clarification and Expansion of Prohibition on 
        Gender-Segregated Training in the Marine Corps...........   153
      Section 559C--Requirement to Issue Regulations Ensuring 
        Certain Parental Guardianship Rights of Cadets and 
        Midshipmen...............................................   153
      Section 559D--Defense Language Continuing Education Program   153
      Section 559E--Public-Private Consortium to Improve 
        Professional Military Education..........................   153
      Section 559F--Standards for Training of Surface Warfare 
        Officers and Enlisted Members............................   153
      Section 559G--Professional Military Education: Report; 
        Definition...............................................   154
      Section 559H--Study on Training and Education of Members of 
        the Armed Forces Regarding Social Reform and Unhealthy 
        Behaviors................................................   154
    Subtitle G--Military Family Readiness and Dependents' 
        Education................................................   154
      Section 561--Establishment of Exceptional Family Member 
        Program Advisory Council.................................   154
      Section 562--Non-Medical Counseling Services for Military 
        Families.................................................   154
      Section 563--Expansion of Support Programs for Special 
        Operations Forces Personnel and Immediate Family Members.   154
      Section 564--Clarification of Qualifications for Attorneys 
        Who Provide Legal Services to Families Enrolled in the 
        Exceptional Family Member Program........................   154
      Section 565--Improvements to the Exceptional Family Member 
        Program..................................................   154
      Section 566--Database of Next of Kin of Deceased Members of 
        the Armed Forces.........................................   154
      Section 567--Policy regarding Remote Military Installations   155
      Section 568--Feasibility Study on Program for Drop-In Child 
        Care Furnished to Certain Military Spouses at Military 
        Child Development Centers................................   155
      Section 569--Comptroller General of the United States 
        Reports on Employment Discrimination against Military 
        Spouses by Civilian Employers............................   155
      Section 569A--Report on Efforts of Commanders of Military 
        Installations to Connect Military Families with Local 
        Entities That Provide Services to Military Families......   155
      Section 569B--Report on Preservation of the Force and 
        Family Program of United States Special Operations 
        Command..................................................   155
      Section 569C--GAO Review of Preservation of the Force and 
        Family Program of United States Special Operations 
        Command..................................................   155
      Section 569D--Continued Assistance to Schools with 
        Significant Numbers of Military Dependent Students.......   155
      Section 569E--Verification of Reporting of Eligible 
        Federally Connected Children for Purposes of Federal 
        Impact Aid Programs......................................   155
    Subtitle H--Diversity and Inclusion..........................   156
      Section 571--Information on Female and Minority 
        Participation in Military Service Academies and the 
        Senior Reserve Officers' Training Corps..................   156
      Section 572--Surveys on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion 
        and Annual Reports on Sexual Assaults and Racial and 
        Ethnic Demographics in the Military Justice System.......   156
      Section 573--Amendments to Additional Deputy Inspector 
        General of the Department of Defense.....................   156
      Section 574--Extension of Deadline for GAO Report on Equal 
        Opportunity at the Military Service Academies............   156
      Section 575--GAO Review of Extremist Affiliations and 
        Activity among Members of the Armed Forces on Active Duty   156
    Subtitle I--Decorations and Awards...........................   156
      Section 581--Semiannual Reports regarding Review of Service 
        Records of Certain Veterans..............................   156
      Section 582--Eligibility of Veterans of Operation End Sweep 
        for Vietnam Service Medal................................   157
      Section 583--Establishment of the Atomic Veterans Service 
        Medal....................................................   157
      Section 584--Authorization for Award of the Medal of Honor 
        to Marcelino Serna for Acts of Valor during World War I..   157
    Subtitle J--Miscellaneous Reports and Other Matters..........   157
      Section 591--Command Climate Assessments: Independent 
        Review; Reports..........................................   157
      Section 592--Healthy Eating in the Department of Defense...   157
      Section 593--Plant-Based Protein Pilot Program of the Navy.   157
      Section 594--Reports on Misconduct by Members of Special 
        Operations Forces........................................   157
      Section 595--Updates and Preservation of Memorials to 
        Chaplains at Arlington National Cemetery.................   157
TITLE VI--COMPENSATION AND OTHER PERSONNEL BENEFITS..............   158
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   158
      Assessment of STEM Education in Department of Defense 
        Education Activity Schools...............................   158
      Basic Allowance for Housing................................   158
      Basic Allowance for Housing Calculation....................   158
      Bereavement Study..........................................   159
      Child Development Centers..................................   159
      Childcare Best Practices...................................   160
      Comptroller General of the United States review of certain 
        professional development activities of Department of 
        Defense Education Activity employees.....................   160
      Department of Defense Education Activity Standardized 
        Record System............................................   160
      Hazardous Duty Pay Parity..................................   161
      In-Home Childcare Licensures...............................   161
      Military Families' Safety on Installations.................   161
      Military Internship Program Feasibility Study..............   162
      Portability of Professional Licenses of Servicemembers and 
        their Spouses............................................   163
      Report on Access to Financial Institutions on Military 
        Installations............................................   163
      Report on Naval Special Warfare............................   164
      Report on STEM Talent Recruitment and Retention............   164
      Report on the counting of military servicemembers and their 
        families for purposes of completing the decennial census.   164
      Reserve Component Service Member Benefits..................   165
      Support for Teachers in Military Impacted Communities......   165
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   166
    Subtitle A--Pay and Allowances...............................   166
      Section 601--Basic Needs Allowance for Low-Income Regular 
        Members..................................................   166
      Section 602--Equal Incentive Pay for Members of the Reserve 
        Components of the Armed Forces...........................   166
      Section 603--Expansions of Certain Travel and 
        Transportation Authorities...............................   166
      Section 604--Unreimbursed Moving Expenses for Members of 
        the Armed Forces: Report; Policy.........................   166
      Section 605--Report on Relationship between Basic Allowance 
        for Housing and Sizes of Military Families...............   166
      Section 606--Report on Temporary Lodging Expenses in 
        Competitive Housing Markets..............................   166
      Section 607--Report on Rental Partnership Programs.........   166
    Subtitle B--Bonuses and Incentive Pays.......................   167
      Section 611--One-Year Extension of Certain Expiring Bonus 
        and Special Pay Authorities..............................   167
    Subtitle C--Family and Survivor Benefits.....................   167
      Section 621--Expansion of Parental Leave for Members of the 
        Armed Forces.............................................   167
      Section 622--Transitional Compensation and Benefits for the 
        Former Spouse of a Member of the Armed Forces Who 
        Allegedly Committed a Dependent-Abuse Offense during 
        Marriage.................................................   167
      Section 623--Claims Relating to the Return of Personal 
        Effects of a Deceased Member of the Armed Forces.........   167
      Section 624--Expansion of Pilot Program to Provide 
        Financial Assistance to Members of the Armed Forces for 
        In-Home Child Care.......................................   167
      Section 625--Continuation of Paid Parental Leave for a 
        Member of the Armed Forces upon Death of Child...........   167
      Section 626--Casualty Assistance Program: Reform; 
        Establishment of Working Group...........................   168
    Subtitle D--Defense Resale Matters...........................   168
      Section 631--Additional Sources of Funds Available for 
        Construction, Repair, Improvement, and Maintenance of 
        Commissary Stores........................................   168
    Subtitle E--Miscellaneous Rights and Benefits................   168
      Section 641--Electronic or Online Notarization for Members 
        of the Armed Forces......................................   168
TITLE VII--HEALTH CARE PROVISIONS................................   168
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   168
      Acceleration of Malaria Treatments.........................   168
      Adverse Event Reporting....................................   168
      Adverse Events Reported for Dietary Supplements............   169
      Blast Injury Health Policy Review..........................   169
      Burn and Wound Care Innovation.............................   170
      Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Medical 
        Response.................................................   170
      Clinical Trials for Freeze-Dried Platelets for Trauma......   171
      Coverage of Chiropractic Care Services under the TRICARE 
        Program..................................................   171
      Creative Arts Therapies....................................   172
      Determination of Eligibility for Adult Incapacitated 
        Children of Service Members..............................   172
      Discrimination against Military Dependents with Prior 
        Mental Health Conditions.................................   173
      Health Threat Travel Information...........................   173
      Heat Illness Report........................................   174
      Holistic Health and Fitness Programs.......................   174
      Impact of Mental Health Copays Report......................   175
      Individual First-Aid Kits Improvements.....................   176
      Innovations in Suicide Prevention Efforts..................   176
      Medication Optimization Plan...............................   177
      Mental Health Services.....................................   177
      Military Wellness Programs.................................   178
      Modernization of Antibiotics Acquisition Process...........   178
      National Disaster Medical System Medical Surge Pilot.......   179
      National Guard Telehealth Capability.......................   180
      Ocular Trauma Specialized Care.............................   180
      Omega-3 Fatty Acids........................................   181
      Prohibition on Sale of Genetic Testing Kits................   181
      Rare Cancer Treatment Report...............................   182
      Retrofitting Buildings with Lactation Rooms................   182
      Review of Efforts to Address Service Member Fatigue........   183
      Study on Alternate Treatments for Suicide Prevention.......   184
      Telehealth Licensure Flexibility Review....................   184
      Traumatic Brain Injury Test Devices........................   184
      Tri-Service Nursing Research Program.......................   185
      TRICARE Dental Contracting.................................   185
      TRICARE Healthcare Demonstration Project...................   185
      TRICARE Reimbursement of Critical Access Hospitals.........   186
      Warstopper Program.........................................   186
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   187
    Subtitle A--TRICARE and Other Health Care Benefits...........   187
      Section 701--Improvement of Postpartum Care for Certain 
        Members of the Armed Forces and Dependents...............   187
      Section 702--Eating Disorders Treatment for Certain Members 
        of the Armed Forces and Dependents.......................   187
      Section 703--Modifications Relating to Coverage of 
        Telehealth Services under TRICARE Program and Other 
        Matters..................................................   187
      Section 704--Modifications to Pilot Program on Health Care 
        Assistance System........................................   187
      Section 705--Temporary Requirement for Contraception 
        Coverage Parity under the TRICARE Program................   187
    Subtitle B--Health Care Administration.......................   187
      Section 711--Modification of Certain Defense Health Agency 
        Organization Requirements................................   187
      Section 712--Requirements for Consultations Related to 
        Military Medical Research and Defense Health Agency 
        Research and Development.................................   188
      Section 713--Authorization of Program to Prevent Fraud and 
        Abuse in the Military Health System......................   188
      Section 714--Mandatory Referral for Mental Health 
        Evaluation...............................................   188
      Section 715--Inclusion of Exposure to Perfluoroalkyl and 
        Polyfluoroalkyl Substances as Component of Periodic 
        Health Assessments.......................................   188
      Section 716--Prohibition on Adverse Personnel Actions Taken 
        against Certain Members of the Armed Forces Based on 
        Declining COVID-19 Vaccine...............................   188
      Section 717--Establishment of Department of Defense System 
        to Track and Record Information on Vaccine Administration   188
      Section 718--Authorization of Provision of Instruction at 
        Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences to 
        Certain Federal Employees................................   188
      Section 719--Mandatory Training on Health Effects of Burn 
        Pits.....................................................   188
      Section 720--Department of Defense Procedures for 
        Exemptions from Mandatory COVID-19 Vaccines..............   189
      Section 721--Modifications and Report Related to Reduction 
        or Realignment of Military Medical Manning and Medical 
        Billets..................................................   189
      Section 722--Cross-Functional Team for Emerging Threat 
        Relating to Anomalous Health Incidents...................   189
      Section 723--Implementation of Integrated Product for 
        Management of Population Health across Military Health 
        System...................................................   189
      Section 724--Digital Health Strategy of Department of 
        Defense..................................................   189
      Section 725--Development and Update of Certain Policies 
        Relating to Military Health System and Integrated Medical 
        Operations...............................................   189
      Section 726--Standardization of Definitions Used by the 
        Department of Defense for Terms Related to Suicide.......   189
    Subtitle C--Reports and Other Matters........................   190
      Section 731--Grant Program for Increased Cooperation on 
        Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Research between United 
        States and Israel........................................   190
      Section 732--Pilot Program on Cardiac Screening at Certain 
        Military Service Academies...............................   190
      Section 733--Pilot Program on Cryopreservation and Storage.   190
      Section 734--Pilot Program on Assistance for Mental Health 
        Appointment Scheduling at Military Medical Treatment 
        Facilities...............................................   190
      Section 735--Pilot Program on Oral Rehydration Solutions...   190
      Section 736--Authorization of Pilot Program to Survey 
        Access to Mental Health Care under Military Health System   190
      Section 737--Prohibition on Availability of Funds for 
        Research Connected to China..............................   190
      Section 738--Independent Analysis of Department of Defense 
        Comprehensive Autism Care Demonstration Program..........   190
      Section 739--Independent Review of Suicide Prevention and 
        Response at Military Installations.......................   191
      Section 740--Feasibility and Advisability Study on 
        Establishment of Aeromedical Squadron at Joint Base Pearl 
        Harbor-Hickam............................................   191
      Section 741--Plan to Address Findings Related to Access to 
        Contraception for Members of the Armed Forces............   191
      Section 742--GAO Biennial Study on Individual Longitudinal 
        Exposure Record Program..................................   191
      Section 743--GAO Study on Exclusion of Certain Remarried 
        Individuals from Medical and Dental Coverage under 
        TRICARE Program..........................................   191
      Section 744--Study on Joint Fund of the Department of 
        Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs for 
        Federal Electronic Health Record Modernization Office....   191
      Section 745--Briefing on Domestic Production of Critical 
        Active Pharmaceutical Ingredients........................   191
      Section 746--Briefing on Anomalous Health Incidents 
        Involving Members of the Armed Forces....................   192
      Section 747--Sense of Congress on National Warrior Call Day   192
TITLE VIII--ACQUISITION POLICY, ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT, AND 
    RELATED MATTERS..............................................   192
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   192
      Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in the Defense 
        Contracting Process......................................   192
      Artificial Intelligence-Enabled Autonomous Systems.........   193
      Assessment and Mitigation Strategy for Microelectronics 
        Supply Chain Vulnerabilities for Army Ground Vehicles....   193
      Briefing on Navy Ship Repair Withholds.....................   194
      Cost Data and Software Effort..............................   194
      Creation of a Consortium Focused on Semiconductor Supply 
        and Alignment of Foreign Direct Investment to National 
        Defense Strategy.........................................   195
      Department of Defense Use of GSA's Fourth-Party Logistics 
        (4PL) program............................................   195
      Evaluating Employee Ownership in Department of Defense 
        Government Contractors...................................   196
      Expansion of Canadian ITAR Exception to NTIB Members.......   196
      GSA E-Commerce Clarification...............................   197
      Implementation of Enhanced Post-Award Debriefings..........   197
      Industrial Base Analysis and Sustainment Support...........   198
      Interoperability and Commercial Solutions for Combined 
        Joint All-Domain Command and Control.....................   198
      Minority- and Veteran-Owned Defense Supplier Development in 
        the Aerospace Supply Chain Network.......................   199
      Modeling and Simulation....................................   199
      National Security Implications of Chinese Influence on 
        Agriculture..............................................   200
      Refining Capacity in the United States.....................   200
      Registered Apprenticeship Program Corrosion Prevention and 
        Control Training.........................................   200
      Report on Ship Components..................................   201
      Securing Allies' 5G Networks...............................   201
      Securing Critical Mineral Supply Chains....................   202
      Shipbuilding and Naval Capability..........................   202
      Sourcing in Major and Critical Defense Acquisition Programs   202
      Sourcing in Major Defense Acquisition Programs.............   203
      Status of Procurement Technical Assistance Program 
        Integration into Office of Industrial Policy.............   204
      Supply Chain Management Leveraging Cross Domain Artificial 
        Intelligence Technologies................................   205
      Titanium Supply............................................   205
      Use of Multi-role Contractor Owned Contractor Operated 
        Aircraft.................................................   206
      Value of Foreign Direct Investment and Engaging Allies in 
        Rapid Innovation.........................................   207
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   207
    Subtitle A--Acquisition Policy and Management................   207
      Section 801--Acquisition Workforce Educational Partnerships   207
      Section 802--Special Emergency Reimbursement Authority.....   207
      Section 803--Prohibition on Procurement of Personal 
        Protective Equipment from Non-Allied Foreign Nations.....   207
      Section 804--Minimum Wage for Employees of Department of 
        Defense Contractors......................................   207
      Section 805--Diversity and Inclusion Reporting Requirements 
        for Covered Contractors..................................   208
      Section 806--Website for Certain Domestic Procurement 
        Waivers..................................................   208
      Section 807--Suspension or Debarment Referral for Egregious 
        Violations of Certain Domestic Preference Laws...........   208
    Subtitle B--Amendments to General Contracting Authorities, 
        Procedures, and Limitations..............................   208
      Section 811--Extension of Authorization for the Defense 
        Civilian Acquisition Workforce Personnel Demonstration 
        Project..................................................   208
      Section 812--Modifications to Contracts Subject to Cost or 
        Pricing Data Certification...............................   208
      Section 813--Office of Corrosion Policy and Oversight 
        Employee Training Requirements...........................   208
      Section 814--Standard Guidelines for Evaluation of 
        Requirements for Services Contracts......................   209
      Section 815--Extension of Requirement to Submit Selected 
        Acquisition Reports......................................   209
      Section 816--Limitation on Procurement of Welded Shipboard 
        Anchor and Mooring Chain for Naval Vessels...............   209
      Section 817--Competition Requirements for Purchases from 
        Federal Prison Industries................................   209
      Section 818--Repeal of Preference for Fixed-Price Contracts   209
      Section 819--Modification to the Pilot Program for 
        Streamlining Awards for Innovative Technology Projects...   209
      Section 820--Other Transaction Authority Information 
        Accessibility............................................   210
    Subtitle C--Provisions Relating to Supply Chain Security.....   210
      Section 831--Department of Defense Research and Development 
        Priorities...............................................   210
      Section 832--Defense Supply Chain Risk Assessment Framework   210
      Section 833--Plan to Reduce Reliance on Supplies and 
        Materials from Adversaries in the Defense Supply Chain...   210
      Section 834--Enhanced Domestic Content Requirement for 
        Major Defense Acquisition Programs.......................   210
      Section 835--Reduction of Fluctuations of Supply and Demand 
        for Certain Covered Items................................   210
      Section 836--Prohibition on Certain Procurements from the 
        Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region........................   210
    Subtitle D--Industrial Base Matters..........................   211
      Section 841--Modification of Pilot Program for Development 
        of Technology-Enhanced Capabilities with Partnership 
        Intermediaries...........................................   211
      Section 842--Designating Certain SBIR and STTR Programs as 
        Entrepreneurial Innovation Projects......................   211
      Section 843--Modifications to Printed Circuit Board 
        Acquisition Restrictions.................................   211
      Section 844--Defense Industrial Base Coalition for Career 
        Development..............................................   211
      Section 845--Additional Testing of Commercial E-Commerce 
        Portal Models............................................   212
      Section 846--Support for Industry Participation in Global 
        Standards Organizations..................................   212
    Subtitle E--Other Matters....................................   212
      Section 851--Mission Management Pilot Program..............   212
      Section 852--Pilot Program to Determine the Cost 
        Competitiveness of Drop-In Fuels.........................   212
      Section 853--Assuring Integrity of Overseas Fuel Supplies..   212
      Section 854--Cadre of Software Development and Acquisition 
        Experts..................................................   212
      Section 855--Acquisition Practices And Policies Assessment.   212
TITLE IX--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT......   213
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   213
      Report on the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
        for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict........   213
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   213
    Subtitle A--Office of the Secretary of Defense and Related 
        Matters..................................................   213
      Section 901--Modification of Requirements for Appointment 
        of a Person as Secretary of Defense after Relief from 
        Active Duty..............................................   213
      Section 902--Implementation of Repeal of Chief Management 
        Officer of the Department of Defense.....................   214
      Section 903--Designation of Senior Official for 
        Implementation of Electromagnetic Spectrum Superiority 
        Strategy.................................................   214
    Subtitle B--Other Department of Defense Organization and 
        Management Matters.......................................   214
      Section 911--Clarification of Treatment of Office of Local 
        Defense Community Cooperation as a Department of Defense 
        Field Activity...........................................   214
      Section 912--Use of Combatant Commander Initiative Fund for 
        Certain Environmental Matters............................   214
      Section 913--Inclusion of Explosive Ordnance Disposal in 
        Special Operations Activities............................   214
      Section 914--Coordination of Certain Naval Activities with 
        the Space Force..........................................   214
      Section 915--Space Force Organizational Matters and 
        Modification of Certain Space-Related Acquisition 
        Authorities..............................................   215
      Section 916--Report on Establishment of Office to Oversee 
        Sanctions with Respect to Chinese Military Companies.....   215
      Section 917--Independent Review of and Report on the 
        Unified Command Plan.....................................   215
    Subtitle C--Space National Guard.............................   215
      Section 921--Establishment of Space National Guard.........   215
      Section 922--No Effect on Military Installations...........   215
      Section 923--Implementation of Space National Guard........   215
      Section 924--Conforming Amendments and Clarification of 
        Authorities..............................................   215
TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS......................................   216
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   216
      Anti-Surface Integration...................................   216
      Cultivating Special Operations Forces Technical Skills.....   216
      Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency Working 
        Capital Fund Operations..................................   217
      Department of Defense's Use of Independent Public 
        Accounting Firms for Audit Remediation Services..........   218
      Deployment to Dwell Ratio of Special Operation Forces......   218
      Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships................   218
      Fire Boats.................................................   219
      Increased Access to Oceanographic Data.....................   219
      Integration of Nonstandard Data............................   219
      Irregular Warfare Annex Implementation Plan................   220
      National Background Investigation Services.................   220
      Optimizing AMBIT Adjustments...............................   221
      Other Potential Uses for Decommissioned Naval Assets.......   222
      Report on Congressional Increases to the Defense Budget....   222
      Report on Need for Additional Ice Breakers in the Great 
        Lakes Region.............................................   223
      Report on Posture of Special Operations Forces in the U.S. 
        Central Command Area of Responsibility...................   223
      Report on United States Contributions to Multilateral and 
        International Organizations..............................   223
      Secure Congressional Communications........................   224
      Special Operations Forces Activities in Latin America and 
        the Caribbean............................................   224
      Update on the Limitation of Funds to Institutions of Higher 
        Education Hosting Confucius Institutes...................   225
      USNS Bridge and USNS Rainier...............................   226
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   226
    Subtitle A--Financial Matters................................   226
      Section 1001--General Transfer Authority...................   226
      Section 1002--Determination of Budgetary Effects...........   226
      Section 1003--Budget Justification for Operation and 
        Maintenance..............................................   226
    Subtitle B--Naval Vessels....................................   226
      Section 1011--Critical Components of National Sea-Based 
        Deterrence Vessels.......................................   226
      Section 1012--Biennial Report on Shipbuilder Training and 
        the Defense Industrial Base..............................   226
      Section 1013--Revision of Sustainment Key Performance 
        Parameters for Shipbuilding Programs.....................   227
      Section 1014--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Retirement of 
        Mark VI Patrol Boats.....................................   227
      Section 1015--Assessment of Security of Global Maritime 
        Chokepoints..............................................   227
      Section 1016--Annual Report on Ship Maintenance............   227
      Section 1017--Availability of Funds for Retirement or 
        Inactivation of Ticonderoga Class Cruisers...............   227
    Subtitle C--Counterterrorism.................................   227
      Section 1021--Inclusion in Counterterrorism Briefings of 
        Information on Use of Military Force in Collective Self-
        Defense..................................................   227
      Section 1022--Extension of Authority for Joint Task Forces 
        to Provide Support to Law Enforcement Agencies Conducting 
        Counter-Terrorism Activities.............................   227
      Section 1023--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Transfer or 
        Release of Individuals Detained at United States Naval 
        Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to Certain Countries......   228
    Subtitle D--Miscellaneous Authorities and Limitations........   228
      Section 1031--Navy Coordination with Coast Guard on 
        Aircraft, Weapons, Tactics, Technique, Organization, and 
        Equipment of Joint Concern...............................   228
      Section 1032--Prohibition on Use of Navy, Marine Corps, and 
        Space Force as Posse Comitatus...........................   228
      Section 1033--Program to Improve Relations between Members 
        of the Armed Forces and Military Communities.............   228
      Section 1034--Authority to Provide Space and Services to 
        Military Welfare Societies...............................   228
      Section 1035--Required Revision of Department of Defense 
        Unmanned Aircraft Systems Categorization.................   228
      Section 1036--Limitation on Funding for Information 
        Operations Matters.......................................   229
      Section 1037--Prohibition on Provision of Equipment to 
        Other Departments and Agencies for Protection of Certain 
        Facilities and Assets from Unmanned Aircraft.............   229
      Section 1038--Limitation on Use of Funds for United States 
        Space Command Headquarters...............................   229
    Subtitle E--Studies and Reports..............................   230
      Section 1041--Congressional Oversight of Alternative 
        Compensatory Control Measures............................   230
      Section 1042--Comparative Testing Reports for Certain 
        Aircraft.................................................   230
      Section 1043--Extension of Reporting Requirement regarding 
        Enhancement of Information Sharing and Coordination of 
        Military Training between Department of Homeland Security 
        and Department of Defense................................   230
      Section 1044--Continuation of Certain Department of Defense 
        Reporting Requirements...................................   230
      Section 1045--Geographic Combatant Command Risk Assessment 
        of Air Force Airborne Intelligence, Surveillance, and 
        Reconnaissance Modernization Plan........................   230
      Section 1046--Biennial Assessments of Air Force Test Center   230
      Section 1047--Comparative Study on .338 Norma Magnum 
        Platform.................................................   231
      Section 1048--Comptroller General Report on Aging 
        Department of Defense Equipment..........................   231
      Section 1049--Report on Acquisition, Delivery, and Use of 
        Mobility Assets that Enable Implementation of 
        Expeditionary Advanced Base Operations...................   231
      Section 1050--Force Posture in the Indo-Pacific Region.....   231
      Section 1051--Assessment of United States Military 
        Infrastructure in Diego Garcia, British Indian Ocean 
        Territory................................................   231
      Section 1052--Report on 2019 World Military Games..........   231
      Section 1053--Reports and Briefings regarding Oversight of 
        Afghanistan..............................................   232
      Section 1054--Report and Briefing on United States 
        Equipment, Property, and Classified Material That Was 
        Destroyed, Surrendered, and Abandoned in the Withdrawal 
        from Afghanistan.........................................   232
      Section 1055--Report on Defense Utility of United States 
        Territories and Possessions..............................   232
      Section 1056--Report on Coast Guard Explosive Ordnance 
        Disposal.................................................   232
      Section 1057--Independent Assessment with Respect to the 
        Arctic Region............................................   232
      Section 1058--Annual Report and Briefing on Global Force 
        Management Allocation Plan...............................   232
    Subtitle F--District of Columbia National Guard Home Rule....   232
      Section 1066--Short Title..................................   232
      Section 1067--Extension of National Guard Authorities to 
        Mayor of the District of Columbia........................   232
      Section 1068--Conforming Amendments to Title 10, United 
        States Code..............................................   233
      Section 1069--Conforming Amendments to Title 32, United 
        States Code..............................................   233
      Section 1070--Conforming Amendment to the District of 
        Columbia Home Rule Act...................................   233
    Subtitle G--Other Matters....................................   233
      Section 1071--Technical, Conforming, and Clerical 
        Amendments...............................................   233
      Section 1072--Assistant Secretary of Defense for Indo-
        Pacific Security Affairs.................................   233
      Section 1073--Improvement of Transparency and Congressional 
        Oversight of Civil Reserve Air Fleet.....................   233
      Section 1074--Enhancements to National Mobilization 
        Exercises................................................   233
      Section 1075--Providing End-to-End Electronic Voting 
        Services for Absent Uniformed Services Voters in 
        Locations with Limited or Immature Postal Service........   233
      Section 1076--Responsibilities for National Mobilization; 
        Personnel Requirements...................................   234
      Section 1077--Update of Joint Evacuation Publication 3-68: 
        Non-Combatant Evacuation Operations......................   234
      Section 1078--Treatment of Operational Data from 
        Afghanistan..............................................   234
      Section 1079--Defense Resource Budgeting and Allocation 
        Commission...............................................   234
      Section 1080--Commission on Afghanistan....................   234
      Section 1081--Technology Pilot Program to Support Ballot 
        Transmission for Absent Uniformed Services and Overseas 
        Votes....................................................   234
      Section 1082--Recognition of the Memorial, Memorial Garden, 
        and K9 Memorial of the National Navy UDT-SEAL Museum in 
        Fort Pierce, Florida, as the Official National Memorial, 
        Memorial Garden, and K9 Memorial, Respectively, of Navy 
        SEALs and Their Predecessors.............................   235
      Section 1083--Sense of Congress on the Legacy, 
        Contributions, and Sacrifices of American Indian and 
        Alaska Natives in the Armed Forces.......................   235
      Section 1084--Name of Naval Medical Center Camp Lejeune....   235
      Section 1085--Sense of Congress regarding Naming a Warship 
        the USS Fallujah.........................................   235
      Section 1086--Name of Air Force Utah Test and Training 
        Range....................................................   235
      Section 1087--Name of Air Force Utah Test and Training 
        Range Consolidated Mission Control Center................   235
      Section 1088--Sense of Congress regarding Crisis at the 
        Southwest Border.........................................   235
      Section 1089--Improvements and Clarifications Relating to 
        Unauthorized Use of Computers of Department of Defense...   235
TITLE XI--CIVILIAN PERSONNEL MATTERS.............................   236
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   236
      Appointment of Recently Retired Members of the Armed Forces 
        to Civil Service Positions...............................   236
      Civilian Personnel in the Office of the Secretary of 
        Defense..................................................   236
      Prevention and Response Efforts in the National Nuclear 
        Security Administration Nuclear Security Forces regarding 
        Sexual Assault...........................................   237
      Technical and Digital Talent...............................   237
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   238
      Section 1101--One-Year Extension of Authority to Waive 
        Annual Limitation on Premium Pay and Aggregate Limitation 
        on Pay for Federal Civilian Employees Working Overseas...   238
      Section 1102--One-Year Extension of Temporary Authority to 
        Grant Allowances, Benefits, and Gratuities to Civilian 
        Personnel on Official Duty in a Combat Zone..............   238
      Section 1103--DARPA Personnel Management Authority to 
        Attract Science and Engineering Experts..................   238
      Section 1104--Civilian Personnel Management................   238
      Section 1105--Comptroller General Review of Naval Audit 
        Service Operations.......................................   238
      Section 1106--Implementation of GAO Recommendations on 
        Tracking, Response, and Training for Civilian Employees 
        of the Department of Defense regarding Sexual Harassment 
        and Assault..............................................   239
      Section 1107--Guidelines for Reductions in Civilian 
        Positions................................................   239
      Section 1108--Repeal of 2-Year Probationary Period.........   239
      Section 1109--Amendment to Diversity and Inclusion 
        Reporting................................................   239
      Section 1110--Including Active Duty in the Armed Forces in 
        Meeting Service Requirement for Federal Employee Family 
        and Medical Leave........................................   239
      Section 1111--Treatment of Hours Worked under a Qualified 
        Trade-of-Time Arrangement................................   239
      Section 1112--Modification of Temporary Authority to 
        Appoint Retired Members of the Armed Forces to Positions 
        in the Department of Defense.............................   239
      Section 1113--Increase in Allowance Based on Duty at Remote 
        Worksites................................................   240
      Section 1114--Limiting the Number of Local Wage Areas 
        Defined within a Pay Locality............................   240
TITLE XII--MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS...................   240
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   240
      Accountability and Security of Biometric Data..............   240
      Afghanistan Intelligence Assessment........................   241
      Aviation Contractor Support to the Afghan Air Force........   241
      Bagram Air Base............................................   241
      Briefing on Authorities to Build Partner Capacity of 
        Security Forces of Friendly Foreign Countries............   242
      Briefing on Foreign Military Sales to Poland...............   242
      Countering Hybrid Threats..................................   243
      Defense Cooperation with Compacts of Free Association 
        States...................................................   243
      Defense Security Cooperation Agency Briefing on Lessons 
        Learned from the Failure of the ANSF and Partner Forces 
        with Less Capable Security Forces........................   244
      Department of Defense State Partnership Program Support to 
        U.S. Security Cooperation Objectives.....................   244
      Feasibility of Delivering a Plan to Congress Prior to and 
        After a Withdrawal of U.S. Forces from a Country.........   244
      Global Fragility Act Implementation........................   245
      Mine Warfare...............................................   245
      Operational Concepts.......................................   246
      Operational Energy Readiness...............................   246
      PLA Civilian Strategic Mobility Capacity...................   247
      Potential Department of Defense Funding for the Wuhan 
        Institute of Virology....................................   247
      Report on Anti-Ship Systems for Defense of Taiwan..........   248
      Report on Engaging Taiwan in Indo-Pacific Regional 
        Dialogues or Forums......................................   248
      Report on Evacuation of Remaining American Citizens and 
        Counterterrorism Operations in Afghanistan...............   248
      Report on Iranian Support for Military Forces Committing 
        Severe Human Rights Abuses...............................   249
      Report on Iranian Support for the Assad Regime.............   249
      Report on Iranian Support for the Taliban in Afghanistan...   249
      Report on Personal Identifiable Information Shared by the 
        Department of Defense with the Taliban during Evacuation 
        Operations...............................................   249
      Report on Security Impact of Taliban Prisoner Releases.....   250
      Report on Security of Pakistan's Nuclear Arsenal...........   250
      Report on the Progress and Development of ICBM Silos in 
        Eastern XinJiang, Gansu, and Jinlantai Provinces.........   250
      Report to Congress on the Status of Abandoned United States 
        Military Air Capabilities in Afghanistan.................   250
      SIGAR Performance Evaluation of the Afghan National 
        Security and Defense Forces..............................   251
      Special Inspector General of Afghanistan Reconstruction 
        (SIGAR) Evaluation of Performance of Afghan National 
        Defense and Security Forces (ANDSF)......................   251
      Special Operations Forces Cooperation with Israel..........   252
      Status of Operation Atlantic Resolve.......................   252
      Strategy for Preserving the Rights of Women and Girls in 
        Afghanistan..............................................   252
      Strategy to Mitigate Modifications to Defender Europe......   253
      Strategy to Mitigate U.S. Army V Corps in the Continental 
        United States Challenges.................................   254
      Sustaining Deterrence in Europe............................   254
      Taliban Financial Assets Report............................   256
      Taliban relationship with Foreign Terrorist Organizations..   256
      Tracking Local National Support to U.S. Armed Forces.......   256
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   257
    Subtitle A--Assistance and Training..........................   257
      Section 1201--Extension of Support of Special Operations 
        for Irregular Warfare....................................   257
    Subtitle B--Matters Relating to Afghanistan and Pakistan.....   257
      Section 1211--Clarification of Certain Matters regarding 
        Protection of Afghan Allies..............................   257
      Section 1212--Afghanistan Security Forces Fund.............   257
      Section 1213--Prohibition on Providing Funds or Material 
        Resources of the Department of Defense to the Taliban....   257
      Section 1214--Prohibition on Transporting Currency to the 
        Taliban and the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan...........   257
      Section 1215--Extension and Modification of Authority for 
        Reimbursement of Certain Coalition Nations for Support 
        Provided to United States Military Operations............   258
      Section 1216--Quarterly Briefings on the Security 
        Environment in Afghanistan and United States Military 
        Operations Related to the Security of, and Threats 
        Emanating from, Afghanistan..............................   258
      Section 1217--Quarterly Report on the Threat Potential of 
        Al-Qaeda and Related Terrorist Groups under a Taliban 
        Regime in Afghanistan....................................   258
      Section 1218--Sense of Congress............................   258
    Subtitle C--Matters Relating to Syria, Iraq, and Iran........   258
      Section 1221--Extension and Modification of Authority to 
        Provide Assistance to Vetted Syrian Groups and 
        Individuals..............................................   258
      Section 1222--Extension and Modification of Authority to 
        Support Operations and Activities of the Office of 
        Security Cooperation in Iraq.............................   258
      Section 1223--Extension and Modification of Authority to 
        Provide Assistance to Counter the Islamic State of Iraq 
        and Syria................................................   259
      Section 1224--Prohibition of Transfers to Badr Organization   259
      Section 1225--Prohibition on Transfers to Iran.............   259
      Section 1226--Report on Iran-China Military Ties...........   259
      Section 1227--Report on Iranian Military Capabilities......   259
      Section 1228--Report on Iranian Terrorist Proxies..........   259
    Subtitle D--Matters Relating to Russia.......................   260
      Section 1231--Extension of Limitation on Military 
        Cooperation between the United States and Russia.........   260
      Section 1232--Prohibition on Availability of Funds Relating 
        to Sovereignty of Russia over Crimea.....................   260
      Section 1233--Modification and Extension of Ukraine 
        Security Assistance Initiative...........................   260
      Section 1234--Report on Options for Assisting the 
        Government of Ukraine in Addressing Integrated Air and 
        Missile Defense Gaps.....................................   260
      Section 1235--Biennial Report on Russian Influence 
        Operations and Campaigns Targeting Military Alliances and 
        Partnerships of Which the United States is a Member......   260
      Section 1236--Sense of Congress on Georgia.................   261
    Subtitle E--Matters Relating to the Indo-Pacific Region......   261
      Section 1241--Sense of Congress on a Free and Open Indo-
        Pacific Region...........................................   261
      Section 1242--Clarification of Required Budget Information 
        Related to the Indo-Pacific..............................   261
      Section 1243--Report on Cooperation between the National 
        Guard and Taiwan.........................................   261
      Section 1244--Report on Military and Security Developments 
        Involving the People's Republic of China.................   261
      Section 1245--Biennial Report on Influence Operations and 
        Campaigns of the Government of the People's Republic of 
        China Targeting Military Alliances and Partnerships of 
        Which the United States Is a Member......................   261
      Section 1246--Report on Efforts by the People's Republic of 
        China to Expand Its Presence and Influence in Latin 
        America and the Caribbean................................   262
      Section 1247--Sense of Congress on Taiwan Defense Relations   262
      Section 1248--Sense of Congress on Inviting Taiwan to the 
        Rim of the Pacific Exercise..............................   262
      Section 1249--Sense of Congress on Enhancing Defense and 
        Security Cooperation with Singapore......................   262
      Section 1250--Sense of Congress............................   262
      Section 1251--Sense of Congress with Respect to Qatar......   262
      Section 1252--Statement of Policy..........................   262
TITLE XIII--OTHER MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS............   262
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   262
    Subtitle A--Matters Relating to Europe and NATO..............   262
      Section 1301--Report on the State of United States Military 
        Investment in Europe including the European Deterrence 
        Initiative...............................................   262
      Section 1302--Sense of Congress on United States Defense 
        Posture in Europe........................................   263
      Section 1303--Sense of Congress on Security Assistance to 
        the Baltic Countries.....................................   263
    Subtitle B--Security Cooperation and Assistance..............   263
      Section 1311--Extension of Authority for Certain Payments 
        to Redress Injury and Loss...............................   263
      Section 1312--Foreign Area Officer Assessment and Review...   263
      Section 1313--Women, Peace, and Security Act Implementation 
        at Military Service Academies............................   263
    Subtitle C--Other Matters....................................   263
      Section 1321--Extension of Authority for Department of 
        Defense Support for Stabilization Activities in National 
        Security Interest of the United States...................   263
      Section 1322--Notification Relating to Overseas 
        Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid Funds Obligated in 
        Support of Operation Allies Refuge.......................   264
      Section 1323--Limitation on Use of Funds for the 2022 
        Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in China.............   264
      Section 1324--Report on Hostilities Involving United States 
        Armed Forces.............................................   264
TITLE XIV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS..................................   264
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   264
    Subtitle A--Military Programs................................   264
      Section 1401--Working Capital Funds........................   264
      Section 1402--Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, 
        Defense..................................................   264
      Section 1403--Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug 
        Activities, Defense-Wide.................................   264
      Section 1404--Defense Inspector General....................   264
      Section 1405--Defense Health Program.......................   265
    Subtitle B--Other Matters....................................   265
      Section 1411--Acquisition of Strategic and Critical 
        Materials from the National Technology and Industrial 
        Base.....................................................   265
      Section 1412--Authority for Transfer of Funds to Joint 
        Department of Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs 
        Medical Facility Demonstration Fund for Captain James A. 
        Lovell Health Care Center, Illinois......................   265
      Section 1413--Authorization of Appropriations for Armed 
        Forces Retirement Home...................................   265
TITLE XV--CYBERSPACE-RELATED MATTERS.............................   265
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   265
      21st Century IDEA Compliance...............................   265
      Africa Data Science Center.................................   265
      Briefing on the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center's Data 
        Efforts..................................................   266
      Comptroller General Review of Department of Defense 
        Training to Prepare for Leadership and Operations in a 
        Contested Information Environment........................   266
      Cyber Institutes Program...................................   267
      Department of Defense Data Strategy........................   267
      Department of Defense Website and Forms Modernization 
        Program..................................................   267
      Directive Authority for National Security Systems..........   267
      Director of Operational Test & Evaluation Software Academic 
        Technical Expertise......................................   268
      Effectiveness Metrics for Information Operations...........   268
      Enterprise Network Endpoint Monitoring.....................   269
      Enterprise Telecommunications Security.....................   269
      Investing in Robust Data Infrastructure for Artificial 
        Intelligence.............................................   269
      Strategy and Posture Review for Information Operations.....   270
      Support for Zero Trust within the Department of Defense....   270
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   271
    Subtitle A--Cyber Threats....................................   271
      Section 1501--Cyber Threat Information Collaboration 
        Environment..............................................   271
      Section 1502--Enterprise-Wide Procurement of Commercial 
        Cyber Threat Information Products........................   271
    Subtitle B--Cyber Systems and Operations.....................   271
      Section 1511--Legacy Information Technologies and Systems 
        Accountability...........................................   271
      Section 1512--Update Relating to Responsibilities of Chief 
        Information Officer......................................   271
      Section 1513--Protective Domain Name System within the 
        Department of Defense....................................   272
    Subtitle C--Cyber Weapons....................................   272
      Section 1521--Notification Requirements regarding Cyber 
        Weapons..................................................   272
      Section 1522--Cybersecurity of Weapon Systems..............   272
    Subtitle D--Other Cyber Matters..............................   272
      Section 1531--Feasibility Study regarding Establishment 
        within the Department of Defense a Designated Central 
        Program Office, Headed by a Senior Department Official, 
        Responsible for Overseeing All Academic Engagement 
        Programs Focusing on Creating Cyber Talent across the 
        Department...............................................   272
      Section 1532--Prohibition on Chief Information Officer of 
        the Department of Defense Serving as Principal Cyber 
        Advisor of the Department................................   272
TITLE XVI--SPACE ACTIVITIES, STRATEGIC PROGRAMS, AND INTELLIGENCE 
    MATTERS......................................................   273
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   273
    Space Activities.............................................   273
      Alternate Global Positioning System Constellation..........   273
      Arctic Satellite Ground Station............................   273
      Commercial Cloud for Military Space Programs...............   274
      Commercial Imagery Capabilities............................   274
      Commercial Radio Frequency Capabilities....................   275
      Commercial Satellite Weather...............................   275
      Commercial Space Situational Awareness.....................   267
      Efforts to Reduce Space Debris.............................   277
      Hybrid Space Architecture..................................   277
      Launch of Experimental Spaceflight Activities..............   278
      Long-term Plan for Preserving American Space Dominance.....   278
      Positioning, Navigation, and Timing Infrastructure 
        Resilience...............................................   279
      Report Language for Satellite Cybersecurity--Space 
        Development Agency.......................................   279
      SATCOM Transition Path for Future Capabilities.............   279
      Space Warfare Analysis Center..............................   280
    Missile Defense Programs.....................................   281
      Layered Defense for the Homeland...........................   281
      Leveraging AN/TPY-2 Radar Foreign Military Sales for U.S. 
        Programs.................................................   281
      Lower Tier Air and Missile Defense Sensor (LTAMDS) Program 
        Protection...............................................   282
      Radar Upgrades for Hypersonic Weapons Identification.......   282
    Nuclear Forces...............................................   283
      Cybersecurity Requirements in the Nuclear Modernization 
        Life Cycle...............................................   283
      Report on Nuclear Command, Control, and Communications 
        Enterprise Modernization.................................   284
    Intelligence Matters.........................................   284
      Intelligence Collection Prioritization on Advanced 
        Technologies of Adversaries..............................   284
      Intelligence Sharing Frameworks............................   284
      Prophet Enhanced Signals Processing Kits...................   285
      Report on Challenges to U.S. Security in Space.............   285
      Report on China's People's Liberation Army Strategic 
        Support Force............................................   286
      Report on Intelligence Collection Capabilities and 
        Activities of U.S. Forces Korea..........................   286
      Report on the origins of SARS-CoV-2 and the COVID-19 global 
        pandemic.................................................   287
      Report on Threats Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction by 
        China and Russia.........................................   287
      Secretary of Defense briefing related to influence efforts 
        on U.S. employees by foreign governments.................   287
      Ubiquitous Technical Surveillance..........................   288
    Other Matters................................................   288
      Chemical Weapons Stockpile Destruction.....................   288
      Defense Biosecurity Efforts................................   288
      Fielding of the Conventional Prompt Strike Weapons System..   289
      Strategy for Biological Defense Vaccines...................   289
      Testing Infrastructure to Support Strategic and Missile 
        Defense Programs.........................................   290
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   291
    Subtitle A--Space Activities.................................   291
      Section 1601--Improvements to Tactically Responsive Space 
        Launch Program...........................................   291
      Section 1602--National Security Space Launch Program.......   291
      Section 1603--Classification Review of Programs of the 
        Space Force..............................................   292
      Section 1604--Report on Range of the Future Initiative of 
        the Space Force..........................................   292
      Section 1605--Norms of Behavior for International Rules-
        Based Order in Space.....................................   292
      Section 1606--Programs of Record of Space Force and 
        Commercial Capabilities..................................   293
      Section 1607--Clarification of Domestic Services and 
        Capabilities in Leveraging Commercial Satellite Remote 
        Sensing..................................................   293
      Section 1608--National Security Council Briefing on 
        Potential Harmful Interference to Global Positioning 
        System...................................................   293
    Subtitle B--Defense Intelligence and Intelligence-Related 
        Activities...............................................   293
      Section 1611--Notification of Certain Threats to United 
        States Armed Forces by Foreign Governments...............   293
      Section 1612--Strategy and Plan to Implement Certain 
        Defense Intelligence Reforms.............................   293
      Section 1613--Authority of Under Secretary of Defense for 
        Intelligence and Security to Engage in Fundraising for 
        Certain Nonprofit Organizations..........................   294
      Section 1614--Executive Agent for Explosive Ordnance 
        Intelligence.............................................   294
      Section 1615--Inclusion of Explosive Ordnance Intelligence 
        in Defense Intelligence Agency Activities................   294
    Subtitle C--Nuclear Forces...................................   294
      Section 1621--Exercises of Nuclear Command, Control, and 
        Communications System....................................   294
      Section 1622--Independent Review of Nuclear Command, 
        Control, and Communications System.......................   294
      Section 1623--Review of Safety, Security, and Reliability 
        of Nuclear Weapons and Related Systems...................   294
      Section 1624--Review of Engineering and Manufacturing 
        Development Contract for Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent 
        Program..................................................   295
      Section 1625--Long-Range Standoff Weapon...................   295
      Section 1626--Prohibition on Reduction of the 
        Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles of the United States.   296
      Section 1627--Limitation on Availability of Certain Funds 
        until Submission of Information Relating to Proposed 
        Budget for Nuclear-Armed Sea-Launched Cruise Missile.....   296
      Section 1628--Limitation on Availability of Certain Funds 
        until Submission of Information Relating to Nuclear-Armed 
        Sea-Launched Cruise Missile..............................   296
      Section 1629--Annual Certification on Readiness of 
        Minuteman III Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles........   296
      Section 1630--Cost Estimate to Re-Alert Long-Range Bombers.   296
      Section 1631--Notification regarding Intercontinental 
        Ballistic Missiles of China..............................   296
      Section 1632--Information regarding Review of Minuteman III 
        Service Life Extension Program...........................   297
      Section 1633--Sense of Congress regarding Nuclear Posture 
        Review...................................................   297
    Subtitle D--Missile Defense Programs.........................   297
      Section 1641--Directed Energy Programs for Ballistic and 
        Hypersonic Missile Defense...............................   297
      Section 1642--Notification of Changes to Non-Standard 
        Acquisition and Requirements Processes and 
        Responsibilities of Missile Defense Agency...............   297
      Section 1643--Missile Defense Radar in Hawaii..............   298
      Section 1644--Guam Integrated Air and Missile Defense 
        System...................................................   298
      Section 1645--Limitation on Availability of Funds Until 
        Receipt of Certain Report on Guam........................   298
      Section 1646--Repeal of Transition of Ballistic Missile 
        Defense Programs to Military Departments.................   298
      Section 1647--Certification Required for Russia and China 
        to Tour Certain Missile Defense Sites....................   298
      Section 1648--Sense of Congress on Next Generation 
        Interceptor Program......................................   299
    Subtitle E--Other Matters....................................   299
      Section 1651--Cooperative Threat Reduction Funds...........   299
      Section 1652--Establishment of Office to Address 
        Unidentified Aerial Phenomena............................   299
      Section 1653--Matters regarding Integrated Deterrence 
        Review...................................................   299
      Section 1654--Sense of Congress on Indemnification and the 
        Conventional Prompt Global Strike Weapon System..........   299
TITLE XVII--TECHNICAL AMENDMENTS RELATED TO THE TRANSFER AND 
    REORGANIZATION OF DEFENSE ACQUISITION STATUTES...............   300
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   300
      Section 1701--Technical, Conforming, and Clerical 
        Amendments Related to the Transfer and Reorganization of 
        Defense Acquisition Statutes.............................   300
      Section 1702--Conforming Cross Reference Technical 
        Amendments Related to the Transfer and Reorganization of 
        Defense Acquisition Statutes.............................   300

DIVISION B--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AUTHORIZATIONS.................   300
  PURPOSE........................................................   300
  MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AND FAMILY HOUSING OVERVIEW..............   300
      Section 2001--Short Title..................................   300
      Section 2002--Expiration of Authorizations and Amounts 
        Required To Be Specified by Law..........................   301
      Section 2003--Effective Date...............................   301
TITLE XXI--ARMY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION............................   301
  SUMMARY........................................................   301
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   301
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   301
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   302
      Section 2101--Authorized Army Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   302
      Section 2102--Family Housing...............................   302
      Section 2103--Authorization of Appropriations, Army........   302
      Section 2104--Extension of Authority to Carry Out Certain 
        Fiscal Year 2017 Project.................................   302
      Section 2105--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2021 Project.........................   302
      Section 2106--Additional Authorized Funding Source for 
        Certain Fiscal Year 2022 Project.........................   303
TITLE XXII--NAVY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION...........................   303
  SUMMARY........................................................   303
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   303
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   303
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   305
      Section 2201--Authorized Navy Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   305
      Section 2202--Family Housing...............................   305
      Section 2203--Authorization of Appropriations, Navy........   305
TITLE XXIII--AIR FORCE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION.....................   305
  SUMMARY........................................................   305
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   306
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   306
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   307
      Section 2301--Authorized Air Force Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   307
      Section 2302--Family Housing...............................   308
      Section 2303--Authorization of Appropriations, Air Force...   308
      Section 2304--Extension of Authority to Carry Out Certain 
        Fiscal Year 2017 Projects................................   308
      Section 2305--Modification of Authority to Carry Out 
        Military Construction Projects at Tyndall Air Force Base, 
        Florida..................................................   308
TITLE XXIV--DEFENSE AGENCIES MILITARY CONSTRUCTION...............   308
  SUMMARY........................................................   308
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   308
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   308
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   310
      Section 2401--Authorized Defense Agencies Construction and 
        Land Acquisition Projects................................   310
      Section 2402--Authorized Energy Resilience and Conservation 
        Investment Program Projects..............................   310
      Section 2403--Authorization of Appropriations, Defense 
        Agencies.................................................   310
      Section 2404--Extension of Authority to Carry Out Certain 
        Fiscal Year 2017 Project.................................   310
TITLE XXV--INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS................................   310
  SUMMARY........................................................   310
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   310
    Subtitle A--North Atlantic Treaty Organization Security 
        Investment Program.......................................   310
      Section 2501--Authorized NATO Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   310
      Section 2502--Authorization of Appropriations, NATO........   311
    Subtitle B--Host Country In-Kind Contributions...............   311
      Section 2511--Republic of Korea Funded Construction 
        Projects.................................................   311
      Section 2512--Republic of Poland Funded Construction 
        Projects.................................................   311
TITLE XXVI--GUARD AND RESERVE FORCES FACILITIES..................   311
  SUMMARY........................................................   311
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   311
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   311
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   312
      Section 2601--Authorized Army National Guard Construction 
        and Land Acquisition Projects............................   312
      Section 2602--Authorized Army Reserve Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   312
      Section 2603--Authorized Navy Reserve and Marine Corps 
        Reserve Construction and Land Acquisition Projects.......   313
      Section 2604--Authorized Air National Guard Construction 
        and Land Acquisition Projects............................   313
      Section 2605--Authorized Air Force Reserve Construction and 
        Land Acquisition Projects................................   313
      Section 2606--Authorization of Appropriations, National 
        Guard and Reserve........................................   313
TITLE XXVII--BASE REALIGNMENT AND CLOSURE ACTIVITIES.............   313
  SUMMARY........................................................   313
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   313
      Explanation of Funding Adjustments.........................   313
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   314
      Section 2701--Authorization of Appropriations for Base 
        Realignment and Closure Activities Funded through the 
        Department of Defense Base Closure Account...............   314
      Section 2702--Conditions on Closure of Pueblo Chemical 
        Depot and Chemical Agent Destruction Pilot Plant, 
        Colorado.................................................   314
TITLE XXVIII--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION GENERAL PROVISIONS...........   314
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   314
      Air Purification Assessment................................   314
      All-American Abode.........................................   315
      Army Compatible Use Buffer Program.........................   315
      Arresting Further Science and Technology Infrastructure 
        Decline..................................................   315
      Assessment of Army Privatized Housing Initiative...........   316
      Assessment of Childcare Facilities Needs...................   317
      Briefing on the Navy's Future Base Design in Hampton Roads.   317
      CNO Integrated Vulnerability Report........................   317
      Conditions of Unaccompanied Personnel Housing..............   318
      Dillingham Airfield Water System...........................   318
      DoD Housing Compliance, Disclosure, and Evaluation of 
        Housing Facilities.......................................   318
      Energy Infrastructure at Former Naval Air Station Barbers 
        Point....................................................   319
      Emergency Generators for Energy Resiliency.................   319
      Hawai'i Infrastructure Readiness Initiative................   320
      Housing Assessment for Military and Federal Civilian 
        Employees................................................   321
      Innovative Building Technologies...........................   321
      Installation Security Improvements.........................   322
      Installations of the Future................................   322
      Integrated Project Delivery................................   323
      Intergovernmental Support Agreements.......................   324
      Land Exchange with the Nisqually Tribe of Indians..........   324
      Leveraging Opportunities for Public-Private Partnerships on 
        U.S. Military Installations..............................   324
      Lualualei Naval Road/Kolekole Pass.........................   325
      Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake Modernization.........   325
      Officer and Enlisted Housing Conditions....................   326
      Prioritizing Prototyping Facilities........................   326
      Privatized On-Base Lodging Programs........................   327
      Scoring Improvements and Defense Community Support 
        Authority................................................   328
      Soo Locks, Sault Ste. Marie, Michigan......................   328
      Support for Gould Island demolition........................   329
      Three Rivers Levee Authority...............................   329
      Update on Tenant's Bill of Rights Implementation...........   329
      Wait Times for On-Base Housing.............................   330
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   330
    Subtitle A--Military Construction Program Changes............   330
      Section 2801--Special Construction Authority to Use 
        Operation and Maintenance Funds to Meet Certain United 
        States Military-Related Construction Needs in Friendly 
        Foreign Countries........................................   330
      Section 2802--Increase in Maximum Amount Authorized for Use 
        of Unspecified Minor Military Construction Project 
        Authority................................................   330
      Section 2803--Increased Transparency and Public 
        Availability of Information regarding Solicitation and 
        Award of Subcontracts under Military Construction 
        Contracts................................................   330
      Section 2804--Public Availability of Information on 
        Facilities Sustainment, Restoration, and Modernization 
        Projects and Activities..................................   331
      Section 2805--Limitations on Authorized Cost and Scope of 
        Work Variations..........................................   331
      Section 2806--Use of Qualified Apprentices by Military 
        Construction Contractors.................................   331
      Section 2807--Modification and Extension of Temporary, 
        Limited Authority to Use Operation and Maintenance Funds 
        for Construction Projects in Certain Areas outside the 
        United States............................................   331
    Subtitle B--Continuation of Military Housing Reforms.........   331
      Section 2811--Applicability of Window Fall Prevention 
        Requirements to All Military Family Housing whether 
        Privatized or Government-Owned and Government-Controlled.   331
      Section 2812--Modification of Military Housing to 
        Accommodate Tenants with Disabilities....................   331
      Section 2813--Required Investments in Improving Military 
        Unaccompanied Housing....................................   332
      Section 2814--Improvement of Department of Defense Child 
        Development Centers and Increased Availability of Child 
        Care for Children of Military Personnel..................   332
    Subtitle C--Real Property and Facilities Administration......   332
      Section 2821--Secretary of the Navy Authority to Support 
        Development and Operation of National Museum of the 
        United States Navy.......................................   332
      Section 2822--Expansion of Secretary of the Navy Authority 
        to Lease and License United States Navy Museum Facilities 
        to Generate Revenue to Support Museum Administration and 
        Operations...............................................   332
      Section 2823--Department of Defense Monitoring of Real 
        Property Ownership and Occupancy in Vicinity of Military 
        Installations to Identify Foreign Adversary Ownership or 
        Occupancy................................................   332
    Subtitle D--Military Facilities Master Plan Requirements.....   332
      Section 2831--Cooperation with State and Local Governments 
        in Development of Master Plans for Major Military 
        Installations............................................   332
      Section 2832--Prompt Completion of Military Installation 
        Resilience Component of Master Plans for At-Risk Major 
        Military Installations...................................   333
      Section 2833--Congressional Oversight of Master Plans for 
        Army Ammunition Plants Guiding Future Infrastructure, 
        Facility, and Production Equipment Improvements..........   333
    Subtitle E--Matters Related to Unified Facilities Criteria 
        and Military Construction Planning and Design............   333
      Section 2841--Amendment of Unified Facilities Criteria to 
        Require Inclusion of Private Nursing and Lactation Space 
        in Certain Military Construction Projects................   333
      Section 2842--Additional Department of Defense Activities 
        to Improve Energy Resiliency of Military Installations...   333
      Section 2843--Consideration of Anticipated Increased Share 
        of Electric Vehicles in Department of Defense Vehicle 
        Fleet and Owned by Members of the Armed Forces and 
        Department Employees.....................................   333
      Section 2844--Conditions on Revision of Unified Facilities 
        Criteria or Unified Facilities Guide Specifications 
        regarding Use of Variable Refrigerant Flow Systems.......   333
    Subtitle F--Land Conveyances.................................   334
      Section 2851--Modification of Restrictions on Use of Former 
        Navy Property Conveyed to University of California, San 
        Diego....................................................   334
      Section 2852--Land Conveyance, Joint Base Cape Cod, Bourne, 
        Massachusetts............................................   334
      Section 2853--Land Conveyance, Rosecrans Air National Guard 
        Base, Saint Joseph, Missouri.............................   334
      Section 2854--Land Conveyance, Naval Air Station Oceana, 
        Virginia Beach, Virginia.................................   334
    Subtitle G--Authorized Pilot Programs........................   334
      Section 2861--Pilot Program on Increased Use of Mass Timber 
        in Military Construction.................................   334
      Section 2862--Pilot Program on Increased Use of Sustainable 
        Building Materials in Military Construction..............   334
      Section 2863--Pilot Program on Establishment of Account for 
        Reimbursement for Use of Testing Facilities at 
        Installations of the Department of the Air Force.........   334
      Section 2864--Pilot Program to Expedite 5G 
        Telecommunications on Military Installations through 
        Deployment of Telecommunications Infrastructure..........   334
    Subtitle H--Asia-Pacific and Indo-Pacific Issues.............   335
      Section 2871--Improved Oversight of Certain Infrastructure 
        Services Provided by Naval Facilities Engineering Systems 
        Command Pacific..........................................   335
    Subtitle I--Miscellaneous Studies and Reports................   335
      Section 2881--Identification of Organic Industrial Base 
        Gaps and Vulnerabilities Related to Climate Change and 
        Defensive Cybersecurity Capabilities.....................   335
    Subtitle J--Other Matters....................................   335
      Section 2891--Clarification of Installation and Maintenance 
        Requirements regarding Fire Extinguishers in Department 
        of Defense Facilities....................................   335
TITLE XXIX--ADDITIONAL MILITARY CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS RELATED TO 
    SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, TEST, AND EVALUATION....................   335
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   335
      Section 2901--Authorized Army Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   335
      Section 2902--Authorized Navy Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   335
      Section 2903--Authorized Air Force Construction and Land 
        Acquisition Projects.....................................   335
      Section 2904--Authorization of Appropriations..............   336

DIVISION C--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY AUTHORIZATIONS 
  AND OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS.......................................   336
TITLE XXXI--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAMS......   336
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   336
      Advanced Simulation and Computing for Stockpile Stewardship   336
      Briefing on Capabilities, Plans, and Strategy with regard 
        to Artificial Intelligence, Machine Learning, and Data 
        Science..................................................   337
      Comptroller General Review of Insider Threats to the 
        Nuclear Security Enterprise..............................   337
      Comptroller General Review of the Enhanced Capability for 
        Subcritical Experiments Program..........................   337
      Cost Estimating Practices of the National Nuclear Security 
        Administration...........................................   338
      Incentivizing Disposition of Radioactive Sources...........   338
      Independent Review Team Report on the B61-12 Life Extension 
        Program and W88 Alteration 370 Technical Issue...........   339
      Leveraging Artificial Intelligence and Innovative 
        Commercially Available Technology to Secure Department of 
        Energy Installations.....................................   339
      NNSA Management and Operation Contract Risk Mitigation.....   340
      Sustaining and Improving Monitoring, Detection, and 
        Verification Test Bed Capabilities.......................   340
      Transition to Independent Audits of Management and 
        Operating Contractors' Annual Statements of Costs 
        Incurred and Claimed.....................................   341
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   341
    Subtitle A--National Security Program Authorizations.........   341
      Section 3101--National Nuclear Security Administration.....   341
      Section 3102--Defense Environmental Cleanup................   341
      Section 3103--Other Defense Activities.....................   341
      Section 3104--Nuclear Energy...............................   342
    Subtitle B--Program Authorizations, Restrictions, 
        Limitations, and Other Matters...........................   342
      Section 3111--Improvements to Annual Reports on Condition 
        of the United States Nuclear Stockpile...................   342
      Section 3112--Modifications to Certain Reporting 
        Requirements.............................................   342
      Section 3113--Plutonium Pit Production Capacity............   342
      Section 3114--Report on Runit Dome and Related Hazards.....   342
      Section 3115--University-Based Nuclear Non Proliferation 
        Collaboration Program....................................   343
      Section 3116--Prohibition on the Availability of Funds to 
        Reconvert or Retire W76-2 Warheads.......................   343
TITLE XXXII--DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD.............   343
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   343
      Section 3201--Authorization................................   343
      Section 3202--Technical Amendments regarding Chair and Vice 
        Chair of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board.........   343
TITLE XXXIV--NAVAL PETROLEUM RESERVES............................   343
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   343
      Section 3401--Authorization of Appropriations..............   343
TITLE XXXV--MARITIME MATTERS.....................................   344
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   344
    Subtitle A--Maritime Administration..........................   344
      Section 3501--Authorization of the Maritime Administration.   344
      Section 3502--Maritime Administration......................   344
    Subtitle B--Other Matters....................................   344
      Section 3511--Effective Period for Issuance of 
        Documentation for Recreational Vessels...................   344
      Section 3512--America's Marine Highway Program.............   344
      Section 3513--Committees on Maritime Matters...............   344
      Section 3514--Port Infrastructure Development Program......   344
      Section 3515--Uses of Emerging Marine Technologies and 
        Practices................................................   344
      Section 3516--Prohibition on Participation of Long Term 
        Charters in Tanker Security Fleet........................   344
      Section 3517--Coastwise Endorsement........................   345
      Section 3518--Report on Efforts of Combatant Commands to 
        Combat Threats Posed by Illegal, Unreported, and 
        Unregulated Fishing......................................   345
      Section 3519--Coast Guard Yard Improvement.................   345
      Section 3520--Authorization to Purchase Duplicate Medals...   345

DIVISION D--FUNDING TABLES.......................................   345
      Section 4001--Authorization of Amounts in Funding Tables...   345
      Summary of National Defense Authorizations for Fiscal Year 
        2022.....................................................   345
      National Defense Budget Authority Implication..............   350
TITLE XLI--PROCUREMENT...........................................   352
      Section 4101--Procurement..................................   354
TITLE XLII--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION..........   400
      Section 4201--Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation..   400
TITLE XLIII--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE...........................   452
      Section 4301--Operation and Maintenance....................   452
TITLE XLIV--MILITARY PERSONNEL...................................   478
      Section 4401--Military Personnel...........................   478
TITLE XLV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS..................................   479
      Section 4501--Other Authorizations.........................   479
TITLE XLVI--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION................................   482
      Section 4601--Military Construction........................   482
TITLE XLVII--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAMS.....   499
      Section 4701--Department of Energy National Security 
        Programs.................................................   499

DIVISION E--NON-DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE MATTERS....................   510
TITLE L--BARRY GOLDWATER SCHOLARSHIP AND EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION 
    MODERNIZATION ACT............................................   510
      Section 5001--Short Title..................................   510
      Section 5002--Clarifying Amendments to Definitions.........   510
      Section 5003--Barry Goldwater Scholarship and Excellence in 
        Education Awards.........................................   510
      Section 5004--Stipends.....................................   510
      Section 5005--Scholarship and Research Internship 
        Conditions...............................................   510
      Section 5006--Sustainable Investments of Funds.............   510
      Section 5007--Administrative Provisions....................   511
TITLE LI--FINANCIAL SERVICES MATTERS.............................   511
      Section 5101--Enhanced Protection against Debt Collector 
        Harassment of Servicemembers.............................   511
      Section 5102--Comptroller General Study on Enhanced 
        Protection against Debt Collector Harassment of 
        Servicemembers...........................................   511
      Section 5103--Support to Enhance the Capacity of 
        International Monetary Fund Members to Evaluate the Legal 
        and Financial Terms of Sovereign Debt Contracts..........   511
      Section 5104--Adverse Information in Cases of Trafficking..   511
      Section 5105--United States Policy regarding International 
        Financial Institution Assistance with Respect to Advanced 
        Wireless Technologies....................................   511
TITLE LII--RECOMMENDATIONS OF THE NATIONAL SECURITY COMMISSION ON 
    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE......................................   512
  ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST......................................   512
      Additional Software Acquisition Contracting Mechanism......   512
      Comptroller General Report on STEM/AI Workforce Development   512
      Enhancing Department of Defense Innovation Efforts Focused 
        on Policy Analytics and Insights.........................   513
  LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS.........................................   514
      Section 5201--Modification of National Defense Science and 
        Technology Strategy......................................   514
      Section 5202--Department of Defense Plan to Compete in the 
        Global Information Environment...........................   514
      Section 5203--Resourcing Plan for Digital Ecosystem........   514
      Section 5204--Digital Talent Recruiting Officer............   514
      Section 5205--Occupational Series for Digital Career Fields   514
      Section 5206--Artificial Intelligence Readiness Goals......   515
      Section 5207--Pilot Program to Facilitate the Agile 
        Acquisition of Technologies for Warfighters..............   515
      Section 5208--Short Course on Emerging Technologies for 
        Senior Civilian Leaders..................................   515
TITLE LIII--GREAT LAKES WINTER SHIPPING..........................   515
      Section 5301--Great Lakes Winter Shipping..................   515
TITLE LX--OTHER MATTERS..........................................   515
      Section 6001--FAA Rating of Civilian Pilots of the 
        Department of Defense....................................   515
      Section 6002--Property Disposition for Affordable Housing..   515
      Section 6003--Requirement to Establish a National Network 
        for Microelectronics Research and Development............   516
      Section 6004--Definition of State for Purposes of Omnibus 
        Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968...............   516
      Section 6005--Advancing Mutual Interests and Growing Our 
        Success..................................................   516
      Section 6006--Department of Veterans Affairs Governors 
        Challenge Grant Program..................................   516
      Section 6007--Foreign Corruption Accountability............   516
      Section 6008--Justice for Victims of Kleptocracy...........   516
      Section 6009--Expansion of Scope of Department of Veterans 
        Affairs Open Burn Pit Registry to Include Open Burn Pits 
        in Egypt and Syria.......................................   516
      Section 6010--Extension of Period of Eligibility by Reason 
        of School Closures Due to Emergency and Other Situations 
        under Department of Veterans Affairs Training and 
        Rehabilitation Program for Veterans with Service-
        Connected Disabilities...................................   517
      Section 6011--Extension of Time Limitation for Use of 
        Entitlement under Department of Veterans Affairs 
        Educational Assistance Programs by Reason of School 
        Closures Due to Emergency and Other Situations...........   517
      Section 6012--Exemption of Certain Homeland Security Fees 
        for Certain Immediate Relatives of an Individual Who 
        Received the Purple Heart................................   517

Department of Defense Authorization Request......................   517
Communications from Other Committees.............................   520
Congressional Budget Office Estimate.............................   537
Statement Required by the Congressional Budget Act...............   539
Committee Cost Estimate..........................................   540
Disclosure of Earmarks and Congressionally Directed Spending 
  Items..........................................................   540
Oversight Findings...............................................   546
General Performance Goals and Objectives.........................   546
Statement of Federal Mandates....................................   546
Federal Advisory Committee Statement.............................   546
Applicability to the Legislative Branch..........................   546
Duplication of Federal Programs..................................   546
Committee Votes..................................................   547
Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported............   570
Additional Views.................................................   571
Dissenting Views.................................................   574





117th Congress }                                            { Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session   }                                            { 117-118

======================================================================


 
        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2022

                                _______
                                

 September 10, 2021.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Mr. Smith of Washington, from the Committee on Armed Services, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                    ADDITIONAL AND DISSENTING VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 4350]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Armed Services, to whom was referred the 
bill (H.R. 4350) to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 
2022 for military activities of the Department of Defense and 
for military construction, to prescribe military personnel 
strengths for such fiscal year, and for other purposes, having 
considered the same, reports favorably thereon with amendments 
and recommends that the bill as amended do pass.
    The amendments are as follows:
    The amendment strikes all after the enacting clause of the 
bill and inserts a new text which appears in italic type in the 
reported bill.
    The title of the bill is amended to reflect the amendment 
to the text of the bill.

                       PURPOSE OF THE LEGISLATION

    The bill would: (1) authorize appropriations for fiscal 
year 2022 for procurement and for research, development, test, 
and evaluation; (2) authorize appropriations for fiscal year 
2022 for operation and maintenance and for working capital 
funds; (3) authorize for fiscal year 2022 the personnel 
strength for each Active Duty Component of the military 
departments, and the personnel strength for the Selected 
Reserve for each Reserve Component of the Armed Forces; (4) 
modify various elements of compensation for military personnel 
and impose certain requirements and limitations on personnel 
actions in the defense establishment; (5) authorize 
appropriations for fiscal year 2022 for military construction 
and family housing; (6) authorize appropriations for fiscal 
year 2022 for the Department of Energy national security 
programs; and (7) authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2022 
for the Maritime Administration.

                    RATIONALE FOR THE COMMITTEE BILL

    H.R. 4350, the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2022, is the primary vehicle through which Congress 
fulfills its responsibility as mandated in Article I, Section 
8, of the Constitution of the United States, which grants 
Congress the power to provide for the common defense, to raise 
and support an Army, to provide and maintain a Navy, and to 
make rules for the government and regulation of the land and 
naval forces. Rule X of the House of Representatives provides 
the House Committee on Armed Services with jurisdiction over 
the Department of Defense generally and over the military 
application of nuclear energy. The committee bill includes 
findings and recommendations resulting from its oversight 
activities, conducted through hearings and briefings with 
Department of Defense and Department of Energy civilian and 
military officials, intelligence analysts, outside experts, and 
industry representatives, and it is informed by institutional 
experience. H.R. 4350 provides the Department of Defense and 
the Department of Energy with important policy authorities to 
speed decision making and improve agility, while improving 
readiness and increasing capabilities and capacities.
    H.R. 4350 authorizes a defense enterprise that draws on all 
sources of our national power, one that draws on our diversity, 
vibrant economy, dynamic civil society, innovative 
technological base, enduring democratic values, and our broad 
and deep network of partnerships and alliances around the 
world.
    Central to H.R. 4350 is the focus on improving the lives of 
our men and women in uniform. The committee believes our 
service members confront unique, complex challenges and deserve 
our support.
    H.R. 4350 meets the committee's goal of facilitating a 
strong national defense apparatus that is resourced properly, 
accountable for its actions, and cognizant of the essential and 
direct oversight role of Congress. H.R. 4350 emphasizes 
transformational change and leans forward to fortify the 
Department's technological advantage to respond to ensure our 
servicemembers have the tools required to address growing 
threats in this area. H.R. 4350 allows our military to improve 
readiness, expand capabilities, and invest in the new 
technologies required to secure our country and protect us 
against our adversaries.

                                HEARINGS

    In compliance with clause 3(c) of rule XIII, (1) the 
following hearing was used to develop or consider H.R. 4350:
    On June 23, 2021, the committee held a hearing, ``The 
Fiscal Year 2022 National Defense Authorization Budget Request 
from the Department of Defense''. (2) The following related 
hearings were held:
    On February 17, 2021, the committee held a hearing, 
``Update on the Department of Defense's Evolving Roles and 
Mission in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic''.
    On March 10, 2021, the committee held a hearing, ``National 
Security Challenges and U.S. Military Activities in the Indo-
Pacific''.
    On March 24, 2021, the committee held a hearing, Extremism 
in the Armed Forces''.
    On April 14, 2021, the committee held a hearing, ``National 
Security Challenges and U.S. Military Activity in North and 
South America''.
    On April 15, 2021, the committee held a hearing, ``National 
Security Challenges and U.S. Military Activities in Europe''.
    On April 20, 2021, the committee held a hearing, ``National 
Security Challenges and U.S. Military Activities in the Greater 
Middle East and Africa''.
    On April 28, 2021, the committee held a hearing, ``The 
Department of Defense's Financial Improvement and Audit 
Readiness Plan: Fiscal Year 2020 Audit Results and the Path 
Forward''.
    On May 5, 2021, the committee held a hearing, ``Member 
Day''.
    On May 12, 2021, the committee held a hearing, ``An Update 
on Afghanistan''.
    On May 19, 2021, the committee held a hearing, 
``Recommendations of the National Commission on Military, 
National, and Public Service''.
    On June 15, 2021, the committee held a hearing, 
``Department of the Navy Fiscal Year 2022 Budget Request''.
    On June 16, 2021, the committee held a hearing, 
``Department of the Air Force Fiscal Year 2022 Budget 
Request''.
    On June 23, 2021, the committee held a hearing, ``The 
Fiscal Year 2022 National Defense Authorization Budget Request 
from the Department of Defense''.
    On June 29, 2021, the committee held a hearing, ``The 
Fiscal Year 2022 National Defense Authorization Budget Request 
for the Department of the Army''.
    On July 20, 2021, the committee held a hearing, ``Non-
Governmental Views on the Fiscal Year 2022 Department of 
Defense Budget''.
    In addition, the seven subcommittees of the committee 
conducted 19 hearings and 7 markups to develop and consider 
H.R. 4350.

                           COMMITTEE POSITION

    On September 1, 2021, the Committee on Armed Services held 
a markup session to consider H.R. 4350. The committee ordered 
the bill H.R. 4350, as amended, favorably reported to the House 
of Representatives by a recorded vote of 47-2, a quorum being 
present.

                EXPLANATION OF THE COMMITTEE AMENDMENTS

    The committee adopted an amendment in the nature of a 
substitute during the consideration of H.R. 4350. The title of 
the bill is amended to reflect the amendment to the text of the 
bill. The remainder of the report discusses the bill, as 
amended.

            RELATIONSHIP OF AUTHORIZATION TO APPROPRIATIONS

    The bill does not provide budget authority. This bill 
authorizes appropriations; subsequent appropriations acts will 
provide budget authority. However, the committee strives to 
adhere to the recommendations as issued by the Committee on the 
Budget as it relates to the jurisdiction of this committee.
    The bill addresses the following categories in the 
Department of Defense budget: procurement; research, 
development, test, and evaluation; operation and maintenance; 
military personnel; working capital funds; and military 
construction and family housing. The bill also addresses the 
Armed Forces Retirement Home, Department of Energy National 
Security Programs, the Naval Petroleum Reserve, and the 
Maritime Administration.
    Active Duty and Reserve personnel strengths authorized in 
this bill and legislation affecting compensation for military 
personnel determine the remaining appropriation requirements of 
the Department of Defense. However, this bill does not provide 
authorization of specific dollar amounts for military 
personnel.

          SUMMARY OF DISCRETIONARY AUTHORIZATIONS IN THE BILL

    The President requested discretionary budget authority of 
$743.1 billion for national defense programs within the 
jurisdiction of the committee for fiscal year 2022. Of this 
amount, $714.8 billion was requested for Department of Defense 
programs, $27.9 billion was requested for Department of Energy 
national security programs and the Defense Nuclear Facilities 
Safety Board, and $0.4 billion was requested for defense-
related activities associated with the Maritime Administration.
    The committee recommends an overall discretionary 
authorization for national defense of $768.1 billion in fiscal 
year 2022. The committee authorization represents a $36.5 
billion increase above the national defense levels provided for 
in the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283).
    The table preceding the detailed program adjustments in 
division D of this report summarizes the committee's 
recommended discretionary authorizations by appropriation 
account for fiscal year 2022 and compares these amounts to the 
President's request.

                      BUDGET AUTHORITY IMPLICATION

    The President's total request for the national defense 
budget function (050) in fiscal year 2022 is $765.5 billion, as 
estimated by the Congressional Budget Office. In addition to 
funding for programs addressed in this bill, the total 050 
request includes discretionary funding for national defense 
programs not in the committee's jurisdiction, discretionary 
funding for programs that do not require additional 
authorization in fiscal year 2022, and mandatory programs.
    The table preceding the detailed program adjustments in 
division D of this report details changes to the budget request 
for all aspects of the national defense budget function.

            DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AUTHORIZATIONS

                          TITLE I--PROCUREMENT

                       Aircraft Procurement, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Assured Communications on Tactical Unmanned Aerial Systems in Highly 
        Contested Environments

    The committee anticipates that future combat operations 
will involve increasingly hostile radio frequency environments 
requiring improved low probability of detection, low 
probability of intercept, low probability of exploitation, and 
anti-jam tactical communications capability. The committee 
commends the Army and Air Force officials for working with 
industry partners to develop a multicarrier spread spectrum 
protected waveform designed to resolve gaps in wideband 
tactical data link terminals that are critical to Unmanned 
Aerial Systems (UAS) operations in highly contested 
environments. This capability will help ensure secure, 
persistent, reliable communications required for UAS tactical 
operations.
    The committee remains interested in continued efforts to 
mature assured communications technologies. Accordingly, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Army, in coordination 
with Commander, Army Futures Command, to provide a briefing to 
the House Armed Services Committee not later than March 1, 
2022, on plans to accelerate fielding of a next-generation 
protected waveform. The briefing shall include the Army's plans 
to:
    (1) expand research and development efforts to scale 
terminals for multiple applications and to address adjacent 
functions, such as electronic warfare techniques;
    (2) port to small form-factor radios and demonstrate 
airborne testing on relevant tactical UAS platforms;
    (3) augment additional capabilities like multiple-access 
networking or burst-mode transmission;
    (4) optimize processor architecture to improve size, 
weight, power, and cost; and
    (5) achieve any other critical next generation features.
    The briefing should also explain what steps the Department 
is taking to integrate next-generation secure waveforms with a 
multi-channel antenna for assured communications.

Litter Load Stability Technology

    The committee is aware that load stability technology has 
the potential to offer performance and safety improvements for 
military utility and medical evacuation helicopters. The 
committee understands that Army Futures Command and Army 
Program Directorate Medical Evacuation have conducted test and 
evaluation of litter-attached load stability systems on 
helicopter hoists. The committee supports completing any 
further testing and certification of this type of safety 
stabilization technology and allowing units to make use of this 
capability for life-saving and other missions. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Assistant Secretary of the Army for 
Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services no later than March 31, 
2022, on the remaining testing required on load stabilization 
technology and the status of plans to procure and field this 
capability to Army aviation units, to include estimated cost 
and schedule.

                       Missile Procurement, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Extended Range Air Defense

    The committee notes the Army's efforts to restore its 
short-range air defense (SHORAD) systems capability and 
capacity. Of the capabilities tested, the Army is pursuing the 
Initial Maneuver SHORAD (IM-SHORAD) system consisting of a 
Stryker vehicle equipped with multiple air defense weapons 
including its existing air defense missile. The Army plans to 
begin fielding IM-SHORAD vehicles in fiscal year 2021.
    However, the committee is concerned there may be a 
requirement to engage hostile aircraft at greater ranges to 
successfully protect U.S. and allied ground forces. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of the Army for 
Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services by December 30, 2021, on 
the Army's plans for sustaining and improving SHORAD system 
capability and capacity to meet current and potential air 
threats. This briefing should address issues including, but not 
limited to, the technology options under consideration for 
SHORAD capability improvements, force structure options under 
consideration for SHORAD capacity improvements, the schedule 
and funding profiles through the Future Years Defense Program 
associated with each option, the relative priority for 
modernizing SHORAD systems in the Army's modernization 
strategy, and options for mitigation of short-term air defense 
risk while SHORAD improvements are developed, procured, and 
fielded.

        Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army


Items of Special Interest

Armored plate technical performance specifications

    The committee is aware that several Army armored vehicles 
currently in production specify the use of proprietary branded 
armor plate products and that sources for some of these 
products are uncertain or potentially unreliable. The committee 
is concerned that the practice of specifying proprietary or 
brand-name products, rather than a technical performance 
specification, may reduce the ability of domestic manufacturers 
of equivalent products to fairly compete for subcontracts and 
may pose unacceptable risk to the supply chain for such 
products. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than March 1, 2022, concerning the full 
extent to which proprietary branded armor plate products are 
used in armored vehicle production by the Army; the extent to 
which such products are supplied by foreign sources or foreign-
owned entities; and the efforts the service is taking to 
establish military technical performance specifications for 
armor plate material for use in armored vehicles.

M240 medium machine gun

    The committee is concerned about the Army's management of 
risk in the M240 medium machine gun industrial base. The 
committee understands the Army has achieved the procurement 
objective for the M240 medium machine gun, and that the current 
M240 acquisition and sustainment strategy is to end production 
of new machine guns and rely on replacement of individual 
parts. The committee's concern is focused on the implications 
of closing a production line that would be expensive and 
difficult to reestablish at a later date, risking an industrial 
base that lacks the capacity and capability necessary to 
support current and future military requirements.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than January 28, 2022, that includes details 
on the state of the small arms industrial base both currently 
and as planned based on the fiscal year 2022 Future Years 
Defense Plan; the expected impacts to the small arms industrial 
base of closing production lines such as the M240; and options 
to manage risk in the small arms industrial base through the 
sustainment, upgrade, or replacement of existing weapons.

                    Procurement of Ammunition, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Conventional ammunition demilitarization

    The committee is concerned about the growing stockpile of 
obsolete or expired munitions and the yearlong contract award 
delay for the ongoing conventional ammunition demilitarization 
mission. The committee notes that the original award date was 
planned for September 2020. The committee understands that the 
dangerous and challenging process of munition demilitarization 
requires the combination of a proven workforce and highly 
specialized equipment to safely handle and dispose of 
explosives and hazardous munitions. The committee is further 
concerned that continued uncertainty and contract award delays 
have resulted in poor program execution of previously enacted 
funds.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives not later than December 
30, 2021, that addresses the Army's obligations and 
expenditures of the conventional demilitarization budget. The 
report should include the strategy for the utilization of each 
government-owned/government-operated, government-owned/
contractor-operated, and contractor-owned/contractor-operated 
activity and include an analysis of the recent cost-benefit and 
cost trends data, recycling costs, efficiency, and 
environmental compliance.

Medium caliber ammunition

    The committee supports and encourages the Army's careful 
management of production capacity, capability, and risk in its 
medium caliber ammunition industrial base. The committee is 
also aware that the Army is evaluating the adequacy of and risk 
associated with medium caliber industrial base production 
capability and capacity for 20mm to 30mm ammunition. The 
committee is further aware that adequate production capability 
and capacity exists today, within a competitive procurement 
environment, with two North American vendors. Given this 
ongoing evaluation, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than December 30, 2021, on the current 
medium caliber direct-fire ammunition acquisition strategy and 
future changes, if any, under consideration. The briefing shall 
include cost-benefit considerations and potential industrial 
base impacts to any future medium caliber ammunition 
acquisitions.

                        Other Procurement, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


Army modular open systems architecture

    The committee notes the Army's progress with the 
development of Command, Control, Communications, Computers, 
Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) Modular 
Open Suite of Standards (CMOSS). However, the committee is 
concerned about an apparent lack of sufficient policy and 
programmatic governance with the research, development, 
testing, and decision-making associated with these standards, 
as well as the enforcement of these standards throughout the 
research, development, acquisition, and sustainment cycles 
across programs for the upgrade, modernization, or replacement 
of equipment and weapon systems. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Army to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by December 30, 2021, on 
plans for the establishment of a governance system for CMOSS 
that includes the formal assignment of responsibility, 
authority, and accountability for the development of CMOSS 
standards and their enforcement. The briefing should include 
how such a governance system incentivizes programs of record to 
ensure their compliance with current and future CMOSS 
requirements.

Enhanced Night Vision Goggle-Binocular

    The committee continues to support the Army's Enhanced 
Night Vision Google--Binocular (ENVG-B) program. ENVG-B 
provides the U.S. Army's close combat forces with the critical 
visual situational awareness necessary for engaging in close 
combat and combat support operations in all weather conditions, 
through obscurants, during limited visibility, and under all 
lighting conditions. ENVG-B technology utilizes thermal sensors 
and white phosphor dual Image Intensification (I2) tubes, both 
of which are key to low-light functionality and 
interoperability with other Army target acquisition devices and 
weapons. The committee supports the continued fielding of ENVG-
B. Furthermore, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary 
of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than December 30, 2021, on the acquisition strategy for 
procurement and fielding of all night vision devices to include 
testing and fielding schedules for each program, funding 
profiles, and acquisition objectives. The briefing should also 
include how the Army plans to ensure competition among current 
and future technologies and management of risk in the 
industrial base, and to ensure technology innovations in ENVG-B 
functionality are able to be rapidly manufactured and 
integrated into qualified fielded systems.

Firefighting equipment modernization

    The committee recognizes the importance of fire safety and 
firefighting capabilities at all military installations at home 
and around the world. Managing risk at acceptable levels 
against the loss of property or lives, as well as meeting the 
legal and regulatory requirements of fire safety, protection, 
and response, requires that military and civilian firefighters 
have modern, capable, and reliable equipment. Critical 
firefighting equipment such as structural fire engines, ladder 
trucks, water tankers, and supporting items such as 
communications define how such requirements are identified and 
risks managed. Modern capabilities for fire safety and response 
reduce the risk of loss for infrastructure and military 
equipment, and most importantly, protect the safety and lives 
of service members, families, and the Department of Defense's 
civilian workforce.
    The committee acknowledges the opportunity that modern 
firefighting equipment provides to efficiently and effectively 
respond to events and, therefore, manage risk. At the same 
time, the committee clearly sees the danger of allowing 
firefighting capabilities to atrophy, wear out, and become 
unreliable or obsolete. Accordingly, the committee strongly 
encourages the Department to invest in the procurement of 
modern firefighting and fire safety equipment and prioritize 
its fielding to installations lacking proper equipment to meet 
the legal and regulatory requirements for fire safety and fire 
emergency response.

High frequency radio infrastructure

    The committee supports modernization of high frequency 
radio infrastructure, including fielding of near-term 
technology upgrades to infrastructure that provide continued 
beyond-line-of-sight communications capability in the event of 
the disruption of primary systems. The committee encourages the 
Department of Defense to coordinate with other Federal agencies 
to identify a central coordinating authority for high frequency 
operational interoperability and modernization planning. 
Furthermore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than 
December 30, 2021, on high frequency communications 
infrastructure, including modernization plans, coordination 
between Federal agencies, and infrastructure resiliency.

High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle rollover mitigation

    The committee remains concerned about tactical vehicle 
accidents resulting in serious injuries and fatalities. A 
significant number of accidents with the most serious injuries 
or loss of life appear to be those involving vehicle rollovers 
based on excessive speed, mishandling, or breaking. Although 
environmental conditions, operator training, supervision, and 
discipline are almost always contributing factors in these 
accidents, there is evidence that for some tactical vehicles, 
their technical capabilities can be improved to reduce such 
risks. This is particularly the case with older models of the 
widely used High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle (HMMWV).
    To deal with this challenge for the HMMWV fleet, the Army 
designed, developed, and validated an antilock brake system and 
electronic stability control (ABS/ESC) rollover mitigation 
solution for installation over time onto the existing HMMWV 
fleet. In 2018, the Army mandated that all new production 
HMMWVs must have the ABS/ESC installed. Since July 2018, the 
Army has received approximately 5,000 new production or 
recapitalized HMMWV vehicles with ABS/ESC installed. In 2019, 
the Army created an ABS/ESC retrofit kit to upgrade the fielded 
fleet for installation at either the depot or home station. 
This dual approach, production and retrofit, will ensure that 
all HMMWVs in the enduring fleet eventually include installed 
ABS/ESC rollover mitigation technology.
    The committee is concerned, however, that the Army 
investment in new production and retrofit installations, either 
at home station or the depot, is not as aggressive as necessary 
to manage risk in the HMMWV fleet. Given there are over 54,000 
HMMWVs in the fielded fleet that are older models without 
installed rollover kits, the committee is concerned that the 
fleet upgrade may take longer than prudent risk allows. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by December 
30, 2021, on the Army's plans, including schedule and funding 
profiles, for the completion of the installation of rollover 
mitigation kits onto all HMMWVs the Army plans to retain.

Joint Light Tactical Vehicle Acquisition Strategy

    The Committee recognizes that the Joint Light Tactical 
Vehicle (JLTV) offers the protection and off-road mobility 
needed to support operations along the full spectrum of 
conflict and will serve as part of the Army and Marine Corps 
tactical wheeled vehicle (TWV) fleet for decades. The Committee 
also understands that the Army plans to initiate a full and 
open competitive process for a new JLTV production contract in 
fiscal year 2022. The committee is concerned, however, that 
Army leadership's decisions over the last three years have 
failed to provide stable funding to support documented 
production plans and introduced avoidable risk within the JLTV 
supplier base. Accordingly, the committee directs the Assistant 
Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and 
Technology, not later than March 1, 2022, to provide a report 
to the House Armed Services Committee that reassesses the 
health of the JLTV industrial base and the business case for a 
competition for future JLTV production.

Magazine acquisition for the Next Generation Squad Weapon

    The committee understands that rifle magazine malfunctions 
threaten a soldier's survival in combat and reduce operator 
lethality. The committee expects that the Army's Next 
Generation Squad Weapon will perform as reliably as legacy 
platforms. The committee encourages the Army to field the best-
performing magazine with respect to reliability for the Next 
Generation Squad Weapon. Furthermore, the committee encourages 
the Army to consider the following qualifications for magazines 
throughout the acquisition process, such as overall weapon and 
magazine related Mean Rounds Between Stoppages (MRBS) 
requirements; how joint utilization of the Next Generation 
Squad Weapon across the military services and by allied nations 
would impact said qualifications; how the Army will be 
evaluating the potential suppliers for average MRBS; 
performance in extreme temperature conditions; and resiliency 
against chemicals, corrosive substances, and UV radiation.

Rifle Integrated Controller

    The committee understands the U.S. Army is currently 
conducting research, development, test, and evaluation in the 
development of soldier systems that improve lethality, optics, 
image intensification, fire control, and many more functions. 
In consideration of this effort, the committee encourages the 
Army to evaluate technology that integrates these capabilities 
into a simplified control platform.
    The committee recognizes the challenges that exist for an 
individual soldier to operate separate situational awareness, 
communications, target designators, thermal sights, and other 
battle management devices and notes a Rifle Integrated 
Controller (RIC) system could consolidate these disparate 
capabilities into one unified capability. The committee 
encourages the Chief of Staff of the Army to consider a rapid 
acquisition strategy to accelerate the operational testing, 
procurement, and fielding of a RIC utilizing existing 
acquisition reform authorities.

Soldier Enhancement Program

    The budget request contained $1.3 million for the Soldier 
Enhancement Program (SEP). The committee is concerned that the 
Army's budget request for fiscal year 2022 appears to 
inadequately fund the SEP. Since its creation by Congress in 
1990, SEP has served a unique and critical function to 
accelerate the evaluation and procurement of off-the-shelf 
items with the potential to substantially improve weapons and 
support equipment in the areas of fires, mission command, 
movement and maneuver, sustainability, and protection. SEP is a 
low-risk, low-cost, high-payoff investment that has also 
demonstrated consistent success, in close collaboration with 
industry, in addressing mission-critical and training-critical 
soldier needs in a timely and highly cost-effective manner.
    The committee notes that enduring operational and threat 
environments demonstrate the continued need for this successful 
and critical research, development, and acquisition activity. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than December 30, 2021, on its plans to fulfill the 
critical soldier equipment evaluation and acquisition role 
played by SEP, as well as the distribution of responsibility 
and authority for budgeting and the management of the execution 
of the program. Furthermore, the committee recommends $6.3 
million, an increase of $5.0 million, for the SEP.

Synthetic Training Environment

    The committee recognizes the future role that the Army 
expects the Synthetic Training Environment (STE) will play in 
preparing a wide range of next-generation training capabilities 
for soldiers and units. The STE Live Training System (LTS) 
segment of this program in particular seeks to provide combat 
units with simulators and simulations for training in dynamic 
real-world scenarios that will accelerate and sustain soldier 
skills and improve overall unit readiness. The STE-LTS has the 
potential to provide the Army with a high-fidelity 
representation of real combat scenarios, including simulated 
direct and indirect fire engagements, that integrates synthetic 
and live training and enhances warfighter readiness. The 
committee will continue to follow the Army's plans to 
accelerate live training efforts and encourages the Army to 
continue STE-LTS development.

                       Aircraft Procurement, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


CMV-22

    The V-22 is an assault support tilt-rotorcraft that 
provides unparalleled flexibility by combining the vertical 
takeoff/landing strengths of a helicopter with the speed (250+ 
knots) and range (425 nautical miles combat radius) advantages 
of a turbo-prop airplane. It is the only tiltrotor in the 
Department of Defense inventory and is in high demand 
throughout the world. Fiscal year 2022 is the final year of a 
multiyear procurement (MYP) contract authorized by Congress in 
fiscal year 2018. Congress has added V-22s the last 4 years to 
pull remaining aircraft into the MYP contract, resulting in a 
reduced price for the aircraft and faster delivery to the 
fleet. There are only five remaining V-22s outside of the last 
year of the MYP contract. The committee encourages the Navy to 
support the full program of record for the CMV-22.

Nacelle Improvement

    The Committee notes that the United States Air Force has 
requested funding to modernize and upgrade its fleet of CV-22 
aircraft, specifically for Nacelle Improvements. The Air Force 
Nacelle Improvement program is specifically engineered to 
attack the highest reliability and readiness degraders within 
the nacelle, which constitute nearly 60% of maintenance actions 
on the aircraft. Nacelle improvements are a top priority for 
improving V-22 readiness across all variants. Therefore, the 
committee recommends an additional $5,000,000 for the Air Force 
upgrades.
    Additionally, the committee recommends that the US Marine 
Corps leverage the Air Force's investment in nacelle 
improvement and initiates a plan to begin the upgrades and 
install the nacelle improvement kits on their fleet of MV-22 
aircraft. The committee recognizes that the most efficient 
means of implementing the Nacelle Improvement program across 
the fleet may be to do this work at the original equipment 
manufacturer final assembly facility. The committee believes 
that there is the potential to save money, reduce down-time of 
the aircraft, and impact the entire program in an extremely 
positive manner. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary 
of the Navy to prepare a brief to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by March 1, 2022 as to options to accelerate MV-22 
nacelle improvements.

Naval adversary aircraft recapitalization

    The committee is aware of evolving requirements for the 
Navy to maintain near-peer simulated air-to-air combat training 
scenarios using organically provided aggressor aircraft that 
can emulate capabilities similar to those of advanced threat 
airborne adversaries. The committee supports continuing efforts 
to increase capabilities of aircraft assigned squadrons 
responsible for providing adversary aggressor training, but has 
concerns about Navy plans to use foreign F-5 and pre-block F-16 
aircraft, which are older and less capable than the aircraft of 
advanced adversaries, to perform this mission long term. Due to 
the criticality of simulating relevant adversary air tactics 
and capabilities, the committee believes that the Navy should 
instead reprioritize planned funding to transition organic 
aggressor squadrons away from less capable aircraft to a more 
advanced and capable platform, such as the F/A-18E/F Super 
Hornet, that would more effectively support the adversary air 
training mission requirements. The committee is also 
discouraged by Navy plans to reduce tactical fighter aircraft 
capacity by designating certain adversary air aggressor 
squadrons as no longer deployable to meet warfighting 
contingency requirements in order to resolve the significant 
strike-fighter inventory shortfall that currently exists within 
the Navy.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than March 21, 2022, that provides an alternative plan to 
transition all Navy Reserve Component aggressor squadrons to a 
more capable and relevant aircraft within a 10-year timeframe. 
The report should include a holistic overview and description 
of the validated mission requirements of the Navy's current 
adversary aircraft aggressor enterprise and assess how less 
capable aircraft, such as F-5 and pre-block F-16 aircraft, will 
meet future training requirements and capabilities necessary to 
represent near-peer threat-based scenarios. Finally, the report 
should also identify the risk and fleet sustainment costs 
incurred by the continued employment of older, less capable 
aircraft attempting to provide realistic and relevant adversary 
air mission training for the Navy's operational fleet of 
aircraft and aircrews.

Navy tactical fighter aircraft force structure

    The budget request contained $87.8 million for F/A-18E/F 
aircraft production line activities but did not include any 
funding for the procurement of additional aircraft.
    The committee recalls that the prior budget request for 
fiscal year 2020 programmed the purchase of 36 new F/A-18E/F 
aircraft over fiscal years 2022, 2023, and 2024, but the Navy 
revised that plan in the fiscal year 2021 budget request by 
eliminating the 36 new aircraft in those same fiscal years. 
Additionally, the committee believes that the Navy's decision 
to eliminate the 36 new aircraft incurred greater risk for 
combatant commanders and increased the Navy's strike-fighter 
deficit in fiscal year 2021 from -49 to -58 aircraft, and 
forecasted the shortfall resolving to zero in fiscal year 2030. 
Further, the Navy still plans its strike-fighter inventory 
without including traditional margin for attrition reserve 
aircraft that would backfill forces in cases of training or 
contingency operational losses of aircraft. The Navy should 
plan for 54 aircraft per aircraft carrier air-wing (CVW), but 
instead only budgets for 44 aircraft per CVW. Consequently, the 
Navy had an actual deficit of -148 strike-fighter aircraft in 
fiscal year 2021 when including attrition reserve planning 
factors.
    In fiscal year 2022 analysis the Navy claims that the 
strike-fighter shortfall is resolved to zero in 2025, 5 years 
earlier than planned, but the committee is highly circumspect 
of the Navy's new analysis. Since last year's budget, the Navy 
has delayed the fielding of its planned F/A-XX aircraft, 
removed 104 F/A-18E/F Block II aircraft from the planned 
Service-Life Modification (SLM) program, and F-35C procurement 
quantity has still not reached 24 aircraft per year. The 
committee believes that these significant factors actually 
exacerbate the shortfall and would not contribute to the 
expedited timing of resolving the shortfall prior to 2030 as 
stated last year.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $1.17 billion, an 
increase of $1.08 billion, for the procurement of 12 F/A-18E/F 
aircraft and production line activities to reduce operational 
and warfighting capacity risk. The committee also directs the 
Director, Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation, to submit a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than 
February 1, 2022, that compares and contrasts the ground rules, 
assumptions, and planning factors contained in the Navy's 
fiscal year 2021 strike-fighter analysis as compared to the 
fiscal year 2022 strike-fighter shortfall analysis.

P-8 aircraft

    The committee notes that the budget request contained no 
funds for P-8A Poseidon aircraft procurement. The budget 
request for fiscal year 2022 does not take into account the 
increased warfighter requirement for 138 aircraft which is 10 
additional P-8As. This increase is driven by the proliferation 
of adversarial submarine fleets and their increasingly active 
operational tempo. The committee is encouraged by the Navy's 
recognition of the Navy Reserve force and the contribution they 
can provide to the increased requirement for the P-8A but is 
discouraged by the Navy's decision to not procure the aircraft 
needed to reach the warfighting requirement. The committee 
highly encourages the Secretary of the Navy to program the 
remaining aircraft into the fiscal year 2023 budget which may 
be the last opportunity before the production line is shut 
down.

Survivability systems for Navy, Marine Corps, and Air Force rotary-wing 
        aircraft

    The committee recognizes the Department of the Navy's 
progress on developing and fielding the Distributed Aperture 
Infrared Countermeasure System (DAIRCM) for aviation 
survivability. In the committee report accompanying the William 
M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2021 (H. Rept. 116-442), the committee expressed 
support for this effort and requested information on the status 
of DAIRCM fielding under Joint Urgent Operational Need 
Statement (JUONS) SO-0010 to Navy MH-60, Marine Corps UH-1Y and 
AH-1Z, and Air Force HH-60G helicopters. According to the 
briefing provided in response, the services have fielded over 
half of the systems slated for integration under the JUONS.
    The committee understands that the Navy, Marine Corps, and 
Air Force all view DAIRCM as part of their long-term strategy 
for sustainable, cyber-secure aviation survivability against 
future battlefield threats. Both the Marine Corps and the Air 
Force expect to make production decisions on procuring 
additional DAIRCM capability mid-decade. The committee 
recommends continued focus on enhanced rotary aircraft 
survivability and expects to see future budget requests that 
support timely fielding of DAIRCM to Navy, Marine Corps, and 
Air Force helicopters.

T-45 Program Report

    The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide 
a report to the House Committee on Armed Services no later than 
June 1, 2022 on the continued T-45 engine obsolescence issues, 
the T-45 replacement program, and potential alternatives that 
could support an accelerated replacement timeline.

V-22 Nacelle Improvement Program

    In prior budget submissions, the Air Force has stated that 
the Nacelle Improvement (NI) program is ``. . .Air Force 
Special Operations Command #1 priority for the CV-22 weapon 
system'' and will increase the readiness, reliability and 
ability to deploy of one of Defense Departments highest in-
demand aircraft. The committee is pleased the NI program is on 
track to deliver the first modified CV-22 this year and 
encourages the Air Force Special Operations Command to continue 
to work with industry to accelerate the program as quickly as 
possible. Further, the committee is aware that should Air Force 
Special Operations Command accelerate the NI program, a gap 
could open between the end of the Air Force program and the 
initiation of the Marine Corps' NI effort. To avoid an 
unnecessary and costly break in the program, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Navy to coordinate with the 
Secretary of the Air Force and industry to ensure that the NI 
program transitions from modifying CV-22 aircraft to MV-22 
aircraft without interruption. The committee further directs 
the Secretary of the Navy to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by January 1, 2022 on Marine Corps' 
NI effort and their coordination with the Air Force.

                   Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


Aegis radar

    The committee recognizes that the rapid deployment of next-
generation maritime radar systems is required to address 
existing and emerging gaps in integrated air and missile 
defenses, particularly in the Indo-Pacific region. However, the 
committee is concerned by the apparent lack of alignment and 
congruent planning between three concurrent Aegis Baseline 
radars funded at various stages of development or production 
across the Navy and Missile Defense Agency. Specifically, the 
Navy budget includes funding for the backfit of AN/SPY-6(V), 
which began low-rate production in 2016 and will enter full-
rate production upon the award of a hardware production and 
sustainment contract anticipated by the end of fiscal year 
2021. The Navy budget also includes funding for the development 
of a digital low noise amplifier modification to the existing 
AN/SPY-1 radar. At the same time, the Missile Defense Agency 
budget includes funding for the development of a variant of the 
Long Range Discrimination Radar for use in Aegis Ashore 
applications.
    The committee believes there are opportunities to better 
leverage common, mature radar technology in modernizing all 
Aegis-based platforms, including through U.S. Navy weapon 
systems applications aboard existing surface ships, Homeland 
Defense Guam, and/or defense of the continental United States 
from cruise missiles or air and missile defense threats. 
Leveraging such commonality across platforms would serve as a 
means to achieve critical distributed maritime operations 
objectives by expanding the number of deployed netted sensors 
while also proliferating the number of sensors capable of 
simultaneously defending against advanced air and missile 
defense threats. Moreover, the committee believes that better 
aligning Aegis Baseline radar investments would also serve to 
reduce risk and lower acquisition, lifecycle, and sustainment 
costs.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Director of Cost 
Assessment and Program Evaluation to conduct a review of the 
three Aegis Baseline radars included in the budget request for 
fiscal year 2022 and to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees not later than December 1, 2021, outlining 
the results of this review and making recommendations for 
achieving greater affordability, commonality, and 
sustainability through improved alignment of radar 
modernization investments.

Analysis of the Costs and Benefits of the Littoral Combat Ship Program

    The committee notes that the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) has reported extensively on issues with the 
Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) program. Since 2005, GAO has issued 
no fewer than 19 reports that highlight failures in the 
acquisition of LCS, including ships delivered late, with 
increased costs and less capability than planned--such as lower 
lethality and survivability--higher than expected costs for 
contractor maintenance, and numerous mechanical failures. Most 
recently in 2021, GAO found that the Navy continues to face 
substantial challenges in demonstrating the operational and 
warfighting capabilities that the LCS fleet needs to perform 
its missions.
    The committee notes that the Navy continues to make 
significant investments in the LCS program even as it has 
stopped accepting Freedom-class LCS variants while the 
contractor fixes a class-wide engineering defect, is 
decommissioning two LCS ships in 2021 after completing just one 
mission each, and has proposed retiring four more ships in 
fiscal year 2022. The Navy has yet to complete reviews to 
identify ways to improve LCS employment, lethality, 
maintenance, reliability, and sustainability.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees by 
March 15, 2022, assessing the costs and benefits of continued 
investment in the LCS program. As the ships are being employed 
differently and are experiencing different levels of 
reliability and different employment schedules, the report 
should address the Independence and Freedom variants 
separately. The report shall include:
    (1) An assessment of whether the LCS is meeting current and 
future performance requirements and fleet needs and whether the 
LCS fleet could be expected to contribute to forward naval 
presence and operate effectively against near-peer threats and 
on blue water missions.
    (2) An assessment of all LCS deployments in 2020-2021 to 
include reliability, missions performed, and feedback from 
Fleet Commanders, and an assessment of operational impact of 
changes to manning and maintenance CONOPS for deployed LCSs.
    (3) An updated estimate of total life cycle costs for the 
program as currently structured, including research and 
development, acquisition of the seaframes and mission modules, 
test and evaluation, in-service modernization, training, 
operating and support, and disposal. The associated costs and 
benefits of modifying the current LCS program, including 
alternatives such as revising the LCS capabilities and concept 
of operations, such as different mixes of mission modules, 
weapons, crews, and missions to find a combination that is 
efficient to operate and effectively performs a useful mission; 
increasing the endurance of the vessels, including reliability, 
maintainability, and availability; addressing deficiencies 
identified during deployments and operational testing; retiring 
some or all of the LCS fleet earlier than planned; and 
implementing other major modifications to the LCS program 
currently under consideration or already being executed, such 
as recommendations resulting from Task Force LCS and ongoing 
studies.
    (4) An analysis of fleet wide costs to support LCS compared 
with other ship classes and an assessment of whether end-
strength and funds devoted to keeping LCS ready and mission 
capable would be better used to mitigate shortfalls on other 
ship classes.
    (5) A recommendation from the Secretary of the Navy as to 
whether the benefits and performance of LCS justify continued 
investment in the program.

Astern refueling on Expeditionary Sea Based platforms

    The committee recognizes that current versions of the 
Expeditionary Sea Based (ESB) platforms do not possess an 
astern refueling capability. Current astern fueling 
configuration height does not allow for safe refueling of the 
Littoral Combat Ship or the Expeditionary Fast Transport ship. 
Addition of an astern refueling capability, coupled with the 
large fuel capacity of the ESB, will allow for coordinated 
operation of these platforms in a variety of expeditionary 
missions, such as mine warfare. The committee encourages the 
Secretary of the Navy to consider designing and incorporating 
an astern refueling capability for ESB platforms.

Comptroller General review of enabling technologies for unmanned 
        systems

    The committee recognizes that, as part of the Navy's plan 
to counter increasing competition among nations in the maritime 
environment, the Navy intends to field a future fleet composed 
of a mix of manned and unmanned platforms. In doing so, the 
Navy identified core technologies and enabling capabilities it 
believes are necessary for its future unmanned undersea and 
surface vehicles. The core technologies and enabling 
capabilities are a broad range of efforts including autonomous 
management of ship systems and navigation, communications, 
manned-unmanned teaming, and payload development and 
integration among others. Congress has previously expressed 
concern with the Navy's proposed concurrent approach for the 
large unmanned surface vessel design, technology development, 
and integration. While the Navy takes action to address our 
concerns, the committee would like a better understanding of 
the Navy's technology development efforts for unmanned maritime 
systems as a whole.
    The committee directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to conduct a review of the Navy's core technologies and 
enabling capabilities for unmanned undersea and surface 
vehicles and to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services not later than March 1, 2022, on its findings. 
As part of this review, the Comptroller General should examine:
    (1) the status of the Navy's efforts to develop the core 
technologies and enabling capabilities for unmanned maritime 
systems;
    (2) the extent to which the Navy has successfully 
identified all critical technologies necessary for unmanned 
maritime systems;
    (3) the methods and documentation the Navy uses to track 
technology development for unmanned maritime systems;
    (4) the extent to which the technologies developed for 
unmanned maritime systems will meet Navy requirements and 
mission needs;
    (5) the Navy's process for tracking and prioritizing 
investments made into its technologies; and
    (6) any other areas the Comptroller General deems 
important.

DDG-51 multiyear procurement

    The committee remains concerned that the Navy is not 
adequately planning for the DDG(X) procurement. The current 
DDG-51 multiyear procurement contract ends in fiscal year 2022, 
and the Navy has yet to produce program milestones or an 
acquisition strategy for the next large surface combatant, 
known as DDG(X). The lack of an adequate plan is even more 
troubling given the Navy's most recent shipbuilding proposal 
that reduces a destroyer in fiscal year 2022 and violated the 
current multiyear procurement contract. This will incur a 
penalty of over $33.0 million. The reduction will delay the 
force level goal for large surface combatants during a period 
of increasing demand, particularly in countering threats from 
China and Russia. Therefore, in order to mitigate this risk and 
ensure a smooth shipbuilding manufacturing and design 
industrial base transition from DDG-51 to DDG(X), elsewhere in 
this Act, the committee authorizes a multi-year procurement for 
up to 15 Flight III DDGs beginning in fiscal year 2023.

Improving Safe and Secure Cyber-Enabled Navy Vessels

    The committee continues to have concerns regarding the 
emerging threat of cyberattacks and present danger to US Navy 
vessels, both surface and underwater. Entire Navy systems, 
including vessels, weapons, and facilities, continue to be 
cyberattack targets from both state and non-state sponsored 
actors. Significant investment in cyber-defense training and 
technology development is essential to ensure continued naval 
superiority throughout the world for the foreseeable future. 
The digital thread from manned ships and autonomous platforms 
provides enormous opportunities for efficiencies in 
coordination, operation, maintenance, and cyber-resilience. 
However, this thread of critical data, including location, 
heading, and platform health, presents one of the biggest 
opportunities for cyber threats and cyber-attacks to Navy 
vessels. End-to-end cybersecurity and anti-tamper technology 
need to be addressed for a wide range of systems, from small 
man-portable autonomous vehicles to systems as large as carrier 
groups.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by March 31, 2022. that includes current plans and potential 
opportunities to improve the cybersecurity of the digital 
thread communication network for Navy vessels, specifically 
communication between unmanned and autonomous vessels.
    The briefing should also include:
    (1) A description and evaluation of current Naval vessel 
cyber-security real-world test-bed facilities and their 
capabilities.
    (2) A description and evaluation of requirements for 
autonomous Naval vessel cybersecurity communications testing 
and qualifications.
    (3) A description and evaluation of current Naval vessel 
cybersecurity workforce and expected future workforce needs.
    (4) An analysis of opportunities to expand Naval vessel 
digital thread cybersecurity development and testing, 
specifically for unmanned and autonomous vessels.

National Security Hospital Vessel

    The committee recognizes the Navy's plan to increase Role 2 
afloat medical capacity through the procurement of a modified 
Expeditionary Fast Transport (EPF) ship called an EPF Flight 
II. The committee is supportive of this effort and recognizes 
that an embarkable Role 2 enhanced (R2E) medical capability 
will allow the Navy to fill gaps identified by the Naval 
Expeditionary Health Services Support (NEHSS) for Distributed 
Maritime Operations. The committee further understands that the 
afloat theater hospitalization Role 3 requirement will continue 
to be met by the Navy's aging hospital ships (T-AH). The 
committee believes that as an alternative to maintaining 
converted supertankers that were procured in the mid 1970s, the 
Navy could take advantage of a redesigned EPF or the National 
Security Multi-Mission Vessel (NSMV) that the Maritime 
Administration is currently procuring for the 6 State Maritime 
Academies ``to meet this Role 3 requirement.'' By utilizing the 
NSMV or the EPF hull form and an ongoing production line, the 
Navy could minimize design costs and schedule of the T-AH(X) 
that is planned to replace the current T-AHs. This strategy 
would also allow the Navy to defer future costly maintenance 
availabilities on the existing T-AHs and deliver a replacement 
capability sooner than the current plan. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than March 1, 2022, on the feasibility of utilizing the EPF or 
the NSMV hull forms to fill the requirements of the T-AH(X).

Report on large surface combatant production transition

    The committee recognizes the Navy's successful transition 
from the Los Angeles-class submarine to the Seawolf and 
Virginia submarine classes and the importance of shipbuilding 
schedule overlap within that transition. The committee believes 
that new programs such as the DDG(X) should also implement some 
type of overlap shipbuilding schedule, which would mitigate 
shipbuilding issues related to stops in lead ship build design 
and construction. The committee notes that absence of a proper 
overlap plan may adversely impact both the Navy's overall 
shipbuilding numbers and the associated shipyard's ability to 
adjust their production line accordingly.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than December 30, 2021, that details what the proper 
transition between the two platforms should include. The report 
should be informed by early collaboration with the two current 
shipbuilders to maximize design and cost efficiencies and 
emphasize the needs of the industrial base regarding both 
design and construction capacity. This report shall include at 
a minimum:
    (1) a review of the Los Angeles submarine class transition 
to the Seawolf and Virginia submarine classes, including 
shipyard schedules and operational impacts; shipyard cost 
impacts; effects on associated shipyard manpower and skill; 
impact on planned versus actual fiscal year shipbuilding 
numbers; and lessons learned;
    (2) a review of the DDG-51 class transition to the Zumwalt 
DDG-1000 program, including shipyard schedules and operational 
impacts; shipyard cost impacts; effects on associated shipyard 
manpower and skill; impact on planned versus actual fiscal year 
shipbuilding numbers; and lessons learned;
    (3) a review of the Nimitz-class carrier transition to the 
Ford-class carrier program, including shipyard schedules and 
operational impacts; shipyard cost impacts; effects on 
associated shipyard manpower and skill; impact on planned 
versus actual fiscal year shipbuilding numbers; and lessons 
learned;
    (4) recommendations on the amount of time for a successful 
overlap transition period before a shipyard shifts to full-rate 
production of the next-generation ship; and
    (5) recommendations on requirements for an ideal large 
surface combatant shipyard transition and next-generation 
shipbuilding production.

Sentinel-class Fast Response Cutter

    The committee looks forward to reviewing the Navy's updated 
force structure assessment and shipbuilding plan. The committee 
understands the Navy intends to change the fleet architecture 
reflected in the 355-ship force-level goal to reflect a more 
distributed fleet mix with a smaller proportion of larger ships 
and a larger proportion of smaller manned ships as well as 
unmanned vessels. The committee supports incorporating a mix of 
smaller manned ships into the fleet and encourages the Navy to 
consider the capabilities the U.S. Coast Guard's Sentinel-class 
Fast Response Cutter could provide to the fleet and the concept 
of operations and associated requirements that would support 
acquisition of these vessels.
    Further, the committee is aware the U.S. Coast Guard has 
contract options for 12 additional Sentinel-class Fast Response 
Cutters with firm fixed pricing in place until May of 2023. 
Exercising these contract options in advance of their 
expiration would lock in favorable pricing on Sentinel-class 
Fast Response Cutters should the Navy determine that they add 
value to the fleet.
    Given the successes of the U.S. Coast Guard's Sentinel-
class Fast Response Cutter in support of the Navy's Fifth Fleet 
as a part of Patrol Forces Southwest Asia, the committee 
believes there are similar roles for Sentinel-class Fast 
Response Cutters in other areas of responsibility. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
February 1, 2022, that details the current mission sets and 
operating requirements for the Sentinel-class Fast Response 
Cutter and expands on how successes in the U.S. Central Command 
area of responsibility would translate to other regions, 
including the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command. Further, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Navy to assess the requisite 
upgrades to the Sentinel-class Fast Response Cutter required to 
meet Navy standards and evaluate the concept of operations for 
employing these vessels in Southeast Asia. This report should 
be unclassified but may include a classified annex.

SPY-1D capability improvements

    The committee recognizes the urgent need to deliver 
increased warfighting capability through combat systems 
modernization to the destroyers comprising flight I, II, and 
certain IIA ships, and further understands that advances in 
digital technology, solid-state upgrades, and other innovations 
can be leveraged in existing mature systems to keep Aegis 
destroyers threat-relevant to the end of their service lives. 
The committee encourages the Secretary of the Navy to consider 
specific initiatives that could rapidly incorporate digital 
technology into the receive chain of the SPY-1D radar in order 
to improve readiness, lethality, survivability, and operational 
availability.

Virginia Class Submarine Spare Parts

    The committee notes a March 2021 report by the 
Congressional Budget Office, prepared as part of its ongoing 
work to evaluate submarine maintenance issues first requested 
by the House Seapower and Projection Forces and Readiness 
Subcommittees in 2015, found that ``Administrative data from 
NAVSEA suggest that cannibalization associated with submarine 
maintenance has increased over the past two years.'' The 
increase was particularly acute for the Virginia class program, 
with data showing an increase in the number of cannibalized 
parts from 146 in 2017 to 485 in 2019. CBO also found that 
certain VCS overhauls ``took longer and that most required more 
labor than the class plan estimated for each ship . . . in part 
because some parts had to be replaced earlier than expected,'' 
and that the Virginia class was designed to require less 
maintenance than the Los Angeles class, in part because the 
Virginia class featured more parts that were designed to last 
the life of the ship . . . at this early stage in the class's 
life cycle, the reverse has been the case, though that could 
change as the shipyards gain more experience with the class.''
    The committee recognizes that as the Navy begins to take 
delivery of more Virginia class submarines (VCS), spare parts 
will be at an increased demand. Due to the shortage of existing 
spares and earlier than expected failures of parts, the Navy 
has resorted to the cannibalization of spares from other 
submarines. This has led to increased maintenance timelines and 
a higher possibility of damaging the parts as they are changed 
out between submarines. This problem is only exacerbated when 
the Navy chooses to redirect spares funding to higher priority 
needs. Rather than chasing the problems as they arise, the Navy 
should take an experienced based process that tracks the types 
of spares that are in highest demand and closely monitor which 
components are failing ahead of their expected design life.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to brief the House Committee on Armed Services no later than 
February 1, 2022 on what efforts the Navy is taking to reduce 
the backlog of spares and cannibalization on Virginia class 
submarines.

                        Other Procurement, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


Joint force tiltrotor training

    The committee recognizes that tiltrotor aircraft will be a 
significant part of the Department of Defense for the 
foreseeable future. The tiltrotor community is the only 
Department of Defense undergraduate pilot training program 
without a dedicated, technologically comparable aircraft to 
conduct undergraduate-level pilot training. Utilizing an 
initial pilot training platform that can more efficiently and 
effectively train new tiltrotor pilots could lower training 
costs. The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
May 2, 2022, that discusses current initial pilot tiltrotor 
training program requirements including aircraft, sorties/
hours, planned student throughput, and training locations; 
training effectiveness of using fixed-wing and rotary-wing 
training to train new tiltrotor pilots; hours/sorties required 
to transition new pilots from initial fixed-wing/rotary-wing 
aircraft to instrument qualification in the V-22; impacts of 
initial training sorties/hours on overall V-22 readiness and 
sustainment; and feasibility of using current and future 
vertical lift technology platforms to support and streamline 
initial joint force pilot tiltrotor qualification training.

Maritime Augmented Guidance with Integrated Controls for Carrier 
        Approach and Recovery Precision Enabling Techniques

    The committee is aware that the Department of the Navy has 
performed flight testing events with advanced flight control 
software for the F-35, F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet, and E/A-18G 
Growler tactical aircraft platforms. The committee supports the 
Navy's efforts to reduce the workload and improve safety for 
naval aviators and landing signals officers (LSOs) performing 
the tasks associated with aircraft carrier approaches and 
landings. The Maritime Augmented Guidance with Integrated 
Controls for Carrier Approach and Recovery Precision Enabling 
Techniques (MAGIC CARPET) software assists aviators in 
maintaining consistent and safe glide-slope descent tracking 
during final approach to landing in all environmental 
conditions. MAGIC CARPET increases the automation of terminal 
approach operations and could potentially enable the Navy to 
reduce training costs for operations related to aircraft 
carrier operational certifications prior to steaming in support 
of deployments.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than February 1, 2022, on MAGIC CARPET software 
development, flight testing, and fielding schedule. The 
briefing should also include the impact on naval aviator and 
LSO workloads, the potential reduction in training missions and 
associated cost avoidance, and a notional schedule for 
implementation and integration of the software to support 
locations hosting E/A-18G aircraft operations.

Mine-hunting capabilities from Expeditionary Sea Base platforms

    The committee notes that while the Mine Countermeasures 
(MCM) Mission Package (MP) was designed to be employed on the 
Littoral Combat Ship (LCS), operational tests of this system on 
LCS have faced technical challenges and delays in fielding. 
Legacy MCM platforms have remained in service well past their 
intended service life, but it is imperative that the Navy fill 
an equal or greater capability before the legacy platforms can 
be retired. Various components of the MCM MP have successfully 
deployed from Expeditionary Sea Base (ESB) 4 and have potential 
when operated from this platform, either in conjunction with or 
independently from LCS, to provide a robust mine 
countermeasures package, which is urgently needed. The 
committee recognizes that the ESB has command, control, 
communications, computers, and intelligence (C4I) spaces that 
could provide mission planning and execution of MCM operations. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives by March 1, 2022, on the feasibility 
and cost of incorporating MCM capabilities on all ESB 
platforms.

Tactical aircraft training telemetry system recapitalization

    The committee is aware of the need for the Air Force and 
Navy to upgrade training range data and information-sharing 
capabilities to improve readiness levels, weapon systems 
capabilities, and joint, combined force employment of organic 
and coalition air forces to deter aggression against current 
and future rising competitors, both peer and non-peer. The 
committee continues to support the efforts of the Air Force and 
the Navy to jointly pursue a common tactical aircraft training 
telemetry system to replace legacy systems, allowing current 
and next-generation aircraft pilots to train together. Current 
telemetry systems lack required security features to support 
training needs, and have end-of-life obsolescence issues and 
diminishing manufacturing sources that are limiting training 
effectiveness and that incur a high cost of ownership.
    The committee encourages the Air Force in partnership with 
the Navy to expedite fielding of next-generation combat 
training systems to ensure robust interoperability with joint 
service partners and provide a generational upgrade in 
realistic training for current and next-generation tactical 
aircraft platforms to enable proficiency and survivability 
against existing and evolving threat systems. The Air Force and 
Navy agreement should also pursue a common range training 
telemetry system enabling a live, virtual, and constructive 
training environment for aircrews. The committee supports 
accelerated fielding, where feasible, by the Air Force and Navy 
to achieve cost savings and more efficient use of limited 
flight training hours, while simultaneously enabling more 
secure, realistic, and supportable training for Air Force and 
Navy aircrews.

Underwater ranges

    The committee supports the acceleration of the upgrading of 
our underwater ranges. These ranges are critical as they 
facilitate training, tactics development, and test and 
evaluations. Most of the Navy's underwater ranges are multi-
environmental and are capable of supporting surface, 
subsurface, air, and space operations simultaneously. These 
ranges are in need of continuous modernization and upkeep. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2022, on the status and timeline of upgrades and 
planned maintenance of all naval underwater ranges.

                       Procurement, Marine Corps


                       Items of Special Interest


High Mobility Engineer Excavator

    The Marine Corps budget request does not include any 
funding for procurement of the High Mobility Engineer Excavator 
(HMEE). The committee is concerned that stopping procurement of 
HMEE will leave the Marine Corps with an aging, less capable 
and sustainable, trailer-transported backhoe loader system that 
does not meet current or future deployed requirements. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Commander, Marine Corps 
Combat Development Command, to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by January 30, 2022, that 
identifies the current and future requirements for highly 
mobile engineer excavation capability and how the Marine Corps 
plans to meet those requirements.

                    Aircraft Procurement, Air Force


                       Items of Special Interest


A-10 Wing Replacement Program

    The committee believes that prudent modernization of the A-
10 fleet provides the Air Force a cost and mission effective 
close air support capacity and capability that will meet joint 
force requirements. The committee continues to support the A-10 
ATTACK wing replacement program, which will enable full fleet 
operations to 2030 and beyond. The committee believes that wing 
replacement for the planned fleet is a critical element of the 
fleet's sustainment and should be a high priority for the Air 
Force.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services no later than January 31, 2022, regarding the planned 
timeline for completion of the re-winging of all planned 
aircraft in the A-10 fleet.

A-10C Threat Warning System Modernization

    The committee understands the A-10C aircraft supports the 
Air Force's close air support and forward air control missions, 
with fighter squadrons in both the active and reserve 
components. The committee also recognizes the increased risk 
associated with the combat search and rescue mission, which may 
require operations in dense or advanced threat environments. As 
identified in the 2012, A-10 Operational Viability and 
Sustainment Gap Analysis Report and subsequent requirements 
studies contained in the Air National Guard and Air Force 
Reserve Modernization Priorities Book, the existing threat 
warning system is inadequate and requires modernization. The 
committee also notes that Air Force Air Combat Command has 
formally defined a modernization requirement for installing a 
digital radar warning receiver system within the A-10 aircraft. 
To reduce costs and expedite fielding, the committee recommends 
fielding a digital radar warning system currently in production 
and already in operation on a number of existing Air Force 
aircraft. Existing digital radar warning receivers have the 
ability to integrate threat identification of the most 
sophisticated modern threats and are designed to be a form, 
fit, function replacement. Modernized electronic warfare suite 
subsystems, architecture, and countermeasures will enable the 
A-10 to conduct complex combat operations in the vast majority 
of today's contested environments.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by March 31, 2022, on the Secretary's strategy to 
expeditiously integrate a digital radar warning receiver onto 
the A-10C fleet of aircraft.

Airlift tactical data link

    The committee understands airlift aircraft will be required 
to operate in a contested environment and is concerned with the 
lack of situational awareness upgrades for these aircraft. The 
committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by December 
30, 2021, that provides a modification plan to provide 
situational awareness for airlift aircraft.

Bridge Tanker

    The committee believes that the Secretary of the Air Force 
should consider the benefit of seamless tanker recapitalization 
deliveries by accelerating the Bridge Tanker competition with a 
request for proposal not later than fiscal year 2023, an award 
in fiscal year 2024, and the delivery of the first bridge 
tanker not later than in fiscal year 2029. The committee 
further believes that this bridge tanker should be limited 
developmental, operationally ready and best value based on 
platform capability. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to prepare a brief to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2022 that provides the 
Secretary's assessment of the bridge tanker acquisition 
timelines to include requirements development, procurement 
milestones and proposed contract type.

C-130H propellers/engines

    The committee notes that the C-130H aircraft that are flown 
primarily by the Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve 
continue to provide critical tactical airlift capabilities and 
will continue to support this mission for years to come. The 
committee is once again disappointed with the amount of time it 
has taken for the Air Force to address a safety of flight issue 
with the legacy propeller system of the C-130H.
    Procurement of new composite propeller blades is the 
obvious solution to this serious safety of flight and readiness 
issue. The Air Force has moved slowly in addressing the issue 
and still refers to the propeller upgrade as an enhancement and 
not a safety requirement. A new composite blade would also 
decrease maintenance time and improve logistics support, which 
will result in increased readiness. Delays are unacceptable 
considering the inherent safety of flight and readiness risks 
surrounding this issue.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by January 31, 2022, updating the acquisition strategy 
for procuring new blades. This plan should include updated 
estimated costs, timelines, and a unit upgrade schedule. The 
briefing should also include the Air Force plan to incorporate 
C-130H T-56 Series 3.5 Engine Enhancement Packages. Congress 
has repeatedly added additional funds for these upgrades and 
the Air Force has yet to budget for them despite the 
demonstrated performance benefits and fuel efficiencies.

Degraded visual environment system for Air Force combat search and 
        rescue helicopter fleet

    The committee has encouraged and supported efforts by the 
military services to develop and field modernized degraded 
visual environment (DVE) systems on rotary wing aircraft. 
Uncharted wires and low visibility brown-out conditions present 
military helicopters with additional hazards during training 
and operational missions, sometimes leading to aircraft damage, 
aircraft loss, or aircrew fatalities.
    The committee supported plans by the Air Force to leverage 
investments made by the Army and U.S. Special Operations 
Command and field a DVE capability to its HH-60G Pave Hawk 
fleet. However, the fiscal year 2022 budget request eliminated 
nearly all HH-60G DVE funding, leaving only $5.6 million for 
contract close-out. Information provided to the committee from 
the Air Force cited delays caused by integration challenges as 
the reason for cancelling the DVE program. In a June 30, 2021, 
committee hearing on the fiscal year 2022 budget request for 
rotary wing aircraft, the Acting Assistant Secretary of the Air 
Force for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics testified that 
the planned divestment of the HH-60G fleet within this decade 
influenced the decision to cancel the DVE project.
    The committee is concerned about the abrupt DVE 
cancellation and the deemphasis on increasing flight and 
aircrew safety. Though the Air Force claims that near-term HH-
60G retirement justifies not fielding a DVE system, the 
replacement combat rescue aircraft, the HH-60W Jolly Green II, 
has no DVE system in its current program baseline. The 
committee notes that in 2018, an entire crew of seven service 
members died when their HH-60G Pave Hawk flew into an 
undetected wire on the border between Iraq and Syria.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to submit a report to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by December 15, 2021, on a plan to restore the DVE 
integration and fielding effort to the HH-60G program. The 
report shall include a schedule for integration and fielding 
and the associated remaining costs.

EC-37B Compass Call Replacement

    The committee notes the Air Force commitment to improving 
electromagnetic spectrum (EMS) capabilities through its 
recently published EMS Superiority Strategy. However, the 
committee remains concerned that the Air Force's only dedicated 
electromagnetic warfare (EW) aircraft, the EC-130H Compass 
Call, is rapidly nearing the end of its service life, while the 
EC-37B Compass Call replacement program faces production and 
delivery delays. The committee is also aware that the Air Force 
underestimated the cost of implementing system-wide open 
reconfigurable dynamic architecture (SWORD-A) capabilities, 
forcing the Compass Call program to realign funding from 
procurement to research and development. All of these issues 
raise concerns that the Air Force will be unable to meet joint 
airborne EW requirements as legacy aircraft retirements outpace 
the availability of replacement capability.
    Given these concerns and the critical importance of 
airborne EW in support of joint military operations, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 
2022, on its plan to procure the full complement of ten EC-37B 
aircraft as defined in the program of record. The briefing 
shall include details on the planned utilization of the ten 
aircraft EC-37B fleet to meet test, training, operational 
deployment, and depot maintenance requirements, and the Air 
Force's plan to provide modernized EW capabilities to combatant 
commands in accordance with the Department's EMS Superiority 
Strategy implementation plan.

HH-60W Combat Search and Rescue helicopter

    The committee recognizes the Air Force's focus on testing, 
procuring, and fielding the HH-60W Jolly Green II to replace 
the HH-60W Pave Hawk combat rescue helicopter. The committee 
notes that the HH-60W is designed to provide increased range, 
lethality, situational awareness, safety, and reliability for 
the crucial Air Force combat search and rescue (CSAR) mission.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the congressional defense 
committees by March 1, 2022, on the status of the HH-60W 
program. This briefing should include, at a minimum, the 
following: the plan and schedule for aircraft beddown; planned 
force structure, to include current and future basing and the 
timing of associated divestment of the HH-60G Pave Hawk; 
manning, training, and infrastructure requirements; required 
support equipment; the associated funding requirements for all 
these elements; and recommendations on further improving the 
overall combat effectiveness and readiness of the HH-60W 
aircraft and the CSAR mission.

Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System

    The budget request included $16.3 million for E-8 Joint 
Surveillance Target Attack Radar System.
    The committee continues to be concerned about insufficient 
investment in the Joint Surveillance Target Attack Radar System 
(JSTARS). The committee notes that the geographical combatant 
commanders rely on JSTARS for battle management command and 
control and ground moving target indicator radar support. 
Current public law, most recently amended in the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-
283), requires the Air Force to keep at least six JSTARS 
available annually for allocation to the geographic combatant 
commanders through the Global Force Management process.
    The committee further notes that Congress has expressed 
concern about inadequate funding for JSTARS in previous 
legislation and denied prior year attempts to reprogram 
modernization funds for necessary JSTARS communication 
upgrades. The committee understands that the JSTARS program has 
begun this data link upgrade with funding appropriated in 
fiscal year 2021 but requires additional funds to continue this 
work. The bandwidth efficient common data link will replace a 
critical information-sharing link between JSTARS and Army and 
Marine Corps forces that no longer operates due to outdated 
technology and cybersecurity risk.
    The committee recommends $43.3 million, an increase of 
$27.0 million, for communication modernization upgrades to E-8 
JSTARS.

KC-135 modernization

    The committee understands the KC-135 is projected to fly 
for potentially another 30 years and needs to modernize to 
operate in a contested environment. Accordingly, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Air Force to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services by December 30, 2021, 
that provides the pros and cons of designating a single point 
of contact to prioritize and deconflict all modernization 
efforts for the KC-135.

KC-135R Cooling Capability

    The committee understands the KC-135R provides Aerial 
Refueling, Aeromedical Evacuation and Mobility Transport for 
both the Active and Reserve Components. The committee also 
understand that these critical yet aged airframes do not have 
adequate cooling capability for ground and low-altitude 
operations, significantly impacting operations and crew stamina 
in a large number of our nations key operating environments. 
The committee also recognizes that Ground cooling carts are the 
primary method for temperature reduction, but are removed prior 
to engine start and are not usable if mission delays occur. A 
roll-on/roll-off vapor cycle air conditioning units placed 
onboard can provide required cooling at a fraction of the cost 
of replacing the aircraft handling system. The committee 
understands that aircrew cooling has been a long-standing Air 
National Guard Critical requirement, but has yet to receive 
funding. The committee recommends additional funding for the 
National Guard and Reserve Component Equipment Account (NGREA) 
to meet this requirement. The committee directs the Secretary 
of the Air Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee 
on Armed Services by March 31, 2022 on the Air Force's strategy 
to fill this identified, critical requirement for the KC-135R 
fleet.

MH-139 conversion

    The committee recognizes that the 908th Reserve Airlift 
Wing at Maxwell Air Force Base (AFB) was recently selected by 
the Air Force and Air Force Reserve for conversion from its 
current mission as a Combat Coded C-130 airlift wing to an Air 
Force Reserve Flying Training Unit (FTU) to train air crew 
members for the new MH-139 helicopter. The successful 
transition and on-time schedule depend on the completion of the 
environmental assessment and the completion of the requisite 
facility modifications. The aircraft are currently scheduled to 
be delivered as early as fiscal year 2023.
    In testimony before the committee, the commander of U.S. 
Strategic Command emphasized the pressing need to replace the 
current fleet of UH-1N Huey helicopters with the new MH-139 
aircraft and recognized the important role this new aircraft 
will play in maintaining the operational readiness of the 
nation's Intercontinental ballistic missile force. The 
committee emphasizes that for the transition to the new weapons 
system to remain on schedule, it is critical that the new FTU 
be equipped, manned, and ready to produce aircrew members as 
soon as the aircraft is operationally ready. The committee 
believes that failure to immediately fund related projects to 
retrofit existing facilities to accommodate simulators and 
training of the initial cadre of flight training instructors 
prior to the delivery of the aircraft would have significant 
adverse impacts on the readiness of the FTU to begin its 
mission. Additionally, the committee believes that any C-130 
divestiture of mission at Maxwell AFB should be ``heel to toe'' 
with the delivery of replacement MH-139 aircraft. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 
2022, as to: the delivery timeline for MH-139 helicopter 
aircraft; the anticipated transition of C-130 aircraft; and the 
facility recapitalization to support the aircraft simulators, 
building updates, training aircraft, and instructor training to 
ensure this bed-down remains on schedule at Maxwell AFB.

MH-139A Grey Wolf Aircrew Exposure Protection

    The committee supports Air Force modernization plan to 
replace the UH-1N helicopter with the MH-139A Grey Wolf to 
continue the critical mission of ensuring the security of the 
ground-based leg of the nuclear triad. The committee 
understands that Air Force helicopter aircrews providing 
operational support to strategic missile sites in remote 
locations of the United States often face severe weather 
conditions and sub-arctic temperatures that present a wide 
range of operational hazards, especially for Airmen operating 
side-mounted M240 medium machine guns while exposed to the 
elements. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Air Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by March 1, 2022, on potential MH-139 aircrew exposure 
hazards related to operation of side-mounted machine guns. The 
briefing should include a description of developmental test and 
evaluation activities focused on operations in extreme cold 
weather, potential options, to include aircraft modifications, 
to address or mitigate the risk of aircrew exposure due to 
extreme weather conditions, and the estimated costs of these 
mitigation measures.

Propeller blades

    The committee received recent information regarding the 
United States inability to support C-130 aircraft propeller 
blades previously sold under Foreign Military Sales to United 
States allies. These C-130s are operational assets of foreign 
militaries around the globe and assets that could be called 
upon by the United States in times of need. Currently, the 
production of C-130 propeller blades is nearly entirely 
consumed by the U.S. Air Force, leaving other countries with 
propeller blade shortages and grounded C-130 aircraft. The Air 
Force is aware of this situation and has indicated that the 
only way for this blade shortage to end is for overseas 
manufacturer to produce more blades or move the manufacturing 
of these C-130 blades to the United States. The committee 
encourages the Air Force to coordinate with the manufacturer to 
increase production to address global C-130 blade shortages by 
shifting or augmenting production of these blades to a capable 
United States manufacturer. This shift will have the benefit of 
uninterrupted support of our allies, ensuring mission-critical 
asset readiness, increasing United States jobs, and better 
control over United States military asset production and 
maintenance.

Survivable Airborne Operations Center

    The committee supports the Air Force's recapitalization 
effort for the Survivable Airborne Operations Center (SAOC), 
formerly known as the E-4B National Airborne Operations Center 
(NAOC). The aging E-4B fleet faces capability gaps, diminishing 
manufacturing sources, increased maintenance costs, and parts 
obsolescence as it approaches the end of its serviceable life. 
The recapitalization effort will be informed by Air Force and 
Department of Defense analyses used to determine a holistic 
approach to replacing the aging E-4B fleet and capabilities of 
other nuclear and national command and control mission sets. 
The committee understands that the SAOC weapon system will be 
comprised of a Commercial Derivative Aircraft (CDA), mission 
system, and ground support systems. The committee is encouraged 
by the program's effort to maintain a full and open competitive 
acquisition and maximize competition across the entire weapon 
system lifecycle. The committee supports the funding for SAOC 
in fiscal year 2022 and expects the Air Force and the DoD to 
prioritize funding in the future years. Given the critical and 
uniquely complex nature of this recapitalization effort, the 
committee strongly encourages the Air Force and the Department 
of Defense to consider non-traditional acquisition strategies 
to enable flexibility, accelerate systems development, and 
sufficiently address the risks of modernization and integration 
of the mission systems. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to deliver a briefing to the House 
committee on Armed Services no later than March 1, 2022, on the 
Air Force's comprehensive SAOC modernization strategy.

V-22 nacelle improvement program

    The budget request contained $71.5 million for the V-22 
nacelle improvement program. In prior budget submissions, the 
Air Force stated that the nacelle improvement program is an Air 
Force priority for the V-22 weapon system and will increase the 
readiness, reliability, and ability to deploy one of the 
Defense Department's highest in-demand aircraft. The committee 
is pleased the nacelle improvement program has now delivered 
the first modified CV-22 to the fleet and encourages continued 
work to accelerate the program as quickly as possible. The 
committee recommends $76.5 million, an increase of $5.0 
million, for the V-22 nacelle improvement program.

                      Other Procurement, Air Force


                       Items of Special Interest


Bomber fleet hypersonic weapons integration

    The committee notes that the Air Force is retiring 17 B-1s, 
one quarter of the B-1 fleet. The committee is concerned that 
the remaining B-1, B-2 and B-52 aircraft may not have the 
necessary improvements to make up for the substantial reduction 
in numbers and be capable of meeting the Nation's long-range 
precision strike requirements. The committee notes that the 
bomber fleet are a critical component to the United States' 
force projection capability and will continue to be used both 
as conventional and strategic deterrence assets in this great 
powers competition with China and Russia. The committee notes 
that part of the future power projection capability will 
involve the integration of hypersonic missiles into the bomber 
aircraft. The committee also notes that the retirement of the 
17 B-1s will result in substantial cost savings over the FYDP 
and expects the Air Force to dedicate part of these cost 
savings back into the B-1 fleet by increasing its capabilities, 
possibly including expanded carriage, hardpoint pylon 
development and hypersonic weapons.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing, no later than March 1, 2022, to 
the House Committee on Armed Services on the plans for 
hypersonic integration for the bomber fleet. This briefing 
shall include an updated Air Force bomber roadmap and the Air 
Force's plans for the integration of hypersonics into the 
bomber fleet, including a plan to achieve full operational 
capability of the B-1 fleet to deliver hypersonic weapons by 
2025 and any other upgrades that will be required for the 
bomber fleet.

Commercial best practices

    The committee supports procuring commercial derivative 
aircraft for the Air Force and Navy. Commercial industries have 
maintained aircraft for decades and the committee encourages 
the Air Force and Navy to learn from any best practices saving 
time and money.

Standardization for Full Motion Video Dissemination

    The committee notes that after more than a decade of proven 
operational performance, the Defense Information Systems 
Agency's Unified Video Dissemination System (UVDS) and the 
National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency's Motion Imagery Online 
(MIO) have become the de facto standards for disseminating full 
motion video (FMV) on classified computer systems within the 
Department of Defense and select interagency partners. Both 
UVDS and MIO leverage an open architecture, well-documented 
standards-based interfaces, and a common software baseline to 
keep pace with rapidly evolving commercial developments in FMV 
technology. For example, the committee is aware that the Joint 
Artificial Intelligence Center is leveraging UVDS and MIO as 
the primary sources for its FMV ingest capabilities. Given the 
ubiquitous use of UVDS and MIO, both via traditional data 
centers and cloud deployments, the committee is concerned that 
the Air Force is potentially overlooking the utility of 
standardizing the existing, proven FMV dissemination 
capabilities of UVDS and MIO, especially as they relate to 
emerging cloud requirements for the Air Force Distributed 
Common Ground System.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Chief of Staff of the 
Air Force to provide a briefing to the House Armed Services 
Committee, by February 15, 2022, on plans for full motion video 
dissemination standardization. The briefing shall include, at a 
minimum: a description of the Air Force's analysis of utilizing 
UVDS and MIO as the platforms for FMV dissemination; an 
assessment of the costs of leveraging these existing systems as 
compared to developing similar systems; and a technical and 
security comparison between these systems and other systems 
under consideration or under development.

Transfer of U.S. Coast Guard HC-130H Aircraft to the State of 
        California

    The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 
(Public Law 115-232) directed the Air Force to modify and 
transfer seven Coast Guard HC-130H aircraft to the State of 
California, Natural Resources Agency, for use by the Department 
of Forestry and Fire Protection (CAL FIRE). The Committee notes 
that the current estimated delivery date for the first 
Retardant Delivery System (RDS)-modified aircraft is November 
2022, with the seventh in June 2023. The committee understands 
that these aircraft are necessary to California's efforts to 
fight ongoing and future wildfires. Therefore, the Committee 
directs the Secretary of the Air Force to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services by December 1, 2021, on 
the progress made to deliver these aircraft. The briefing shall 
include: 1) an assessment of capacity and capability to deliver 
these aircraft on an accelerated schedule; 2) a cost assessment 
associated with a potential early delivery schedule; and 3) 
impact to other programs in the event that the Air Force elects 
to accelerate delivery of these aircraft.

                       Procurement, Defense-Wide


                       Items of Special Interest


Comptroller General review of tactical fighter aircraft capacity 
        shortfalls and capability gaps

    Despite billions of dollars of investment in developing and 
acquiring tactical fighter aircraft over many years, the Air 
Force, Navy, and Marine Corps will likely continue to face 
capability and capacity shortfalls over the upcoming decades. 
The committee understands that each of the services has begun 
reevaluating its tactical aircraft force structure requirements 
and capability needs, with the Air Force and Navy 
simultaneously planning to heavily invest funding in the 
upcoming years to develop and field advanced Next Generation 
Air Dominance (NGAD) capabilities.
    The committee notes that the tactical fighter aircraft 
shortfalls facing the military services did not suddenly 
appear. As far back as 2010, the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) noted in its report (GAO-10-789) that the Air 
Force, Navy, and Marine Corps were projecting tactical fighter 
aircraft shortfalls beginning in the 2020 timeframe. GAO 
concluded that the services needed to gain a clearer and more 
comprehensive portfolio-level understanding of their tactical 
fighter aircraft requirements and forecasted shortfalls in 
order to ensure that they made well-informed tactical fighter 
aircraft acquisition investment decisions.
    Therefore, given that the services are still facing 
tactical fighter aircraft inventory and capability shortfalls 
more than a decade after the last GAO report on the issue, the 
committee directs the Comptroller General of the United States 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than April 1, 2022, that assesses and identifies current 
Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps tactical aircraft capability 
and capacity requirements and forecasted shortfalls. In 
addition, the report should assess the extent to which the 
services' tactical aircraft acquisition and modernization 
investment plans, including NGAD efforts, are likely to meet 
those requirements and address the shortfalls. Finally, the 
Comptroller General should, as appropriate, provide the 
congressional defense committees with periodic briefings on 
preliminary findings and pertinent information during the 
compilation and drafting of the final report.

F-35

    The budget request contained $9.97 billion for the 
procurement of 85 F-35 aircraft and associated spares, 
modifications, depot activations, and advanced procurement for 
fiscal year 2023 aircraft for the Air Force, Navy, and Marine 
Corps. The budget request contained $2.05 billion for research 
and development related to deployability and suitability 
initiatives, Block 4 and Continuous Capability Development and 
Delivery (C2D2), and Air Force dual-capable aircraft efforts. 
The committee notes that the unfunded priority lists for the 
Navy contained five F-35C aircraft.
    The committee supports the F-35 program and acknowledges it 
is a capability that can be used against advanced integrated 
air defense systems operating against the United States or its 
foreign partners and allies during high-end, very contested 
contingencies when the aircraft is finally installed with 
Technical Refresh-3 hardware and Block 4 software capabilities. 
But given the extraordinary costs to date of the program, the 
committee calls into question the actual affordability of the 
program for the taxpayer after 20 years since its inception. 
The committee agrees with the F-35 Program Executive Officer in 
that the current and forecasted high cost of sustainment 
remains a real and existential threat to the program, and the 
committee remains continually frustrated by the program's 
overly aggressive development and production schedules that 
contain significant amounts of execution risk and concurrency, 
which have traditionally resulted during the 20-year lifetime 
of the program in longer schedules and much higher costs than 
planned to realize less than full warfighting capabilities 
required by the Department of Defense. Additionally, given that 
the program's capability requirements were established over 20 
years ago and predicted near-peer threats have realized 
capabilities more rapidly than assessed, the committee is 
uncertain as to whether or not the F-35 aircraft can 
sufficiently evolve to meet the future expected threat in 
certain geographical areas of operations in which combat 
operations could occur.
    The committee is concerned about the Department's lack of 
sufficient access to accurate and complete F-35 enterprise-wide 
technical data, intellectual property, software code, expedient 
engineering disposition turnaround times, and the Department's 
significant reliance upon original equipment manufacturers 
supporting development, fielding, and sustainment activities 
for the airframe, propulsion, and mission systems. Especially 
for an aircraft that is a military unique end item for which 
the Department of Defense has invested billions of fiscal 
resources over the years for a capability that still has yet to 
reach its full and required combat capability to be an 
effective combat platform. The committee is also discouraged by 
the Department's slow response introducing competition across 
the F-35 development and sustainment enterprises for both the 
airframe and propulsion systems, and believes that the lack of 
competition in these areas is a significant contributor to 
runaway costs and the Department's inability to hold original 
equipment manufacturers properly accountable for subpar 
performance of products and services provided.
    Therefore the committee recommends $11.73 billion, a 
decrease of $292.7 million and reduction of 5 F-35A aircraft, 
that would support procurement of 80 aircraft and associated 
spares, modifications, depot activations, advanced procurement 
for fiscal year 2023 aircraft, research and development related 
to deployability and suitability initiatives, Block 4 and C2D2, 
and Air Force dual-capable aircraft efforts for the Air Force, 
Navy, and Marine Corps. The committee believes that reductions 
in aircraft procurement quantities should also be considered in 
future years that would reallocate funding towards resolving 
the multitude of cost and performance issues within the F-35 
sustainment enterprise.
    The committee also recommends provisions elsewhere in this 
Act that would: (1) limit total quantities of F-35 aircraft 
that could be procured by the Department based on current cost-
per-tail-per-year affordability constraints that have been 
established by the Department; (2) integrate a more fuel-
efficient and higher performance propulsion system that would 
help reduce sustainment costs and provide better capabilities 
regarding combat radius and thermal management, in addition to 
reducing reliance upon aerial refueling aircraft; (3) direct 
the Comptroller General of the United States to conduct an 
annual review of F-35 sustainment efforts; and (4) require a 
report and certification regarding F-35 program sustainment 
costs, and prohibit the Secretary of Defense from entering into 
a Performance-Based Logistics (PBL) sustainment contract until 
he certified that the program met sustainment cost reduction 
metrics and that any PBL contract would further reduce 
sustainment costs.

National Guard and Reserve Equipment Account

    The budget request contained no funding for a National 
Guard and Reserve Component equipment account. The committee 
has long been concerned about the availability of modern 
equipment needed to ensure the relevance and readiness of the 
National Guard and Reserve Components as an operational reserve 
and for their domestic support missions. The committee notes 
that the annual National Guard and Reserve Equipment Reports 
over the last several years identify continuing shortages in 
modernized equipment and challenges associated with efficiently 
fulfilling combat readiness training requirements.
    The committee believes additional funds would help manage 
strategic risk and eliminate identified critical dual-use 
equipment shortfalls. The committee expects these funds to be 
used for the purposes of, but not limited to, the procurement 
and modernization of High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled 
Vehicles including modifications for rollover mitigation; 
Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles trucks; F-16 Active 
Electronically Scanned Array radar; KC-135 modernization; C-130 
propeller upgrades; C-130 firefighting system upgrades; UH-60 
conversions and UH-60M Black Hawk helicopters; UH-72 Lakota 
helicopters and sustainment; and other critical dual-use, 
unfunded procurement items for the National Guard and Reserve 
Components.
    The committee recommends $950.0 million for National Guard 
and Reserve equipment.

Persistent Airborne Intelligence Surveillance & Reconnaissance

    The committee is concerned that the combatant commands have 
a critical requirement for persistent airborne ISR in active 
conflict and low-intensity, highly dispersed regions that is 
not being met by existing unmanned aerial systems (UAS).
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Defense to provide a brief to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by March 1, 2022, on how ISR capabilities on 
persistent, ultra-long endurance (multi-day), attritable Group 
III unmanned aerial systems address these threats and how the 
Secretary plans to develop these critical capabilities. This 
brief should include (1) total program cost; program costs 
included in the fiscal year defense plan and (2) overall 
development timetable.

Radio Integration System program upgrade

    The budget request contained $284.5 million for Warrior 
Systems. Of this amount, $13.8 million was requested for the 
Radio Integration Systems (RIS) program. The committee 
recognizes the importance of ensuring timely procurement for 
the RIS and the need to fully integrate disparate 
communications across air, ground, and maritime domains, 
providing full battlespace awareness and communication 
capabilities critical across the full spectrum of special 
operations forces missions.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $33.8 million, an 
increase of $20.0 million, in Warrior Systems for the U.S. 
Special Operations Command Radio Integration System program to 
procure and test the Digital Aided Close Air Support Gateways 
components necessary to maintain programmatic schedule.
    Further, the committee directs the Commander, U.S. Special 
Operations Command, to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than January 28, 2022, on 
the Radio Integration System program, to include historical and 
current funding levels, an updated program schedule, and 
necessary milestones to achieve full operational capability, 
and any other information the Commander would like to provide.

Review of Armed Overwatch aircraft systems

    The committee directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to assess U.S. Special Operations Command's (USSOCOM's) 
Armed Overwatch concept. The assessment shall review:
    (1) the roles and responsibilities of the Department of 
Defense organizations involved in the transfer of the Air 
Force's Light Attack Experimentation program to USSOCOM as the 
Armed Overwatch concept, and the analysis conducted to execute 
such a transfer;
    (2) the extent to which the Department of Defense, to 
include those organizations identified in review element (1), 
has assessed the intended roles and missions of the Armed 
Overwatch platforms, to include consideration of how such 
platforms would support the joint force with close air support, 
precision fires, and armed intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance (ISR), if it is intended to do so;
    (3) the extent to which Armed Overwatch, as an armed ISR 
capability, will satisfy USSOCOM's airborne ISR requirements;
    (4) the extent to which USSOCOM has prioritized missions 
and plans, to include evaluating risks, to employ Armed 
Overwatch independently or with other ISR and operational 
platforms;
    (5) the extent to which alternatives were considered to 
meet this concept, to include capabilities provided by the 
joint force; and
    (6) any other matters the Comptroller General deems 
appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than March 25, 2022, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings, and to submit a final report to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives on a date agreed to at the time of the 
briefing.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


              Section 101--Authorization of Appropriations

    This section would authorize appropriations for procurement 
at the levels identified in section 4101 of division D of this 
Act.

                       Subtitle B--Army Programs


    Section 111--Multiyear Procurement Authority for AH-64E Apache 
                              Helicopters

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Army to 
enter into one or more multiyear contracts for AH-64E Apache 
helicopters beginning in fiscal year 2022, in accordance with 
section 2306b of title 10, United States Code.

  Section 112--Multiyear Procurement Authority for UH-60M and HH-60M 
                         Black Hawk Helicopters

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Army to 
enter into one or more multiyear contracts for UH and HH-60M 
Black Hawk helicopters beginning in fiscal year 2022, in 
accordance with section 2306b of title 10, United States Code.

        Section 113--Continuation of Soldier Enhancement Program

    This section would continue the Soldier Enhancement Program 
under the responsibility and authority of the Assistant 
Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and 
Technology.

 Section 114--Strategy for the Procurement of Accessories for the Next 
                        Generation Squad Weapon

    This section would require the Secretary of the Army to 
develop and implement an acquisition strategy for the Next 
Generation Squad Weapon accessories and other components.

                       Subtitle C--Navy Programs


Section 121--Extension of Procurement Authority for Certain Amphibious 
                         Shipbuilding Programs

    This section would extend the authority granted by section 
124(a)(1) of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) to 
fiscal year 2022.

 Section 122--Inclusion of Basic and Functional Design in Assessments 
Required Prior to Start of Construction on First Ship of a Shipbuilding 
                                Program

    This section would amend section 124 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (Public Law 110-
181) and would require the Secretary of the Navy to ensure that 
certain levels of design maturity are met before funds can be 
authorized or appropriated for a first of a class naval vessel.

 Section 123--Multiyear Procurement Authority for Arleigh Burke Class 
                               Destroyers

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Navy to 
enter into one or more multiyear contracts for Arleigh Burke 
class destroyers and associated systems beginning in fiscal 
year 2023, in accordance with section 2306b of title 10, United 
States Code.

 Section 124--Incorporation of Advanced Degaussing Systems into DDG-51 
                            Class Destroyers

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
ensure that an advanced degaussing system is incorporated into 
the contract for the next multiyear procurement contract for 
the DDG-51 Flight III.

                     Subtitle D--Air Force Programs


    Section 131--Contract for Logistics Support for VC-25B Aircraft

    This section would require the Secretary of the Air Force 
to re-compete the depot sustainment contract for the VC-25B 
after the first 5 years.

     Section 132--Limitation on Availability of Funds for the B-52 
                 Commercial Engine Replacement Program

    This section would set a cost baseline for the B-52 
Commercial Engine Replacement Program.

Section 133--Inventory Requirements and Limitations Relating to Certain 
                     Air Refueling Tanker Aircraft

    This section would address KC-135 and KC-10 retirements and 
limit the Air Force from moving KC-135 from Primary Mission 
Aircraft Inventory to Backup Aircraft Inventory in the Air 
Force Guard and Reserve.

    Section 134--Minimum Inventory of Tactical Airlift Aircraft and 
   Limitation on Modification of Air National Guard Tactical Airlift 
                            Flying Missions

    This section would require the Secretary of the Air Force 
to retain a minimum of 279 C-130 aircraft.

  Section 135--Procurement Authority for Certain Parts of the Ground-
             Based Strategic Deterrent Cryptographic Device

    This section would allow the Secretary of the Air Force to 
enter into a life-of-type procurement for the KS-75 
cryptographic device as part of the Ground-Based Strategic 
Deterrent program.

       Subtitle E--Defense-Wide, Joint, and Multiservice Matters


    Section 141--Implementation of Affordability, Operational, and 
       Sustainment Cost Constraints for the F-35 Aircraft Program

    This section would limit the total quantity of F-35 
aircraft that could be procured and maintained in the aircraft 
inventory by the Secretary of the Air Force and the Secretary 
of the Navy based on existing affordability cost constraints 
that have been determined by each Secretary.

 Section 142--Limitation on Availability of Funds for Aircraft Systems 
                    for the Armed Overwatch Program

    This section would prohibit the expenditure of certain 
funds to the Department of Defense for the procurement of armed 
overwatch aircraft systems until such time after the provision 
of the airborne intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance 
acquisition roadmap for the U.S. Special Operations Command as 
directed by section 165 of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public 
Law 116-283) to the congressional defense committees.

  Section 143--Major Weapon Systems Capability Assessment Process and 
                      Procedure Review and Report

    This section would require a report on the Department of 
Defense's processes for the management of strategic risk with 
respect to major weapon systems capabilities and capacities 
including ensuring major weapon systems' suitability for 
current and emerging military threats to U.S. forces and 
accomplishment of their missions, and identifying for 
modernization by either upgrade or replacement any weapon 
systems that are not capable of effectively accomplishing their 
military purpose or are excess to operational requirements. The 
section would also require the Comptroller General of the 
United States to review the report and provide a briefing on 
the preliminary assessment.

 Section 144--Reports on Exercise of Waiver Authority with Respect to 
                    Certain Aircraft Ejection Seats

    This section would require the Secretary of the Air Force 
and Secretary of the Navy to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees on a semi-annual basis that 
would describe the total quantity of ejection seats currently 
in operational use that are operating with an approved waiver 
due to deferred maintenance actions or because required parts 
or components are not available to replace expired parts or 
components. The committee is aware of two recent aircraft 
accidents in which ejection seats in operational service 
malfunctioned during the pilot's ejection sequence due to lack 
of parts or deferred maintenance actions; one ejection resulted 
in a fatality.

         TITLE II--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION


           Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army


                       Items of Special Interest


40mm Training Ammunition Analysis of Alternatives

    The committee has supported the Army's development of two 
new 40mm day, night and thermal (DNT) training ammunition: the 
M918E1 40mm high velocity (HV) cartridge and M781E1 40mm low 
velocity (LV) cartridge. The committee is aware of the Army's 
cancellation of the M918E1 40mm HV DNT and pause in transition 
of the M718E1 LV DNT training cartridges into production. With 
this delay, the Army may need to revert to legacy ammunition 
and use a ``mixed belt'' configuration consisting of both the 
legacy M918 and M385A1 cartridges for HV day and night training 
and legacy M781 cartridge to conduct LV day-only training.
    The committee is concerned that legacy HV ammunition may 
present avoidable risk including unexploded ordnance (UXO) 
danger, an incendiary hazard that creates a fire hazard on 
training areas and reduces training efficacy. The committee is 
also concerned about the use of legacy LV ammunition due to its 
limitation of day-only training use.
    The committee is further aware that other services 
currently use alternative 40mm HV and LV day and night training 
cartridges that do not present the hazards and impediments 
found in the Army's legacy ammunition. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Army to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees by March 1, 2022 that 
evaluates existing and available 40mm HV and LV day and night 
training ammunition currently in use in other services. The 
report shall include, but is not limited to, an assessment of 
the ability of other cartridges to meet the Army's 
requirements, a cost analysis of procuring this ammunition for 
Army use, an analysis of the contractual and legal barriers, if 
any, to procurement and a potential fielding schedule.

Advanced ammunition material and manufacturing technologies

    The budget request included $43.0 million in PE 0605805A 
for Munitions Standardization, Effectiveness and Safety, Life 
Cycle Pilot Process. The committee supports the Army's 
investments in ammunition enterprise modernization. The 
committee also supports the Army's focus on early research and 
development of safe and clean ammunition manufacturing 
technology, including novel materials, foamable celluloid and 
propellant energetics. These efforts have the potential to 
support the Army's key modernization efforts while continuing 
to deliver high-quality, reliable and effective ammunition 
products to Warfighters. The committee recommends $48.0 
million, an increase of $5.0 million, in PE 0605805A for 
Munitions Standardization, Effectiveness and Safety, Life Cycle 
Pilot Process.

Advanced combat engine

    The committee is aware of an effort to develop an advanced 
combat engine with the potential to provide a modular and 
scalable powertrain solution fitting the needs of the current 
and next generation of combat vehicles programs, including the 
Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle (OMFV). The committee 
understands that this technology is based upon an innovative 
opposed piston technology with the potential to provide 
significant increases in power density and efficiency in a 
smaller size compared with current engines in armored or combat 
vehicle applications.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Commander, U.S. Army 
Futures Command to submit a report to the House Committee on 
Armed Services not later than December 30, 2021, that provides 
an assessment of the technical and affordability potential of 
an advanced combat engine based on opposed piston technology. 
Such engine's technical assessment should include its potential 
for application in any current or future combat or tactical 
vehicle, including OMFV.

Autonomous robotic targets for small arms live fire training ranges

    The committee is aware of Department of Defense interest in 
autonomous robotic targets (ART) to improve soldier lethality, 
team performance, and marksmanship. The committee understands 
that this technology could provide the Army with an 
unpredictable and dynamic live fire training adversary, improve 
warfighter readiness, and enhance soldier and squad performance 
evaluation tools while expanding the useful life of existing 
small arms ranges.
    The committee is aware of the Army's efforts to improve 
targets as part of the Future Army System of Integrated Targets 
Program, and understands the Army is currently working to test 
trackless moving target efforts, but that these differ from 
ARTs. The committee understands that ARTs may require some 
range modifications or accommodations to facilitate complex 
individual and squad training exercises, but that based in part 
on the favorable technology review by the Asymmetric Warfare 
Group in 2013 and the Army Research Institute in 2017, select 
units in the U.S. Army, Marine Corps, and Special Operations 
Forces have fielded ARTs in limited capacity, providing 
outstanding results. Going forward, the committee understands 
that the Department's Close Combat Lethality Task Force (CCLTF) 
considers ARTs to be one of the most important training 
enhancement tools to significantly increase close combat 
lethality today.
    The committee believes ARTs as a range enhancement and 
training tool significantly contribute to the ongoing CCLTF 
objectives and therefore supports broader rapid adoption of 
this commercial-off-the-shelf capability. The committee directs 
the Secretary of the Army to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees not later than April 30, 2022, 
on how the Army can field this capability in fiscal year 2023, 
and what assistance the Army may need to accelerate its 
fielding.

Auxiliary power units for Army combat and tactical vehicles

    The committee understands that the Army is currently 
exploring auxiliary power units (APUs) for use on Army combat 
and tactical vehicles. APUs provide electrical power to the 
vehicle's on-board systems, such as weapons, sensors, 
computers, and radios, without draining the batteries or 
running the engine. The committee understands that the APUs 
under development could offer significant improvements in size, 
weight, and fuel efficiency compared to other APU and power 
generation solutions currently available. The committee 
encourages the Army to continue to pursue modern, light, 
efficient APUs to supplement existing on-board vehicle power 
and maximize mission effectiveness while minimizing fuel 
consumption in the future.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary 
of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
December 30, 2021, on efforts to develop modern, light, 
efficient APUs for use on combat and tactical vehicles. This 
report shall include, but not be limited to, plans to field new 
APUs on Army combat and tactical vehicles, an overview of 
current and planned research and development efforts relating 
to auxiliary power units, and an assessment of which combat and 
tactical vehicles stand to benefit the most from APUs currently 
in development.

Battery charging for electric vehicles in tactical environments

    The committee is aware of interest and efforts on the part 
of the military departments and defense agencies toward the 
development and potential use of electric vehicles and systems 
throughout an area of operations. Using electric vehicle to 
replace or supplement the current or future tactical vehicle 
fleet will require sustained and focused investment in a 
variety of technical areas not only in fleet electric vehicles 
but in the capabilities and infrastructure necessary to support 
them. The committee notes that the Army has started to identify 
the capabilities required to support and sustain tactical 
vehicles in an operational environment with particular focus on 
the capabilities and infrastructure need to recharge those 
tactical systems that are not hybrid or otherwise capable of 
recharging themselves with an onboard generator. The concept of 
tactical charging or recharging is central to feasibility of 
the electrification of combat or tactical vehicles. The 
committee is concerned that research and development of 
electric vehicle charging or recharging technology should keep 
pace with research and development of the vehicles themselves.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by December 30, 2021, on research and development 
plans related to electric vehicle charging and recharging in 
the tactical environment. This briefing should include, but not 
be limited to, an overview of the Army's current thinking on 
electric vehicle operations in a tactical environment and 
related sustainment requirements including battery charging or 
recharging; an assessment of existing commercially available 
battery charging capabilities and their potential for use in a 
tactical environment; how plans and schedules for battery 
charging research and development are synchronized with 
electric vehicle development; and funding profiles for battery 
charging research and development support electric vehicle 
development.

Carbon fiber and graphite foam applications for combat and tactical 
        vehicles

    In the committee report accompanying the William M. (Mac) 
Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2021 (H. Rept. 116-442), the committee noted that the U.S. Army 
Ground Vehicle Systems Center (GVSC) and U.S. Special 
Operations Command (USSOCOM) were conducting developmental 
research on carbon fiber composite wheels and graphitic carbon 
foam in support of the Army's and the special operations 
forces' combat and tactical vehicle programs. The committee 
took the opportunity in that report to encourage the Army and 
USSOCOM to ensure that the combat and tactical vehicle 
industrial base were aware of their potential interest in 
graphite and carbon fiber technologies as well as to continue 
to assess their possible application to future combat and 
tactical vehicles.
    The committee now understands that the GVSC and USSOCOM may 
be interested in a wider application of graphitic composite and 
graphitic carbon foam components in support of the Army's Next 
Generation Combat Vehicle and for other vehicle technology 
purposes. For example, graphitic composites used in batteries 
and fuel cells may reduce their weight with increased strength. 
Graphitic carbon foam may have utility in reducing component 
heat signatures and protecting against blast, directed energy, 
or electromagnetic pulse weapons.
    Given the committee's encouragement in last year's report, 
and its enduring interest in the testing and demonstration of 
the potential of graphite composite and graphitic carbon foam 
vehicle components, the committee directs the Commander, Army 
Futures Command, in coordination with the Commander, U.S. 
Special Operations Command, to submit a report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than December 30, 2021, 
on efforts to make the combat and tactical vehicle industrial 
base aware of its interest in graphite composite and graphitic 
carbon foam vehicle components.

Electrification of combat and tactical vehicles

    The committee understands the Army is in the process of 
developing a tactical and combat vehicle electrification (TaCV-
E) initial capabilities document (ICD) to lay out the 
operational characteristics or requirements for electrification 
of the Army's ground vehicle fleet. The committee understands 
the TaCV-E ICD will identify electrification opportunities for 
both new start and modification of existing vehicle programs. 
The committee also notes the electric light reconnaissance 
vehicle (eLRV) program is the Army's rapid prototyping effort 
to develop an all-electric tactical vehicle with which soldiers 
can then experiment and demonstrate electrification's potential 
as well as inform the broader TaCV-E initiative.
    The committee is aware that the automotive industry is 
aggressively moving forward with electrification based on 
mature commercial technologies, including advanced battery 
technology, and expects the Army to engage with traditional and 
non-traditional industry entities to accelerate eLRV prototype 
development and, looking farther into the future, also inform 
the broader TaCV-E initiative. Inherent in vehicle 
electrification is the potential for operational exportable 
power generation, making modification of existing tactical 
vehicles, where appropriate and cost effective, part of the 
TaCV-E initiative. The Army's new Infantry Squad Vehicle and 
U.S. Special Operations Command's (USSOCOM) light tactical 
vehicles may be candidates for such consideration.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army, in coordination with the Commander, U.S. Special 
Operations Command, to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by December 30, 2021, on the status 
and plans for the TaCV-E and the eLRV rapid prototyping 
program. The briefing should include, but not be limited to, 
initial assessment of characteristics or requirements for 
electrification of combat and tactical vehicles. The briefing 
should include technology development plans including schedule, 
technology objectives, test and evaluation strategies, and 
funding profiles separately for TaCV-E and eLRV. The briefing 
should identify options for the realistic and achievable 
acceleration of eLRV to include funding requirements and 
engagement strategies, if any, with the commercial electric 
vehicle industrial base. Finally, the briefing should address 
how the Army and USSOCOM are coordinating on combat and 
tactical vehicle electrification technology development.

Extended range cannon artillery rate of fire

    The committee notes the Army's commitment to its highest 
priority modernization effort that would develop and field new 
long range precision fires using both missile and cannon 
artillery systems. Last year, the Extended Range Cannon 
Artillery (ERCA) program demonstrated the prototype of a 
modified M109A7 Paladin self-propelled howitzer that fired a 
cannon launched projectile nearly 70 kilometers. Although 
ranges of 70 kilometers or more appear achievable, the Army 
recognizes that improving ERCA's rate of fire is critically 
important to its fundamental operational utility.
    In this regard, the committee is aware that last year, a 
test of the Army designed and fabricated automatic loader, 
intended for later insertion into the ERCA system, failed to 
demonstrate suitability as a component of the modified M109A7 
Paladin chassis and turret. Nonetheless, the Army is committed 
to exploring other potential technical solutions that will 
improve ERCA's rate of fire without undermining its operational 
reliability and supportability. The committee supports this 
approach.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Commander, Army 
Futures Command to provide a report to the House Committee on 
Armed Services by December 30, 2021, on alternative 
technologies, including an automatic loader, for increasing the 
ERCA system's rate of fire. This report should include, but not 
be limited to a survey and assessment of the artillery systems 
of NATO allies or other partner nations that evaluates and 
considers the potential of the technologies they are developing 
or have developed and fielded to improve cannon rate of fire. 
This report should also detail the actions taken and planned 
for identifying technologies relevant to ERCA rate of fire and 
how the Army will ensure the widest possible participation of 
relevant and available technologies in a free, fair, and open 
competition for the collection, evaluation, and selection of 
these candidates for possible further development. Plans 
included in this report should include detailed schedules and 
funding profiles.

Future Long Range Assault Aircraft

    The budget request contained $1.13 billion in PE 0603801A 
for advanced aviation development, including $448.4 million for 
the Future Long Range Assault Aircraft (FLRAA).
    As part of the Future Vertical Lift (FVL) program, the 
FLRAA will eventually replace the UH-60 Black Hawk as the 
Army's medium-lift utility helicopter. In previous legislation, 
the committee has supported the Army's decision to accelerate 
FLRAA development by 4 years and has authorized additional 
funding beyond that requested in the budget submission. FLRAA 
is conducting an extended competitive critical design risk 
reduction (CDRR) phase through the second quarter of fiscal 
year 2022, after which the program will be awarded to one 
vendor and transition to a major defense acquisition program at 
Milestone B. The committee notes that the extended CDRR is 
intended to de-risk system and sub-system design integration to 
facilitate the accelerated development schedule.
    While the committee understands that the Future Years 
Defense Program is under review by the Department of Defense, 
the lack of outyears funding for FLRAA and the rest of the FVL 
portfolio in the fiscal year 2022 budget request complicates 
the committee's ability to assess the adequacy of the program's 
funding profile. The committee expects the Army to budget 
sufficient funding to maintain FLRAA technical development and 
schedule and to share a revised future years funding profile as 
soon as practicable.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends $1.13 billion, an 
increase of $33.0 million, in PE 0603801A for advanced aviation 
development, specifically to continue risk reduction work on 
the Future Long Range Assault Aircraft.

Future Vertical Lift

    The committee supports the Army's pursuit of a Future 
Vertical Lift (FVL) program to replace some of the Army's 
existing portfolio of rotary wing assets. Army operations 
depend on the capabilities of rotary wing aviation for troop 
transport, reconnaissance, close air support, and logistics. 
The committee recognizes that while the Army's current aviation 
platforms, such as UH-60 Blackhawk, AH-64 Apache, and CH-47 
Chinook, have been modified and extensively refurbished, their 
basic designs have been in service for decades and may be 
reaching the limits of modernization.
    The committee notes that since designating Future Vertical 
Lift as a top modernization priority in 2017, the Army has 
shifted its acquisition strategy and now intends to develop and 
procure two new platforms, the Future Attack Reconnaissance 
Aircraft and the Future Long Range Assault Aircraft, in 
parallel. Both programs are scheduled for First Unit Equipped 
in fiscal year 2030.
    The committee believes the magnitude of this program 
necessitates an independent baseline assessment against which 
to measure future progress, and that such an examination would 
assist the committee in conducting appropriate oversight.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees by April 1, 2022, on the Army's Future 
Vertical Lift program. The committee further directs the 
Comptroller General to provide a briefing to the Committee on 
Armed Services of the House of Representatives by February 1, 
2022, on the Comptroller General's preliminary findings. The 
required report shall include, but not be limited to, the 
following elements:
    (1) the capabilities the Army intends to acquire through 
the Future Vertical Lift effort and the plan for replacing 
existing aircraft;
    (2) the acquisition approaches and contracting strategies 
under consideration for the FVL portfolio;
    (3) the estimated cost and schedule for development and 
acquisition of FVL capabilities; and
    (4) an assessment of the risk reduction approaches the Army 
intends to employ to develop technologies, demonstrate designs, 
and produce aircraft and related FVL capabilities.

Helicopter Vertical Tail Boom Modification

    The committee is aware of new and emerging commercial 
technologies that could benefit the Army's UH-60 aircraft 
performance, to include providing more directional control with 
increased lift capability. The committee supports the Army's 
efforts to incorporate proven enhanced capabilities into its 
current aircraft inventory.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the House Armed Services Committee by March 15, 
2022, on any testing conducted on vertical tail boom 
modifications to improve the directional control and lift 
capabilities of rotary wing aircraft, any plans for continued 
testing of such capabilities, and an assessment of the aircraft 
performance benefits that could be provided by these 
technologies.

Improving Ground Vehicle System Center Modeling and Simulation

    In the committee report accompanying the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (H. Rept. 116-120), the 
committee noted that modeling and simulation (M&S) has 
demonstrated its utility as a tool for vehicle technology 
development. Subsequently, in the committee report accompanying 
the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (H. Rept. 116-442), the committee 
further recognized the importance and value of modeling and 
simulation (M&S) in supporting digital design, experimentation, 
and developmental and operational test and evaluation for 
military ground vehicle systems. The committee also appreciates 
the briefing provided by the Army in December 2020 that 
outlines the Ground Vehicle Systems Center (GVSC) plans and 
efforts to improve and expand its M&S capabilities through 
public-private partnerships and finding additional M&S tools 
through their innovative outreach program.
    The committee remains interested in the Army's development 
and appropriate use of M&S capabilities supporting digital 
design, technology development, experimentation, and testing of 
combat and tactical vehicles. Accordingly, the committee 
directs the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, 
Logistics, and Technology, not later than March 1, 2022, to 
provide a briefing to the House Armed Services Committee that 
outlines the Army's accomplishments, if any, that demonstrate 
its improvement and expansion of GVSC's internal and external 
M&S capabilities and how such improvements and expansion 
directly supports, materially advances, and reduces costs for 
the Army's high priority programs for combat and tactical 
vehicle modernization.

Modernization of mobile X-ray systems

    The committee recognizes that forward-deployed military 
medical facilities require ruggedized diagnostic equipment that 
provide lifesaving and timely diagnostics in adverse conditions 
to save lives during the ``golden hour,''and that recent 
breakthroughs in X-ray technology have resulted in mobile units 
with significant reductions in Size, Weight & Power Cost. The 
committee believes that these new technologies have the 
potential to improve currently deployed mobile X-ray imaging 
systems, and urges the Secretary of the Army to consider plans 
to modernize mobile X-ray units to ensure that the best 
possible care is available to deployed soldiers.

Modular approach to combat vehicle lethality

    The committee notes that the Army and Marine Corps have 
related modernization efforts to improve the lethality of their 
existing and future ground combat vehicles. These efforts are 
directed at all the combat functions but are particularly 
noteworthy in the modernization of the direct fire weapons 
systems for tanks, mechanized and motorized infantry, light and 
armored reconnaissance, and air defense.
    Ground combat vehicle lethality today and well into the 
future depends upon technologically superior sensors, fire 
control, and weapons. Current combat vehicles initially 
developed and fielded decades ago, and upgraded several times 
since, have a variety of capabilities for each. In the 
committee report accompanying the William M. (Mac) Thornberry 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (H. 
Rept. 116-442), the committee expressed its interest in the 
potential of commonality in weapon station configuration for 
the Stryker infantry carrier. The committee remains interested 
in the potential opportunity, given the number of combat 
vehicle development programs underway in the Army and Marine 
Corps, to focus development efforts for new vehicles on 
modular, multi-purpose approaches that allow fielding future 
weapons capabilities in different mixes, across like-vehicle 
chassis families, and in configurations that allow rapid 
weapons changes even in a field environment.
    Accordingly, the committee encourages the Army and Marine 
Corps to consider modernization of ground combat vehicle 
lethality by pursuing modular, multi-purpose sensor, fire 
control, and weapon configurations capable of hosting a variety 
of weapons across a vehicle family. Such modular, multi-purpose 
capability should include capacity for technological growth 
allowing for the incorporation of advances in sensors, fire 
control, and weapons as they are fielded.
    The committee also directs the Assistant Secretary of the 
Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by December 
30, 2021, on an assessment of the potential of combat vehicle 
lethality that uses modular, multi-purpose approach to sensor, 
fire control, and weapons configuration. This assessment should 
include existing or future capabilities, if any, that could 
provide this capability.

Report on the Universal Robotics Controller (URC) Program

    The committee is aware that the U.S. Army's Universal 
Robotics Controller (URC) program is developing a common, open 
architecture operating system to run applications for all 
battalion and below Robotic and Autonomous Systems (RAS). URC 
is intended to be both backwards compatible with existing Army 
RAS and forward compatible with emerging Army and Joint RAS 
such as the Next Generation Combat Vehicle (NGCV), Optionally 
Manned Fighting Vehicle (OMFV), and Robotic Combat Vehicle 
(RCV) programs. The committee is also aware that there may be 
commercial operating systems that meet the requirements of the 
URC program and provide equivalent functionality at lower cost. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology, not later 
than January 30, 2022, to provide a briefing to the House Armed 
Services Committee on the Army's development strategy for URC 
including identification and an assessment of any viable 
commercially available alternatives for the URC program.

Request for Briefing on Vehicle Cyber Security Research Center

    The budget request contained $164.9 million in PE 0603462A 
for Next Generation Combat Vehicle advanced technology 
development. The committee recommends $169.9 million, an 
increase of $5.0 million, in PE 0603462A for vehicle cyber 
security research.
    The committee understands the risks that cyber-threats pose 
to the effective and efficient operation of our military and 
commercial vehicles and recognizes that a wide range of 
expertise, resources, and technical capability are necessary to 
address cyber-security challenges. The committee also 
acknowledges that there is both a national security and an 
economic value in collaboration to address these challenges 
through the integration of Department of Defense, federal 
agencies, commercial entities, and academic partners. Private-
public collaboration and formal partnerships are important 
tools for conducting research and innovation, specifically in 
technology and cyber-security programs.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Commander, Army 
Futures Command, not later than February 1, 2022, to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services on the 
feasibility and advisability of establishing a research center 
for vehicle cyber security development and testing either under 
the authority of the U.S. Army Ground Vehicle Systems Center or 
as a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement. This 
briefing should include an assessment of the purposes, 
objectives, governance, facilities and staffing requirements, 
cost estimates, and identification of suitable locations for 
establishment of such a center to support vehicle cyber 
security research, development, and testing.

Thermal imaging and intrusion detection technology

    The committee is aware of technology developing within the 
commercial sector for thermal imaging, analytics, and intrusion 
detection. These technologies are currently used within the 
mining industry and could have potential application to 
Department of Defense systems by increasing capabilities and 
reliability, reducing component size, and come at substantial 
cost savings over legacy systems. The committee encourages the 
military departments to investigate adoption of this technology 
to current and future military applications for thermal imaging 
and intrusion detection requirements.

Vehicle protection systems against unmanned aerial systems

    The committee has consistently supported the Army's efforts 
to identify, develop, integrate, and test various active and 
passive vehicle protection systems (VPS) that would increase 
armored vehicle survivability and protect crew and passengers. 
The Army has examined many technologies with the potential to 
provide such protection from direct fire systems such as 
missiles, rocket-propelled grenades, as well as medium and 
small arms projectiles. The committee is unclear, however, as 
to VPS research or development efforts related to potential 
threats from unmanned aerial systems (UAS).
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary 
of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than January 28, 2022, that addresses the Army's plans 
and activities related to VPS against UAS threats. This 
briefing shall include:
    (1) an assessment of current and future UAS threats to 
armored vehicles;
    (2) the Army's research, development, test, and evaluation 
strategy to identify and examine existing or readily available 
counter-UAS VPS technologies; and
    (3) funding profiles for research and procurement though 
the Future Years Defense Program.

Wearable Gesture Control Technology

    The committee understands the 2019 Army Modernization 
Strategy calls for the development and procurement of tools and 
platforms that increase situational awareness, reduce cognitive 
load, simplify use of unmanned systems, and improve human-
machine connectivity. The committee also understands the Army 
is pursuing gesture control technology, a potential capability 
shared between these priorities that harnesses neural and 
physical gesture impulses to control digital interfaces, 
unmanned systems, and communications. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Army to brief the congressional 
defense committees no later than March 1, 2022, on its efforts 
to integrate gesture control technology into platforms with 
potential compatibility, including but not limited to 
Integrated Visual Augmentation System (IVAS), Android Tactical 
Assault Kit (ATAK), Nett Warrior, Enhanced Night Vision Goggle-
Binocular (ENVG-B), Soldier Borne Sensors, and aerial and 
ground robotics. The briefing shall include, but is not limited 
to, existing capabilities, research and development efforts, 
and potential budget and schedule timelines.

           Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Navy


                       Items of Special Interest


Accelerating supercavitating ammunition

    The committee has been supportive of efforts to test and 
validate supercavitating ammunition technologies. Recent 
reports provided by the Department of Defense to the committee 
demonstrate that this technology fulfills current unmet 
requirements. Specifically, the capability provides increased 
performance over conventional rounds with higher impact energy 
through multiple media while delivering improved precision 
projectiles. The rounds are also meeting capability 
expectations in air to water, water to air, and underwater 
shooting. The committee is concerned that advancements by near-
peer competitors in this area have led to gaps in U.S. Armed 
Forces readiness and lethality capabilities.
    Current reports indicate an intention to begin procurement 
of the capability in fiscal year 2021, and the committee 
encourages the Secretaries of the Army and the Navy to move 
quickly to procure this capability. As the Joint Program 
Executive Office Armaments & Ammunition (JPEO-A&A) is tasked 
with providing superior ammunition to the soldier, the 
committee believes this technology is needed to help them 
fulfill their mission of delivering dominating capabilities to 
the warfighter and urges the JPEO-A&A to formalize this 
capability within a program of record as a component of the 
upcoming Program Objective Memorandum and Budget Estimate 
Submission for fiscal year 2023.

Advanced Low Cost Munition Ordnance

    The committee continues to support accelerating deployment 
of and continued roadmap development of the Advanced Low Cost 
Munition Ordnance 57mm guided projectile, with fire-and-forget 
capability that requires no Littoral Combat Ship fire control 
system changes, to counter the growing threats posed by small 
boat swarms, unmanned aerial systems, and other emerging 
threats.

Assessment of the Naval Air Warfare Center Division

    The committee recognizes the significance of the Naval Air 
Warfare Center Weapons Division (NAWCWD) and the vital 
research, development, acquisition, test, and evaluation of 
U.S. military weapons systems conducted throughout the 
division. NAWCWD leverages its experienced and diverse 
military-civilian personnel workforce to deliver critical 
capabilities to the warfighter that provide tactical advantages 
and carry out complex development, integration, and testing of 
weapon systems. The committee understands that as threats grow 
with the advancement of technology, NAWCWD faces challenges in 
fulfilling its mission. These challenges include funding for 
key sustainment, restoration, and modernization of specialized 
and relevant research and testing capabilities and equipment, 
and increasing workforce recruitment, retention, and expertise. 
The committee believes that given the need for advanced and 
next-generation weapon systems development, a current 
assessment is necessary to provide relevant information on the 
challenges confronting NAWCWD.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
provide a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than December 30, 2021, that assesses the key enabling 
issues and items supporting NAWDC's mission to determine what 
capacity, resources, and infrastructure is required to support 
advanced and next-generation weapon systems development and 
testing activities into the future.

Implementation of the National Security Innovation Partnerships and 
        Integration of the Future of Defense Center and Naval Tech 
        Bridges

    The committee notes that the United States has entered an 
era of great power competition. As the 2021 Interim Strategic 
Guidance suggests: We face a world of rising nationalism, 
receding democracy, growing rivalry with China, Russia, and 
other authoritarian states, and a technological revolution that 
is reshaping every aspect of our lives . . . China, in 
particular, has rapidly become more assertive. It is the only 
competitor potentially capable of combining its economic, 
diplomatic, military, and technological power to mount a 
sustained challenge to a stable and open international system.
    To meet the demands of great power competition, the United 
States must not only compete on the battlefield, but also in 
the technological sphere. To effectively compete and out-
innovate strategic competitors such as China, the committee 
believes the Department of Defense should harness, organize, 
and integrate the talent within the Department, universities, 
and the private sector around critical national security 
problems.
    The committee believes that Hacking for Defense continues 
to be an innovative educational model that could underpin other 
Department innovation efforts. The committee notes that the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public 
Law 115-91) authorized the Secretary of Defense to support 
national security innovation and entrepreneurial education 
including the Hacking for Defense program. The committee 
further notes that the Department has adopted and scaled the 
program and applauds the Department's expansion of this and 
other efforts to scale innovation at the speed of relevance.
    The committee further notes that section 219 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public 
Law 116-283) National Security Innovation Partnerships directed 
the Secretary of Defense to facilitate engagement with academic 
institutions, private sector firms in defense and commercial 
sectors, commercial accelerators and incubators, commercial 
innovation hubs, public sector organizations, and nonprofit 
entities with missions relating to national security innovation 
for the purpose of developing solutions to national security 
and defense problems articulated by entities within the 
Department, including through programs such as the Hacking for 
Defense program. The Office of Naval Research (ONR) has been 
engaged in innovation efforts that are consistent with the 
Hacking for Defense model, and the committee encourages ONR to 
continue supporting the Secretary in executing the direction in 
this section.
    Further, the committee supports the ONR's efforts to train 
and deploy innovation leaders and leverage the Department of 
the Navy's tech bridges to bring new and innovative 
capabilities to the warfighter. Through such efforts, the 
committee believes the Navy will inculcate the foundational 
principles of problem definition and build operational concepts 
through methods such as Lean Startup to allow for faster 
delivery of capability to the warfighter.
    In addition, the committee supports the ONR's establishment 
of the Future for Defense Center. The committee believes such a 
center will help the Department of the Navy study, improve, and 
institutionalize processes that will build and harness the 
national security innovation base.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees by 
April 1, 2022 on how the Department of Defense is integrating 
the Future of Defense Center, the training and deployment of 
innovation leaders, and the Department of the Navy's NavalX 
Tech Bridges and the Centers for Adaptive Warfighting to 
achieve new and innovative technologies at scale. The report 
should include, but not be limited to, the following:
    (1) The authorities the Department of the Navy requires for 
such efforts;
    (2) The required budget to sustain such efforts in the ONR 
in future fiscal years;
    (3) The partnerships that the ONR is undertaking to further 
such efforts;
    (4) Similar efforts within the other United States Armed 
Forces and across the Department of Defense ecosystem;
    (5) A status on the implementation of Section 219 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public 
Law 116-283) National Security Innovation Partnerships; and,
    (6) Any other information the Secretary deems relevant.

MH-60 Service Life Extension Program and modernization

    The budget request contained $46.4 million in PE 0604216N 
for multi-mission helicopter upgrade development.
    The committee is aware that the Navy's MH-60 Seahawk fleet 
is nearing the end of its service life and is slated for a 
service life extension program (SLEP) to avoid creating a gap 
in the helicopter inventory. The committee understands that the 
Navy intends to begin the MH-60S SLEP in 2024, followed by the 
MH-60R approximately 3 years later. The committee notes that 
while a SLEP will extend the service life of these aircraft, 
weight growth, operations in a GPS-denied environment, and 
increased cyber and electronic warfare threats require similar 
attention to keep the aircraft and mission system performance 
relevant through the next decade.
    The committee views scheduling capability upgrades in 
conjunction with the MH-60 SLEP as the most efficient route to 
addressing evolving threats, enhancing performance, and 
resolving obsolescence issues in the MH-60 fleet. The committee 
further notes that the Consolidated Appropriations Act for 
Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-260) included an additional 
$10.0 million for MH-60 upgrades. The committee is aware that 
the Navy intends to utilize this funding to begin integration 
of a digital magnetic anomaly detector, upgrade software and 
mission systems, and address obsolescence issues. The committee 
supports this effort and considers these technology 
improvements as key to reducing future operational risk for the 
upgraded MH-60 fleet.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends $56.4 million, an 
increase of $10.0 million, in PE 0604216N for multi-mission 
helicopter upgrade development, specifically to continue 
development of performance enhancement and threat mitigation 
solutions for integration on the MH-60 helicopter.

Next Generation Jammer high band

    The budget request included $243.9 million in PE 0604274N 
for Next Generation Jammer Increment 1 and $248.0 million in PE 
0604282N for Next Generation Jammer Increment II, but no 
funding for a capability to counter the high band electronic 
warfare threat.
    The committee supports the ongoing development of the 
Department of the Navy's Next Generation Jammer mid and low 
band capabilities but notes that the Navy has yet to begin to 
address the high band threat. The committee is aware that the 
Navy's airborne electronic attack community views a high band 
capability as a top modernization priority and that the 
existing tactical jammer on the EA-18 Growler is not equipped 
to meet evolving threats. The committee concurs with this 
assessment and recognizes the need for an upgraded high band 
jamming capability for the Navy's EA-18 Growler.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $245.4 million, an 
increase of $1.5 million, in PE 0604274N, to include an 
increase of $10.0 million to begin risk reduction on a high 
band electronic attack capability for EA-18G aircraft, and a 
reduction of $8.5 million due to test and evaluation delays.
    The committee further directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees by 
February 1, 2022, on the technical requirements, estimated cost 
and schedule, and acquisition strategy for producing a high 
band capability for the EA-18 Growler. The report should also 
assess the practicality of leveraging the investments already 
made on Next Generation Jammer to develop and field a high band 
capability.

Shipboard High Energy Laser

    The committee is encouraged by the Navy's continued 
progress in testing and deploying High Energy Laser Systems 
(HELS). The integration of the 150kW class Solid State Laser 
Technology Maturation on the USS Portland (Landing Platform/
Dock-27) in 2019 is a significant improvement in lethality over 
the Laser Weapons System and will provide a valuable capability 
to counter unmanned aerial systems and fast inshore attack 
craft, as well as intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance capabilities on its upcoming deployment. The 
committee is also encouraged by the planned integration of the 
60kW HELIOS and 30 kW Optical Dazzler Interdictor Navy on 
identified Arleigh Burke-class destroyer ships beginning in 
2021. The committee is eager to facilitate the widespread 
adoption of this necessary capability, but is concerned about 
inadequate Space, Weight, Power and Cooling, Service Life 
Allowances in currently deployed ships and a robust industrial 
base. Lastly, the committee would like to avoid backfitting 
costs by ensuring future ship design plans include HELS.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by December 
1, 2021, on a plan describing a path forward for integration of 
HEL Systems with more than 150kW of power on the DDG(X) ship 
class, and address installation plans on other surface 
combatants Arleigh Burke-class destroyers.

Silicon carbide power modules

    The committee supports the recommendations in the recently 
updated Naval Power and Energy Systems Technology Development 
Roadmap for development of advanced power electronics, 
including silicon carbide power modules, which can reduce the 
size and weight of power conversion modules and other 
electronic systems needed to power advanced sensors and weapon 
systems. Space is limited on current and legacy Navy ships and 
the committee encourages the Secretary of the Navy to provide 
additional funding to support cost reduction and qualification 
of silicon carbide power modules in order to enable a 
deployment of high-power, mission-critical systems on Navy 
platforms as early as fiscal year 2024.

Transformational Reliable Acoustic Path System

    The committee recognizes the Transformational Reliable 
Acoustic Path System (TRAPS) is a deployable deep-water passive 
undersea sensor, designed to auto-detect and report subsurface 
contacts. The TRAPS system uses a fixed sonar node placed on 
the ocean floor, exploiting the advantages of operating from 
the seafloor, to achieve large-area surveillance. Each node 
communicates back to a floating ``stationary surface node'' 
through a wireless acoustic modem when the ocean floor node 
detects a sound. The committee further recognizes that this 
system gives Navy operators the ability to provide safe havens 
in contested areas for surface fleet vessels and provides added 
capability for Anti-Submarine Warfare (ASW) surveillance. The 
key features of the TRAPS system, in particular, is its small 
footprint and operational flexibility. TRAPS provides reliable 
long-range detection of quiet submarines in open-ocean and key 
transit areas. The committee encourages the Secretary of the 
Navy to continue development of this critical capability.

Virtualization Technology

    The committee is aware of the important role that weapons 
system virtualization technology can play in reducing size and 
weight, streamlining hardware requirements, increasing 
efficiency, and improving capability. Using virtualization 
technology, the Navy was able to run AEGIS Weapon System code 
in a successful live fire engagement in a fraction of the 
original hardware space, allowing that space to be used for 
other purposes. As the information technology needs of deployed 
forces and weapons systems increases, it is important that 
virtualization technology be utilized where appropriate to 
reduce unnecessary hardware requirements while providing safe, 
secure, and interoperable capabilities to the battlefield edge. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Under Secretary of Defense for Research 
and Engineering, the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition 
and Sustainment, and the Director of Operational Test and 
Evaluation, to submit a briefing to the congressional defense 
committees not later than March 1, 2022, on a plan to use 
commercial virtualization technology, such as was used in the 
AEGIS system, in weapon systems and for deployed forces. This 
briefing can accompany or be included in the Digital twin 
assessment required elsewhere in this bill.

         Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force


                       Items of Special Interest


Adaptive Engine Transition Program propulsion system

    The budget request contained $13.5 million in PE 0604004F 
for the Adaptive Engine Transition Program (AETP).
    The committee supports the adaptive cycle engine research 
and development initiative and encourages the Department of 
Defense to transition this technology into the engineering and 
manufacturing development phase quickly. Tactical fighter 
aircraft propulsion is one of the few areas in which the United 
States maintains a distinct advantage over near-peer 
competitors. The F-35 Lightning II is currently planned to 
comprise a significant portion of tactical fighter aircraft 
inventories for the United States and its global partners and 
allies, but it's presenting affordability challenges for all 
involved with the program related to current and forecasted 
sustainment and maintenance costs. According to Air Force 
officials, the AETP technology is predicted to reduce F-35 fuel 
consumption by 25 percent, increase F-35 combat radius 27 
percent, provide a 167 percent increase in F-35 air system 
thermal management capability, and provide a positive impact 
towards environmental considerations. The Department's failure 
to transition the AETP into production at the earliest 
opportunity on the F-35, after reaching appropriate 
technological and production representative maturity, would 
constitute a missed opportunity to capitalize on the more than 
$4.0 billion invested to date in research and development for 
AETP. AETP also presents an opportunity to reduce the current 
unaffordability of the F-35 given currently planned future 
inventory levels and would strengthen F-35 performance 
capabilities. The committee also recognizes the importance of 
maintaining a strong, competitive military engine industrial 
base and the role AETP technology could play in supporting our 
national security strategy for defense and the environment.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $270.5 million, an 
increase of $257.0 million, in PE 0604004F for acceleration and 
integration of AETP into the F-35. The committee also includes 
a provision elsewhere in this title that would require an 
executable and risk informed acquisition strategy for 
integrating and fielding the AETP propulsion system into the F-
35A aircraft be submitted to Congress as part of the fiscal 
year 2023 budget request. The committee also expects the 
Department to evaluate the use and implementation of middle-
tier acquisition authorities enabling rapid prototyping and 
fielding of AETP into F-35A aircraft.

Advanced Battle Management System

    The committee supports the Air Force's November 2020 
decision to restructure the Advanced Battle Management System 
(ABMS) development effort and direct the Air Force Rapid 
Capabilities Office (AFRCO) to assume responsibility for 
producing specific capabilities for fielding to the force. The 
committee agrees with the decision to prioritize tangible 
solutions but emphasizes that questions remain about the 
direction of ABMS. Though the Air Force reduced the amount 
requested under the ABMS budget line, the service also 
requested $82.4 million in PE 0604006F, Department of the Air 
Force Technical Architecture Design, Integration, and 
Evaluation, a new program element to fund technical 
architecture activities. ABMS is now split between two lines of 
effort, architecture and interface development under the Chief 
Architect's purview, and product development managed by AFRCO.
    The committee is concerned with ensuring that ABMS supports 
Air Force all-domain command and control and avoids wasting 
resources on duplicative or low priority solutions. While 
connecting every sensor to every shooter appears a worthy goal, 
the ABMS emphasis on architecture interface development may 
have the undesired effect of locking the Air Force into the 
current centralized command and control process to which the 
Joint Force has become reliant. Concepts, such as the Defense 
Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)'s mosaic warfare 
whereby forces could be recombined to provide more options 
against an adversary, will require decision support tools to 
aid command and control rather than a narrower focus on a pre-
defined communications architecture. The committee encourages 
the Air Force to concentrate on a command, control, and 
communications strategy that maximizes flexibility to avoid 
inadvertently constraining future commanders' options.
    The Air Force should ensure the capabilities ABMS delivers 
support the overarching Joint All Domain Command and Control 
concept. Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller 
General of the United States to conduct a review of ABMS and 
provide the congressional defense committees with a report by 
November 1, 2022. The committee further directs the Comptroller 
General to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by March 15, 2022, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings. The required report shall include, but 
not be limited to, the following elements:
    (1) an evaluation of the Air Force's business case for 
ABMS, such as the acquisition strategy, technology readiness 
assessments, product roadmaps, and cost estimates;
    (2) an assessment of the Air Force's approach to 
prioritizing and developing capabilities to address Combined 
Joint All Domain Command and Control requirements, including 
efforts focused on command and control, and those focused on 
communications;
    (3) an assessment of how AFRCO is evaluating the value of 
its development efforts and obtaining feedback from warfighters 
using these capabilities; and
    (4) an assessment of how AFRCO is ensuring its development 
efforts are not duplicative of the other ongoing programs in 
military departments.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends $178.8 million, a 
reduction of $25.0 million, in PE 0604003F for the Advanced 
Battle Management System and $48.4 million, a reduction of 
$34.0 million, in PE 0604006F, Department of the Air Force 
Technical Architecture Design, Integration, and Evaluation.

Air Force Sensor Open Systems Architecture Standard initiative

    The committee commends the Department of Defense's support 
for Modular Open Systems Architecture (MOSA) in recent years. 
The Air Force's Sensor Open Systems Architecture (SOSA) and the 
Army's Command, Control, Communications, Computers, 
Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (C4ISR) Modular 
Open Suite of Standards (CMOSS) are examples of mature military 
electronics standards initiatives that are proving that 
programs of record can be unified around common modular 
building blocks. Increased use of these standards has the 
potential to increase speed of technology refresh, foster 
industry competition, and reduce the U.S. Government's costs of 
modernization and sustainment.
    The committee notes that the SOSA and CMOSS standards are 
aligned in both hardware and software specifications, creating 
cross-service cooperation and cost savings for the Department 
of Defense (DoD). Nonetheless, the committee understands that 
despite this progress, Department of the Air Force software 
standards are still largely stovepiped along mission or 
capability areas and often not accessible to smaller or non-
traditional defense contractors.
    The committee encourages the Air Force to consider 
leveraging SOSA software and hardware standards across high 
priority sensor and C4ISR programs in support of building a 
true open, common, multi-purpose backbone architecture able to 
incorporate new capability more quickly and at lower cost.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees by March 1, 2022, on plans to accelerate and expand 
implementation of SOSA software and hardware standards. This 
report shall explain:
    (1) How the Air Force intends to leverage SOSA to combine 
mission areas into a common system hardware and software 
ecosystem for multi-mission/multi-intelligence tactical 
communication, C4ISR, electronic warfare, signals intelligence, 
geospatial intelligence, and battlefield embedded computing;
    (2) How the Air Force can maximize the accessibility and 
participation from industry and NATO partners, especially small 
and medium sized traditional and non-traditional defense 
businesses, to build against the SOSA standard;
    (3) How the Air Force will ensure life cycle support of 
future SOSA sensor and C4ISR programs; and,
    (4) How the Air Force will resource future SOSA standard 
research and development efforts such as prototyping, industry 
technical interchanges, a method of SOSA system accreditation/
industry technical interchanges, and efforts to domestically 
source advanced chip technologies and manufacturing of critical 
components for the DoD.

Airborne augmented reality for Air Force pilot training

    The budget request contained $7.1 million in PE 0207701F 
for full combat mission training activities, but did not 
include sufficient funding for airborne augmented reality 
training capability development.
    The committee has been monitoring significant Air Force 
pilot shortfalls for the past two decades but remains concerned 
that minimal progress has been made addressing the issue, 
especially increasing the quantity of tactical fighter aircraft 
pilots. Although initiatives by Air Education and Training 
Command (AETC) and Air Combat Command (ACC), such as Pilot 
Training Next, Undergraduate Pilot training 2.5/3.0, and 
project ``Rebuilding the Forge'', are designed to leverage 
innovative technologies and methodologies to train and field 
fighter pilots faster and to a higher training standard, 
neither AETC nor the ACC has sufficiently supported the 
development optimization of other innovative technologies 
advancing inflight training operations to meet pilot production 
and training requirements. The committee notes that airborne 
augmented reality (AAR) technology currently under evaluation 
by the Air Force Research Laboratory, ACC, and AETC are 
demonstrating great promise at addressing this aspect of 
training.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $16.6 million, an 
increase of $9.5 million, in PE 0207701F for full combat 
mission training activities, to accelerate AAR technologies for 
military pilot training. The committee also expects the 
Secretary of the Air Force to move more rapidly to develop and 
field AAR technologies that will enable significantly improved 
training outcomes, reduced net training costs, and increased 
environmental sustainability.

Common Armament Tester Fighters (CAT-F)

    The committee is aware the Air Force is conducting an 
analysis of alternatives (AoA) to develop a new material 
solution as part of the Air Force Common Armament Tester 
Fighters (CAT-F) program. This program is critical to providing 
a common test capability for fighter aircraft armament systems 
in support of F-15, F-16, A-10, MQ-9, and F-22 aircraft. The 
committee has a strong interest lowering acquisition cost and 
program risk by evaluating and leveraging existing operational 
systems in use across the military services that have the 
potential to meet new mission requirements. The committee 
expects the Air Force to fully consider all available options, 
including Navy test systems now in use, that may have the 
potential to meet Air Force operational requirements while 
delivering enhanced capability faster and at a lower cost.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by March 1, 2022, on its strategy to consider existing 
systems and technologies across the military services with the 
potential to meet CAT-F mission requirements, what systems have 
this potential, and how this information will be assessed and 
incorporated by the Air Force prior to release of the CAT-F 
request for proposal.

Digital engineering design and manufacturing expansion

    The committee supports the Air Force's continued 
development of its advanced manufacturing techniques and 
processes that are predicted to reduce cost and time needed to 
develop, test, and field new weapon systems and capabilities. 
The committee acknowledges the positive impacts that ``e-
Design'' digital engineering initiatives had on the new T-7A 
trainer by nearly eliminating manufacturing rework and touch-
labor hours to assemble the first aircraft. The committee 
believes e-Design and advanced manufacturing processes and 
techniques will allow the Air Force to exchange real-world 
activities with the digital environment, increasing speed and 
agility.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than February 15, 2022, on the Air Force's 
ability to expand digital engineering capabilities to a wider 
range of programs, high-cost structural parts, mission systems, 
and component subsystems. The committee expects the briefing to 
include verifiable information that describes how e-Design 
methodologies and processes will reduce a program's 
maintenance, sustainment, and operations costs during the life-
cycle of the program.

Enhanced connectivity with RC-135 aircraft

    The committee continues to be concerned about networked 
data sharing between intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance (ISR) aircraft and current and advanced next 
generation tactical platforms. The committee is aware of 
disparate efforts aimed at equipping existing tactical and ISR 
aircraft with resilient, low probability of intercept, low 
probability of detection (LPI/LPD) data links for information 
sharing but is unaware of any comprehensive, near-term plan for 
incorporation on existing systems.
    As a high-demand, low-density airborne signals intelligence 
collection platform, the RC-135V/W Rivet Joint is a critical 
node in the Air Force sensing grid, providing sensor processing 
at the tactical edge, electromagnetic support, and tactical and 
beyond line of sight communications capabilities. The committee 
notes that despite the RC-135's expanded tactical role 
delivering time-sensitive situational awareness information 
directly to the warfighter, the Air Force has yet to consider 
utilizing available LPI/LPD data links on the aircraft for 
connectivity with 5th generation systems. Given that the Air 
Force's ISR 2030 plan includes maintaining RC-135 in the 
inventory into the next decade, the committee believes the Air 
Force should prioritize modernized data links for the aircraft 
to ensure maximum interoperability with key weapons systems.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Armed Services 
Committee not later than December 15, 2021, on efforts to 
enhance collaboration between the RC-135 system and current 4th 
and 5th generation platforms and future next generation 
platforms. At a minimum, the briefing shall include:
    (1) an assessment of the existing LPI/LPD networking data 
links in use or technologically suitable for any ISR aircraft 
in the Air Force inventory;
    (2) current communication and information sharing 
capability between RC-135 and 4th and 5th generation aircraft, 
to include types and amount of data able to be shared and an 
assessment of the security and resiliency of each capability;
    (3) any planned future connectivity and data sharing 
capabilities between RC-135 and 5th generation or advanced next 
generation platforms, to include a description of the technical 
requirements, cost, and timeline for integration onto the RC-
135; and
    (4) an analysis of the feasibility, technical requirements, 
and estimated cost of integrating the multifunction advanced 
data link onto the RC-135.

Report on the Agility Prime program of the U.S. Air Force

    The committee recognizes that the U.S. Air Force's Agility 
Prime program is working towards its goal of ensuring a robust 
domestic market for electric vertical takeoff and landing 
(eVTOL) aircraft, as well as introducing the Department of 
Defense to zero emissions aviation. eVTOL aircraft can provide 
the Department with many unique use cases since they are 
electric, have significantly lower noise levels compared to 
today's aircraft, lower maintenance and operating costs, and 
reduced heat signatures. The committee commends the Air Force 
for prioritizing the Agility Prime program and believes that 
continued investment in this technology will help to maintain 
the country's global leadership in the eVTOL market.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than March 30, 2022, on the research, 
development, testing, and acquisition strategy for the Agility 
Prime program. The required report shall address the following 
matters:
    (1) a description and justification for the focus areas of 
the program.
    (2) projected dates for key milestones within the strategy.
    (3) cost estimates and a projected budget for a 5-year 
investment plan.
    (4) a description of how the strategy will improve 
collaboration with the private sector and military exploration 
of these key areas of innovation.
    (5) a description of how the strategy will encourage 
competition and reward innovation for addressing system 
performance requirements.
    (6) policies that could be pursued by the Department to 
ensure global leadership in the sector.
    (7) a projected timeline for acquisition of electric 
aircraft.

T-7 review and program risk assessment

    The budget request contained $188.9 million in PE 0605223F 
for the research and development efforts associated with the 
Air Force T-7 advanced pilot training aircraft that is 
scheduled to replace the T-38C aircraft at various Air Force 
pilot training basing locations in the continental United 
States beginning in the fiscal year 2023 timeframe.
    The committee notes that the T-7 program commenced in 
September 2018 with expectations of low-risk and high-reward 
program execution due to the prime contractor for the program 
using leading-edge, digital engineering design and full-sized 
determinate manufacturing technologies to produce two prototype 
aircraft in near-record time. While the committee appreciates 
the advances in more rapid acquisition practices and aircraft 
manufacturing processes, the committee remains concerned 
regarding the flight science development and supply chain 
establishment for this program. The committee notes that the 
low-rate initial production milestone decision has been 
postponed at least 1 year from the originally planned date due 
to flight science software glitches and challenges associated 
with sourcing and establishing critical parts from the global 
supply chain. Acknowledging that the T-7 aircraft is not 
planned to integrate complex mission systems nor have the 
ability to employ weapons, the committee remains cautiously 
optimistic that the T-7 program will not experience the program 
issues, challenges, and cost overruns that the Air Force has 
seen with other programs.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $170.0 million, a 
decrease of $18.9 million, in PE 0605223F for the research and 
development efforts associated with the Air Force T-7 advanced 
pilot training aircraft. The committee also directs the 
Comptroller General of the United States to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than March 
1, 2022, that provides an assessment of current estimates for 
cost, schedule, contractor performance, technology maturation, 
software development, systems integration, and program risks 
for the development and manufacturing of the T-7 aircraft.

Teamable Attritable Air Vehicles

    The committee is aware of progress made regarding the 
development of teamable attritable air vehicles and believes 
they will play an important role in effectively countering 
anti-access area denial threats. While the Committee encourages 
the continued rapid development of these vehicles under the 
Skyborg Vanguard program, it is concerned by the absence of 
available propulsion systems with cost-optimized limited-life 
design, high-speed maneuverability, and high electrical power 
generation capacity. Modified commercial jet engines currently 
used on Skyborg experimentation demonstrator vehicles do not 
provide the electrical power generation and high-G 
maneuverability necessary for fighter aircraft teaming 
missions, without significant modification. These commercial 
engines are also designed for thousands of flight hours, which 
are excessive compared to the Department's requirements for 
attritable vehicles, resulting in unnecessarily high 
acquisition and operating costs.
    The committee is encouraged by the Air Force Research 
Laboratory's effort to develop long-term propulsion solutions 
for attritable air vehicles under the Attritable Cost-Optimized 
Limited-Life Engine Technologies program and believes these 
activities must be appropriately funded in Fiscal Year 2022 
(FY22) and beyond to ensure parity with ongoing airframe 
systems development. Therefore, the committee directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering to provide a 
briefing to the congressional defense committees by June 30, 
2022 on a roadmap for the development of teamable attritable 
aircraft and high-speed attritable propulsion starting in FY22.

        Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Space Force


                       Items of Special Interest


Space Force higher education strategy

    The committee appreciates the Space Force's establishment 
of a Chief Scientist, a Chief Technology and Innovation 
Officer, and a University Partnership Program as part of its 
efforts to improve its science and technology strategic vision 
and execution as well as its access to the talent, research 
expertise, and technological capabilities resident in 
universities. The committee directs the Chief of Space 
Operations to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services not later than January 31, 2022, that assess the 
effectiveness of the Space Force's higher education strategy in 
creating long-term, strategic relationships; in developing 
talent; and in providing access to expertise and engineering, 
research, and development capability. The briefing should 
outline the Space Force's strategy to engage higher education, 
to include minority institutions, in foundational research in 
disciplines that the Chief determines to be critical to the 
mission of the Space Force, and what role the University 
Partnership Program plays in that strategy.

University Consortium for Space Technology Development

    The Committee recognizes the need to accelerate the 
transition of fundamental research and early-stage technology 
development into integrated systems capable of aiding the 
national security space enterprise. Specifically, the Committee 
recognizes and values the critical role universities play in 
spurring transformational research and technology development 
within the space domain. Given the diverse and highly technical 
needs of the Space Force, the Committee supports the 
development of a university-led consortium that addresses and 
facilitates the advancement of capabilities related to space 
domain awareness; position, navigation, and timing; autonomy; 
data analytics; communications; space-based power generation; 
and space applications for cybersecurity. The Committee directs 
the Chief of Space Operations, in coordination with the Chief 
Scientist of the Space Force, to establish a university 
consortium for space technology development that will support 
the Space Force's research, development and demonstration needs 
in these areas and others as needed. This university consortium 
should also promote the education and training for students in 
order to support the nation's future national security space 
workforce.

       Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-Wide


                       Items of Special Interest


5G Open Radio Access Network

    The Committee notes that the Department of Defense and the 
military Services manage a number of 5G programs. The Committee 
further notes that 5G offers the potential for significant 
strategic and tactical improvements and advantages for the 
Department of Defense as well as the American people. The 
Committee is concerned that to date, the Department of Defense 
does not appear to have developed a well-coordinated 5G effort.
    The Committee is aware that the Executive Order on 
Promoting Competition in the American Economy reads in part 
that the Administration supports the ``continued development 
and adoption of 5G Open Radio Access Network (O-RAN) protocols 
and software, continuing to attend meetings of voluntary and 
consensus-based standards development organizations, so as to 
promote or encourage a fair and representative standard-setting 
process, and undertaking any other measures that might promote 
increased openness, innovation, and competition in the markets 
for 5G equipment;''
    The Committee believes continued support and increased 
attention on the development and adoption of O-RAN in 5G could 
result in a downstream effect, whereby the United States 
becomes less dependent on foreign sourced technology. The 
Committee believes O-RAN, if more broadly supported, adopted, 
and deployed, will contribute to an environment of increased 
competition by new and innovative, competitive suppliers, 
leading to a more robust domestic supply chain that is able to 
develop more organically.
    The Committee supports 5G Open Radio Access Network (O-RAN) 
because it promotes competition. To this end, the Committee is 
extremely supportive of efforts and collaborations helping 
support the development of a healthy, domestic, multivendor 
supply base of O-RAN equipment and software providers.
    Therefore, the Committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, by March 31, 2022, to 
provide a briefing to the Senate Committee on Armed Services 
and the House Committee on Armed Services on the steps the 
Department is taking to support 5G and O-RAN. The report shall 
address how the Department is supporting the development of a 
domestic industrial base for 5G.
    Additionally, the Committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, in coordination with 
the Senior Official for 5G, to provide a report to the Senate 
Committee on Armed Services and the House Committee on Armed 
Services by March 31, 2022 regarding the Department of 
Defense's ability to carry out 5G research, prototyping and 
production projects utilizing existing consortia, as well as 
the advisability of creating one or more additional consortia 
in order to address the specific needs of the 5G Wireless 
Networking Cross Functional Team and others.

Advanced Development of Chemical and Biological Detection Media

     The budget request contained $56.4 million in PE 0602144A 
for RDT&E, Army, Ground Technology. The committee recognizes 
that there are emerging technology opportunities in the field 
of bioaerosol and chemical detection, collection, and analysis. 
The committee believes the Department of Defense should 
sufficiently resource these emerging chemical and biological 
threats. Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of 
$5.0 million, in PE 0602144A to support development of a small 
lightweight wearable sensor for real-time detection of chemical 
and biological threat agents.

Advanced electronic warfare capabilities

    The committee is aware that the Department of Defense views 
advanced electronic warfare techniques, such as adaptive and 
cognitive capabilities, as key attributes of future electronic 
warfare (EW) systems. Adaptive EW applies artificial 
intelligence and machine learning to EW systems to identify 
unknown signals and generate a counter response to those 
characterized as threats. Cognitive systems aim to condense the 
detection-to-response timeline significantly through near-real 
time learning and response. A true cognitive EW capability will 
be able to identify previously unknown signals and generate 
near-real time countermeasures as these new signals are 
characterized. It is the committee's understanding that it may 
take months to incorporate emerging threat detection capability 
into current airborne EW systems.
    The Department of the Air Force Electromagnetic Spectrum 
Superiority Strategy, released publicly in April 2021, states 
that anticipatory cognitive systems and platform-agnostic 
applications comprise the core of the service's modernization 
plan. While the Navy has yet to update its own electromagnetic 
spectrum strategy, the committee is aware of ongoing research 
and development of adaptive EW capabilities within the Navy. 
The committee is concerned, however, with the pace of 
development of true cognitive electronic warfare capabilities. 
While the committee understands and supports the effort to 
field near-term improved EW systems to Navy and Air Force 
airborne fleets, the committee believes greater emphasis should 
be placed on cognitive and other advanced techniques.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force, in coordination with the Secretary of the Navy, to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees by 
April 1, 2022, on current research, development, and 
procurement programs in progress with the goal of fielding 
advanced or cognitive EW capabilities to their respective 
airborne fleets. The report should include, at a minimum: 
descriptions of the cognitive and advanced EW technologies and 
techniques in research, development, and acquisition; the 
intended or potential application of these technologies and 
techniques; the estimated Technology Readiness Level of each 
project; costs already invested and the planned budget through 
the Future Years Defense Program for each project; and any 
identified technology or resource challenges associated with 
integration and implementation in the airborne fleet.

Advancing Gaming, Exercising, Modeling, and Simulation capabilities

    The committee is aware of the Defense Science Board's final 
report on Gaming, Exercising, Modeling, and Simulation (GEMS), 
which concluded that the Department of Defense must 
significantly advance its capabilities to keep pace with 
competitors and effectively counter threats, both today and in 
the future. Therefore, the committee directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by January 
15, 2022, on current and contemplated efforts to invest in and 
improve Gaming, Exercising, Modeling, and Simulation innovation 
across the analytical community within the Department of 
Defense. The briefing should include planned or ongoing 
efforts, assessments and evaluation, and investments in:
    (1) digital engineering to support an enterprise-level GEMS 
strategy that would promote effective adoption of improved 
tools.
    (2) training and experimentation augmented and facilitated 
by tools to help inform better implementation of modeling and 
simulation to discover new tactics and concepts and improve 
warfighter performance and readiness in the face of emerging 
threats from peer competitors.
    (3) better strategic data collection and use and improved 
modeling and simulation to enable the evaluation and testing of 
high-level geopolitical strategies with long time horizons.
    (4) integrating the use of technology-based enablers such 
as game engines and synthetic environments for a wide variety 
of Department of Defense missions.
    (5) promoting effective GEMS governance to enable the 
proper coordination of activities and uses across the 
Department and the wider national security enterprise.

Aircraft ejection seat spinal injuries assessment

    The committee understands Department of Defense Military 
Handbook-516C (MIL-HNBK-516C) defines modern ejection related 
injury criteria and that change-notice five to that 
publication, issued in 2016, established abbreviated index 
scale (AIS) level-two as the standard which provides aircrew 
the ability to successfully escape and evade post-ejection. 
Injuries which preclude post-ejection aircrew the ability to 
escape and evade are classified as AIS level-three.
    The committee notes that spinal injuries sustained during 
the ejection and escape sequence and subsequent landing can 
result in hospitalization, chronic pain and mobility 
limitations, and permanent disability that adversely affects 
long-term quality of life. In combat scenarios, certain types 
of ejection related spinal injuries could pose a serious 
challenge for aircrew trying to escape and evade enemy capture. 
The committee expects that any ejection system technology in 
development or production should strive to eliminate lower-back 
spinal fractures and lumbar compression injuries to escaping 
aircrews. However, the committee notes that fulsome ejection-
related injury data is difficult to ascertain by ejection seat 
manufacturers because of data-sharing policy differences and 
mechanisms in place by each military service and how the 
services categorize and assess ejection seat injuries, thereby 
complicating a comprehensive evaluation of ejection system 
performance across the Department.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with the Secretary of the Air Force and 
Secretary of the Navy, to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees not later than March 1, 2022, that analyzes 
and summarizes spinal-fracture and lumbar compression injuries 
that have occurred during ejections from Department of Defense 
aircraft between 1985 and present day. The report should also 
contain a comparison of performance between different ejection 
and escape systems, including an analysis of AIS level-2 and 
level-3 injuries, and information regarding future acquisition 
and ejection seat upgrades for ejection and escape systems that 
will minimize injury and increase survivability. The committee 
also expects the Department to implement standardized policies 
that facilitate inter-service exchange of ejection event safety 
and injury-related data and information.

Artificial intelligence for Small Unit Maneuver

    The budget request contained $145.8 million in PE 1160408BB 
for Operational Enhancements.
    The committee recognizes the need to increase investments 
in artificial intelligence/machine learning (AI/ML) enabled 
autonomous systems. The committee supports the shift from 
inadequate legacy platforms and weapons systems to increased 
investment in cutting-edge technologies and capabilities needed 
to support strategic competition with near-peer adversaries.
    The committee supports the efforts of U.S. Special 
Operations Command (USSOCOM) to accelerate the development and 
employment of AI/ML applications and AISUM, which can augment 
the warfighter by enhancing operational maneuver and lethality.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $195.8 million, an 
increase of $50.0 million, in PE 1160408BB for AISUM.
    Further, the committee directs the Commander, USSOCOM to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
December 31, 2021, on the planned resourcing, development, and 
transition roadmap for AISUM. The briefing shall include 
anticipated operational applications of enhanced development of 
AISUM technologies, and an assessment of these technologies and 
their application to support the Joint Force in near-peer 
competition, GPS-denied, and anti-access/area denial (A2/AD) 
environments.

Comptroller General Report on STEM and AI Workforce Development

    The National Security Commission on Artificial 
Intelligence's (AI) final report highlighted that the 
Department of Defense and the Intelligence Community both face 
an alarming talent deficit in their digital and AI workforce 
and that America is not prepared to defend or compete in the AI 
era--a reality that demands comprehensive, whole-of-nation 
action. China's ambition to surpass the United States as the 
world's AI leader within a decade should be taken seriously. To 
address this daunting challenge, the Commission emphasized that 
the government must expand science, technology, engineering, 
and mathematics (STEM), to include AI, talent pipelines from 
universities to government service, to include streamlining the 
hiring process and building new training infrastructure such as 
a digital service academy. In 2018 the Comptroller General 
evaluated federal investment in STEM education fields and found 
that government efforts to assess the performance of STEM 
programs are limited and hinder efforts to identify effective 
programs. The United States government, and particularly the 
Department, cannot afford to fall behind in the development of 
a robust STEM workforce when AI and other emerging technology 
tools will be vital in future conflicts.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than March 31, 2022, with a report to follow on the 
Department's--including the defense intelligence components'--
progress in developing a robust STEM, to include AI, workforce. 
The review shall assess the Department's:
    (1) current organization and workforce planning process for 
their STEM, to include AI, workforce needs, including the 
identification of STEM skills and the resources currently 
dedicated to the hiring, training, and retention of their STEM 
workforces;
    (2) plans and efforts to expand hiring in their STEM 
workforce, including collaboration with industry and academia, 
the broadening of recruiting pipelines, and mechanisms to 
attract the best AI talent;
    (3) efforts to grow the training infrastructure for their 
STEM workforce, such as special schools or online training 
programs, and continuing professional education; and
    (4) efforts to improve the retention and visibility of 
their STEM workforce, including the availability of non-
financial benefits, the implementation of flexible career 
paths, and the development of management structures to enhance 
the workforce.

Counter Unmanned Aerial Systems (C-UAS) Development, Testing and 
        Fielding

    The committee supports the Department of Defense (DOD) and 
Joint Counter Unmanned Aerial Systems (C-UAS) Office (JCO) 
efforts to identify gaps and prioritize CUAS solutions. 
However, the committee is concerned that the rapidly evolving 
threat of advanced autonomous aerial systems could, at its 
current rate, continue to outpace DOD capabilities. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, not later than 
March 1, 2022, provide the House Armed Services Committee a 
briefing on its plan to rapidly develop, test, and field C-UAS 
systems. The briefing shall include a DOD UAS global threat 
assessment, a summary of DOD C-UAS capability requirements; and 
an identification and assessment of:
    (1) C-UAS systems under development by both DOD and the 
private sector, if any, including schedules for their current 
and planned testing;
    (2) existing and developmental systems' capability to 
counter advanced threat UAS including their ability to 
integrate with existing DOD air defense networks;
    (3) existing and developmental C-UAS systems ability to 
detect, track and kill individual drones or swarms;
    (4) their ability to protect rapidly deploying and mobile 
forces and operator safety;
    (5) potential policies impacting C-UAS fielding; and
    (6) an overall assessment of funding to include projected 
shortfalls and alternative near-term funding opportunities in 
order to rapidly develop, test and field C-UAS capabilities 
from now and over the next five years.

Critical Shortage of STEM Professionals

    The committee remains concerned that the Department of 
Defense continues to face a critical shortage of science, 
technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professionals, 
both among the uniformed military and the Department civilian 
workforce. As the Department continues its modernization 
efforts, these shortages will only increase in severity. High 
demand among private technology companies has dramatically 
increased the average salaries for STEM professionals, making 
recruiting and retention for the government even more 
challenging.
    The committee notes that, until now, the Department has 
compensated for many of these critical shortages by relying on 
contractors to provide needed support in critical STEM fields. 
However, contractors are now having difficulty attracting and 
retaining STEM talent because statutory caps on allowable 
contractor compensation have not kept pace with salary 
inflation in certain in demand STEM fields. Congress 
contemplated this problem might occur when establishing the 
caps, and therefore included section 2324(e)(1)(P) of Title 10, 
United States Code, which enables the Secretary of Defense to 
establish an exception to the compensation limit for 
``positions in the science, technology, engineering, 
mathematics, medical, and cybersecurity fields and other fields 
requiring unique areas of expertise upon a determination that 
such exceptions are needed to ensure that the Department of 
Defense has continued access to needed skills and 
capabilities.'' Yet the committee is unclear as to whether this 
exception has been effectively used.
    Section 245 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) directed the Department 
to develop programs and incentives to ensure the Department's 
contractors are engaging with schools and universities to 
encourage students to pursue STEM education. However, once 
students are educated in STEM fields, they tend to gravitate 
toward jobs at private technology firms that do not have 
restrictions on how much they can be paid. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a report 
to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives by March 1, 2022, on the following matters:
    (1) For Calendar Years 2019 and 2020, the number of times 
the exception under section 2324(e)(1)(P) of title 10, United 
States Code, has been used by an executive agency and the 
specific circumstances under which it was used.
    (2) How the Federal Acquisition Regulation, which requires 
an agency head using the exception to analyze each individual 
contractor employee to determine whether that individual's 
position should be exempted, rather than allowing the general 
exemption of certain types or classes of positions, affects the 
Department's use of this exception.
    (3) How is the Department engaging with contractors to 
address rapidly rising wages in the competitive STEM labor 
market?
    (4) Any other matters the Secretary determines relevant to 
the issue of compensation for STEM professionals.

Data storage capabilities for special operations forces

    The budget request included $93.4 million in PE 1160402BB 
for special operations forces advanced technology development.
    The committee is encouraged by U.S. Special Operations 
Command's efforts to develop scalable, platform-agnostic data 
storage system solutions and the use of the Small Business 
Innovation Research program to identify relevant and 
commercially viable small business-developed technologies. The 
committee recognizes the long-term value in maximizing the 
utility of existing and future data streams with machine-to-
machine communications in a platform agnostic tool environment. 
Furthermore, the committee notes that advances in common data 
standards can rapidly identify and extract information of value 
across available data sources while leveraging advances in 
artificial intelligence, machine learning, and computer vision. 
Finally, the committee recognizes the strategic value across a 
broad range of military applications where special operations 
forces require access to large scale common data standards and 
must avoid the risks associated with vendor lock.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $98.4, an increase of 
$5.0 million, in PE 1160402BB, for the further development and 
fielding of a platform-agnostic data storage system.

Defense Innovation Unit assessment

    The committee is concerned that the Defense Innovation Unit 
(DIU) does not have an adequate size and composition of 
personnel to accomplish its mission. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than March 31, 2022, on the DIU that 
includes:
    (1) a determination of the appropriate size and composition 
of personnel to accomplish the organization's mission;
    (2) an assessment of whether existing structures, offices, 
and personnel are appropriately resourced to accomplish the 
organization's mission;
    (3) an assessment of any additional authorities that would 
assist the organization and its affiliated entities in better 
accomplishing its mission; and
    (4) an assessment of the structure, personnel, resources, 
and field offices that would be sufficient in fulfilling the 
organization's responsibilities and requirements.
    The report shall be submitted in unclassified form that can 
be made available to the public.

Development of High Mach and Hypersonic Aircraft

    The committee is encouraged by recent efforts to mature 
technologies necessary to develop reusable high-mach and 
hypersonic aircraft. The reports required by the Fiscal Year 
2021 National Defense Authorization Act and Intelligence 
Authorization Act mandated hypersonic flight roadmaps, which 
demonstrates that these reusable aircraft have the potential to 
expand operational capability in intelligence, surveillance, 
and reconnaissance and low-cost responsive space access, 
mitigating the threat posed by traditional anti-access/area-
denial systems and providing critical intelligence collection 
resiliency. The committee supports ongoing investments by the 
Department of Defense to deliver reusable high-mach flight 
capability in 2030, including near-term development and testing 
of high-mach propulsion, high-temperature materials, and 
hypersonic test facilities. The committee further believes that 
effective development of reusable high-mach flight capabilities 
will likely comprise integration of unique intelligence related 
mission requirements early in the development cycle.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, in coordination with 
the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence and Security, 
to provide a report no later than April 15, 2022, to the 
congressional defense committees on the Department's ability to 
meet intelligence capability requirements as described in the 
Department's hypersonic flight roadmap, as well as explain any 
significant divergence in strategy or schedule. The report 
should also describe consultation and joint development 
activities with the intelligence community on research, 
development, test, and evaluation of reusable hypersonic flight 
platforms.

Digital Engineering Infrastructure and Workforce Development

    The Committee is concerned about the pace of weapon systems 
development at the Department of Defense and the ability of the 
Department's acquisition system to overcome the increasing 
threats posed by our adversaries. Current model-based system 
engineering, as a part of digital engineering practices, offers 
the Department transparency, flexibility, rigor in 
communication, analysis, quality control, and an increase in 
the efficiency in engineering and acquisition practices.
    The committee urges Department components to embrace and 
resource their digital engineering infrastructure and workforce 
skill development needed to practically implement digital 
practices using state-of-the-practice methods and techniques. 
The Committee encourages the services to consider establishing 
partnerships with academic institutions to create consortia 
which can act as centers of excellence and promulgate best 
practices across the Department's research and development 
programs.
    Therefore, the Committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Research and Engineering to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2022, on the 
status of the Department's adoption and implementation of 
digital engineering, including, but not limited to:
    (1) The workforce skill development required;
    (2) Implementation best practices from across the 
Department's research and development ecosystem, grouped by 
domain, enterprise, or functional area;
    (3) Efforts to increase adoption and improve the use of 
digital engineering across the Department and the defense 
industrial base; and
    (4) The amount of funding provided across the Department 
for this effort.

Digital twin assessment and agile verification processes

    Implementation of the Software Acquisition Pathway directed 
in section 800 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) and the digital 
engineering capability to automate testing and evaluation 
effort directed in section 231 of Public Law 116-92 have made 
it clear that digital twins are a critical enabler to extending 
the efficacy and efficiency of continuous integration/
continuous delivery (CI/CD) approaches beyond simple 
information technology systems. This extension includes systems 
that have joint and systems-of-systems warfighting 
requirements, as well as those in which battlefield 
complexities become a more prominent factor in survivability 
and effectiveness. The committee is concerned that many 
acquisition programs do not develop digital twins at all, or 
they develop twins that are not adequate for test and 
evaluation purposes.
    The determination of a digital twin's adequacy is a lengthy 
process often appended to the development of a model later, and 
at a time when most resources have already been exhausted. When 
the digital twin evolves from an engineering baseline as the 
program develops, the adequacy of that twin can evolve in a 
more iterative and incremental way that builds a body of 
evidence over time.
    The committee believes the use of digital twins must be a 
more prevalent practice in the Department of Defense. To that 
end, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Under Secretary of Defense for Research 
and Engineering and Director of Operational Test and Evaluation 
(DOT&E), to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than March 1, 2022, that assesses:
    (1) the state of digital twin practices in the Department. 
This assessment should include how many programs on the 
Software Acquisition Pathway or under DOT&E oversight are 
applying CI/CD methodologies and have built or are planning to 
build digital twins. It should also include information on the 
extent to which these twins are adequate to support test and 
evaluation as part of a CI/CD process, and where gaps continue 
to exist.
    (2) the existing verification, validation, and 
accreditation body of work, and provide recommendations on how 
adequacy can be developed and determined in a more agile 
process as the digital twin evolves, instead of through a 
waterfall process enacted at the end of the digital twin 
development.

Emerging Tech Adoption Training

    The committee notes the importance of Department of Defense 
efforts to train its active duty and civilian workforce on 
innovation and technology adoption. The committee recognizes 
that the Department is offering training programs on these 
topics through both program offices and private sector 
organizations. As emerging technologies hold the ability to 
have a disruptive impact on U.S. national security, the 
committee understands the importance of ensuring the DoD is 
trained and prepared to identify, acquire, and integrate 
innovative technologies. The committee directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, in 
coordination with the Under Secretary of Defense for Research 
and Engineering, to submit a report to the House Armed Services 
Committee by March 31, 2022 on the current status of the 
Department's emerging technology adoption training programs. 
The report shall include:
    (1) a detailed description of the types of training 
programs already underway on these subjects and the 
professional series of the participants;
    (2) the metrics collected on workforce performance 
following each program (to include the rate of adoption of 
emerging technologies and innovative contracting methods);
    (3) a list of the Department and private sector 
organizations providing the training programs;
    (4) a description of any plans to expand the training 
programs; and
    (5) a discussion of any authorities or funding needed to 
support expanded trainings.

Establishing a National Network for Microelectronics Research and 
        Development

    The committee recognizes that semiconductors are essential 
components in the electronic devices that Americans use every 
day. The committee also recognizes that the COVID-19 pandemic 
has highlighted weaknesses in our nation's reliance on supply 
chains abroad, particularly with regard to semiconductor 
manufacturing. The Committee believes that the United States 
must commit to translating innovations that occur inside the 
laboratory to the marketplace--commonly referred to as ``lab to 
fab'' capability--to support American manufacturing jobs and 
prevent the United States from falling further behind other 
countries in semiconductor manufacturing. Specifically, the 
committee believes it is important to establish a national 
network for microelectronics research and development, composed 
of United States research universities, to increase American 
``lab to fab'' capability; conduct microelectronics research 
and development; aid in workforce development; and increase 
supply chain resiliency for United States semiconductor 
production.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 31, 2022, on efforts to establish a national network for 
microelectronics research and development composed of United 
States research universities. The report shall include:
    (1) opportunities to explore new cost-effective materials, 
devices, and architectures, and prototyping in facilities at 
United States research universities to safeguard domestic 
intellectual property;
    (2) opportunities to accelerate the transition of new 
technologies to domestic microelectronics manufacturers;
    (3) an assessment of United States research universities 
that can join the network through a competitive process; and
    (4) how the Department can ensure that research and 
development participants in the network represent the 
geographic diversity of the United States.

F-35 breathing system disruptions

    The committee is aware that U.S. F-35 pilots interviewed by 
the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Engineering 
and Safety Center, during the recent study that assessed the F-
35 pilot breathing system, stated that perturbations in F-35 
breathing systems present a hazard to operations. The committee 
notes that the study found that pilots who have suffered 
physiological episodes in the F-35 fault the breathing system 
for acute and chronic health conditions that have caused 
impairment for days, weeks, months, or longer. Pilots reported 
that interactions with the F-35 breathing system have resulted 
in symptoms ranging from confusion, distraction, extreme 
discomfort and persistent fatigue, as well as lung inflammation 
resulting in permanent dysfunction. The committee also notes 
that F-35 pilots have regularly labeled certain F-35 aircraft 
as having consistently more difficult breathing systems than 
other aircraft. The study also noted significant differences 
between the two F-35 aircraft that were assessed in the study, 
as well as, between both F-35 aircraft and prior generation 
aircraft breathing systems in terms of breathing dynamics and 
functionality. Furthermore, the study noted that F-35 pilot and 
F-35 jet disharmony could create stress on the pilot and result 
in discomfort, fatigue, and may ultimately lead to short-term 
or long-term physiological damage to the pilot.
    Therefore, the committee includes a provision elsewhere in 
this title that would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Administrator of the National Aeronautics 
and Space Administration, to design and conduct thorough 
testing of the F-35 pilot breathing system and then implement 
immediate actions to resolve deficiencies that may be 
discovered. Lastly, the committee finds it unacceptable and 
disappointing that the Department of Defense must be 
continually prodded by Congress to conduct testing, 
assessments, and resolution of physiological episodes and poor 
performing pilot breathing systems in military aircraft, 
similar to what was required in recent years to address 
significant issues with pilot breathing systems in the F-22, T-
6, T-45, and F/A-18 aircraft.

Fielding of Counter-Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems Across the Joint 
        Force

    The committee understands that the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment designated an Executive 
Agent for Counter-Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (C-sUAS). The 
committee included language in the fiscal year 2021 NDAA 
Conference Report requiring the Executive Agent to ``prioritize 
the objective of developing and executing a plan to develop, 
test, and begin production of a counter unmanned aircraft 
system that can be fielded as early as fiscal year 2021 to meet 
immediate operational needs in countering Group 1, 2, and 3 
unmanned aircraft systems and, to the extent practical, has the 
potential to counter other, larger unmanned aircraft systems.'' 
The committee is concerned about the increasing threats to US 
forces by UAS, including swarms, and believes certain 
commercial solutions, if tested and proven suitable and 
effective, can be acquired, tested, and fielded at a faster 
rate than what is occurring today. The committee also believes 
that dynamic live-fire testing, demonstrations, and competitive 
shoot-offs can be effective ways to comparatively evaluate 
systems and accelerate their acquisition. Therefore the 
committee directs the Executive Agent for C-sUAS, not later 
than March 1, 2022, to brief the House Armed Services Committee 
on plans, if any, to expedite the identification, live-fire 
testing, acquisition, and fielding of commercial C-sUAS 
solutions suitable and effective for use at forward deployed 
locations.

High Energy Laser System Power and Thermal Management

    The Committee notes with concern the recent decision by a 
major defense contractor to exit the Directed Energy Mobile 
Short-Range Air Defense program following repeated failure of 
its power and thermal management system. The Committee 
recognizes the need for expanded investment in power and 
thermal management systems as the Office of the Secretary of 
Defense (OSD) and the military services seek to increase the 
power of high energy laser systems. The Committee supports OSD 
and service efforts to increase high energy laser power levels, 
but remains concerned about the strength and breadth of the 
industrial base in key enabling technology areas, including 
power and thermal management.
    Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to brief the House Armed Services Committee not later than June 
1, 2022 on plans to budget for and invest in the development of 
power and thermal management subsystems, as well as the 
integration of those subsystems with OSD and service-led high 
energy laser activities in the timeframes described in the 
Directed Energy Roadmap.

Mobile Compact High Energy Laser

    The budget request contained $145.8 million in PE 1160408BB 
for Operational Enhancements.
    The committee recognizes the value in ruggedized, mobile, 
compact high energy laser technologies that can be moved, 
assembled, and operated by special operations forces in austere 
environments. These technologies are ideal for clandestine 
engagement from safe distances, without detectable signatures, 
to disable or destroy enemy critical equipment and 
infrastructure. The committee recognizes that recent advances 
in relevant technologies are rapidly maturing laser systems 
that can be adapted to a variety of tactical configurations to 
support multiple mission areas.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $163.8 million, an 
increase of $18.0 million, in PE 1160408BB for mobile high-
energy laser technologies.

Naval aviation dedicated operational test capacity reductions

    The committee understands that the Secretary of the Navy 
plans to significantly reduce, by nearly half, the dedicated 
capacity and aviation force structure during fiscal year 2022 
that supports critical testing and evaluation activities for 
various Department of the Navy acquisition programs and 
modernization projects. Additionally, the committee understands 
that the Secretary of the Navy plans to mitigate planned 
testing capacity reductions by randomly tasking non-testing 
certified naval fleet operational aviation units and non-
testing qualified operational unit personnel with resourcing, 
planning, and executing complex and rigorous testing activities 
that would normally be conducted by highly trained and 
qualified Navy operational testing personnel with specialized 
aircraft and instrumentation to collect and subsequently 
analyze critical data gained during testing events. The 
committee believes that a reduction of this magnitude without 
sufficiently analyzing risk to programs could adversely affect 
the quality of testing and evaluation for weapons systems and 
mission systems before being declared operationally suitable 
and effective prior to being operationally fielded to Sailors 
and Marines.
    Therefore, the committee includes a provision elsewhere in 
this title that would prohibit the Secretary of the Navy from 
reducing any dedicated aviation operational testing capacity or 
aircraft force structure during fiscal year 2022. Additionally, 
the provision would require the Director of Operational Test 
and Evaluation to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees that assesses the risk associated with such a 
significant reduction in dedicated naval aviation operational 
testing capacity.

Prioritizing retrofit of the C-130 with autonomous flight capabilities

    The committee notes the utility of the C-130 aircraft as a 
critical multi-mission capability for the Department of 
Defense. As suggested by the House Committee on Armed Services 
Future of Defense Task Force, the Department should consider 
ways in which artificial intelligence/machine learning (AI/ML) 
and autonomous capabilities can be integrated into existing 
platforms.
    The committee is aware of U.S. Special Operations Command's 
use of AI/ML for predictive maintenance on special operations 
forces (SOF)-peculiar air platforms, and appreciates the impact 
such capability can have on the avionics of Air Force Special 
Operations Command (AFSOC) capabilities to provide autonomous 
flight in existing capabilities. Integrating AI/ML-enabled 
autonomous technology into SOF-peculiar platforms, such as the 
C-130, could greatly enhance operational service time and 
enable the Department to more effectively utilize current 
platforms and resources instead of pursuing acquisition of new 
capabilities. Further, the committee encourages the Department 
to consider commercially available AI/ML-enabled autonomous 
technologies, such as those being tested by AFSOC, to lower 
cost and risk across the Joint Force. The committee also 
recommends other military services consider how emergent 
commercial technologies, such as automation, can be included in 
fixed-wing fleet modernization efforts.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than December 31, 2021, on the efforts underway by AFSOC 
to incorporate autonomous capabilities into the SOF-peculiar C-
130 platform. The briefing shall include a timeline, 
milestones, expected final operating capability for development 
and operational deployment of these capabilities, and whether 
there are any challenges to integrating commercially available 
technologies into this platform.

Report on flexible funding for transitioning science and technology

    The committee is concerned that the Department of Defense 
struggles to transition and scale critical innovative 
technologies from development projects to acquisition programs 
in a time period that meets the needs of the warfighter and 
ensures technology providers are able to survive. Despite 
Congress providing significant new acquisition authorities and 
flexibilities, too often successful prototypes and pilot 
efforts are unable to transition to successful programs due to 
a lack of agile funding. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Deputy Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees by July 1, 2022, with an 
evaluation of the barriers preventing the Department from 
quickly and successfully scaling innovative technologies to 
support the warfighter and the Department's critical 
operational needs. This report shall include:
    (1) a description of the systemic challenges associated 
with scaling innovation, including requirements, acquisition, 
programming, and culture; and
    (2) a discussion of whether flexible funding could help 
bridge critical innovative technologies into programs of 
record.
    The committee further directs the Deputy Secretary of 
Defense to include a framework for how the Department would 
execute any flexible funding for transitioning science and 
technology, including:
    (1) a list of critical operational needs to be addressed;
    (2) a recommendation of the level of funding required and 
appropriate award size;
    (3) the government entity best suited to execute and 
oversee the funding until the program is included in the Fiscal 
Year Defense Plan (FYDP);
    (4) the metrics by which a project will be selected for 
funding and the success or failure of the transition assessed;
    (5) how to prioritize innovative performers with clearly 
demonstrated and successful past performance;
    (6) a plan of action and milestones for selected projects 
from time of identification to time of funding;
    (7) how to ensure such projects are successfully integrated 
into the FYDP and transitioned to service program executive 
offices; and
    (8) the frequency and substance of congressional reporting 
recommended to ensure transparency throughout the selection and 
transition process.
    The Deputy Secretary may consider in this report any 
additional recommendations that would support successful 
transition of technology pilot and prototype programs to scale 
to address defined mission requirements, critical operational 
needs, or emerging threats.

Solid rocket motors

    The committee notes the diminishing domestic supplier base 
for solid rocket motors, and that the two existing U.S. 
providers both rely on manufacturing technology that was 
developed in the 1950s. Meanwhile, U.S. near-peer competitors 
are rapidly developing small, low-cost, mobile, highly 
responsive space launch systems that are based on storable, 
responsive solid rocket motors. In late 2019, one near-peer 
competitor conducted simultaneous launches of small satellites 
from two mobile, ground-based solid-rocket-motor-based launch 
systems within 6 hours of one another.
    The committee is aware of advanced additive manufacturing 
technologies that could be applied to rapidly manufacture solid 
propellant-based rocket motors addressing a critical need for 
the Department of Defense to enable a new class of highly 
mobile, responsive, low-cost solid rocket motors that would 
incentivize competition and benefit programs across the 
military services. Therefore, the committee directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering, in 
coordination with the directors of the Service Research Labs 
and Space Rapid Capabilities Office, to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services not later than January 
31, 2022, on how the Department of Defense could leverage 
investment in additive manufacturing technology to improve the 
domestic solid rocket motor industrial base with the intent of 
incentivizing competition, and delivering more responsive 
capabilities to the Warfighter. The committee further 
encourages the Department to invest in technologies with small 
businesses and non-traditional suppliers to increase the solid 
rocket motor industrial base.

Strengthening the Diversity of the Science, Technology, Research, and 
        Engineering Workforce

    The committee notes that diversity remains an issue within 
the Department of Defense, particularly in the Department's 
science, technology, research, and engineering workforce. 
Increasing diversity brings new ideas and perspectives into the 
innovation and technology development processes. Section 229 of 
House Report 116-333 for the National Defense Authorization Act 
of Fiscal Year 2020 required the Secretary of Defense, acting 
through the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering and in consultation with the Under Secretary for 
Personnel and Readiness, to conduct an assessment of critical 
skill sets required across, and the diversity of, the research 
and engineering workforce of the Department, including the 
science and technology reinvention laboratories, to support 
emerging and future warfighter technologies.
    Based on this assessment, the Secretary of Defense, acting 
through the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering and in consultation with the Under Secretary for 
Personnel and Readiness, was tasked with developing and 
implementing a plan to diversify and strengthen the science, 
technology, research, and engineering workforce of the 
Department of Defense. To that end, the committee has been 
pleased to see the release of the Department of Defense's STEM 
Strategic Plan for Fiscal Year 2021 through Fiscal Year 2025.
    The committee now directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a briefing to the congressional defense committees no 
later than September 1, 2022, regarding the progress the 
Secretary has made towards implementing the Department's plan 
to strengthen the diversity of the science, technology, 
research, and engineering workforce. In this briefing, the 
Secretary should highlight all recruitment efforts carried out 
in cooperation with minority-serving institutions of higher 
education to create talent pipelines and all retention efforts 
to ensure that underrepresented communities are fully supported 
within the Department.

Support for Department of Defense-wide SBIR and STTR Transition 
        Education Program

    The budget request contained $3.6 million in PE 0605790D8Z 
for the administration of the Department of Defense Small 
Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program and the Small 
Business Technology Transfer (STTR) program.
    The committee is encouraged by the Department of Defense's 
innovative execution of the SBIR/STTR 3 percent administrative 
fund, as authorized by section 638(mm) of title 15, United 
States Code, and the Department of the Navy's efforts to reach 
out to non-traditional performers. The committee encourages the 
Secretary of Defense to seek additional opportunities to 
support participation of non-traditional performers from 
Defense Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research 
(DEPSCoR) states and other underserved communities, and 
encourages the Secretary to leverage the Navy's SBIR/STTR 
Transition Program (STP) as a way of achieving efficient and 
effective support to those non-traditional performers.
    The Navy has demonstrated success in mentoring Phase II 
companies for increased transition of SBIR and STTR 
technologies by focusing administrative funding toward 
education within the STP. Recently, the STP has leveraged 
online resources and virtual platforms for successful delivery 
of this mentorship and education. By modeling the Navy's STP 
delivery methodology success, the Department of Defense can 
achieve a broadly accessible and cost-effective virtual program 
aimed at increasing participation within DEPSCoR states and 
underserved communities.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $8.6 million, an 
increase of $5.0 million, in PE 0605790D8Z to enable the 
Secretary of Defense to expand the Navy's SBIR/STTR transition 
program across the Department to better educate small 
businesses, researchers, and universities in DEPSCoR states and 
underserved communities on how to participate in the 
Department's SBIR and STTR programs.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
June 30, 2022, on the Secretary's progress in expanding the 
Navy's SBIR/STTR transition program in support of small 
businesses, researchers, and universities in DEPSCoR states and 
underserved communities.

Sustained human performance and resilience

    The budget request for fiscal year 2022 contained $44.8 
million in PE 1160401BB for special operations forces 
technology development.
    The committee recognizes that U.S. Special Operations 
Forces (SOF) have endured disproportionate impacts following 
two decades of continuous combat operations. The compounding 
effects of high operational tempo deployments, corresponding 
training, and increasing operational load requirements coupled 
with the lasting psychological and physical trauma of these 
cycles continues to impact the readiness of SOF. The committee 
recognizes that such trauma is not specific to operators, but 
can and does affect support and enabling personnel as well. The 
committee is concerned about the consequences of undiagnosed, 
untreated traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic 
stress syndrome (often referred to as ``operator syndrome'') 
across the SOF formation, which has resulted in alcoholism, 
drug use, suicide, and other violent behavior both in active 
and veteran SOF personnel, as well as those augmenting SOF from 
the Reserve and Guard Components.
    The committee believes that the recording and monitoring of 
blast exposures and head strikes should occur throughout the 
SOF training and operational cycle. Recent studies highlight 
that consistent monitoring of SOF personnel can inform on brain 
health trends and individual blast or impact exposure with the 
goal of diagnosing and reducing the incidence of TBI within the 
force. Such monitoring could also increase health risk 
surveillance, identifying high risk behaviors and tracking 
emerging signs and symptoms of acute or chronic blast exposure. 
The committee recognizes the imperative to identify, 
rehabilitate, and assist in the recovery of those SOF members 
who are suffering psychological or physical trauma resulting 
from such operational demands and understands that several 
efforts are underway at U.S. Special Operations Command 
(USSOCOM) to develop and align the appropriate care and 
technologies to those SOF members in need. The committee 
expects USSOCOM to prioritize rehabilitative care of cognitive, 
psychological, emotional trauma, and physical performance of 
SOF members within its human performance efforts, to thus 
reestablish resilience and readiness of the formation.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $49.8 million, an 
increase of $5.0 million, in PE 1160401BB for sustained human 
performance and resilience.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


              Section 201--Authorization of Appropriations

    This section would authorize appropriations for research, 
development, test, and evaluation at the levels identified in 
section 4201 of division D of this Act.

    Subtitle B--Program Requirements, Restrictions, and Limitations


 Section 211--Duties and Regional Activities of the Defense Innovation 
                                  Unit

    This section would modify section 2358b(c)(2)(B) of title 
10, United States Code, to update the Department of Defense's 
technology strategy documents for which the Joint Reserve 
Detachment of the Defense Innovation Unit (DIU) is responsible 
for increasing awareness. Additionally, subject to the 
availability of appropriations, this section would also 
authorize the Secretary of Defense to, as appropriate, expand 
the efforts of the Defense Innovation Unit to engage and 
collaborate with private-sector industry and communities in 
various regions of the United States that do not otherwise have 
a DIU presence, including in economically disadvantaged 
communities.

    Section 212--Modification of Mechanisms for Expedited Access to 
  Technical Talent and Expertise at Academic Institutions to Support 
                     Department of Defense Missions

    This section would modify section 217 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91) on mechanisms for expedited access to technical talent and 
expertise at academic institutions to encourage the sharing of 
information on research and consulting in Department-wide 
shared information systems, and would add additional mission 
areas of nuclear science, security, and non-proliferation and 
chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear defense. This 
section would also extend the authority through September 30, 
2028.

    Section 213--Modification of Mechanisms for Expedited Access to 
        Technical Talent and Expertise at Academic Institutions

    This section would modify section 2358 of title 10, United 
States Code, on mechanisms for expedited access to technical 
talent and expertise at academic institutions and would add a 
33rd mission area called ``spectrum activities.''

          Section 214--Minority Institute for Defense Research

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a plan to the congressional defense committees not later 
than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act for the 
establishment of a Minority Institute for Defense Research and 
authorize the Secretary to establish a program to award grants, 
on a competitive basis, to minority institutions. This section 
would also amend section 2304 of title 10, United States Code, 
to direct the head of an agency to require that a contract 
awarded to a Department of Defense Federally Funded Research 
and Development Center or University Affiliated Research Center 
includes a requirement to establish a partnership to develop 
the capacity of minority institutions to address the research 
and development needs of the Department through a subcontract 
with one or more minority institutions for at least 5 percent 
of the contract award.

  Section 215--Test Program for Engineering Plant of DDG(X) Destroyer 
                                Vessels

    This section would require the Navy to initiate a land-
based test site prior to the start of construction of the 
DDG(X) destroyer program.

           Section 216--Consortium to Study Irregular Warfare

    This section would direct the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Research and Engineering to establish an academic research 
consortium to study irregular warfare and responses to 
irregular threats.

Section 217--Development and Implementation of Digital Technologies for 
                  Survivability and Lethality Testing

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
expand survivability testing of covered systems to include 
testing against non-kinetic threats, and to develop digital 
technologies to test those systems against threats throughout 
the system's lifecycle. This section would also direct the 
Secretary to carry out activities to demonstrate digital 
technologies for live fire testing, and would require the 
Director of Operational Test and Evaluation to submit a report 
to the congressional defense committees not later than March 
15, 2023, with an assessment of the Secretary's progress on 
expanding survivability testing, supporting development of 
digital technologies for live fire testing, and the 
demonstration activities.
    The committee notes that digital technologies and non-
kinetic threats have advanced beyond the efficacy of the 
language in section 2366 of title 10, United States Code, Major 
systems and munitions programs: survivability testing and 
lethality testing required before full-scale production, and 
modernization is necessary. Survivability and lethality are no 
longer constrained by simple ballistics and are instead today 
susceptible to contemporary non-kinetic threats including 
cyber; electromagnetic spectrum operations; chemical, 
biological, radiological, nuclear, high yield explosives; and 
directed energy weapons. These threats can interact in 
inventive ways to degrade, disable, deceive, and destroy a 
force or mission, and they can evolve continually. It is 
imperative that the Secretary of Defense take a whole of 
systems and whole of lifecycle approach in the identification 
of these threats and their effects to assess the full spectrum 
of survivability and lethality of any system.
    Digital technologies, including digital twins and modeling 
and simulation, have advanced and enable the Department to 
build high-fidelity models of systems to test and evaluate this 
full spectrum of threats, perform many more digital tests, and 
perform continuous vulnerability discovery and mitigation of 
the most prominent threats throughout the system's lifecycle. 
Data from physical and digital testing must be collected and 
fed back into the models to improve their fidelity and value 
over the system's lifecycle. Additionally, the Department has a 
legacy fleet with non-kinetic vulnerabilities and should 
consider model creation when appropriate and necessary. The 
committee believes the Department will benefit from broadening 
its view of survivability and lethality testing and evaluation 
to include non-kinetic threats. The Department should also 
broaden its view of live fire testing to include digital-live 
fires through models and simulations, which may augment, or in 
some cases replace, live-testing, and allow for continuous 
survivability assessments over time. Taken together, these two 
modernization improvements should provide the foundation for a 
full spectrum survivability assessment approach throughout the 
system's lifecycle.

Section 218--Pilot Program on the Use of Intermediaries to Connect the 
            Department of Defense with Technology Producers

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to carry 
out a 5-year pilot program to help foster transition of the 
Department of Defense's science and technology programs, 
projects, and activities into full scale implementation. This 
section would direct the Secretary to seek to enter into 
agreements with qualified intermediaries to provide technical 
assistance to technology producers to better participate in the 
procurement programs and acquisition processes of the 
Department. This section would require a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than December 31, 2022, 
on the Secretary's progress in implementing the program and any 
related policy issues. This section would also direct the 
Comptroller General of the United States to submit a report to 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives not later than 5 years after the date of the 
enactment of this Act on the pilot program's effectiveness.
    The committee is aware that there are a growing number of 
access points for innovative technology companies to engage 
with the Department of Defense, but there is no support team 
connecting those businesses between each of the innovation 
entities and to the appropriate customers in the Department, 
including program executive offices, program management 
offices, and science and technology reinvention laboratories. 
The pilot program would provide support to those technology 
producers looking to do business with the Department, and 
guidance on how to navigate unfamiliar processes including 
those surrounding requirements, budgeting, contracting, and 
other statutory, regulatory, and cultural hurdles. The 
committee believes that an entity that specializes in engaging 
and supporting technology producers is necessary to help the 
Department become a better buyer and a more attractive customer 
to innovative commercial companies.

  Section 219--Assessment and Correction of Deficiencies in the F-35 
                    Aircraft Pilot Breathing System

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Administrator, National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration, to investigate, assess, and implement, if 
necessary, effective corrective actions for the F-35 breathing 
system to address the initial findings and recommendations 
noted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's 
Engineering and Safety Center Technical Assessment Report on 
the F-35 pilot breathing system published on November 19, 2020.

     Section 220--Identification of the Hypersonics Facilities and 
         Capabilities of the Major Range and Test Facility Base

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
identify each facility and capability of the Major Range and 
Test Facility Base that is primarily concerned with the ground-
based simulation of hypersonic atmospheric flight conditions 
and the test and evaluation of hypersonic technology in open 
air flight.

Section 221--Requirement to Maintain Access to Category 3 Subterranean 
                           Training Facility

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
maintain access to a covered category 3 subterranean training 
facility on a continuing basis and authorize the Secretary to 
enter into a short-term lease with a provider of a covered 
category 3 subterranean training facility.

  Section 222--Prohibition on Reduction of Naval Aviation Testing and 
                          Evaluation Capacity

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of the Navy from 
taking any actions to reduce the aviation testing capacity with 
regards to aircraft divestment or personnel billet changes of 
the Navy below fiscal year 2021 levels and requires the 
Director of Operational Test and Evaluation to assess the 
Navy's planned reductions and mitigation strategy.

  Section 223--Limitation on Availability of Funds for Certain C-130 
                                Aircraft

    This section would limit funds for the E-6B 
recapitalization until the Secretary of the Navy submits a 
report to the congressional defense committees with more 
information.

 Section 224--Limitation on Availability of Funds for VC-25B Aircraft 
              Program Pending Submission of Documentation

    This section would limit funds for the VC-25B Presidential 
aircraft until the Secretary of the Air Force submits an 
updated schedule.

             Subtitle C--Plans, Reports, and Other Matters


     Section 231--Modification to Annual Report of the Director of 
                    Operational Test and Evaluation

    This section would amend section 139(h)(2) of title 10, 
United States Code, by removing the sunset date for the 
Director of Operational Test and Evaluation's annual report to 
Congress.

 Section 232--Adaptive Engine Transition Program Acquisition Strategy 
                         for the F-35A Aircraft

    This section would require the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Acquisition and Sustainment to submit to the congressional 
defense committees an acquisition strategy for continued 
development, integration, and operational fielding of the 
Adaptive Engine Technology Program propulsion system into the 
U.S. Air Force fleet of F-35A aircraft beginning in fiscal year 
2027.

Section 233--Advanced Propulsion System Acquisition Strategy for the F-
                         35B and F-35C Aircraft

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy, in 
consultation with the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment, to submit to the congressional 
defense committees a report on the integration of the Adaptive 
Engine Transition Program propulsion system or other advanced 
propulsion system into F-35B and F-35C aircraft not later than 
14 days after the date on which the budget of the President for 
fiscal year 2023 is submitted to Congress pursuant to section 
1105 of title 31, United States Code.

   Section 234--Assessment and Report on Airborne Electronic Attack 
                       Capabilities and Capacity

    This section would require the Secretary of the Air Force 
to conduct an assessment of the airborne electronic attack 
capabilities and capacity of the Air Force and analyze the 
feasibility of integrating the Department of the Navy's ALQ-249 
Next Generation Jammer on Air Force tactical aircraft. This 
section would require a report on the assessment to be 
submitted to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives not later than February 15, 2022.

 Section 235--Strategy for Autonomy Integration in Major Weapon Systems

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
create a strategy for maneuver autonomy capability in major 
weapon systems by fiscal year 2025. The Secretary of Defense 
would also be required to submit a report not later than 1 year 
after the date the strategy is submitted, and by October 1 of 
each of the following 5 years, on the Department's 
implementation progress.

                  TITLE III--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                       Budget Request Adjustments


                       Nucleated Foam Engine Wash

    The budget request for fiscal year 2022 contained $1.08 
billion in Defense-Wide Operations and Maintenance for 
maintenance.
    The committee is aware that an advanced FAA-accepted 
nucleated foam engine restoration technology is demonstrating 
the ability to improve the long-term readiness, efficiency, and 
sustainability of critical military aircraft engines, while 
reducing fuel consumption and emissions. The committee also 
understands that in addition to achieving substantial 
efficiency and safety improvements, recent foam engine wash 
testing performed on CV-22 turbine engines under an AFWERX SBIR 
contract has significantly reduced the engine wash cycle from 
multiple hours to only thirty minutes, while reducing the need 
for up to five maintainers, further increasing critical 
aircraft readiness while reducing overall maintenance cost and 
manning requirements.
    The committee appreciates the Air Force Office of 
Operational Energy and the Air Force Special Operations 
Command's roles in advancing this technology demonstration and 
is interested in opportunities to leverage this solution across 
varying military aircraft platforms in other military services, 
such as the Marine Corps Special Operations Command, so that it 
may enhance combat capability and improve aeronautical 
performance and readiness of military aircraft against 
potential future threats.
    Therefore, the committee recommends $1.08 billion, an 
increase of $2.0 million, in Maintenance for nucleated foam 
engine wash testing.
    Further, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
December 31, 2021, on the resources required for the MARSOC to 
implement this program.

                             Energy Issues


         Enhancing Base Resiliency through Ocean Thermal Energy

    The committee remains interested in renewable sources of 
energy for remote and island facilities. The committee also 
understands that ocean thermal energy conversion represents an 
abundant source of redundant power and water that could be used 
at remote and island facilities. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and 
Sustainment to brief the House Committee on Armed Services by 
April 1, 2022 on the potential employment of commercial-scale 
ocean thermal energy conversion power plants.

                     Fuel Visibility and Management

    The committee acknowledges the recent efforts of the 
Department to seek fuel asset visibility solutions to improve 
current accountability infrastructure. The committee believes 
that leveraging existing commercial solutions for fuel 
accountability and remote transaction monitoring can reduce 
internal development requirements, lower sustainment costs, and 
increase the speed and accuracy of fuel transaction reporting. 
The committee notes with interest the Defense Logistics 
Agency's intent to replace the legacy fuels manager defense 
accountability system as an opportunity to research, identify, 
and leverage the best practices of the energy industry to 
improve the remote monitoring and quality assurance procedures 
for defense fuel business practices.
    The committee encourages the Department and military 
services to identify existing electronic fuel management 
systems being employed by the energy and maritime industries 
for the monitoring of fuel storage, fuel transfer transactions, 
operational fuel consumption, and CO2 emissions reporting at 
remote locations on land and at sea. The committee believes 
that fuel management systems that provide near-real time, 
secure, accurate and automated monitoring capabilities via a 
common analytics dashboard, and which reduce the need for 
manual reporting and opportunity for human error in data entry 
should be considered for transition to defense application.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Serves by 
March 1, 2022 on progress the military services have made in 
identifying and evaluating existing technology and industry 
best practices for remote fuel monitoring and accountability.

                     Installation Energy Resilience

    The Committee is aware of Department of Defense initiatives 
on energy resilience as outlined in Department of Defense 
Instruction 4170.11, Installation Energy Management and 
commends the Department for efforts to mitigate the impact of 
energy disruptions on military installations that would 
threaten mission accomplishment. The committee continues to 
encourage the Secretary of Defense to procure, operate, 
maintain, test and upgrade energy resilient systems for 
critical energy requirements on its military installations. The 
use of alternative or renewable energy offers great promise in 
achieving energy resilience and meeting the goal of 25 percent 
renewable energy goal for the Department of Defense will 
require the Department and the Services to streamline project 
requirements and address barriers to development of renewable 
energy to support military installation energy needs.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Services, to standardize, where possible, 
the policies and processes that guide renewable energy 
developments. Further, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense in coordination with the military service secretaries 
to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
February 1, 2022, on the following:
    (1) currently operational renewable energy projects on 
military installations;
    (2) The average time elapsed from project initiation to 
completion, organized by type (wind, solar, geothermal, energy 
storage, hydro, CHP/Cogeneration, microgrids) and by Service;
    (3) areas that the Department of Defense and the Services 
can standardize items such as consent agreements, Power 
Purchase Agreements, site licenses, ground and roof-top leases 
and subleases and memos of aforementioned documents;
    (4) an analysis of whether more flexible contract terms 
could increase incentives for project developers; and
    (5) measures that would increase incentives for battery 
storage on military installations.

        Micro-reactor Support of Installation Energy Resiliency

    The committee commends the Department of Defense (DoD) for 
pursuing policies and goals to increase energy resilience as a 
means to enhance the range, endurance, agility, and mission 
assurance of DoD installations. The committee recognizes that 
the Department has a variety of policies, programs, statutory 
authorities, and tools to implement energy resilience and 
maintain critical missions and readiness. The committee 
appreciates the efforts of the Department of Defense to further 
the research and development of micro-reactors as a possible 
means to increase energy resilience at defense installations 
without contributing to the carbon footprint of the Department.
    Sections 2911 and 2924 of Title 10 of the United States 
Code establish the Energy Policy of the DoD, which emphasizes 
the importance of energy security, resilience, and sets a goal 
for the use of renewable energy to meet energy needs. However, 
the committee notes that many of these goals are set to be 
achieved in 2025, and questions whether it is time for the 
Department to establish new goals to continue progress towards 
energy resiliency beyond 2025.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services by February 1, 2022, 
regarding the Department's evaluation of future energy 
resilience. The briefing shall address
    (1) the Department's evaluation of its current and 
projected performance out to 2025, in meeting the existing 
resilience and energy performance goals. Such evaluation should 
include an assessment of the challenges to achieving relevant 
policies;
    (2) the Department's evaluation of the adequacy of current 
resilience requirements for installation energy to determine 
whether changes are needed to address the following: (a) the 
need to provide uninterrupted power to installations during 
power grid failures for at least three days; (b) protection 
against cyber threats and electromagnetic pulses; (c) 
resilience to extreme natural events, including earthquakes, 
volcanology, tornados, hurricanes, floods, tsunamis, seiches, 
high snowfall, and very low or high temperatures;
    (3) the Departments plans for deploying a micro-reactor or 
small modular reactor at a domestic installation by 2025, and 
the efforts by each military branch to include micro-reactors 
in the planning for meeting future installation energy needs.
    (4) What if any barriers to the deployment of micro-
reactors currently exist in statute or regulation.

               Mobile, High-Density Hybrid Power Delivery

    The committee recognizes that resourcing sufficient, 
expeditionary clean power to off-the-grid and remote locations 
remains an operational challenge to our military and limits its 
ability to compete against near-peer adversaries. The 
development of advanced technologies for mobile energy 
generation will improve our energy resilience and independence, 
and ensure our Joint Forces can meet high-density, near-term 
power requirements in remote areas that have limited access to 
fuel and resupply convoys.
    The committee also notes that mobile, high-density hybrid 
power delivery systems may be configured to drive novel 
electric powertrains in applications from high-torque vehicles 
to unmanned maritime systems to long-range high-power 
autonomous flight vehicles.
    The committee directs the Deputy Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Environment and Energy Resilience to provide a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services by December 1, 
2022, on efforts to incorporate mobile, high-density power 
delivery technologies in electric powertrain platforms. The 
report should consider commercial, off-the-shelf solutions.

                           Operational Energy

    The committee remains concerned about the logistics 
challenges our armed services will encounter in a contested 
environment. In particular, the committee is cognizant of the 
obstacles related to energy that could lead to disruptions in 
operations due to potential intermittent energy availability.
    While the committee is aware of the Department of Defense's 
nascent efforts to address these issues, the lack of 
coordination and the focus on addressing both supply- and 
demand-side element of the problem is concerning. The committee 
observes that some of the Department's policies, such as a 
preference for a single drop-in fuel type, may not be the only 
option for meeting certain requirements of the National Defense 
Strategy.
    The committee notes that industry, as well as our allies 
and partners, have been investing in hydrogen fuels, electric 
propulsion systems, and other systems that increase the range 
and on-station time of fossil fuel vehicles and that these 
systems could be selectively applied to reduce the risk in a 
contested environment. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Energy, Installations, and 
Environment, in coordination with the Director of Logistics for 
the Joint Staff, the Assistant Service Secretaries of the 
military departments for Energy, Installations, and 
Environment, the Commander of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, and 
the Director of the Defense Logistics Agency, to submit a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 15, 
2022, that identifies and evaluates viable operational energy 
architectures including but not limited to the above for their 
value in reducing the demand on the contested logistics 
enterprise. The report shall include at a minimum the 
following:
    (1) an assessment of alternate-fuel-based commercial 
platforms and products, and the level of suitability, effort, 
and risk associated with adapting them for Department of 
Defense use;
    (2) a general discussion about potential performance 
benefits and corresponding operational benefits of platforms 
powered by alternate fuels, with a specific focus on the 
feasibility, benefits, and risks of using hydrogen fuels and 
cached hydrogen fuel feedstock for operational energy in 
expeditionary advanced base operations;
    (3) a discussion of current and future production capacity 
by U.S. allies and partners for fuel alternatives that could 
address demand in a contested environment, with a specific 
focus on the commercial availability of hydrogen and hydrogen 
fuel feedstocks within the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command area of 
responsibility;
    (4) a review of transportation safety and storage capacity 
for fuel alternatives, with a focus on the feasibility, 
benefits, and risks of transporting hydrogen gas in bulk as 
well as storing hydrogen fuel feedstocks; and
    (5) a list of recommendations for Department of Defense 
research and development investments to address the demand side 
of the contested logistics environment.

                    Logistics and Sustainment Issues


     Addressing Out-of-Pocket Cost Disparities for Military Uniform

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Service Secretaries, to submit a report 
to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than March 
1, 2022 on the plan to address the recommendations in the U.S. 
Government Accountability Office's report entitled Military 
Service Uniforms: DOD Could Better Identify and Address Out-of-
Pocket Cost Inequities'' (GAO-21-120).
    In responding to the recommendations, the report shall 
include a summary of actions that have been or will be taken to 
implement the recommendation, and a schedule, with specific 
milestones, for completing implementation of the 
recommendation.
    The report shall also include the following:
    (1) define standardized thresholds at which cost 
differences in allowances or from planned uniform changes 
(across the Services or by gender within a Service) are 
considered significant and warrant adjustments, including 
analysis completed to define those (per the official DoD 
response to GAO-21-120);
    (2) demonstrate how a service's directed uniform changes 
are calculated into the enlisted uniform allowance; and
    (3) Identify causes for like-uniform cost disparities 
between males and females, and actions the Department can take 
to eliminate that disparity.

            Air Force Mobility Sustainment and Modernization

    The committee recognizes the importance of a strong Air 
Force Reserve Component that can provide needed surge 
capability to the Active Component during times of peak demand. 
The Reserve Component is an especially critical force provider 
of inter- and intra-theater mobility assets to United States 
Transportation Command, via the Air Force Air Mobility Command. 
To that end, the committee is concerned that the Air Force 
continues to divest legacy aircraft from the Reserve Component 
while it modernizes the Active Component.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than March 1, 2022, on the Air Force's 
sustainment and modernization plans for the global fleet of C-
17 and C-130 aircraft, broken out by Active and Reserve 
Components, including an assessment of the need for 
standardized fielding allocations and permanent aircraft tail 
number assignments for Reserve Component airlift squadrons.

          Air Logistics Complex Capital Equipment Requirements

    The committee recognizes the importance of the work 
performed at the Air Force's three public depots (Air Logistics 
Complexes) and has concerns about the aging capital equipment 
at each location.
    The committee therefore directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of 
the Senate and House of Representatives by March 1, 2022, on 
the capital equipment replacement and/or refurbishment 
requirements at each of the Air Force Air Logistics Centers. 
The report should include the name, age, and expected 
replacement age of equipment; replacement or refurbishment 
cost; year of obsolescence; replacement plan for obsolescent 
equipment; and the plan to invest in advanced technology 
capital equipment.

              Army Futures Command Depot-Level Maintenance

    While the committee is encouraged by the ongoing work of 
Army Futures Command to modernize Army platforms, it is 
concerned about how these future systems will be maintained. 
The committee believes that there must be planning and 
infrastructure in place for the sustained maintenance of these 
systems, and that depot-level maintenance will be particularly 
important. It is also critical that the introduction of new 
equipment maintenance obligations be effectively integrated 
with existing capabilities to ensure that Army Futures Command 
can meet delivery schedule requirements. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Army to submit a report 
to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than January 
31, 2022, that includes the following:
    (1) an analysis of the ability of the Army to perform 
depot-level sustained maintenance of any future systems 
developed by Army Futures Command; and
    (2) recommendations for additional maintenance capabilities 
that will need to be established to sustain such systems.

                    C-130 Depot Maintenance Capacity

    The committee is aware that Air Force, Navy, and Marine 
Corps C-130 depot maintenance is performed at multiple 
locations and Air Force Air Logistics Centers, and it has 
concerns about potential capacity and capability shortfalls to 
execute overflow or surge C-130 depot maintenance. Accordingly, 
the committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than March 1, 2022, on the Air Force's efforts to ensure that 
adequate capacity and capability exists to complete all current 
and forecast C-130 depot maintenance. The briefing should 
include an explanation of C-130 depot work performed, by 
location; a description of the workforce composition at each 
location, broken down between government and contractor 
employees; and a description of each location's existing 
additional capability and capacity to meet surge or overflow C-
130 depot maintenance. If capability or capacity shortfalls are 
identified, the briefing should include the Air Force's plans 
to mitigate these shortfalls.

       Data Analytics Driving On-Time Ship Maintenance Deliveries

    The committee recognizes the benefits of leveraging the 
vast amounts of data collected to drive better and more rapid 
decision across the Department of Defense. The Navy is 
implementing data analytics tools and techniques to enhance 
warfighting, training, acquisition and all corporate decisions. 
Using quantitative techniques, data driven analysis, and 
various other research techniques, Navy leadership is embracing 
data analytics and the benefits it brings to all organizations 
at all echelons. Initiatives such as Perform to Plan (P2P) have 
shown how data driven decisions not only enhance readiness but 
reduce cost. The committee is particularly impressed with how 
the Mid-Atlantic Regional Maintenance Center (MARMC) has 
leveraged previous Department of Defense Small Business 
Innovation Research (SBIR) investments in Data Analytics to 
drive improved performance in the ship maintenance process. By 
extending the Expeditionary Logistics (EXLOG)/Logistics Common 
Operating Picture (LOGCOP) tool created under the SBIR program, 
the command has increased the speed and quality of decisions 
which is resulting in improved performance during maintenance 
periods. The committee believes the Navy should leverage this 
SBIR technology to improve the tool and expand this best 
practice to other Regional Maintenance Centers. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Navy by February 1, 
2022, to prepare a brief to the House Committee on Armed 
Services as to Secretary's intent to expand these data analytic 
tools and techniques throughout the ship maintenance 
enterprise.

       Defense-Wide Working Capital Fund Cash Management Actions

    The committee is aware that the Defense-Wide Working 
Capital Fund has faced cash management challenges due to the 
COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent reduced operational tempos of 
the individual services, and that the Defense Logistics Agency 
has executed multiple near-term actions to maintain adequate 
cash balances, including purchase order reductions, 
reprogramming actions, and rate increases. However, the 
committee is concerned with the potential longer-term impacts 
to readiness and supply chain resilience as a result of these 
cash management actions. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Director, Defense Logistics Agency to submit a report to the 
House Committee on Armed Services not later than March 1, 2022, 
on the overall solvency of the Defense-Wide Working Capital 
Fund. At a minimum, the report shall address the following 
elements:
    (1) a review of monthly fiscal years 2020 and 2021 cash 
balances compared to upper and lower limits, and cash 
management actions taken to ensure adequate balances;
    (2) an assessment of the impact to the supply base from 
cash management actions taken in fiscal years 2020 and 2021;
    (3) a review of strategies implemented to lessen the impact 
on the supply base, especially smaller vendors, due to fiscal 
year 2020-2021 cash management actions;
    (4) an assessment of what impact reduced purchase order 
actions in fiscal years 2020 and 2021 will have on future 
readiness over 6-month, 12-month, 18-month, and 24-month time 
horizons;
    (5) A review of actions taken in the President's budget 
request for fiscal year 2022 that will allow for the 
normalization of purchase orders in execution year 2022;
    (6) an identification of the percentage of fluctuation 
related to long-range forecasting and demand requirements for 
troop support end items, and an assessment of specific 
processes used to track and reduce such fluctuations; and
    (7) a recommendation as to whether shifting from a long-
range forecasting model to a consumption pull model would 
create a more consistent purchase order environment and 
facilitate cost reductions as a result of greater certainty for 
contractors in the supply chain, and whether reducing the range 
of minimum and maximum contract obligations to a range of plus 
or minus 20 percent of annual estimated quantities would 
relieve ordering fluctuation and improve supply chain 
resilience.

                        Depot Capital Investment

    The Committee authorizes $900 million of additional depot 
modernization funds for each of the Services. These funds shall 
only be used to sustain, modernize, or improve the efficiency 
of government-owned depot facilities, infrastructure, 
equipment, processes, and work environment. None of the funding 
provided may be used for depot operations. The Committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense and the Service Secretaries to 
submit a detailed spend plan by project, location, and dollar 
amount not less than 30 days prior to the obligation of these 
funds. The Committee also directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
December 1, 2022, that describes the impact of these funds on 
depot modernization and operations.

           Efficiency in in the Field of Logistics Management

    The committee supports the Marine Corps' continued 
development of real-time global asset inventory systems at the 
Marine Corps Platform Integration Center (MCPIC). MCPIC was 
created to enable visibility into inventory location and 
condition. Originally, MCPIC was designed for the Marine Corps 
Prepositioning Program's global mission of supporting the 
warfighter using commercially available technologies in 
accordance with the Department's cybersecurity standards. The 
committee acknowledges the system's positive impacts on 
inventory management of supplies and its capacity to provide 
insight into the physical location of items during the in-
storage, in-process, and in-maintenance phases. Broader 
implementation of this capability could enable a common 
logistics picture across the enterprise and reduces 
redundancies between the services and supporting agencies such 
as the Defense Logistics Agency.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
no later than February 15, 2022, on the potential efficiencies 
and other benefits of expanding MCPIC technology to a wider 
range of asset management programs within the Department-wide 
supply enterprise.

                  F-35 Organic Maintenance Capability

    The committee recognizes the importance of the F-35 
Lightning II program to our national defense and its foreign 
partners. The committee is concerned that the program faces 
affordability challenges for the services, and that organic 
repair capability could play a large role in reducing 
sustainment costs.
    Given the significance of the F-35 program to the future of 
tactical air for the military, the Department of Defense's need 
to operate and deploy the F-35 on a widespread basis in the 
coming years, the involvement of international partners and 
foreign military sales customers, and the importance of 
maintaining affordability, the committee directs the 
Comptroller General of the United States to review organic 
maintenance capability of the F-35. At minimum, the review 
shall address the following elements:
    (1) depot standup, including prospects for moving some 
aspects from contract-led to organic repair capability; F-35 
Joint Program Office efforts to speed up the establishment of 
depot maintenance capability; technical data rights and unique 
tooling requirements associated with an expanded organic depot 
repair capability; prime and sub-prime contractor efforts to 
provide required technical data and unique tooling in 
accordance with organic repair requirements; and an assessment 
of the actual versus forecast complexity for scheduled and 
unscheduled depot-level repair actions, as well as planned 
efforts to account for expanded complex repair requirements;
    (2) options, progress, and impact for organic supply chain 
management; options and efforts to make supply chain management 
an organic task, as well as assessment of potential cost 
savings in doing so;
    (3) field-level maintenance challenges including Autonomic 
Logistics Information System (ALIS), ALIS to Operational Data 
Integrated Network transition, lack of technical data and 
unique tooling, and reliability and maintainability problems; 
assessment of key drivers of Not Mission Capable for 
Maintenance (NMC-M) rates; assessment of Department efforts to 
address key drivers to NMC-M rates; and
    (4) other items the Comptroller General determines 
appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than March 1, 2022, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings and to present final results in a format 
and timeframe agreed to at the time of the briefing.

         Ground Combat Vehicle Maintenance Modernization Report

    The committee is aware that while Army rotary-wing aviation 
has digitized their systems to increase efficiency, those in 
ground combat vehicle maintenance are still using paper records 
for multiple processes including ordering parts and standard 
checks. The committee is concerned that such techniques slow 
the maintenance process down and increase the risk of human 
error. The committee notes that recent reports have highlighted 
Army Materiel Command's efforts to modernize and invest in 
technologies that will speed up and improve the maintenance 
process. The committee applauds these efforts and believes 
there is room to investigate further modernization efforts 
involving ground combat units force-wide.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology to provide 
a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by February 
15, 2022, assessing at a minimum the following:
    (1) a description of current field-level maintenance 
procedures for ground combat vehicles;
    (2) a review of current efforts that the Department of the 
Army has taken to digitize items including, but not limited to, 
procedures and manuals;
    (3) a discussion of the options available for further 
digitization and the expected efficiencies that can be gained 
from these possible changes;
    (4) a cost estimate for procuring said capabilities; and
    (5) an estimated implementation plan and timeline for doing 
so.

         Ground Tactical Vehicles for Special Operations Forces

    The committee recognizes that commonplace technologies and 
equipment such as Non-Standard Commercial Vehicles (NSCV) can 
support special operations forces (SOF) efforts to compete with 
near-peer adversaries and counter violent extremist 
organizations. NSCV can also enable SOF to operate safely while 
blending into the local population as the fleet is based upon 
globally available, regionally specific commercial vehicle 
platforms that are enhanced with SOF-specific modifications. 
The committee recognizes the importance of such a capability, 
which can enable SOF operations and activities in plain sight. 
However, the committee is also aware that the current NSCV 
fleet is coming to the end of its service life.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict to 
submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than February 25, 2022, on the current and future plans 
for the NSCV fleet. The report must include a strategy for the 
use of ground tactical vehicles across the spectrum of SOF-
specific missions, focusing on great power competition. 
Further, the report must include an analysis of alternatives to 
the NSCV fleet, if applicable. The report may contain a 
classified annex if necessary.

           Implementation of Improvements to F-35 Sustainment

    The committee recognizes the importance of the F-35 
Lightning II Program to the nation's defense. The F-35 and its 
advanced capabilities represent a growing portion of the 
tactical aviation fleet for the Department of Defense, 
eventually to replace a variety of legacy fighter aircraft in 
the Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps. The F-35 is also the 
Department's most ambitious and costly weapon system, with 
overall costs for the program estimated by the Department at 
more than $1.7 trillion over its 66-year life cycle. The 
majority of these costs, approximately $1.3 trillion, are 
associated with the sustainment of the aircraft. The Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) has been assessing the Department's 
efforts to sustain the F-35 since 2013. The GAO's work has 
resulted in over 30 recommendations to the Department on how it 
could more effectively manage sustainment of the F-35 program. 
Although the Department has taken positive steps to implement 
and eventually close out several of these recommendations, the 
majority of GAO's recommendations remain open. Some of these 
recommendations, which focus on critical aspects of sustainment 
such as developing an intellectual property strategy for the 
program and establishing a performance-measurement process for 
the Autonomic Logistics Information System (ALIS), have been 
open for 7 years. Others, such as the June 2021 recommendations 
to help the Department ensure it can afford to sustain the 
number of F-35s it plans to purchase, are more recent and 
particularly time-sensitive.
    The GAO's work assessing sustainment of the F-35 has 
produced critically important recommendations that, if 
implemented, could help the Department improve overall 
sustainment and affordability of the program. Given the 
significance of the F-35 program to the future of tactical air 
in the Department, and the Department's need to continue to 
procure, operate, and deploy the F-35 in the coming years, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report 
to the congressional defense committees by March 1, 2022, on 
the Department's progress implementing GAO's F-35 sustainment-
related recommendations, including:
    (1) the status of the Department's efforts to address open 
GAO recommendations for enhancing F-35 sustainment;
    (2) the steps the Department plans to take to fully 
implement GAO's recommendations; and
    (3) key factors hindering the implementation of these 
recommendations.

                     Landing Gear System Management

    The committee is aware of seven landing gear related Air 
Force flight mishaps between June 2020 and May 2021, involving 
seven different aircraft (A-10, C-17, F-15, F-16, F-22, F-35, 
and MQ-9), and has concerns about landing gear systems 
management across the total Air Force inventory. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than March 1, 2022, on the Air Force's efforts to reduce 
landing gear related mishaps and discrepancies across its 
entire inventory of aircraft. The briefing should include a 10-
year historical review of landing gear related mishaps; 
identification of any trend data across platforms; and an 
assessment of the need to consolidate management of total 
inventory landing gear systems to one organization within the 
Air Force as a means to identify trend data across platforms, 
develop common solutions, and reduce Air Force landing gear 
systems malfunctions and mishaps.

                         Predictive Maintenance

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense has in 
recent years undertaken various initiatives to determine the 
most effective and efficient way to plan and perform 
maintenance on its weapon systems, including through preventive 
maintenance performed on a regular schedule and conditions-
based maintenance performed at predetermined trigger events. 
The military services have begun developing predictive 
maintenance programs that rely on sensor technology, data 
analytics, and algorithms, rather than calendars and current 
conditions, to better plan what maintenance is needed when. If 
performed effectively, predictive maintenance can reduce weapon 
system downtime, ensure adequate supply of needed parts, and 
decrease costs.
    The committee directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to review the incorporation of predictive maintenance 
into the military services' weapon system sustainment. The 
review should address the following elements:
    (1) the extent to which the Department and the military 
services have incorporated predictive maintenance into the 
sustainment of ground combat systems, ships and submarines, and 
aircraft;
    (2) the extent to which the Department and the military 
services have set goals, resourced, tested, and executed their 
predictive maintenance efforts; and
    (3) the extent to which the Department and the military 
services have established policies and implemented processes to 
track and manage predictive maintenance efforts.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than March 1, 2022, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings and present final results in a format and 
timeframe agreed to at the time of the briefing.

    Report on Navy Dry Dock Strategy for Ship Maintenance and Repair

    The committee understands that the Navy has made 
investments to increase dry dock capacity on the west coast of 
the United States to meet ship repair surge capacity 
requirements and support the National Defense Strategy. The 
committee is concerned that a lack of clarity on how these dry 
docks will be used and administered could have unintended 
negative consequences on the private sector maintenance and 
repair industrial base.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
no later than March 1, 2022, that outlines the Navy's long-term 
plans for its utilization of existing and potential new dry 
docks on the west coast. The report should address:
    (1) how the Navy will execute a consistent and balanced 
docking strategy that ensures the health of the private sector 
maintenance and repair industrial base;
    (2) the conditions under which the Navy plans to utilize 
surplus dock space on the west coast;
    (3) any additional Navy-owned dry dock assets the Navy 
plans to locate on the west coast and the planned cost to build 
and maintain such planned additional dry docks;
    (4) the projected utilization of all dry dock assets (both 
private and public) through 2026; and
    (5) how the Navy assesses the impact of government 
investment in additional dry dock capacity on private sector 
repair and maintenance facilities and these facilities' 
planning for future upgrades.

             Space Resources (Propellant) National Reserve

    The committee recognizes the great importance of utilizing 
the resources found in space (space resources) to support the 
mission of the Space Force and national security space 
enterprise as well as the viability of civil and commercial 
space activities. Of particular importance is satellite or 
rocket propellant. The committee notes that creating a 
logistics chain for supplying satellite and rocket propellant 
in space is key to the long-term sustainability of the Space 
Force and central to one of its core competencies, Space 
Mobility and Logistics. The committee further notes that 
creating a strategic propellant reserve in space will act as a 
catalyst for America's commercial space and resources 
industries to invest the capital to create the elements of the 
supply chain. These include developing sources of propellant on 
the Moon and asteroids, developing the transportation elements 
to move propellant within cislunar space, and developing the 
distribution nodes or depots to store the propellant. The 
committee believes that ready access to propellant for 
satellites allows maneuver without regret, the ability to 
reposition orbital assets as needed for greatest strategic and 
tactical benefit. Finally, the committee notes that refueling 
rockets outbound from Earth results in a dramatic lowering of 
the cost of space transportation to any destination beyond Low 
Earth Orbit, providing tremendous benefits to military, civil 
and commercial space activities. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Air Force, in consultation with 
academia and private sector subject matter experts, to provide 
a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 31, 
2022 that evaluates the national security benefits of creating 
a Space Resources (Propellant) National Reserve.

              Sustainment Competition in the F-35 Program

    The committee is concerned about rising sustainment costs 
in the F-35 program, as these costs create affordability 
challenges for the services. As such, the committee is 
interested in determining the Department of Defense's plans to 
increase competition within the F-35 enterprise, including what 
intermediate steps could be taken in the near term to leverage 
the whole of industry outside the original equipment 
manufacturers. Increased competition for F-35 sustainment could 
reduce lifecycle costs, increase efficiency, and drive 
innovation while strengthening the overall viability of the 
program. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than March 1, 2022, on the Department's 
efforts to reduce sustainment costs by driving competition into 
the F-35 program. The briefing should include information on 
known barriers that must be overcome to facilitate a 
competitive sustainment environment, as well as recommended 
solutions.

                            Readiness Issues


  Air Force briefing on delivery of emergency services by firefighters

    The committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
February 1, 2022, outlining efficiencies that will be gained 
from the transfer of Emergency Medical Service (EMS) delivery 
to firefighters. The briefing will include the following 
elements:
    (1) an analysis of cost savings to the Air Force from 
moving EMS delivery to Fire and Emergency Services (FES).
    (2) an analysis of manpower savings potential in the 
transition to FES.
    (3) an assessment of cost required to train firefighters to 
appropriate certification levels.
    (4) an assessment of physical space required to move 
ambulances to fire stations.
    (5) an assessment of required equipment to support the 
transition.

                   Army Enterprise Resource Planning

    The Committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a report to the congressional defense committees no later than 
March 1, 2022 regarding the implementation, operation, and 
maintenance of its enterprise resource planning systems. The 
report should address:
    (1) challenges the Army faces in its efforts to implement, 
operate and maintain its enterprise resource planning (ERP) 
systems;
    (2) the extent to which the Army is executing business 
process reengineering to match commercial best practices;
    (3) how the Army has conducted market research and the 
results of that market research; and
    (4) how the Army is incorporating lessons learned and best 
practices in its ERP modernization program.

            Assessment of Low-Level Military Training Routes

    The committee is aware of Department of Defense concerns 
regarding encroachment from development of various types on 
low-level military training routes (MTRs) and special use 
airspace (SUA). The committee also recognizes that the 
Department's airspace needs change over time. The committee 
remains committed to preserving access to national airspace for 
military test and training activities to ensure military 
readiness. However, the committee is also interested, where 
feasible, in facilitating deployment of renewable energy 
projects, such as wind turbines, that enhance our national and 
economic security in ways that are compatible with military 
airspace needs. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary 
of Defense, in coordination with the Secretaries of the Army, 
Navy and Air Force, provide a report to the congressional 
defense committees by October 1, 2022 that assesses low-level 
military training routes and special use airspace to identify 
areas that are no longer needed or could be adjusted while 
still meeting military training requirements. This report shall 
document and define military airspace requirements based on 
service operational and training needs, identify routes and 
special use airspace that could potentially be eliminated or 
modified in various ways to accommodate future deployment of 
additional wind turbines renewable energy projects, and provide 
recommendations for such changes.

             Body-Worn Cameras for Military Law Enforcement

    The committee recognizes the expansive use of body cameras 
by law enforcement personnel around the nation, along with the 
positive benefits that result from their use. However, the 
committee also notes that there are differences between some of 
the tasks that military law enforcement and civilian law 
enforcement are called to perform. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Energy, 
Installations, and Environment to submit a report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by February 15, 2022, assessing the 
use of body cameras by military law enforcement. The committee 
believes that local community stakeholders should also be 
engaged during the production of this report, to make sure 
their thoughts and suggestions are taken into consideration and 
incorporated into any final report recommendations. The report 
shall include at a minimum the following:
    (1) an assessment of the viability of using body cameras by 
military law enforcement personnel;
    (2) a description of the duties where their use would be 
the most appropriate and impactful;
    (3) a discussion of what policies would need to be in place 
to govern the storage, release, and distribution of camera 
recordings to address accountability, transparency, and 
national security concerns;
    (4) a cost estimate of deployment and storage of camera 
equipment; and
    (5) to the extent that body cameras are deemed appropriate 
and necessary for use by military law enforcement personnel, an 
implementation plan for their deployment and use.

 Continuation of Waterjet Technology Systems for Removal of Underwater 
                          Explosive Munitions

    The Committee understands underwater munitions continue to 
pose environmental and safety threats for the military. The 
committee is aware that high pressure waterjet technology 
systems have demonstrated capability to safely demilitarize 
munitions on land and can demilitarize munitions underwater. 
Despite the department's efforts, underwater munitions pose a 
continued threat. To ensure the issue has been sufficiently 
addressed, the Committee directs the Secretary of the Army to 
provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services by 
February 1, 2022, about current and planned efforts to mitigate 
against underwater munitions threats, including efforts to 
employ waterjet technology systems for the removal of explosive 
constituents in underwater munitions.

                   Eglin Gulf Test and Training Range

    The committee notes that the 96th Test Wing's mission, 
headquartered and largely executed at Eglin Air Force Base and 
the Eastern Gulf Test and Training Range (EGTTR), is to plan, 
conduct, test, and evaluate U.S. and allied non-nuclear 
munitions, target acquisition, weapon delivery, command and 
control systems, navigation systems, integrated base defense 
security systems, and supporting systems.
    The committee is aware that EGTTR will require highly 
specialized capabilities enabling successful fifth-/sixth-
generation weapons testing. The committee is concerned that the 
open-air range test-data gathering instrumentation 
infrastructure on EGTTR is not keeping pace with the advanced 
capabilities of modern weapons systems and munitions. The 
committee is further concerned that, with a growing volume of 
test and training requirements, more instrumentation throughout 
the EGTTR is required for efficient use of air, surface, and 
subsurface test areas to address the competition for range 
space between competing operational readiness and testing 
priorities.
    Accordingly, the committee encourages the Secretary of 
Defense to modernize and expand open-air range test 
capabilities operation and maintenance in the EGTTR through the 
upgrades of the Electronic Combat Range. The committee further 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to continue to work with 
the other departments to ensure that the test and training 
missions conducted in EGTTR are protected from activities 
incompatible with successful mission completion.

          Foreign Military Flight Training Program Assessment

    The committee understands the United States has trained 
foreign nationals for decades with over 5,100 foreign students 
from over 153 countries in the United States for security 
cooperation related training with the Department of Defense. It 
fully supports this training and its goal of advancing U.S. 
security interests by building defense partnerships. It also 
understands that international military students undergo 
security and medical screening by U.S. officials in the foreign 
country before getting a visa and the Secretary of Defense 
directed a review of vetting procedures for all foreign 
nationals who come to the United States to train.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 
2022, on its foreign military flight training in the United 
States. The briefing will include, at a minimum, the number of 
current locations being used for flight training of foreign 
nationals, the number of foreign nationals being trained at 
each location and the type of training and equipment being 
used, the types of additional flight training in the United 
States that would be beneficial to both the United States and 
the partner countries, and locations where additional flight 
training can be continued or expanded.

 Impacts of Tijuana River Sewage on the Ability of Training Ranges to 
                 Meet Joint Force Training Requirements

    The committee acknowledges recent efforts by United States 
and Mexican authorities to address the impact of transboundary 
sewage runoff from the Tijuana River. The committee is aware 
that this pollution has eroded Navy Outlying Landing Field 
Imperial Beach and contributed to over 250 in-water canceled 
training events in Fiscal Year 2020. These findings suggest 
Tijuana River sewage runoff will continue to impact the utility 
of range complexes, installations, and related facilities in 
the San Diego region and the Navy's ability to train to 
required standards until proper mitigation measures have been 
enacted. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services, not later than February 1, 2022, related to the 
impacts of Tijuana River sewage on the ability of training 
ranges in the region to meet joint force training requirements. 
This briefing shall address the ability of relevant commands to 
accomplish mission essential tasks across the Navy's mission 
areas; the ramifications of cancelled, delayed, or altered 
training on joint force operations; and what actions might be 
taken to resolve or mitigate these impacts on relevant ranges.

           Implementation of the Navy Common Readiness Model

    The committee notes that it is critical for the United 
States Navy to leverage technology to identify lifecycle needs 
and address readiness challenges. The Navy Common Readiness 
Model, which utilizes modeling, simulation and analytic 
capabilities to understand and optimize readiness, could allow 
the Navy to save development, maintenance and sustainment 
funding and enhance the readiness of our naval platforms and 
weapon systems.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 
2022, on the implementation of the Navy Common Readiness Model 
(NCRM). This briefing should address:
    (1) the cost, scope and schedule for NCRM implementation;
    (2) the Navy platforms and weapons system that will be 
modeled in the NCRM in Fiscal Year 2022; and
    (3) the projected cost savings and readiness impact for 
each of the platforms and weapons systems.

               Minimizing Large Transport Fleet Fuel Burn

    The committee strongly supports the mission of the Air 
Force's large transport fleet, responsible for airlifting 
troops and critical equipment to and from military theaters 
across the world. The committee is aware that engines onboard 
these aircraft are routinely exposed to harsh environments that 
prematurely damage their engine fan blades. The committee 
understands that such damage can lead to increased fuel usage 
that escalates costs and carbon emissions. As such, the 
committee encourages the Air Force to utilize innovative 
coating technology to engine fan blades that will reduce fuel 
usage and thereby improve the efficiency of existing aircraft. 
The committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 
2022 on the Air Force's strategy to reduce large transport 
aircraft fuel burn. The briefing shall address: (1) The large 
transport fleet's annual fuel consumption and associated 
operational costs; and (2) An analysis of engine fan blade 
coatings that could deliver greater fuel efficiency.

                        Mission Training Complex

    The committee recognizes the importance of modernizing 
United States Army mission training complexes to meet the 
evolving challenges in a multi-domain environment. The 
committee notes that upgrading existing information technology 
(IT) infrastructure is essential to ensuring these facilities 
have access to the most advanced classified networks for 
critical training and mission preparation for members of the 
U.S. Armed Forces. The committee further notes that IT 
modernization is crucial to mission planning, rehearsals and 
execution, and support to culminating training exercises for 
future evolving threats in an immersive training environment.
    Finally, the committee recognizes that these upgrades to 
existing infrastructure improve the U.S. Army's ability to 
sustain readiness, better integrate with joint forces, and 
prepare for the complex array of global challenges they must 
counter across the multi-domain environment. The committee 
strongly encourages the U.S Army to continue modernization of 
mission training complexes and prioritize such efforts on 
installations whose units experience high operational tempo.

                 National All-Domain Warfighting Center

    The committee recognizes the critical need for the National 
Guard, as an essential component of the Joint Force, to conduct 
all domain training and exercises in support of the National 
Defense Strategy (NDS). The committee notes the Joint Staff's 
development of an all-domain warfighting concept to support the 
NDS.
    The committee notes that in order to support the national 
defense strategy there is an identified need for training 
capabilities that can best be achieved within an all-domain 
training environment that is able to support training and 
exercises for aircraft, maritime, littoral, amphibious, joint 
fire support, maneuver coordinated with fires and effects, 
multi-echelon sustainment, combined arms live fire, decisive 
major combat operations scenarios, air mobility, cyber 
operations, space operations, electronic warfare spectrum 
availability, mission command, remotely piloted aircraft launch 
and recovery, and four seasons capabilities.
    The committee notes that the National All Domain 
Warfighting Center in Michigan is able to support this all-
domain approach and the requirements that come with it, 
therefore enhancing opportunities for all military services to 
train within its facilities. Joint All Domain training, 
exercise integration, and test and experimentation capability 
currently residing within NADWC supports military units from 
all service branches, our allies and partners.
    The committee further notes that NADWC delivers a joint 
all-domain, four-season, training environment that is able to 
support its users in their efforts to achieve or sustain 
proficiency in conducting joint command and control, air, 
maritime, and ground maneuver integration, and the 
synchronization of lethal and non-lethal (cyber) fires in a 
joint, multinational major combat operations environment that 
is scalable across unit resources levels. These capabilities 
are critical to the preparedness of our armed forces for future 
warfighting demands. NADWC provides a training environment that 
addresses training gaps and builds readiness at multiple 
echelons with the scope and scale required to address emerging 
challenges of near-peer competitors.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army, in 
coordination with the Secretary of the Air Force, to submit a 
report to the House Armed Services Committee by March 31, 2022, 
on existing joint all-domain warfighting centers that are able 
to support training and exercises for aircraft, maritime, 
littoral, amphibious, joint fire support, maneuver coordinated 
with fires and effects, multi-echelon sustainment, combined 
arms live fire, decisive major combat operations scenarios, air 
mobility, cyber operations, space operations, electronic 
warfare spectrum availability, mission command, remotely 
piloted aircraft launch and recovery, and four seasons 
capabilities., including:
    (1) current funding levels for the National Guard training 
centers that meet all these requirements and conduct joint all-
domain warfighting training;
    (2) whether these training centers that meet all these 
requirements are appropriately resourced to conduct joint all-
domain warfighting training;
    (3) training capabilities and opportunities available at 
each joint all-domain warfighting center that meet all these 
requirements; and
    (4) training gaps and limitations present at each joint-all 
domain warfighting center that meet all these requirements.

                   Navy Optimized Fleet Response Plan

    The committee notes that in order to address its 
persistently low readiness levels, the Navy implemented a 
revised operational schedule, the Optimized Fleet Response Plan 
(OFRP), in November 2014. OFRP was intended to address several 
problems that had developed as the Navy coped with heavy 
operational demands. These included increased ship deployment 
lengths, reduced or deferred maintenance, decreased 
predictability for sailors and the ship repair industrial base, 
declining ship conditions across the fleet, and longer 
maintenance periods. The Navy's implementation of the OFRP--and 
readiness recovery more broadly--is premised on adherence to 
more sustainable deployment, training, and maintenance 
schedules.
    However, the Navy has faced persistent challenges in 
implementing OFRP since its inception and Navy readiness 
declined between 2017 and 2019. In addition, the Navy has 
experienced continued difficulties with ship maintenance 
timeliness, implementing training for the high-end fight, 
limiting deployment lengths, maintaining ship readiness after 
deployment to provide for surge capacity, meeting ``fit and 
fill'' crewing goals across the fleet, and maintaining carrier 
air wing readiness. In October 2020, the Navy updated its OFRP 
instruction to implement additional changes and address lessons 
learned. The committee remains concerned about the Navy's 
implementation of OFRP and its effect on the Navy's readiness 
recovery.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to assess the following:
    (1) the extent to which the Navy has been successful in 
achieving OFRP goals for maintenance completion, timeliness, 
training certifications, personnel fit/fill rates, operational 
availability, and others;
    (2) the extent to which OFRP implementation impacted 
carrier air wing maintenance, training, and readiness;
    (3) the extent to which the Navy has taken action to 
improve OFRP and the challenges it faces in maximizing the 
fleet's operational availability; and
    (4) any other related matters the Comptroller General 
considers appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than November 1, 2021, on the Comptroller General's 
preliminary findings and to present final results in a format 
and timeframe agreed to at the time of the briefing.

                          Next Generation 911

    The committee recognizes the importance of quick response 
times in responding to emergencies on military installations. 
Incidents at Naval Air Station Corpus Christi, Joint Base Pearl 
Harbor-Hickam, and Washington Navy Yard show the importance and 
need for rapid alert systems and responses. The committee is 
aware of Department of Defense's ongoing efforts to upgrade 
their public safety communications ecosystem, taking advantage 
of innovative technological solutions in the emergency services 
space to increase efficiency and save lives. The committee is 
encouraged by these steps by the Department and looks forward 
to further progress in this realm as their planning continues.
    The committee directs the Director of the Defense 
Information Systems Agency to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by February 15, 2022, including at 
a minimum the following:
    (1) an update of ongoing efforts and plans to modernize 
emergency alert systems on domestic installations;
    (2) a discussion on the specific challenges to modernizing 
emergency alert systems on domestic installations;
    (3) an assessment of the possible use of an outside project 
manager or consulting service to assist in Department efforts 
to modernize emergency alert systems on domestic installations; 
and
    (4) a description of next steps for the implementation of 
this program.

                      Parachute Management System

    The committee continues its interest in updating the way in 
which the Army manages parachute systems. In the committee 
report accompanying the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (H. Rept. 116-
442), the committee required a report on Personnel Parachute 
and Cargo Management Inventory which the Army provided to the 
committee on January 8, 2021. The report concluded that the 
existing paper-based system used by parachute riggers is 
inadequate. As a result, the Army is developing an interim 
parachute management system that is slated to be replaced by a 
program of record in the 2027 timeframe.
    The committee is concerned that the Army has decided to 
forgo suitable commercially available parachute management 
systems, and instead develop a government solution to bridge 
the gap between today and the program of record replacement. 
The committee notes that the report does not conclude that the 
commercially available systems do not meet the Army's 
requirements. The committee therefore directs the Secretary of 
the Army to submit a report to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by February 1, 2022, containing at a minimum an 
analysis of the ability of commercial parachute management 
solutions to meet Army requirements and the cost of developing 
a government solution versus deploying an interim solution for 
parachute management with a commercial-off-the-shelf system.

                 Pilot Training Next--Advanced (PTN-A)

    The committee acknowledges the challenges the Air Force 
faces in training and retaining qualified pilots and is 
concerned about the risk this poses to the Air Force core 
mission. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Air Force to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by March 1, 2022 on the Air Force's strategy to train 
1450 pilots per year and the required combat system operators 
(CSOs), from initial mission qualification through combat 
mission qualification. The report should specifically address:
    (1) Considerations related to retirement of the T-1 Jayhawk 
including a cost benefit analysis comparing upgrading and 
maintaining the current fleet or part thereof; transitioning to 
a new commercially available aircraft; or transitioning to a 
simulator only course;
    (2) Status of development for the T-7 Red Hawk syllabus and 
course requirements to account for the expected increased 
capability of the T-7 aircraft compared to the legacy T-38 
aircraft;
    (3) A strategy to incorporate new technologies developed 
under Pilot Training Next/Pilot Training Next--Advanced (PTN/
PTN-A) experimental training courses to improve training 
effectiveness and efficiency, including considerations for 
incorporating immersive technologies with the intent of 
leveraging low-cost training devices where appropriate;
    (4) Considerations related to the incorporation of 
biometric monitoring devices and psychometric testing to assess 
readiness of instructor and student aircrew;
    (5) Other material and non-material requirements to achieve 
improvements in rated aircrew training effectiveness, 
efficiency, and operator retention.

                  Preserving Military Training Routes

    The committee commends the Military Aviation and 
Installation Assurance Siting Clearinghouse (the Clearinghouse) 
for its efforts in ensuring that compatible energy development 
for energy security does not present an undue national security 
risk or undermine readiness. The committee notes that the 
Clearinghouse has conducted considerable analysis related to 
potential wind energy projects on military training routes and 
ensuring that adequate mitigations are in place to avoid any 
adverse impact on military operations and readiness. Further, 
the committee encourages the Department of Defense to engage 
with all stakeholders as part of its process to assess and make 
a determination of whether an individual project is compatible. 
As such, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2022, to include, at a minimum the following:
    (1) an update on the process by which the Clearinghouse 
reviews and seeks stakeholder input on proposed wind energy 
projects with the potential to impact military training routes;
    (2) a review of available mitigations to include 
technological mitigations being used to avoid any negative 
impact to readiness;
    (3) any ongoing research and development programs to 
mitigate readiness impacts of wind turbines and how emerging 
technologies are factored into the Clearinghouse's 
compatibility analysis;
    (4) a discussion of how the Clearinghouse assesses the 
cumulative impacts of wind projects on the viability of a 
military training route; and
    (5) a list of military training routes that are no longer 
in use due to wind energy projects, and what training 
mitigations were put in place to counter the readiness impacts 
of those routes not being available for use.

                           Readiness Modeling

    The committee is encouraged by the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment's efforts to improve 
readiness and control lifecycle costs. The committee encourages 
the Department of Defense to expand these efforts across the 
enterprise and look at the potential for using modeling for all 
complex defense systems, performing simulation and analytically 
optimizing readiness and lifecycle cost outcomes. The committee 
notes that this methodology could reliably redefine readiness 
not as a single measure, but as a cost-optimized curve that 
could provide Congress and the Department with multiple support 
options across an array of budgetary scenarios thereby 
increasing understanding of the steps required to reduce 
lifecycle costs and improve system performance. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment to submit a report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by December 1, 2021, on efforts to 
standardize readiness modeling for major weapon systems across 
the Department of Defense enterprise.

Review of Mitigation Options for Potential Wind Turbine Interference on 
                                 Radars

    The committee is aware of Department of Defense concerns, 
including coming from the North American Aerospace Defense 
Command (NORAD), regarding compatibility between wind turbines 
and radars if energy projects are not properly sited. The 
committee also understands there are some mitigations available 
today, both on the wind farm side and the radar side, to 
address wind turbine and radar issues, and others under 
consideration but not yet fully developed or validated.
    For example, the committee is aware and has previously 
supported development of gap-filler, or infill, radars that are 
delivering promising results mitigating the impact of wind 
turbine interference on the Department's radar infrastructure. 
The impact of wind turbine interference is most significant at 
the moment within the United States Northern Command/North 
American Aerospace Defense Command (USNORTHCOM/NORAD) air 
surveillance command and control system (C2). Therefore, the 
committee encourages the Department of Defense to move more 
rapidly to test the integration of infill radars into the 
existing C2 architecture.
    The committee is also aware of potential opportunities to 
upgrade ASR-11/DASR sites utilized by NORAD, including through 
adapting the CARSR 270 software modification for use in ASR-11/
DASRs, concurrent beam processing, and MIT Lincoln Lab's 
turbine adaptive nulling concept. The committee encourages the 
Department to move rapidly to develop, validate and deploy 
these mitigations as necessary.
    The committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment, in coordination with the Commander 
of North American Aerospace Defense Command, to provide a 
briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives by February 1, 2022 on a strategy 
for integrating in-fill radars into the Battle Command System-
Fixed (BCS-F) command and control architecture and other 
potential alternative mitigations. The briefing should also 
include the strategy for upgrading ASR-11/DASR sites. At a 
minimum, the briefing should include the following elements:
    (1) Impact of wind turbine radar interference on the 
homeland air sovereignty mission and how it is assessed;
    (2) Limitations and challenges associated with infill radar 
integration into the BCS-F architecture;
    (3) Strategy, milestone events, and timeline for 
integration of infill radars into BCS-F;
    (4) Status of development, testing and/or deployment of 
upgrades to the ASR-11/DASR sites;
    (5) Any additional migration options the Department is 
actively investigating to address potential wind turbine/radar 
conflicts and the remaining steps and timeline to validate and 
deploy such mitigations if they are successfully tested;
    (6) Mitigation options the Department is not considering 
but could with additional resources;
    (7) Mitigation options the Department has considered but 
rejected, if any, along with an explanation of why the 
option(s) is not considered viable; and
    (8) An assessment of the resources necessary to develop, 
test, validate and deploy the mitigation options described 
above, including opportunities for industry financing under 
section 183a of title 10, United States Code.

 Study and Report on Feasibility of Permanent Basing Air Force Flying 
                             Unit/s on Guam

    The committee recognizes the importance the island of Guam 
plays in the National Military Strategy for the Department of 
Defense and its critical role in safeguarding our national 
security interests in the Indo-Pacific. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force, in 
consultation with the Chief of the National Guard Bureau and 
the Director of the Air National Guard, to report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by February 15, 2022, on the 
feasibility and advisability of establishing Total Force flying 
mission/s on Guam that include the Guam Air National Guard. The 
report shall include at a minimum the following:
    (1) a detailed analysis on how permanent basing flying 
mission/s on Guam would affect the region's strategic planning 
and overall national defense and security;
    (2) the optimum airframe type/s and mission designation;
    (3) the overall cost estimate for such establishment;
    (4) a cost-benefit analysis of rotational presence vs. 
permanent basing;
    (5) an estimate of how many assigned personnel are required 
to support the mission;
    (6) the length of time and critical milestones required for 
such establishment;
    (7) the recommended structure of the organization (Active 
or Classic Associate); and
    (8) such other matters as may be determined relevant by the 
Secretary.

                   T-7A Red Hawk Predictive Analytics

    The Committee supports the use of predictive analytics by 
the Department of the Air Force's Air Education and Training 
Command (AETC) to achieve improvements in aircrew training 
production, aircraft readiness, and cost. The use of such data 
has provided important advantages to help address AETC 
production challenges and pilot shortages.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force, in coordination with the Commander, Air Education and 
Training Command, to provide a briefing to the House Committee 
on Armed Services by March 1, 2022 on the strategy to expand 
predictive analytics in the effort to mitigate mission and cost 
impacts during the transition process from the T-38 Talon to 
the T-7A Red Hawk.

       Use of Fitness Wearables to Measure and Promote Readiness

    The Committee recognizes warfighter readiness remains an 
ongoing challenge. In recent years, the Department of Defense 
conducted several pilot programs to use wearable health and 
fitness trackers to measure individual and troop readiness. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by no 
later than March 1, 2022 on the potential for wearable 
technology to improve readiness. The report shall at a minimum 
include the following:
    1. An assessment of the potential for a DOD-wide program to 
use wearable health and fitness trackers to provide the 
warfighter with key readiness metrics and scores, including 
activity levels, stress, sleep, heart rate variability, and 
oxygen saturation;
    2. How aggregated data could be used to improve physical 
readiness programs;
    3. What steps would be required to safeguard data and 
maintain privacy protections; and,
    4. What steps would be required to safeguard classified 
data in locations where wearables are being used.

                   Wind Turbine Mitigation Technology

    The committee notes that energy security is a key component 
of national security. However, the committee is aware of the 
challenges posed to military readiness created by wind turbine 
radar interference. The committee is concerned that without 
mitigation, these challenges can lead to lost opportunities for 
compatible development of a clean, renewable energy source 
without any accompanying detriment to military readiness.
    Fortunately, the committee is also aware of substantial 
progress in the development of technological solutions 
including infill radar systems that are delivering promising 
results mitigating the impact of wind turbine radar 
interference on the Department of Defense's air traffic control 
radar infrastructure. Consequently, the committee encourages 
the Department of Defense to prioritize the development, 
analysis, and certification of radar infill data solutions to 
improve mission readiness and enable wind energy development to 
promote energy security.

                             Other Matters


   Briefing on Progress of Cleanup Actions Related to Department of 
    Defense-Caused Per- and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances Contamination

    The committee remains concerned about the progress of 
environmental remediation at sites contaminated with 
perfluorooctanesulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid 
(PFOA) caused by the Department of Defense. The committee 
recognizes the concerns of communities impacted by this 
contamination and their frustration with poor communication by 
the Department. Accordingly, the committee directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to provide 
a briefing not later than February 1, 2022, on the progress of 
all ongoing environmental remediation actions to clean up PFOS- 
and PFOA-contaminated sites. The briefing shall at a minimum 
include the following:
    (1) a list of contaminated sites by service;
    (2) the status of environmental remediation at each site;
    (3) for sites that have completed the preliminary 
assessment or site inspection phase, the number that have been 
assessed to require no further action and the justification for 
this finding;
    (4) for sites that have proceeded to the remedial 
investigation or feasibility study phase, the timeline for 
completion of this phase;
    (5) for sites that have completed the remedial 
investigation or feasibility study phase, a discussion of next 
steps to include, where appropriate, the justification for a 
finding that no further action is required;
    (6) a discussion of any site where duly promulgated State 
standards or regulations have been assessed as applicable or 
relevant and appropriate requirements; and
    (7) the means by which the Department is communicating with 
community stakeholders about the progress of environmental 
remediation actions.

  Briefing on Southern Resident Killer Whale Interagency Working Group

    The Committee notes the Southern Resident Killer Whales 
(SRKW) are an important cultural symbol and environmental 
linchpin in the Pacific Northwest.
    The Committee is encouraged the Navy met with the US Coast 
Guard (USCG) regarding future interagency cooperation in 
developing measures to protect SRKWs. The Committee is also 
encouraged the Navy and USCG are both eager to work together to 
address SRKW monitoring and have set up an interagency working 
group to understand and leverage each agency's capabilities to 
enhance the protection of the SRKW.
    The Committee directs the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the 
Navy for Environment and Mission Readiness, in coordination 
with the Director of Marine Transportation Systems and the 
Senior Arctic Policy Advisor at the USCG, to brief members of 
the House Armed Services Committee, not later than February 28, 
2022, on the findings, goals and needed capabilities for the 
Interagency Working Group to enhance the protection of the 
SRKW.

   Chemicals Used for Aircraft Rescue and Firefighting Operations at 
               Civilian and Joint Use Airport Operations

    The committee recognizes the continuing work of the 
Department of Defense on important environmental issues 
relating to the use of Aqueous Film-Forming Foam (AFFF) 
containing Per- and polyfluoroalkyl (PFAS) chemicals in 
Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting (ARFF) operations at military 
installations. This work includes environmental remediation and 
research to develop an effective fire-fighting foam that does 
not contain PFAS.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees by 
March 1, 2022. The report should address: the coordination 
between the Department and the FAA with the Joint and Shared 
Use civilian airports that depend on military-controlled 
emergency response; the progress towards establishing a formal 
consultation system to coordinate the review process and final 
actions on PFAS-containing foam with the Joint and Shared Use 
Airport operators; and the timeline for the Department of 
Defense to issue directives on PFAS-containing foam.

                 Continuing Foreign Language Education

    The committee recognizes the importance of providing 
ongoing foreign language instruction to maintain linguists' 
highly perishable skills after they transition from education 
or training settings to operational environments. In addition, 
given the importance of frequently updating language and 
cultural awareness training content, it is also critical that 
the Department of Defense monitor the quality and suitability 
of its post-schoolhouse language training programs and 
establish metrics to ensure training effectiveness. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Personnel and Readiness to submit a report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services, not later than March 1, 2022, that 
includes the following:
    (1) a summary of the Department's in-person and virtual 
offerings for language professionals to sustain their 
proficiency, including information on these platforms' online 
and mobile accessibility;
    (2) a description of the Department's utilization of both 
organic and commercially available advanced foreign language 
tools;
    (3) a description of the extent to which the Department's 
current tools and programs include multimedia content, 
including video, audio, print, and interactive features; and
    (4) information on the oversight and management of these 
programs, including an assessment of the necessity and 
feasibility of establishing an executive agent for continued 
foreign language education.

    Feasibility and Relative Toxicity of Bio-Based Corrosion Control

    The committee commends the Department of Defense on its 
research and analysis of the feasibility of incorporating 
domestically manufactured, bio-based chemicals for corrosion 
control. The committee is aware that corrosion is a significant 
problem for the Department of Defense and that some estimate 
the cost of addressing corrosion to be approximately $20 
billion a year department-wide. The committee is concerned 
about the toxicity of many of the widely used corrosion control 
and mitigation measures. The committee is also concerned that 
many of the currently used phosphate-based chemicals are not 
produced domestically creating further risk both to the 
maintenance of weapon systems and equipment and to the 
environment due to a lack of regulatory controls in the nations 
in which they are produced. The committee is aware that the 
field of synthetic biology continues to advance, and that 
domestic producers are developing innovative corrosion control 
formulations that may provide safer, domestically produced 
alternatives. The committee encourages the Department to 
continue testing these formulations for efficacy and to 
determine relative ecotoxicity, with the goal of identifying 
safer corrosion control options that meet the Department's 
requirements.

                     Fire Detection and Monitoring

    The committee is aware of Department of Defense efforts to 
assist states in the initial detection and monitoring of 
wildfires through a pilot program known as FireGuard. In recent 
years, wildfires have burned millions of acres, causing 
economic damage and the displacement of thousands of people. 
The committee is also aware that this pilot program requires 
Department of Defense to extend it incrementally rather than 
providing long term authorization, and of the Department of 
Defense's efforts to transition the program to the National 
Interagency Fire Center (NIFC). If the Department executes its 
transition, the committee is concerned about maintaining the 
continuity of operations of this critical resource and whether 
Department-provided resources and support will be made 
available to the NIFC to ensure a seamless transition. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
February 15, 2022, that will include at a minimum the 
following:
    (1) a history of the FireGuard program, examples of the 
types of data it provides, and how that data is ultimately used 
by states and interagency partners;
    (2) a full review of what resources may or may not be 
transferred from the FireGuard program to the National 
Interagency Fire Center to ensure continuity of operations and 
why; and
    (3) an assessment of what other resources could be made 
available to the States to assist in the detection and 
monitoring of wildfires.

   Planning Tool for Assessing Drought, Water Scarcity, and Fire Risk

    The committee shares the Department of Defense's view that 
climate change represents a significant concern for military 
readiness. The committee notes that since 2010, the Secretary 
of Defense has acknowledged that a changing climate has a 
dramatic effect on military missions, plans, and installations. 
The committee is concerned about increasing incidents of 
flooding, drought, wildfires, and extreme weather events and 
their effects on military installations. In addition, the 
committee notes that combatant commanders, allies, and 
coalition partners have been forced to conduct operations that 
result from instability in societies strained by 
desertification and the demands for humanitarian assistance 
worldwide. The committee is also concerned about the potential 
for instability around the globe in societies impacted by the 
intersection of drought, health, water scarcity, food 
insecurity, and national security. The committee is aware that 
drought conditions have the potential to create vulnerabilities 
or ``hot spots'' that could require an armed response.
    The committee commends the Air Force Weather Agency for 
initiating a program to develop a global early warning drought 
indicator in fiscal year 2021 that could be used to inform 
climate change considerations in policy activities and risk 
assessments to mitigate these drivers of insecurity. The 
committee understands that the program leverages existing 
infrastructure and platforms developed by other Federal 
partners to address emerging national security concerns through 
machine learning and big data analytics. This program fuses 
climate, hydrologic, biophysical, and vegetation conditions 
with social and economic risk and vulnerability factors to 
create a global drought early warning system for use by 
combatant commanders, military services, and the intelligence 
community to predict global ``hot spots'' and potentially 
reduce the need for armed conflict. The committee encourages 
the Air Force to continue its support and development of this 
tool.

                    Reducing the Risk of Flash Fire

    The committee is aware of the ongoing risks of flash fire 
to members of the Armed Forces and National Guard and 
encourages the implementation of enhanced protections against 
this significant category of injury. The committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the House Committee 
on Armed Services by February 1, 2022, on the risk of flash 
fire to members of the Armed Forces and National Guard of the 
United States which shall include at a minimum:
    (1) an assessment of the risk to members of the Armed 
Forces and National Guard presented by flash fire in combat and 
non-combat operations;
    (2) a review of existing criteria for determining in what 
circumstances combat uniforms of the Armed Forces and National 
Guard are required to be flame-resistant;
    (3) the potential benefits of flame-resistant combat 
uniforms on operational safety and force protection; and
    (4) plans for enhancing protections for members of the 
Armed Forces and National Guard against flash fire.

Report on Existing Use of Virtual Reality Technology in Hard Skills and 
                          Soft Skills Training

    The Committee recognizes the rapid advance in the 
capability of virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) 
systems, and notes their commercial adoption in training 
programs for activities such as aircraft maintenance, aircraft 
operations, and advanced pilot education. The committee 
believes that adoption of VR and AR technologies in the 
activities of the Department of Defense promises to produce 
favorable impacts in readiness, cost effectiveness, 
productivity, and availability. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the 
House Armed Services Committee not later than March 30, 2022, 
that includes, at minimum, the following:
    (1) An overview of the current level of adoption of 
commercially-based VR and AR training platforms throughout the 
Department of Defense;
    (2) The impacts to readiness observed to be associated with 
VR and AR adoption, including cost effectiveness, productivity, 
availability, access, adaptability, and end user satisfaction;
    (3) Currently planned additional deployments of 
commercially-based VR and AR training capabilities, including 
those associated with major acquisition programs;
    (4) The possible utility of commercially available VR and 
AR platforms to support additional Department of Defense 
training activities, including but not limited to aircraft 
maintenance, aircraft operations, advanced pilot education, 
sexual assault prevention, and suicide prevention; and
    (5) Such other information as the Secretary deems 
appropriate.

       Report on Incorporation of Disinfecting Technologies Like 
 Antimicrobial, Antiviral, Antifungal in Department of Defense Issued 
                   Clothing and Individual Equipment

    The committee remains concerned about the threat of 
transmission of infectious diseases among Department of Defense 
(DoD) personnel in training and deployed due to the ongoing 
worldwide pandemic. The committee understands DoD has developed 
and executed processes and procedures to mitigate the 
pandemic's impact on the readiness of our military and its 
ability to execute its peacetime and wartime missions. However, 
the committee is not aware of any efforts currently being 
developed to incorporate antimicrobial and antiviral technology 
in the manufacturing of DoD issued clothing and individual 
equipment.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by March 1, 2022, on current efforts, effectiveness, and 
feasibility of including antimicrobial and antiviral technology 
in the manufacturing of DoD issued clothing and individual 
equipment. The report will include at a minimum:
    (1) assessment of infectious diseases that could be 
mitigated by incorporating disinfection technologies into DoD 
issued clothing and equipment;
    (2) a detailed description of the current use of 
disinfection technologies in the manufacturing of DoD issued 
clothing and individual equipment;
    (3) identification of existing textile based disinfection 
technologies including environmentally friendly solutions that 
could be utilized in DoD issued clothing and individual 
equipment;
    (4) assessment of the effectiveness of incorporating 
disinfection technologies into DoD issued clothing and 
individual equipment;
    (5) proposed strategy and the timeline for incorporating 
such disinfection technology into the production of DoD issued 
clothing and individual equipment in order to better protect 
the health of our Service Members; and
    (6) a cost assessment of incorporating disinfecting 
technologies into DoD issued clothing and individual equipment.

                Report on the Status of PFAS Remediation

    The committee recognizes the Department's efforts to test 
for and plan for the remediation of perfluoroalkyl substances 
and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) at and around military 
installations. However, the committee is concerned that many 
service members, military families, and nearby communities 
remain at risk of PFAS exposure. The committee notes that rapid 
remediation of PFAS is critical to safeguarding the health of 
military and nearby communities. Therefore, the Committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives by March 1, 2022, detailing a proposed schedule 
for the completion of remediation of PFAS at military 
installations, formerly used defense sites, and State-owned 
National Guard facilities in the United States and the 
associated cost estimates to perform such remediation. The 
committee further directs the Secretary of Defense to identify 
the status of efforts to remediate PFAS at the following sites 
in the report:
    (1) England Air Force Base, Louisiana.
    (2) Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake, California.
    (3) Patrick Air Force Base, Florida.
    (4) Myrtle Beach Air Force Base, South Carolina.
    (5) Langley Air Force Base, Virginia.
    (6) Naval Air Station Jacksonville, Florida.
    (7) Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station, New York.
    (8) Grand Prairie Armed Forces Reserve Complex, Texas.
    (9) Altus Air Force Base, Oklahoma.
    (10) Charleston Air Force Base, South Carolina.
    (11) Barksdale Air Force Base, Louisiana.
    (12) Plattsburgh Air Force Base, New York.
    (13) Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida.
    (14) Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas.
    (15) Columbus Air Force Base, Mississippi.
    (16) Chanute Air Force Base, Illinois.
    (17) Marine Corps Air Station Tustin, California.
    (18) Travis Air Force Base, California.
    (19) Ellsworth Air Force Base, South Dakota.
    (20) Minot Air Force Base, North Dakota.
    (21) Westover Air Reserve Base, Massachusetts.
    (22) Eaker Air Force Base, Arkansas.
    (23) Naval Air Station Alameda, California.
    (24) Eielson Air Force Base, Alaska.
    (25) Horsham Air Guard Station, Pennsylvania.
    (26) Vance Air Force Base, Oklahoma.
    (27) Dover Air Force Base, Delaware.
    (28) Edwards Air Force Base, California.
    (29) Robins Air Force Base, Georgia.
    (30) Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, New Jersey.
    (31) Galena Air Force Base, Alaska.
    (32) Naval Research Laboratory Chesapeake Bay Detachment, 
Maryland.
    (33) Buckley Air Force Base, Colorado.
    (34) Arnold Air Force Base, Tennessee.
    (35) Tinker Air Force Base, Oklahoma.
    (36) Fairchild Air Force Base, Washington.
    (37) Vandenberg Air Force Base, California.
    (38) Hancock Field Air National Guard Base, New York.
    (39) F.E. Warren Air Force Base, Wyoming.
    (40) Nevada Air National Guard Base--Reno, Nevada.
    (41) K.I. Sawyer Air Force Base, Michigan.
    (42) Pease Air Force Base, New Hampshire.
    (43) Whiteman Air Force Base, Missouri.
    (44) Wurtsmith Air Force Base, Michigan.
    (45) Shepherd Field Air National Guard Base, West Virginia.
    (46) Naval Air Station Whidbey Island--Ault Field, 
Washington.
    (47) Rosecrans Air National Guard Base, Missouri.
    (48) Joint Base Andrews, Maryland.
    (49) Iowa Air National Guard Base--Des Moines, Iowa.
    (50) Stewart Air National Guard Base, New York.

   Research and Development of New and Emerging Technologies for the 
                    Remediation and Disposal of PFAS

    The committee commends the Defense Strategic Environmental 
Research and Development Program and Environmental Security 
Technology Certification Program for their work on the research 
and development of new technologies to aid in the environmental 
remediation of soils and water contaminated with per- and 
polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS), and the safe disposal of 
aqueous film-forming foam and other PFAS-contaminated items. 
However, the committee is aware that there is still significant 
work to be done in the development and field-testing of these 
technologies. Accordingly, the committee directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to provide 
a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by February 
1, 2022, on its continuing efforts to develop and field 
remediation and disposal technologies to address PFAS 
contamination. The briefing shall at a minimum address the 
following:
    (1) a description of completed and ongoing work in PFAS 
sampling and analysis technologies;
    (2) a description of completed and ongoing work in in situ 
and ex situ treatment for PFAS to include work or planned work 
in the following areas: super-critical water oxidation 
technology, granulated active carbon filter alternatives, and 
thermal destruction; and
    (3) a description of completed and ongoing work on 
incineration alternatives for disposal to include non-thermal 
plasma technologies, various thermal and hydrothermal 
technologies, chemical and photo/electric reduction 
technologies, and electron beam technologies.

Study and Report to Congress on DoD Logistics and Potential Benefits of 
                               Carsharing

    The Committee is interested in enabling and incentivizing 
servicemembers (especially when deployed) to share their car(s) 
or use a shared car through a peer-to-peer carsharing platform, 
creating an economic opportunity for car owning servicemembers 
and providing a key mobility option for those servicemembers 
and dependents in need of a car. The primary advantage to the 
warfighter is that the expense of a depreciating asset can be 
monetized while deployed. Costs of storage should also be 
reduced for DoD.
    Peer-to-peer (P2P) carsharing is the authorized use of a 
vehicle by an individual other than the vehicle's owner through 
a peer-to-peer carsharing platform, which is a business that 
connects vehicle owners with drivers to enable the sharing of 
vehicles for financial consideration. P2P carsharing is 
distinct from rental car or rental activity.
    P2P carsharing is an alternative to personal car ownership. 
Instead of owning a vehicle, by using a smartphone application 
(app) and an online marketplace, users have access to cars 
shared by private owners that they can use to run errands, 
commute to work, or enjoy a road trip. Many shared cars are 
available by the hour or day 24/7, and can be more conveniently 
located than other forms of transportation. P2P carsharing is 
increasing in popularity among Americans.
    Some P2P carsharing platforms require that an individual 
manually provide the car keys to the user so that the user may 
unlock and drive the car. Other platforms use in-car technology 
to enable the user to unlock the car using a smartphone to 
access keys inside, without meeting anyone in person. It is 
anticipated that forthcoming technological developments will 
enable a user to unlock and drive the shared car using a 
smartphone and a carsharing app, without a traditional car key.
    Studies have also shown that P2P carsharing benefits the 
environment by reducing car ownership and increases use of mass 
transit, buses, bikes, and other alternative transportation 
options because car sharers are less likely to use their own 
personal vehicle for all trips. Further studies have shown that 
P2P carsharing can economically assist individuals by 
contributing additional income to their household.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to study the 
logistics and potential benefits of P2P carsharing, including:
    (1) Personal car ownership, including selling one's car or 
not purchasing a car in the first place, potentially reducing 
opportunities for predatory lending occurrences.
    (2) Benefits to the deployed warfighter
    (3) Reduction of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions
    (4) Benefits to spouses and dependents (i.e., economic 
revenue and expense reduction, such as not having to purchase a 
second car)
    (5) Mode shift away from using one's own automobile to 
other transportation options
    The study should also consider the equity and economic 
impacts on users of having access to a shared car, as well how 
participation would impact car depreciation. The Department 
shall report back to the Committee not later than April 1, 
2022.

 Sufficiency of Current Special Operations Force Language Capabilities 
               to Meet Great Power Competition Challenges

    The shift in focus by the Department of Defense on 
strategic competition with near-peer adversaries necessitates a 
force that is not simply proficient in foreign languages such 
as Chinese and Russian, but also regional dialects and the 
languages of relevant foreign partners. Proficiency and 
sufficiency of foreign language skills are a necessity for the 
joint force to conduct irregular warfare (IW), and the 
Department must maintain an expandable baseline level of 
institutional readiness, to include that of foreign language 
proficiency, to meet the full range of enduring IW 
requirements. While the conduct of IW is a whole-of-government 
effort in which the Department plays an important role, U.S. 
Special Operations Forces (USSOF) are an integral part of those 
military activities carried out below the level of armed 
conflict and therefore must maintain a high degree of 
proficiency in those languages critical to enable strategic 
competition.
    The committee is concerned that the last two decades of 
combatting violent extremism has impacted USSOF's ability to 
access and participate in foreign language training and thus 
led to an atrophy of such skills across the formation. Further, 
the committee is aware that foreign language readiness of the 
formation is an element that is not well documented nor 
assessed.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to conduct a review of the foreign language 
skills of special operations forces. The review shall assess:
    (1) the required number of SOF personnel trained and 
proficient in foreign languages;
    (2) the current number of SOF personnel trained and 
proficient in foreign languages;
    (3) the distribution of SOF personnel with language skills 
by military occupational specialty;
    (4) the ways in which proficiency of foreign languages is 
determined;
    (5) the accessibility of such foreign language programs by 
SOF personnel;
    (6) how the Department determines the sufficiency of 
existing foreign language training, education, and testing 
programs to address current and emergent threats;
    (7) any gaps in foreign language readiness to include 
specific shortfalls in critical languages and mitigations to 
address those gaps; and
    (8) any other areas the Comptroller General deems 
appropriate.
    The committee directs the Comptroller General to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 4, 
2022, on the initial findings and to submit a final report on a 
date agreed to at the time of the briefing.

                         Waikoloa Maneuver Area

    The committee is aware that Waikoloa Maneuver Area is a 
formerly used defense site on the island of Hawaii that extends 
to over 100,000 acres on the northwest side of the island. The 
committee notes that two surface cleanup actions were taken 
shortly after the end of the Second World War to clean up 
unexploded ordnance and that additional contracts have been 
completed to clear areas planned for development. The United 
States Army Corps of Engineers has assessed certain areas of 
the site as moderate to high risk areas. To date, 28,000 acres 
have been cleared. The committee is concerned that munitions 
continue to be found on the site, and that there has not been 
sufficient progress in clearing areas planned for development. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Energy, Installations, and Environment to provide a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services by February 1, 
2022, that shall include at a minimum the following:
    (1) an updated estimate for the cost to complete the 
investigation, cleanup, and long-term monitoring of the site;
    (2) a prioritized timeline and plan for cleaning up the 
areas of the site planned for industrial or agricultural, and 
other development;
    (3) a description of ongoing communication efforts with 
community stakeholders on the progress and future plans for 
cleanup; and
    (4) the status of current and planned contract awards for 
remaining investigation and cleanup work.

            Water Banking to Support Installation Resiliency

    The committee is concerned about the threat of drought and 
water insecurity, particularly for military installations in 
the western United States that are wholly or in part west of 
the Continental Divide. The committee contends that resiliency 
planning, particularly installation resiliency master planning, 
must be a key priority for the military departments to ensure 
that wise investments are made to ensure efficient management 
and storage of this resource and to model future requirements. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than April 1, 2022, that shall at a minimum contain the 
following:
    (1) the results of a survey of water resources in the 
western United States providing water to military 
installations;
    (2) the amount of water purchased on behalf of military 
installations in the western United States by the Department 
annually;
    (3) a description of how such water (total) is stored and 
by what means (surface, subsurface, or by other means) by 
military installations;
    (4) the amount of such purchased water that is stored as 
emergency reserve for the installation;
    (5) risk factors that could contribute to the loss of such 
purchased water resources;
    (6) a discussion of alternative storage methods that could 
provide additional resiliency; and
    (7) the potential for regional transfers of purchased water 
to mitigate water insecurity or achieve resiliency.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations


              Section 301--Authorization of Appropriations

    This section would authorize appropriations for operation 
and maintenance activities at the levels identified in section 
4301 of division D of this Act.

                   Subtitle B--Energy and Environment


 Section 311--Inclusion of Impacts on Military Installation Resilience 
       in the National Defense Strategy and Associated Documents

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense and the 
Secretaries of the military departments to incorporate 
consideration of the risks related to installation resilience 
in certain strategies of the Department of Defense.

    Section 312--Modification of Authorities Governing Cultural and 
          Conservation Activities of the Department of Defense

    This section would amend section 2694 of title 10, United 
States Code, to include Sentinel Landscapes and encourage the 
establishment of an interagency Sentinel Landscape Partnership.

 Section 313--Modification of Authority for Environmental Restoration 
                       Projects of National Guard

    This section would amend section 2707 of title 10, United 
States Code, to allow the National Guard to access Defense 
Environmental Restoration Programs funds.

 Section 314--Prohibition on Use of Open-Air Burn Pits in Contingency 
                  Operations outside the United States

    This section would prohibit the use of open-air burn pits 
during overseas contingency operations unless an exemption is 
issued by the President of the United States for a particular 
location. Thirty days after an exemption is granted, the 
President would be required to submit a report to Congress 
detailing the location, size, duration, and need of the burn 
pit; the number of personnel assigned to the location; and the 
personal protective equipment or other methods that will be 
used by those personnel to mitigate the health effects of said 
pit.

Section 315--Maintenance of Current Analytical Tools for Evaluation of 
                       Energy Resilience Measures

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
implement a process to ensure that it is using accurate and 
effective tools for analyzing cost and performance of energy 
resiliency measures.

 Section 316--Energy Efficiency Targets for Department of Defense Data 
                                Centers

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
assess its current inventory of data centers and set energy and 
water targets for certain centers.

   Section 317--Modification of Restriction on Department of Defense 
 Procurement of Certain Items Containing Perfluorooctane Sulfonate or 
                         Perfluorooctanoic Acid

    This section would amend section 333 of the William M. 
(Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) and restrict the Department of 
Defense from procuring certain items containing perfluoroalkyl 
or polyfluoroalkyl substances.

  Section 318--Temporary Moratorium on Incineration by Department of 
 Defense of Perfluoroalkyl Substances, Polyfluoroalkyl Substances, and 
                       Aqueous Film Forming Foam

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
institute a moratorium on incineration of materials containing 
or contaminated by perfluoroalkyl substances, polyfluoroalkyl 
substances, or aqueous film forming foam until the Secretary of 
Defense certifies that the Department has implemented the 
Environmental Protection Agency's guidance for disposal.

  Section 319--Public Disclosure of Results of Department of Defense 
   Testing of Water for Perfluoroalkyl or Polyfluoroalkyl Substances

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
publicly disclose the results of testing for perfluoroalkyl or 
polyfluoroalkyl substances on military installations or 
formerly used defense sites.

                 Section 320--PFAS Testing Requirements

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
complete preliminary assessment and site inspection for PFAS at 
all military installations, formerly used defense sites, and 
State-owned facilities of the National Guard within the United 
States.

   Section 321--Standards for Response Actions with Respect to PFAS 
                             Contamination

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to meet 
or exceed the most stringent standards between an enforceable 
State standard under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), an 
enforceable Federal standard under CERCLA, or a health advisory 
under the Safe Drinking Water Act when performing removal or 
remediation actions of PFOS or PFOA contamination from 
Department of Defense or National Guard activities found in 
drinking water or in groundwater that is not currently used for 
drinking water.

Section 322--Review and Guidance Relating to Prevention and Mitigation 
                 of Spills of Aqueous Film-Forming Foam

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
promulgate guidance on the prevention and mitigation of spills 
of aqueous film-forming foam within 180 days of the date of the 
enactment of this Act.

     Section 323--Budget Information for Alternatives to Burn Pits

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
include a budget line item for alternatives to burn pits.

  Section 324--Establishment of Emissions Control Standard Operating 
                               Procedures

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a review of electromagnetic spectrum emissions control 
(EMCON) standard operating procedures. It would further mandate 
that each military department establish standard operating 
procedures for EMCON. In addition, it would require a report 
within 1 year on the Department of Defense's implementation of 
these provisions.

 Section 325--Long-Duration Demonstration Initiative and Joint Program

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
establish a demonstration program with the Department of Energy 
with the aim of developing long-duration energy storage 
technologies.

     Section 326--Pilot Program on Use of Sustainable Aviation Fuel

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
conduct a pilot program on the use of 10 percent blend 
sustainable aviation fuel at two geographically diverse 
locations by 2028.

Section 327--Joint Department of Defense and Department of Agriculture 
    Study on Bioremediation of PFAS Using Mycological Organic Matter

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense and the 
Secretary of Agriculture to jointly carry out a study on 
bioremediation of PFAS using mycological organic matter.

                 Subtitle C--Logistics and Sustainment


   Section 341--Mitigation of Contested Logistics Challenges of the 
  Department of Defense through Reduction of Operational Energy Demand

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
establish a contested logistics working group for the purpose 
of mitigating energy-related contested logistics challenges.

         Section 342--Global Bulk Fuel Management and Delivery

    This section would amend subchapter 3 of chapter 173 of 
title 10, United States Code, by adding a new section that 
would direct the Secretary of Defense to designate a combatant 
command to be responsible for global bulk fuel management and 
delivery. This section also would direct a strategy on global 
bulk fuel management and delivery.

  Section 343--Comptroller General Annual Reviews of F-35 Sustainment 
                                Efforts

    This section would direct the Comptroller General of the 
United States to conduct an annual review of F-35 sustainment 
efforts, provide annual briefings to the House Committee on 
Armed Services not later than March 1 of each year of 2022, 
2023, 2024, and 2025, and annual reports at a time agreed upon 
by the Comptroller General and the House Committee on Armed 
Services.

Section 344--Pilot Program on Biobased Corrosion Control and Mitigation

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
create a 1-year pilot program to test the use of covered 
biobased solutions as alternatives to current solutions for the 
control and mitigation of corrosion. Upon completion of the 
pilot program, the Secretary shall develop recommendations for 
deployment throughout the Department.

     Section 345--Pilot Program on Digital Optimization of Organic 
           Industrial Base Maintenance and Repair Operations

    This section would require that the Secretary of Defense 
initiate a pilot program under which the Secretary shall 
provide for the digitization of the facilities and operations 
of at least one government-owned and operated military depot.

 Section 346--Pilot Program on Implementation of Mitigating Actions to 
 Address Vulnerabilities to Critical Defense Facilities and Associated 
                Defense Critical Electric Infrastructure

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense in 
coordination with the Secretary of Energy to conduct a pilot 
program to mitigate vulnerabilities in defense critical 
electric infrastructure.

     Section 347--Report and Certification Requirements regarding 
              Sustainment Costs for F-35 Aircraft Program

    This section would require a report and certification 
regarding F-35 program sustainment costs, and would prohibit 
the Secretary of Defense from entering into a Performance-Based 
Logistics sustainment contract before certifying that the 
program met sustainment cost reduction metrics and that the 
contract would further reduce sustainment costs.

           Subtitle D--Risk Mitigation and Safety Improvement


 Section 351--Treatment of Notice of Presumed Risk Issued by Military 
Aviation and Installation Assurance Clearinghouse for Review of Mission 
                              Obstructions

    This section would amend section 183a of title 10, United 
States Code, to clarify the treatment of notices of presumed 
risk.

           Section 352--Establishment of Joint Safety Council

    This section would amend chapter 7 of title 10, United 
States Code, to establish a Joint Safety Council within the 
Office of the Deputy Secretary of Defense.

             Section 353--Mishap Investigation Review Board

    This section would direct the Deputy Secretary of Defense 
to develop a proposal for the establishment of a Mishap 
Investigation Review Board to provide oversight and independent 
review of safety and legal mishap investigations.

 Section 354--Implementation of Comptroller General Recommendations on 
             Preventing Tactical Vehicle Training Accidents

    This section would require the Secretaries of the Army and 
Marine Corps to develop a plan to address the recommendations 
contained in the Comptroller General report entitled ``Army and 
Marine Corps Should Take Additional Actions to Mitigate and 
Prevent Training Accidents.''

 Section 355--Pilot Program for Tactical Vehicle Safety Data Collection

    This section would require the Secretary of the Army and 
the Secretary of the Navy to carry out a pilot program to 
evaluate the feasibility of using data recorders to monitor, 
assess, and improve the readiness and safety of military 
tactical vehicles.

                          Subtitle E--Reports


   Section 361--Inclusion of Information regarding Borrowed Military 
                     Manpower in Readiness Reports

    This section would amend section 482 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require that semiannual readiness reports to 
Congress include information on the extent to which service 
members are diverted to perform functions previously performed 
by civilian employees or contractors.

Section 362--Annual Report on Missing, Lost, and Stolen Weapons, Large 
   Amounts of Ammunition, Destructive Devices, and Explosive Material

    This section would add the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, 
Firearms and Explosives to an existing reporting requirement 
and adds an annual report to Congress on missing, lost, or 
stolen weapons, large amounts of ammunition, destructive 
devices, and explosive material for the previous year.

     Section 363--Annual Report on Material Readiness of Navy Ships

    This section would amend section 8674 of title 10, United 
States Code, to make permanent the requirement for an annual 
report to the congressional defense committees on the material 
readiness of Navy ships.

     Section 364--Strategy and Annual Report on Critical Language 
                Proficiency of Special Operations Forces

    This section would require the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict (ASD 
SO/LIC), in coordination with the Commander, U.S. Special 
Operations Command, to prepare a 5-year strategy on current and 
planned efforts to recruit, select, and train special 
operations forces (SOF) in critical languages relevant to 
strategic competition. Further, this section would also direct 
ASD SOLIC to submit an annual report on the assessed 
proficiency of SOF in those critical languages, due not later 
than 1 year after the submission of the strategy.

  Section 365--Report and Briefing on Approach for Certain Properties 
           Affected by Noise from Military Flight Operations

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing and report on the use and applicability of 
the Air Installations Compatible Use Zones program to support 
noise mitigation and insulation efforts.

 Section 366--Study on Use of Military Resources to Transport Certain 
              Individuals and Effect on Military Readiness

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a study to determine the effect on readiness of using 
Department of Defense resources to transport individuals who 
have crossed the southern border of the United States without 
authorization and submit a report to Congress on such study.

                       Subtitle F--Other Matters


    Section 371--Budget Justification for Operation and Maintenance

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Secretary of each military department, to 
provide budget justification details for Operation and 
Maintenance accounts, including information displayed by sub-
activity group, as detailed in the Future Years Defense 
Program, as well as material readiness objectives and any 
associated risks to the supply chain.

   Section 372--Improvements and Clarifications Related to Military 
                              Working Dogs

    This section would amend section 2583 of title 10, United 
States Code, and direct that retired military working dogs 
shall be transferred without charge to the adoption recipients. 
This section would also amend section 708 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) and direct the Joint Trauma Education and Training 
Directorate to consider military working dogs and veterinary 
services in its research and planning efforts.

 Section 373--Management of Fatigue among Crew of Naval Surface Ships 
                        and Related Improvements

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
implement the recommendations contained in the Comptroller 
General of the United States report entitled ``Navy Readiness: 
Additional Efforts Are Needed to Manage Fatigue, Reduce Crewing 
Shortfalls, and Implement Training.''

  Section 374--Authority to Establish Center of Excellence for Radar 
       Systems and Complementary Workforce and Education Programs

    This section would permit the Secretary of Defense to 
establish a Center of Excellence to further the expertise of 
the Department of Defense in the repair, sustainment, and 
support of radar systems.

   Section 375--Pilot Program on Military Working Dog and Explosives 
                 Detection Canine Health and Excellence

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
carry out a pilot program to ensure the health and excellence 
of explosives detection military working dogs.

              TITLE IV--MILITARY PERSONNEL AUTHORIZATIONS

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                       Subtitle A--Active Forces


              Section 401--End Strengths for Active Forces

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for Active Duty personnel of the Armed Forces as of September 
30, 2022:

Sec. 401.




----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2022                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2021                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2022      FY 2021
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army...........................................      485,900      485,000      485,000            0         -900
Navy...........................................      347,800      346,200      346,200            0       -1,600
USMC...........................................      181,200      178,500      178,500            0       -2,700
Air Force......................................      333,475      328,300      328,300            0       -5,175
Space Force....................................        6,434        8,400        8,400            0        1,966
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................    1,354,809    1,346,400    1,346,400            0       -8,409
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Section 402--Revisions in Permanent Active Duty End Strength Minimum 
                                 Levels

    This section would establish new minimum Active Duty end 
strengths for the Army, Navy, Marine Corps, Air Force, and 
Space Force as of September 30, 2022. The committee recommends 
485,000 as the minimum Active Duty end strength for the Army, 
346,200 as the minimum Active Duty end strength for the Navy, 
178,500 as the minimum Active Duty end strength for the Marine 
Corps, 328,300 as the minimum Active Duty end strength for the 
Air Force, and 8,400 as the minimum Active Duty end strength 
for the Space Force.

                       Subtitle B--Reserve Forces


            Section 411--End Strengths for Selected Reserve

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for Selected Reserve personnel, including the end strength for 
Reserves on Active Duty in support of the Reserves, as of 
September 30, 2022:

Sec. 411.




----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2022                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2021                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2022      FY 2021
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................      336,500      336,000      336,000            0         -500
Army Reserve...................................      189,800      189,500      189,500            0         -300
Navy Reserve...................................       58,800       58,600       58,600            0         -200
Marine Corps Reserve...........................       38,500       36,800       36,800            0       -1,700
Air National Guard.............................      108,100      108,300      108,300            0          200
Air Force Reserve..............................       70,300       70,300       70,300            0            0
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................      802,000      799,500      799,500            0       -2,500
Coast Guard Reserve............................        7,000        7,000        7,000            0            0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Section 412--End Strengths for Reserves on Active Duty in Support of 
                              the Reserves

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for Reserves on Active Duty in support of the Reserves as of 
September 30, 2022:

Sec. 412.




----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2022                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2021                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2022      FY 2021
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................       30,595       30,845       30,845            0          250
Army Reserve...................................       16,511       16,511       16,511            0            0
Navy Reserve...................................       10,215       10,293       10,293            0           78
Marine Corps Reserve...........................        2,386        2,386        2,386            0            0
Air National Guard.............................       25,333       26,661       26,661            0        1,328
Air Force Reserve..............................        5,256        6,003        6,003            0          747
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................       90,296       92,699       92,699            0        2,403
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

   Section 413--End Strengths for Military Technicians (Dual Status)

    This section would authorize the following end strengths 
for military technicians (dual status) as of September 30, 
2022:

Sec. 413.




----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2022                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2021                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2022      FY 2021
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................       22,294       22,294       22,294            0            0
Army Reserve...................................        6,492        6,492        6,492            0            0
Air National Guard.............................       10,994        9,885        9,885            0       -1,109
Air Force Reserve..............................        7,947        7,111        7,111            0         -836
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................       47,727       45,782       45,782            0       -1,945
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 Section 414--Maximum Number of Reserve Personnel Authorized To Be on 
                  Active Duty for Operational Support

    This section would authorize, as required by section 115(b) 
of title 10, United States Code, the maximum number of Reserve 
Component personnel who may be on Active Duty or full-time 
National Guard duty during fiscal year 2022 to provide 
operational support. The personnel authorized here do not count 
against the end strengths authorized by section 401 or section 
412 of this Act unless the duration on Active Duty exceeds the 
limitations in section 115(b)(2) of title 10, United States 
Code.

Sec. 414.




----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       FY 2022                 Change from
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                    Service                        FY 2021                  Committee
                                                  Authorized    Request       Recom-      FY 2022      FY 2021
                                                                            mendation     Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................       17,000       17,000       17,000            0            0
Army Reserve...................................       13,000       13,000       13,000            0            0
Navy Reserve...................................        6,200        6,200        6,200            0            0
Marine Corps Reserve...........................        3,000        3,000        3,000            0            0
Air National Guard.............................       16,000       16,000       16,000            0            0
Air Force Reserve..............................       14,000       14,000       14,000            0            0
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
  DOD Total....................................       69,200       69,200       69,200            0            0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Section 415--Accounting of Reserve Component Members Performing Active 
 Duty or Full-Time National Guard Duty Towards Authorized End Strengths

    This section would amend the accounting of Reserve 
Component members performing Active Duty or full-time National 
Guard duty towards authorized end strengths from 1,095 days out 
of 1,460 days to 1,825 days out of 2,190 days.

              Subtitle C--Authorization of Appropriations


                    Section 421--Military Personnel

    This section would authorize appropriations for military 
personnel at the levels identified in the funding table in 
section 4401 of division D of this Act.

                   TITLE V--MILITARY PERSONNEL POLICY

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


               Arlington National Cemetery Burial Policy

    The committee is aware of upcoming changes in eligibility 
for interment at Arlington National Cemetery. The committee is 
concerned that veterans who previously qualified for in-ground 
burials at Arlington National Cemetery will be forced to choose 
between being cremated and being buried somewhere else. The 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in coordination 
with the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to submit a report to 
congressional defense committees no later than March 1, 2022, 
on potential locations of the next national cemetery.

                     Army Aviation Retention Study

    The committee recognizes the importance of the United 
States Army's aviation mission and corresponding need for 
strong end strength. United States Army aviators have unique 
skill sets and provide expertise critical to the service's 
combat readiness. However, the committee is concerned about the 
recruitment and retention of qualified pilots and aviation 
crewmembers and the effect on the Army's ability to conduct 
worldwide operations. The U.S. Army must work towards retaining 
these personnel to avoid a shortage of experienced pilots with 
the technical and tactical knowledge to maintain aviation 
readiness.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to conduct a study and to provide a report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by December 31, 2021, on necessary 
efforts to recruit and retain qualified pilots. The study and 
report shall include information and recommendations based on, 
but not limited to:
    (1) barriers to successful recruitment of qualified pilots;
    (2) the high operational tempo for Army pilots and its 
effects on training and readiness, as well as effects on 
military families;
    (3) pay and bonus structures for Army pilots and aviation 
Military Occupational Specialties;
    (4) the length and structure of aviation contract 
obligations; and
    (5) existing retention tools outside of monetary bonuses 
such as improved quality of life initiatives.

        Artificial Intelligence and Personnel Talent Management

    The committee recognizes the significant resources that all 
of the services spend in recruiting and retaining talent across 
their respective enterprises. The committee is aware of 
capability gaps within the military services in properly 
identifying the skills and necessary attributes of personnel to 
optimize their talent pools. Further, the committee 
acknowledges that artificial intelligence (AI) and other data 
science innovations can help better align individuals' skills 
to service requirements with predictable successful outcomes, 
measured through job performance and retention. The committee 
recognizes that AI can also improve talent management by 
creating a rich repository of data that can be used to build a 
more holistic view of skills obtained throughout a career in 
military service. The committee believes that the technology 
can improve force readiness by enhancing recruitment efficiency 
and increasing retention. Ensuring that military service 
members are identified for the right missions based on a 
critical combination of skills and experience will optimize 
performance and increase mission success. The committee urges 
the Army and other services to support increased AI investment 
for talent management and acquisition.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives not later than February 1, 2022, on 
how each of the military services are leveraging commercially 
available AI platforms that are designed to accurately predict 
human outcomes and radically improve talent management.

                   Award of the Prisoner of War Medal

    The committee notes the unequal treatment of applicants 
across the services for award of the Prisoner of War Medal 
under section 1128(b) of title 10, United States Code, as 
amended by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2013 (Public Law 112-239). The Department of the Army 
specifically has interpreted the statutory requirements in such 
a narrow way as to block seemingly obvious cases of 
eligibility, whereas the other service secretaries have 
implemented the requirements for the award in a much more 
discretionary fashion as was intended. The committee also 
understands that not all services have established clear 
processes for how service members or their next of kin might 
apply for the Prisoner of War Medal under the provisions of 
section 1128(b) of title 10, United States Code. The committee 
encourages the Department of Defense to mandate the sharing of 
best practices of award criteria across the services. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretaries of the 
military departments to provide a briefing to the Committee on 
Armed Services of the House of Representatives not later than 
March 1, 2022, on the details of the process and criteria by 
which they consider the award of the Prisoner of War Medal 
under section 1128(b) of title 10, United States Code.

 Briefing on Efforts of Extremist Organizations to Recruit Members of 
                            the Armed Forces

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing not later than March 1, 2022 to the Congressional 
Defense Committees on all studies, including status reports and 
initial findings from any ongoing studies, regarding the 
efforts of extremist organizations to recruit members of the 
Armed forces (including the reserve components).
    Within 180 days of providing this briefing, and provided 
that the Department of Defense concludes that extremist 
organizations are attempting to recruit members of the armed 
forces, the Secretary of Defense shall provide a follow-on 
briefing to the Congressional Defense Committees regarding how 
the Department is addressing this threat.

Briefing on Implementation of U.S. Special Operations Command Diversity 
                      and Inclusion Strategic Plan

    The committee notes the 1999 RAND study on barriers to 
minority participation in special operations forces. The 
committee also understands that the U.S. Special Operations 
Command struggles to build and maintain a diverse and inclusive 
force. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, in coordination with the Commander, U.S. Special 
Operations Command, to provide a briefing to the Committee on 
Armed Services of the House of Representatives, not later than 
April 1, 2022, to address the following: (1) the specific tools 
and metrics devised to evaluate the diversity and inclusivity 
of recruiting within the special operations community; (2) the 
potential cultural barriers that may prevent those with diverse 
backgrounds from serving in the special operations community 
and possible solutions; and (3) whether the special operations 
community is measuring the right data points to ensure combat 
effectiveness, and if not, what data points should be measured. 
The briefing shall include implementation efforts and the 
milestones to fully realize the Diversity and Inclusion 
Strategic Plan 2021.

                 Career Intermission Program Evaluation

    The committee is concerned about the perceived or real 
barriers to service members using the Career Intermission 
Program to its full potential to benefit service member career 
choices. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed 
Services of the House of Representatives not later than 
February 1, 2022, on the utilization rate of the Career 
Intermission Program, disaggregated by gender, and the barriers 
perceived by service members, such as promotion opportunity, 
that would make them hesitate to use the program.

            Comptroller General Review of Navy Ship Manning

    The committee notes the Navy's efforts to accurately 
calculate manpower requirements for surface ships and improve 
shipboard manning since the fatal ship collisions in 2017. 
However, as the Government Accountability Office (GAO) reported 
in May 2021, the Navy's surface fleet manning shortfalls have 
grown from 6 percent in September 2016 to 15 percent in 
September 2020 (GAO-21-366). The committee is concerned that 
these growing shortfalls are likely contributing to the lack of 
sleep and extensive fatigue also reported by the GAO, creating 
unsafe and ineffective operating conditions in the surface 
fleet. The committee is also concerned that the Navy has not 
historically authorized billets to required levels. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to assess Navy ship manning. The assessment shall 
include:
    (1) the Navy's process for determining the number of 
authorized billets to meet ship manpower requirements;
    (2) the extent to which qualified personnel have been 
assigned to required billets (referred to as ``fit'');
    (3) the extent to which the Navy is manning ships to 
required levels; and
    (4) any other related matters the Comptroller General 
considers appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
April 1, 2022, on preliminary findings and present final 
results in a format and timeframe agreed to at the briefing.

    Defense Prisoner of War and Missing in Action Accounting Agency 
                          Forensic Laboratory

    The committee acknowledges the important work of the 
Defense Prisoner of War and Missing in Action Accounting Agency 
(DPAA) in its mission to provide the fullest possible 
accounting of personnel missing from past conflicts to their 
families and the nation. The committee congratulates the Agency 
for its recent success in the return of remains of sailors and 
Marines aboard the USS Oklahoma who perished during the attack 
on Pearl Harbor. In particular, the committee commends the 
exceptional work of the Agency's laboratory personnel at Offutt 
Air Force Base who, in collaboration with the University of 
Nebraska-Omaha, performed analyses of more than 13,000 bones 
and identified 351 individuals from the USS Oklahoma.
    The committee observes that the Agency's forensic 
laboratory is currently located in Building 301D on Offutt Air 
Force Base, an aging facility that also hosts several other 
missions. The committee notes the historic role of Building 
301D as the Martin Bomber Plant during the Second World War and 
is aware of its more recent utilization as a temporary swing 
space following the 2019 floods that displaced numerous units 
and missions on the installation. However, given the age and 
condition of Building 301D, the committee has concerns 
regarding the structural integrity, environmental impact, 
safety, and long-term viability of this facility.
    Based on the continuing deterioration of Building 301D, the 
committee urges the Department of Defense to accelerate 
planning for the construction and relocation of the Agency's 
laboratory to a more permanent and purpose-built facility. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
brief the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2022, 
on the status of planning for a new facility adjacent to Offutt 
Air Force Base to house the Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency's 
forensic laboratory.

          Demographics of Drug Testing and Evaluation Programs

    The committee is aware of data collected by the Department 
regarding demographics of the drug testing and evaluation 
programs of the Armed Forces, including as set forth in the 
report of the Inspector General of the Air Force titled 
``Report of Inquiry (S8918P), Independent Racial Disparity 
Review,'' and dated December 2020. The committee is concerned 
with the racial disparities found in the report regarding 
random drug test selection, including significant over 
representation in the random drug test selection of non-
commissioned officers and field grade officers and a consistent 
and statistically relevant over representation of Black service 
members overall from fiscal year 2015 to fiscal year 2019. The 
committee further notes a higher positive test rate amongst 
service members of color and a standard course of action upon a 
positive test to administratively separate such personnel.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with the Secretaries of the military 
departments, to provide a report to the House Committee on 
Armed Services by March 1, 2022, on the feasibility of 
implementing standard demographic reporting of the drug testing 
and evaluation programs of each armed force, to include 
collecting demographics on random test selection, availability 
for random testing, results of random testing, referrals to 
investigation, and any other relevant stages of the testing and 
evaluation program; changes to the program necessary to 
implement such data collection; impediments to implementing 
such changes; potential options for mitigating such 
impediments; and a schedule, including specific milestones, in 
which the establishment of such standard demographic reporting 
could be executed.

    Enhancing Readiness to Department of Defense Workforce through 
                               Technology

    The committee notes with grave concern the myriad of issues 
facing the Department's workforce. From recent reports of fraud 
associated with privatized military housing contracts and 
maintenance to sexual assault and other issues in the ranks. 
The committee believes the Secretary of Defense must 
systematically address these workforce issues at the 
enterprise-level.
    As the 2021 Interim Strategic Guidance notes, ``for our 
national security strategy to be effective, it is essential to 
invest in our national security workforce . . .'' The committee 
believes the Department can better leverage new and emerging 
technology to understand the challenges in the Department's 
workforce. The committee notes technology, such as survey tools 
powered by artificial intelligence, have been in use within the 
Department of Defense, including the U.S. Air Force, the U.S. 
Army Training and Doctrine Command, the Defense 
Counterintelligence and Security Agency, the Defense 
Intelligence Agency, the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration, and the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center to 
better understand organizational and workforce challenges. The 
committee believes such a capability would capture individual 
inputs and perspectives at scale--thereby providing insight and 
early warning of systematic issues facing the Department's 
workforce and enabling actionable information on what to work 
on, with whom, and why.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees, no 
later than March 1, 2022, on how the Department of Defense is 
leveraging new and emerging technologies to understand the 
needs and readiness of its workforce. The report should 
include, but not limited to, the following:
    (1) An outline of the various technologies used to 
understand the challenges of the military and civilian 
workforces;
    (2) An assessment of how artificial intelligence-powered 
technology and survey tools could aid in understanding the 
issues within the Department's workforce, including as an 
alternative to command climate surveys;
    (3) An outline of the projected programs that will use new 
and emerging technology to understand the challenges within the 
Department's workforce; and
    (4) Any other information the Secretary deems relevant.

      Enhancing Recruitment and Opportunities for Military Service

    The House Committee on Armed Services recognizes that 
tattoos and body modification for potential enlistees has 
become a deterrent to meeting recruitment goals in previous 
years. The committee also recognizes the value of an all-
volunteer force and encourages the services to consider 
updating their recruitment incentives to reflect changing 
cultural norms and emerging demographics.
    As a result, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Personnel and Readiness to submit a report to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2022, identifying 
the exact number of potential enlistees per year that are 
denied access to the military due to tattoos and body 
modifications.
    The report should include a breakdown by service, by census 
division, and include a minimum of five (5) years of data. It 
should assess the manning impact on emergent branches like U.S. 
Army Cyber and Space Force, qualify the impact on specific 
career-enhancing jobs like recruiting duty, and compare service 
policies with those of private sector companies.
    Due to the prohibitive cost of tattoo removal, the report 
should also include an analysis of the benefits of offering 
tattoo removal as an incentive to meet recruitment goals.
    Lastly, the report should explore commercial solutions to 
remove prohibitive tattoos and body modifications in ineligible 
candidates otherwise qualified for military service and current 
service members seeking promotion opportunities.

      Identifying the Remains of the Casualties of the USS Arizona

    The committee recognizes the importance of identifying the 
85 sets of remains of the sailors and Marines who perished 
aboard the USS Arizona during the Pearl Harbor attack on 
December 7, 1941. The committee notes that it is entirely 
within the capability and capacity of the Defense POW/MIA 
Accounting Agency (DPAA) to identify the remains of the still 
unidentified 85 personnel. The committee further notes that our 
nation owes it to the surviving families of the deceased to 
identify these remains and finally allow these sailors and 
Marines to be laid to rest. Therefore, the committee directs 
the Secretary of the Navy to submit a report to the Committees 
of Armed Services of the Senate and House of Representatives by 
January 31, 2022, on the feasibility and cost associated with 
identifying these remains. The Secretary shall consult with the 
private sector in the creation of this report to leverage the 
most state-of-the-art advancements in applicable technologies 
to expeditiously bring this effort to completion.

                        Media Literacy Training

    The committee is concerned about the level of media 
literacy of service members. Therefore, the committee directs 
the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the Committee 
on Armed Services of the House of Representatives not later 
than March 1, 2022, on a strategy to include media literacy, 
digital literacy, and information literacy as part of regular 
service member education beginning in basic training and 
continuing throughout their careers. Additionally, the 
Secretary will consider the feasibility of making this training 
available to dependents.

                Military Criminal Investigative Training

    The committee still needs to understand whether there are 
any increased costs, gained or lost efficiencies, or capacity 
limitations that may exist derived from any realignments of 
current military criminal investigative training. Given the 
significant organizational changes that the U.S. Army Criminal 
Investigation Command has undergone in response to the Army's 
adoption of the Fort Hood Independent Report, the committee 
encourages the new director of U.S. Army Criminal Investigation 
Command to review the state of the organization before 
recommending further significant changes.

              National Guard Active Guard Reserve Program

    The committee notes that the Army National Guard relies on 
a percentage of its overall personnel to work in a full-time 
support capacity to ensure rapid emergency response, provide 
administrative and logistical execution of training events, and 
maintain National Guard facilities and community relations and 
recruitment of members. The number of full-time support 
personnel is based on the authorized Army National Guard end 
strength. This number is currently less than 62 percent of what 
is authorized across the 54 States and territories. The 
committee is also concerned about multiple consecutive National 
Guard tours in the National Capital Region. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Director of the National Guard Bureau, in 
consultation with the State Adjutants General, to submit a 
report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives not later than April 1, 2022, on 
the National Guard Bureau Title 10 Active Guard and Reserve 
Program. The specific elements of the report should:
    (1) describe the current composition of the National Guard 
title 10 program, including the current levels of Army and Air 
National Guard personnel on Active Duty in support of the 
Reserves; on title 10 duty in the National Capital Region; on 
title 10 duty outside of the National Capital Region; and 
average number of years spent consecutively on title 10 duty.
    (2) assess the feasibility of converting title 10 billets 
to 3-year nonconsecutive rotational billets between title 32 
and title 10 status including a recommended timeline of 
implementation; proposed billets to be converted; criteria used 
to determine which billets should be converted; effects on 
State management of officer career progression; and effects on 
recruiting and retention of the title 32 and title 10 Active 
Guard Reserve force.
    (3) identify the total cost and any barriers to convert 
1,000 traditional Guard positions to Active Guard positions 
every year for the next 10 years, for a total of 10,000 
nationwide.
    (4) identify any additional legislative language deemed 
necessary to convert title 10 billets to rotational duty.

                      National Guard Drill Periods

    The committee is concerned that two decades of continual 
deployment of the National Guard and increasing use of the 
National Guard for domestic missions including security and 
more frequent national disaster response, combined with 
increased drill periods, is exacting a heavier toll on the 
force and on individual guardsmen than was ever intended. 
Ignoring or failing to examine this issue and to consider 
opportunities to mitigate the impact on guardsmen through 
modifications to drill periods and compensation risks long-term 
damage to the National Guard and the service it provides to the 
country.
    The committee directs the Chief of the National Guard 
Bureau to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives by February 1, 
2022, including, for fiscal years 2019 and 2020, data on the 
number of guardsmen who were required to drill on more than 10 
weekdays during the year; data on the number of guardsmen who 
were required to drill for more than 38 total days during the 
year; the distribution of the number of drilling days for 
guardsmen disaggregated by the 10th, 25th, 50th, 75th, and 90th 
percentile; and also analyses of the effects of increased 
mobilization periods and weekday drill periods on National 
Guard readiness and retention, the adequacy of the current 
National Guard drill pay structure for drill periods covering 
weekdays or periods that bring a guardsman's total days drilled 
above 38 per year, and the impact of potential duty status 
reform on these issues.

                   National Guard Force Apportionment

    The committee notes that the current process for National 
Guard Bureau force structure allocation to the States is based 
on various factors, including sustainability to man, equip, and 
ready the unit for its Federal mission. However, this 
apportionment of the Guard does not consider a State's demands 
for its domestic missions, and how those domestic missions may 
affect a unit's readiness for the Federal mission.
    The committee appreciates the tremendous and extraordinary 
efforts of the National Guard over the past year that included 
COVID-19 response, civil unrest, and natural disasters to go 
along with their regular Federal missions. These deployments in 
support of civil authorities are a critical component of the 
Guard mission. However, these domestic missions have put a 
strain on State Guard bureaus, especially in those States with 
lower Guard personnel to population ratios. These States must 
protect a larger portion of their citizens with fewer resources 
and personnel, meaning greater deployments. The committee is 
concerned that these increasing domestic deployments may have 
an impact on recruiting and retaining qualified individuals and 
on a State's ability to man, equip, and ready a unit for its 
Federal mission.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with the Chief of the National Guard Bureau, to 
submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives not later than March 1, 
2022, on how the criteria factors in apportionment of personnel 
to the States consider a State's demands for its domestic 
response missions and how those missions affect its readiness 
for the Federal mission, and whether priority should be given 
to States meeting their recruitment goals that have the lowest 
Guard to civilian population ratios and how that may relate to 
other States' force structure allocation.

   Report on a Digital Technical Skills in the Department of Defense

    The committee notes the critical need for military 
personnel skilled in areas related to Artificial Intelligence 
(AI) and other digital technical related skill areas important 
to national security. The final report of the National Security 
Commission on Artificial Intelligence (NSCAI), dated March 1, 
2021, stated ``national security agencies need more digital 
experts now or they will remain unprepared to buy, build, and 
use AI and associated technologies. The talent deficit in the 
Department of Defense and the Intelligence Community represents 
the greatest impediment to being AI-ready by 2025. The 
government needs new talent pipelines, including a United 
States Digital Service Academy to train current and future 
employees''. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, in coordination with the Secretaries of the military 
department and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to 
submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than March 
1, 2022, regarding the following:
    (1) The military manning requirements and career 
specialties related to AI, cyber and digital warfare;
    (2) An assessment of digital technical fields as defined by 
the NSCAI which include artificial intelligence, software 
engineering, electrical science and engineering, computer 
science, molecular biology, computational biology, biological 
engineering, cybersecurity, data science, mathematics, physics, 
human-computer interaction, robotics, and design and any 
additional fields mentioned in the report;
    (3) The future military manning requirements in AI, cyber 
and digital technical warfare areas as they relate to emerging 
mission requirements;
    (4) The training and education requirements for these types 
of specialties;
    (5) How the Military Service Academies, Senior Military 
Colleges, War Colleges, Military Post Graduate Institutions and 
other DoD training and education activities are meeting these 
mission requirements;
    (6) An assessment of the NSCAI report recommendations that 
create a United States Digital Service Academy;
    (7) An assessment of the NSCAI report recommendation 
related to the emphasis on civil service vs. military service;
    (8) An assessment of what portions of the NCSAI 
recommendations should be considered for potential action by 
the Department of Defense;
    (9) An estimate of the education and training costs related 
to AI, cyber and digital technical warfare fields over the past 
5 years and over the Future Years Defense Program.

              Report on Data Compromise and Payday Lending

    The committee is concerned that service members may be 
harmed by pervasive breaches of personal data, including 
payment card breaches at point of sale and card-not-present 
transactions, by governments and private-sector entities that 
have occurred in the United States, as well as the use of 
payday and title loans with disadvantageous terms. The 
committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel 
and Readiness to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services by February 1, 2022, assessing the impact and 
costs of personal data breaches on military personnel, 
especially those on Active Duty, and the utilization by 
military personnel of payday and title loans, including the 
impact on the financial health of service members and the 
impact on readiness to the Armed Forces.

  Reserve Component Command-Directed Investigations of Sexual Assault

    The committee is concerned about the lack of resources 
available to commanders in the Services' Reserve Components to 
investigate a sexual assault allegation against a Reserve 
Component service member when there is not Uniform Code of 
Military Justice jurisdiction and local law enforcement 
officials did not investigate the allegation or did not 
complete an investigation of sufficient thoroughness to inform 
commanders regarding potential administrative action.
    The committee notes that this gap is unique to the Reserve 
Component context and that the National Guard Bureau has 
addressed a similar problem by creating an Office of Complex 
Investigations, which maintains trained and experienced 
personnel to investigate a sexual assault allegation against a 
Guardsman at the request of an Adjutant General.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with each Secretary of a military department, to 
submit a report to the Committees on Armed Service of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives by March 1, 2022, that:
    (1) identifies resources available to investigate 
allegations of sexual assault against a Reserve Component 
service member both on and off-duty;
    (2) indicates the policies of the Department and the 
services related to command-directed investigations pertaining 
to allegations of sexual assault against a Reserve Component 
service member;
    (3) weighs the costs and benefits of expanding Military 
Criminal Investigative Organizations' jurisdiction to 
investigate sexual assault allegations in the Reserve Component 
that would otherwise be investigated by a command directed 
investigation;
    (4) weighs the costs and benefits of creating a program to 
provide Reserve Component commanders with access to independent 
and experienced administrative investigators from outside their 
commands to investigate sexual assault allegations in the 
Reserve Component that would otherwise be investigated by a 
command-directed investigation; and
    (5) evaluates any other potential alternatives to command-
directed investigations of sexual assault in the Reserve 
Components that the Secretary considers appropriate.

                        ROTC Scholarship Funding

    The committee recognizes that not all U.S. colleges and 
universities have the opportunity or resources to host Reserve 
Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) programs. The committee is 
concerned that there is limited available information on what 
schools seek and receive ROTC funding and how that funding is 
allocated to students. As such, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the House Committee 
on Armed Services by June 30, 2022 evaluating the ROTC 
scholarship process. The report should include a list of which 
schools seek and receive ROTC funding, how those schools are 
chosen, how the amount of funding available through ROTC has 
changed since 2010, how funding changes have that impacted the 
ability of students to attend various universities, from what 
geographic areas are students applying and selected for ROTC 
scholarships, from what ethnic backgrounds are students 
applying and subsequently selected, and recommendations for how 
to expand the ROTC scholarship programs more equitably across 
U.S. colleges and universities. The report should include input 
from each of the military services.

  Service Commitments for Graduates of Military Service Academies and 
                         Professional Athletics

    The committee is concerned that the military services have 
not faithfully enforced the provisions of the cadet and 
midshipman service agreements that relate to graduates of 
military service academies who seek employment as professional 
athletes before completing their military service commitment. 
The committee notes that Sec. 543 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115--91) 
required the military services to revise the cadet and 
midshipman service agreements to include a provision that the 
cadet or midshipman will not seek release from the commissioned 
service obligation to obtain employment as a professional 
athlete following graduation until the cadet or midshipman 
completes at least two consecutive years of military service. 
Despite this contractual provision, the Department of Defense 
has routinely granted waivers to service academy graduates to 
pursue professional athletics careers before completing any 
portion of their military service commitment.
    The committee notes that, in 2018 (the most recent 
available data), the cost to taxpayers to produce a single 
graduate from the military service academies was $415,208 at 
the United States Military Academy, $439,372 at the United 
States Naval Academy, and $560,208 at the United States Air 
Force Academy. Given the significant taxpayer investment in 
graduates of the military service academies and the purpose of 
the academies, which is to produce commissioned officers for 
the military services, a policy or practice of routinely 
waiving provisions in the cadet and midshipman service 
agreements is inconsistent with good stewardship of public 
funds and contravenes the legislative intent of the statute. 
The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives by March 1, 2022, on the 
Department's plans to update the current policy, dated November 
8, 2019, concerning graduates seeking waivers for participation 
in professional sports; to enforce cadet and midshipman service 
agreements as they pertain to seeking employment as a 
professional athlete; the conditions under which waivers 
regarding this provision will be considered and approved; and 
the Department's justification for the value of such waivers to 
the Department in light of the purpose of the military service 
academies and the significant taxpayer investment therein.

                     Small Unit Leadership Training

    The committee is concerned that there may be challenges 
with equipping small unit leaders across the military services 
with the skills to build trust and enduring relationships with 
junior service members. The committee also understands the 
detrimental effect that sexual assault, sexual harassment, 
extremism, hazing, suicide and other issues have on unit 
cohesion. Therefore the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, in coordination with the Secretaries of the military 
departments, to submit a report to the Committee on Armed 
Services of the House of Representatives not later than 
February 1, 2022, that provides the following:
    (1) a review of small unit leader training across the 
military services that highlights challenge areas and 
opportunities for improvement;
    (2) a taxonomy of training and grid that ties small unit 
leaders to the issues raised above and any other issues that 
may affect good order and discipline not herein contained;
    (3) the metrics, both measures of performance and more 
importantly measures of effectiveness, that lead to changes in 
behavior;
    (4) the current state of funding and the optimal level of 
funding that will allow the military services to fully address 
these training issues;
    (5) desired end state of this training;
    (6) the plan of actions and milestones from each military 
service that depicts when they will meet desired end state; and
    (7) any additional legislation or policy recommendations 
that should be considered to ensure transformation and timely 
implementation.

                   Training for Military Prosecutors

    The committee remains concerned that many military 
prosecutors lack sufficient training and experience for the 
increasingly complex cases they are assigned, as discussed in 
Recommendation 1.4 of the July 1, 2021, report, ``Hard Truths 
and the Duty to Change: Recommendations from the Independent 
Review Commission on Sexual Assault in the Military.''
    The committee notes the commitment of the Department of 
Defense to revise personnel structures to allow for judge 
advocates to specialize in military justice litigation and that 
at least one service has already established a military justice 
specialty track. While these efforts are admirable and will, no 
doubt, prove beneficial, they do not specifically address the 
training such personnel receive to best equip them for the 
challenges of complex litigation.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with each Secretary of a military department, to 
submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives by March 1, 2022, that 
describes the training plan for military justice practitioners 
and identifies the plan's costs and benefits.

  Using Commercially Available Technology for Sexual Assault Reporting

    Eliminating sexual harassment and sexual assault in the 
military is critical to creating a safe environment for all 
members of the armed forces. The Committee is concerned by the 
lack of centralized reporting mechanisms available to victims 
and survivors within the military services that could give 
Department leaders a holistic view of the problem as it works 
toward a solution. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services no later than April 1, 2022 
detailing how the Department could develop such tools to accept 
and track reports of sexual assault and harassment and the ways 
the Department could leverage commercial technology to develop 
them.

     Wargaming at War Colleges and Military Postgraduate Education 
                              Institutions

    The committee notes the importance of wargaming as an 
integral component of military training, education, and 
research. Wargaming has been an essential tool for military 
commanders across the tactical, operational, and strategic 
levels of warfare. It also helps military leaders better 
understand the range of possible warfighting futures, innovate 
and express new ideas, challenge current warfighting 
assumptions, and integrate technologies and capabilities into 
operations and force structure. However, there appears to be a 
lack of coordination in the wargaming community and in the 
Department of Defense's academic institutions, challenges with 
sharing lessons learned in an agile and adaptive manner, and 
little coordination to ensure programmatic budget decisions are 
influenced by these sometime crucial military insights.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with the Secretaries of the military 
departments and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to 
submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives not later than March 1, 
2022, regarding the use of wargaming within the Department of 
Defense War Colleges and military postgraduate institutions 
that includes the following:
    (1) a description of how and if wargaming is used and how 
frequently it has been used over the last 10 years;
    (2) how wargaming enriches the student learning experiences 
and how it intersects with Joint Professional Military 
Education;
    (3) how many students and faculty have been exposed to 
wargaming over the last 10 years;
    (4) how are the lessons learned from wargaming captured, 
disseminated, and integrated;
    (5) how much has been spent on wargaming over the last 10 
years;
    (6) how are wargaming scenarios updated to ensure they 
continue to meet the challenge of tomorrow's adversary;
    (7) how are best practices used to ensure currency, 
accuracy, and relevance, including the use of classified 
information, to provide forward-looking war games as 
instructional tools; and
    (8) any recommendations to improve and enhance the use of 
wargaming at War Colleges and military postgraduate 
institutions.

                      Women's Military History Day

    The committee recognizes the significance of women's 
contributions to the United States Armed Forces and broader 
national security dating back to the Revolutionary War. 
Throughout American history, women have served with great 
distinction in every military conflict since the American 
Revolution. Despite significant challenges, female service 
members persevered and remain integral to the global dominance 
of the U.S. military. The committee acknowledges the courage 
and sacrifices of trailblazing women, such as Loretta Perfectus 
Walsh, the first woman to formally enlist in the U.S. military 
and break the gender barrier. These courageous women have 
inspired generations of American women to serve, and 
demonstrated tremendous valor, dedication, professionalism, and 
willingness to sacrifice for the nation. The committee strongly 
encourages the Department of Defense to select a dedicated day 
to honor the pivotal role of these selfless women, and all of 
those who have subsequently served.

              World War I Medal of Honor Recipients Report

    The committee appreciates the Department's efforts to 
review the service records of certain World War I veterans for 
potential eligibility for a posthumously awarded Medal of 
Honor. However, it is imperative that Congress ensures progress 
is made to honor these veterans for their valor. As such, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a report 
to the House Committee on Armed Services no later than March 1, 
2022, on the status of Medal of Honor reviews for veterans who 
participated in World War I, particularly for veterans of 
African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, and Jewish 
American descent.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


               Subtitle A--Rreserve Component Management


       Section 501--Grade of Certain Chiefs of Reserve Components

    This section would authorize the Chief of each service 
Reserve Component be in the grade of three-star officer.

     Section 502--Grade of Vice Chief of the National Guard Bureau

    This section would authorize the Vice Chief of the National 
Guard Bureau to be appointed to serve in the grade of general.

 Section 503--Prohibition on Private Funding for Interstate Deployment 
                           of National Guard

    This section would prohibit private funds from being used 
to fund any State's National Guard deployment in another State, 
except for natural disaster emergencies.

Section 504--Requirement of Consent of the Chief Executive Officer for 
Certain Full-Time National Guard Duty Performed in a State, Territory, 
                      or the District of Columbia

    This section would require the consent of the chief 
executives of both the sending State or territory and receiving 
State or territory, should the President deploy National Guard 
units out of State under section 502 (f) of title 32, United 
States Code.

  Section 505--Continued National Guard Support for FireGuard Program

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
continue supporting the FireGuard program until at least 
September 30, 2026.

Section 506--Study on Reapportionment of National Guard Force Structure 
                      Based on Domestic Responses

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a study to determine whether to reapportion the force 
structure of the National Guard based on wartime and domestic 
response requirements.

   Section 507--Report on Feasibility and Advisability of Including 
       Cybersecurity Operations and Missions to Protect Critical 
  Infrastructure by Members of the National Guard in Connection with 
                         Training or Other Duty

    This section would mandate a report by the Secretary of 
Defense within 1 year after the date of the enactment of this 
Act on the feasibility and advisability of treating cyberspace 
operations as a matter of training for members of the National 
Guard at the request of the Governor of the State concerned.

               Section 508--Access to Tour of Duty System

    This section would direct the Secretary of the Army to 
ensure that a member of the Reserve Components of the Army may 
access the Tour of Duty system using a private internet-enabled 
device.

      Subtitle B--General Service Authorities and Military Records


 Section 511--Prohibition on Commissioning or Enlistment in the Armed 
        Forces of an Individual Convicted of a Felony Hate Crime

    This section would prevent individuals who are convicted of 
a hate crime from commissioning or enlisting in the Armed 
Forces.

Section 512--Reduction in Service Commitment Required for Participation 
        in Career Intermission Program of a Military Department

    This section would amend section 710 of title 10, United 
States Code, to reduce the commitment required for 
participation in the Career Intermission Program.

       Section 513--Modernization of the Selective Service System

    This section would modernize the Selective Service System 
to ensure that the Selective Service System is prepared to 
support the mobilization needs of the Department of Defense if 
the all-volunteer model is no longer able to recruit enough 
people during a time of national crisis.

Section 514--Improvements to Military Accessions in Armed Forces under 
    the Jurisdiction of the Secretaries of the Military Departments

    This section would require the Secretary concerned to take 
directed steps to improve the military accessions process of 
their service.

  Section 515--Authorization of Permissive Temporary Duty for Wellness

    This section would authorize a service member to take not 
more than 2 weeks of permissive temporary duty each year to 
attend a seminar, retreat, workshop, or outdoor recreational 
therapy event hosted by a non-profit that focuses on 
psychological, physical, spiritual, or social wellness.

   Section 516--Required Staffing of Administrative Separation Boards

    This section would ensure all administrative separation 
boards have a recorder and legal advisor. This section would 
also require the recorder to be a legal officer under the 
authority of the staff judge advocate for the separation 
authority.

 Section 517--Administrative Separation: Miscellaneous Authorities and 
                              Requirements

    This section would require the Secretaries of the military 
departments to prescribe regulations which permit the Secretary 
to characterize an administrative discharge, considered by an 
administrative separation board under any conditions (including 
other than honorable) notwithstanding the recommendation of the 
administrative separation board. This section would also allow 
an individual subject to a separation board to request that at 
least one voting member of the board be of the same gender, 
race, or ethnicity.

       Section 518--Prohibition on Algorithmic Career Termination

    This section would prohibit the sole use of automated 
algorithmic, mathematical, or other analytic tools used in the 
evaluation of publicly available social media posts or other 
publicly available online activity attributable to such member 
for discipline unless the Secretary concerned determines an 
imminent threat of physical violence exists.

   Section 519--Prohibition on Discipline against a Member Based on 
                          Certain Social Media

    This section would prohibit funds authorized to be 
appropriated by this Act to be used to subject a member of the 
Armed Forces under the jurisdiction of a Secretary of a 
military department to discipline of any kind solely based on a 
comment, post, or other activity originating from a third party 
regarding a political matter on an online account, forum, or 
other electronic means owned, controlled, or operated by the 
member.

   Section 519A--Command Oversight of Military Privatized Housing as 
                   Element of Performance Evaluations

    This section would require that military privatized housing 
oversight is documented on the performance evaluation of an 
individual responsible for such oversight.

Section 519B--Feasibility Study on Establishment of Housing History for 
   Members of the Armed Forces Who Reside in Housing Provided by the 
                             United States

    This section would direct the Department of Defense to 
submit a report on a feasibility study of providing housing 
history statements to service members in Department-provided 
housing, privatized housing, and economy housing so they can 
prove their tenant history to future landlords.

 Section 519C--Seaman to Admiral-21 Program: Credit towards Retirement

    This section would authorize the Secretary of the Navy to 
include time spent in a baccalaureate degree program when 
computing years of service and retired or retainer pay for 
certain participants in the Seaman to Admiral-21 program during 
fiscal years 2010 through 2014.

Section 519D--Progress Report on Implementation of GAO Recommendations 
    Regarding Career Paths for Surface Warfare Officers of the Navy

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees on the 
progress of implementing the recommendations of the Government 
Accountability Office report titled ``Navy Readiness: Actions 
Needed to Evaluate and Improve Surface Warfare Officer Career 
Path'' (GAO-21-168).

  Section 519E--Independent Assessment of Retention of Female Surface 
                            Warfare Officers

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
enter into a contract with a nonprofit entity or a federally 
funded research and development center to conduct research and 
analysis on the gender gap in retention of surface warfare 
officers in the Navy.

          Subtitle C--Military Justice and Other Legal Matters


Section 521--Rights of the Victim of an Offense under the Uniform Code 
                          of Military Justice

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
establish a uniform policy for the sharing of information 
relating to the victim of an offense with a Special Victims' 
Counsel or Victims' Legal Counsel representing such victim. The 
information would include recorded statements of the victim to 
investigators, the record of any forensic examination of the 
person or property of the victim, and any other personal or 
medical record of the victim that is in the possession of 
investigators or the government.

       Section 522--Commanding Officer's Non-Judicial Punishment

    This section would require a commander to consult with a 
legal officer before imposing nonjudicial punishment and the 
subject of nonjudicial punishment must have the opportunity to 
meet with counsel prior to the imposition of nonjudicial 
punishment unless an exception applies.

 Section 523--Selection Process for Members to Serve on Courts-Martial

    This section would allow for the randomized selection of 
panel members to serve on courts-martial.

    Section 524--Petition for DNA Testing under the Uniform Code of 
                            Military Justice

    This section would permit an accused sentenced to 
imprisonment or death to petition the Judge Advocate General to 
order DNA testing of specific evidence if the Judge Advocate 
General finds that petition meets certain criteria.

           Section 525--Punitive Article on Violent Extremism

    This section would create a punitive article on violent 
extremism in the Uniform Code of Military Justice.

Section 526--Clarifications of Procedure in Investigations of Personnel 
 Actions Taken against Members of the Armed Forces in Retaliation for 
                        Protected Communications

    This section would clarify procedures in investigation of 
personnel actions taken against service members in retaliation 
for protected communications.

   Section 527--Activities to Improve Family Violence Prevention and 
                                Response

    This section would examine the staffing levels of family 
advocacy programs and the measures of effectiveness for family 
violence prevention and response programs.

  Section 528--Mandatory Notification of Members of the Armed Forces 
        Identified in Certain Records of Criminal Investigations

    This section would require military criminal investigative 
organizations to notify a service member and former service 
members (including the Reserve Component) when they have been 
designated, or have been previously designated, as a suspect in 
a case in any official investigative report, and provide 
instructions on how to appeal the decision.

 Section 529--Authority of Military Judges and Military Magistrates to 
                 Issue Military Court Protective Orders

    This section would permit military judges and military 
magistrates to issue military court protective orders.

         Section 529A--Countering Extremism in the Armed Forces

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a definition of extremism within 60 days. This section 
would also create the Office of Countering Extremism within the 
Department of Defense; provide for training and education on 
extremism; ensure data collection on extremist activities; and 
prescribe reporting requirements.

Section 529B--Reform and Improvement of Military Criminal Investigative 
                             Organizations

    This section would require the military services to reform 
their criminal investigative organizations consistent with the 
guidance provided and submit a report through the Secretary of 
Defense to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives not later than 1 year after the 
date of the enactment of this Act. This section would also 
prohibit the Department of Defense from changing the locations 
of military criminal investigative training until the 
implementation plan for reforming military criminal 
investigative organizations is submitted to Congress and the 
Department of Defense provides 60 days' notice of its intent to 
move such training.

Section 529C--Measures to Improve the Safety and Security of Members of 
                            the Armed Forces

    This section would improve the safety and security of 
service members and the processes related to missing service 
members.

   Section 529D--Distribution of Information on the Availability of 
                        Civilian Victim Services

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
require each military legal service provider to provide, to 
each victim referred to such provider, a list of approved 
civilian victim service organizations from which the victim may 
seek legal assistance, legal representation, or other related 
services. This section also would require the Sexual Assault 
Prevention and Response Office of the Department of Defense to 
carry out activities to ensure the widespread distribution, 
throughout the Department, of information on the availability 
of services from civilian victim service organizations.

             Section 529E--Report on Mandatory Restitution

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives a report on the Department's 
progress in evaluating the feasibility and advisability of 
authorizing mandatory restitution.

Subtitle D--Implementation of Recommendations of the Independent Review 
              Commission on Sexual Assault in the Military


                        Section 531--Short Title

    This section would cite this subtitle as the IRC 
implementation Act of 2021''.

     Part 1--Special Victim Prosecutors and Special Victim Offenses


                Section 532--Special Victim Prosecutors

    This section would create one O6 special victim prosecutor 
for each Armed Force appointed by the appropriate service 
secretary as well as such number of special victim prosecutors 
as appropriate to assist the special victim prosecutor. This 
section would establish the qualifications for the special 
victim prosecutors and the assistant special victim 
prosecutors. This section would also establish the roles and 
responsibilities for the special victim prosecutors and the 
assistant special victim prosecutors.

  Section 533--Department of Defense Policies with Respect to Special 
   Victim Prosecutors and Establishment of Offices of Special Victim 
                Prosecutors within Military Departments

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
establish policies with the appropriate mechanisms and 
procedures that the Secretaries of the military departments to 
guide the establishment and operation of each Office of the 
Special Victim Prosecutors. This section would ensure the 
special victim prosecutor is under the sole jurisdiction of the 
Secretary concerned and enables the Judge Advocate General of a 
military department to assign as many assistant special victim 
prosecutors as needed.

    Section 534--Definitions of Military Magistrate, Special Victim 
                 Offense, and Special Victim Prosecutor

    The section would define military magistrate, special 
victim offense, and special victim prosecutor.

 Section 535--Clarification Relating to Who May Convene Courts-Martial

    This section would amend section 822(b) of title 10, United 
States Code (article 229b of the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice) to clarify who may convene special and general courts-
martial.

                  Section 536--Detail of Trial Counsel

    This section would amend section 827 of title 10, United 
States Code (article 27 of the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice) to require a special victim prosecutor or assistant 
special victim prosecutor to be detailed to special and general 
courts-martial referred by a special victim prosecutor.

                    Section 537--Preliminary Hearing

    This section would amend section 832 of title 10, United 
States Code (article 32 of the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice) to require a special victim prosecutor to appoint a 
military judge or military magistrate as the hearing officer 
for a preliminary hearing for all cases where a special victim 
prosecutor is exercising their authority.

  Section 538--Advice to Convening Authority before Referral for Trial

    This section would amend section 834 of title 10, United 
States Code (article 34 of the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice) to permit referral of charges and specifications over 
which a special victim prosecutor exercises authority by only 
the special victim prosecutor or by the convening authority 
where the charges and specifications do not allege a special 
victim offense or where a special victim declines to refer 
charges.

                      Section 539--Former Jeopardy

    This section would amend section 844(c) of title 10, United 
States Code (article 44(c) of the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice) by inserting ``or the special victim prosecutor after 
the convening authority'' each place that it appears.

                     Section 539A--Plea Agreements

    This section would amend subsection (a) of section 853a of 
title 10, United States Code (article 53a of the Uniform Code 
of Military Justice) by permitting special victim prosecutors 
to enter into plea agreements with respect to charges and 
specifications referrer to court-martial by a special victim 
prosecutor.

      Section 539B--Determinations of Impracticality of Rehearing

    This section would amend section 865(e)(3)(B) of title 10, 
United States Code (article 65(e)(3)(B) of the Uniform Code of 
Military Justice) by permitting special victim prosecutors to 
determine whether a rehearing is impractical and dismiss 
charges if the case was referred to trial by a special victim 
prosecutor.

          Section 539C--Punitive Article on Sexual Harassment

    This section would amend subchapter X of chapter 47 of 
title 10, United States Code (the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice), by creating a new article (120d) criminalizing sexual 
harassment.

 Section 539D--Clarification of Applicability of Domestic Violence and 
                      Stalking to Dating Partners

    This section would amend section 928(b) of title 10, United 
States Code (article 128b of the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice) by striking ``any person'' and inserting ``a dating 
partner'' at each place it appears. Additionally, this section 
would define the terms dating partner, immediate family, and 
intimate partner as the meaning in section 930 of title 10, 
United States Code (article 130 of the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice). This section would also amend section 930 of title 
10, United States Code (article 130; stalking) to include the 
term dating partner as defined.

                      Section 539E--Effective Date

    This section would establish an effective date for 2 years 
after the date of enactment of this Act unless otherwise 
specified.

                       Part 2--Sentencing Reform


                    Section 539F--Sentencing Reform

    This section would amend section 853 of title 10, United 
States Code (article 53 of the Uniform Code of Military 
Justice) and except in the case of capital offenses, require 
judge-alone if an accused is convicted by a general or special 
court-martial. Additionally, this section would establish a 
Military Sentencing Parameters and Criteria Board to determine 
sentencing parameters and criteria for the military judge to 
consider in determining appropriate sentences.

                   Part 3--Reports and Other Matters


   Section 539G--Report on Modification of Disposition Authority for 
              Offenses Other than Special Victim Offenses

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report on the feasibility, advisability, and potential 
effects of modifying chapter 47 of title 10, United States 
Code, to require that determinations as to whether to prefer or 
refer charges for trial by court-martial for offenses other 
than special victim offenses should be made by an individual 
outside the chain of command.

 Section 539H--Report on Implementation of Certain Recommendations of 
  the Independent Review Commission on Sexual Assault in the Military

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
provide a report on the following lines of effort from the 
Independent Review Commission on Sexual Assault in the 
Military: Line of Effort 1: Accountability; Line of Effort 2: 
Prevention; Line of Effort 3: Climate and Culture; and Line of 
Effort 4: Victim Care and Support.

  Section 539I--Report on Implementation of Recommendations and Other 
  Activities to Address Racial, Ethnic, and Gender Disparities in the 
                        Military Justice System

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
report on the Department's efforts to implement the 
recommendations from the May 2019 report of the Government 
Accountability Office titled: ``Military Justice: DOD and the 
Coast Guard Need to Improve Their Capabilities to Assess Racial 
and Gender Disparities.''

            Subtitle E--Other Sexual Assault-Related Matters


    Section 541--Independent Investigation of Complaints of Sexual 
                               Harassment

    This section would require independent investigations of 
sexual harassment complaints outside the chain of command of 
the subject and victim.

 Section 542--Modification of Notice to Victims of Pendency of Further 
 Administrative Action Following a Determination Not to Refer to Trial 
                            by Court-Martial

    This section would strike ``alleged sexual assault'' and 
insert ``an alleged sex-related offense'' as defined in section 
1044e(h) of title 10, United States Code, and require 
commanders to notify victims of sex-related offenses of the 
outcomes of administrative actions.

 Section 543--Modifications to Annual Report Regarding Sexual Assaults 
                 Involving Members of the Armed Forces

    This section would extend the reporting requirement of 
section 1631 of the Ike Skelton National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2011 (Public Law 111-383) for 5 years and 
require the annual report to include the race and ethnicity of 
the victim and accused.

  Section 544--Civilian Positions to Support Special Victims' Counsel

    This section would permit the Secretary of a military 
department to establish one or more civilian positions within 
each office of the Special Victims' Counsel under the 
jurisdiction of such Secretary to provide support to Special 
Victims' Counsel and to ensure continuity.

  Section 545--Feasibility Study on Establishment of Clearinghouse of 
Evidence-Based Practices to Prevent Sexual Assault, Suicide, and Other 
   Harmful Behaviors among Members of the Armed Forces and Military 
                                Families

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to study 
the feasibility of establishing a single, centralized 
clearinghouse of evidence-based practices supporting military 
service members and their families' health and well-being.

         Subtitle F--Member Education, Training, and Transition


    Section 551--Training on Consequences of Committing a Crime in 
     Preseparation Counseling of the Transition Assistance Program

    This section would require preseparation training regarding 
the consequences to a member who is convicted of a crime, 
specifically regarding the loss of benefits from the Federal 
Government to such a member.

Section 552--Participation of Members of the Reserve Components of the 
                Armed Forces in the SkillBridge Program

    This section would authorize members of the Reserve 
Component of the Armed Forces to participate in the SkillBridge 
program of the Department of Defense.

Section 553--Expansion and Codification of Matters Covered by Diversity 
                 Training in the Department of Defense

    This section would require that the Secretary of a military 
department conduct ongoing training programs regarding human 
relations, diversity, equity, and inclusion for all covered 
individuals under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of a 
military department. This section would also inform potential 
military members of the armed services of the military oath and 
responsibilities under it.

   Section 554--Expansion of Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
                                Program

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
expand the Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps (JROTC) 
Program curriculum and increase the number of JROTC units, and 
would require a report on the JROTC program.

    Section 555--Defense Language Institute Foreign Language Center

    This section would amend section 2168 of title 10, United 
States Code, to permit the Defense Language Institute to confer 
Bachelor degrees, in addition to Associate degrees, to 
graduates that meet the appropriate requirements for that 
degree.

 Section 556--Allocation of Authority for Nominations to the Military 
Service Academies in the Event of the Death, Resignation, or Expulsion 
                  From Office of a Member of Congress

    This section would authorize an alternative nomination 
allocation in the event of the death, resignation, or expulsion 
of a Member of Congress.

Section 557--Votes Required to Call a Meeting of the Board of Visitors 
                     of a Military Service Academy

    This section would authorize a majority of the Board of 
Visitors of each of the three military service academies to 
call an official meeting of the Board at any time.

           Section 558--United States Naval Community College

    This section would establish the United States Naval 
Community College (USNCC) under the Department of the Navy and 
would provide the USNCC the authority to hire civilian faculty 
and award degrees.

 Section 559--Codification of Establishment of United States Air Force 
                        Institute of Technology

    This section would provide the authority for the United 
States Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT) in title 10, 
United States Code, codifying AFIT's existing role to serve 
both the Air Force and the Space Force.

    Section 559A--Clarifications regarding Scope of Employment and 
        Reemployment Rights of Members of the Uniformed Services

    This section would amend title 38, United States Code, to 
clarify the scope of procedural rights of members of the 
uniformed services with respect to their employment and 
reemployment rights.

  Section 559B--Clarification and Expansion of Prohibition on Gender-
                Segregated Training in the Marine Corps

    This section would further specify the level of gender 
integration required for Marine Corps enlisted and officer 
training.

    Section 559C--Requirement to Issue Regulations Ensuring Certain 
         Parental Guardianship Rights of Cadets and Midshipmen

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
issue regulations ensuring certain parental guardianship rights 
of cadets and midshipmen.

      Section 559D--Defense Language Continuing Education Program

    This section would require the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Personnel and Readiness to coordinate with the Director of 
the Defense Intelligence Agency to designate an executive agent 
for continuing foreign language training.

    Section 559E--Public-Private Consortium to Improve Professional 
                           Military Education

    This section would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
establish and maintain a public-private consortium to improve 
and broaden professional military education for military 
officers and civilian employees of the Federal Government.

 Section 559F--Standards for Training of Surface Warfare Officers and 
                            Enlisted Members

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
establish standards and procedures by which Navy surface 
warfare officers and enlisted members may be issued a merchant 
mariner credential in accordance with part E of subtitle II of 
title 46, United States Code.

   Section 559G--Professional Military Education: Report; Definition

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
review, assess, and standardize the definition of professional 
military education across the Department of Defense.

 Section 559H--Study on Training and Education of Members of the Armed 
         Forces Regarding Social Reform and Unhealthy Behaviors

    This section would require a study on training and 
education of members of the Armed Forces regarding social 
reform and unhealthy behavior.

    Subtitle G--Military Family Readiness and Dependents' Education


    Section 561--Establishment of Exceptional Family Member Program 
                            Advisory Council

    This section would establish an Exceptional Family Member 
Program Advisory Council to better support military families 
who have members with special needs.

   Section 562--Non-Medical Counseling Services for Military Families

    This section would provide licensure portability for non-
medical counseling services for military families by mental 
health care providers through the Department of Defense Family 
Readiness System.

   Section 563--Expansion of Support Programs for Special Operations 
             Forces Personnel and Immediate Family Members

    This section would provide family support programs for Gold 
Star family members of special operations forces.

Section 564--Clarification of Qualifications for Attorneys Who Provide 
 Legal Services to Families Enrolled in the Exceptional Family Member 
                                Program

    This section would clarify the experience required by 
attorneys supporting Exceptional Family Member Program 
participants.

   Section 565--Improvements to the Exceptional Family Member Program

    This section would make improvements to the Exceptional 
Family Member Program.

 Section 566--Database of Next of Kin of Deceased Members of the Armed 
                                 Forces

    This section would direct the Department of Defense to 
provide unit commanders access to contact information for next 
of kin of deceased service members of the same unit.

      Section 567--Policy Regarding Remote Military Installations

    This section would update policies for remote military 
installations and support services for military families.

   Section 568--Feasibility Study on Program for Drop-In Child Care 
  Furnished to Certain Military Spouses at Military Child Development 
                                Centers

    This section would require a feasibility study on the 
possibilities of offering a drop-in childcare option for 
military spouses raising young children alone while their 
partners are deployed or away for extensive training.

   Section 569--Comptroller General of the United States Reports on 
    Employment Discrimination Against Military Spouses by Civilian 
                               Employers

    This section would direct the Comptroller General of the 
United States to develop a report on employment discrimination 
against military spouses in the civilian job market.

Section 569A--Report on Efforts of Commanders of Military Installations 
to Connect Military Families With Local Entities That Provide Services 
                          to Military Families

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report reviewing if and how installation leadership 
connect families with local nonprofit and government providers 
who assist with housing and other wraparound services.

Section 569B--Report on Preservation of the Force and Family Program of 
                United States Special Operations Command

    This section would require the Commander, U.S. Special 
Operations Command, to submit a report on the effectiveness of 
the Preservation of the Force and Family human performance 
domains for the entire special operations community, including 
women and minority communities.

   Section 569C--GAO Review of Preservation of the Force and Family 
          Program of United States Special Operations Command

    This section would require a comprehensive review of the 
Preservation of the Force and Family Program by the Comptroller 
General of the United States.

Section 569D--Continued Assistance to Schools With Significant Numbers 
                     of Military Dependent Students

    This section would authorize $50.0 million for the purpose 
of providing assistance to local educational agencies with 
military dependent students, and $20.0 million for local 
educational agencies eligible to receive a payment for children 
with severe disabilities.

Section 569E--Verification of Reporting of Eligible Federally Connected 
          Children for Purposes of Federal Impact Aid Programs

    This section would direct, on an annual basis, each 
commander of a military installation under the jurisdiction of 
the Secretary of a military department to submit a written 
certification verifying whether the commander has confirmed the 
information contained in all impact aid source check forms 
received from local educational agencies.

                  Subtitle H--Diversity and Inclusion


   Section 571--Information on Female and Minority Participation in 
 Military Service Academies and the Senior Reserve Officers' Training 
                                 Corps

    This section would amend section 113 of title 10, United 
States Code, to include information on female and minority 
participation at the service academies and Senior Reserve 
Officers' Training Corps.

  Section 572--Surveys on Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and Annual 
 Reports on Sexual Assaults and Racial and Ethnic Demographics in the 
                        Military Justice System

    This section would modify surveys on diversity, equity, and 
inclusion; modify and require an annual report on sexual 
assault; and provide for the collection of racial and ethnic 
demographics in the military justice system.

 Section 573--Amendments to Additional Deputy Inspector General of the 
                         Department of Defense

    This section would amend section 554(a) of the William M. 
(Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283).

Section 574--Extension of Deadline for GAO Report on Equal Opportunity 
                   at the Military Service Academies

    This section would extend the deadline for the Comptroller 
General of the United States report on equal opportunity at the 
military service academies.

 Section 575--GAO Review of Extremist Affiliations and Activity Among 
               Members of the Armed Forces on Active Duty

    This section would require the Comptroller General of the 
United States to perform a review to determine the prevalence 
of extremist affiliations and activity among members of the 
Armed Forces on Active Duty.

                   Subtitle I--Decorations and Awards


Section 581--Semiannual Reports Regarding Review of Service Records of 
                            Certain Veterans

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
provide semiannual reports to Congress on the findings from the 
review of service records of each Asian American and Pacific 
Islander war veteran who was awarded the Distinguished Service 
Cross, the Navy Cross, or the Air Force Cross during the Korean 
War or Vietnam War.

Section 582--Eligibility of Veterans of Operation End Sweep for Vietnam 
                             Service Medal

    This section would authorize the Secretary concerned to 
award the Vietnam Service Medal to eligible veterans of 
Operation End Sweep.

    Section 583--Establishment of the Atomic Veterans Service Medal

    This section would authorize the establishment of a 
commemorative Atomic Veterans Service Medal to honor radiation-
exposed retired and former members of the Armed Forces.

Section 584--Authorization for Award of the Medal of Honor to Marcelino 
               Serna for Acts of Valor During World War I

    This section would authorize the award of the Medal of 
Honor to Marcelino Serna for Acts of Valor During World War I.

          Subtitle J--Miscellaneous Reports and Other Matters


 Section 591--Command Climate Assessments: Independent Review; Reports

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
establish an Independent Command Climate Review Board for each 
Armed Force.

        Section 592--Healthy Eating in the Department of Defense

    This section would establish an element of the Department 
of Defense responsible for implementing a plan to improve 
access to healthy food on military installations.

       Section 593--Plant-Based Protein Pilot Program of the Navy

    This section would require a pilot program to provide 
plant-based protein options to members of the Navy at no less 
than two naval facilities and would not preclude the 
consumption of regular meat-based products.

  Section 594--Reports on Misconduct by Members of Special Operations 
                                 Forces

    This section would institutionalize reporting requirements 
for the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations 
and Low Intensity Conflict (ASD SO/LIC). The ASD SO/LIC would 
be required to notify Congress of all instances of misconduct 
by members of special operations forces. Reporting requirements 
would remain consistent with the military services in 
accordance with existing service requirements.

  Section 595--Updates and Preservation of Memorials to Chaplains at 
                      Arlington National Cemetery

    This section would update and preserve memorials to 
chaplains at Arlington National Cemetery.

          TITLE VI--COMPENSATION AND OTHER PERSONNEL BENEFITS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


    Assessment of STEM Education in Department of Defense Education 
                            Activity Schools

    The committee notes that many military children educated 
through the Department of Defense Education Activity (DODEA) 
system go on to serve in the military themselves. As part of 
the effort to build a science, technology, engineering, and 
mathematics (STEM) talent pipeline for both our uniformed and 
civilian services, the committee believes that DODEA should 
invest in STEM education to prepare students for careers in 
these fields, which are critical to national security. The 
committee therefore directs the Director of the Department of 
Defense Education Activity to assess the quality of STEM 
education programs within the DODEA system relative to best-in-
class STEM curricula in U.S. public schools, evaluate the 
performance of DODEA-educated students on the STEM portion of 
standardized tests, and develop recommendations for 
strengthening the STEM curriculum in DODEA schools. The 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report 
to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than 
February 1, 2022, on the recommendations and an implementation 
plan.

                      Basic Allowance for Housing

    The Committee is aware that rental and housing prices in 
Northwest Florida have, in recent years, spiked dramatically. 
This has caused significant hardship for junior enlisted 
military personnel. Due to a lack of on base housing, and 
tightening of the off base housing market, Basic Allowance for 
Housing (BAH) has not kept up with property price increases, 
placing an undue burden on the men and women in uniform and 
their families. As a result, the Committee understands the 
Department of Defense (DoD) is currently evaluating a potential 
BAH increase. Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the House of Representatives, not later than March 
1, 2022, that closely examines the rental properties and BAH 
rates in Northwest Florida and the surrounding locations, the 
effect these rates are having on the service-member and their 
families in the local area and when the last BAH adjustment was 
made in this market.

                Basic Allowance for Housing Calculation

    The committee is concerned that the method of determining 
the Basic Allowance for Housing (BAH) is outdated and in need 
of modernization. The committee finds there can be limitations 
to the Department of Defense's calculations for BAH in rural 
areas or those with low housing stock. The smaller sample size 
can make it difficult for the Department to assess the median 
cost of 30-75 sample housing units. This can result in housing 
benefits that are lower than the actual area cost of living, 
causing financial hardship for military members, their 
families, and veterans accessing this benefit as part of the 
Post 9/11 GI Bill. The committee also notes that concerns have 
been raised regarding BAH's method of calculation having a 
potential adverse impact on the ability of military privatized 
housing providers to finance identified housing upgrades.
    The committee believes changes should be made to 
accommodate low housing stock and rural housing supply issues 
when the Department conducts its Basic Allowance for Housing 
sampling to improve the accuracy of the calculation and the 
reality of housing availability and cost in these areas.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives not later than February 25, 2022, on 
whether the process for calculating BAH meets area cost of 
living in rural military housing areas that did not meet the 
Department's standard sample size during the most recent 
assessment, and a plan for making adjustments to the data 
gathering and calculation process to better meet the needs in 
these kinds of communities. The report should additionally make 
available to the committee the details of the overall process 
and calculation of BAH across the Department of Defense and 
whether adjustments to the current methodology are necessary to 
more realistically determine the rates of BAH.

                           Bereavement Study

    The committee notes the seriousness with which the 
Department of Defense takes the death of any service member and 
believes that a review of the programs and processes related to 
this issue is of importance to assure that family members are 
appropriately cared for during this trying time. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report 
to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives, not later than March 1, 2022, on the 
Department of Defense and military departments' Casualty and 
Mortuary Affairs programs, including an update on the status 
and effectiveness of the Gold Star Advocate Program and the 
status of implementation of Government Accountability Office 
recommendations (GAO-16-569) designed to enhance the 
effectiveness of the Gold Star Advocate Program. The report 
shall include information on the governance of the Casualty 
Assistance Program, goals and metrics used to track the 
effectiveness of the program, and information on the 
implementation of casualty assistance officer training and its 
effect on the quality of the program.

                       Child Development Centers

    The committee continues to be concerned with the deficit 
between availability and demand for military child care across 
Department of Defense installations. As the COVID-19 pandemic 
has demonstrated, access to child care is vital to military 
family readiness and quality of life. As such, the committee 
notes that future resources for, and attention to, childcare 
services should be prioritized to enable readiness and maintain 
retention of service members. Accordingly, the Department 
should consider incentives to encourage military spouses to 
seek employment as nationally accredited childcare service 
providers. The committee strongly encourages the Department of 
Defense to continue its efforts to expand access to child care; 
provide quality, affordable services; improve children's 
educational programs; and incentivize employment opportunities 
to attract qualified childcare staff.

                        Childcare Best Practices

    The committee continues to be concerned that military 
families continue to face shortages in the availability of 
child care as the waitlists continue to grow. Child care is 
also a readiness issue that needs to be addressed and the 
military services should research new, innovative solutions to 
this problem. The committee notes that some military 
installations have had success in establishing community 
partnerships with school districts, colleges, and nonprofit 
organizations. This has allowed military installations to lease 
vacant facilities for childcare operations or has led to 
creative community partnerships. The committee believes that 
every military installation should be attempting to replicate 
these efforts to expand childcare access.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives not later than February 1, 2022, on 
what efforts nationwide and across the military services are 
being undertaken to expand community relationships and 
partnerships with community-based childcare providers. The 
report should also highlight what barriers exist that deter 
innovative solutions to the expansion of military childcare 
facilities.

Comptroller General of the United States Review of Certain Professional 
  Development Activities of Department of Defense Education Activity 
                               Employees

    The committee directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to conduct an assessment of professional development 
activities offered or required by the Department of Defense 
Education Activity (DODEA) of teacher and other school-level 
employees, including an evaluation of how useful and effective 
DODEA school-level employees find this professional 
development. The report shall also include a comparative review 
of DODEA's professional development activities for school-level 
employees and a representative sample of such activities in 
school districts in the United States, as selected by the 
Comptroller General. The report shall also include an 
evaluation of the benefits and utility of DODEA's requirement 
that certain school-level employees perform 24 hours of 
uncompensated professional development activities each school 
quarter outside of normal working hours.
    The committee directs the Comptroller General to provide a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services on its findings 
by May 9, 2022.

  Department of Defense Education Activity Standardized Record System

    The committee is concerned about the standardization of all 
student records throughout the Department of Defense Education 
Activity (DODEA) and the specific tracking of students that are 
gifted or have exceptional needs, including formal Exceptional 
Family Member Program students. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the 
Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives not 
later than April 1, 2022, that assesses the feasibility of 
developing an electronic records system that follows students 
through the DODEA system when they move between permanent 
change of duty stations. This feasibility assessment will 
consider the inclusion of their standardized test scores and 
placement data so that routinely retaking courses or tests is 
unnecessary.

                       Hazardous Duty Pay Parity

    The committee recognizes the important contributions of 
paratroopers serving throughout the military. However, the 
committee is concerned that a disparity in hazardous duty pay 
may exist between Active Component and Reserve Component 
paratroopers. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives not later than 
April 1, 2022, assessing whether a hazardous duty pay disparity 
exists between components, rationale for any potential 
disparity, any cost associated with bringing these pays in 
direct alignment, and recommendations that should be considered 
for legislative action.

                      In-Home Childcare Licensures

    The committee continues to be concerned about the 
availability of child care and the emphasis that the Department 
of Defense has put on in-home childcare licensures. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than 
February 1, 2022, on childcare licensures and in-home provider 
care on military installations. The report will answer the 
following questions:
    (1) how many in-home licenses have been applied for;
    (2) how many were granted;
    (3) how many are needed;
    (4) how long does the licensing process take;
    (5) is the process too cumbersome and bureaucratic to be 
useful as it stands; and
    (6) how can the application process be shortened or speeded 
up.

               Military Families' Safety on Installations

    The committee is aware of concerns over physical safety for 
families living on and off some Department of Defense 
installations. Most recently, the November 2020 Fort Hood 
Independent Review Committee findings suggested a significant 
and growing concern from soldiers and their families not 
feeling safe in their own homes on and off post. The committee 
views this as a potential problem beyond Fort Hood, Texas, that 
may include other installations. The committee encourages the 
Department of Defense to assess the safety needs of service 
members and their families. Moreover, the committee strongly 
urges the Department of Defense to add questions about physical 
safety on and off post to the biennial military spouse survey 
as required by section 1782 of title 10, United States Code.

             Military Internship Program Feasibility Study

    The committee recognizes the importance of the Military's 
recruitment efforts and an installation's relationship with the 
local civilian community. Additionally, the Military is 
uniquely situated to enhance the educational system of local 
civilian school systems due to the Military's deep pool of 
talent and wide variety of unique learning opportunities. The 
committee notes that the Military relies on a wide array of 
highly technical and skilled servicemembers who operate in the 
field of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics 
(STEM). Partnering STEM-oriented servicemembers with local 
civilian students in an internship program may improve interest 
in STEM curricula and the long-term STEM talent in the U.S. 
economy overall. Enlarging the talent pool of well-educated 
STEM professionals in the U.S. will also improve our position 
against near-peer competitors who are investing significant 
resources and effort into STEM-related fields.
    Accordingly, the committee is seeking information from the 
Department of Defense about the feasibility of executing a STEM 
internship program with local civilian schools and universities 
to expand military relationships in the community and boost 
STEM-related educational opportunities for local civilian 
students. The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a report to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives not later than June 1, 2022 on whether 
it is feasible to execute a STEM-centric internship program 
with civilian educational institutions. A ``civilian 
educational institution'' is any civilian high-school, college, 
vocational school, community or junior college, or university. 
The committee further directs the Secretary of Defense to 
include information and recommendations based on, but not 
limited to:
    (1) A summary of any existing military internship programs 
or similar partnership with civilian educational institutions;
    (2) The cost of executing a military internship program and 
the estimated benefit to the military, local community, and 
overall U.S. economy;
    (3) Anticipated difficulties with executing or implementing 
such an internship program, including possible legal liability 
concerns;
    (4) Military installation physical security considerations 
implicated with civilian students temporarily traveling on and 
off installation for the internship program;
    (5) Limitations for the internship program due to 
classification or other security requirements;
    (6) Considerations specific to civilian students within the 
Department of Defense Education Activity;
    (7) Logistics regarding the local travel of apprentices and 
service members to execute the military internship program;
    (8) A vetting process for servicemembers selected to 
supervise a civilian apprentice;
    (9) The availability of interactive, hands-on learning and 
skill-building opportunities for the civilian internship;
    (10) The possibility of the military internship providing 
school credit hours or degree competition credit;
    (11) The relation of internship program participation and 
Service recruiting efforts;
    (12) The possibility of a military service commitment as a 
payback for participation in the military internship program; 
and
    (13) Recommendations for three military installations in 
which to execute a pilot program for a STEM-centric military 
internship program.

   Portability of Professional Licenses of Servicemembers and their 
                                Spouses

    The committee believes that a service member or the spouse 
of a service member with a professional license in good 
standing in a jurisdiction that relocates his or her residency 
because of military orders for military service to a location 
that is not in such jurisdiction, the professional license or 
certification of such servicemember or spouse should be 
considered valid at a similar scope of practice and in the 
discipline applied for in the jurisdiction of such new 
residency for the duration of such military orders. The 
committee believes that the professional license or 
certification of such servicemember shall be considered valid 
if they provide a copy of such military orders to the licensing 
authority in the jurisdiction in which the new residency is 
located, remain in good standing with the licensing authority 
that issued the license, and submits to the authority of the 
licensing authority in the new jurisdiction for the purposes of 
standards of practice, discipline, and fulfillment of any 
continuing education requirements.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to issue a report to the House Armed Services Committee no 
later than March 31, 2022 detailing the status of existing 
interstate compacts, how many have been completed, the costs 
associated and the challenges that remain to implement a 
uniform process across the Department of Defense. The report 
should further detail the annual breakdown by state and 
profession of military spouses that seek state re-licensing 
after relocating due to military orders.

  Report on Access to Financial Institutions on Military Installations

    The Committee recognizes the importance of access to 
financial services for the military community. Furthermore, the 
committee recognizes that competition helps to facilitate more 
affordable and tailored products for consumers and protection 
from predatory lenders. Limited access to financial services, 
particularly for those posted at geographically isolated 
military installations can cause hardship for servicemembers 
and their families. Greater insight into the availability of 
financial services on military installations is needed. 
Accordingly, the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the Committee of Armed Services of the 
Senate and House of Representatives, not later than July 1, 
2022 on the following:
    (1) The availability of financial services institutions on 
military installations.
    (2) The degree to which servicemembers and other personnel 
that live or work on military installations have the ability to 
choose between different financial services providers, 
including banks and credit unions on military installations.
    (3) Federal policies and regulations impacting access for 
financial services providers that seek to offer their services 
on military installations.
    (4) A description of how the Department calculates the in-
kind value of services provided by financial institutions on 
military installations, and whether the inkind value calculated 
for these services can be used to partially or fully satisfy 
the fair market value requirement for leasing non-excess 
property on military installations pursuant to section 2667 of 
title 10, United States Code.

                    Report on Naval Special Warfare

    Naval Special Warfare (NSW) has been at the forefront of 
the Navy's counterterrorism (CT) mission since the terrorist 
attacks on September 11, 2001 and the force has grown 
exponentially since. Non-SEAL NSW support personnel performing 
administrative duties, intelligence collection and 
communications have assisted and gone into the fight alongside 
the Navy SEALs on the battlefields of Afghanistan, Iraq and 
beyond.
    However, while NSW are performing Type-2 Sea Duty, their 
level of incentive-based pay differs significantly from their 
counterparts performing the same duties onboard a ship. This 
disparity in compensation can be up to $8,000 per year.
    The committee believes this disparity creates a financial 
burden on these Sailors and their families that can affect 
retention of experienced NSW sailors, which may affect mission 
readiness.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to submit a report, no later than February 1, 2022, to the 
House Committee on Armed Services, analyzing their ``sea time'' 
eligibility and the pay discrepancy between Type-2 Sea Duty 
tours in NSW and onboard ships, how this may affect readiness, 
and a proposal to address this concern.

            Report on STEM Talent Recruitment and Retention

    The committee is concerned with the Department of Defense's 
ability to recruit personnel with specialized degrees. 
Therefore, the Secretary of Defense shall submit a report to 
the House Armed Services Committee and the Senate Armed 
Services Committee, no later than April 1, 2022, with a list of 
degrees, certificates, and certifications in areas of critical 
need, including but not limited to science, technology, 
engineering, mathematics, cyber security, artificial 
intelligence, quantum computing and language-based security, 
that the Department is failing to meet recruitment and its 
retention goals. The report should include the challenges the 
Department is facing to meet such goals and recommendations for 
improving recruitment and retention of personnel with 
specialized degrees and certifications that the Department is 
failing to recruit and retain.

 Report on the counting of military servicemembers and their families 
            for purposes of completing the decennial census

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives by February 1, 2022, on recommendations to more 
accurately count military servicemembers and their families for 
purposes of completing the decennial census.
    The committee further directs the report to include:
    (1) Whether increased coordination between the Department 
of Defense and the Census Bureau would contribute to a more 
accurate decennial census count; and
    (2) What type of coordination between the Department of 
Defense and the Census Bureau might contribute to a more 
accurate decennial census count while maintaining privacy 
protections of military servicemembers and their families.

               Reserve Component Service Member Benefits

    The committee is concerned that the earned post-service 
benefits for Reserve Component service members, specifically 
career reservists, are not being communicated to them in a 
clear, concise, and easily understandable manner and therefore 
these service members may not ultimately access these earned 
benefits. Because of the nature of Reserve Component service 
with breaks in activation, or the length of time between 
service and discharge or retirement, a clear communication and 
understanding of how to qualify for or have access to post-
service benefits for reservists is critical. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report 
to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives, not later than March 1, 2022, that describes 
and assesses the process, timing, and comprehensiveness of the 
communication of available post-service benefits to Reserve 
Component service members, how many full-time reservists access 
the GI Bill and at what rate as well as any recommendations to 
increase GI Bill benefits for reservists.

         Support for Teachers in Military Impacted Communities

    The committee notes that the Department of the Air Force's 
annual Support of Military Families report, which scores 
communities on the quality of their public primary education, 
is an attempt to encourage military-impacted communities to do 
more to support military families. While the committee 
understands the importance of such a report, there is concern 
that the Department of Defense is not offering enough support 
to address the highlighted areas of concern. As the Department 
of the Navy and the Department of the Army each work to develop 
their own reports, the committee is exploring ways to help 
military-impacted communities to address identified 
deficiencies, including improved support for teachers.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with the Secretary of Education when necessary, 
to submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2022 on the following:
    (1) Challenges faced by military-impacted communities when 
recruiting and retaining teachers;
    (2) Suggestions on how to improve recruitment and retention 
of teachers in military impacted-communities;
    (3) Recommendations on how the Department of Defense can 
better support teachers in military-impacted communities;
    (4) Comparison of teacher salaries and position openings in 
military-impacted schools against state-wide averages.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                     Subtitle A--Pay and Allowances


   Section 601--Basic Needs Allowance for Low-Income Regular Members

    This section would amend section 402 of title 37, United 
States Code, to authorize the Secretary of Defense to pay a 
basic needs allowance to a qualified service member.

Section 602--Equal Incentive Pay for Members of the Reserve Components 
                          of the Armed Forces

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
provide Reserve and National Guard service members incentive 
and special duty pays at the same rate as their Active Duty 
counterparts.

     Section 603--Expansions of Certain Travel and Transportation 
                              Authorities

    This section would amend titles 10 and 37, United States 
Code, to make permanent existing travel and transportation 
authorities that will expire after December 31, 2021. Section 
631 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2012 (Public Law 112-81) consolidated travel and transportation 
allowances with the intent for the Department of Defense to 
reform and update those policies using the new broader travel 
and transportation authorities.

  Section 604--Unreimbursed Moving Expenses for Members of the Armed 
                         Forces: Report; Policy

    This section would direct a report by the Department of 
Defense on unreimbursed expenses for service members and their 
families during their moves broken out by rank, service, and 
military housing area.

Section 605--Report on Relationship between Basic Allowance for Housing 
                     and Sizes of Military Families

    This section would require a report by the Department of 
Defense on whether the basic allowance for housing is 
sufficient for the average family size of members of the Armed 
Forces, broken out by service, rank, and military housing area.

   Section 606--Report on Temporary Lodging Expenses in Competitive 
                            Housing Markets

    This section would direct the Department of Defense to 
report on the appropriateness of the 10 days of per diem for 
Temporary Lodging Expense in highly competitive housing 
markets.

           Section 607--Report on Rental Partnership Programs

    This section would require a report on rental partnership 
programs including the effectiveness of the programs and usage 
by service members who live off post.

                 Subtitle B--Bonuses and Incentive Pays


 Section 611--One-Year Extension of Certain Expiring Bonus and Special 
                            Pay Authorities

    This section would extend, through December 31, 2022, 
income replacement payments for Reserve Component members 
experiencing extended and frequent mobilization for Active Duty 
service; two critical recruitment and retention incentive 
programs for Reserve Component healthcare professionals; 
accession and retention incentives for nuclear-qualified 
officers; and the consolidated special and incentive pay 
authorities.

                Subtitle C--Family and Survivor Benefits


   Section 621--Expansion of Parental Leave for Members of the Armed 
                                 Forces

    This section would amend section 701 of title 10, United 
States Code, to expand parental leave for qualified service 
members to 12 weeks.

  Section 622--Transitional Compensation and Benefits for the Former 
   Spouse of a Member of the Armed Forces Who Allegedly Committed a 
                Dependent-Abuse Offense during Marriage

    This section would modify section 1059 of title 10, United 
States Code, to clarify the timing for eligibility of 
transitional compensation for dependent-abuse offenses during 
marriage to a service member.

  Section 623--Claims Relating to the Return of Personal Effects of a 
                  Deceased Member of the Armed Forces

    This section would authorize claims for reimbursement for 
the personal effects of deceased members of the Armed Forces 
that were damaged, lost, or destroyed when being returned to 
designated persons.

Section 624--Expansion of Pilot Program to Provide Financial Assistance 
         to Members of the Armed Forces for In-Home Child Care

    This section would authorize the expansion of the in-home 
childcare fee assistance pilot program.

 Section 625--Continuation of Paid Parental Leave for a Member of the 
                    Armed Forces upon Death of Child

    This section would authorize commanders to allow service 
members to complete the remainder of their preapproved primary 
or secondary caregiver leave following the death of the child 
for whom the leave was taken.

  Section 626--Casualty Assistance Program: Reform; Establishment of 
                             Working Group

    This section would establish a Casualty Assistance Reform 
Working Group to assess the casualty affairs programs across 
the Department of Defense.

                   Subtitle D--Defense Resale Matters


 Section 631--Additional Sources of Funds Available for Construction, 
       Repair, Improvement, and Maintenance of Commissary Stores

    This section would provide the Defense Commissary Agency 
(DeCA) with flexibility in addressing commissary store 
construction, renovation, repairs, and upgrades by allowing 
DeCA to deposit additional revenues into the surcharge account 
established pursuant to section 2484 of title 10, United States 
Code.

             Subtitle E--Miscellaneous Rights and Benefits


Section 641--Electronic or Online Notarization for Members of the Armed 
                                 Forces

    This section would authorize electronic notarization for 
members of the Armed Forces.

                   TITLE VII--HEALTH CARE PROVISIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                   Acceleration of Malaria Treatments

    The committee remains concerned about the negative impact 
to mission readiness resulting from poor compliance with 
malaria prevention regimens in Active Duty forces. Advances in 
the development of oral, ultra-long-acting drug delivery 
platforms have the potential for significant health 
improvement, drug efficacy, and cost savings for the Department 
of Defense. The committee encourages the acceleration of the 
development of oral, ultra-long-acting, sustained-release 
delivery platforms for bioavailable therapies for treatment of 
service members deployed in malaria-endemic areas.

                        Adverse Event Reporting

    The committee commends the Department of Defense for its 
continued educational efforts to service members on dietary 
supplement use and safety through the Operation Supplement 
Safety Program (OPSS). The committee recognizes dietary 
supplement use is 20 percent higher in service members than the 
civilian population, with a minimum of 60 percent of healthcare 
providers observing adverse events in service members. Adverse 
events from dietary supplements for weight loss, muscle 
building, and energy affect service members' health, readiness, 
and performance. The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA's) 
adverse events reporting data shows that these types of dietary 
supplements are three times more likely to cause severe medical 
injury than vitamins or minerals. Research shows that adverse 
events from these dietary supplements include organ failure, 
heart attack, seizure, stroke, tremors, and other medical 
injury including death. The committee acknowledges the FDA's 
existing adverse event reporting system and recognizes the 
Military Health System's need to track adverse events data and 
share with the FDA to better protect the health, readiness, and 
performance of service members. The committee encourages the 
Department of Defense to include adverse event reporting for 
dietary supplements within military electronic health records 
and to regularly share these data with the FDA's system for 
tracking adverse event reports.

            Adverse Events Reported for Dietary Supplements

    The committee commends the Department of Defense (DOD) for 
its efforts to educate service members on safe dietary 
supplement use through the Operation Supplement Safety Program. 
The committee acknowledges the FDA's existing adverse event 
reporting system and recommends that the DOD include adverse 
event reporting for dietary supplements within military 
electronic health records. The Committee directs the Secretary 
of Defense to provide a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than March 1, 2022 on the instances of 
adverse events reported for dietary supplements.

                   Blast Injury Health Policy Review

    The committee commends the Department of Defense for its 
continued research and development activities related to blast 
injuries and the diagnosis and treatment of traumatic brain 
injury (TBI).
    Although the Department has spent approximately $1.8 
billion over the last 10 years on TBI-related research and 
development, it has pursued only a handful of projects focused 
on TBI preventative devices. The committee is aware of the U.S. 
Special Forces Command's Comprehensive Strategy for Special 
Operations Forces Warfighter Brain Health and the Blast 
Exposure Monitoring (BEMO) initiative to operationalize and 
deploy automated blast exposure monitoring among service 
members and recommends the Department evaluate BEMO as a model 
for service-wide blast exposure monitoring. The committee also 
urges the Department to develop a comprehensive strategy for 
deployment of automated blast monitoring across the force to 
include development, program management, and acquisition, and 
consider non-helmet TBI preventative devices as part of the 
effort to reduce the risk of blast and non-blast related TBI in 
training and in combat.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, not later 
than February 1, 2022, that includes the following:
    (1) a comprehensive Department of Defense strategy to 
provide joint strategic direction to the Department and 
Military Health System including standardized operational 
requirements for neurotrauma prevention, detection, diagnosis, 
treatment (to include non-combat related concussion and blast 
exposure), and integration of training programs for innovative 
solutions necessary to enhance warfighter performance through 
targeted specific mental health assessment, data metrics, data 
analysis, training, and implementation.
    (2) an incorporation of findings and recommendations of the 
forthcoming National Academies of Science, Engineering, and 
Medicine study on neurotrauma.
    (3) an assessment of the impact of broadening the 
definition of a military acute concussive event for 
establishing the collection and documentation of exposure 
information that will support the Department of Defense as it 
sets formal thresholds and then modifies those thresholds as 
the science develops further.
    (4) an assessment of non-helmet TBI preventative devices 
that have Food and Drug Administration clearance and are in use 
by numerous professional athletes that should be a key 
component of the Department of Defense's holistic effort to 
combat TBI, both in training and in combat.
    (5) an assessment of the effectiveness of appropriated 
defense research dollars (including Congressionally Directed 
Medical Research Programs) in producing measurable improvements 
in the prevention, detection, diagnosis, and treatment of brain 
injury for service members with recommendations on improvement 
to defense brain injury research oversight.

                     Burn and Wound Care Innovation

    The committee understands that polytrauma injuries, such as 
massive burns and open wounds, are among the most common combat 
injuries. Burn wounds usually require debridement as soon as 
possible after injury to preserve skin, remove dead tissue, and 
avoid infection, which requires resources that are typically 
unavailable in a battlefield environment. Burn wounds have a 
high risk of infection that can lead to amputations, longer 
hospital stays, and complications, resulting in longer, more 
challenging rehabilitation for service members, including the 
possibility of being unable to return to duty or active life. 
The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives by February 1, 2022, that assesses possible 
burn care innovations that can be used without a surgeon or 
sterile environment that can treat burn wounds and result in 
equal or better patient outcomes.

    Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Medical Response

    The committee applauds the Secretary of Defense's 
deployment of military assets to speed ongoing COVID-19 
vaccination efforts in the United States. The committee also 
notes that the Department of Defense provided significant 
support to State and local agencies in the initial stages of 
the national pandemic response in 2020. Not only did medical 
units from the Army, Navy, and Air Force render invaluable 
support, but other elements of the force, particularly the 
National Guard, provided essential logistical and security 
support to overwhelmed State and local governments and medical 
facilities. While individual units did outstanding work, the 
committee believes the Department's response could have been 
better coordinated. Such coordination is essential, given the 
disruptive nature and frequency of these events, from the West 
African Ebola response in 2014 to the present.
    The committee believes that the United States military will 
always be a primary supporting responder to mass events, 
whether caused by infectious disease or an adversary-generated 
chemical, biological, radiological, or nuclear (CBRN) event. 
Unfortunately, the first time that line units, military medical 
providers, and local authorities ever acted jointly is in the 
occurrence of an actual event, as was the case of the 101st 
Airborne Division (Air Assault) during the Ebola mission to 
Africa. At no time were CBRN first line responders, military 
healthcare providers, and local officials afforded the 
opportunity to train jointly in the operational medical 
response to an epidemic or CBRN attack. This deficiency must be 
addressed. To that end, the committee understands that the CBRN 
School at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri, as well as other 
locations with CBRN military capabilities may provide 
integrated medical and line unit training for these types of 
contingencies to remedy these gaps in training.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees by 
March 1, 2022, on plans to institute integrated medical, line 
unit, and civil authority training for an epidemic or CBRN 
event, to include possible locations for such training and the 
capabilities that may be used during the training to include 
throughput.

         Clinical Trials for Freeze-Dried Platelets for Trauma

    The committee remains concerned that platelet shortage for 
hemorrhage control continues to impact battlefield casualties. 
The committee is aware that forward deployed forces in austere 
environments have limited resources available to treat injuries 
on the frontline. The committee believes that ruggedized 
packaging of freeze-dried plasma and platelets potentially 
offers greater capabilities than currently fielded systems and 
has the potential to reduce the loss of life in combat and 
other environments. Therefore, the committee recommends the 
Department of Defense continue to develop these products and 
accelerate the clinical trials for trauma of freeze-dried 
hemostatic products, to include platelet-derived products, and 
the development of packaging suitable for far forward forces.

    Coverage of Chiropractic Care Services under the TRICARE Program

    The committee is aware that since 1985, the Department of 
Defense has conducted several demonstration projects designed 
to examine the cost and feasibility of chiropractic healthcare 
services for its beneficiaries. The results of these projects 
have concluded that it is feasible to implement chiropractic 
services as part of the military health care benefit, and the 
resulting patient satisfaction is higher than that seen with 
traditional medical care. Moreover, complementary, and 
alternative medicine is increasingly available in the private 
sector and chiropractic care is covered by Medicare and some 
private sector insurers. The committee understands the 
Department of Defense is currently evaluating chiropractic care 
services and similar therapies. Therefore, the committee 
strongly encourages the Department of Defense to expand the 
TRICARE benefit to include chiropractic care for service 
members and beneficiaries.

                        Creative Arts Therapies

    The committee recognizes that clinical research findings 
indicate creative arts therapies (CATs) offered through the 
Department of Defense appear to be having some successful 
outcomes, including facilitating recovery from physical and 
psychological injury, reducing symptoms associated with post-
traumatic stress disorder, regulating emotion, enhancing 
resilience, and encouraging healthy independent coping 
mechanisms. CATs have been used within the Department to 
improve outcomes for service members experiencing trauma dating 
back to World War II. However, there has been increased focus, 
attention, and research in this area over the past decade. The 
Department is currently compiling a report on the current use 
of CATs and the outcomes of these therapies as well as demand 
and resource requirements to expand these services. The 
committee encourages the Department of Defense to further 
examine the effectiveness of these treatments and potentially 
expand initiatives involving CAT once patient outcomes are 
better understood.

   Determination of Eligibility for Adult Incapacitated Children of 
                            Service Members

    The committee understands there are approximately 31,000 
incapacitated adult child dependents enrolled for benefits in 
the Defense Enrollment Eligibility Reporting System. An 
incapacitated adult child must be dependent on the Active Duty 
or retired service member for over one-half of the child's 
support. The Government Accountability Office (GAO) Report 20-
335 found the Department of Defense policy provides limited 
guidance and inconsistent standards resulting in the military 
services developing fragmented approaches for processing 
applications. It also discovered that the calculations for some 
incapacitated adult children were made based on a formula 
called the Family Unit Rule. Moreover, the Marine Corps 
apparently assigns all adults in the household, including 
incapacitated adult children, two shares of household expenses, 
and minor children one share, whereas the Defense Finance 
Accounting Service, Army, Navy, and Air Force calculate these 
shares differently, which creates an inconsistent application 
of policy.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than 
February 1, 2022, that includes the following:
    (1) revised guidance for financial determinations and 
consistent medical standards for all of the military services 
to use in determining the dependency status of incapacitated 
adult children.
    (2) consistent application of the Family Unit Rule which 
assigns all adults in the household, including incapacitated 
adult children, two shares of household expenses, and minor 
children one share.
    (3) clarification of the definition of a nondependent 
family member in DOD Instruction 1315.19 and the circumstances 
under which nondependent family members should be considered 
for services provided by the Exceptional Family Member Program.
    (4) clearly defined oversight responsibilities of the 
Department of Defense Human Resources Activity and the military 
services for the incapacitated adult child dependency process, 
including the consistent tracking, monitoring, and reporting of 
reliable data on incapacitated adult child dependency 
applications and determinations across the military services 
for use in data-driven decision-making.
    (5) the status of other recommendations as reported in GAO 
Report 20-335.

  Discrimination against Military Dependents with Prior Mental Health 
                               Conditions

    The committee remains concerned that military children are 
unfairly disadvantaged when they decide to join a military 
service. Children in military families face stressful 
situations--from their parents' deployment, frequent moves, and 
changes in schools throughout their young lives--which may 
result in them seeking mental health services and other forms 
of counseling. These services are most often for temporary or 
adolescent conditions where they show demonstrable improvement. 
However, the use of these services may prevent them from 
joining the military. The committee urges the Department of 
Defense and the military services to amend their accession 
criteria to address this specific scenario when making 
determinations about medical waivers for accession.

                    Health Threat Travel Information

    The committee is aware that the Department of Defense has 
relied upon a combination of open-source information and 
contracted resources to determine health threats and associated 
force protection recommendations for Service members and 
Department personnel during international travel. Expert-
reviewed information plays a critical role in assisting medical 
planners and providers to better advise groups or individual 
travelers, research threats, and save time.
    Currently, the Department collects information at the 
country-level, leading to gaps in knowledge when travel is 
focused on sub-regions and/or cities. As a result, Department 
planners and providers often must determine which country-level 
information may or may not be relevant to specific sub-region; 
and where sub-region-specific information is available, 
oftentimes, it is less robust than available country-level 
information. At the same time, the Committee is also aware of 
user desire for additional information and functionality, 
including information pertaining to environmental health 
threats and ability to access health threat travel information 
in classified, unclassified, and disconnected environments. 
User-friendly access to health threat travel information is a 
critical tool to help keep Service members and DoD personnel 
safe.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives not later than February 1, 2022, on 
any additional requirements it might have for health travel 
threat information, including but not limited to:
    (1) Environmental health threats;
    (2) Poisonous animals and plants;
    (3) City and sub-regional level data;
    (4) Ability to access all information sources on both 
classified and unclassified systems;
    (5) Ability to access existing health threat information in 
a disconnected and mobile environment.

                          Heat Illness Report

    The committee recognizes that while effective techniques 
and guidelines are in place to prevent exertional heat illness 
(EHI), servicemembers continue to develop EHI with sometimes 
fatal outcomes. The Armed Forces Health Surveillance Branch 
(AFHSB) identified 475 incident cases of heat stroke and 1,667 
incident cases of heat exhaustion among active component 
service members in 2020. The Army Public Health Center reports 
that 2-3 soldiers die annually from heat illness. The projected 
rise in the intensity and frequency of extreme heat conditions 
underscores that this threat will continue to grow and pose 
dangerous health risks to servicemembers. Discrepancies 
continue to exist in how heat-related clinical illnesses are 
managed and reported, undermining valid comparisons across 
locations and settings.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and House of Representatives by September 1, 2022, 
detailing the efforts to reduce heat-related illnesses at U.S. 
military installations. The study and report shall include 
information and recommendations based on, but not limited to:
    (1) An analysis of the number of heat stroke and heat 
exhaustion cases that did not prompt mandatory reports through 
the Reportable Medical Events System, and how the guidelines 
for mandatory reporting, including diagnosis codes, of heat 
illnesses should be updated.
    (2) An analysis of whether the Department of Defense should 
update heat related health guidelines to better reflect current 
risks and projections of worsening extreme heat, especially 
whether specific guidelines are needed for recruit training 
centers.
    (3) A description of the training and education on the 
detection and prevention of heat-related illness that are 
taking place across the military services.
    (4) An accounting of how many black flag days were declared 
at each military training location over the last five years, as 
well as a plan to track black flag days on military 
installations and compile the data in a central location, 
accessible to the public.
    (5) A survey military leaders' understanding and adherence 
to medical protocols and best practices when personnel fall ill 
due to extreme heat.
    (6) As assessment of whether a public-facing online 
resource center with scientific and educational resources that 
provides data and guidance on heat related illness would be 
valuable to increase servicemember knowledge and help reduce 
the frequency of heat-related illnesses.

                  Holistic Health and Fitness Programs

    The committee recognizes that preventable musculoskeletal 
injuries negatively impact soldier health, Army readiness, and 
impose a significant healthcare cost burden. The committee also 
understands that the Army Holistic Health and Fitness (H2F) 
Program is designed to optimize individual performance and 
create stronger, fitter, and faster soldiers better prepared 
for the practical challenges they face both on and off the 
battlefield. Moreover, the committee recognizes that equipment 
and facilities are essential elements of the H2F system and 
that the Soldier Performance Readiness Center (SPRC) is an 
integral part of the H2F programming, as it provides a 
supportive individually focused fitness training environment 
where comprehensive, integrated, and immersive physical and 
nonphysical programming is delivered.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with the Secretary of the Army and the Army H2F 
Program, to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than 
April 1, 2022, that includes the following:
    (1) musculoskeletal injury prevention research efforts 
focused on identifying risk factors for musculoskeletal 
injuries among members of the Armed Forces and creating a 
better understanding for adaptive musculoskeletal and bone 
formation during initial entry military training.
    (2) gaps in musculoskeletal injury prevention research to 
include anticipated budget that would be suitable to fill these 
gaps.
    (3) recommendations on the designation of a program 
executive office that would have oversight and management of 
the Army's performance health and fitness equipment and 
facility acquisition, contracting, and sustainment processes.
    (4) recommendations to include a timeline on the 
establishment of a sustainment cycle for SPRCs, container gyms, 
Army Combat Fitness Test lane equipment, and used gyms-in-a-
box.

                 Impact of Mental Health Copays Report

    The committee is concerned that increases in certain 
TRICARE specialty care copays have had an impact on the 
utilization of outpatient mental health visits and physical, 
speech, and occupational therapy visits by Group A 
beneficiaries. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary 
of Defense to submit a report to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives not 
later than March 1, 2022, that includes an analysis comparing 
the utilization rates of outpatient mental health visits and 
physical, speech, and occupational therapy visits by Group A 
beneficiaries in 2016 and 2017 (before copays increased) to 
utilization rates of these services in 2018 and 2019 (after 
copays increased.) Data for 2020 will not be included due to 
the impact of COVID-19 on healthcare utilization. Utilization 
will be measured by unique users, average/median number of 
visits per user, percent of users with only one visit, 
distribution of users across binned number of visits (1 visit 
only; 2-3 visits; 4-6 visits; 7-9 visits; 10-12 visits; more 
than 12 visits) and other measures the Secretary deems 
appropriate. For TRICARE Prime beneficiaries, the analysis will 
assess the percentage of patients referred for these services 
who actually accessed care. The analysis shall cross tabulate 
data for each beneficiary sponsor category (Active Duty versus 
retired versus medically retired) and TRICARE Plan (Prime 
versus Select), given that copays vary across these groups.

                 Individual First-Aid Kits Improvements

    The committee understands that improving troop readiness 
and reducing preventable deaths on the battlefield are top 
priorities. Individual first-aid kits (IFAKs) and combat 
lifesaver kits (CLS) contain products that are designed to 
improve lifesaving performance by every combatant. A simplified 
supply chain with synchronized manufacturing for these products 
is critical to serving the warfighter and effectively using 
funding. The committee is concerned that the current logistics 
systems may be unsynchronized and that IFAKs/CLSs in tactical 
units require extensive management of approximately 180,000 
single items, from depots to the individual service member 
level, each with its own expiration date and Food and Drug 
Administration (FDA) manufacturer lot number. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report 
to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives not later than May 1, 2022, that includes 
the following:
    (1) comprehensive review of the current procurement system 
for the IFAKs/CLSs, including the following: the effects of 
purchasing, and the locations and destination of IFAK 
components from different contractors via different procurement 
channels; shipping, fees and storage costs of the IFAK/CLS 
components prior to kitting; personnel costs associated with 
labeling and kitting the IFAKs; storage and shipping costs of 
the IFAK/CLS prior to delivering the IFAK/CLS to the service 
members; the different shelf life for each component in the 
IFAK/CLS and its impact on readiness; estimated brigade unit-
level man-hours associated with monthly, quarterly, annual 
requirements for inspection, inventory, documentation, and 
reporting requirements for maintaining IFAKs/CLSs; and the 
ability of the services and warfighter to track and conduct an 
FDA-directed safety recall of an IFAK/CLS component.
    (2) a review of the benefits of synchronizing the 
manufacturing and kitting of individual IFAK/CLS components 
throughout the entire supply chain in an FDA-registered 
facility to ensure the quality of the first-aid kits and combat 
lifesaver kits.

               Innovations in Suicide Prevention Efforts

    The committee recognizes that suicides are tragic events 
that affect the military community on a daily basis and that 
the military's response to suicidal thoughts, attempts, and 
deaths involves clinical and non-clinical approaches. Clinical 
efforts may include depression and suicide-specific screening 
in primary care and during annual periodic health assessments. 
Non-clinical efforts include activities such as facilitating 
training of service members in problem-solving, coping skills, 
and financial literacy. The committee is concerned that despite 
these efforts to reduce the risk of suicide, the suicide rate 
appears to be increasing at an alarming rate. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives, not later than March 1, 2022, on how the 
Department of Defense and the military services are 
incorporating innovative technologies such as artificial 
intelligence and machine learning in identifying at-risk 
individuals, as well as the usefulness of predictive analytics 
in this arena. In addition, the briefing should include how the 
Department of Defense and the military services are measuring 
the effectiveness of recently deployed risk reduction tools 
such as the Army Commander Risk Reduction Toolkit, the Navy's 
Commander Risk Mitigation Dashboard, the National Guard's 
Springboard, and the Marine Corps' Command Individual Risk and 
Resiliency Assessment System at aggregating risk indicators for 
suicide prevention.

                      Medication Optimization Plan

    The committee recognizes that 99 percent of those who have 
served in the military have at least one actionable 
pharmacogenomic variant, every 2 minutes someone dies from an 
adverse drug event (ADE), and over half of people are 
prescribed at least one drug where pharmacogenomic information 
would be critical to dosage or patient harm. Moreover, 
pharmacogenomic testing, analysis, alerting, and entry into the 
military electronic health record system may be an essential 
part of precision medicine and has the potential to save 
service members' lives, improve outcomes, and lower 
expenditures.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than March 1, 2022, on how the Department of Defense 
may be able to implement a plan to optimize medications and 
reduce ADEs among service members and dependents. This plan 
should include an assessment of:
    (1) the current strategies used to optimize medications and 
reduce ADEs, including the role of pharmacists;
    (2) the feasibility of incorporating pharmacogenomic 
testing and clinical decision support tools and aligning 
efforts across the Defense Health Agency, the military 
departments and the Military Health System;
    (3) an implementation plan to integrate pharmacogenomic 
testing results into the electronic health record in a manner 
that informs medication management decisions long term;
    (4) any existing acquisition authorities that may be used 
to catalyze innovative partnerships to rapidly achieve this 
effort; and
    (5) any costs associated with the potential implementation 
plan.

                         Mental Health Services

    The committee is concerned that the demand for mental 
health-related services within the Department of Defense may be 
at a critical breaking point. The recently released Government 
Accountability Office Report 21-437R indicated that COVID-19 
has further exacerbated mental health access challenges across 
the United States. The Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention surveys found about 38 percent of respondents 
reported symptoms of anxiety or depression from April 2020 
through February 2021, up from about 11 percent in 2019. 
Emergency department visits for overdoses and suicide attempts 
from mid-March to mid-October 2020 were up 36 percent and 26 
percent, respectively, from 2019. Many behavioral health 
service providers reported increasing demand and decreasing 
staff sizes.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than 
February 1, 2022, that includes the following:
    (1) a review of how the Health Professions Scholarship 
Program can be expanded to increase the number of mental 
health-related scholarships granted, with the goal of 
increasing the pipeline of mental health providers.
    (2) a review of how the Department of Defense can 
prioritize an increase in Special and Incentive Pays to 
maximize the retention of Active Duty mental health providers.
    (3) a review of how the Department of Defense can increase 
General Schedule paygrades for mental health providers working 
in military treatment facilities.
    (4) a plan to establish a pilot program that uses 
information technology-based human performance synthetic 
training systems capable of advanced biometric data collection 
and reporting that can be used to: establish and monitor 
cognitive and physical baselines for service members throughout 
their careers and aid in forecasting, assessment, and diagnosis 
of mental health issues, including post-traumatic stress 
disorder (PTSD); explore the effectiveness of integrating PTSD 
resiliency skills with warfighter tactical training; and 
utilize data analytics to improve training protocols and 
effective mitigation strategies and tactics.

                       Military Wellness Programs

    Congress is aware of the significant challenges the 
Department faces regarding both the readiness and health of the 
force. The Committee commends the Department for placing a 
priority on and making a concerted investment in these matters.
    A key aspect to this focus is the integration of human and 
technological factors to enhance traditional approaches to 
readiness. The explosive growth in membership to a military 
wellness community of interest should serve as an indicator 
that our soldiers, sailors, marines and airmen are reaching out 
for assistance at an alarming rate. The significant interest of 
programs like this give credence that proven, digital resources 
may provide a connection and community for members is in high 
demand.
    Given the increasing costs associated with recruiting, 
training and sustaining the armed forces, Congress encourages 
the Department to continue their investment in existing 
technologies within the private and non-profit sectors that 
enhances their ability to analyze readiness data to better 
inform the decision-making process. Accordingly, the committee 
urges the Department to continue to resource these programs. 
The Committee also directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the Committees of Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives no later than February 1, 2022, on 
their plan to leverage existing digital solutions and 
capabilities to aid DoD efforts to improve and sustain force 
readiness.

            Modernization of Antibiotics Acquisition Process

    The committee is alarmed by the Future of Defense Task 
Force findings that 80 percent of ingredients used to 
manufacture drugs and 97 percent of antibiotics ingredients are 
sourced from China. The committee is concerned about any 
reliance on adversarial regimes and insecure supply chains 
capable of crippling or halting access to critical medicines. 
While the committee notes the increasing threat posed by 
antimicrobial resistance and the threat of supply chain 
disruption of critical ingredients and antibiotics, the 
committee is also concerned that adversaries are engineering 
bioweapons designed to defeat our outdated legacy 
countermeasures. The committee recognizes the need for more 
effective novel antibiotic countermeasures available for combat 
care and bioterrorism response in the United States. The 
committee strongly supports existing efforts to ensure domestic 
sourcing of ingredients and production of novel antibiotics and 
encourages the Department of Defense to modernize acquisition 
and prioritize procurement of novel antibiotics.

          National Disaster Medical System Medical Surge Pilot

    The committee affirms the primary mission of the Military 
Health System to ensure the medical readiness of the Armed 
Forces and the combat effectiveness of the defense 
establishment. While this fundamental cornerstone of defense 
health is undisputed, the committee is concerned that more 
attention must be placed on medical capabilities and surge 
capacity required for the global pandemic and homeland defense 
mission. To address this need, section 741 of the William M. 
(Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) directed implementation of a 
pilot program for civilian and military partnerships to 
increase medical surge capability and enhance interoperability 
of the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS). The committee 
also observes that the House Appropriations Committee 
Subcommittee on Defense, in its committee report to accompany 
the Department of Defense Appropriations Bill, 2021 (H. Rept. 
116-453), similarly directed accelerated execution of this 
pilot program and directed that a first location partnership be 
underway in calendar year 2021. The congressional defense 
committees remain concerned about the medical, surveillance, 
and preventive medicine capabilities of the Military Health 
System to support both a global pandemic and homeland defense 
mission.
    In view of these mission requirements and clear 
congressional authorization, the committee is also concerned 
that funding for this program was not included in the Defense 
Department's Fiscal Year 2022 budget request and notes that 
without sufficient resources, the transition from planning to 
execution could be jeopardized. Therefore, the committee urges 
the Secretary of Defense to include sufficient funding in the 
department's Fiscal Year 2023 budget request necessary to 
execute a full-scale operational public-private partnership 
prototype of an all-hazards medical surge capability.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than March 
1, 2022, that includes the following:
    (1) the medical, surveillance, and preventive medicine 
capabilities that would be used to support a global pandemic 
and health-related homeland defense missions;
    (2) a list of the coordination, exercises, and support 
agreements between the Department of Defense and NDMS partners;
    (3) a rough order of magnitude on the bed capacity that 
would be available to the Department of Defense through NDMS 
partner healthcare facilities;
    (4) the gaps that currently exist between the Department of 
Defense and NDMS partners; and
    (5) a rough estimate of cost associated with fixing any 
gaps that would improve the capabilities between the Department 
of Defense and NDMS partners.

                  National Guard Telehealth Capability

    The committee notes that the Periodic Health Assessment 
(PHA) is a screening tool used by the Armed Forces to evaluate 
the individual medical readiness of service members. It is the 
first of what may be several activities that provide the 
information needed by the surgeons general to assess individual 
mission readiness. Administration of the PHA for the Guard and 
Reserves is uniquely challenging.
    Members of the Guard and Reserves, who generally live and 
work in their communities rather than on a military 
installation, have multiple training requirements and limited 
time during drill weekends. Currently, the PHA must be 
completed with a secure military facility computer or via a 
Common Access Card (CAC)-enabled computer (not a mobile 
device). Completion of the PHA requires that the Guard or 
Reserve member have access to a computer and CAC card reader, 
take time off work and travel to a military facility to use a 
military computer, or take time away from training to complete 
the PHA during training time. It is logistically and 
administratively difficult and places burden on members of the 
Guard and Reserves.
    As a result, the committee urges the National Guard to 
establish a secure mobile application that provides the 
capability for a member of the National Guard to complete the 
PHA self-assessment and follow-up information and screenings on 
a personally owned smartphone, tablet computer, or other 
handheld mobile device that can communicate with a military 
network. Therefore, the committee directs the Chief of the 
National Guard Bureau to submit a report to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
not later than March 1, 2022, on the plan and progress for 
implementing telehealth Periodic Health Assessments.

                     Ocular Trauma Specialized Care

    The committee understands the goals of the Department of 
Defense Vision Center of Excellence are to improve vision 
health, optimize readiness, and enhance quality of life for 
service members and veterans. However, the committee is 
concerned that recent medical manning divestitures taken on by 
the military medical departments of the services may adversely 
impact the availability of ocular services throughout the 
Department of Defense. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Chairman of the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Secretaries of the military 
departments, to submit a report to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives, not 
later than March 1, 2022, that includes the following:
    (1) a review of medical manpower warfighter readiness, 
requirements, and capabilities for vision trauma and ocular 
care to include training and Graduate Medical Education as they 
relate to all national defense strategy scenarios.
    (2) any planned military medical manning divestitures in 
all areas of ocular to include sensory injuries with 
ophthalmology and optometry requirements by service and 
location.
    (3) the feasibility of establishing at least four regional 
medical hubs for enhanced treatment of ocular trauma and 
traumatic brain injury vision dysfunction injuries with the 
hubs associated with a major military medical center as the 
primary center for providing specialized medical services in 
that region and co-located with major aerial debarkation points 
within the medical evacuation system.
    (4) an analysis of access standards and funding for ocular 
services over the last 5 years in both the direct care system 
and purchased care.

                          Omega-3 Fatty Acids

    The Committee is aware the Department of Defense is taking 
steps to improve the health, performance, and combat 
effectiveness of service members by modifying the food and 
beverages offered at such dining halls, including looking at 
ways that minimize the change for service members. Moreover, 
the Committee understands that there is a positive relationship 
between a high quality, nutrient dense diet that includes 
Omega-3 fatty acids and Service member health and performance 
that has been well established through decades of historical 
knowledge within the nutrition community, along with a series 
of recent research studies. However, the Committee notes that 
the Department of Defense needs to provide additional 
information on the way forward regarding diet and nutrition. 
Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of defense to 
provide a briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives no later than March 1, 2022 on the 
plan to move forward with the development of the DoD Nutrition 
Committee framework and governance structure, the 
identification of the organizational champion and leader, and 
the plan of action and milestones for implementation of DoD 
diet and nutrition.

              Prohibition on Sale of Genetic Testing Kits

    The Committee remains concerned that some direct to 
consumer genetic testing companies continue to encourage 
service-members to purchase genetic ancestry and health 
information by offering discounts and other incentives. These 
direct-to-consumer tests are largely unregulated and could 
expose genetic and personal information with unintended 
security consequences and risk to the mission of the joint 
force. In some instances, this genetic testing material may 
fall into the hands of near peer competitors that may use this 
information to gain a national security advantage. Moreover, 
testing outside the Military Health System is unlikely to 
include a clear description of this risk. The Department of 
Defense has advised service-members to refrain from the 
purchase and use of direct to consumer genetic services. 
Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than 
February 1, 2022, that includes the efforts being undertaken 
throughout the Department of Defense and the Military 
Departments to educate and inform service-members on the 
personal and professional security risks of direct to consumer 
genetic testing and any policy guidance provided to the joint 
force on the security concerns posed by consumer genetic 
testing of military service members.

                      Rare Cancer Treatment Report

    The committee commends the Department of Defense for 
starting to address exposure risks that can correlate with 
cancer, but remains concerned about how care is provided to 
service members following diagnosis of cancer. Over 60 cancers 
disproportionately impact those who have served in the military 
and most are rare cancers, defined as fewer than 6 new cases 
per 100,000 Americans per year. Few targeted treatments are 
being developed and made available for service members and 
understanding the specific molecular driver for each patient's 
cancer is vital to informing the best treatment.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the Senate Committee on Armed Services and the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than March 1, 2022, that 
includes the following:
    (1) a description of the specific types of molecular 
diagnostics, such as microarray, whole exome, and RNA 
sequencing, which the Department of Defense is providing to 
beneficiaries diagnosed with cancer and their frequency of use;
    (2) the Department's detailed policy for data-sharing 
practices for cancer cell lines and models with the external 
research community;
    (3) the feasibility of the Department to engage in public-
private partnerships to use a next-generation, precision-
oncology platform that integrates bioinformatics, machine 
learning, and mathematics to unveil unprecedented insights into 
cancer and moves beyond a single-target-based approach. This 
approach should seek to identify complex and interconnected 
mechanisms responsible for drug response and resistance 
revealed in the human transcriptome to determine the best 
treatments and facilitate developing new ones and any potential 
costs associated with this; and
    (4) the method by which the Department provides information 
to all clinicians treating TRICARE and Military Health System 
patients on the value of using molecular diagnostics for all 
cancer patients and reimburses for these important diagnostics 
at the time of diagnosis.

              Retrofitting Buildings with Lactation Rooms

    The Committee believes that access to clean and private 
spaces for lactating and nursing individuals is important for 
the health of military families and our efforts to recruit and 
retain nursing parents in the military and the DOD civilian 
service. The Committee urges the Department to utilize funds 
provided in the Facilities, Sustainment, Restoration and 
modernization account to retrofit existing DOD facilities with 
lactation spaces. The Committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition & Sustainment to provide a report to 
the congressional defense committees no later than June 1, 2022 
regarding its plan for a phased retrofit of facilities to 
include private nursing and lactation rooms in buildings likely 
to be regularly frequented by nursing mothers who are members 
of the uniformed services, civilian employees of the Department 
of Defense, contractor personnel, or visitors.

          Review of Efforts to Address Service Member Fatigue

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense's own 
reports have found that sleep deprivation is common in the 
military, and this impacts military performance and readiness. 
In its March 2021 report prepared in response to section 749 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 
(Public Law 116-92), the Department noted that although 
military leaders are increasingly recognizing the importance of 
adequate sleep, further shifts in cultural attitudes regarding 
sleep deprivation will help ensure the optimization and 
sustainment of service member performance and health. This 
report recommended that the Department establish policy to 
promote a culture shift with regard to prioritizing adequate 
sleep in the military and noted several actions would be needed 
to accomplish this culture shift. However, the committee notes 
the difficulty of accomplishing such a cultural shift in the 
military. The Government Accountability Office's 2021 report 
examining fatigue management in the Navy's surface fleet in the 
wake of the deadly collisions in 2017 found that the Navy's 
fatigue management policy had been inconsistently implemented, 
had not been successful in ensuring adequate sleep throughout 
the fleet, and was hindered by a lack of quality information on 
the extent of fatigue and the contributing factors. As a 
result, the committee remains concerned about the Department's 
broader efforts to limit sleep deprivation.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to undertake a comprehensive review of the 
Department's efforts to limit sleep deprivation and manage 
fatigue. This review should address the following:
    (1) the extent to which the Department and the services 
have established and implemented fatigue management policies 
throughout the force that prioritize service members obtaining 
adequate sleep.
    (2) the extent to which the Department and the services 
systematically collect quality and timely fatigue data from 
service members, and whether that data is accessible to 
operational commanders to support operational decision-making 
throughout the force.
    (3) the extent to which the Department and the services use 
collected data, if any, on service member fatigue to identify, 
monitor, evaluate, and implement effective mitigations to 
address the factors contributing to fatigue and inadequate 
sleep.
    (4) any other related matters the Comptroller General 
considers appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
April 1, 2022, on preliminary findings of the Comptroller 
General's evaluation, and present final results in a format and 
timeframe agreed to at the briefing.

          Study on Alternate Treatments for Suicide Prevention

    The committee recognizes that research on suicide 
prevention continues to evolve, with new evidence-informed 
practices continuing to come to light. Research, compiled by 
the Costs of War Project at Brown University, found an 
estimated 30,177 active duty personnel and veterans who have 
served in the military since 9/11 have died by suicide, 
compared with 7,057 killed in post 9/11 military operations. 
Alternate forms of therapy such as seminars, retreats, 
workshops, or outdoor recreational therapy events are gaining 
attention in potentially preventing suicides. While attendance 
by servicemembers at such seminars, retreats, workshops, or 
outdoor recreational therapy events might increase their 
wellness and well-being, there is insufficient evidence about 
their efficacy in reducing suicides in the military community. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the Committee on Armed Services of the House 
of Representatives not later than April 1, 2022, that assesses 
the feasibility of incorporating these types of alternate 
suicide prevention treatments into current DoD suicide 
prevention treatment plans. The feasibility assessment should 
include any evidence on the benefits or drawbacks of these 
treatments.

                Telehealth Licensure Flexibility Review

    The committee recognizes that the Department of Defense 
implemented several temporary policy changes because of the 
COVID-19 pandemic. The committee is interested in the 
feasibility of retaining some of those policy changes in 
effect, such as the waiving of certain licensing requirements 
allowing interstate telehealth appointments with TRICARE-
authorized providers. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the Senate Committee 
on Armed Services and the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2022, on the feasibility and estimated cost of 
extending these flexibilities permanently.

                  Traumatic Brain Injury Test Devices

    The committee is encouraged by the recent Food and Drug 
Administration (FDA) approval of a hand-held rapid blood test 
for traumatic brain injury and commends the collaborative 
partnership between the Department of Defense, industry, and 
academia which produced this significant medical achievement. 
The committee acknowledges the leadership of the U.S. Army 
Medical Materiel Development Activity (USAMMDA) product 
management team, their industry partners, and the significant 
contributions of the Transforming Research and Clinical 
Knowledge in Traumatic Brain Injury (TRACK-TBI) clinical 
research team in this multi-year effort. The committee believes 
this achievement represents a significant advancement in 
warrior brain health and will enhance the Department's ability 
to quickly and objectively evaluate service-members who have 
suffered a potential brain injury during combat, training, or 
routine daily activities. Based on its potential to improve 
surveillance and early diagnosis of brain injuries across the 
joint force, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
December 1, 2021 on the Department's strategy, fielding plan, 
and anticipated resource requirements to equip medical element 
and treatment facilities across the military health system with 
FDA-approved blood-based TBI detection devices.

                  Tri-Service Nursing Research Program

    The committee notes the Department of Defense has 
significantly benefited from the research conducted by the Tri-
Service Nursing Research Program (TSNRP), yet its cooperative 
agreement with the Uniformed Services University to conduct 
those activities is to be terminated in fiscal year 2022. Since 
1992, the TSNRP has continuously advanced the science and 
research of military nursing to support mission readiness, 
improve the health and quality of life of military personnel 
and beneficiaries, and provide high-caliber nursing care around 
the globe. Therefore, the committee strongly encourages the 
Defense Health Agency, the Uniformed Services University, and 
the services to renegotiate an agreement to allow the Tri-
Service Nursing Research Program to continue its critical work 
in support of the Department of Defense and service members.

                       TRICARE Dental Contracting

    The committee recognizes the importance and value of the 
TRICARE Dental Program (TDP) to service members and their 
beneficiaries. The committee is also aware that the plan to 
transfer TDP to the Federal Employees Dental and Vision 
Insurance Program (FEDVIP) resulted in unintended consequences: 
increased beneficiary choices came at an increased cost to them 
and limited the Department's ability to provide the benefit to 
beneficiaries living overseas. The FEDVIP option would also 
result in potential increased cost to government, convoluted 
requirements between agencies to provide subsidies, and 
complicated communication with beneficiaries. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives not later than February 1, 2022, on the plan to 
transition the TDP contract that addresses the challenges 
raised above.

                TRICARE Healthcare Demonstration Project

    The Committee notes that the Defense Health Agency's (DHA) 
report on its objectives for the TRICARE program includes 
efforts to incorporate industry best practices and innovation 
to contain costs and increase beneficiary choice and access.
    The Committee concurs with DHA's plans to implement 
demonstrations to test a local market approach via direct 
contracts that allow private sector health care plans and 
providers to address the needs of beneficiaries with 
innovative, value-based care; allow for more collaboration 
between the plans and DHA; increase competition; improve 
quality; benefit beneficiaries; and, contain costs.
    The Committee recognizes there may be impediments for these 
entities, particularly in federal contracting. We believe DHA 
should explore ways to enable broader participation through 
demonstration projects and innovation as do other federal 
agencies that have authorities for alternative acquisition 
methods.
    Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to consider the feasibility of multiple acquisition approaches, 
to include authorities for direct contracts with local health 
care plans and providers for the purposes of temporary 
demonstration projects only, that safeguard the government's 
interests while providing contracting flexibility. Furthermore, 
the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Armed Services Committee not later than 
March 1, 2022 on these demonstrations, the timeline to 
implement them, and what authorities are needed for alternative 
acquisition methods.

           TRICARE Reimbursement of Critical Access Hospitals

    The committee is concerned about the impact of inadequate 
TRICARE reimbursement for care in Critical Access Hospitals. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the Senate Committee on Armed Services and 
the House Committee on Armed Services by February 1, 2022, that 
includes the following:
    (1) a review of current TRICARE reimbursements for all 
Critical Access Hospitals nearby military installations;
    (2) a geographic review and comparison of reimbursement 
rates for all other hospitals participating in TRICARE;
    (3) a review and identification of healthcare providers 
currently receiving rates less than current comparable Medicaid 
rates for TRICARE services; and
    (4) a review of the impact of healthcare provider closures 
on military access to health care and readiness, including 
Critical Access Hospitals or Rural Access Hospitals that 
currently receive less than Medicaid rate for a portion of 
TRICARE services provided.

                           Warstopper Program

    The committee recognizes the contributions of the Defense 
Logistics Agency's Warstopper program in bolstering the 
resilience and responsiveness of the defense industrial base to 
meeting ``go-to-war'' materiel requirements for deploying 
units. The Warstopper Program was utilized during the COVID-19 
national emergency to provide over 6.4 million N95 respirators 
to DOD as well as ventilators and other critical personal 
protective equipment. Warstopper medical readiness contracts 
cover hundreds of pharmaceutical items and account for 
approximately half of the Warstopper budget. The Committee 
believes that the Defense Logistics Agency should develop a 
program, either within the authorities of the Warstopper 
program or building from Warstopper's success, to ensure 
medication supply stability and guarantee access to commonly-
used pharmaceutical items for not just deploying units but all 
servicemembers, their dependents, and others who access care 
through the Military Health System. The Committee also urges 
the Defense Logistics Agency to expand the Warstopper program's 
portfolio of wartime requirements to include a global pandemic 
scenario. The Committee directs the Director of the Defense 
Logistics Agency, in consultation with the Director of the 
Defense Health Agency, to provide a report to the Senate 
Committee on Armed Services and the House Committee on Armed 
Services no later than April 1, 2022 assessing the feasibility 
of expanding the Warstopper program. This report should include 
an assessment of resources or authorities required to ensure 
access to at least a six month supply of at least thirty 
generic pharmaceuticals the Directors determine to be at risk 
of shortage, especially during a public health emergency, for 
all MHS users. Further, the Committee directs the Comptroller 
General of the United States to conduct an assessment of the 
Warstopper program and provide the Senate Committee on Armed 
Services and the House Committee on Armed Services with a 
report on its findings no later than January 1, 2023.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


           Subtitle A--TRICARE and Other Health Care Benefits


Section 701--Improvement of Postpartum Care for Certain Members of the 
                      Armed Forces and Dependents

    This section would require a pilot program in support of 
post-natal care, to include pelvic health rehabilitation, and 
the issuance of policy guidance to develop and to implement 
standard protocols across the Military Health System to treat 
obstetric hemorrhage.

  Section 702--Eating Disorders Treatment for Certain Members of the 
                      Armed Forces and Dependents

    This section would provide for eating disorders treatment 
for members of the Armed Forces and certain dependents of 
members and former members of the uniformed services, and for 
other purposes.

Section 703--Modifications Relating to Coverage of Telehealth Services 
                under TRICARE Program and Other Matters

    This section would modify telehealth services under the 
TRICARE Program and authorize a limited Survivor Benefit Plan 
open season.

 Section 704--Modifications to Pilot Program on Health Care Assistance 
                                 System

    This section would extend the deadline and scope of the 
report required following this pilot.

 Section 705--Temporary Requirement for Contraception Coverage Parity 
                       under the TRICARE Program

    This section would eliminate cost-sharing for contraception 
for 1 year.

                 Subtitle B--Health Care Administration


Section 711--Modification of Certain Defense Health Agency Organization 
                              Requirements

    This section would modify certain Defense Health Agency 
requirements.

Section 712--Requirements for Consultations Related to Military Medical 
      Research and Defense Health Agency Research and Development

    This section would require additional consultation between 
the Department of Defense and the services relating to the 
transfer of medical research and development organizations.

Section 713--Authorization of Program to Prevent Fraud and Abuse in the 
                         Military Health System

    This section would establish a program to prevent fraud and 
abuse in the Military Health System.

      Section 714--Mandatory Referral for Mental Health Evaluation

    This section would amend section 1090a of title 10, United 
States Code, To improve the process by which a service member 
may be referred for a mental health evaluation.

       Section 715--Inclusion of Exposure to Perfluoroalkyl and 
 Polyfluoroalkyl Substances as Component of Periodic Health Assessments

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
offer perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances exposure 
evaluation and testing for service members who want it as part 
of their annual health assessment.

  Section 716--Prohibition on Adverse Personnel Actions Taken against 
Certain Members of the Armed Forces Based on Declining COVID-19 Vaccine

    This section would prohibit certain adverse actions for 
service members who decline the COVID-19 vaccine.

Section 717--Establishment of Department of Defense System To Track and 
              Record Information on Vaccine Administration

    This section would establish a process for the Department 
of Defense to track vaccines administered by the Department, 
including adverse reactions and refusals.

  Section 718--Authorization of Provision of Instruction at Uniformed 
Services University of the Health Sciences to Certain Federal Employees

    This section would expand eligibility for enrollment in the 
Uniformed Services University.

     Section 719--Mandatory Training on Health Effects of Burn Pits

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
provide military health system medical providers with mandatory 
training with respect to the potential health effects of burn 
pits.

   Section 720--Department of Defense Procedures for Exemptions from 
                      Mandatory COVID-19 Vaccines

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
establish a uniform procedure for administrative, medical, or 
religious exemptions to the mandatory COVID-19 vaccine.

     Section 721--Modifications and Report Related to Reduction or 
      Realignment of Military Medical Manning and Medical Billets

    This section would modify previous limitations on the 
realignment or reduction of military medical manning end 
strength in light of emerging requirements.

  Section 722--Cross-Functional Team for Emerging Threat Relating to 
                       Anomalous Health Incidents

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
create a cross-functional team to address the national security 
challenges related to anomalous health incidents. It would also 
require the Secretary to provide a briefing to the appropriate 
congressional committees with respect to the efforts of the 
Department of Defense regarding anomalous health incidents.

  Section 723--Implementation of Integrated Product for Management of 
            Population Health across Military Health System

    This section would require the implementation of a 
population health platform that integrates healthcare data for 
all military health system beneficiaries, including care 
delivered through purchased care and direct care.

     Section 724--Digital Health Strategy of Department of Defense

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop a Digital Health Strategy to incorporate new and 
emerging technologies.

  Section 725--Development and Update of Certain Policies Relating to 
        Military Health System and Integrated Medical Operations

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretaries of the military departments 
and the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to develop and update certain 
policies related to integrated medical operations in the 
continental United States, plans for global patient movement, 
and bio-surveillance and medical research capabilities. In 
addition, this section would require the Secretary of Defense 
to conduct an analysis of whether the current organizational 
structure of the military health system allows for the updated 
plans based on the integrated medical operations requirements.

 Section 726--Standardization of Definitions Used by the Department of 
                  Defense for Terms Related to Suicide

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
standardize suicide attempt and suicidal ideation definitions 
across all of the military services.

                 Subtitle C--Reports and Other Matters


Section 731--Grant Program for Increased Cooperation on Post-Traumatic 
       Stress Disorder Research between United States and Israel

    This section would authorize collaborative research between 
the United States and Israel with respect to post-traumatic 
stress disorder.

  Section 732--Pilot Program on Cardiac Screening at Certain Military 
                           Service Academies

    This section would expand an ongoing pilot to conduct 
cardiac screening for incoming candidates at the military 
service academies.

       Section 733--Pilot Program on Cryopreservation and Storage

    This section would create a pilot program to give 
participating service members the option of cryopreserving 
their gametes before deploying to a combat zone.

Section 734--Pilot Program on Assistance for Mental Health Appointment 
          Scheduling at Military Medical Treatment Facilities

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
create a pilot program to provide direct assistance for mental 
health appointment scheduling at military medical treatment 
facilities and clinics, and provide a report assessing the 
program.

        Section 735--Pilot Program on Oral Rehydration Solutions

    This section would authorize a pilot program for oral 
rehydration solutions.

Section 736--Authorization of Pilot Program to Survey Access to Mental 
                Health Care under Military Health System

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a 1-year pilot program that surveys mental healthcare 
stigma and access.

    Section 737--Prohibition on Availability of Funds for Research 
                           Connected to China

    This section would prohibit Department of Defense fiscal 
year 2022 funding from being spent on research conducted in 
China or with entities owned or controlled by the Chinese 
government unless the Secretary of Defense provides a waiver 
for national security reasons. If the Secretary grants a 
waiver, the Secretary must submit to the congressional defense 
committees a justification not later than 14 days after the 
waiver is provided.

      Section 738--Independent Analysis of Department of Defense 
            Comprehensive Autism Care Demonstration Program

    This section would require an independent review of the 
Department of Defense Comprehensive Autism Care Demonstration 
program to be completed by the National Academies of Sciences, 
Engineering, and Medicine.

 Section 739--Independent Review of Suicide Prevention and Response at 
                         Military Installations

    This section would establish a committee to undertake an 
independent review of suicide prevention and response at not 
fewer than three military installations.

  Section 740--Feasibility and Advisability Study on Establishment of 
         Aeromedical Squadron at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam

    This section would require a feasibility and advisability 
study on establishing a Hawaii Air National Guard Aeromedical 
Evacuation Squadron at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam.

      Section 741--Plan to Address Findings Related to Access to 
             Contraception for Members of the Armed Forces

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a plan to address findings related to access to 
contraception.

  Section 742--GAO Biennial Study on Individual Longitudinal Exposure 
                             Record Program

    This section would direct the Comptroller General of the 
United States to conduct a study of the Individual Longitudinal 
Exposure Record program as it rolls out to catch problems and 
identify opportunities for expansion.

 Section 743--GAO Study on Exclusion of Certain Remarried Individuals 
         from Medical and Dental Coverage under TRICARE Program

    This section would require the Comptroller General to 
conduct a study on the purpose and effects of limiting medical 
and dental coverage under the TRICARE program to exclude 
remarried widows, widowers, and former spouses of members or 
former members of the uniformed services.

 Section 744--Study on Joint Fund of the Department of Defense and the 
  Department of Veterans Affairs for Federal Electronic Health Record 
                          Modernization Office

    This section would require the Department of Defense and 
the Department of Veterans Affairs to evaluate the 
effectiveness and future of the Federal Electronic Health 
Record Modernization Office.

    Section 745--Briefing on Domestic Production of Critical Active 
                       Pharmaceutical Ingredients

    This section would require a briefing on the development of 
a domestic production capability for critical active 
pharmaceutical ingredients and final dosage form medicines.

 Section 746--Briefing on Anomalous Health Incidents Involving Members 
                          of the Armed Forces

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing on anomalous health incidents, 
recommendations for improving data collection, and 
identification of a senior official responsible for internal 
Department coordination on this issue and for interfacing with 
the interagency.

      Section 747--Sense of Congress on National Warrior Call Day

    This section would express support for the designation of 
National Warrior Call Day and recognize the importance of 
connecting our warriors to support structures necessary to 
transitioning from the battlefield.

  TITLE VIII--ACQUISITION POLICY, ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT, AND RELATED 
                                MATTERS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning in the Defense Contracting 
                                Process

    The committee notes its continued encouragement of 
Department of Defense efforts to experiment with new 
capabilities that incorporate artificial intelligence and 
machine learning to increase efficiencies in the Department's 
contracting processes. The military services have utilized 
these technologies to streamline procurement decision 
activities related to identifying cost data, determining 
pricing methods, and verifying price estimates. These efforts 
have demonstrated the potential for artificial intelligence and 
machine learning to enhance efficiency and produce cost 
savings. However, in order to evaluate the scalability, full 
range of benefits, and appropriate safeguards for the 
application of existing technologies and emerging capabilities 
to the Department's contracting processes, deeper evaluation is 
needed.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a briefing to the House Armed Services Committee, no 
later than March 31, 2022 that shall include:
    (1) identification of any artificial intelligence and 
machine learning applications currently used within the 
Department to assist contracting processes;
    (2) assessment of the feasibility, costs, and benefits of 
more broadly employing artificial intelligence and machine 
learning technologies to further streamline the Department's 
contracting processes and improve efficiencies;
    (3) identification of ongoing research into artificial 
intelligence and machine learning related to contracting 
practices, as well as market research on the current 
availability of such technologies; and
    (4) evaluation of whether artificial intelligence and 
machine learning could reduce the time required to execute 
contracting processes, and to identify whether such 
technologies could provide the Department with cost savings 
when balanced with the costs associated with safeguarding the 
technology and training the workforce.

           Artificial Intelligence-Enabled Autonomous Systems

    The committee's Future of Defense Task Force 2020 report 
found that advancements in artificial intelligence will have an 
outsized impact on national security and the Department of 
Defense. The committee believes that to ensure technological 
and military superiority, the Department must lead in both 
developing and quickly integrating artificial intelligence 
capability into its systems and operational concepts, 
particularly its major defense acquisition programs to make 
them more reliable, networked, and effective.
    Thus, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
brief the House Armed Services Committee no later than March 
31, 2022, on the following:
    (1) how the Department plans to integrate artificial 
intelligence-enabled autonomous systems into its future 
operational concepts;
    (2) how the Department evaluates the need and feasibility 
of integrating artificial intelligence capability into its 
current and future major defense acquisition programs;
    (3) how the Department evaluates artificial intelligence-
enabled autonomous systems as an alternative to major defense 
acquisition programs;
    (4) the potential use of artificial intelligence-enabled 
systems and programs to ensure connectivity and 
interoperability between existing and future systems, 
particularly in support of the Joint All Domain Command and 
Control concept; and
    (5) the Department's efforts to leverage universities and 
non-traditional companies to advance these objectives.

 Assessment and Mitigation Strategy for Microelectronics Supply Chain 
                Vulnerabilities for Army Ground Vehicles

    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army, in 
consultation with the Army Venture Capital Initiative, to 
conduct an assessment of the risks and vulnerabilities in the 
supply of microelectronics for use in current and next-
generation ground vehicles and submit a strategy to the 
congressional defense committees by September 1, 2022, to 
address the risks and vulnerabilities identified, and considers 
the development of a secure, domestic supply chain for 
microelectronics for ground vehicles. The strategy should 
include:
    (1) How to best leverage public-private partnerships to 
achieve greater security in microelectronics supply chains.
    (2) How to best incorporate private capital and investment 
in domestic microelectronics manufacturing to support the 
development of secure, domestic supply chains for 
microelectronics for ground vehicles.
    (3) The commercial automobile industry's challenges 
throughout 2021 in securing microelectronics for vehicles, and 
whether the Army should engage and cooperate with the domestic 
commercial automobile industry to potentially seek commercial 
investment to develop a secure, domestic supply chain for 
microelectronics for use in both military and commercial 
vehicles to take advantage of economies of scale.
    To develop this strategy, the Secretary of the Army shall 
consult with the Army Venture Capital Initiative, established 
pursuant to Section 8150 of the Department of Defense and 
Emergency Supplemental Appropriations for Recovery from and 
Response to Terrorist Attacks on the United States Act (Public 
Law 107-117).

                 Briefing on Navy Ship Repair Withholds

    The committee recognizes that, per section 2307 of title 
10, United States Code, the Navy has the ability to withhold as 
much as ten percent or as little as one percent on private 
shipyard repair contracts. The private repair industry and the 
Navy have struggled with the transition from cost plus 
contracts to fixed price contracts for repair work on Navy 
surface ships with regard to addressing issues such as 
unexpected growth work and contract modifications. These issues 
have led to extended repair availabilities which subsequently 
have impacts to fleet deployments. Rather than using the 
flexibility provided in statute for withholds as a punitive 
measure, the committee believes that the Navy should be using 
that mechanism as an incentive to drive performance. The 
committee notes that the Navy could obligate the maximum amount 
at award for shipyards that have demonstrated consistent 
performance and have delivered ships on schedule and on cost.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by February 1, 2022 on what efforts the Navy is making to 
utilize contract withholdings as an incentive to drive improved 
performance in the private surface ship repair industry.

                     Cost Data and Software Effort

    The committee commends the initiative of the Director of 
Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation (CAPE), in collaboration 
with the Department of Defense's cost community from across the 
military departments and Department-wide agencies, to create a 
unified effort to ensure the strategic collection, curation, 
and use of acquisition, cost, and technical data for improved 
analysis and decision making. In the past decade, CAPE and the 
Department's cost community have come together to move towards:
    (1) digitizing data collection, storage, and sharing to 
expedite availability for analysis;
    (2) expanding the type of data collected and the set of 
programs and large contracts from which the data is collected;
    (3) strategically planning and collecting data rather than 
issuing ad hoc and belated data calls; and
    (4) reducing the reporting burden on contractors while 
improving data quality and insight for analysis.
    The committee is concerned that without adequate funding, 
CAPE's cost data and software initiative will slow, efficient 
availability of up-to-date data will decrease, and the lack of 
strategic planning will cause irreparable data gaps in the 
future. Strategic collection of cost and technical data and 
continued improvements to advanced analytical capabilities are 
crucial for CAPE's ability to develop independent cost 
estimates and provide accurate information and realistic 
estimates of cost for the Department's acquisition programs, as 
required by section 2334 of title 10, United States Code. 
Indeed, this committee has often relied on the independent 
analysis provided by the Director based on comprehensive and 
quality data to inform the decisions and actions the committee 
takes in drafting its annual National Defense Authorization 
Acts. Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary of 
Defense to increase support for the Director's cost data and 
software effort.

Creation of a Consortium Focused on Semiconductor Supply and Alignment 
       of Foreign Direct Investment to National Defense Strategy

    The committee encourages the Department of Defense to 
support a consortium comprised of U.S. entities and entities 
originating from allied countries to focus on semiconductor 
research and development, securing global supply chains, and 
alignment of foreign direct investment with the National 
Defense Strategy. Therefore, the committee directs a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services from the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment on 
semiconductor research and development by February 1, 2022.

Department of Defense Use of GSA's Fourth-Party Logistics (4PL) program

    The committee notes the Department of Defense's continued 
successful use of the General Services Administration's (GSA's) 
long-standing Fourth-Party Logistics (4PL) program to provide 
crucial industrial supplies and services to the U.S. Military 
worldwide. For over ten years, the 4PL program has allowed the 
Department of Defense to leverage GSA's acquisition expertise 
and experience in fulfilling the military's industrial product 
requirements. Through the 4PL program, GSA has worked with the 
Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps to strengthen their 
global supply chain across 70 countries.
    To make certain that the 4PL program achieves its 
objectives, GSA conducts comprehensive competitive 
solicitations among qualified providers. GSA has awarded 
contracts to qualified industrial supply companies through fair 
and open competition comporting fully with the Competition in 
Contracting Act of 1984 (41 U.S.C. 253). GSA extends its reach 
by selecting companies with strong supply chain, broad product 
inventory, financial and logistic strength, global reach and 
rigorous compliance to all procurement regulations. In 
addition, the 4PL program is incredibly cost-effective for the 
government. While the companies under contract maintain 
millions of dollars' worth of product inventory, the military 
only pays when it needs an item.
    GSA's 4PL program, which provides cost-effective, reliable 
products and services when they are needed, is a significant 
asset to the Department of Defense. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the 
House Committee on Armed Services no later than January 30, 
2022, on the status and further access and expansion of the 
Fourth Party Logistics Solutions program for the military 
services.

   Evaluating Employee Ownership in Department of Defense Government 
                              Contractors

    The committee recognizes that businesses that are 
established as S corporations with 100 percent of the 
outstanding stock held through an employee stock ownership plan 
(ESOP), as defined in section 4975(e)(7) of the Internal 
Revenue Code, are uniquely resilient during a financial crisis.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to evaluate whether the corporate structure of nontraditional 
defense contractors wholly owned by ESOPs enables them to 
successfully transition between experimental prototyping to 
full-scale development, by identifying a contracting activity, 
such as the Defense Innovation Unit, and prescribing minimally 
burdensome procedures for businesses entering agreements with 
that contracting activity to verify that they are wholly owned 
through an ESOP.
    The committee further directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services, not 
later than March 1, 2022, that includes:
    (1) the number of firms wholly owned through ESOPs that 
were awarded prototyping agreements during the past year;
    (2) data on the ability of firms wholly owned through ESOPs 
to attract and retain a talented workforce in a competitive 
market;
    (3) an evaluation of how these firms were able to leverage 
the capital needed to bridge the funding gap between prototype 
demonstration and full-scale development; and
    (4) any challenges that prevent firms wholly owned through 
ESOPs from partnering with the Department of Defense to scale 
their technologies and capabilities.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to provide a briefing to the House Committee 
on Armed Services, not later than July 1, 2022, on the 
Comptroller General's preliminary review of the report 
submitted by the Secretary. At a minimum, the review shall 
address acquisition authorities that could be used to 
incentivize businesses to become qualified businesses wholly 
owned through ESOPs and to overcome challenges to partnering 
with the Department.

          Expansion of Canadian ITAR Exception to NTIB Members

    The committee believes that the unique and close 
relationship between the United States and Canada has provided 
significant advantages to both nations' security and economic 
well-being. In particular, the committee notes Canada's 
exemption from the International Traffic in Arms Regulations 
(ITAR). The committee is aware of proposals to provide a 
similar exemption for other members of the National 
Technological Industrial Base (NTIB), and arguments that such 
an exemption could be beneficial. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the 
Secretary of State, to brief the House Committee on Armed 
Services no later than January 1, 2022 on the feasibility and 
desirability of expanding the Canadian ITAR exemption to other 
members of the NTIB.

                      GSA E-Commerce Clarification

    In its final report on increasing competition and 
streamlining the acquisition process, the Section 809 Panel, 
established by the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92), recommended that the 
Department of Defense use e-commerce portals as a tool to gain 
transparency and improve management of micro-purchases, 
including achieving visibility into AbilityOne and Federal 
Prisons Industries spending patterns. When Congress established 
a program to procure commercial products through commercial e-
commerce portals in Section 846 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91), it 
stated that the purpose of the pilot was to enhance 
competition, enable market research, and ensure reasonable 
pricing of commercial products. In the joint explanatory 
statement accompanying the bill, Congress expressed its 
expectation that the Department of Defense would participate in 
the initial rollout phase of the e-commerce portal. In June 
2020, the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) awarded 
contracts to three e-marketplace platform providers for a 
proof-of-concept, but to date, no Department of Defense 
acquisition offices have volunteered to participate in the 
program.
    In order to achieve the assessment that can only be gained 
by testing the current proof-of-concept, the Committee expects 
that the Under Secretary for Acquisition and Sustainment 
collaborate with the GSA to educate acquisition professionals 
within each service branch and related Defense acquisition 
activities on the availability, operation, and intent of the 
GSA Commercial Platforms Initiative. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Under Secretary to submit a brief to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2022, on the training 
it is providing acquisition professionals, to include: (1) an 
assessment of workforce hesitation to participate in the proof-
of-concept; (2) information on how to use the platform 
providers, and the extent to which the current proof-of-concept 
meets statutory requirements, Department of Defense acquisition 
regulations and directives; and (3) other relevant information 
to ensure the Department of Defense agencies are aware of and 
have the maximum opportunity to use the proof-of-concept for 
micro-purchase acquisitions of commercial items.

           Implementation of Enhanced Post-Award Debriefings

    The committee remains concerned that more should be done to 
address findings made in a RAND Corporation report, directed by 
section 885 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328), that ``debriefings that 
are evasive or adversarial will lead to a bid protest in most 
cases.'' The committee emphasizes the value of meaningful 
debriefings, and observes that an April 2016 Defense 
Procurement and Acquisition Policy Memorandum provides that 
``timely and thorough debriefings increase competition, 
encourage offerors to continue to invest resources in the 
Government marketplace, and enhance the Government's 
relationship and credibility with Industry.''
    The committee is encouraged that in evaluating the extent 
to which the bid protest system affects or is perceived to 
affect the quality or quantity of pre-proposal discussions, 
discussions of proposals, or post-award debriefings, the RAND 
report found that some Department of Defense agencies are 
improving dialogue with companies to increase the transparency 
of the procurement process and dissuade unsuccessful offerors 
from filing bid protests.
    The committee is further encouraged that the enhanced 
debriefing rights established in section 818 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91) were immediately implemented as a class deviation and 
expects the related Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation 
Supplement case to be resolved soon.
    In order for the Department to gain the full benefit of 
enhanced debriefings, the committee emphasizes the demonstrated 
value of meaningful, in-person debriefings to avoid 
unnecessarily costly and time-consuming bid protests. Therefore 
the committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by December 30, 2021, on the 
Department's efforts to implement enhanced debriefings with 
disappointed offerors and to conduct training for and sharing 
of best practices with contracting officers to ensure 
debriefings are responsive and informative, and on the 
resulting impact on the number of post-award bid protest 
filings. The briefing shall also include an assessment of the 
costs and benefits of revising Department policy to require 
post-award debriefings on contracts over $500.0 million be 
conducted in person.

            Industrial Base Analysis and Sustainment Support

    The committee notes Congressional support over the past 
several fiscal years for Industrial Base Analysis and 
Sustainment (IBAS) funding addressing several specific domestic 
defense industrial base and supply chain shortfalls, 
particularly in the areas of radar resiliency and directed 
energy systems.
    The committee strongly supports IBAS initiatives being 
overseen and coordinated on a Defense-wide basis by the Office 
of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Industrial Policy, 
and is concerned that the Department may be leaving the 
individual military services to deal with their own individual 
supply chain or industrial base concerns. If allowed to 
proceed, this approach would represent a step backwards in 
assuring our fragile defense industrial base, and would imperil 
important advances that have been made in recent years to 
address supply chain resiliency and future sustainment of 
critical defense radar systems.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to report to the congressional defense committees no later than 
March 1, 2022 on a five-year plan to support current and future 
IBAS projects with a particular emphasis on how it intends to 
assure a coordinated and robust domestic industrial base and 
supply chain with a particular focus on sustainment of radar 
and directed energy systems.

Interoperability and Commercial Solutions for Combined Joint All-Domain 
                          Command and Control

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by December 
31, 2021 as a part of a quarterly update on the Joint All-
Domain Command and Control required under section 1076 of the 
William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization for 
Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) on the following matters:
    (1) Availability and functionality of commercially 
available battlefield management software systems for use as 
part of the Joint All-Domain Command and Control;
    (2) Interoperability among each of the military services;
    (3) Interoperability among allied communications systems;
    (4) Employment of existing program of record open-
architecture solutions.

    Minority- and Veteran-Owned Defense Supplier Development in the 
                     Aerospace Supply Chain Network

    The committee recognizes the need to ensure the resiliency 
of the aerospace supply chain network, particularly with regard 
to small unmanned aircraft systems (sUAS), particularly in 
light of a shrinking number of suppliers and limited 
availability of skilled workforce at all levels of production. 
Specifically, the committee notes the Department of Defense's 
Fiscal Year 2020 Industrial Capabilities Report identified just 
5 U.S. companies in the top 10 of U.S. sUAS market 
shareholders.
    The committee is aware that the National Aeronautics and 
Space Administration (NASA) Aeronautics Research Institute 
(ARI) is building a modeling and simulation capability that 
will enable parametric sensitivity analysis of various demand 
profiles and their effects on the supply chain, from systems 
and parts to raw materials. The committee encourages the 
Department to explore ways to partner with the NASA ARI to 
ensure the aerospace supply chain can meet current and future 
needs for readiness, resiliency, production targets, and 
competitiveness in the complete life cycle.
    Further, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
not later than December 31, 2022, that includes an assessment 
of current supply chain risks in the sUAS industrial base, an 
analysis of efforts needed to ensure a strong and resilient 
supply chain ecosystem to meet future and emerging needs, and 
an assessment of benefits that could be gained through a shared 
services agreement between the Department and NASA. The 
briefing shall also include an examination of the workforce 
skills and talents needed to support the evolving aerospace 
industry, with a specific focus on bringing minority-owned and 
veteran-owned suppliers into the supply chain.

                        Modeling and Simulation

    The committee supports efforts by the Department of Defense 
to use modeling and simulation technologies to enhance rapid 
and efficient development and fielding of weapon systems and 
subsystems. These technologies have important applications in 
various aspects of programs, including research and 
development, design, production, delivery, maintenance, and 
sustainment. Therefore, the committee directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering, in 
coordination with the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment and the senior acquisition 
executives of each of the military departments, to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by April 1, 
2022, on current and contemplated efforts to increase speed to 
market, reduce risk, and foster interoperability in the 
industrial base through the use of modeling and simulation. The 
briefing shall include a discussion of ways to include 
artificial intelligence and digital twin technologies in these 
efforts.

   National Security Implications of Chinese Influence on Agriculture

    In general, the committee is concerned about foreign 
influence, including the influence of the government of the 
People's Republic of China, in critical U.S. supply chains. The 
committee is further concerned whether there is such influence 
in agricultural supply chains that could impact the food for 
U.S. servicemembers and have national security implications. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services no 
later than March 1, 2022, on the vulnerability of Department of 
Defense food supply chains to foreign influence, and any 
mitigation plans to avoid national security implications of 
such influence.

                 Refining Capacity in the United States

    The committee remains attentive to the national security 
implications of assured access to energy. Although refining 
capacity for fossil fuels remains important in the near term, 
the committee is encouraged by ongoing developments in 
sustainable aviation fuels with comparable performance 
characteristics to traditional fuels and capability with 
existing fuel infrastructure and equipment. The committee 
emphasizes the importance of a robust domestic market for both 
legacy and emerging fuel technology as well as emerging markets 
for non-agricultural domestic feedstocks. Accordingly, the 
committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by April 1, 2022, on the Department 
of Defense efforts to sustain and expand sources of fuel to 
meet operational requirements. The briefing shall address the 
national security implications of reduced refinery capacity in 
the United States, including the national security implications 
of diminished regional diversity of refining capacity 
attributable to closures over the last several years, any 
financial impacts of those closures, the potential impacts of 
the closures on the fuel supply chain and the risks associated 
with reliance on foreign sources of fossil fuels, including 
finished petroleum products. The briefing shall also address 
the status of the Department's work to integrate hydrogen-based 
fuels and sustainable fuel refining capabilities and describe 
how the Department is integrating those emerging capabilities 
into overall plans for delivering fuel.

  Registered Apprenticeship Program Corrosion Prevention and Control 
                                Training

    The Committee notes the importance of investing in training 
and professional activities for civilian employees and military 
personnel to perform corrosion prevention and control (CPC) 
work. In the committee report accompanying the National Defense 
Authorization Act of 2020 (H. Rept. 116-442), the committee 
directed the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Sustainment to 
assess the capability and capacity of the Department of Defense 
workforce to perform CPC work, including the application of 
preventative coatings. In its assessment, the Department 
determined the need for additional training facility capacity 
yet noted that the ``high initial investment and reoccurring 
costs as well as the implementation risks associated with 
establishing a physical painting training preclude recommending 
this option.'' Therefore, the committee encourages the 
Department to take advantage of existing registered 
apprenticeship programs to train personnel and directs the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Sustainment to brief the 
House Committee on Armed Services not later than March 14, 2022 
on inclusion of registered apprenticeship programs in its plan 
to increase CPC training capacity.

                       Report on Ship Components

    The Secretary of the Navy is directed to provide a report 
to the congressional defense committees by September 1, 2022 as 
to cost and schedule impacts associated with requiring the 
following components to be procured consistent with section 
2534 of title 10, U.S.C.: Ship shafts, electric power 
generators, electric propulsion motors, degaussing systems, 
power distribution equipment, breakers, switchgear, load 
center, power panels, power conversion equipment, rectifiers, 
frequency converters, inverters, machinery control, damage 
control, sensors, or programs for command, control, 
communications, computers, and intelligence (commonly known as 
`C4I').

                      Securing Allies' 5G Networks

    The committee recognizes the importance of 5G 
telecommunications networks and the role that this next 
generation technology plays in the national security community. 
The committee also recognizes that foreign strategic 
competitors have the potential to exploit communications 
technology to influence democratic processes, whether through 
political and economic leverage and subversion or technological 
espionage and trade secret theft. The committee believes that 
the United States should use its defense, military, and 
intelligence apparatus and economy of scale to encourage and 
incentivize treaty allies and close partners to adopt secure 
communications and follow best practices to defend against 
malign influence, including disinformation and misinformation 
from strategic competitors like China and Russia.
    Therefore the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, 
not later than March 1, 2022, on existing United States efforts 
to help NATO allies secure national 5G communications networks. 
The briefing shall include: (1) the status and membership of 
the NATO Multinational 5G Working Group (MM5G); (2) the United 
States' goals and objectives for participating in the Working 
Group; (3) opportunities to expand the Working Group to include 
other allies within the NATO Alliance; (4) challenges and/or 
barriers to allies developing a shared understanding of 
standards, military use cases, and risks that certain providers 
pose to their systems; (5) existing cooperation with the United 
States' European partners and how those relationships can 
improve efforts to help NATO allies secure their 5G networks; 
and (6) existing arrangements and new opportunities for 
strengthening cooperation between the Department of Defense and 
other federal agencies in helping allies secure their 5G 
networks.

                Securing Critical Mineral Supply Chains

    The committee applauds the Department of Defense for 
recognizing that critical minerals are imperative to national 
security and developing a strategy to mitigate dangerous supply 
chain vulnerabilities. The committee supports the Department's 
significant investments into the defense industrial base to 
establish the domestic production of rare earth elements, 
materials necessary for important weapon systems, civilian 
technology, and increasing renewable energy needs. The 
committee is concerned, however, that the Department has 
refrained from addressing supply chain shortfalls for other 
minerals identified by the government as critical to national 
security and susceptible to disruption. In 2018, the Secretary 
of the Interior identified 35 critical minerals with 
significant foreign reliance but essential to the national 
defense. The committee notes that disruptions to the supply 
chains for tin, tantalum, tungsten, and niobium would expose 
the United States to national security vulnerabilities that 
foreign adversaries are capable of exploiting. As such, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by June 30, 
2022 on the progress of the Department's efforts to understand 
the disruptions to the supply chain that shortfalls of these 
and other critical materials cause and update the committee on 
strategies to mitigate current and potential supply chain 
vulnerabilities.

                   Shipbuilding and Naval Capability

    The committee remains concerned by the challenges facing 
the shipbuilding industry in the United States. The acquisition 
and development of a capable fleet, both military and 
commercial, will be critical in addressing the threats from 
near peer adversaries and advancing other national security 
interests over the next five to ten years. Although the 
committee acknowledges that the Navy has provided previous 
reports about sourcing of specific components, the committee 
believes a broader report is warranted in light of the wide-
ranging supply chain disruptions that the COVID-19 pandemic 
precipitated.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by June 1, 2022 on the principal factors presenting risks to 
U.S. shipbuilding, specifically focusing on those factors that 
could lead to cost increases or supply chain vulnerabilities, 
and recommendations to reduce those risks.

      Sourcing in Major and Critical Defense Acquisition Programs

    The committee continues to emphasize the importance of 
aligning the Department of Defense acquisition processes with 
the standards of the Buy American Act (Public Law 72-428). In 
the committee report accompanying the William M. (Mac) 
Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2021 (H. Rept. 116-442), the committee required a report 
assessing the source content of procurement carried out in 
support of major defense acquisition programs (MDAPs). The 
committee received that report more than a month after its 
required due date. Further, the findings were heavily qualified 
by references to constraints of collecting underlying data. The 
committee appreciates the Department's proactive coordination 
with the Secretaries of the military departments to conduct in-
depth reviews of certain MDAPs, as described in the report. 
However, the relatively short timeframe for those in-depth 
reviews resulted in a cursory section of the report that 
restated problems and offered few practical solutions.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services, not later than March 
1, 2022, to update the assessments performed in the prior 
report. Specifically, the briefing shall discuss year-over-year 
changes to:
    (1) the proportion of items and services procured in 
connection with an MDAP, or other critical government 
acquisition programs that the Secretary identifies, such as 
program elements of the national security space and strategic 
architecture, or other critical government acquisition programs 
manufactured or developed in the United States which are 
substantially all from articles, materials, or supplies mined, 
produced, or manufactured in the United States; and
    (2) the components of the programs captured in (1) that are 
sole sourced from a foreign supplier, including those sourced 
from a member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization or a 
country that otherwise qualifies for a waiver under the Buy 
American Act. The briefing shall also address the extent to 
which such procurement is developed from ideas, concepts, or 
information originating from individuals or companies inside 
the United States. Finally, the briefing shall include a 
detailed set of options, including realistic cost and timing 
estimates, to overcome the challenges of data analysis and 
supply chain illumination that the prior report identified in 
connection with the in-depth reviews. In developing those 
potential courses of action, the briefing shall consider 
relevant software, services, and other tools available in and 
from the private sector.

             Sourcing in Major Defense Acquisition Programs

    The committee continues to emphasize the importance of 
aligning the Department of Defense acquisition processes with 
the standards of the Buy American Act (Public Law 72-428). In 
the committee report accompanying the William M. (Mac) 
Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2021 (H. Rept. 116-442), the committee required a report 
assessing the source content of procurement carried out in 
support of major defense acquisition programs (MDAPs). The 
committee received that report more than a month after its 
required due date. Further, the findings were heavily qualified 
by references to constraints of collecting underlying data. The 
committee appreciates the Department's proactive coordination 
with the Secretaries of the military departments to conduct in-
depth reviews of certain MDAPs, as described in the report. 
However, the relatively short timeframe for those in-depth 
reviews resulted in a cursory section of the report that 
restated problems and offered few practical solutions.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services, not later than March 
1, 2022, to update the assessments performed in the prior 
report. Specifically, the briefing shall discuss year-over-year 
changes to: (1) the proportion of items and services procured 
in connection with an MDAP manufactured or developed in the 
United States which are substantially all from articles, 
materials, or supplies mined, produced, or manufactured in the 
United States; and (2) the components of major defense 
acquisition programs that are sole-sourced from a foreign 
supplier, including those sourced from a member of the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization or a country that otherwise 
qualifies for a waiver under the Buy American Act. The briefing 
shall also address the extent to which such procurement is 
developed from ideas, concepts, or information originating from 
individuals or companies inside the United States. Finally, the 
briefing shall include a detailed set of options, including 
realistic cost and timing estimates, to overcome the challenges 
of data analysis and supply chain illumination that the prior 
report identified in connection with the in-depth reviews. In 
developing those potential courses of action, the briefing 
shall consider relevant software, services, and other tools 
available in and from the private sector.

  Status of Procurement Technical Assistance Program Integration into 
                      Office of Industrial Policy

    The committee supports the Procurement Technical Assistance 
Program (PTAP) and its Procurement Technical Assistance Centers 
(PTACs) throughout the nation as a critical resource for the 
warfighter and large and small businesses, especially as the 
economy recovers from the COVID-19 pandemic. PTACs create a 
unique communication channel with subcontractors and suppliers, 
who often have limited or no direct interaction with 
government, but are critical to the defense supply chain. The 
committee supports the integration of the PTAP into the Office 
of Industrial Policy in compliance with section 852 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public 
Law 116-92). The committee's intent for the move was to better 
integrate the PTAP into the Office of the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to enhance the defense 
industrial base and find new and better ways to utilize the 
program beyond its core mission.
    The committee further encourages the Office of the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to work 
closely and collaboratively with the Association of PTACs, and 
to implement the recommendations published in a Comptroller 
General of the United States report (GAO-21-287), issued in 
response to the committee report accompanying the William M. 
(Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2021 (H. Rept. 116-442), to ensure the overlap between 
PTACs and the Small Business Administration's Small Business 
Development Centers is collaborative. The committee directs the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense (Industrial Policy) to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than November 1, 2021, on specific efforts, both planned and 
implemented, to expand the role of the PTAP in acquisition, the 
defense industrial base, and its ability to serve more clients.

Supply Chain Management Leveraging Cross Domain Artificial Intelligence 
                              Technologies

    The committee supports the Department of Defense and its 
Joint Artificial Intelligence Center (JAIC) efforts to 
accelerate the delivery and adoption of Artificial Intelligence 
capabilities across the department, its services, and agencies. 
The Defense Critical Supply Chain Task Force believed the 
Department must use the available tools, scale efforts, and 
partner with industry to achieve supply chain transparency and 
make strategic assessments. The Task Force also believed that 
the Department could leverage artificial intelligence (AI) and 
machine learning to collect multiple inputs, connect disparate 
data sets, and then share with the services to identify and 
address obsolescence or single-source risks.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to develop a plan on how to leverage new cross-enterprise AI 
technologies to improve the Department's predictive supply 
chain management for critical and essential materials and brief 
the House Committee on Armed Services on its plan no later than 
March 1, 2022. The plan will include at a minimum the use of AI 
in the following elements: providing visibility into all supply 
chains, service patterns and their external drivers; ability to 
assess and rate Defense Industrial Base and Organic Industrial 
Base suppliers; ability to quickly link data within and across 
the Department, and predict impending supply constraints, 
optimize inventories, ordering and transport to increase 
mission readiness.

                            Titanium Supply

    The Defense Logistics Agency Strategic Materials office 
(DLA-SM) serves as the program manager for the National Defense 
Stockpile (NDS). The committee understands that DLA-SM has 
identified titanium as a priority NDS material. Titanium is a 
high-strength, corrosion-resistant metal with properties that 
make it critical for use in aerospace applications, including 
structural components of military aviation platforms. The U.S. 
titanium industry has historically been reliant on imports of 
titanium sponge, a key feedstock used in the titanium 
production process. More than 90 percent of titanium sponge is 
sourced from Japan, a U.S. ally. The last remaining titanium 
sponge manufacturing facility in the United States closed 
indefinitely in 2020. As a result, the U.S. industrial base 
depends on imports of this material. The committee understands 
that DLA-SM has sought authority and resources to acquire 1,500 
metric tons of titanium for the NDS. The committee supports 
efforts to stockpile titanium in a variety of forms as a cost-
effective method to increase assured access to domestic 
supplies. A reserve supply will provide availability to meet 
national security needs, even in the event of a market 
disruption, and will bolster domestic titanium industry 
capabilities in the near term.

    Use of Multi-role Contractor Owned Contractor Operated Aircraft

    The committee understands that Combatant Commanders 
continue to manage air assets to maximize ability to meet 
mission requirements in their Area of Responsibility. It also 
understands those forces are composed of a combination of 
organic and contractor personnel operating single-role and 
multi-role aircraft and that currently, all contractor owned 
contractor operated Intelligence Surveillance and 
Reconnaissance (ISR) aircraft are dedicated to ISR missions and 
contractor owned contractor operated Mobility/Casualty 
Evacuation aircraft are dedicated to mobility/casualty 
evacuation missions. As a result, there are missed 
opportunities for cross-over or economies of scale. The 
committee believes an increase in the use of multi-role assets 
could provide Combatant Commanders additional flexibility in 
executing day-to-day mission requirements. Any contractor owned 
contractor operated solutions considered should be responsive 
to validated Joint Service gaps and should be incorporated into 
their Force Development processes. However, the committee is 
concerned about potential tasking and funding restrictions on 
the use of contractor owned multi-role capable aircraft and the 
ability to execute missions such as air mobility, medical and 
casualty evacuation and ISR.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide the congressional defense committees a briefing, not 
later than June 1, 2022, on the Department of Defense's ability 
to utilize contractor owned contractor operated aircraft in a 
multi-use role. At a minimum, the briefing will include:
    (1) challenges and opportunities associated with a single 
or fleet of contractor owned contractor operated aircraft 
equipped to carry out multiple functions and missions;
    (2) cost associated with single-role versus multi-use 
contractor operated contractor owned aircraft;
    (3) comparison of operational value associated with single-
role versus multi-use contractor operated contractor owned 
aircraft;
    (4) capability of swapping payloads in a timely manner to 
meet changing mission requirements;
    (5) assessment of types of aircraft available to meet 
multi-role mission requirements;
    (6) assessment of single role mission capabilities with 
similar mission capabilities on a multi-role aircraft;
    (7) potential contracting challenges associated with 
executing multi-role missions using contractor operated 
contractor owned aircraft (i.e. air mobility, medical/casualty 
evacuation, ISR, etc.);
    (8) mission prioritization and tasking constraints;
    (9) and analysis that weighs the costs, benefits, and risks 
required to determine the expected impact on costs and on 
mission achievement;
    (10) methods to ensure that multi-role aircraft that will 
transport service members are certified to the proper standard; 
and
    (11) processes for evaluating functions that could be 
categorized as inherently governmental or closely associated to 
governmental services.

    Value of Foreign Direct Investment and Engaging Allies in Rapid 
                               Innovation

    The committee is encouraged by the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment's efforts to integrate 
foreign direct investment and global collaboration with trusted 
allies and partners and the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Research and Engineering's work with allies and partners on 
foreign comparative testing, which both help the Department 
pursue rapid innovation and fielding of new technologies, and 
secure global supply chains, procurement and sustainment 
strategies.
    The committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment and the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Research and Engineering to jointly provide a briefing to 
the committee by March 1, 2022 on the Department's ongoing 
efforts, including the role the Department plays in the 
committee on Foreign Investment in the United States process 
and foreign comparative testing, and how they work together to 
identify promising innovative technology in support of National 
Defense Strategy priority areas and promote strategic 
engagements between foreign governments, institutions, and 
private sector entities from allied countries that improve the 
Department's access to and sustainment of technologies that are 
critical to national security.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


             Subtitle A--Acquisition Policy and Management


      Section 801--Acquisition Workforce Educational Partnerships

    This section would direct the president of the Defense 
Acquisition University (DAU) to create a program and designate 
a program manager to partner with outside entities to augment 
the DAU curriculum with experiential learning opportunities and 
ensure the entire acquisition workforce receive training 
related to critical operational challenges. The section would 
further establish a formal partnership with outside faculty and 
require an annual report on legislative proposals and 
recommendations related to emerging acquisition policy issues.

         Section 802--Special Emergency Reimbursement Authority

    This section would establish special emergency authority 
for the Secretary of Defense to reimburse contractors for 
certain costs during a covered emergency.

    Section 803--Prohibition on Procurement of Personal Protective 
               Equipment from Non-Allied Foreign Nations

    This section would prohibit the procurement of certain 
personal protective equipment from designated nations.

   Section 804--Minimum Wage for Employees of Department of Defense 
                              Contractors

    This section would establish a minimum wage of $15 per hour 
for covered employees of Department of Defense contractors 
performing on covered contracts.

Section 805--Diversity and Inclusion Reporting Requirements for Covered 
                              Contractors

    This section would require covered contractors to submit 
annual reports regarding diversity and inclusion within their 
workforce and would require the Secretary of Defense to submit 
an annual report on the consolidated findings.

     Section 806--Website for Certain Domestic Procurement Waivers

    This section would amend section 4814 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require the Secretary of Defense to establish 
and maintain a publicly available website for the purpose of 
publishing information related to the type and reasoning for 
each waiver or exception granted to the Buy American Act 
sourcing requirements.

Section 807--Suspension or Debarment Referral for Egregious Violations 
                  of Certain Domestic Preference Laws

    This section would require a contracting officer to refer 
to the appropriate suspension or debarment official any current 
or former Department of Defense contractor if the contracting 
officer believes the contractor has egregiously violated the 
domestic preference requirements of section 2533a of title 10, 
United States Code, Berry Amendment, or section 2533b of title 
10, United States Code, Restrictions on Specialty Metals. The 
section would include a safe harbor exception where a 
contractor reasonably acted in good-faith reliance on a written 
waiver from an authorized individual, or on a representation by 
a third party about the origin of goods, articles, materials, 
or supplies.

Subtitle B--Amendments to General Contracting Authorities, Procedures, 
                            and Limitations


   Section 811--Extension of Authorization for the Defense Civilian 
         Acquisition Workforce Personnel Demonstration Project

    This section would extend the United States Air Force's 
Acquisition Demonstration program by 2 years, to 2025.

Section 812--Modifications to Contracts Subject to Cost or Pricing Data 
                             Certification

    This section would make technical changes to section 2306a 
of title 10, United States Code, to conform to amendments made 
by section 814 of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-
283).

Section 813--Office of Corrosion Policy and Oversight Employee Training 
                              Requirements

    This section would require the Director of the Office of 
Corrosion Policy and Oversight to ensure that contractors 
preventing and mitigating corrosion of Department of Defense 
equipment and infrastructure make use of qualified training 
programs for hiring and that the Department do the same for 
training or professional development of military personnel and 
civilian employees.

  Section 814--Standard Guidelines for Evaluation of Requirements for 
                           Services Contracts

    This section would amend section 2329 of title 10, United 
States Code, to include standard guidelines based on the 
checklist in use by the Department of the Army and to require 
the senior official supervising requirements to certify that 
task orders and statements of work comply with such standards.

 Section 815--Extension of Requirement to Submit Selected Acquisition 
                                Reports

    This section would restore the requirement for a report at 
the end of each fiscal-year quarter on current major defense 
acquisition programs and any program to exceed $300.0 million.

 Section 816--Limitation on Procurement of Welded Shipboard Anchor and 
                    Mooring Chain for Naval Vessels

    This section would amend section 2534 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require that all shipboard anchor chains be 
manufactured in the national technology and industrial base.

Section 817--Competition Requirements for Purchases from Federal Prison 
                               Industries

    This section would amend section 3905 of title 10, United 
States Code, to restore the mandatory preference for the 
Department of Defense to purchase from Federal Prison 
Industries so long as market research demonstrates the product 
is comparable to products available from the private sector and 
best meets the needs of the Department in terms of price, 
quality, and time of delivery.

      Section 818--Repeal of Preference for Fixed-Price Contracts

    This section would repeal section 829 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328), which established a statutory preference for fixed-price 
type contracts and a requirement for senior acquisition 
executives to approve the award of cost-type contracts over 
$25.0 million.

Section 819--Modification to the Pilot Program for Streamlining Awards 
                   for Innovative Technology Projects

    This section would amend section 873 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92), Pilot Program for Streamlining Awards for Innovative 
Technology Projects, as amended by section 832 of the William 
M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283), to extend the deadline 
by 2 years to October 1, 2024. This section would also require 
the Secretary of Defense to submit a recommendation to the 
congressional defense committees by April 1, 2023, as to 
whether the pilot should be further extended, and if so include 
with it the lessons learned from this pilot and usage data.

   Section 820--Other Transaction Authority Information Accessibility

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
provide recommendations to make other transaction authority 
data more accessible and improve the reporting structure.

        Subtitle C--Provisions Relating to Supply Chain Security


 Section 831--Department of Defense Research and Development Priorities

    This section would require Department of Defense priorities 
to be addressed in research and development programs focused on 
alternative technologies to, and methods for the extraction, 
processing, and recycling of, critical minerals.

      Section 832--Defense Supply Chain Risk Assessment Framework

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
develop a supply chain risk assessment framework leveraging of 
supply chain illumination tools.

  Section 833--Plan to Reduce Reliance on Supplies and Materials from 
                Adversaries in the Defense Supply Chain

    This section would require a plan to reduce reliance on 
certain materials obtained from sources located in geographic 
areas controlled by foreign adversaries.

 Section 834--Enhanced Domestic Content Requirement for Major Defense 
                          Acquisition Programs

    This section would establish certain thresholds for 
domestic content requirements, and would require a related 
assessment.

Section 835--Reduction of Fluctuations of Supply and Demand for Certain 
                             Covered Items

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
specify methods and processes to track fluctuations in supply 
chain forecasting and demand requirements for certain items and 
implement policies to encourage predictable demand 
requirements. The section would also require a quarterly report 
on supply chain forecasting fluctuations to the Under Secretary 
of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment.

  Section 836--Prohibition on Certain Procurements from the Xinjiang 
                        Uyghur Autonomous Region

    This section would prohibit Department of Defense funds for 
certain procurements from the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region 
of China. This section would also require the issuance of rules 
for contracts with the Department of Defense related to such 
prohibition.

                  Subtitle D--Industrial Base Matters


     Section 841--Modification of Pilot Program for Development of 
    Technology-Enhanced Capabilities with Partnership Intermediaries

    This section would amend the pilot program authorized in 
section 851 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) to raise the aggregate 
amount allowed to be spent on the pilot from $2.0 million to 
$20.0 million, to allow for other entities in the Department of 
Defense that make awards under the Small Business Innovation 
Research program to transfer funding to the Commander of the 
U.S. Special Operations Command to use in the pilot, and to 
extend the activity from September 30, 2021, through September 
30, 2025. The annual reporting requirement would be modified to 
include additional data and information requirements and 
extended to cover the duration of the pilot program.

      Section 842--Designating Certain SBIR and STTR Programs as 
                  Entrepreneurial Innovation Projects

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense and the 
Secretaries of the military departments to each carry out a 
pilot program to more effectively transition Small Business 
Innovation Research programs and Small Business Technology 
Transfer programs into Phase III. This section would direct the 
Secretaries to each designate five completed Phase II programs 
to include in the next Future Years Defense Program as 
Entrepreneurial Innovation Projects, and to consider them as 
part of the Department of Defense's planning, programming, 
budgeting, and execution process. The Secretary of Defense 
would be responsible for submitting a report annually to the 
congressional defense committees on the programs selected for 
the duration of the 5-year pilot.

    Section 843--Modifications to Printed Circuit Board Acquisition 
                              Restrictions

    This section would amend section 2533d of title 10, United 
States Code, and section 841 of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public 
Law 116-283), which prohibited acquisitions of certain printed 
circuit boards by the Department of Defense.

 Section 844--Defense Industrial Base Coalition for Career Development

    This section would require the establishment of a coalition 
among covered institutions of higher education, career and 
technical education programs, workforce development boards, 
labor organizations, and organizations representing defense 
industrial base contractors to focus on career pathways for 
individuals seeking careers in manufacturing as well as a 
report on current efforts and offer recommendations.

 Section 845--Additional Testing of Commercial E-Commerce Portal Models

    This section would direct the Administrator of General 
Services to begin testing other e-commerce portal models and 
provide a report to congressional defense committees with a 
summary of their findings and testing results.

  Section 846--Support for Industry Participation in Global Standards 
                             Organizations

    This section would create a grant program to assist 
domestic businesses with the high costs of participating in 
standards development, including conducting relevant research, 
developing requisite skills and expertise, preparing standards 
proposals, and attending technical standards-setting meetings.

                       Subtitle E--Other Matters


             Section 851--Mission Management Pilot Program

    This section would establish a mission management pilot 
program led by the Strategic Capabilities Office to identify 
lessons learned and improved mission outcomes achieved by 
quickly delivering solutions that fulfill cross-service 
operational needs.

  Section 852--Pilot Program to Determine the Cost Competitiveness of 
                             Drop-In Fuels

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
establish a 5-year pilot program to determine the cost 
competitiveness of the fully burdened cost of drop-in fuels 
compared with the fully burdened cost of traditional fuel using 
a commercially available scenario-based strategic sourcing 
tool, and to submit an annual report on the impact of the pilot 
program.

       Section 853--Assuring Integrity of Overseas Fuel Supplies

    This section would amend section 813(c)(3) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 by adding fuel 
procurement and fuel-related services to the list of 
acquisition activities that shall avoid use of lowest price 
technically acceptable source selection, to the maximum extent 
practicable.
    This section would also add certification requirements for 
overseas contingency fuel contracting.

   Section 854--Cadre of Software Development and Acquisition Experts

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
create a software development and acquisition cadre. The cadre 
will assist the Department with developing and acquiring 
software by providing expert advice, assistance, and resources.

       Section 855--Acquisition Practices and Policies Assessment

    This section would direct the Department of Defense Climate 
Working Group to assess and develop recommendations for 
implementing sustainable acquisition practices and policies in 
regulations and to submit a report on the assessment and 
recommendations.

      TITLE IX--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


Report on the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special 
                 Operations and Low Intensity Conflict

    The committee reaffirms its commitment to the fundamental 
principle of civilian control of the military. Civilian 
leadership within the Department of Defense includes the roles 
and responsibilities of the office of the Assistant Secretary 
of Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict in 
overseeing various military functions, especially those 
activities of the United States Special Operations Command to 
organize, train, and equip special operations forces to carry 
out assigned missions. The committee is concerned that the 
current size and composition of the office of the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity 
Conflict may not be proportionate to the scope of its roles and 
responsibilities.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to review the organizational structure of the office of the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low 
Intensity Conflict and to provide a report to the congressional 
defense committees, not later than March 1, 2022, on the 
organizational requirements of the office of the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity 
Conflict and any plans that the Secretary may develop to 
reorganize that office. The report shall include a detailed 
description of the office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict's roles and 
responsibilities; a detailed description of the office's 
organizational structure; the number and type of billets funded 
by the Department of Defense that the Secretary determines are 
required to support the office's roles and responsibilities; a 
detailed description of the process and a timeline for 
validating those billets; a detailed description of any extant 
organizational gaps or redundancies; and a plan for remediating 
any such gaps or redundancies.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


   Subtitle A--Office of the Secretary of Defense and Related Matters


 Section 901--Modification of Requirements for Appointment of a Person 
         as Secretary of Defense after Relief from Active Duty

    This section would modify the limitation on a person who 
may be appointed as Secretary of Defense that is required by 
section 113(a) of title 10, United States Code, by increasing 
the limitation to 10 years after departure from Active Duty and 
applying the limitation only to commissioned officers of the 
pay grade 0-6 or above.
    This section would also allow the appointment of a person 
as Secretary of Defense notwithstanding this limitation if 
Congress enacts a joint resolution of approval with an 
affirmative vote of three-fourths of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives.

 Section 902--Implementation of Repeal of Chief Management Officer of 
                       the Department of Defense

    This section would remove the restriction that prohibits an 
individual who served as the Chief Management Officer before 
the date of the enactment of this Act to be assigned duties or 
responsibilities previously served by the Chief Management 
Officer.

   Section 903--Designation of Senior Official for Implementation of 
             Electromagnetic Spectrum Superiority Strategy

    This section would require the Department of Defense to 
designate a sole senior official responsible for implementing 
any current or future electromagnetic spectrum superiority 
strategy of the Department. This section would also require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees on the sufficiency of electromagnetic 
warfare rules of engagement. In addition, this section would 
require the Secretary to provide the congressional defense 
committees with a copy of the implementation plan signed by the 
Secretary in July 2021 for the Electromagnetic Spectrum 
Superiority Strategy. It would also limit funds for the Office 
of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and 
Sustainment for travel until the Secretary meets various 
briefing requirements related to the status of the 
implementation plan.

  Subtitle B--Other Department of Defense Organization and Management 
                                Matters


  Section 911--Clarification of Treatment of Office of Local Defense 
    Community Cooperation as a Department of Defense Field Activity

    This section would clarify that the Office of Local Defense 
Community Cooperation is to be treated as a Department of 
Defense Field Activity.

  Section 912--Use of Combatant Commander Initiative Fund for Certain 
                         Environmental Matters

    This section would add resilience of military 
installations, ranges, and supporting infrastructure to the 
list of permissible uses for the Combatant Commander Initiative 
Fund.

   Section 913--Inclusion of Explosive Ordnance Disposal in Special 
                         Operations Activities

    This section would amend section 167(k) of title 10, United 
States Code, regarding the inclusion of explosive ordnance 
disposal into special operations activities.

 Section 914--Coordination of Certain Naval Activities with the Space 
                                 Force

    This section would amend section 8062(d) of title 10, 
United States Code, and would establish the Space Force as a 
matter of joint concern to the Navy.

  Section 915--Space Force Organizational Matters and Modification of 
             Certain Space-Related Acquisition Authorities

    This section would provide a sense of Congress regarding 
the intent behind establishing the U.S. Space Force, and the 
organizational structure of the military service. This section 
would further emphasize the need for Space Force to remain a 
lean, agile, and fast organization, and encourage continued 
communication with Congress on areas for which legislative 
action is needed to enable the service to reach full 
operational capability.
    This section would also amend the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 by modifying the 
implementation date for having a Service Acquisition Executive 
for Space in place to not later than October 1, 2022. This 
section would also allow the Secretary of the Air Force to 
assign the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Space 
Acquisition and Integration duties and authorities of the 
senior procurement executive for space systems and programs.

  Section 916--Report on Establishment of Office to Oversee Sanctions 
               with Respect to Chinese Military Companies

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report on the feasibility of establishing an office 
within the Department of Defense to oversee sanctions with 
respect to Chinese military companies.

 Section 917--Independent Review of and Report on the Unified Command 
                                  Plan

    This section would require an independent review of the 
current Unified Command Plan and a report on the findings of 
that review.

                    Subtitle C--Space National Guard


           Section 921--Establishment of Space National Guard

    This section would establish a Space National Guard as part 
of the United States Space Force.

            Section 922--No Effect on Military Installations

    This section would clarify that nothing in this subtitle 
would require or authorize the relocation of any facility, 
infrastructure, or military installation of the Space National 
Guard or Air National Guard.

          Section 923--Implementation of Space National Guard

    This section would require the Secretary of the Air Force 
and the Chief of the National Guard Bureau to implement the 
changes authorized not later than 18 months after the date of 
the enactment of this Act.

  Section 924--Conforming Amendments and Clarification of Authorities

    This section would authorize the required conforming 
amendments.

                      TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                        Anti-Surface Integration

    The committee remains focused on deterring ever-increasing 
Chinese aggression, specifically the threat of military force 
against Taiwan, and ensuring combatant commanders are well-
equipped to defeat the threat should a regional crisis 
materialize in the near term. The committee seeks to strengthen 
the credibility of American deterrence while simultaneously 
ensuring sufficient combat-ready U.S. forces in the Indo-
Pacific to prevent China from seizing or maintaining the 
advantage early in a conflict. To that end, the committee is 
encouraged by the Navy's efforts to leverage proven aviation 
platforms to combat China's growing fleet of assault ships; for 
example, integration of the Long-Range Anti-Ship Missile 
(LRASM) onto the Multi-Mission P-8 aircraft, which is also 
utilized for Anti-Submarine Warfare and ISR missions by 
strategic regional allies such as India and Australia. 
Additionally, the committee remains supportive of the Maritime 
Strike Tomahawk, Harpoon block II, offensive mining initiatives 
and other related strike options to better advance surface 
strike capabilities. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Commander of the U.S. Indo-Pacific Command to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 
2022 as to an assessment of the current number of available 
anti-ship fires in the region and anticipated capabilities and 
capacities of options projected to be available in the next 
five years. The briefing should also include an assessment of 
how additional fires would impact the ability of the command to 
meet operational requirements.

         Cultivating Special Operations Forces Technical Skills

    Foreign adversaries are increasingly operating below the 
level of armed conflict, engaging in disinformation operations, 
cyber espionage, and economic coercion against the United 
States and partners and allies of the United States. The 
committee understands that certain niche technical skills, such 
as computer programming, psychological operations, and foreign 
language proficiency are essential to the conduct of irregular 
warfare. While the committee recognizes that irregular warfare 
is a necessary whole-of-government tradecraft in which the 
Department of Defense is a critical component, special 
operations forces (SOF) can--and do--play an important role in 
irregular warfare. The committee believes that the United 
States should prioritize recruiting, enhancing, and retaining 
such technical skills within SOF as a means to proactively 
posture against malign influence.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict, in 
coordination with the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel 
and Readiness, to provide a report to the House Committee on 
Armed Services by June 30, 2022, on a five-year strategy to 
identify, recruit, and retain individuals from the military 
services for SOF who possess an aptitude for or technical 
skills in computer programming, machine learning and artificial 
intelligence, psychological operations, threat finance, and 
biological engineering. As framed by the Interim National 
Security Strategic Guidance, the report shall also include:
    (1) a definition and baseline of those technical skillsets 
deemed critical by U.S. Special Operations Command extant 
within the SOF formation, articulated by military service 
component and technical skill;
    (2) a baseline of such technical skills in computer 
programming, machine learning and artificial intelligence, 
psychological operations, threat finance, and biological 
engineering, if distinct from assessed capabilities currently 
resident within the SOF formation in reporting element (1);
    (3) annual recruitment targets (for each of the five years 
covered by the strategy) for candidates with demonstrated 
technical skills specified in reporting elements (1) and (2) to 
be selected for participation in the initial assessment and 
qualification programs of the special operations forces;
    (4) any gaps between recruitment/retainment targets and 
those SOF members with the demonstrated technical skills 
specified in reporting elements (1) and (2);
    (5) a description of any training programs used to maintain 
or enhance technical skills within SOF, including any non-
governmental programs used;
    (6) an annual plan (for each of the five years covered by 
the strategy) to maintain and enhance technical skills within 
SOF; and
    (7) an annual plan (for each of the five years covered by 
the strategy) to retain those SOF members who have the 
specified technical skills.

 Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency Working Capital Fund 
                               Operations

    The committee notes that when it was responsible for 
Federal background investigations, the Office of Personnel 
Management (OPM) struggled to manage its working capital fund 
in accordance with best practices, project its workload, and 
set appropriate and transparent rates for its customers. The 
Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency (DCSA) became 
the Government's primary investigative service provider in 
October 2020, and also intends to finance its background 
investigation activities using a working capital fund. It is 
critical that appropriate controls, processes, and procedures 
be established from the onset to ensure that DCSA management of 
the working capital fund amounts is in accordance with best 
practices.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to review the processes, procedures, and 
operations of DCSA's defense working capital fund. This review 
should address the following elements:
    (1) the transfer of funds from OPM's working capital fund 
to DCSA's working capital fund and the effect the loss of 
revenue from background investigations has had on OPM's 
operations;
    (2) DCSA's use of different revenue streams to fund its 
operations and the controls, processes, and procedures it has 
put in place to ensure working capital fund amounts are used 
only for eligible activities;
    (3) the extent to which DCSA has maintained its working 
capital fund cash balance within appropriate upper and lower 
thresholds and the drivers behind increases or decreases in the 
DCSA working capital fund cash balance;
    (4) DCSA's efforts to effectively manage its working 
capital fund by applying lessons learned and using best 
practices for working capital fund operations; and
    (5) DCSA's efforts to plan for changes in costs as Trusted 
Workforce 2.0 and continuous vetting are implemented, as well 
as the effect this is expected to have on rates charged to 
customers, including administrative overhead costs.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing on the review to the House Committee on 
Armed Services not later than March 1, 2022, and to submit a 
final report on a date agreed to at the time of the briefing.

Department of Defense's Use of Independent Public Accounting Firms for 
                       Audit Remediation Services

    The committee notes the significant work that has been done 
to improve auditing practices within the Department of Defense. 
The Department has invested a substantial amount of time and 
money on audit and audit remediation efforts. The committee 
encourages the Department to continue to ensure a free and open 
competition for audit remediation services.

         Deployment-to-Dwell Ratio of Special Operation Forces

    The committee understands that special operations forces 
(SOF) sustained a near 1:1 deployment-to-dwell operational 
tempo for the last 20 years in support of geographic combatant 
commands to counter violent extremist organizations. The 
committee is aware that the 20 years of constant deployments 
has profoundly challenged SOF culture and readiness, and is 
encouraged by efforts to increase the time between deployments 
across the formation.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict to provide a 
report to the congressional defense committees by January 28, 
2022, on the current and projected deployment to dwell ratio 
for special operations forces. The report shall consider the 
Global Force Management Allocation Plan and any Request for 
Forces related to SOF. Further, in addition to specifically 
addressing the deployment to dwell ratio for support forces, 
the report must include the National Guard and Reserve 
Components.

              Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships

    The committee understands the importance of naval history 
to sailors and their families like. The Dictionary of American 
Naval Fighting Ships is the official reference work on the 
basic facts about ships commissioned by the U.S. Navy since 
October 13, 1775. The committee is concerned that the 
Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships is severely out of 
date.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
brief the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2022, 
on efforts to update the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting 
Ships. The briefing will include at a minimum: (1) timeline; 
(2) scope of project; and (3) existing and proposed budget 
needed to update the Dictionary of American Naval Fighting 
Ships within five years.

                               Fire Boats

    The committee recognizes the lack of fire boats at U.S. 
naval bases. This lack of access to dedicated fire boats may be 
a safety hazard to sailors and civilian workers and may expose 
warships worth tens of billions of dollars to unnecessary 
danger. The committee is particularly concerned about the loss 
of the USS Bonhomme Richard in 2020 and how fire boat access 
contributed to the complete loss of this warship.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to prepare a brief to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2022 that: details the findings associated with the 
USS Bonhomme Richard accident investigation and deficiencies 
identified that would have allowed Navy to more adequately 
respond to the loss of the USS Bonhomme Richard; and, develop a 
fire boat response plan at major U.S. naval bases. The plan 
will include at a minimum the scope, budget and timelines 
necessary to implement such plan.

                 Increased Access to Oceanographic Data

    The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to submit a 
report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives not later than March 1, 2022, 
regarding such steps as may be necessary to ensure the release 
of and public access to unclassified and declassified 
oceanographic data, subject to applicable regulatory 
restrictions.

                    Integration of Nonstandard Data

    The committee is aware that the Department of Defense is 
exploring multiple options for the nondisruptive ingestion of 
data from nonstandard sources and locations. This data 
``fabric'' is created when data is created or collected from 
various systems and sensors.
    However, such data presents issues with formatting, 
latency, and other obstacles to integration and exploitation. 
This data ``fabric'' is analogous to the creation of numerous 
``threads'' that may or may not have the ability to talk to 
each other and be interpreted in a sensible way.
    The committee is pleased that the Department, especially in 
the special operations community, is developing capabilities to 
access and analyze this data, including the use of artificial 
intelligence and machine learning services that are dedicated 
to data fabric integration to meet national security needs.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to brief 
the House Committee on Armed Services no later than March 2, 
2022 on the progress that the Army is making in ensuring that 
all units, both in special operations and conventional forces, 
have access to contracted data fabric integration capabilities 
when necessary to meet operational requirements.

              Irregular Warfare Annex Implementation Plan

    The committee recognizes that the shift from countering 
violent extremism to countering strategic competition 
necessitates a fully synchronized effort across the Department 
of Defense. While the Department must always prepare for high-
intensity traditional warfare, the future state of strategic 
competition is more likely to be dominated by irregular 
warfare. The committee is concerned that a fully integrated and 
proactive approach to planning for and implementing irregular 
warfare has not yet been fulsomely adopted by those Department 
of Defense organizations which are tantamount to the success of 
such a shift in the conduct of warfare. Thus, the committee 
believes that, to achieve truly comprehensive national 
security, the Department of Defense must pursue the development 
of capabilities in both the traditional and irregular warfare 
constructs.
    The committee believes that the office of the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity 
Conflict (ASD SO/LIC) commands a unique perspective in the 
shaping and integration of irregular warfare resourcing, 
requirements, training, and force posture adjustments across 
the Department of Defense due to the strategic civilian 
oversight responsibilities of special operations forces, which 
are an exemplar force in the conduct of irregular warfare. The 
committee is aware of ASD SO/LIC's efforts, in partnership with 
the Joint Staff, to support the Department of Defense's 
development of an irregular warfare implementation plan for the 
Joint Force which will undoubtedly facilitate a more thorough 
understanding of how to expand the competitive space through 
irregular warfare methodology.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than February 25, 2022, on its progress supporting the 
Department of Defense's efforts towards institutionalizing 
irregular warfare as a core competency for the Joint Force. The 
briefing shall include how the Department is developing and 
planning to leverage a Functional Center for Security Studies 
in Irregular Warfare, as previously directed in the committee 
report accompanying the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (H. Rept. 116-
442).

               National Background Investigation Services

    The committee notes that the Defense Counterintelligence 
and Security Agency (DCSA) is developing the National 
Background Investigation Services (NBIS) system, which will be 
the Federal Government's primary information technology system 
for end-to-end personnel vetting and will replace the suite of 
legacy background investigation and case management systems 
previously operated by the Office of Personnel Management. The 
NBIS system will be the centerpiece of the Federal Government's 
transformation to a modernized personnel vetting system and 
will functionalize critical innovations such as continuous 
vetting as the background investigations enterprise moves from 
periodic reinvestigations to real-time automated record checks. 
However, the committee is concerned by the NBIS system's cost, 
delayed delivery schedule, potential security vulnerabilities, 
and information sharing challenges with key stakeholders.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to review the NBIS system. This review should 
address the following elements:
    (1) the amount of funding requested, expended, and 
projected thus far for the NBIS system and the associated 
capabilities that have been delivered;
    (2) the extent to which DCSA has planned for and 
implemented cybersecurity controls for both the NBIS system and 
legacy background investigation systems;
    (3) the extent to which DCSA is engaging stakeholders in 
the development of NBIS requirements and capabilities; and
    (4) any other related matters the Comptroller General 
considers appropriate.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide preliminary observations to the House Committee on 
Armed Services not later than March 1, 2022, and to submit a 
final report on a date agreed to at the time of the briefing.

                      Optimizing AMBIT Adjustments

    The committee is aware of the upcoming auction of the 3450-
3550 MHz band of mid-band spectrum currently under exclusive 
license to the Department of Defense. Enabling commercial 
access to this band will, when combined with existing 
commercial spectrum, make significant contributions to the 
effectiveness and efficiency of U.S. 5G and 5G-enabled 
technologies, benefitting Americans while also bolstering our 
economic competitiveness.
    However, the sale will also require major adjustments to a 
number of Department of Defense spectrum-dependent systems. 
Through the Spectrum Relocation Fund (SRF), proceeds from the 
upcoming auction will help to defray the costs associated with 
those adjustments. However, SRF funding may only be used for 
costs associated with achieving ``comparable capability'' to 
that lost by the affected systems.
    At the same time, there is broad recognition that such 
``comparable capability'' is no longer sufficient to deliver 
U.S. advantage in a spectrum environment that is increasingly 
constrained, congested, and contested. That recognition has 
driven the creation of the Electromagnetic Spectrum (EMS) 
Superiority Strategy and associated Implementation Plan, though 
funding to support the scope and scale of necessary advances to 
support that plan remains scarce.
    As the mid-band-dependent systems affected by the upcoming 
auction make the required adjustments, this presents the 
Department with an opportunity to achieve leap-ahead advances 
toward more agile spectrum use. Capitalizing on this 
opportunity will require deliberate, careful alignment of SRF 
and appropriated funding to ensure both funding sources are 
used appropriately, but to maximum combined effect.
    To ensure this alignment, the committee directs the Senior 
Designated Official for EMS, supported by the Office of the 
Secretary of Defense Chief Information Office, the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering, and the 
Under Secretary of Defense, Comptroller, to provide a briefing 
to the House Committee on Armed Services not later than January 
15, 2022. The briefing shall describe the Department's plan to 
align adjustments to the affected mid-band-dependent systems 
with the goals of the EMS Superiority Strategy, the expected 
uses of various funding sources in support of that plan, and 
the oversight mechanisms to ensure appropriate adherence to the 
plan.

          Other Potential Uses for Decommissioned Naval Assets

    The Committee believes there is merit in examining other 
possible uses of ships proposed to be decommissioned by the US 
Navy. The Committee is aware of interest on the part of foreign 
allies in some of these ships which could be beneficial to the 
US Navy and allied relationships. The Navy has proposed 
additional retirements of several Littoral Combat ships, as 
well as Aegis cruisers. Both these classes of ships offer the 
opportunity for interoperability and commonality with allied 
navies either due to Hull, Mechanical and Electrical (HM&E) 
characteristics or similarities with combat or weapons systems.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2022 on the viability of transferring ships planned 
for decommissioning to allied Navies, to include Ticonderoga 
Class Cruisers the Littoral Combat Ships. The report should 
explore all options, with associated costs and risks, in 
effecting the transfer, including a full transfer or a 
potential leasing mechanism that would allow for the ultimate 
transfer of the asset back to the US Navy upon completion of 
the lease term. The report should also examine modifications 
and repairs that would be necessary to address operational 
deficiencies and other modifications necessary for operation by 
allied Navies.

        Report on Congressional Increases to the Defense Budget

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees as an 
unclassified appendix to the Fiscal Year 2023 Department of 
Defense budget request on the programs and activities of the 
Department for which Congress provided authorization or 
appropriations levels in the Fiscal Year 2022 National Defense 
Authorization Act or the Fiscal Year 2022 Defense 
Appropriations Act that exceeded the amount requested for such 
program or activity in the budget for the Department of Defense 
submitted to Congress by the President for Fiscal Year 2022.
    The report shall include information on:
    (1) Any program or activity that the Department of Defense 
sought to divest from entirely, or requested zero units, but 
that was restored wholly or in part by Congress, and;
    (2) Any program or activity that Congress authorized or 
appropriated at a level exceeding the amount requested by the 
Department of Defense in its Fiscal Year 2022 budget request by 
$20,000,000 or more.
    (3) Each program or activity listed in this report shall 
include an assessment of whether and how the program or 
activity does or does not meet requirements in support of the 
priorities articulated in the 2018 National Defense Strategy 
and the 2021 Interim National Security Strategic Guidance.
    In addition to being appended to the Department of 
Defense's Fiscal Year 2023 budget request, this report shall be 
made publicly available on the website of the Under Secretary 
of Defense (Comptroller).

  Report on Need for Additional Ice Breakers in the Great Lakes Region

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees by March 1, 2022 
on whether additional ice breaking vessels are necessary in the 
Great Lakes region. The report must include an analysis on the 
necessity for ice breaking vessels in the St. Clair River.

  Report on Posture of Special Operations Forces in the U.S. Central 
                     Command Area of Responsibility

    The committee recognizes that U.S. Special Operations 
Forces (USSOF) are a potent force that is deployed globally and 
provides critical capability and tradecraft in locations in and 
outside of areas of active hostilities. Given the ongoing 
conflicts in U.S. Central Command's (USCENTCOM) area of 
responsibility (AOR) and the forthcoming withdrawal from 
Afghanistan, the committee is interested in understanding SOF 
posture across the USCENTCOM AOR.
    Therefore, the committee directs the the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a report to the congressional defense 
committees by January 28, 2022, on any possible special 
operations forces in the USCENTCOM AOR. The report shall 
describe:
    (1) the location(s), disposition, mission, and rules of 
engagement for special operations forces in the USCENTCOM AOR, 
exclusive of Afghanistan and Iraq;
    (2) any potential combat engagements within the USCENTCOM 
AOR, exclusive of Afghanistan and Iraq, within the period of 1 
year preceding the date of the submission of the report; and
    (3) any plans or anticipated adjustments to force posture 
of USSOF in the areas described in reporting element (2) within 
the 1-year period following the date of the submission of the 
report, to include the Afghanistan retrograde.
    The report must be submitted in unclassified form but may 
contain a classified annex.

Report on United States Contributions to Multilateral and International 
                             Organizations

    The committee believes that U.S. support for multilateral 
and international organizations is critical to national 
security. A wide diversity of multilateral and international 
organizations are aligned with the United States' national 
interest. However, the committee wishes to become better 
informed on the extent to which U.S. funding contributions to 
those organizations are aligned with the strategic objectives 
identified by the National Defense Strategy.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in consultation with the Secretary of State, to provide a 
report, not later than March 31, 2022, to the House Committee 
on Armed Services, with the following information:
    (1) the aggregate amount of the United States' monetary 
contributions to multilateral and international organizations 
and the amount of such contributions toward purposes that are 
aligned with the strategic objectives of the National Defense 
Strategy; and
    (2) analysis relating to: (a) the progress or record of 
achievement of each recipient organization regarding the 
purposes aligned with the strategic objectives of the National 
Defense Strategy that are associated with the United States' 
contributions; (b) any demonstrable proof of fraud, waste, or 
abuse in connection with such contributions; and (c) whether 
U.S. contributions received by each such organization were in 
turn provided directly or indirectly to: the People's Republic 
of China, the Russian Federation, the Democratic People's 
Republic of Korea, the Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela, the 
Syrian Arab Republic, the Taliban, or any organization 
designated as a foreign terrorist organization pursuant to 
section 210 of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 19 
1189).

                  Secure Congressional Communications

    The Defense Information Systems Agency (DISA) has provided 
the House Committee on Armed Services with support, services, 
and equipment for secure voice and video communications through 
the Distributed Continuity Integrated Network--Top Secret 
(DCIN-TS) Gold System. This support is provided through an 
interagency service agreement that currently runs through 
January 3, 2022. The committee notes that having assured access 
to secure voice and video communications has assisted the 
committee with its oversight responsibilities while also 
providing additional flexibility and efficiencies to the 
Department of Defense, Members of Congress, and committee 
staff. While the committee is planning to renew the interagency 
agreement beyond fiscal year 2022, the committee believes that 
providing a programmatic increase to DISA's operation and 
maintenance account is a more appropriate and efficient way for 
covering the sustainment and support costs associated with the 
committee's use of the DCIN-TS Gold System. Therefore, the 
committee recommends a $35,000 increase for DISA to cover the 
costs associated with providing support, services, and 
equipment to the committee for secure voice and video 
communications. Furthermore, the committee encourages DISA to 
consider planning and programming for these recurring costs in 
future budget requests.

Special Operations Forces Activities in Latin America and the Caribbean

    The committee recognizes that today's threats are globally 
diffuse and characterized by transnational networks that 
transcend geographic boundaries. The committee further notes 
that violent extremist organizations and near peer adversaries 
often take advantage of regions which have historically been 
focused on demands for conventional military forces and 
capabilities, including in Latin America and the Caribbean. The 
committee recognizes that a whole of government approach can 
address diffuse threats, including the unique capabilities of 
U.S. Special Operations Forces (USSOF).
    Therefore, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict, in 
coordination with the Commander, U.S. Special Operations 
Command, to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by January 28, 2022, on the current and projected 
force posture, assigned capabilities, and related activities by 
USSOF in Latin America and the Caribbean. The report shall 
address how USSOF posture, capabilities, and activities advance 
U.S. national security interests, address evolving threats from 
state and non-state actors operating in the region, and support 
the objectives set forth in extant national security strategic 
guidance. Finally, the report shall identify any capability or 
capacity gaps and the reasons for those gaps.

 Update on the Limitation of Funds to Institutions of Higher Education 
                      Hosting Confucius Institute

    Section 1062 of the Fiscal Year 2021 (FY21) National 
Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) (PL 116-617) placed a 
limitation on the provision of Department of Defense funds to 
institutions of higher education that hosted Confucius 
Institute, unless the Secretary of Defense, in consultation 
with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and 
Medicine, determines a waiver is appropriate. Section 1299C of 
the same bill established an academic liaison in the Department 
responsible for working with the academic and research 
communities to protect Department-sponsored academic research 
of concern from undue foreign influence and threats. Section 
1062 directed that academic liaison manage the waiver process 
on behalf of the Secretary, and that waivers may be granted to 
institutions of higher education that have taken steps to:
    (1) Protect academic freedom at the institution;
    (2) Prohibit the application of any foreign law on any 
campus of the institution;
    (3) Grant full managerial authority of the Confucius 
Institute to the institution, including full control over what 
is being taught, the activities carried out, the research 
grants that are made, and who is employed at the Confucius 
Institute; and
    (4) Engage with the Academic Liaison Officer in the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering, and take 
appropriate measures to safeguard defense-funded fundamental 
research activities.
    The conferees directed that the Secretary brief the 
congressional defense committees on the establishment of the 
waiver process, including the institutions for which the waiver 
has been invoked. The committee is now aware that the majority 
of universities have closed or ended their agreements with 
Confucius Institute, and that there are fewer than 20 
universities with these contracts today.
    Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary to provide a 
briefing to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives, not later than March 1, 2022, on which of 
these universities that have obtained waivers from the 
Secretary and therefore still receive Department funding also 
host or coordinate Department programs such as the Reserve 
Officers' Training Corps or innovation programs including the 
National Security Innovation Network (NSIN).

                      USNS Bridge and USNS Rainier

    The committee understands that there is a lack of organic 
seagoing tanker capacity in the Navy's Combat Logistics Force 
(CLF). The committee further recognizes that the USNS Bridge 
and USNS Rainier were deactivated with additional service life 
remaining as a cost savings measure and are currently in 
reserve status. These two ships could immediately add 
additional, much-needed CLF capability in the critical U.S. 
Indo-Pacific Command area of responsibility. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 
2022, on the cost benefit of reactivating the USNS Bridge and 
USNS Rainier.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                     Subtitle A--Financial Matters


                Section 1001--General Transfer Authority

    This section would allow the Secretary of Defense, with 
certain limitations, to make transfers between amounts 
authorized for fiscal year 2022 in division A of this Act. This 
section would limit the total amount transferred under this 
authority to $6.50 billion.

            Section 1002--Determination of Budgetary Effects

    This section would state the budgetary effects of this Act 
for the purpose of complying with the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go 
Act of 2010.

    Section 1003--Budget Justification for Operation and Maintenance

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Secretary of each of the military 
departments, to provide an unclassified budget display to 
identify the material readiness objectives for each major 
weapon system, as well as the funds obligated, budgeted, and 
programmed for the purpose of achieving the material readiness 
objectives.

                       Subtitle B--Naval Vessels


  Section 1011--Critical Components of National Sea-Based Deterrence 
                                Vessels

    This section would add additional components to the 
continuous production authority that resides within the 
National Sea-Based Deterrence Fund.

 Section 1012--Biennial Report on Shipbuilder Training and the Defense 
                            Industrial Base

    This section would make technical changes to section 1026 
of the William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283).

 Section 1013--Revision of Sustainment Key Performance Parameters for 
                         Shipbuilding Programs

    This section would require the Secretary of the Navy to 
include sustainment and lifecycle planning as a key performance 
parameter in any new ship class.

  Section 1014--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Retirement of Mark VI 
                              Patrol Boats

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of the Navy from 
retiring any Mark VI patrol boat in fiscal year 2022. This 
section would also require the Secretary of the Navy to provide 
a report on the Mark VI patrol boat.

  Section 1015--Assessment of Security of Global Maritime Chokepoints

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act 
on the security of all global maritime chokepoints.

            Section 1016--Annual Report on Ship Maintenance

    This section would amend chapter 863 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require the Secretary of the Navy to submit to 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives an annual report on ship maintenance.

 Section 1017--Availability of Funds for Retirement or Inactivation of 
                       Ticonderoga Class Cruisers

    This section would restrict the Secretary of the Navy from 
deactivating three guided middle cruisers.

                      Subtitle C--Counterterrorism


Section 1021--Inclusion in Counterterrorism Briefings of Information on 
            Use of Military Force in Collective Self-Defense

    This section would amend section 485(b) of title 10, United 
States Code, to include additional reporting requirements 
regarding all instances of the use of military force by special 
operations forces under the notion of the collective self-
defense of foreign partners into the monthly counterterrorism 
operations briefings.

 Section 1022--Extension of Authority for Joint Task Forces to Provide 
   Support to Law Enforcement Agencies Conducting Counter-Terrorism 
                               Activities

    This section would extend section 1022(b) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2004 (Public Law 108-
136) by 2 years.

 Section 1023--Prohibition on Use of Funds for Transfer or Release of 
 Individuals Detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, 
                       Cuba, to Certain Countries

    This section would prohibit the use of funding authorized 
to be appropriated or otherwise made available for the 
Department of Defense during the period beginning on the date 
of the enactment of this Act and ending on December 31, 2022, 
to transfer, release, or assist in the transfer or release of 
any individual detained at U.S. Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, 
Cuba, to Libya, Somalia, Syria, and Yemen.

         Subtitle D--Miscellaneous Authorities and Limitations


Section 1031--Navy Coordination with Coast Guard on Aircraft, Weapons, 
    Tactics, Technique, Organization, and Equipment of Joint Concern

    This section would amend section 8062(d) of title 10, 
United States Code, and would establish the United States Coast 
Guard as a matter of joint concern to the Navy.

Section 1032--Prohibition on Use of Navy, Marine Corps, and Space Force 
                           as Posse Comitatus

    This section would prohibit the use of any part of the 
Navy, the Marine Corps, or the Space Force as a posse 
comitatus, except in cases and under circumstances expressly 
authorized by the Constitution or an Act of Congress.

Section 1033--Program to Improve Relations between Members of the Armed 
                    Forces and Military Communities

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a biennial survey related to the relations between 
members of the armed services and the military communities in 
which they serve.

   Section 1034--Authority to Provide Space and Services to Military 
                           Welfare Societies

    This section would add Coast Guard Mutual Assistance to the 
list of military welfare societies that can be provided space 
on military installations.

   Section 1035--Required Revision of Department of Defense Unmanned 
                    Aircraft Systems Categorization

    This section would require the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Acquisition and Sustainment to conduct a review of and 
initiate a process to modify the existing Department of Defense 
Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) categorization. The section would 
require the Under Secretary to consult with the Secretaries of 
the military departments, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff, and the Administrator of the Federal Aviation 
Administration (FAA) when conducting the required review. This 
section would also require the Under Secretary to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees, the House 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, and the Senate 
Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation on the 
result of the directed review and any revisions planned to the 
UAS categories.
    The current UAS categorization defines UAS into five 
discrete groups, based on speed, maximum gross take-off weight 
(MGTOW), and altitude. The committee notes that the five UAS 
groups were originally determined by the Joint UAS Center of 
Excellence in 2008, partially based on the three UAS categories 
as defined by the FAA.
    The committee believes that significant technology and 
capability advancements in such areas as autonomy, propulsion, 
and sensor payloads require modifications be made to the UAS 
group definitions. This is particularly the case for the group 
3 category, which includes any UAS that has a MGTOW between 55 
pounds and 1,320 pounds. The wide range in MGTOW in the group 3 
category has resulted in a category of UAS that have quite 
different capabilities and operational usage. The committee 
remains concerned that the broad definition used by the 
Department of Defense for group 3 UAS is overly burdensome for 
small UAS. These internal policies create a high cost of 
ownership for group 3 UAS that not only limit the ability of 
the military services to rapidly field small group 3 UAS to 
support warfighting concepts and needs, but also discourage 
industry from pursing internally funded development efforts in 
that weight class. The committee encourages the Department to 
consider these factors during the review process.

 Section 1036--Limitation on Funding for Information Operations Matters

    This section would limit funding available for Office of 
the Secretary of Defense travel until the Secretary provides 
the information operations strategy and posture review required 
by the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 
(Public Law 116-92).

     Section 1037--Prohibition on Provision of Equipment to Other 
   Departments and Agencies for Protection of Certain Facilities and 
                     Assets from Unmanned Aircraft

    This section would prohibit the obligation or expenditure 
of funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act or otherwise 
made available for fiscal year 2022 for the Department of 
Defense to acquire, loan, transfer, sell, or otherwise provide 
equipment to a department or Federal agency for use in 
exercising authorities or taking actions pursuant to section 
210G of the Homeland Security Act of 2002 (6 U.S.C. 124n).

   Section 1038--Limitation on Use of Funds for United States Space 
                          Command Headquarters

    This section would prohibit the Department of Defense from 
using authorized fiscal year 2022 funds to plan, design, or 
construct a United States Space Command headquarters building, 
until the Department of Defense Inspector General and the 
Government Accountability Office complete their reports on the 
basing process for United States Space Command.

                    Subtitle E--Studies and Reports


   Section 1041--Congressional Oversight of Alternative Compensatory 
                            Control Measures

    This section would require the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Policy to notify the congressional defense committees upon 
the establishment or disestablishment of all alternative 
compensatory control measures. This section would also require 
an annual report to the congressional defense committees.

     Section 1042--Comparative Testing Reports for Certain Aircraft

    This section would require the Director, Operational Test 
and Evaluation and the Secretary of the Air Force to submit to 
the congressional defense committees not later than 45 days 
after the date of the enactment of this Act, the tactical 
aircraft comparative testing reports required by section 134(b) 
of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
(Public Law 114-328).

Section 1043--Extension of Reporting Requirement regarding Enhancement 
 of Information Sharing and Coordination of Military Training between 
       Department of Homeland Security and Department of Defense

    This section would extend until December 31, 2023, a report 
required by section 1014 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328), on the 
coordination of Department of Defense training missions with 
the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) operational needs at 
the international borders of the United States and the 
information provided to DHS as a result of the coordinated 
training.

 Section 1044--Continuation of Certain Department of Defense Reporting 
                              Requirements

    This section would extend the requirement for biennial 
analysis and a subsequent report on strategic and critical 
materials.

Section 1045--Geographic Combatant Command Risk Assessment of Air Force 
 Airborne Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Modernization 
                                  Plan

    This section would require each commander of a geographic 
combatant command to submit to the congressional defense 
committees not later than March 31, 2022, an assessment of the 
operational risk to that command posed by the restructuring and 
inventory divestments projected in the Modernization Plan for 
Airborne Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance for the 
Department of the Air Force as required by the William M. (Mac) 
Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2021 (Public Law 116-283).

      Section 1046--Biennial Assessments of Air Force Test Center

    This section would require the Secretary of the Air Force 
to provide a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than 30 days after the President's budget request is 
submitted for fiscal years 2023, 2025, and 2027, that updates 
the information contained in the reports required by the 
committee report accompanying the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (H. Rept. 115-200) and 
the committee report accompanying the William M. (Mac) 
Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2021 (H. Rept. 116-442).
    The committee continues to recognize the importance of the 
Air Force Test Center enterprise and its role as a cornerstone 
for developmental test and evaluation of air, space, and cyber 
systems. The committee acknowledges that given technology 
advancements and the emergence of peer competitors globally, 
innovative and modernized weapons system testing and 
development capabilities are needed to support development and 
acquisition of effective deterrence and combat capabilities.

     Section 1047--Comparative Study on .338 Norma Magnum Platform

    This section would require the Secretary of the Army to 
conduct a comparative study among medium caliber machine gun 
ammunition.

Section 1048--Comptroller General Report on Aging Department of Defense 
                               Equipment

    This section would require the Comptroller General to 
submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services on 
legacy platforms within the Department of Defense and their 
relevance and resiliency of such platforms to emerging threats.

  Section 1049--Report on Acquisition, Delivery, and Use of Mobility 
   Assets that Enable Implementation of Expeditionary Advanced Base 
                               Operations

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees on the 
efforts being made to implement expeditionary advanced base 
operations.

         Section 1050--Force Posture in the Indo-Pacific Region

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
force posture in the Indo-Pacific region and require the 
Commander of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command to submit a report to 
the congressional defense committees regarding the force 
posture in the Indo-Pacific region.

 Section 1051--Assessment of United States Military Infrastructure in 
              Diego Garcia, British Indian Ocean Territory

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report containing an assessment of military 
infrastructure related to Diego Garcia.

           Section 1052--Report on 2019 World Military Games

    This section would require a report regarding service 
members who participated in the 2019 World Military Games and 
the COVID-19 virus.

 Section 1053--Reports and Briefings regarding Oversight of Afghanistan

    This section would require briefings and reports on the 
Department of Defense's counterterrorism capabilities regarding 
Afghanistan, plans to evacuate Afghans eligible for the special 
immigrant visa program, military equipment left in Afghanistan, 
updated threat assessments, and any military cooperation with 
specified countries.

Section 1054--Report and Briefing on United States Equipment, Property, 
and Classified Material That Was Destroyed, Surrendered, and Abandoned 
                   in the Withdrawal from Afghanistan

    This section would require a report and briefing to 
Congress on military equipment left in Afghanistan.

 Section 1055--Report on Defense Utility of United States Territories 
                            and Possessions

    This section would require a report on the defense utility 
of United States territories and possessions in the Pacific.

    Section 1056--Report on Coast Guard Explosive Ordnance Disposal

    This section would require the Secretary of Homeland 
Security to submit to Congress a report on the viability of 
establishing an explosive ordnance disposal program in the 
Coast Guard by February 15, 2023.

 Section 1057--Independent Assessment with Respect to the Arctic Region

    This section would require an independent assessment on 
achieving specific objectives in the Arctic for fiscal years 
2023-2027.

  Section 1058--Annual Report and Briefing on Global Force Management 
                            Allocation Plan

    This section would require an annual report and a briefing 
on the Global Force Management Allocation Plan and its 
implementation.

       Subtitle F--District of Columbia National Guard Home Rule


                       Section 1066--Short Title

    This section would cite the short title as the ``District 
of Columbia National Guard Home Rule Act''.

 Section 1067--Extension of National Guard Authorities to Mayor of the 
                          District of Columbia

    This section would extend the authorities over the National 
Guard of the District of Columbia to the Mayor of the District 
of Columbia in the same manner as the Governor of a State.

  Section 1068--Conforming Amendments to Title 10, United States Code

    This section would add conforming amendments to title 10, 
United States Code.

  Section 1069--Conforming Amendments to Title 32, United States Code

    This section would add conforming amendments to title 32, 
United States Code.

  Section 1070--Conforming Amendment to the District of Columbia Home 
                                Rule Act

    This section would add conforming amendments to the 
District of Columbia Home Rule Act.

                       Subtitle G--Other Matters


      Section 1071--Technical, Conforming, and Clerical Amendments

    This section would make technical, conforming, and clerical 
amendments to existing law.

Section 1072--Assistant Secretary of Defense for Indo-Pacific Security 
                                Affairs

    This section would codify the position of the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Indo-Pacific Security Affairs and the 
principal duties of such position.

 Section 1073--Improvement of Transparency and Congressional Oversight 
                       of Civil Reserve Air Fleet

    This section would amend Section 2640 of title 10, United 
States Code, and subject Department of Defense charter air 
cargo transportation services to the same safety requirements 
as those required for Department of Defense charter air 
transportation for members of the Armed Forces.
    This section would require an annual report on instances 
when Department of Defense cargo transportation service 
contracts are awarded to carriers who do not meet the 
requirements of subparagraph (d) of this section.

     Section 1074--Enhancements to National Mobilization Exercises

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense, every 5 
years, as part of the major mobilization exercise, to include 
the processes of the Selective Service System in preparation 
for a draft, and submit a report on the results of that 
exercise.

   Section 1075--Providing End-to-End Electronic Voting Services for 
Absent Uniformed Services Voters in Locations with Limited or Immature 
                             Postal Service

    This section would explore electronic solutions for 
reducing voting barriers for service members in remote 
locations.

  Section 1076--Responsibilities for National Mobilization; Personnel 
                              Requirements

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
designate an official as the Executive Agent for National 
Mobilization and to submit a plan for obtaining draft inductees 
as part of a mobilization timeline for the Selective Service 
System.

    Section 1077--Update of Joint Evacuation Publication 3-68: Non-
                    Combatant Evacuation Operations

    This section would require the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff to update Joint Publication 3-68: Noncombatant 
Evacuation Operations by March 1, 2022.

      Section 1078--Treatment of Operational Data from Afghanistan

    This section would require the retention of operational 
data from Afghanistan and a briefing on how the Department of 
Defense has removed, retained, and assured long term access to 
this operational data.

   Section 1079--Defense Resource Budgeting and Allocation Commission

    This section would establish a Defense Resource Budgeting 
and Allocation Commission to develop a consensus on an 
effective and strategic approach to Department of Defense 
resource budgeting and allocation, including by conducting an 
examination of the planning, programming, budgeting, and 
execution methodology of the Department; and by considering 
potential alternatives to such methodology to maximize the 
ability of the Department to equip itself in a timely manner to 
respond to current and emerging threats.

                Section 1080--Commission on Afghanistan

    This section would establish a commission on the war in 
Afghanistan and require it to make recommendations about 
lessons learned. The commission would cover 20 years of the 
U.S. and NATO conflict in Afghanistan and the period of Taliban 
control prior to the U.S. led invasion of 2001.

 Section 1081--Technology Pilot Program to Support Ballot Transmission 
            for Absent Uniformed Services and Overseas Votes

    This section would direct the Department of Defense to 
conduct a pilot program to provide grants to States and local 
jurisdictions in support of absent uniformed services personnel 
and overseas votes.

  Section 1082--Recognition of the Memorial, Memorial Garden, and K9 
Memorial of the National Navy UDT-SEAL Museum in Fort Pierce, Florida, 
 as the Official National Memorial, Memorial Garden, and K9 Memorial, 
           Respectively, of Navy SEALs and Their Predecessors

    This section would recognize the memorial, memorial garden, 
and K9 memorial of the National Navy UDT-SEAL Museum as the 
official memorial of the Navy SEALs and their predecessors.

   Section 1083--Sense of Congress on the Legacy, Contributions, and 
  Sacrifices of American Indian and Alaska Natives in the Armed Forces

    This section would recognize and honor the legacy and 
contributions of American Indian and Alaska Natives and tribal 
communities to the military of the United States and would 
commit to ensuring progress for American Indian and Alaska 
Native members of the Armed Forces and veterans with regard to 
representation in senior military leadership positions, 
improving access to culturally competent resources and 
services, and supporting families and tribal communities.

        Section 1084--Name of Naval Medical Center Camp Lejeune

    This section would designate the Naval Medical Center Camp 
Lejeune as the ``Walter B. Jones Naval Medical Center''.

  Section 1085--Sense of Congress regarding Naming a Warship the USS 
                                Fallujah

    This section would express the sense of Congress that the 
Secretary of the Navy should name a warship the ``USS 
Fallujah''.

      Section 1086--Name of Air Force Utah Test and Training Range

    This section would designate the Utah Test and Training 
Range as the ``Bishop Utah Test and Training Range''.

     Section 1087--Name of Air Force Utah Test and Training Range 
                  Consolidated Mission Control Center

    This section would designate the Air Force Utah Test and 
Training Range Consolidated Mission Control Center the ``Robert 
W. Bishop Utah Test and Training Range Mission Control 
Center''.

   Section 1088--Sense of Congress regarding Crisis at the Southwest 
                                 Border

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
the Southwest border.

Section 1089--Improvements and Clarifications Relating to Unauthorized 
               Use of Computers of Department of Defense

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
ensure that the electronic banner that appears on the screens 
of computers of the Department of Defense upon access of such 
computers is updated to include language prohibiting users from 
using Government email for an unauthorized purpose.

                  TITLE XI--CIVILIAN PERSONNEL MATTERS

                       Items of Special Interest


 Appointment of Recently Retired Members of the Armed Forces to Civil 
                           Service Positions

    The committee is aware of continued workforce challenges at 
the military depots. As the military modernizes, it has become 
increasingly difficult to compete with industry for the skilled 
technicians needed to maintain modern weapon systems. The 
committee notes that section 1108 of the William M. (Mac) 
Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2021 (Public Law 116-283) established a 3-year waiver of the 
``180-Day Rule'' to permit the appointment of recently retired 
service members to positions at the GS-13 level and below at 
organic industrial base facilities. The committee looks forward 
to receiving information on the Department of Defense's use of 
this authority and remains interested in exploring options to 
enable the hiring of the talent needed at our military depots 
while preserving competitive and merit-based hiring principles.

      Civilian Personnel in the Office of the Secretary of Defense

    The committee notes that civilian oversight and control of 
the Armed Forces is essential to ensure accountability, 
readiness, and the deployment of the Armed Forces in the 
national interest. A strong civilian workforce in the Office of 
the Secretary of Defense (OSD), particularly in the Office of 
the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy (OUSDP), is essential 
to maintain this principle of civilian control of the military. 
However, hiring freezes and attrition in OUSDP have led to a 
manpower reduction of almost 27 percent over the last 11 years. 
This has resulted in an inappropriate reliance on contractors 
and undermined OUSDP's ability to carry out robust civilian 
control and oversight of the Armed Forces. The committee 
encourages the Department of Defense to undertake an assessment 
of the civilian billets in OUSDP and consider increasing the 
size of the OUSDP civilian workforce to better reflect mission 
needs and reduce reliance on contracted personnel.
    Further, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than January 31, 2022, that includes the following:
    (1) the number of military and civilian personnel assigned 
to or employed by each OSD component in each of the previous 10 
fiscal years;
    (2) the number of contractor personnel supporting each OSD 
component, including contractor personnel performing 
``inherently governmental functions,'' ``closely associated 
with inherently governmental functions,'' ``critical 
functions'' (as defined in sections 129a and 2463 of title 10, 
United States Code), as well as the number of staff 
augmentation contractors supporting each component in each of 
the previous 10 fiscal years;
    (3) the share of civilian OSD personnel allocated to OUSDP 
in each of the previous 10 fiscal years; and
    (4) an assessment of whether the number of civilian billets 
has kept pace with changes in OUSDP's mission over time and 
whether an increase to the personnel cap established by section 
143 of title 10, United States Code, is necessary to ensure 
sufficient civilian staffing in OUSDP and enable corrective 
action for any inappropriate contracting.

   Prevention and Response Efforts in the National Nuclear Security 
    Administration Nuclear Security Forces regarding Sexual Assault

    The committee commends the work of the Comptroller General 
of the United States in reviewing the National Nuclear Security 
Administration's (NNSA's) policies, programs, and responses to 
preventing sexual assault in NNSA's security forces and its 
recent report (GAO-21-307). The committee further commends the 
Secretary of Energy's commitment to implementing the 
Comptroller General's recommendations in this regard. Ensuring 
that all Federal employees and contractors of the NNSA are able 
to serve the nuclear enterprise without fear of harassment is a 
national security issue, in addition to one of workplace 
rights. Therefore, the committee directs the Administrator of 
the National Nuclear Security Administration to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than January 15, 2022, on implementing the Comptroller General 
report's recommendations. The briefing should include:
    (1) a plan to fully implement the report's recommendations;
    (2) progress toward implementing the report's 
recommendations;
    (3) options available to the Department of Energy to 
penalize contractors for not upholding their obligations 
regarding sexual assault; and
    (4) a plan to conduct an independent review of the NNSA's 
progress on implementing the Government Accountability Office 
recommendations.

                      Technical and Digital Talent

    The committee recognizes the technical and digital talent 
deficit within the Department of Defense. In order to attract 
the necessary technical and digital talent to serve within the 
military or at the Department, the Government must understand 
the public's perception and knowledge of technical and digital 
jobs available within the Department. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and 
Readiness to provide a report to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than January 15, 2022, regarding:
    (1) the awareness and opinions of science, technology, 
engineering, and mathematics (STEM) job opportunities within 
the Department and military held by young professionals, 
defined as individuals under the age of 35, employed full- or 
part-time in the technology industry or pursuing a degree in a 
STEM field;
    (2) the work incentives and pay structures used by the 
technology industry, including publicly- or privately-held 
companies of any size with a focus on delivering technology 
products or services, compared with Government incentives and 
structures;
    (3) the willingness of young professionals, defined as 
adults under the age of 35, employed full- or -part- in the 
technology industry or pursuing a degree in a STEM field, to 
serve part-time in the military or government, or rotate 
between the private sector and Government;
    (4) barriers that prevent defined as adults under the age 
of 35, employed full- or -part- in the technology industry or 
pursuing a degree in a STEM field, from working for the 
Department or serve within the military;
    (5) the approximate proportion of individuals, under the 
age of 35, working within the STEM fields that have previously 
worked for the Department or served in the military; and
    (6) any information available regarding why individuals, 
under the age of 35, choose to leave Department or military 
service STEM careers for those in the private sector.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


     Section 1101--One-Year Extension of Authority to Waive Annual 
 Limitation on Premium Pay and Aggregate Limitation on Pay for Federal 
                  Civilian Employees Working Overseas

    This section would amend section 1101 of the Duncan Hunter 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 (Public 
Law 110-417) by extending premium pay for Federal civilian 
employees working overseas until the end of 2022.

   Section 1102--One-Year Extension of Temporary Authority to Grant 
Allowances, Benefits, and Gratuities to Civilian Personnel on Official 
                         Duty in a Combat Zone

    This section would amend section 1106 of the William M. 
(Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) by extending the temporary 
authority granting allowances, benefits, and gratuities to 
civilian personnel on official duty in a combat zone by 1 year.

 Section 1103--DARPA Personnel Management Authority to Attract Science 
                        and Engineering Experts

    This section would amend section 1599h(b) of title 10, 
United States Code, by adding the ability for the Defense 
Advanced Research Projects Agency to pay for travel, 
transportation, and relocation expenses and services when 
hiring up to 15 individuals in any fiscal year.

              Section 1104--Civilian Personnel Management

    This section would amend section 129 of title 10, United 
States Code, to strengthen the prohibition against managing 
civilian personnel according to a constraint or limitation on 
man-years, end strength, or full-time equivalent positions. 
This section would also prohibit the use of term or temporary 
hiring authorities for enduring functions.

    Section 1105--Comptroller General Review of Naval Audit Service 
                               Operations

    This section would prohibit changes to the size or function 
of the Naval Audit Service until the Comptroller General of the 
United States completes a report on the operations of the Naval 
Audit Service.

   Section 1106--Implementation of GAO Recommendations on Tracking, 
  Response, and Training for Civilian Employees of the Department of 
            Defense regarding Sexual Harassment and Assault

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop a plan to address the recommendations contained in the 
Comptroller General of the United States report entitled 
``Sexual Harassment and Assault: Guidance Needed to Ensure 
Consistent Tracking, Response, and Training for Department of 
Defense Civilians.''

     Section 1107--Guidelines for Reductions in Civilian Positions

    This section would amend section 1597 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require that, in implementing any reduction in 
force of civilian positions in the Department of Defense, the 
determination of employees to be separated shall be made 
primarily on the basis of seniority and veterans preference.

           Section 1108--Repeal of 2-Year Probationary Period

    This section would repeal the 2-year probationary period 
for Department of Defense civilians provided in section 1599e 
of title 10, United States Code.

      Section 1109--Amendment to Diversity and Inclusion Reporting

    This section would amend section 113 of title 10, United 
States Code, to require that the Department of Defense 
establish relevant metrics, collect and report on diversity 
statistics, and report on the status of diversity and inclusion 
efforts among the civilian workforce.

  Section 1110--Including Active Duty in the Armed Forces in Meeting 
   Service Requirement for Federal Employee Family and Medical Leave

    This section would establish Active Duty service in the 
Armed Forces as having met the service requirements for 
eligibility toward Federal Employee Family and Medical Leave.

Section 1111--Treatment of Hours Worked under a Qualified Trade-of-Time 
                              Arrangement

    This section would amend section 5542 of title 5, United 
States Code, to exclude hours worked as part of any trade-of-
time arrangement from the calculation of overtime pay for 
Federal firefighters.

 Section 1112--Modification of Temporary Authority to Appoint Retired 
 Members of the Armed Forces to Positions in the Department of Defense

    This section would amend section 1108(b) of the William M. 
(Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) to provide that the temporary 
authority to appoint retired members of the Armed Forces to 
civilian positions applies to positions at any industrial base 
facility, range, or test facility.

 Section 1113--Increase in Allowance Based on Duty at Remote Worksites

    This section would direct the Director of the Office of 
Personnel Management to conduct an assessment of the remote 
site pay allowance.

Section 1114--Limiting the Number of Local Wage Areas Defined within a 
                              Pay Locality

    This section would amend section 5343 of title 5, United 
States Code, to prohibit the Office of Personnel Management 
from including more than one local wage area within a General 
Schedule pay locality in order to align Federal Wage System 
areas with General Schedule locality pay areas.

             TITLE XII--MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS

                       Items of Special Interest


             Accountability and Security of Biometric Data

    The Committee recognizes the importance of collecting and 
analyzing biometric data from noncombatants, combatants, and 
unlawful combatants during military operations. There are over 
one million entries saved in the Department of Defense's 
Automatic Biometrics Identification System. With the sudden 
fall of Afghanistan to the Taliban, the committee is very 
concerned about the possibility of this data trove falling into 
the hands of the Taliban or another enemy of the United States, 
particularly because recent media reports allege that the 
Taliban has seized some of the devices the U.S. military used 
to collect biometrics.
    Allowing the Taliban to access the Automatic Biometrics 
Identification System would be a catastrophic loss that 
permanently undermines the safety of Afghan citizens who helped 
the U.S. during twenty years of war and occupation. It would 
also fundamentally weaken Department of Defense biometric 
collection efforts moving forward because of actual or 
perceived data security concerns.
    Therefore, the Committee directs the Department of Defense 
to provide a report to the Committee on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives no later than December 31, 2021 
regarding the current integrity of the Department's Automatic 
Biometrics Identification System and whether the Taliban or 
other unauthorized group or individual may have access to this 
system or related Department biometric system. The Committee 
further directs the Secretary of Defense to include information 
based on, but not limited to:
    (1) A summary of actual or potential biometric-related 
equipment or tools currently possessed or believed to be 
possessed by the Taliban or other unauthorized user in 
Afghanistan;
    (2) An accounting of abandoned or destroyed biometric-
related equipment or tools as a result of the U.S. withdrawal 
from Afghanistan;
    (3) An assessment of whether or not the Taliban or another 
unauthorized user has access to all or a portion of the 
Department of Defense's Automatic Biometrics Identification 
System, or any similar biometrics database controlled by the 
Department of Defense;
    (4) Current efforts to ensure the data security and 
integrity of the Department of Defense biometric data and data 
collection enterprise; and,
    (5) Recommendations to Congress on how the Department of 
Defense can improve the security and integrity of its biometric 
data collection efforts.

                  Afghanistan Intelligence Assessment

    The committee directs the Secretary of the Defense to 
submit a report to the House Armed Services Committee no later 
than March 1, 2022, on the effectiveness of the production and 
communication of the intelligence and other information 
provided by the Department of Defense relating to the 
withdrawal of United States troops from Afghanistan. The 
assessment shall include an analysis on how intelligence 
officials could have improved all-source intelligence 
direction, collection, processing, exploitation, and 
dissemination as circumstances in Afghanistan changed in 
response to the U.S. announcement of a withdrawal of U.S. 
military personnel and the implementation of the withdrawal 
plans; and recommendations on how to improve intelligence 
direction, collection, processing, exploitation, and 
dissemination relating to future military withdrawals in 
regions with terrorist or hostile military threats to better 
inform policymaking.

          Aviation Contractor Support to the Afghan Air Force

    The committee notes that the defeat of the Afghan Air Force 
was largely due to the inability of the Afghan Air Force to 
properly maintain its fleet of aircraft without U.S. contracted 
maintenance support. During the May 12, 2021 House Committee on 
Armed Services hearing, the Department of Defense was asked to 
provide the committee with a plan on how it would continue to 
provide maintenance support to the Afghan Air Force to include 
the possibility of any in country support provided by U.S. 
contracted personnel. This information was never provided to 
the committee. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary 
of Defense to provide a briefing to the House Committee on 
Armed Services by November 1, 2021, on the Department of 
Defense's plan to provide contractor support to the Afghan Air 
Force. This briefing should include, but not be limited to, why 
the plan was not executed and the effects that had on the 
Afghan Air Force.

                            Bagram Air Base

    The committee notes the strategic and tactical importance 
of Bagram Air Base during Operation Enduring Freedom. The 
committee also notes that the U.S. military retrograded from 
Bagram Air Base in July 2021 as part of the withdrawal from 
Afghanistan, leaving the Hamid Karzai International Airport in 
Kabul the only airfield accessible to the United States and our 
partners. The committee is interested in understanding the 
strategic decision behind leaving Bagram Air Base. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense brief the House 
Committee on Armed Services by November 1, 2021, on the 
Department of Defense's decision to leave Bagram Air Base.

Briefing on Authorities to Build Partner Capacity of Security Forces of 
                       Friendly Foreign Countries

    The committee recognizes the impactful work done under the 
authorities within section 333 of title 10, United States Code. 
The committee also recognizes current authorities may not meet 
the needs for all programs, particularly with regards to the 
use of funds to pay for the personnel expenses of the national 
security forces of a friendly foreign country to participate in 
a training program conducted by the national security forces of 
another friendly foreign country.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Policy to provide a briefing, not later than March 
31, 2022 to the congressional defense committees on the 
feasibility and advisability of an authority that allows for 
payment of personnel expenses as mentioned above.

              Briefing on Foreign Military Sales to Poland

    The Committee continues to place high priority on deterring 
Russian aggressive action on NATO's Eastern flank and in 
empowering our allies in the region. Since the illegal seizure 
of Ukraine's Crimea region, Russia has supported continued 
conflict in Ukraine's Donbas province, massed and maintained 
armed forces on Ukraine's Eastern borders, harassed NATO allies 
and activities in the Black Sea, and discussed integration of 
Russian and Belarusian military forces on Poland's border.
    Poland has become the anchor of NATO's deterrence strategy 
on the Eastern European flank and the United States' strongest 
ally. It continues to meet defense budget targets in accordance 
with the Wales Summit Declaration by which the NATO member 
states agreed to spend 2 percent of their Gross Domestic 
Product on defense, 20 percent of which is spent on major 
equipment, including related research and development. Poland 
has also aggressively pursued modernization of its military 
capability, emphasizing interoperability with U.S. Army and Air 
Force capabilities based in Poland.
    The Committee approves of Poland's recent decision to 
purchase 250 of the most modern versions of the U.S. Abrams 
main battle tank to increase the capability of its armored 
forces. This will enhance NATO's ability to deter Russian 
aggression on its Eastern flank and the Committee encourages 
the Administration to facilitate this foreign military sale as 
soon as possible.
    Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in consultation with the Director, Defense Security Cooperation 
Agency, to brief the congressional defense committees not later 
than December 31, 2021 on the process and timeline to 
facilitate the foreign military sales of U.S. Abrams tanks to 
Poland.

                       Countering Hybrid Threats

    The committee supports the Department of Defense's efforts 
to develop resilience and build capacity to counter hybrid 
threats through research, training, and exercises with diverse 
partners, including at centers of excellence such as the 
European Centre of Excellence for Countering Hybrid Threats. 
The committee also supports efforts to incorporate learning 
from public, private, and academic sectors. Further, the 
William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) authorized the 
participation of members of the U.S. Armed Forces and 
Department of Defense civilian personnel at the European Centre 
of Excellence for Countering Hybrid Threats. The committee 
therefore encourages the Department to explore opportunities to 
participate with the European Centre of Excellence for 
Countering Hybrid Threats on activities that incorporate best 
practices in addressing hybrid threats and enhance the ability 
of the military forces and civilian personnel of participating 
countries to conduct joint exercises and international military 
operations, as well as improve interoperability between the 
armed forces of such countries. The committee further directs 
the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than February 1, 2022, on 
Department activities to participate in the European Centre of 
Excellence for Countering Hybrid Threats.

      Defense Cooperation with Compacts of Free Association States

    The committee supports expanded defense cooperation with 
Compacts of Free Association states. The committee welcomes 
statements from Compact State leaders, such as President 
Surangel Whipps Jr. of the Republic of Palau, in support of 
closer ties with the United States, including potential 
military presence. As the Department of Defense considers 
options to improve the design and posture of the joint force in 
the Indo-Pacific region west of the International Date Line, 
the committee strongly urges the Department to consider the 
strategic geography of these crucial partners. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a report 
to the Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives no later than March 1, 2022, describing:
    (1) The manner in which Compacts of Free Association states 
could contribute to national security objectives;
    (2) The advantages and disadvantages of various options 
related to presence of United States military forces in 
Compacts of Free Association states to support national 
security objectives, including through Expeditionary Advanced 
Base Operations;
    (3) An assessment of the resources required to carry out 
the various options related to the presence of Unites States 
military forces in Compacts of Free Association states;
    (4) Additional logistical requirements or considerations 
associated with the requirements of paragraph (3);
    (5) Further avenues for defense cooperation with Compacts 
of Free Association States;
    (6) Any other matters the Secretary of Defense considers 
appropriate.

 Defense Security Cooperation Agency Briefing on Lessons Learned from 
 the Failure of the ANSF and Partner Forces with Less Capable Security 
                                 Forces

    The committee is concerned about the failure of the Afghan 
National Security Forces (ANSF) to sustain security operations 
after the withdrawal of American forces. The rapid failure of 
the ANSF raises questions about the Department's ability to 
oversee security cooperation programs. After years of training, 
funding, and embedding with the ANSF, their mission failure 
raises serious concerns about how the United States trains and 
equips certain partner forces. Training less capable partner 
forces to fight with American technology and assets, to include 
multi-domain intelligence, intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance, close air support, and other sophisticated 
technology that is not present organically for host nations, 
may not achieve U.S. security cooperation objectives nor 
develop an enduring capability for partner nations. The 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than December 1, 2021, that includes how the agency plans to 
incorporate lessons learned from the failure of the ANSF and 
how the agency trains other partner forces with less capable 
security forces.

    Department of Defense State Partnership Program Support to U.S. 
                    Security Cooperation Objectives

    The committee maintains a continuing interest in the 
Department of Defense State Partnership Program (SPP). The 
committee recognizes that SPP is an important component of U.S. 
security cooperation efforts. Further, the committee notes that 
SPP has expanded significantly in size and scope since its 
inception.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than March 1, 2022, regarding SPP. Such briefing 
shall include an evaluation of the support provided by SPP to 
the security cooperation objectives of the United States in 
support of the National Security Strategy and the National 
Defense Strategy; an analysis of the National Guard's SPP 
requirements and resources (to include state-level components 
and associated personnel); an analysis of the roles played by 
National Guard bilateral affairs officers in support of the 
SPP; and any other matters regarding the status of the SPP that 
the Secretary determines relevant.

   Feasibility of Delivering a Plan to Congress Prior to and After a 
                Withdrawal of U.S. Forces from a Country

    The committee is concerned with the lack of information 
that was provided in the months leading up to the withdrawal of 
U.S. forces from Afghanistan.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to deliver a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2022 on the feasibility of providing future reports to 
the committee prior to and after the complete withdrawal of 
U.S. forces from a country. The report should identify a means 
for the Department of Defense to deliver reports to the 
committee at the earliest possible time on the plans for a 
withdrawal. Additionally, the report should detail how the 
Department would plan to keep the committee updated on 
conditions in the country after the withdrawal. The committee 
believes that these updates should be focused on communicating 
a clear plan, contingencies that must be accounted for, 
description of conditions on the ground, anticipation of 
increased terror activity, and an assessment of needs for U.S. 
forces on the ground.

                  Global Fragility Act Implementation

    The committee notes that the Global Fragility Act of 2019 
(Public Law 116-94) passed with strong support and that 
successful implementation is intended to improve the 
interagency's approach to stabilization in conflict-affected 
areas and prevent violence and fragility globally. The 
committee also notes that successful implementation requires 
attention at the appropriate level within the respective 
departments and agencies. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than December 1, 2021, 
that identifies the official, as required by law, at the 
appropriate and commensurate level who has been delegated 
responsibility for overseeing and leading the Global Fragility 
Initiative, including coordination within the Department. The 
Secretary is further directed to identify in that briefing any 
gaps in staffing, authorities, or other requirements needed to 
implement the law and what limitations, if any, continue to 
impede the progress of implementation.

                              Mine Warfare

    Given advances in mine warfare and the important role it 
could play in a high-intensity conflict, the committee is 
concerned about the People's Liberation Army Navy (PLAN) in 
both mine warfare capability and capacity. The committee 
requires additional information regarding the U.S. Navy's own 
offensive and defensive mine warfare capabilities. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services, not later 
than March 1, 2022, detailing the projected impact to U.S. 
operational plans of PLAN mine warfare operations, including 
but not limited to, a conflict over Taiwan. The briefing should 
examine the following questions:
    (1) What would be the objectives of Chinese employment of 
mine warfare in an invasion of Taiwan?
    (2) Do present PLAN mine warfare capabilities allow the 
People's Republic of China to meet the objectives described in 
paragraph (1)?
    (3) What countermeasures are Taiwan, the United States, and 
other partners able to employ that might reduce the 
effectiveness of the PLAN's mine warfare?
    (4) What would be the optimal use of U.S. and Taiwanese 
offensive and defense mine warfare capabilities to contribute 
to efforts to deny a fait accompli against Taiwan?
    (5) Do either the U.S. or Taiwanese Navy currently maintain 
the capabilities described in paragraph (4)? If not, what 
resources, platforms, or ordinances would be required to obtain 
said capabilities?
    (6) How would the additions described in paragraph (5) 
contribute to the ability of the Department of Defense to 
execute its operational plans?

                          Operational Concepts

    The committee aims to ensure that Department of Defense 
operational concepts with regard to challenges from near-peer 
competitors are adequately developed and appropriately 
coordinated with the Department's strategies, resources, and 
activities. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services not later than January 15, 2022, on operational 
concepts developed for the purpose of countering the Government 
of the People's Republic of China (PRC) and Russia. This 
briefing shall include, at a minimum:
    (1) an assessment of the operational challenges presented 
by the PRC and Russia;
    (2) a detailed overview of the Department's past and 
present efforts to develop operational concepts to address 
these challenges in every military domain, including the land, 
air, sea, space, and cyber domains;
    (3) a detailed overview of the Department's past and 
present efforts to develop operational concepts to counter 
hybrid warfare and aggression occurring below the threshold of 
armed conflict, including cyber-attacks and disinformation 
campaigns;
    (4) a detailed overview of the Department's past and 
present efforts to develop operational concepts to defeat 
aggression by the PRC or Russia should deterrence fail;
    (5) a detailed overview of what metrics the Department is 
using to measure progress in development of these operational 
concepts;
    (6) a detailed overview of how the Department is working to 
link these operational concepts to objectives, capabilities, 
and force posture;
    (7) a detailed overview of how the Department coordinates 
and deconflicts operational concepts between the military 
services;
    (8) an assessment of relevant operational concepts of the 
PRC and Russia;
    (9) with regard to the overviews and assessments included 
in the briefing, a quantification of the proportion of relevant 
work that has been devoted respectively to the PRC and to 
Russia; and,
    (10) any other aspects of an operational assessment the 
Secretary determines is necessary or useful to the committee's 
understanding of the operational concepts under evaluation and 
development.

                      Operational Energy Readiness

    The Committee is concerned about the Department's pattern 
of ignoring potential logistical challenges that could occur in 
a conflict while conducting major overseas exercises. Exercises 
in the European Command and Indo-Pacific Command areas of 
responsibility have neglected to fully account for the 
challenges posed by a contested logistics environments and fuel 
supplies subject to the control of adversaries assumed in such 
exercises. Logistical assumptions and caveats represent 
substantial tactical and strategic assumptions that may not 
reflect combat conditions and which may diminish the value of 
field exercises in learning to overcome these challenges.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
by March 1, 2022 on exercises in the European Command and Indo-
Pacific Command areas of responsibility where fuel supplies for 
combat and non-combat units actively participating in such 
exercises originated from sources that could be disrupted or 
made completely unavailable by the notional adversary portrayed 
in such exercise.

                PLA Civilian Strategic Mobility Capacity

    The committee remains focused on deterring Chinese 
aggression, and particularly the threat of military force 
against Taiwan. To that end, the committee is concerned by the 
recent reports surrounding the People's Liberation Army Navy's 
(PLAN's) potential use of civilian vessels to expand the size 
of its amphibious lift capacity as well as the potential use of 
other non-military, state-owned or private assets to assist in 
the invasion of Taiwan. Consequently, the committee directs the 
Commander of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command to submit a report to 
the congressional defense committees no later than January 1, 
2022, including:
    (1) An assessment of the People's Liberation Army Navy 
amphibious transport capacity, including an analysis of the 
role that commercial ferries and other relevant private or 
publicly-owned vessels could play during an invasion of Taiwan;
    (2) An assessment of the potential use of civilian 
airliners for military purposes, including to support of an 
invasion of Taiwan;
    (3) An analysis of how the capabilities outlined in 
paragraphs (1) and (2) could impact the ability of the People's 
Republic of China to execute a successful invasion of Taiwan, 
the operational planning assumptions of Indo-Pacific command, 
and any required capability or force structure changes to 
successfully prevent a fait accompli against Taiwan.

  Potential Department of Defense Funding for the Wuhan Institute of 
                                Virology

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the Armed Services Committee of the House of 
Representatives not later than January 1, 2022 describing:
    (1) All contracts the Department of Defense signed with the 
EcoHealth Alliance or its affiliates by year from 2012-2021 in 
spreadsheet format, to include purpose, location where contract 
was performed, cost, metrics, contract number, contract 
oversight organization, and whether any funds were provided 
ultimately to the Wuhan Institute of Virology;
    (2) Whether any DoD-funded research projects involving 
EcoHealth Alliance or its affiliates were performed in China or 
in support of research performed in China, and if so, a 
description of the projects, the work performed, and the risk 
assessments DoD used to evaluate the project;
    (3) Whether DoD issued any awards to the EcoHealth Alliance 
or its affiliates that are not available on USASpending.gov;
    (4) Whether the Department sponsored any classified 
research involving EcoHealth Alliance or its affiliates; and
    (5) Copies of the agreements, initial research reports, and 
all progress and final reports from the EcoHealth Alliance or 
its affiliates.
    This report shall be submitted in unclassified form and 
made publicly available on an internet website in a searchable 
format, but may contain a classified annex.

           Report on Anti-Ship Systems for Defense of Taiwan

    The committee supports the strategic partnership between 
the United States and Taiwan, and notes the importance of anti-
ship systems in defending the territorial integrity of the 
Government of Taiwan. The committee further notes the urgent 
need for ground-based anti-ship cruise missiles, ground-based 
cruise missiles, and anti-ship mines to defend United States 
and allied forces in the Indo-Pacific against growing threats 
and deter conflict in the region. The committee strongly 
supports an effort to expand defense industrial cooperation 
with the Government of Taiwan. Therefore, the committee directs 
the Secretary of Defense to submit to the congressional defense 
committees a report by January 31, 2022, on what anti-ship 
systems and capabilities in the extant U.S. military hardware 
inventory might be used to enhance the defense of Taiwan, and 
plans on how these systems and capabilities could be 
incorporated into the current military of the Government of 
Taiwan to enhance their self-defense capabilities.

 Report on Engaging Taiwan in Indo-Pacific Regional Dialogues or Forums

    The committee recognizes the value of Taiwan-U.S. 
relations, and the importance Taiwan plays in the Indo-Pacific 
region.
    As such, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, to 
submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
March 1, 2022, on the Department of Defense's plan to 
meaningfully engage Taiwan in regional security dialogues or 
forums that shall include the following:
    (1) An assessment of list of security regional dialogues or 
forums that would fit for Taiwan's participation.
    (2) A discussion of current and future plans to achieve 
engaging Taiwan in regional security dialogues or forums.
    (3) An evaluation of the feasibility of cooperating on a 
range of activities with the aforementioned security dialogues 
or forums, including: (a) humanitarian-assistance and disaster-
relief; (b) supply chain security; (c) cyber security; (d) 
coast guard; and (e) any other matters the Secretary of Defense 
determines appropriate.

        Report on Evacuation of Remaining American Citizens and 
               Counterterrorism Operations in Afghanistan

    The committee remains concerned about the safety of 
American citizens still remaining in Afghanistan who seek to 
leave and the ability to safely evacuate them with U.S. Armed 
Forces no longer in Afghanistan. Furthermore, the Committee 
continues to seek information regarding the risk of Afghanistan 
becoming a terrorist safe haven. The committee is particularly 
concerned that it has not been presented with clearly defined 
plans to conduct counterterrorism operations and respond to 
terrorist threats emanating from Afghanistan.
    Therefore, not later than October 1, 2021, the Committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to submit to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives a 
plan describing how the Secretary intends to carry out the 
following operations in Afghanistan:
    (1) support to the evacuation of American citizens or legal 
permanent residents seeking evacuation by the Department of 
State.
    (2) maintain air superiority.
    (3) intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance 
missions.
    (4) counterterrorism operations.
    For each of these operations, the plan shall include--
    (1) an estimate of the number of servicemembers required to 
carry out such operations;
    (2) the assets, resources, and other capabilities the 
Department will employ to carry out such operations, including 
those required for Special Operations Forces peculiar assets 
and irregular warfare programs;
    (3) the location where such troops, assets, resources, and 
capabilities will be based;
    (4) intelligence requirements to maintain situational 
awareness;
    (5) the costs associated with carrying out such operations; 
and
    (6) whether other authorities or operational requirements 
for the continued counterterrorism mission in Afghanistan, 
including operations in and from adjacent regions, are 
required.

 Report on Iranian Support for Military Forces Committing Severe Human 
                             Rights Abuses

    By March 1, 2022, the Committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the committees on Armed Services 
of the House of Representatives and the Senate that includes a 
detailed assessment of tactics used by Iran's internal security 
forces, including the Basij, Ansar Hezbollah, and law 
enforcement forces including all subunits and special forces, 
as well as any religious police to suppress opposition groups 
or violate human rights.

             Report on Iranian Support for the Assad Regime

    By March 1, 2022, the Committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the House of Representatives and the Senate that includes a 
detailed description of ongoing or recent Iranian material 
support for the government of Bashar al-Assad and the role this 
support may have played in the losses of American or coalition 
forces.

        Report on Iranian Support for the Taliban in Afghanistan

    By March 1, 2022, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to submit to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
House of Representatives and the Senate a report that includes 
a detailed description of ongoing or recent Iranian material 
support for the Taliban and the role this support may have 
played in the losses of American or coalition forces.

Report on Personal Identifiable Information Shared by the Department of 
         Defense with the Taliban during Evacuation Operations

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report on disclosure of personally identifying information and 
biometrics to the Taliban to the committees on armed services 
of the House and Senate no later than December 31st, 2021.
    The report should include--
    (1) A disclosure of the identifying information that the 
Department shared with the Taliban regarding Americans, allies, 
and Afghan civilians who worked with the coalition force, 
including: (a) The number of individuals who had their 
information shared; and(b) The types of information shared 
including names, addresses, green cards, passports, or any 
other identifying information. (2) An assessment of how the 
Taliban has or plans to utilize this identifying information to 
target or harm individuals in acts of reprisal.

         Report on Security Impact of Taliban Prisoner Releases

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees by November 1, 
2021 on the impacts that prisoners released by the Taliban are 
having on the security environment in Afghanistan, threats such 
released prisoners pose to servicemembers in the Central 
Command Area of Responsibility, and any impact on United States 
military operations in the Central Command Area of 
Responsibility.

            Report on Security of Pakistan's Nuclear Arsenal

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the to the congressional defense committees not later 
than December 31, 2021, on the vulnerability of the nuclear 
arsenal of the Government of Pakistan to seizure or control, 
that includes considerations of known extremism among personnel 
of the Inter-Services Intelligence and the possibility of 
terror group threats from Afghanistan.

    Report on the Progress and Development of ICBM Silos in Eastern 
                XinJiang, Gansu, and Jinlantai Provinces

    The committee also directs the Secretary of Defense provide 
a report to the House Committee on Armed Services, no later 
than March 31, 2022 on the current progress and development of 
intercontinental ballistic missile silos in Eastern Xinjiang, 
Gansu and Jinlantai provinces of the People's Republic of China 
(PRC). The report should also include a current assessment of 
silo capabilities, an analysis of the infrastructure concept 
behind development of such silos, updates on the size of over 
the horizon force with respect to such silos, updates on the 
locations of such silos, and anticipated completion dates of 
such silos, and a comparative assessment of the modernization 
efforts of the PRC's nuclear triad.

 Report to Congress on the Status of Abandoned United States Military 
                    Air Capabilities in Afghanistan

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report on the inventory of aircraft left behind by the United 
States during the 2021 withdrawal of forces from Afghanistan to 
the committees on armed services of the House and Senate no 
later than March 1st, 2022.
    The report should include an inventory of both rotary and 
fixed wing aircraft left behind in Afghanistan as well at the 
number of aircraft that were returned to the United States.
    The report should also include a plan from the Department 
to recoup or reduce the United States aircraft that are in the 
hands of the Taliban.

   SIGAR Performance Evaluation of the Afghan National Security and 
                             Defense Forces

    The committee recognizes the value of the Special Inspector 
General for Afghanistan Reconstruction's assessments of United 
States engagement in Afghanistan. The committee also notes the 
Afghan National Security and Defense Forces (ANDSF)'s inability 
to defend Afghanistan following the withdrawal of U.S. military 
personnel. Therefore, the committee directs the Special 
Inspector General for Afghanistan Reconstruction to conduct an 
evaluation of the performance of the ANDSF for the period 
between February 2020 and August 2021. The committee also 
directs the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan 
Reconstruction to submit a report to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives and the 
Secretary of Defense by March 1, 2022, on the findings of such 
evaluation, including why the ANDSF proved unable to defend 
Afghanistan from the Taliban following the withdrawal of U.S. 
military personnel; the impact of the withdrawal of U.S. 
military personnel had on the performance of the ANDSF; 
elements of the U.S. military's efforts since 2001 to provide 
training, assistance, and advising to the ANDSF that impacted 
the ANDSF's performance following the U.S. military withdrawal; 
the current status of U.S.-provided equipment to the ANDSF; the 
current status of U.S.-trained ANDSF personnel; and any other 
matters the Special Inspector General for Afghanistan 
Reconstruction deems appropriate. The report shall be provided 
in unclassified form, but may include a classified appendix.
    Provided further, the Secretary of Defense shall, insofar 
as is practicable and not in contravention of any existing law, 
furnish all such information or assistance to the Special 
Inspector General as the Special Inspector General may request 
for the purpose of conducting the evaluation required by this 
section.

    Special Inspector General of Afghanistan Reconstruction (SIGAR) 
   Evaluation of Performance of Afghan National Defense and Security 
                             Forces (ANDSF)

    The Committee recognizes the work of SIGAR with respect to 
U.S. military engagement in Afghanistan and directs the agency 
to conduct an evaluation of performance of the Afghan National 
Security and Defense Forces for the period between February 
2020 and August 2021. The report shall include, and is not 
limited to, findings towards the following questions:
    (1) Why the ANDSF proved unable to defend Afghanistan from 
the Taliban following the withdrawal of U.S. military 
personnel.
    (2) The impact the withdrawal of U.S. military personnel 
had on the performance of the ANDSF;
    (3) Elements of the U.S. military's efforts since 2001 to 
provide training, assistance, and advising to the ANDSF that 
impacted the ANDSF's performance following the U.S. military 
withdrawal;
    (4) The current status of U.S.-provided equipment to the 
ANDSF;
    (5) The current status of U.S.-trained ANDSF personnel; and
    (6) Any other matters the Special Inspector General for 
Afghanistan Reconstruction deems appropriate;
    The committee also directs SIGAR to submit a report of 
these findings to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives and the Secretary of 
Defense by February 1, 2022. The report shall be provided in 
unclassified form but may include a classified appendix.
    Further, the Secretary of Defense shall, insofar as is 
practicable and not in contravention of any existing law, 
furnish all such information or assistance to the Special 
Inspector General as the Special Inspector General may request 
for the purpose of conducting the evaluation required by this 
section.

           Special Operations Forces Cooperation with Israel

    The committee recognizes that allies and partners are a 
crucial component of U.S. national security. The committee also 
recognizes that strong relationships between U.S. Special 
Operations Forces (USSOF) and the corresponding forces of our 
allies and partners serve as an important anchor in addressing 
complex threats. The committee notes that the challenges 
presented by state and non-state actors in the Middle East and 
the Levant underscore the need for reliable relationships, 
including interoperable relationships if feasible, in which 
USSOF can partner to deter and challenge those threats.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict, in 
coordination with the Commander, U.S. Special Operations 
Command, to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed 
Services by December 31, 2021, on all current, developing, and 
planned cooperative and collaborative activities and 
initiatives between USSOF and Israeli special operations 
forces.

                  Status of Operation Atlantic Resolve

    The committee believes it is important for the Department 
of Defense and Congress to be definitionally clear on the 
official status of Operation Atlantic Resolve. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide to the 
House Committee on Armed Services not later than January 5, 
2022, a determination in writing as to whether or not Operation 
Atlantic Resolve officially constitutes a named operation or 
not, along with an assessment of the legal and policy 
implications of that status.

  Strategy for Preserving the Rights of Women and Girls in Afghanistan

    The committee is concerned about the impact of the 
withdrawal of U.S. forces from Afghanistan on Afghan women and 
girls. The committee notes that the U.S. military has many 
capabilities that could be used to support regional security 
partners. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, in coordination and consultation with the Secretary of 
State, to submit a report to the House Committee on Armed 
Services and House Committee on Foreign Affairs by March 1, 
2022, including a comprehensive strategy for how U.S. military 
capabilities and partnerships could be used to promote the 
protection of the rights of women and girls in Afghanistan. The 
strategy should include:
    (1) an analysis of any programs in the region that could be 
leveraged to protect the rights of women and girls, preserve 
the gains made by women and girls, and best ensure the 
meaningful participation of Afghan women in any transitional 
security arrangements and any future political or peace 
processes, in accordance with the Women, Peace and Security Act 
of 2017 (Public Law 115-68; 22 U.S.C. 2151).
    (2) an assessment of military capabilities that could be 
used to assist with State Department-led efforts to protect the 
rights of Afghan women and girls relating to Afghanistan and 
the region.
    (3) an assessment of additional statutory authority needed 
to permit the effective use of Department of Defense 
capabilities to protect the rights of women and girls and 
ensure opportunity of meaningful participation in any future 
Afghan political processes.
    (4) ways to ensure that activities carried out under the 
strategy employ rigorous monitoring and evaluation 
methodologies and are informed by gender analysis as defined by 
the Women's Entrepreneurship and Economic Empowerment Act of 
2018 (Public Law 115-428) and required by the U.S. Strategy on 
Women, Peace, and Security.
    Such strategy must be submitted in an unclassified format 
but may contain a classified annex.

         Strategy to Mitigate Modifications to Defender Europe

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense 
cancelled the large-scale theater level Defender Europe 
exercise for fiscal year 2022 at a time of increased escalatory 
Russian military activity and replaced it with smaller-scale 
activities. Large-scale theater level Defender Europe exercises 
have been a cornerstone of United States deterrence activity 
against Russia and demonstrate the United States capacity to 
rapidly reinforce the European continent in a contingency while 
building readiness, demonstrating resolve, enhancing 
capability, and strengthening alliances and partnerships. The 
committee further notes that this change could impact Defender 
Pacific exercises in the Indo-Pacific. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide to the 
congressional defense committees not later than January 5, 
2022, a strategy in writing that details how it will mitigate 
the impacts on readiness, deterrence, and interoperability of 
the modifications made to this exercise.
    The committee is concerned that the decision to modify the 
Defender Europe exercise was made years ago but was not shared 
with Congress until the fiscal year 2022 President's Budget 
request. The committee urges the Department of Defense to 
review this decision and the benefits of conducting a theater-
level European exercise to deter Russia in future years.

Strategy to Mitigate U.S. Army V Corps in the Continental United States 
                               Challenges

    The committee notes previous military advice indicating 
that U.S. Army V Corps should be forward-stationed in Europe 
and the potential operational impacts of the stationing of V 
Corps in the continental United States. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, in 
coordination with the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment, the Secretary of the Army, and the 
Commander, United States European Command, to provide a 
strategy to the congressional defense committees not later than 
January 5, 2022, to mitigate any logistical and policy 
challenges posed by hybrid rotational structure to Europe. The 
strategy shall include measures to address challenges posed by 
potential Russian actions to disrupt V Corps interaction with 
the European theater, substantial time zone differences, 
limitations on the ability to coordinate with and assure allies 
due to physical distance, staffing and logistical challenges 
inherent in spreading a Corps headquarters between North 
America and Europe, and all other relevant issues. The strategy 
shall include, for each mitigation measure, an assessment of 
the effectiveness that each measure would have in addressing 
each relevant challenge, as well as a comparative assessment of 
the effectiveness that each measure would have in comparison to 
forward-stationing V Corps in Europe as well as a comparative 
assessment of the cost of the current hybrid structure as 
compared to fully forward stationing V Corps in Europe.

                    Sustaining Deterrence in Europe

    The Committee asserts that sustained deterrence against 
Russian aggression on Europe's eastern flank is an essential 
element of our global posture. Further, it is more critical 
than ever that the United States demonstrate a continuing 
commitment to its alliances and partnerships in Europe.
    The Committee asserts that there is operational and 
strategic value in permanent forward presence and in some 
locations where it is most appropriate, continued rotational 
presence. Forward-positioned forces:
    (1) reduce time and space limitations by providing rapid 
response capabilities to geographic combatant commanders;
    (2) serve as a deterrent to potential adversaries while 
assuring partners and allies;
    (3) can reduce cost, given that the use of rotational 
forces encumbers at least three units to support the one 
rotation: the unit currently performing the rotational mission, 
the unit training to assume the rotational mission, and the 
unit undergoing reset after completing the rotational mission, 
so that the financial costs of supporting ``heel-to-toe'' 
rotational units over several years may be greater than 
correlating costs for permanently forward-stationed units;
    (4) can enable increased deterrence in multiple theaters 
given the three-to-one ratio of units required to sustain 
rotational deployments, so that permanent forces can facilitate 
greater deterrent focus using a comparable amount of forces;
    (5) enable U.S. forces to develop and sustain expertise on 
the terrain, supporting infrastructure, sustainable lines of 
communication, and regional security forces in the region, 
while building closer relationships with ally and partner 
forces, and improved understanding of the cultural and regional 
context in which deterrence and potential conflict occur;
    (6) benefit military families by enabling families to 
accompany service members on deployments and reducing the wear 
and tear on service members and their family relations inherent 
in a constant rotational redeployment and training cycle;
    (7) facilitate cooperative efforts to build and develop 
partner country security capabilities; and
    (8) help mitigate contested logistics risks and 
vulnerabilities inherent to rotational forces.
    Moreover, the Committee notes that since Fiscal Year 2016, 
and nearly every year thereafter, Congress has consistently 
advocated for an approach to U.S. defense posture in Europe 
that includes a greater emphasis on permanent forward 
positioned forces. Due to these factors, the Committee asserts 
that it may best serve the United States operational and 
strategic interests to maintain additional permanently 
stationed forces on Europe's eastern periphery, in order to: 
provide rapid response capabilities; deter potential 
adversaries; assure partners and allies; enhance U.S. forces 
understanding of the local environment; reduce cost; free up 
logistical resources to enhance U.S. forward presence in 
multiple theaters where closer relationships and enhanced 
deterrence are needed; counter the challenges inherent in 
deployment from the continental United States to a contested 
logistics environment; and facilitate cooperative efforts to 
build and develop partner-nation security capabilities.
    Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in consultation with the service secretaries, to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees not later than 
March 15, 2022, on the Department's strategy for enhancing the 
United States forward presence on NATO's eastern periphery, to 
include assessments of possibilities for potential force 
structure enhancements at a minimum in Romania, Poland, and the 
Baltic states, along with options for enhanced deterrent 
posture in Ukraine. The report shall include,
    (1) an assessment of the impact on deterrence of increased 
forward presence;
    (2) an assessment of the impact on relationships with 
allies and partners in the region that would result from 
increased forward presence;
    (3) a comparative assessments of the costs and benefits of 
increased permanent forces versus rotational forces;
    (4) an assessment of the synergies that might be 
implemented via additional presence and participation of other 
allied and partner forces;
    (5) the current and potential state of host nation 
contributions to collective defense and any synergies with 
potential enhanced U.S. posture;
    (6) the impact of forward positioned forces versus 
rotational forces on mitigating contested logistics risks;
    (7) the feasibility of deploying forces to train and advise 
in their defense against active Russian-backed aggression; and
    (8) any other information the Secretary deems relevant.

                    Taliban Financial Assets Report

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report on the Taliban's access to rare earth minerals, 
financial resources, and United States military equipment, to 
the Committees on Armed Services of the House of 
Representatives not later than March 1, 2022.The report should 
include--
    (1) the estimated value of Afghanistan's rare earth mineral 
resources currently under control of the Taliban;
    (2) the estimated value of the cash reserves of the 
previous government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan that 
are now in the hands of the Taliban;
    (3) a detailed accounting articles of United States and 
NATO military equipment now in the hands of the Taliban;
    (4) the estimated net wealth of the Taliban as an 
organization, and how much that net wealth grew after the fall 
of the government of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan;
    (5) a detailed estimation of the Haqqani Network's access 
to military, financial and rare earth mineral resources after 
the fall of the government of the Islamic Republic of 
Afghanistan;
    (6) the impact that the United States withdrawal from 
Afghanistan had on the military, financial and rare earth 
mineral resources of al-Qaeda in Afghanistan;
    (7) a detailed assessment of all sources of Taliban, al-
Qaeda, and Haqqani Network financing in Afghanistan including 
from the sale of illicit drugs such as opium; and
    (8) the current state of United States and United Nations 
sanctions with respect to Afghanistan and their feasibility at 
blocking the Taliban, including the Haqqani network, as well as 
al-Qaeda from accessing such financial and military resources.

       Taliban relationship with Foreign Terrorist Organizations

    The Committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report on the Taliban's associations, affiliations, and 
relationships with Foreign Terrorist Organizations to the 
Committee on Armed Services of the House of Representatives not 
later than March 1, 2022. The report should include--
    (1) The Haqqani network's economic, political and military 
relationship and association with the Taliban.
    (2) Tehrik-e Taliban Pakistan (TTP) economic, political and 
military relationship and association with the Taliban.
    (3) Al Qaeda economic, political and military relationship 
and association with the Taliban.
    (4) Whether the Taliban has provided material support for 
Al Qaeda, Haqqani, and TTP.

          Tracking Local National Support to U.S. Armed Forces

    The committee recognizes the invaluable support provided to 
the United States military by local nationals who serve in a 
variety of different positions from linguist, cultural 
advisors, and other support positions. Without their support, 
the ability to accomplish our mission would be more difficult.
    To ensure the Department of Defense is able to support 
routine immigration requests as well as emergency evacuations, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing by March 1, 2022, to the House Committee on Armed 
Services and Senate Committee on Armed Services detailing the 
feasibility of maintaining a comprehensive database of local 
nationals that work in support of the United States military 
during armed conflicts.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                  Subtitle A--Assistance and Training


Section 1201--Extension of Support of Special Operations for Irregular 
                                Warfare

    This section would modify section 1202(a) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91), as most recently amended by section 1207 of the William M. 
(Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283), by striking ``2023'' and 
inserting ``2025''.

        SUBTITLE B--MATTERS RELATING TO AFGHANISTAN AND PAKISTAN


Section 1211--Clarification of Certain Matters regarding Protection of 
                             Afghan Allies

    This section would modify the Afghan Allies Protection Act 
of 2009 (Public Law 111-8). The committee notes the critical 
importance of the Special Immigrant Visa Program and remains 
committed to Afghan citizens who, at great personal risk, 
supported United States operations in Afghanistan.

             Section 1212--Afghanistan Security Forces Fund

    This section would extend the Afghanistan Security Forces 
Fund through fiscal year 2022 for the termination of contracts 
associated with Afghan National Defense and Security Forces, 
the return of equipment to Department of Defense stocks, and 
other close out activities. This section also would require a 
quarterly report on the progress and cost associated with the 
utilization of this authority.

 Section 1213--Prohibition on Providing Funds or Material Resources of 
                the Department of Defense to the Taliban

    This section would prohibit Department of Defense funds or 
material resources to the Taliban.

 Section 1214--Prohibition on Transporting Currency to the Taliban and 
                   the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan

    This section would prohibit Department of Defense aircraft 
from transporting currency or other items of value to the 
Taliban, the Islamic Emirate of Afghanistan, or any subsidiary.

Section 1215--Extension and Modification of Authority for Reimbursement 
  of Certain Coalition Nations for Support Provided to United States 
                          Military Operations

    This section would extend through December 31, 2022, the 
authority to make Coalition Support Fund payments under section 
1233 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2008 (Public Law 110-181).

   Section 1216--Quarterly Briefings on the Security Environment in 
   Afghanistan and United States Military Operations Related to the 
          Security of, and Threats Emanating from, Afghanistan

    This section would require quarterly briefings on the 
security environment in Afghanistan and U.S. military 
operations related to the security and threats emanating from 
Afghanistan.

Section 1217--Quarterly Report on the Threat Potential of Al-Qaeda and 
     Related Terrorist Groups under a Taliban Regime in Afghanistan

    This section would require a quarterly report on the threat 
of al-Qaeda and related terrorist groups under a Taliban regime 
in Afghanistan.

                    Section 1218--Sense of Congress

    This section would provide the sense of Congress 
recognizing the men and women of the Armed Forces for their 
heroic and noble service securing Hamid Karzai International 
Airport and supporting the largest Noncombatant Evacuation 
Operation in United States history. The sense of Congress would 
also recognize the ultimate sacrifice of the 11 Marines, the 
sailor, and the solider who gave their lives for this mission.

         Subtitle C--Matters Relating to Syria, Iraq, and Iran


   Section 1221--Extension and Modification of Authority to Provide 
           Assistance to Vetted Syrian Groups and Individuals

    This section would extend and modify section 1209 of the 
Carl Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291), by 
extending the authority to support vetted Syrian groups and 
individuals through December 31, 2022, and the required notice 
before the provision of assistance.

   Section 1222--Extension and Modification of Authority to Support 
Operations and Activities of the Office of Security Cooperation in Iraq

    This section would extend by 1 year, section 1215 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (10 
U.S.C. 113), the Office of Security Cooperation-Iraq authority.

   Section 1223--Extension and Modification of Authority to Provide 
       Assistance to Counter the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria

    This section would modify section 1236 of the Carl Levin 
and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291) to provide 
assistance to the security forces of the Government of Iraq to 
counter the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria and extend the 
authority through December 31, 2022. This section would also 
limit the obligation and execution of some funds until the 
Secretary of Defense and Secretary of State submit security 
cooperation and security sector reform plans for Iraq.
    The committee notes the importance of building sustainable 
partner forces that share common security goals. The committee 
further notes the absence of an integrated plan for security 
cooperation in Iraq, beyond the current phase of Operation 
Inherent Resolve. The committee encourages security cooperation 
with Iraqi military partners, including the Kurdish Peshmerga 
Regional Guard Brigades, that emphasizes training and equipping 
and seeks to achieve the objective of building lasting, 
sustainable military capacity. Therefore, the committee further 
urges the Department to use funds authorized by this Act to be 
used predominantly to train and equip partner forces toward 
that objective. Finally, the committee believes U.S. security 
cooperation and military activities should nest within a whole-
of-government approach, executed in coordination with coalition 
and NATO partners, to strengthen Iraq's governance and 
institutions of national defense, promote stability, shared 
economic prosperity, and broad reform.

      Section 1224--Prohibition of Transfers to Badr Organization

    This section would prohibit Department of Defense funds to 
be made available to the Badr Organization.

             Section 1225--Prohibition on Transfers to Iran

    This section would prohibit Department of Defense funds to 
be used to transfer or facilitate a transfer of pallets of 
currency, currency, or other items of value to the Government 
of Iran, or any subsidiary, agent, or instrumentality of the 
Government of Iran.

            Section 1226--Report on Iran-China Military Ties

    This section would require an annual report on military 
ties between China and Iran.

         Section 1227--Report on Iranian Military Capabilities

    This section would require a recurring report on Iranian 
military capabilities and the impact that removal of sanctions 
would have on such capabilities.

           Section 1228--Report on Iranian Terrorist Proxies

    This section would require a recurring report on 
improvements of military capabilities of Iran-backed militias 
and the impact that removal of sanctions would have on such 
capabilities.

                 Subtitle D--Matters Relating to Russia


 Section 1231--Extension of Limitation on Military Cooperation between 
                      the United States and Russia

    This section would extend for 1 year section 1232(a) of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328). This section would limit the use of fiscal year 
2022 funds for bilateral military-to-military cooperation 
between the Government of the United States and Russia until 
the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of 
State, provides a certification to appropriate congressional 
committees relating to certain actions by Russia.

    Section 1232--Prohibition on Availability of Funds Relating to 
                   Sovereignty of Russia over Crimea

    This section would extend by 1 year the prohibition imposed 
by section 1245 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92). This section would 
prohibit the use of fiscal year 2022 funds to implement any 
activity that recognizes the sovereignty of Russia over Crimea. 
This section would also allow the Secretary of Defense, with 
the concurrence of the Secretary of State, to waive the 
prohibition if the Secretary of Defense determines that doing 
so would be in the national security interest of the United 
States and submits a notification to the House Committee on 
Armed Services, the Senate Committee on Armed Services, the 
Senate Committee on Foreign Relations, and the House Committee 
on Foreign Affairs.

Section 1233--Modification and Extension of Ukraine Security Assistance 
                               Initiative

    This section would extend by 1 year section 1250 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92) to authorize the Secretary of Defense to provide 
security assistance and intelligence support to the Government 
of Ukraine, with the concurrence of the Secretary of State. 
This section would also authorize $300.0 million to carry out 
this authority in fiscal year 2022.

Section 1234--Report on Options for Assisting the Government of Ukraine 
         in Addressing Integrated Air and Missile Defense Gaps

    This section would require a report on options for the 
United States to support Ukraine in addressing integrated air 
and missile defense gaps.

   Section 1235--Biennial Report on Russian Influence Operations and 
 Campaigns Targeting Military Alliances and Partnerships of Which the 
                       United States is a Member

    This section would require a biennial report on Russia's 
influence operations and campaigns targeting U.S. military 
alliances and partnerships.

               Section 1236--Sense of Congress on Georgia

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
Georgia.

        Subtitle E--Matters Relating to the Indo-Pacific Region


 Section 1241--Sense of Congress on a Free and Open Indo-Pacific Region

    This section would express the sense of Congress on the 
United States' steadfast commitment to a free and open Indo-
Pacific region, including the central role of close U.S. 
alliances and partnerships in deterring aggression and 
countering malign activity by the Governments of the People's 
Republic of China and North Korea. This section would also 
express the sense of Congress that the United States should 
continue to invest in military posture and capabilities in the 
Indo-Pacific.
    The committee condemns aggressive actions by the Government 
of the People's Republic of China to disrupt U.S. alliances, 
values, and partnerships; threaten its neighbors; renege on its 
commitments regarding autonomy, democracy, and freedom of 
expression in Hong Kong; and violate fundamental human rights 
in Xinjiang. The committee supports the executive branch's 
continued efforts to counter the Government of the People's 
Republic of China's aggressive behavior, territorial claims, 
and violations of rules and international norms, and to 
increase cooperation with allies and partners in the Indo-
Pacific and worldwide against these challenges.

 Section 1242--Clarification of Required Budget Information Related to 
                            the Indo-Pacific

    This section would clarify the required budget information 
related to the Indo-Pacific.

  Section 1243--Report on Cooperation Between the National Guard and 
                                 Taiwan

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report on the feasibility and advisability of enhanced 
cooperation between the National Guard and Taiwan.

 Section 1244--Report on Military and Security Developments Involving 
                     the People's Republic of China

    This section would modify current annual reporting 
requirements on military and security developments involving 
the People's Republic of China.

Section 1245--Biennial Report on Influence Operations and Campaigns of 
  the Government of the People's Republic of China Targeting Military 
   Alliances and Partnerships of Which the United States Is a Member

    This section would require a biennial report on the 
Government of the People's Republic of China's influence 
operations and campaigns targeting U.S. military alliances and 
partnerships.

 Section 1246--Report on Efforts by the People's Republic of China to 
  Expand Its Presence and Influence in Latin America and the Caribbean

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense, with 
concurrence of the Secretary of State, and in coordination with 
the Secretary of the Treasury and the Director of National 
Intelligence, to submit a report on the Government of the 
People's Republic of China's efforts to expand its presence and 
influence in Latin America and the Caribbean.

      Section 1247--Sense of Congress on Taiwan Defense Relations

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
Taiwan defense relations.

 Section 1248--Sense of Congress on Inviting Taiwan to the Rim of the 
                            Pacific Exercise

    This section would express the sense of Congress that the 
naval forces of Taiwan should be invited to participate in the 
Rim of the Pacific exercise conducted in 2022.

   Section 1249--Sense of Congress on Enhancing Defense and Security 
                       Cooperation with Singapore

    This section would express the sense of Congress on 
enhancing defense and security cooperation with Singapore.

                    Section 1250--Sense of Congress

    This section would express the sense of Congress in support 
of U.S. Armed Forces presence in South Korea.

         Section 1251--Sense of Congress with Respect to Qatar

    This section would provide the sense of Congress on the 
relationship between the United States and Qatar.

                   Section 1252--Statement of Policy

    This section would state that it shall be the policy of the 
United States to maintain the ability of the United States 
Armed Forces to deny a fait accompli by a strategic competitor 
against a covered defense partner.

         TITLE XIII--OTHER MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


            Subtitle A--Matters Relating to Europe and NATO


Section 1301--Report on the State of United States Military Investment 
         in Europe including the European Deterrence Initiative

    This section would require a report outlining the current 
state of U.S. defense investments in Europe.

  Section 1302--Sense of Congress on United States Defense Posture in 
                                 Europe

    This section would express the sense of Congress on United 
States defense posture in Europe.

 Section 1303--Sense of Congress on Security Assistance to the Baltic 
                               Countries

    This section would express the sense of Congress on 
security assistance to the Baltic countries.

            Subtitle B--Security Cooperation and Assistance


 Section 1311--Extension of Authority for Certain Payments to Redress 
                            Injury and Loss

    This section would extend through December 31, 2023, the 
authority to make ex gratia payments for damage, personal 
injury, or death that is incident to combat operations of the 
United States Armed Forces, under section 1213 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-
92).

        Section 1312--Foreign Area Officer Assessment and Review

    This section would require an independent assessment and 
comprehensive review of the development, advancement, 
retention, and utilization of Foreign Area Officers (FAOs) and 
the feasibility of billeting more Senior Defense Official roles 
to FAOs.

Section 1313--Women, Peace, and Security Act Implementation at Military 
                           Service Academies

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
funding for Women, Peace, and Security Act of 2017 (Public Law 
115-68) implementation funding, requires professional military 
education activities as well as a briefing on security 
cooperation activities consistent with such Act, encourages 
admission of diverse individuals at military service academies, 
and requires the Department to partner with schools and 
nonprofit organizations.

                       Subtitle C--Other Matters


Section 1321--Extension of Authority for Department of Defense Support 
   for Stabilization Activities in National Security Interest of the 
                             United States

    This section would extend the authority to conduct programs 
authorized under section 1210A of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92), 
Defense Support for Stabilization Activities in National 
Security Interest of the United States.

Section 1322--Notification Relating to Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, 
  and Civic Aid Funds Obligated in Support of Operation Allies Refuge

    This section would require a report on overseas 
humanitarian, disaster, and civic aid (OHDACA) funds obligated 
for expenses in support of Operation Allies Refuge.

   Section 1323--Limitation on Use of Funds for the 2022 Olympic and 
                    Paralympic Winter Games in China

    This section would prohibit the Department of Defense from 
providing transportation of United States Officers and United 
States Officials to the 2022 Olympic and Paralympic Winter 
Games in the People's Republic of China.

   Section 1324--Report on Hostilities Involving United States Armed 
                                 Forces

    This section would require the President to submit a 
report, not later than 48 hours after any incident in which the 
United States Armed Forces are involved in hostilities unless 
the relevant incident is reported under the requirements of 
section 4 of the War Powers Resolution (50 U.S.C. 1543) or 
occurred pursuant to an authority for the use of force that has 
been reported according to section 1264 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (50 U.S.C. 1549).

                    TITLE XIV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                     Subtitle A--Military Programs


                  Section 1401--Working Capital Funds

    This section would authorize appropriations for Defense 
Working Capital Funds at the levels identified in section 4501 
of division D of this Act.

    Section 1402--Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense

    This section would authorize appropriations for Chemical 
Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense at the levels 
identified in section 4501 of division D of this Act.

 Section 1403--Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-
                                  Wide

    This section would authorize appropriations for Drug 
Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-wide at the 
levels identified in section 4501 of division D of this Act.

                Section 1404--Defense Inspector General

    This section would authorize appropriations for the Office 
of the Inspector General of the Department of Defense at the 
levels identified in section 4501 of division D of this Act.

                  Section 1405--Defense Health Program

    This section would authorize appropriations for the Defense 
Health Program at the levels identified in section 4501 of 
division D of this Act.

                       Subtitle B--Other Matters


Section 1411--Acquisition of Strategic and Critical Materials from the 
                National Technology and Industrial Base

    This section would prioritize the acquisition of certain 
materials from the National Technology and Industrial Base.

 Section 1412--Authority for Transfer of Funds to Joint Department of 
 Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration 
     Fund for Captain James A. Lovell Health Care Center, Illinois

    This section would authorize the transfer of funds to the 
Joint Department of Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs 
Medical Facility Demonstration Fund.

    Section 1413--Authorization of Appropriations for Armed Forces 
                            Retirement Home

    This section would authorize appropriations for the 
operation of the Armed Forces Retirement Home.

                  TITLE XV--CYBERSPACE-RELATED MATTERS

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                      21st Century IDEA Compliance

    The Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for Public 
Affairs recently appointed the Defense Media Activity (DMA) as 
the lead agency for consolidating all DoD component public 
website management into a central DoD Public Web Program. The 
Committee is supportive of this much-needed website 
consolidation and modernization effort that will allow DoD to 
fully comply with the 21st Century Integrated Digital 
Experience Act ``21st Century IDEA'' (Public Law 115-336). The 
committee views a modernized DoD Public Web Program as 
essential to ensure DoD websites are more secure, accessible, 
consistent in appearance, user-centered and mobile friendly to 
all who use them, including active duty and civilian personnel, 
military families and the broader defense community. The 
committee directs the Assistant to the Secretary of Defense for 
Public Affairs, in coordination with the Director of the 
Defense Media Activity, to brief the committee on the Public 
Web Program no later than April 1, 2022.

                       Africa Data Science Center

    The committee recognizes and commends the work of the 
Africa Data Science Center within the U.S. Army Intelligence 
and Security Command's 207th Military Intelligence Brigade-
Theater. With support from U.S. Army Africa and U.S. Africa 
Command (USAFRICOM), this pilot program serves as a model for 
the innovation needed to meet Department of Defense 
modernization priorities. With a small staff and limited funds, 
the team has been able to leverage best practices from across 
the intelligence community, applying leading-edge data science 
tradecraft to fulfill operational intelligence requirements. 
Their work has been invaluable in helping USAFRICOM better 
understand near-peer adversary activities across Africa. The 
committee believes the Africa Data Science Center is an 
exemplar of operationalizing innovative technological solutions 
in an Area of Responsibility with limited resources aligned 
against it. In understanding how the lessons of the Africa Data 
Science Center can be applied to other national security and 
regional challenges, the committee directs the Chief of Staff 
of the Army to provide a briefing to the committee no later 
than May 1st, 2022 on how other regionally-aligned Army 
elements can incorporate best practices of the Africa Data 
Science Center to the maximum extent practicable.

  Briefing on the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center's Data Efforts

    The committee supports the Joint Artificial Intelligence 
Center's creation of the Department of Defense Artificial 
Intelligence (AI) Enterprise Infrastructure and Cybersecurity 
Committee and encourages the Department to invest in the 
necessary machine learning data infrastructure to support 
Department-wide artificial intelligence efforts. This effort 
should incorporate foundational data readiness required for 
ongoing and future AI algorithm development into all programs 
of record, as appropriate. The committee directs the Director 
of the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than January 15, 2022, on the activities and priorities, 
including data infrastructure development, of the Department of 
Defense AI Enterprise Infrastructure and Cybersecurity 
Committee.

Comptroller General Review of Department of Defense Training to Prepare 
  for Leadership and Operations in a Contested Information Environment

    The committee notes the importance of maintaining U.S. 
dominance in the information environment and ensuring proper 
training so that leaders can function effectively in a 
contested information environment.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Comptroller General 
of the United States to submit a report to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
not later than July 2, 2022, reviewing Department of Defense 
decision-making policy and training for service members and 
commanders operating in a contested information environment. 
The review should assess policy, training and exercises where 
service members develop and maintain decision-making skills in 
an information environment where information may be inaccurate, 
incomplete, or manipulated. The review should also assess the 
extent to which regulations and tactics, techniques, and 
procedure allow commanders to apply critical thinking skills 
and flexible decision making in a contested information 
environment.

                        Cyber Institutes Program

    The Committee directs the Principal Cyber Advisor to submit 
a report to the House Committee on Armed Services by May 31, 
2022 on the effectiveness of the cyber institutes program under 
section 1640 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (10 U.S.C. 2200 note; 
Public Law 115-232). The report should include information 
about the number of students within that school's Reserve 
Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) who participate in the 
institutes' activities, the occupational specialties of ROTC 
students having participated in the institutes' activities, and 
information related to research by professors and students 
affiliated with the institutes' activities.

                  Department of Defense Data Strategy

    The committee commends the Department of Defense for 
developing the 2020 Department of Defense Data Strategy, 
understanding that data is an important resource that must be 
managed and secured in order for it to be used for operational 
effects. Ensuring the trustworthiness and security of this data 
should be at the foundation of implementation efforts across 
the Department. The strategy notes that the Department must 
protect its own data while at rest, in motion, and in use. It 
also lays out several approaches to data protection, including 
attribute-based access control. However, it is unclear to the 
committee how the Department plans to implement this strategy. 
The committee directs the Chief Information Officer of the 
Department of Defense, in coordination with the Director of the 
Defense Information Systems Agency, to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services not later than February 
1, 2022, on efforts to build cohesive data standards, 
monitoring for compliance and adherence to common frameworks, 
and planned efforts over the Future Years Defense Program.

     Department of Defense Website and Forms Modernization Program

    The 21st Century Integrated Digital Experience Act (Public 
Law 115-336), enacted in December 2018, required that the 
Department of Defense make all websites and forms related to 
serving the public available in a secure, consistent, 
accessible, fully usable and mobile friendly format by December 
2020. To ensure that the Department of Defense continues its 
path towards compliance, the committee directs the Department 
of Defense Chief Information Officer to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services not later than February 
15, 2022, on its current trajectory toward form modernization.

           Directive Authority for National Security Systems

    The committee recognizes the advancement of government-wide 
cybersecurity through directive authorities, such as those held 
by the Department of Homeland Security, and binding operational 
directives for civilian agencies, and those of the Department 
of Defense, through Joint Functional Headquarters-Department of 
Defense Information Network (JFHQ-DODIN), for the military and 
subordinate components. However, while these agencies are able 
to direct required actions to the majority of the federal 
government, there appear to be impediments to a comparable 
authority over National Security Systems (NSS).
    As such, the committee directs the Director of the National 
Security Agency to provide a report to the House Committee on 
Armed Services no later than March 2, 2022, on impediments to 
the effective use of directive authorities by the NSA over 
National Security Systems. The report shall also include 
recommendations to maximize the impact directive authority over 
National Security Systems can have in mitigating risk to the 
federal government, as well as steps taken to date.

 Director of Operational Test & Evaluation Software Academic Technical 
                               Expertise

    The Fiscal Year 2019 Director of Operational Test and 
Evaluation's (DOT&E) annual report to Congress argues that a 
wealth of software and cyber expertise is available in the 
United States' academic sector, but that the Department of 
Defense has yet to apply significant resources to harness the 
capabilities of American universities. Alternatively, the 
report notes that competing nations have been harnessing United 
States academic capabilities for decades and recommends that 
the Department make a concerted effort to employ more of the 
software and cyber experts in academia in the defense of our 
Nation. To this end, the committee recommends that the Director 
of Operational Test and Evaluation support a university-based 
test and evaluation software and cyber Center of Excellence to 
modernize assessments of, and improve confidence in, the 
operational effectiveness, suitability, and survivability of 
software intensive and cyber physical systems. Additionally, 
the committee encourages the Director to support commensurate 
scholarships and internships to grow a workforce pipeline into 
the software and cyber test and evaluation workforce. 
Therefore, the committee directs the DOT&E to submit an 
implementation plan to the congressional defense committees by 
March 31, 2022 on how the DOT&E will support and implement both 
a test and evaluation software and cyber Center of Excellence 
and commensurate scholarships and internships.

            Effectiveness Metrics for Information Operations

    The committee directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives on the 
effectiveness and sufficiency of the Department of Defense's 
assessment capability for defining and measuring the impact of 
Department information operations. The report will be due not 
later than 180 days after the Department of Defense designates 
a Department entity and develops, applies, and refines an 
assessment capability for defining and measuring the impact of 
information operations in compliance with section 1749 of the 
William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283).

                 Enterprise Network Endpoint Monitoring

    The committee commends actions taken to date by the 
Department of Defense to increase and improve the visibility 
across the network of its assets to include endpoints. 
Nevertheless, the committee remains concerned by the inability 
of the Department, the Chief Information Officer, and Joint 
Forces Headquarters-Department of Defense Information Networks 
(JFHQ-DODIN) to compel components under directive authority for 
cyberspace operations (DACO) authorities to be configured for 
and provide live data to JFHQ-DODIN. A key aspect of the 
Department's vulnerabilities lay in its numerous endpoint 
devices, with each service and component possibly taking unique 
approaches toward endpoint monitoring. To address these 
concerns, the committee directs the Department of Defense Chief 
Information Officer, in coordination with the JFHQ-DODIN, to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than April 1, 2022, on the efforts of the Department to 
increase and ensure compliance at the component level of 
network endpoint monitoring, and plans to update network 
patching standards to reflect current industry approaches and 
practices. Additionally, the briefing should address barriers 
which prevent or hinder the ability of components under JFHQ-
DODIN's authority to provide live data.

                 Enterprise Telecommunications Security

    The committee asserts that the military forces require a 
robust telecommunications infrastructure with built-in 
resilience and persistent risk mitigations measures. While the 
Department must develop enterprise-wide efforts, the regional 
combatant commands must also consider regionally specific 
considerations. These often include analyses of military-
managed and commercially managed infrastructures. To understand 
these region-specific considerations devised by combatant 
commands, the committee directs the Chief Information Officer 
of the Department of Defense, in coordination with the 
combatant commands, to brief the committee no later than May 
31, 2022 on the evolution of the Department's secure 
communications infrastructure. The committee further directs 
that the briefing should place greater emphasis on European 
Command and Indo-Pacific Command, in line with the National 
Defense Strategy. The briefing should specifically address how 
integration with U.S. hosted commercial capabilities could 
improve mission effectiveness, including considerations of 
reduced latency and increased fidelity through emerging 
technologies.

  Investing in Robust Data Infrastructure for Artificial Intelligence

    The committee recognizes that the Department of Defense is 
deploying artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning to 
increase warfighter capability, decrease operational costs, and 
ensure civilian safety. The Department should incorporate the 
foundational data readiness required for ongoing and future AI 
algorithm development into all programs and systems of records. 
The Department should endeavor to ensure these program and 
system data holdings are structured with consistent and 
accurate annotations that have known and measurable recall and 
precision to ensure production-level performance and efficient 
AI development. Furthermore, the committee is pleased by Joint 
Artificial Intelligence Center creation of the Department of 
Defense AI Enterprise Infrastructure and Cybersecurity 
Subcommittee.

         Strategy and Posture Review for Information Operations

    The committee notes that Information Operations (IO) play a 
critical role in military advantage. Our national security 
depends on our ability to influence and disrupt adversary 
information flow and decision-making, as well as defend and 
bolster our own. IO can include a range of capabilities, from 
electromagnetic warfare and cyber operations to operations 
security and information assurance. Near-peer competitors are 
currently using IO to achieve objectives below the threshold of 
armed conflict. Russia has repeatedly leveraged cyberattacks 
and disinformation campaigns to undermine U.S. institutions and 
allies and China has invested heavily in electronic warfare 
capabilities to counter our own.
    These tactics are particularly effective in ``gray zone'' 
warfare, where adversaries operate below the level of armed 
conflict. Department of Defense leadership has acknowledged 
China and Russia's extremely effective use of gray zone warfare 
and the risk to the Department of Defense if it doesn't learn 
to operate in that space effectively. IO will play a critical 
role in making the Department more competitive in the ``gray 
zone.''
    Currently, the Department defines IO inconsistently across 
components of the organization and does not have clear policy 
for it. Section 1631(g) of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) directed the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a Strategy and Posture Review to 
the House Armed Services Committee and the Senate Armed 
Services Committee no later than 270 days after the Act was 
enacted. The committee notes that this report has not yet been 
submitted.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, acting through the Principal Information Operations 
Advisor under Section 397 of Title 10, United States Code, to 
submit this report to the House Armed Services Committee as 
soon as possible. This report should make sure to complete a 
detailed evaluation of any organizational changes that may be 
necessary within the Office of the Secretary of Defense 
including changes to the role of the Principal Information 
Operations Advisor in IO governance and leadership as required 
in Section 1631(g)(3)(B) of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2020.
    Additionally, the committee directs the Principal 
Information Operations Advisor to brief the House Armed 
Services Committee no later than February 1, 2022, on the 
progress of the Principal Information Operations Advisor's 
office standup and ongoing IO efforts, as well as the 
Department of Defense's broader efforts in IO.

        Support for Zero Trust Within the Department of Defense

    The committee supports the Department of Defense's efforts 
undertaken in the past year to progress toward adoption of a 
zero trust security model to protect its systems and data, 
including:
    (1) the Department's collaboration with industry 
stakeholders to research, develop, pilot and test a zero trust 
architecture, under which network operators assume that an 
environment is breached and require that every user, device, 
and network component request for access to data be verified; 
and
    (2) the issuance of guidance by the National Security 
Agency on Embracing a Zero Trust Security Model which describes 
zero trust guiding principles and design concepts in greater 
detail.
    The committee encourages the Department to continue its 
adoption of a zero trust security model in accordance with the 
above-referenced National Security Agency guidance, which will 
ensure that the Department will be better positioned to more 
rapidly detect and respond to malicious activity and limit the 
consequences of a successful breach.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                       Subtitle A--Cyber Threats


    Section 1501--Cyber Threat Information Collaboration Environment

    This section would direct the Secretary of Homeland 
Security, in coordination with the Secretary of Defense and the 
Director of National Intelligence, acting through the Director 
of the National Security Agency, to develop an information 
collaboration environment that enables entities to identify, 
mitigate, and prevent malicious cyber activity. The 
collaboration environment would provide limited access to 
appropriate operationally relevant data about cybersecurity 
risks and cybersecurity threats, including malware forensics 
and data from network sensor programs, on a platform that 
enables query and analysis.

 Section 1502--Enterprise-Wide Procurement of Commercial Cyber Threat 
                          Information Products

    This section would direct Joint Forces Headquarters-
Department of Defense Information Networks to establish a 
program management office for the purposes of procuring and 
managing the Department of Defense's enterprise-wide licensing 
and use of commercial threat information products.

                Subtitle B--Cyber Systems and Operations


       Section 1511--Legacy Information Technologies and Systems 
                             Accountability

    This section would mandate that each military service 
initiate an effort to account for the legacy information 
technology (IT) systems, applications, and software. Efforts to 
discover and inventory legacy IT systems, applications, and 
software ensure that redundant and unnecessary investments can 
be better aligned to departmental priorities.

Section 1512--Update Relating to Responsibilities of Chief Information 
                                Officer

    This section would update the responsibilities of the Chief 
Information Officer to reflect the new organization at the 
National Security Agency responsible for cybersecurity.

 Section 1513--Protective Domain Name System within the Department of 
                                Defense

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense, within 
120 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, to ensure 
that each component of the Department of Defense uses a 
Protective Domain Name System instantiation offered by the 
Department.

                       Subtitle C--Cyber Weapons


    Section 1521--Notification Requirements regarding Cyber Weapons

    This section would establish a limitation of funds on the 
Office of the Secretary of Defense, to remain until the 
congressional defense committees are presented with a report 
from the Secretary of Defense establishing a definition for a 
``cyber capability'' which includes software, hardware, 
toolkits and other information technologies developed using 
funds from the Cyberspace Activities Budget of the Department 
of Defense that may be used in operations authorized under 
title 10, United States Code.

             Section 1522--Cybersecurity of Weapon Systems

    This section would modify section 1640 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91) to add two mission elements to the portfolio of the 
Strategic Cybersecurity Program. Additionally, this section 
would add a requirement for a biannual report to the 
congressional defense committees on the work of the Strategic 
Cybersecurity Program.

                    Subtitle D--Other Cyber Matters


  Section 1531--Feasibility Study regarding Establishment within the 
Department of Defense a Designated Central Program Office, Headed by a 
  Senior Department Official, Responsible for Overseeing All Academic 
   Engagement Programs Focusing on Creating Cyber Talent across the 
                               Department

    This section would mandate a feasibility study to be 
conducted by the Secretary of Defense of a designated central 
program office, headed by a senior Department of Defense 
official, responsible for overseeing all academic engagement 
programs focusing on creating cyber talent across the 
Department. This feasibility study would be required to be 
submitted to the congressional defense committees not later 
than 270 days after the date of the enactment of this Act.

     Section 1532--Prohibition on Chief Information Officer of the 
    Department of Defense Serving as Principal Cyber Advisor of the 
                               Department

    This section would prohibit the Department of Defense Chief 
Information Officer from serving concurrently as the Principal 
Cyber Advisor.

   TITLE XVI--SPACE ACTIVITIES, STRATEGIC PROGRAMS, AND INTELLIGENCE 
                                MATTERS


                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST


                            Space Activities


           Alternate Global Positioning System Constellation

    The committee remains concerned about potential threats to 
the Global Positioning System (GPS) program and position, 
navigation, and timing (PNT) resiliency. The committee supports 
the current GPS III program, but believes there should be 
redundant PNT capabilities to mitigate threats posed to our 
current GPS architecture. The committee understands that in 
2019, the U.S. Air Force designated the Navigation Technology 
Satellite-3 (NTS-3) program as one of three Air Force 
``Vanguard'' programs that integrate science and technology 
advances to demonstrate transformational military technologies 
and operational concepts. Additionally, the committee 
understands that NTS-3 is the first satellite navigation 
(SATNAV) space experiment in 40 years that is intended to test 
new hardware including an electronically steerable, high-power 
phased array antenna coupled with a digital signal generator 
that can be reprogrammed on orbit, enabling operators to 
quickly deploy newly developed, advanced signals as they 
encounter electronic threats.
    Furthermore, NTS-3 will be working on PNT enhancements such 
as experimental antennas, flexible and secure signals, 
increased automation, and use of commercial assets. NTS-3 
technology is intended to complement and add resiliency to GPS 
satellites that fly in Medium Earth Orbit (MEO). The committee 
understands NTS-3 technology enhances space-based SATNAV 
systems by investing in capabilities to mitigate and increase 
resiliency from harmful interference. The committee believes 
the Air Force must prioritize GPS resiliency by ensuring the 
Department of Defense has an alternate PNT capability available 
should GPS be denied.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force, in coordination with the Director of the Air Force 
Research Lab and the Chief of Space Operations, to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services not later 
than December 31, 2021, on a detailed funding, development, 
procurement, and launch plan to deploy an alternate PNT 
constellation that provides the following capabilities:
    (1) rapid deployment of PNT satellites to address emerging 
electronic warfare threats to GPS;
    (2) regional military signal protection to resist jamming 
and on-orbit reprogrammability to counter spoofing; and
    (3) active Electronically Steered Phased Array antenna that 
can be configured to support simultaneous area of operations 
broadcasting independent and unique signal configurations.

                    Arctic Satellite Ground Station

    The committee notes a gap in US satellite ground station 
coverage in the arctic region, and the fact that extremely high 
latitude ground stations are critical as they provide frequent 
daily contact with polar orbiting satellites. The committee 
further notes buildup of strategic competitors military assets 
in the non-US Arctic and increasing frequency and scope of 
military exercises in the High North indicate that it could 
become a location for a future incident. To address these 
concerns and gaps, the committee directs the Chief of Space 
Operations to submit a report no later than February 28, 2022 
to the House Armed Services Committee on the feasibility of 
deploying an arctic satellite ground station.

              Commercial Cloud for Military Space Programs

    The Department of Defense has stated that it ``is embarking 
on the most significant transformation in the history of the 
U.S. national security space program'' according to the 2020 
Defense Space Strategy. This transformation will require the 
Department of Defense, and in particular the U.S. Space Force, 
to rapidly embrace modern and advanced commercial technologies 
to address the challenges in space and ensure U.S. leadership 
in this vital domain. The committee commends the Chief of Space 
Operations' goal to create a ``digital service from the ground 
up.''
    When creating a digital service, the committee recognizes 
the importance of the collection, transport, and processing of 
data for space development and operations. The space community 
has been challenged by the processing of massive amounts of 
data from space systems, fusing the disparate information 
across multiple security levels, and providing the relevant 
information to the necessary users at speed and scale. The 
committee fully supports commercial cloud adoption for military 
space programs and believes that cloud-based technologies are 
essential to these challenges and fundamentally modernize the 
infrastructure of space mission systems.
    Therefore, the committee directs the U.S. Space Force Chief 
Technology and Innovation Officer, in coordination with the 
Commander of the Space and Missile Systems Center, to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by December 
31, 2021, on how the U.S. Space Force will work with the 
Department of Defense Chief Information Officer, as well as the 
Chief Information Officer of the Department of the Air Force, 
to leverage modern cloud computing technologies for space 
programs and systems. The plan should include, at a minimum:
    (1) an inventory of current space programs with a 
description of how the activities do, or do not, leverage 
cloud-based technologies;
    (2) opportunities to increase modern commercial cloud 
technology adoption, including full and open competitions for 
industry providers;
    (3) challenges or impediments related to adoption of such 
technology; and
    (4) timelines and resources required to execute the plan 
for cloud technology adoption for space programs.

                    Commercial Imagery Capabilities

    The committee recognizes U.S. commercial remote sensing 
capabilities serve a critical national security function for 
the Department of Defense, intelligence community, and 
combatant commands. Timely, accurate geospatial intelligence 
(GEOINT) and satellite imagery is integral to the safety and 
success of our nation's warfighters. The committee supports 
programs and exercises that leverage commercial GEOINT 
satellites, automatic target recognition systems using the 
latest artificial intelligence capabilities, and direct 
downlinks to remote ground terminals to help military leaders 
rapidly execute long-range precision fires.
    The committee also recognizes the requirement for U.S. 
Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) to maintain situational 
awareness in operational environments and the role 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance plays in 
ensuring a complete battlefield picture. The committee notes 
that multiple commercial Earth observation companies provide 
global imagery that may be able to fill gaps and provide value 
to USSOCOM and regional combatant commands.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with the Directors of the National 
Reconnaissance Office and National Geospatial-Intelligence 
Agency as required, to submit a report to the House Committee 
on Armed Services not later than December 31, 2021, identifying 
each commercial vendor that provides global imagery to support 
Department of Defense combatant commands, any gaps that exist 
in GEOINT intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance 
capacity the Department of Defense combatant commands most in 
need of taskless global daily imagery to support mission 
requirements, and an assessment of how commercial capabilities 
can be integrated into the current and planned sensor-to-
shooter programs across the services.

                Commercial Radio Frequency Capabilities

    The committee recognizes the benefits to national security 
that commercial space-based radio frequency (RF) capabilities 
can provide in satisfying national security user needs, 
enabling greater international cooperation, increasing 
architectural resilience and diversity, and extending U.S. 
technological advantage in space. The committee believes more 
concrete steps must be taken to deliver and integrate U.S. 
commercial space-based RF capabilities. The committee expects 
the Secretary of Defense to provide direction on leveraging 
U.S. commercial space-based RF capabilities, explicitly data, 
products, and services, to appropriate components through 
planning and programming guidance, and to include funding for 
such capabilities in the Department's Future Years Defense 
Program, in accordance with section 1612 of the William M. 
(Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283). Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the 
Director of National Intelligence, to submit a report to the 
congressional defense and intelligence committees by January 
31, 2022, that describes how the Department of Defense, in 
collaboration with the intelligence community, is implementing 
such policy in its planning, programming, and budgeting 
guidance.

                      Commercial Satellite Weather

    The committee notes that the Air Force Weather Services 
(AFWS) supports worldwide operations across the services, 
special operation forces, and other government agencies with 
weather observing and forecasting capabilities at in-garrison 
and deployed locations. These funds integrate government and 
commercial environmental data with AFWS for processing, 
storing, exploiting, and disseminating weather data for 
analysis, forecasting, and mission integration at the 
strategic, operational, and tactical levels. Global Positioning 
System (GPS) Radio Occultation on-orbit data sources are a 
priority for the Air Force, viewed as the most promising 
commercial satellite weather data available, and will provide 
immediate forecast improvement and help support new 
applications within the Department of Defense and space weather 
enterprise.
    The committee supports the Commercial Weather Data Pilot 
program's transition from a pilot to procurement of operational 
data, ultimately adding higher resolution, lower latency, and 
further augmenting the measurements made by large government 
weather satellites. In moving forward with this program, the 
committee strongly encourages the Air Force to allow for 
maximum competition from commercial weather data entrants to 
partner with and compete for Air Force data contracts.

                 Commercial Space Situational Awareness

    The committee believes that, in an increasingly congested 
and threatened environment, the space situational awareness 
(SSA) and space domain awareness (SDA) missions are essential 
to U.S. Government, allied, and commercial space operations. 
The committee views the use of commercial data for this mission 
as an important part of an integrated approach to achieving a 
full, comprehensive common operational picture of the space 
environment from traffic management and threat awareness in all 
orbits. However, the committee notes the lack of clear 
Department of Defense plans for incorporating commercial space 
situational awareness, including radio frequency (RF) sensing, 
into the wider commercial SSA architecture to support Joint All 
Domain Command and Control (JADC2) and a broad range of 
intelligence operations. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Chief of Space Operations to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by March 1, 2022, on a 
comprehensive acquisition strategy that incorporates commercial 
RF sensing capabilities into a resilient and integrated SSA/SDA 
architecture to augment and inform multi-orbit, all-weather, 
and day/night collection capability for the Department.
    Further, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees by February 1, 2022, on the following:
    (1) an assessment of current U.S. space situational 
awareness and space domain awareness capabilities that includes 
an analysis of the number and size of objects tracked in low-
Earth orbit, geosynchronous-Earth orbit, and cislunar orbit;
    (2) a review of planned systems development and procurement 
of commercial space situational awareness and space domain 
awareness across the Future Years Defense Program, including 
cost and schedule estimates;
    (3) an overview of the U.S. Space Force Unified Data 
Library that includes current volume, access to new 
observational data, U.S. Space Command utilization; and
    (4) recommendations to improve the use of commercial space 
situational awareness and space domain awareness data services.

                     Efforts to Reduce Space Debris

    The committee recognizes the importance of Space 
Development Agency's efforts to deliver space-based capability 
to the joint force by harnessing commercial development to 
achieve a proliferated and resilient architecture. The 
committee also recognizes that the proliferation of larger 
constellations of smaller satellites in low-earth orbit is 
increasing the need for better space surveillance technology 
and investment in technologies that reduce future space debris. 
According to U.S. Space Command, the organization is tracking 
almost 35,000 objects in low earth orbit, a 22 increase in two 
years and a result of new mega constellations and debris 
generating events. The committee is interested in better 
understanding defense investments in technologies that may 
reduce future space debris, including nontoxic or non-reactive 
alternatives to Hall Thrusters. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the 
House Committee on Armed Services, not later than June 1, 2022, 
on the Department's efforts to reduce future space debris. The 
report shall include at a minimum the following:
    (1) the degree to which the Department of Defense has 
assessed the impact of space debris on the National Defense 
Space Architecture;
    (2) an assessment of the risk posed by the proliferation of 
commercial or military satellites in low-earth orbit;
    (3) the extent to which the Department of Defense is 
engaging allies and partners on efforts to develop technologies 
that reduce space debris;
    (4) the identification of specific defense research and 
development efforts to minimize future debris-creating events, 
including alternatives to traditional propellant propulsion 
systems.

                       Hybrid Space Architecture

    The committee recognizes U.S. Government and commercial 
space capabilities are vital to our national and economic 
security. These capabilities are increasingly threatened 
militarily by potential adversaries, and commercially by 
foreign government-backed competition. To meet these challenges 
and retain U.S. primacy in space, the U.S. Government should 
take advantage of the revolution in the commercial capabilities 
by integrating them with traditional government systems as part 
of a ``Hybrid Space Architecture'' approach.
    The committee is pleased that most national security space 
organizations have publicly embraced the Hybrid Space 
Architecture concept, notably the Space Force, National 
Reconnaissance Office, National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, 
and the Space Development Agency. However, the committee 
further notes that funding for the Hybrid Space Architecture 
has historically lagged in budget submissions. Accordingly, the 
committee believes that funds authorized in this bill, to the 
extent appropriated, should be executed in a manner consistent 
with promotion of a future Hybrid Space Architecture.

             Launch of Experimental Spaceflight Activities

    The committee notes increased activities by commercial 
space launch providers with regards to experimental spaceflight 
capabilities that have potential current and future national 
security applications. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the House Committee 
on Armed Services not later than February 1, 2022, on the 
execution of experimental spaceflight activities for next-
generation launch vehicle systems and technologies that have 
national security space launch applications, particularly in 
relation to maintaining U.S. space technology leadership over 
China. The report shall address:
    (1) permissions and authorities required to support 
expedited approval for experimental spaceflight activities, 
including Department of Defense procedures to approve 
experimental spaceflight activities determined to be in the 
national security interests of the United States;
    (2) how safety to the public will be ensured during 
experimental spaceflight activities authorized by the 
Department of Defense, as well as detailed requirements for 
private insurance coverage for potential third-party losses due 
to experimental spaceflight activities; and
    (3) how to expedite timelines and reduce costs to providers 
for experimental spaceflight activities that support national 
security space launch and foster rapid innovation and 
development to address future requirements.

         Long-term Plan for Preserving American Space Dominance

    The committee reaffirms its recognition of the primacy of 
space in importance to our economy, national security, and way 
of life. The committee also recognizes the extraordinary 
efforts of our space professionals throughout the Department of 
Defense and intelligence community to reform the national 
security space enterprise. Furthermore, the committee notes 
with increasing alarm the rate at which our near-peer rivals 
are rapidly enhancing their own space capabilities with a view 
to challenging American space dominance and nullifying the 
capabilities and services of our space assets. While the 
committee appreciates the ongoing hard work of our nation's 
space professionals at reforming our national security 
enterprise, there is interest in continuing to accelerate the 
pace at which new capabilities and technologies which will 
solidify American space dominance are developed and procured. 
There is also significant interest in ensuring the U.S. 
maintain freedom of movement and action on the Moon and in 
lunar and cislunar space. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Chief of Space Operations to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees on the most likely and most 
dangerous threats to American space dominance in the short term 
(within the next three years) and in the long term (within the 
next ten years), options to maintain American space dominance 
for the next ten years, and any capabilities needed to support 
that plan by February 25, 2022. The Chief of Space Operations 
may consult with any entities they choose in the development of 
this report. The committee encourages the report to include an 
executive summary at no higher a classification level than 
SECRET if at all practicable.

     Positioning, Navigation, and Timing Infrastructure Resilience

    The committee is aware of significant vulnerabilities to 
the Global Positioning System (GPS) enterprise its associated 
position, navigation, and timing (PNT) infrastructure. As the 
threats to this critical infrastructure continue to grow, the 
committee affirms the urgency of ensuring the resiliency and 
survivability of this vital asset and urges the Department of 
Defense to fully leverage technologies to harden and reinforce 
PNT infrastructure. Therefore, the committee directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering, in 
consultation with the Secretaries of the Military Departments, 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
no later than March 1, 2022 addressing the Department's 
strategy to address current and projected vulnerabilities in 
GPS/PNT infrastructure and its plan to increase resilience. The 
briefing should include how the Department plans to employ 
technologies to provide highly secure and precision time 
coherency for all federally funded GPS satellites in addition 
to its plans to integrate innovative technologies, such as 
small spacecraft of low size, weight, and power (SWaP), which 
can operate independently from GPS and can be hosted on air, 
space, and surface platforms.

 Report Language for Satellite Cybersecurity--Space Development Agency

    To address cyber vulnerabilities to space-based systems 
utilizing small satellites for communications, intelligence, 
weather and more, the committee supports the Space Development 
Agency's Defense in Depth as Mission Assurance for Spacecraft 
(DiDaMAS) program to explore concepts for cyber protection. 
DiDaMAS will leverage the Air Force's Firestarter program by 
incorporating its capabilities in a defense-in-depth layered 
approach with an emphasis on mission assurance. DiDaMAS will 
also incorporate Zero Trust Architecture and on-board Machine 
Learning algorithms for monitoring and intelligent response. To 
further negate cyber-attacks, Mission Essential Functions 
(MEFs) will be identified and prioritized. Accordingly the 
Committee directs the Director of Space Development Agency no 
later than March 1, 2022, provide a report to the House Armed 
Services Committee on the Space Development Agency's Depth as 
Mission Assurance for Spacecraft (DiDaMAS) program to explore 
concepts for cyber protection.

             SATCOM Transition Path for Future Capabilities

    The Committee notes the Space Force plans to transition 
from a legacy Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) 
satellite constellation to a more resilient Evolved Strategic 
SATCOM (ESS) satellite constellation which will sustain and 
enhance the Nation's critical strategic SATCOM services, 
modernize and enhance the protected waveform payload, and 
provide increased space vehicle and constellation resiliency to 
address rapidly increasing threats to space capabilities. The 
Committee also recognizes the Space Force ESS Space Segment 
prototype phase contracts are underway to enable a follow-on 
ESS production phase, which will, per the current plan, deploy 
initial ESS satellites by end fiscal year 2030 to achieve 
initial operating capability by end fiscal year 2032.
    This Committee is concerned that the Nation's Strategic 
SATCOM capability will have growing vulnerabilities during the 
transition period as currently planned, and wants to ensure 
that this critical capability is sustained and evolved as 
responsively as possible to the rapidly emerging and evolving 
threat environment. The Committee further notes that industry 
concepts have emerged to optimize the transition by leveraging 
proven commercial on-orbit servicing satellites coupled with 
mature communications payload equipment to assure legacy AEHF 
sustainment while providing an accelerated transition to a more 
resilient ESS capability. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to provide a report that defines and 
validates technical concepts, cost, schedule, risks, policy, 
and benefits of on-orbit servicing of current strategic 
communications satellites and evaluate the merits of the 
concept in providing a transition path for future capabilities. 
The report shall be submitted to the House Armed Services 
Committee not later than March 1, 2022, and may include a 
classified annex, as necessary.

                     Space Warfare Analysis Center

    The committee notes the requested legislative proposal by 
the Department of Defense to establish a new field operating 
activity for the Space Warfare Analysis Center (SWAC), which 
would report to the Chief of Space Operations and be 
responsible for setting requirements and overall satellite 
architecture for future programs. The committee further notes 
that this activity has to date fallen under the joint-
Department of Defense and Director for National Intelligence 
Space Security and Defense Program (SSDP), and there has not 
been clear communication with the committee on how these two 
organizations will interact, and who will ultimately be 
responsible for those activities which cross over both title 10 
and title 50, United States Code, equities. The committee is 
supportive of efforts undertaken to re-look at the current 
missile warning, track and defense design, and ensure 
resilience and future threats are taken into account when 
designing the architecture, and is encouraged that other 
mission areas, such as communications, will be assessed next.
    While the committee is generally supportive of the intent 
in establishing the SWAC, alignment to the Chief of Space 
Operations should be reassessed, and alignment to the Assistant 
Secretary of the Air Force for Space Acquisition and 
Integration should be considered to ensure that both 
requirements and acquisition are fully integrated at the 
decision-making level to avoid previous failures of space 
acquisition where these functions have been disaggregated. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force 
to provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services 
not later than January 31, 2022, on future alignment of the 
SWAC and funding and personnel required to stand-up and sustain 
the center. The Secretary should further consider a co-
reporting structure to the Chief of Space Operations to ensure 
a direct line to the operational community with regards to 
architecture studies.

                        Missile Defense Programs


                    Layered Defense for the Homeland

    The committee notes advances in long-range missile 
capabilities by rogue states, particularly by making 
significant developments towards more sophisticated missile and 
rocket technologies, from use of solid fuels to developing new 
submarine-launched ballistic missiles. The committee continues 
to encourage the Department of Defense to analyze and assess 
these variable threats posed by these missile and rocket 
capabilities, as well as provide an analysis of gaps in 
homeland missile defense, with focus on missile defense gaps 
along the east coast of the United States. As such, the 
committee looks forward to receiving from the Department a 
report on layered homeland missile defense system as directed 
by section 1648 of H.R. 6395, the William M. (Mac) Thornberry 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021, as 
passed by the House.
    Further, the committee notes the successful test of the 
Aegis Weapon System (AWS) and Standard Missile-3 (SM-3) Block 
IIA against an intercontinental-range ballistic missile (ICBM) 
in November 2020, and funding requested by the Missile Defense 
Agency to continue development of a layered defense 
architecture. Therefore, the committee directs the Director of 
the Missile Defense Agency, in coordination with the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Policy, Chief of Naval Operations, and 
Commander of U.S. Northern Command, to submit a report to the 
House Committee on Armed Services by December 31, 2021, on 
development and deployment plans for using the AWS with SM-3 
Block IIA interceptors as part of a layered missile defense 
system. The report shall include:
    (1) requirements for deploying a layered defense using the 
AWS and SM-3 Block IIA for defense of the continental United 
States (CONUS);
    (2) analysis of future AWS and SM-3 Block IIA locations 
that would support improved defensive coverage of CONUS, and 
how the preferred location of Fort Drum, NY, for a CONUS 
interceptor site using Ground-Based Interceptors could be 
leveraged for a future layered defense system;
    (3) analysis of how deploying Arleigh Burke-class guided-
missile destroyers for the homeland missile defense mission 
would impact Navy readiness and global force management;
    (4) should land-based AWS systems be deployed for layered 
homeland defense, the applicable manning strategy; and
    (5) any applicable lessons learned from analysis conducted 
for the Guam Defense System that could be applied to a layered 
homeland defense architecture, particularly for locations 
previously evaluated and preferred for a CONUS interceptor 
site.

   Leveraging AN/TPY-2 Radar Foreign Military Sales for U.S. Programs

    The committee is aware of a limited opportunity for the 
United States to leverage the Army/Navy Transportable Radar 
Surveillance (AN/TPY-2) production line restart driven by 
recent Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) foreign 
military sales (FMS) case. In fiscal year 2021, Congress 
supported the production of a 13th AN/TPY-2 radar, which will 
be the first U.S. production of the modernized Gallium Nitride 
(GaN) configuration of the system, providing greater range and 
discrimination.
    The Missile Defense Agency (MDA) plans to keep the current 
system antenna viable through 2040, initially with a removal 
and replacement (R&R) strategy of Transmit Receive Integrated 
Microwave Modules (TRIMMs) and beginning in 2026, the full 
radar replacement of TRIMMs with GaN. The R&R sustainment 
strategy would not achieve the capability improvements 
associated with a full GaN refresh of TRIMMs. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Director of the Missile Defense Agency to 
provide a briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by 
February 1, 2022, on:
    (1) current and planned production rates of TRIMMs through 
2025;
    (2) opportunities to increase production rates above the 
current plan; and
    (3) recommendations to accelerate procurement delivery of 
TRIMMs to support a full refresh of existing radars.

 Lower Tier Air and Missile Defense Sensor (LTAMDS) Program Protection

    The Committee is concerned that inadequate funding was 
requested by the Secretary of the Army for Lower Tier Air and 
Missile Defense Sensor (LTAMDS) Program Protection to be 
included as part of Pre-Planned Product Improvements. LTAMDS 
will replace legacy Patriot radars and will be the foundation 
of the Army's air and missile defense architecture for the next 
three decades. Patriot battalions are some of the most deployed 
units in the Department and are often located in austere 
locations. Program Protection ensures that critical 
technologies like this advanced radar are fully protected in an 
expeditionary environment. The Committee understands that this 
effort must be initiated no later than Fiscal Year 2022 to 
align with the Army fielding plan.
    Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a report to the House Armed Services Committee no 
later than January 31, 2022 on the overall Program Protection 
plan for LTAMDS through fielding and what additional funding is 
required throughout the Future Years Defense Program to 
complete the program and support fielding to US batteries, 
including additional Program Protection requirements that would 
be needed for potential future foreign military sale of LTAMDS.

          Radar Upgrades for Hypersonic Weapons Identification

    The committee is concerned about the inability of current 
radar systems to detect, track, engage, and defeat emerging 
threats from hypersonic weapons. As identified by the National 
Defense Strategy, the Department of Defense has an immediate 
need to reinforce efforts to counter these weapons. The 
committee encourages the Air Force and the Missile Defense 
Agency to assess current hypersonic missile defense efforts and 
to evaluate whether the agencies are sufficiently taking into 
account innovative and cost-effective solutions available 
commercially.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the United States 
Air Force and the Director of the Missile Defense Agency, in 
consultation with the Commander of United States Northern 
Command, to brief the House Armed Services Committee, not later 
than November 30, 2021, on the status of Department-wide 
efforts to rapidly develop the ability to detect low-flying 
hypersonic weapons via radar. In particular, the briefing shall 
address--
    (1) An evaluation of the Air Force's current ability to 
detect hypersonic weapons;
    (2) Plans to ensure comprehensive assessment of 
commercially available technology for radar technology 
improvements;
    (3) A description of any investments in planned upgrades to 
existing radar systems in support of hypersonic detection;
    (4) A description of any investments in standalone gap 
filler radars in support of hypersonic detection;
    (5) A cost comparison of those investments versus what is 
available commercially off-the-shelf; and
    (6) An estimate of future budget requirements in FY23 and 
beyond to complete necessary upgrades and gap filler 
deployments.

                             Nuclear Forces


   Cybersecurity Requirements in the Nuclear Modernization Life Cycle

    The committee recognizes that the Department of Defense has 
taken actions recently to make high-tech weapon systems more 
secure and less vulnerable to cyberattacks. However, the 
committee is concerned about cybersecurity vulnerabilities and 
digital security in the nuclear modernization acquisition 
process. The committee believes that digital systems must meet 
established security and reliability thresholds before being 
integrated into the nuclear enterprise. As noted in a March 
2021 Government Accountability Office report (GAO-21-179), the 
Department should issue additional guidance to better 
communicate requirements to contractors. In addition, the 
report noted that Department of Defense Chief Information 
Officer officials support development of another overlay for 
nuclear command, control, and communications systems.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Research and Engineering, in coordination with the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, to 
submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than December 31, 2021, on cybersecurity requirements in 
the nuclear modernization acquisition life cycle. The report 
shall include at a minimum the following:
    (1) current digital security standards for the nuclear 
modernization process;
    (2) the degree to which the Department has considered 
requiring additional digital security and reliability metrics 
during the acquisitions process; and
    (3) an assessment of requiring third-party, independent 
tests to confirm that security and reliability requirements are 
met before a system becomes operational.

   Report on Nuclear Command, Control, and Communications Enterprise 
                             Modernization

    The committee notes that the age, complexity, and dispersed 
nature of the legacy nuclear command, control, and 
communications (NC3) enterprise requires sustained and 
coordinated investments. Adding to this complex problem are 
upgraded and modernized systems coming online replacing legacy 
systems. The committee further notes that the Department of 
Defense cannot afford delays or unaligned acquisitions, given 
the importance of this mission.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than May 1, 2022, on the Department's modernization 
strategy with respect to NC3. The report shall include at a 
minimum the following:
    (1) a definition of the future NC3 enterprise;
    (2) a description of critical NC3 capability gaps;
    (3) projected NC3 operational requirements through 2026;
    (4) a proposed acquisition strategy;
    (5) consideration of all available software development 
authorities; and
    (6) associated timelines and cost estimates for critical 
elements of the NC3 enterprise through 2026.

                          Intelligence Matters


  Intelligence Collection Prioritization on Advanced Technologies of 
                              Adversaries

    The committee recognizes that strategic competitors and 
adversaries of the United States are innovating rapidly to 
develop and exploit technology-enabled tools that may harm the 
United States and allies of the United States. The committee is 
concerned that the Defense Intelligence Enterprise has not 
adequately prioritized collection of these emerging scientific 
and technical developments. The committee believes the Defense 
Intelligence Enterprise must prioritize collection of emerging 
technologies of strategic competitors and adversaries of the 
United States to better understand those capabilities and 
intentions.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Intelligence and Security to provide a briefing to 
the House Committee on Armed Services not later than December 
31, 2021, on steps taken within the Defense Intelligence 
Enterprise to prioritize collection of emerging technologies 
being pursued by strategic competitors and adversaries of the 
United States, including developments in biotechnology, 
artificial intelligence and machine learning, lethal autonomous 
weapons, hypersonic weapons, and directed energy weapons.

                    Intelligence Sharing Frameworks

    The committee recognizes the special intelligence sharing 
relationship that the United States has maintained with 
Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and the United Kingdom (the 
Five Eyes) since World War II. The committee also recognizes 
that this community of trust did not develop overnight but that 
over decades these countries have developed unique ways to 
gather and share intelligence, and thereby strengthen the 
relationship. The committee acknowledges that the threat 
landscape has vastly changed since the inception of the Five 
Eyes arrangement, with primary threats now emanating from China 
and Russia. The committee believes that, in confronting great 
power competition, the Five Eye countries must work closer 
together, as well as expand the circle of trust to other like-
minded democracies.
    The committee directs the Director of National 
Intelligence, in coordination with the Secretary of Defense, to 
provide a report to the House Committee on Armed Services, the 
Senate Committee on Armed Services, and the congressional 
intelligence committees, not later than May 20, 2022, on 
current intelligence and resource sharing agreements between 
the United States and the countries of Australia, Canada, New 
Zealand, and the United Kingdom; as well as opportunities to 
expand intelligence sharing with South Korea, Japan, India, and 
Germany. The review shall include:
    (1) the current state of the Five Eyes sharing agreement, 
including any potential shortcomings of the agreement, and 
proposed changes to implement efficiencies and enhance 
security;
    (2) the current resource sharing efforts among the Five 
Eyes, to include military and intelligence efforts, and 
proposed future resource sharing opportunities; and
    (3) the benefits of expanding the Five Eyes arrangement to 
include South Korea, Japan, India, and Germany, including the 
nature of insights that each of these countries may be in a 
position to contribute, any technology limitations that prevent 
closer sharing and actions needed to remediate those technology 
limitations, identification of the risks associated with 
expanding intelligence sharing arrangements, and suggestions on 
how to safely incorporate each country into a closer sharing 
framework.

                Prophet Enhanced Signals Processing Kits

    The budget request for fiscal year 2022 contained $39.0 
million in PE 9912BZ9750 for Prophet Enhanced Modifications. 
This request supports Prophet Enhanced Signals Processing (ESP) 
Kit modifications to retrofit, test, train, and support 
previously fielded Prophet ESP systems.
    The committee recognizes that the period of performance for 
the Prophet ESP Kits concludes in fiscal year 2022. The 
committee recognizes that the requested fiscal year 2022 
authorization will support a hybrid sustainment approach and 
will serve as a bridge to the Terrestrial Layer System, which 
is the Army's long-term integrated electronic warfare and 
signals intelligence program. The committee therefore supports 
the President's request.

             Report on Challenges to U.S. Security in Space

    The committee notes that in February 2019 the Defense 
Intelligence Agency published a report titled ``Challenges to 
Security in Space'' that examined the space and counterspace 
programs that could challenge U.S. or partner interests in the 
space domain. Due to the rapidly changing domain of space, the 
committee directs the Director of the Defense Intelligence 
Agency to submit to the House Armed Services Committee, no 
later than October 1, 2021, an unclassified update to the 2019 
space security report.

   Report on China's People's Liberation Army Strategic Support Force

    The committee recognizes that the People's Liberation Army 
has undertaken dramatic reforms over the past several years 
through the establishment of the Strategic Support Force (SSF). 
By centralizing psychological warfare capabilities with 
electronic, space, and cyber capabilities, the SSF seeks to 
build synergies between otherwise disparate capabilities to 
optimize strategic information operations.
    Given the imperative to prevail against our competitors in 
the information domain, the committee recognizes the imperative 
to more fully understand the SSF. The Committee urges the 
Defense Intelligence Agency to prioritize collection and 
analysis of the PLA's SSF.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Director of the 
Defense Intelligence Agency to provide the House Committee on 
Armed Services by February 1, 2022, a classified report and 
briefing on the SSF. The report shall include an analysis of 
SSF doctrine and capabilities, information operations targeted 
at other countries in the Asia-Pacific region, SSF exercises or 
engagements with other countries, and multilateral efforts to 
share intelligence about PLA information operations targeting 
U.S. allies and partners.

 Report on Intelligence Collection Capabilities and Activities of U.S. 
                              Forces Korea

    The committee directs the Commander of U.S. Indo-Pacific 
Command, in consultation with the Commander of U.S. Forces 
Korea and the Commander of U.S. Special Operations Command, to 
submit a report to the House Committee on Armed Services not 
later than February 25, 2022, on intelligence collection 
capabilities and activities in the U.S. Forces Korea area of 
operations, including with respect to spaceborne, airborne, 
ground, maritime, and cyber intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance capabilities. The report shall be unclassified 
but may contain a classified annex. At a minimum, the report 
shall include:
    (1) validated intelligence requirements, by specific 
intelligence capability type, and how each intelligence 
capability type supports such requirements;
    (2) the fulfillment rate for each validated intelligence 
requirement, by specific intelligence capability type;
    (3) a summary of critical gaps and deficiencies, by 
specific intelligence capability type;
    (4) additional impediments to efforts to collect, process, 
analyze, and share intelligence;
    (5) efforts to ensure the joint force and the interagency 
provide combatant commanders with relevant intelligence 
capabilities;
    (6) a summary of risk mitigation strategies to address 
deficiencies and impediments; and
    (7) any other relevant matters that the Commander of U.S. 
Forces Korea determines should be included.

  Report on the origins of SARS-CoV-2 and the COVID-19 global pandemic

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Director of the Defense Intelligence 
Agency and the Director of National Intelligence, to submit a 
report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives by December 31, 2021, on the 
origins of SARS-CoV-2 and the COVID-19 global pandemic.
    The committee further directs the report to include:
    (1) A detailed analysis of coronavirus research conducted 
at the Wuhan Institute of Virology (WIV), including 
intelligence reporting collected or held by the Defense 
Intelligence Agency (DIA);
    (2) A detailed analysis of the actions of the Chinese 
Communist Party to conceal the type of research being conducted 
at the WIV, including intelligence reporting collected or held 
by the DIA;
    (3) A detailed assessment of any actions taken by the 
Chinese Communist Party and the WIV from August 2019 to March 
2020 to conceal the possibility that SARS-CoV-2 could have 
leaked from the WIV, including intelligence reporting collected 
or held by the DIA; and
    (4) A detailed assessment of whether SARS-CoV-2 leaked from 
the WIV, thus creating the COVID-19 global pandemic, including 
intelligence reporting collected or held by the DIA.
    The report shall be submitted in unclassified form, but may 
include a classified annex.

 Report on Threats Regarding Weapons of Mass Destruction by China and 
                                 Russia

    The Committee directs the Director of the Defense 
Intelligence Agency to submit an unclassified report to the 
House Armed Services Committee by March 4, 2022 containing a 
description of the efforts underway by China and Russia 
regarding chemical and biological weaponization.

  Secretary of Defense briefing related to influence efforts on U.S. 
                    employees by foreign governments

    The Committee recognizes that foreign competitors and 
adversaries target for espionage employees of the Department of 
Defense or employees of contractors of the Department of 
Defense. The committee also recognizes the potential for grave 
damage to national security when such employees are persuaded 
by foreign governments to steal information, intellectual 
property, or maliciously access Department of Defense systems. 
The Department has a responsibility to inform and educate those 
companies and entities on the risk of employees being targeted 
to commit espionage. Therefore, the Committee directs the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Intelligence and Security to provide a 
briefing to the House Committee on Armed Services by March 2, 
2022, on the Department's efforts to inform and educate 
entities contracting with the Department about efforts 
targeting employees to commit espionage.

                   Ubiquitous Technical Surveillance

    The committee recognizes the risks presented by the 
proliferation of ubiquitous technical surveillance (UTS) 
technologies, particularly in the era of Great Power 
Competition, and commends the Department of Defense's efforts 
to comprehensively address the issue. The committee urges the 
Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency, as the leader in 
providing virtual security to the Department of Defense, to 
prioritize and resource advanced technologies, training, 
tactics, and procedures that enable the intelligence community 
and special operation forces to counter UTS and successfully 
execute traditional and irregular warfare operations.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Director of the 
Defense Intelligence Agency to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services by February 4, 2022, on current, 
developing, and anticipated UTS challenges as well as current 
tactics, supporting technologies, techniques, policies, 
procedures, and requirements.

                             Other Matters


                 Chemical Weapons Stockpile Destruction

    The committee recognizes that, as a signatory to the 
Chemical Weapons Convention, the United States is obligated to 
destroy the U.S. inventory of lethal chemical agents and 
munitions. The committee further recognizes that the Department 
of Defense is responsible for and working toward destroying 100 
percent of the remaining chemical weapons stockpile no later 
than December 31, 2023, as required by section 1521 of title 
50, United States Code, as amended. The committee expects that 
all necessary efforts will be undertaken to ensure that the 
United States remains in compliance with this mandatory 
destruction date. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Nuclear, Chemical, and 
Biological Defense Programs to provide a briefing to the House 
Committee on Armed Services not later than December 31, 2021, 
on the status and progress of this requirement, and any 
challenges to meeting the mandatory destruction date.

                      Defense Biosecurity Efforts

    The committee recognizes the importance of biosecurity and 
the potential threats posed by the proliferation of advanced 
gene editing technologies by state and non-state actors. During 
the course of its regular operations, the Department of Defense 
(DoD) routinely comes into possession of personally 
identifiable information, biometrics, and other sensitive 
personal information. The committee recognizes the importance 
of ensuring we protect our service members' sensitive 
information against current and future threats posed by 
nefarious actors or mishandling of data. As biotechnology 
capabilities have become more democratized and globally 
accessible, the strategic importance of securing service 
members' genetic data has become more critical, as highlighted 
in a December 2019 memorandum from the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Intelligence and Security stating, ``Exposing 
sensitive genetic information to outside parties poses personal 
and operational risk to service members.'' The committee is 
concerned that the potential threats posed by the proliferation 
of advanced gene editing technologies and genetic data has 
become more worrisome in light of the COVID-19 global pandemic 
and its impact on military readiness and U.S. economic and 
national security. These concerns have been heightened based on 
the significant increase in high profile cyber-attacks and 
breaches that have impacted U.S. government agencies, including 
the Department of Defense, defense industrial base entities, 
and the impact these breaches may have on service member's 
genetic information. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide an unclassified report, with 
the option of a classified appendix, to the House Committee on 
Armed Services, not later than June 1, 2022, on biosecurity 
efforts across the Department of Defense. To the extent 
possible, the unclassified report shall include the following:
    (1) the degree to which the Department of Defense has 
assessed the biosecurity of its systems maintaining or 
processing service member's genetic information;
    (2) the identification of any Department of Defense or 
contractor breaches over the previous five years that may have 
exposed service member's genetic information;
    (3) an assessment of the risk posed by the proliferation of 
gene editing technologies;
    (4) an assessment of the risk posed by the transfer of 
service member's genetic data to foreign countries, including 
China;
    (5) the extent to which the Department of Defense provides 
biosecurity guidelines or standards in defense funded research 
and development programs;
    (6) the extent to which the Department of Defense has 
invested in new technologies to secure service members' genetic 
data.

       Fielding of the Conventional Prompt Strike Weapons System

    The Committee commends the Department's plan to rapidly 
field the Conventional Prompt Strike (CPS) weapon system. The 
Committee believes similar commitment and transparency is 
required to develop new technologies and advanced capabilities 
needed for CPS to keep pace and ultimately surpass the 
capabilities of our adversaries. Therefore, the Committee 
encourages the Secretary of the Navy to budget CPS Advanced 
Capabilities activities in a separate project its next budget 
submission. The Committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
provide a report to the House Armed Services Committee on the 
fielding of the Conventional Prompt Strike program by March 1, 
2022.

                Strategy for Biological Defense Vaccines

    The committee recognizes the devastating impact that 
biological threats, whether naturally occurring or deliberate, 
can have on U.S. national security, as evidenced by the COVID-
19 pandemic. The committee believes that advances in science 
and biotechnology underscore the need for U.S. Food and Drug 
Administration (FDA) approved vaccines to protect the 
warfighter.
    The committee understands that the Department of Defense 
defunded two vaccine programs, the botulinum toxin vaccine and 
plague vaccine, after persistent manufacturing challenges. 
Nonetheless, the committee recognizes the imperative that the 
Department of Defense ensure reliable access to safe and 
effective vaccines to protect U.S. service members against 
biological agents, including against botulinum toxin and 
plague.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees by 
December 31, 2021, on the strategy for acquiring vaccines for 
the Department of Defense. The report shall include the 
following:
    (1) identification of each vaccine currently being pursued, 
and for each, an assessment of the time and cost to achieve a 
viable, FDA-approved product;
    (2) identification of the work completed on botulinum toxin 
and plague and details on potential courses of action for 
utilizing the work conducted for those programs, including cost 
and time;
    (3) countermeasures being developed for each biological 
agent identified in (1) and (2); and
    (4) an assessment of the collaboration undertaken with 
partners and allies to develop or otherwise procure vaccines.

    Testing Infrastructure to Support Strategic and Missile Defense 
                                Programs

    The committee notes that developing and fielding hypersonic 
offensive and defensive capabilities continues to be a priority 
for the Department of Defense, with multiple programs of record 
across the services and agencies. As a component of each of 
these efforts, testing infrastructure continues to be 
highlighted as an area in which the United States lacks 
infrastructure and capacity to conduct needed subscale, 
developmental, and operational testing, in addition to 
extensive modeling and simulation needed to validate system 
performance prior to production and deployment. The same 
infrastructure is also needed for other strategic systems, such 
as the Ground Based Strategic Deterrent (GBSD), Long Range 
Stand Off Weapon (LRSO), and Next Generation Interceptor (NGI).
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Research and Engineering, in coordination with the 
Secretaries of the military departments, Director of 
Operational Test and Evaluation, and Director of the Missile 
Defense Agency, to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees not later than February 28, 2022, on an integrated 
master plan for the required testing infrastructure needed 
across hypersonic, strategic, and missile defense portfolios 
over the next 10-year timeframe, including:
    (1) an integrated ground and flight test schedule for 
hypersonic offensive and defensive programs in addition to 
GBSD, LRSO, and NGI, for fiscal years 2022 through 2028;
    (2) an inventory of flight and ground test ranges and other 
needed testing infrastructure, such as wind tunnels and arc 
heaters, required to meet subscale, developmental, and 
operational testing of programs of record;
    (3) a list of modernization efforts that support strategic 
and missile defense testing, including a listing of projects 
and the associated National Environmental Policy Act 
initiatives and timelines;
    (4) a list of existing and planned facilities at academic 
institutions and other Federal agencies (e.g., National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration) that have hypersonic 
testing capability, including propulsion systems, combustor 
testing for transition from gas turbine to scramjet, and 
scramjet testing for dual mode propulsion;
    (5) deficiencies that exist either in flight test ranges or 
areas such as wind tunnels and arc heaters, that would need to 
be addressed in the next 10-year timeframe to support required 
testing; and
    (6) how high fidelity modeling and simulation could augment 
ground and flight testing requirements.

                         LEGISLATIVE PROVISIONS


                      Subtitle A--Space Activities


   Section 1601--Improvements to Tactically Responsive Space Launch 
                                Program

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
the successful tactically responsive launch-2 mission conducted 
by the U.S. Space Force, and how it should be used as a 
pathfinder to inform future concepts of operation for 
responsive launches. This section would further modify section 
1609 of the William M. (Mac) National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) to require the 
Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Director of 
National Intelligence, to support the tactically responsive 
launch program to ensure that the program addresses: (1) The 
ability to rapidly place on-orbit systems to respond to urgent 
needs of the commanders of the combatant commands or to 
reconstitute space assets and capabilities to support national 
security priorities; and (2) The entire launch process, 
including with respect to launch services, satellite bus and 
payload availability, and operations and sustainment on-orbit.
    This section would also require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a plan to Congress on the future of the tactically 
responsive space launch program.

          Section 1602--National Security Space Launch Program

    This section would express a sense of congress that the 
Department of Defense and National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) 
should, to the extent possible, use services under phase two of 
the National Security Space Launch (NSSL) program. This section 
would also establish policy that the NSSL program should be 
used to the maximum extent possible for space launches that 
fall within the requirements of phase two and maximize 
continuous competition as the U.S. Space Force initiates 
planning for phase three of the program.
    This section would further require a congressional 
notification within seven days in the event the Department or 
NRO determines a launch that could be met under the 
requirements of NSSL phase two will use an alternative launch 
procurement approach. Lastly, the section would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Director of 
National Intelligence, Chief of Space Operations, and the 
Director of the Space Development Agency, submit a report 
within 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act on plans 
of the Secretary to address, with respect to launches that 
would be procured in addition to or outside of launches under 
NSSL phase two, emerging launch requirements in the areas of 
space access, mobility, and logistics.

   Section 1603--Classification Review of Programs of the Space Force

    This section would require the Chief of Space Operations to 
conduct a classification review of each classified program 
under the authority of the Space Force to determine if any 
programs should be reclassified or declassified. The review 
would need to be conducted in coordination with the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Space Policy, and any other heads of 
elements of the Department of Defense as appropriate. This 
section would also require the Chief of Space Operations to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees on any 
programs that would be subject to a classification change due 
to the review conducted.

  Section 1604--Report on Range of the Future Initiative of the Space 
                                 Force

    This section would express the sense of Congress regarding 
the importance of improving infrastructure on U.S. Space Force 
launch ranges to meet future demand. The section would also 
require the Chief of Space Operations to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees on the Space Force ``Range of 
the Future'' initiative, specific legal authorities that would 
need to be changed to address long-term challenges to the long-
term physical infrastructure at U.S. Space Force launch ranges, 
and any proposals to further improve infrastructure at the 
ranges, including legislative action needed to implement those 
proposals.

Section 1605--Norms of Behavior for International Rules-Based Order in 
                                 Space

    This section would require the covered officials to each 
submit to the National Space Council, not later than 90 days 
after the date of the enactment of this Act, a list of 
prioritized objectives with respect to establishing norms of 
behavior in space to be addressed through bilateral and 
multilateral negotiations relating to an international rules-
based order in space. The goal would be to bolster and further 
develop the international rules-based order, particularly as it 
applies to the space domain. The list of covered officials 
includes:
    (1) the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, in 
consultation with the Chief of Space Operations, the Commander 
of U.S. Space Command, and the Director of National Geospatial-
Intelligence Agency;
    (2) the Assistant Secretary of State for Arms Control, 
Verification, and Compliance;
    (3) the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration; and
    (4) the Director of the National Reconnaissance Office.
    This section would further require the National Space 
Council to consolidate the lists received, and the Secretary of 
State, in collaboration with other heads of relevant 
departments and agencies of the Federal Government, to use such 
consolidated list as a guide to establish a framework for 
bilateral and multilateral negotiations.
    Lastly, this section would require the National Space 
Council to provide the consolidated list of priorities to the 
congressional defense committees; the Committee on Foreign 
Affairs, the Committee on Science, Space, and Technology, and 
the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of 
Representatives; and the Committee on Foreign Relations, the 
Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation, and the 
Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate.

    Section 1606--Programs of Record of Space Force and Commercial 
                              Capabilities

    This section would prohibit the Service Acquisition 
Executive for Space Systems and Programs from establishing a 
new program of record until a certification has been provided 
to the congressional defense committees that there is no 
commercially available capability that would meet the threshold 
objectives for that proposed program.

 Section 1607--Clarification of Domestic Services and Capabilities in 
             Leveraging Commercial Satellite Remote Sensing

    This section would modify section 1612(c) of the William M. 
(Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2021 (Public Law 116-283) by further defining the 
definition of the term ``domestic'' to include companies that 
operate in the United States and have active mitigation 
agreements pursuant to the National Industrial Security 
Program.

 Section 1608--National Security Council Briefing on Potential Harmful 
               Interference to Global Positioning System

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing at the highest level of classification to 
the National Security Council, the Department of Commerce, and 
the Federal Communications Commission, within 30 days after the 
date of the enactment of this Act, on the harmful interference 
from the 1525 to 1559 megahertz bands and 1626.5 to 1660.5 
megahertz bands to the Global Positioning System or other 
tactical Department of Defense systems. Within 7 days after 
providing the briefing, the Secretary of Defense shall provide 
the same briefing to congressional defense and commerce 
committees.

  Subtitle B--Defense Intelligence and Intelligence-Related Activities


 Section 1611--Notification of Certain Threats to United States Armed 
                     Forces by Foreign Governments

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
notify Congress when the Secretary determines with high 
confidence that an official of a foreign government plans or 
takes some other substantive step that is intended to cause the 
death of, or serious bodily injury to, any member of the United 
States Armed Forces.

     Section 1612--Strategy and Plan to Implement Certain Defense 
                          Intelligence Reforms

    This section would require the Director of National 
Intelligence, in coordination with the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Intelligence and Security, to develop and implement 
a strategy and plan to support the priorities of the combatant 
commanders, including efforts to counter the malign activities 
of adversaries of the United States.

Section 1613--Authority of Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence 
      and Security to Engage in Fundraising for Certain Nonprofit 
                             Organizations

    This section would authorize the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Intelligence and Security to engage in certain fundraising 
in an official capacity for the benefit of nonprofit 
organizations that provide support to surviving dependents of 
deceased employees of the Defense Intelligence Enterprise or 
for the welfare, education, or recreation of employees and 
former employees of the Defense Intelligence Enterprise and the 
dependents of such employees and former employees.

   Section 1614--Executive Agent for Explosive Ordnance Intelligence

    This section would designate the Director of the Defense 
Intelligence Agency as the executive agent for explosive 
ordnance intelligence.

 Section 1615--Inclusion of Explosive Ordnance Intelligence in Defense 
                     Intelligence Agency Activities

    This section would add explosive ordnance intelligence to 
the activities of the Defense Intelligence Agency.

                       Subtitle C--Nuclear Forces


Section 1621--Exercises of Nuclear Command, Control, and Communications 
                                 System

    This section would require the President to participate in 
at least one large-scale nuclear command, control, and 
communications exercise within the first year of assuming 
office, per term, and would include waiver authority on a case-
by-case basis.

   Section 1622--Independent Review of Nuclear Command, Control, and 
                         Communications System

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
enter into an agreement with the National Academies of 
Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to conduct a review of the 
current plans, policies, and programs of the nuclear command, 
control, and communications system, and such plans, policies, 
and programs that are planned through 2030. This section also 
would require an interim briefing on the review not later than 
September 1, 2022.

 Section 1623--Review of Safety, Security, and Reliability of Nuclear 
                      Weapons and Related Systems

    This section would direct the Secretary of Defense to 
create an independent advisory committee to review the safety, 
security, and reliability of U.S. nuclear weapons systems; 
nuclear command, control, and communications; and the 
integrated tactical warning/attack assessment system. This 
section also contains findings that discuss a similar previous 
study conducted in 1990. The review would last not more than 1 
year and provide options and recommendations to the Secretary 
of Defense on altering U.S. nuclear modernization programs to 
cybersecurity, strengthen safeguards, and prevent unauthorized 
or inadvertent incidents. The review would also provide options 
for nuclear risk reduction measures focused on confidence and 
predictability that United States could carry out alone or with 
near-peer adversaries.

   Section 1624--Review of Engineering and Manufacturing Development 
         Contract for Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent Program

    This section would require the Secretary of the Air Force 
to conduct a review of the Ground Based Strategic Deterrent 
program and provide a report to the congressional defense 
committees within 270 days after the date of the enactment of 
this Act. This section would also require the Secretary of the 
Air Force to provide a briefing to the congressional defense 
committees on implementation of the recommendations of the 
review within 90 days of submittal of the report to the 
congressional defense committees. The review would examine:
    (1) the schedule, cost, and execution of Ground Based 
Strategic Deterrent Program;
    (2) the ability of the program to leverage competition 
during the operations and maintenance phase of the program;
    (3) the ability of the program to implement industry best 
practices; and
    (4) the ability of the program to leverage digital 
engineering.
    This section would require the Secretary of the Air Force 
to appoint at least two experts with expertise from outside of 
the defense industry to the review.

                Section 1625--Long-Range Standoff Weapon

    This section would require the Secretary of the Air Force, 
before awarding the procurement portion of the long-range 
standoff weapon (LRSO) contract, to provide the following the 
congressional defense committees:
    (1) an updated cost estimate for the procurement portion of 
the LRSO;
    (2) a certification that Future Years Defense Program 
funding includes or will include estimated funding for the 
program specified in such cost estimate; and
    (3) a copy of the justification and approval documentation 
regarding the Secretary determining to award a sole-source 
contract for the program, including with respect to how the 
Secretary will manage the cost of the program in the absence of 
competition.
    This section would also require the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing, not later than 90 days after the 
date of the enactment of this Act, on how the timely 
development of the LRSO may serve as a hedge to delays in other 
nuclear modernization efforts, how potential W80-4 warhead 
delays may affect the LRSO initial operational capability, 
options to adjust the budget profile of the LRSO to ensure the 
program remains on schedule, a plan to reconcile the cost 
estimates of the Air Force and the Director of Cost Assessment 
and Program Evaluation, and a plan to ensure best value to the 
United States for the procurement portion of the program.

    Section 1626--Prohibition on Reduction of the Intercontinental 
                Ballistic Missiles of the United States

    This section would prohibit the Department of Defense from 
reducing, or preparing to reduce, the responsiveness or alert 
level of the intercontinental ballistic missiles of the United 
States during fiscal year 2022. It would also prohibit the 
Department from reducing the number of intercontinental 
ballistic missiles of the United States below 400. The 
provision contains exceptions to the prohibition for 
maintenance, sustainment, safety, security, and reliability.

    Section 1627--Limitation on Availability of Certain Funds until 
Submission of Information Relating to Proposed Budget for Nuclear-Armed 
                      Sea-Launched Cruise Missile

    This section would limit the availability of not more than 
75 percent of the funds for the Office of the Secretary of the 
Navy for travel until the Secretary submits to the 
congressional defense committees all written communications by 
the personnel of the Department of Defense regarding the 
proposed budget amount or limitation for the nuclear-armed sea-
launched cruise missile.

    Section 1628--Limitation on Availability of Certain Funds until 
Submission of Information Relating to Nuclear-Armed Sea-Launched Cruise 
                                Missile

    This section would limit the funds available to the Office 
of the Secretary of Defense for travel to not more than 75 
percent, except for the Secretary and the Deputy Secretary, 
until the Secretary submits the analysis of alternatives for 
the nuclear-armed sea-launched cruise missile and provides a 
briefing on the analysis.

   Section 1629--Annual Certification on Readiness of Minuteman III 
                  Intercontinental Ballistic Missiles

    This section would require, not later than March 1, 2022, 
and annually thereafter until the ground-based strategic 
deterrent program achieves initial operating capability, the 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs to certify whether the state of 
readiness of the Minuteman III missile system requires placing 
heavy bombers equipped with nuclear warheads and associated 
refueling tanker aircraft on alert status.

       Section 1630--Cost Estimate to Re-Alert Long-Range Bombers

    This section would require the Secretary of the Air Force 
to develop a cost estimate to re-alert the long-range bombers 
in the absence of a ground-based leg of the nuclear triad. It 
also contains findings of the Commander of Strategic Command 
related to the issue.

    Section 1631--Notification regarding Intercontinental Ballistic 
                           Missiles of China

    This section would require the Commander of Strategic 
Command to notify the congressional defense committees in the 
event that the commander determines that the number of 
intercontinental ballistic missiles in China's active inventory 
exceeds those of the United States, or that the number of 
warheads equipped on such missiles exceeds the number equipped 
on those of the United States. It would further require the 
commander to provide an assessment of Chinese intercontinental 
ballistic missiles and associated warheads, and a strategy to 
deter China.

  Section 1632--Information regarding Review of Minuteman III Service 
                         Life Extension Program

    This section would require the Secretary of Defense to 
provide information to the congressional defense committees 
regarding any review undertaken by a federally funded research 
and development center regarding a service life extension 
program for the Minuteman III missile system.

    Section 1633--Sense of Congress regarding Nuclear Posture Review

    This section would contain the sense of Congress on issues 
that should be considered as part of the Nuclear Posture Review 
initiated in 2021.

                  Subtitle D--Missile Defense Programs


  Section 1641--Directed Energy Programs for Ballistic and Hypersonic 
                            Missile Defense

    This section would provide findings that there are 
promising directed energy technologies for ballistic and 
hypersonic defense applications, and that those efforts have 
consistently not been funded in the Missile Defense Agency 
budget for the past several fiscal year budget requests, 
despite continued support from yearly appropriation and 
authorization bills. The section would also express the sense 
of Congress that these efforts should continue within the 
Missile Defense Agency for potential future hypersonic and 
ballistic missile defense capabilities. Finally, the section 
would provide authority to the Secretary of Defense to delegate 
to the Director of the Missile Defense Agency the authority to 
budget for, direct, and manage directed energy programs 
applicable for ballistic and hypersonic missile defense.

 Section 1642--Notification of Changes to Non-Standard Acquisition and 
 Requirements Processes and Responsibilities of Missile Defense Agency

    This section would prohibit the Secretary of Defense from 
making any changes to the Missile Defense Agency non-standard 
acquisition and requirements processes until certain conditions 
were met including consulting with several offices within the 
Department of Defense, providing certifications, and report to 
the c