[Senate Report 116-48]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]


                                                         Calendar No. 114
                                                      
 116th Congress  }                                             {  Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session     }                                             {  116-48
                                                        
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     

                                                       


        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2020

                              R E P O R T

                         [TO ACCOMPANY S. 1790]

                                   on

     TO AUTHORIZE APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2020 FOR MILITARY 
ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, FOR MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, AND 
   FOR DEFENSE ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, TO PRESCRIBE 
   MILITARY PERSONNEL STRENGTHS FOR SUCH FISCAL YEAR, AND FOR OTHER 
                                PURPOSES

                               ----------                              

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES
                          UNITED STATES SENATE




                 June 11, 2019.--Ordered to be printed
                 
                 
                 
                 



        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2020
        
        
        
        
        
        
                                                       Calendar No. 114
        
116th Congress  }                                            {   Report
                                  SENATE                         
1st Session     }                                            {   116-48
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     

                                                       


        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2020

                              R E P O R T

                         [TO ACCOMPANY S. 1790]

                                   on

     TO AUTHORIZE APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2020 FOR MILITARY 
ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, FOR MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, AND 
   FOR DEFENSE ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, TO PRESCRIBE 
   MILITARY PERSONNEL STRENGTHS FOR SUCH FISCAL YEAR, AND FOR OTHER 
                                PURPOSES

                               __________

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES

                          UNITED STATES SENATE




                 June 11, 2019.--Ordered to be printed
                 
                 
                 
                               _________ 

                U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING OFFICE
                   
36-532                 WASHINGTON : 2019                       
                 


  

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES

                  JAMES M. INHOFE, Oklahoma, Chairman
ROGER F. WICKER, Mississippi         JACK REED, Rhode Island
DEB FISCHER, Nebraska                JEANNE SHAHEEN, New Hampshire
TOM COTTON, Arkansas                 KIRSTEN E. GILLIBRAND, New York
MIKE ROUNDS, South Dakota            RICHARD BLUMENTHAL, Connecticut
JONI ERNST, Iowa                     MAZIE K. HIRONO, Hawaii
THOM TILLIS, North Carolina          TIM KAINE, Virginia
DAN SULLIVAN, Alaska                 ANGUS S. KING, Jr., Maine
DAVID PERDUE, Georgia                MARTIN HEINRICH, New Mexico
KEVIN CRAMER, North Dakota           ELIZABETH WARREN, Massachusetts
MARTHA McSALLY, Arizona              GARY C. PETERS, Michigan
RICK SCOTT, Florida                  JOE MANCHIN, West Virginia
MARSHA BLACKBURN, Tennessee          TAMMY DUCKWORTH, Illinois
JOSH HAWLEY, Missouri                DOUG JONES, Alabama
                      John Bonsell, Staff Director
               Elizabeth L. King, Minority Staff Director
               

                                  (II)

  
                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
REPORT TO ACCOMPANY S. 1790
Purpose of the Bill..............................................     1
Committee Overview...............................................     2
Budgetary Effects of This Act (Sec. 4)...........................     5
Summary of Discretionary Authorizations and Budget Authority 
  Implication....................................................     5
DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AUTHORIZATIONS.................     7
TITLE I--PROCUREMENT.............................................     7
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................     7
        Authorization of appropriations (sec. 101)...............     7
    Subtitle B--Army Programs....................................     7
        Sense of Senate on Army's approach to capability drops 1 
          and 2 of the Distributed Common Ground System-Army 
          program (sec. 111).....................................     7
        Authority of the Secretary of the Army to waive certain 
          limitations related to Distributed Common Ground 
          System-Army Increment 1 (sec. 112).....................     7
    Subtitle C--Navy Programs....................................     7
        Modification of prohibition on availability of funds for 
          Navy port waterborne security barriers (sec. 121)......     7
        Capabilities based assessment for naval vessels that 
          carry fixed-wing aircraft (sec. 122)...................     8
        Ford-class aircraft carrier cost limitation baselines 
          (sec. 123).............................................     8
        Design and construction of amphibious transport dock 
          designated LPD-31 (sec. 124)...........................     9
        LHA Replacement Amphibious Assault Ship Program (sec. 
          125)...................................................     9
        Limitation on availability of funds for the Littoral 
          Combat Ship (sec. 126).................................     9
        Limitation on the next new class of Navy large surface 
          combatants (sec. 127)..................................    10
        Refueling and complex overhauls of the U.S.S. John C. 
          Stennis and U.S.S. Harry S. Truman (sec. 128)..........    10
        Report on carrier wing composition (sec. 129)............    11
    Subtitle D--Air Force Programs...............................    12
        Requirement to align Air Force fighter force structure 
          with National Defense Strategy and reports (sec. 141)..    12
        Requirement to establish the use of an Agile DevOps 
          software development solution as an alternative for 
          Joint Strike Fighter Autonomic Logistics Information 
          System (sec. 142)......................................    12
        Report on feasibility of multiyear contract for 
          procurement of JASSM-ER missiles (sec. 143)............    12
        Air Force aggressor squadron modernization (sec. 144)....    13
        Air Force plan for the Combat Rescue Helicopter fielding 
          (sec. 145).............................................    13
        Military type certification for AT-6 and A-29 light 
          attack experimentation aircraft (sec. 146).............    13
    Subtitle E--Defense-Wide, Joint, and Multiservice Matters....    13
        Limitation on availability of funds for communication 
          systems lacking certain resiliency features (sec. 151).    13
        F-35 sustainment cost (sec. 152).........................    13
        Economic order quantity contracting authority for F-35 
          Joint Strike Fighter program (sec. 153)................    14
        Repeal of tactical unmanned vehicle common data link 
          requirement (sec. 154).................................    14
    Budget Items.................................................    14
        Army.....................................................    14
            Utility fixed wing aircraft..........................    14
            AH-64 Apache Block IIIB New Build....................    14
            UH-60M Blackhawk.....................................    15
            UH-60V Conversion....................................    15
            Interim Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 
              2..................................................    15
            Terminal High Altitude Area Defense Army procurement.    16
            Stryker lethality....................................    16
            Bradley program......................................    16
            Abrams upgrade program...............................    16
            Joint Light Tactical Vehicle.........................    17
            Joint Light Tactical Vehicle.........................    17
            Q53 extended range radar.............................    17
            Integrated Personnel and Pay System--Army............    18
            C4I life-cycle replacement at Joint Intelligence 
              Operations Center Europe Analytic Center...........    18
            Army contract writing system.........................    18
            Robotics and Applique Systems........................    18
        NAVY.....................................................    18
            F-35C................................................    18
            F-35B................................................    19
            F-5 aircraft procurement.............................    19
            F-35B Spares.........................................    19
            F-35C Spares.........................................    19
            F-35B Engine.........................................    20
            Tomahawk.............................................    20
            LCS Over-the-Horizon missile.........................    20
            MK-48 torpedo........................................    20
            Columbia-class submarine advance procurement.........    21
            Carrier replacement program..........................    21
            Virginia-class submarine program.....................    21
            Virginia-class submarine advance procurement.........    22
            Refueling and complex overhauls of aircraft carriers.    22
            Refueling and complex overhaul advance procurement...    23
            Arleigh Burke-class destroyers.......................    23
            Arleigh Burke-class destroyer advance procurement....    23
            LPD-class amphibious transport ship..................    23
            LPD-class amphibious transport ship advance 
              procurement........................................    24
            LHA replacement amphibious assault ship..............    24
            Outfitting...........................................    24
            Service craft........................................    25
            Expeditionary Fast Transport (T-EPF 14) conversion...    25
            Ship to shore connector advance procurement..........    25
            Hull, mechanical, and electrical upgrades for Arleigh 
              Burke-class destroyers.............................    25
            Expeditionary mine countermeasures...................    26
            Littoral Combat Ship mine countermeasures mission 
              modules............................................    26
            Knifefish............................................    26
            Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program.......    26
            Ship's signal exploitation equipment expansion.......    27
            Next Generation Surface Search Radar.................    27
            Sonobuoys............................................    27
            Electronic Procurement System........................    27
        Air Force................................................    27
            F-35A................................................    27
            F-35 advanced procurement............................    28
            F-15X................................................    28
            KC-46................................................    28
            F-15 ADCP............................................    28
            F-15 IFF modernization...............................    29
            F-15 Longerons.......................................    29
            F-15 Radar...........................................    29
            F-16 modernization...................................    29
            F-15C EPAWSS.........................................    30
            Command and control sustainability...................    30
            F-35A Spares.........................................    30
            KC-46 Spares.........................................    30
            RQ-4 spare parts.....................................    31
            Minuteman III Modifications..........................    31
            Air-Launched Cruise Missile..........................    31
            F-35 training and range modernization................    31
            Air Force Integrated Personnel and Pay System........    31
        Defense Wide.............................................    32
            Sharkseer transfer...................................    32
            Terminal High Altitude Area Defense Missile Defense 
              Agency procurement.................................    32
            Sharkseer transfer...................................    32
            Radio Frequency Countermeasure System................    32
            Transfer OCO to Base.................................    33
        Items of Special Interest................................    33
            A-10 modernization...................................    33
            Acquisition strategy for LHA-9 and LHA-10............    33
            Acquisition strategy for LPD Flight II-class ships...    34
            Active Protection System for Stryker.................    34
            Adaptive Threat Force................................    34
            Advanced Helicopter Training System..................    35
            Advanced survivability modeling capability for air-
              launched weapons...................................    35
            Aerospace ground equipment for B-52 Stratofortress...    36
            Air Force Active Association.........................    36
            Air Force Future ISR Integration Strategy............    36
            Air Force ISR SIGINT data integration................    37
            Army rotary wing munitions capabilities, capability 
              gaps, and solutions................................    38
            ATACMS Requirement...................................    38
            Bomber roadmap.......................................    39
            Bradley program......................................    39
            Building Partner Combat Air Capacity.................    40
            Capability to counter supersonic and hypersonic 
              cruise missiles....................................    40
            Carbon fiber wheels and graphitic foam for Next 
              Generation Combat Vehicle..........................    41
            CH-47F Block II Program..............................    41
            CH-53K King Stallion program.........................    42
            Close combat lethality task force....................    42
            Columbia-class schedule..............................    43
            DOD efforts to improve friendly force identification.    43
            Future Vertical Lift Capability Set 3 potential 
              acceleration.......................................    44
            Global Broadcast System Technologies.................    45
            Guided missile frigate (FFG(X))......................    45
            Improved Turbine Engine Program......................    46
            Improving Air Force acquisition and sustainment 
              processes..........................................    46
            Marine Corps nano vertical takeoff and landing 
              unmanned aerial systems............................    46
            Metrics for evaluating potential impacts to airspace.    46
            Mobile aircrew restraint system......................    47
            Modular rugged power devices.........................    47
            Mounted A-PNT solutions..............................    47
            MQ-1 Gray Eagle briefing.............................    48
            Multiyear block buy for F-35.........................    48
            Operational energy of generator sets.................    48
            Persistent Intelligence, Surveillance and 
              Reconnaisance (ISR) and heavy payloads.............    49
            Personal recovery devices for servicemembers.........    50
            Reliability growth of systems on Ford-class aircraft 
              carriers...........................................    50
            Report on future force design alternatives for 
              Department of the Air Force........................    51
            Report on impact to force structure of using aircraft 
              for missile defense................................    52
            Robotics and autonomous systems......................    52
            Size, weight, power reductions of naval combat 
              systems............................................    53
            Small-Unit Support Vehicle replacement...............    53
            Submarine industrial base and parts availability.....    53
            Supporting and expanding the submarine sub-
              contracting industrial base........................    54
            Survivable artillery.................................    54
            Tactical wheeled vehicle industrial base.............    54
            TH-57 replacement....................................    55
            UH-1N replacement....................................    55
            Unmanned aerial systems training locations...........    56
            Vehicle Reconnaissance System........................    56
            Virginia-class hull treatment briefing...............    56
            Western Army Aviation Training Site (WAATS) for FMS..    57
TITLE II--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION............    59
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................    59
        Authorization of appropriations (sec. 201)...............    59
    Subtitle B--Program Requirements, Restrictions, and 
      Limitations................................................    59
        Development and acquisition strategy to procure secure, 
          low probability of detection data link network 
          capability (sec. 211)..................................    59
        Establishment of secure next-generation wireless network 
          (5G) infrastructure for the Nevada Test and Training 
          Range and base infrastructure (sec. 212)...............    59
        Limitation and report on Indirect Fire Protection 
          Capability Increment 2 enduring capability (sec. 213)..    60
        Electromagnetic spectrum sharing research and development 
          program (sec. 214).....................................    60
        Sense of the Senate on the Advanced Battle Management 
          System (sec. 215)......................................    61
        Modification of proof of concept commercialization 
          program (sec. 216).....................................    61
        Modification of Defense quantum information science and 
          technology research and development program (sec. 217).    61
        Technology and National Security Fellowship (sec. 218)...    62
        Direct Air Capture and Blue Carbon Removal Technology 
          Program (sec. 219).....................................    62
    Subtitle C--Reports and Other Matters........................    62
        National security emerging biotechnologies research and 
          development program (sec. 231).........................    62
        Cyber science and technology activities roadmap and 
          reports (sec. 232).....................................    63
        Requiring certain microelectronics products and services 
          meet trusted supply chain and operational security 
          standards (sec. 233)...................................    63
        Technical correction to Global Research Watch Program 
          (sec. 234).............................................    64
        Additional technology areas for expedited access to 
          technical talent (sec. 235)............................    64
        Sense of the Senate and periodic briefings on the 
          security and availability of fifth-generation (5G) 
          wireless network technology and production (sec. 236)..    64
        Transfer of Combating Terrorism Technical Support Office 
          (sec. 237).............................................    64
        Briefing on cooperative defense technology programs and 
          risks of technology transfer to China or Russia (sec. 
          238)...................................................    65
        Modification of authority for prizes for advanced 
          technology achievements (sec. 239).....................    65
        Use of funds for Strategic Environmental Research 
          Program, Environmental Security Technical Certification 
          Program, and Operational Energy Capability Improvement 
          (sec. 240).............................................    65
        Funding for the Sea-Launched Cruise Missile-Nuclear 
          analysis of alternatives (sec. 241)....................    65
        Review and assessment pertaining to transition of 
          Department of Defense-originated dual-use technology 
          (sec. 242).............................................    66
    Budget Items.................................................    66
        Army.....................................................    66
            Defense research sciences for counter unmanned aerial 
              vehicle research...................................    66
            3D printing research.................................    66
            Cyber Collaborative Research Alliance................    67
            Multi-Domain Task Force for the Indo-Pacific region..    67
            Advanced materials manufacturing processes...........    67
            Biopolymer structural materials research.............    68
            Advanced materials for infrastructure................    68
            Next Generation Combat Vehicle technology............    68
            Composite tube and propulsion research...............    69
            Printed armament components..........................    69
            C3I Applied Cyber....................................    69
            Female warfighter performance research...............    69
            Long duration battery storage........................    70
            Computational manufacturing engineering..............    70
            Lightweight protective and hardening materials 
              research...........................................    70
            Robotic construction research........................    70
            Ground vehicle sustainment research..................    71
            Next generation combat vehicle advanced technology 
              for fuel cell propulsion and autonomous driving 
              control............................................    71
            Hypersonics testing research.........................    71
            Future Long Range Assault Aircraft (FLRAA)...........    72
            Hypersonic weapon system.............................    72
            Next Generation Squad Weapon--Automatic Rifle........    72
            Integrated Personnel and Pay System--Army............    72
            Army contract writing system.........................    73
            Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2......    73
            Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2 EMAM.    73
            Multi-Domain Artillery...............................    73
            Ground Robotics Squad Multipurpose Equipment 
              Transport (S-MET)..................................    74
            Next Generation Combat Vehicle 50mm gun..............    74
            Joint Light Tactical Vehicle.........................    74
            Cybersecurity threat simulation research.............    75
            Directed energy test capabilities....................    75
            CD ATACMS............................................    75
            Nanoscale materials manufacturing....................    75
        Navy.....................................................    76
            University Research Initiatives......................    76
            Carbon capture increase..............................    76
            Electric propulsion research.........................    76
            Energy resilience research...........................    76
            Force protection applied research....................    77
            Test bed for autonomous ship systems.................    77
            Interdisciplinary cyber research.....................    77
            Common picture applied research......................    77
            Applied warfighter safety and performance research...    78
            Electromagnetic systems applied research.............    78
            Navy industry-university undersea vehicle 
              technologies.......................................    78
            USMC Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD).........    79
            Mobile Unmanned/Manned Distributed Lethality Airborne 
              Network............................................    79
            Innovative Naval Prototypes (INP) advance technology 
              development........................................    79
            Littoral battlespace sensing autonomous undersea 
              vehicle............................................    79
            Large unmanned surface vessels.......................    80
            Advanced submarine system development................    80
            Large Surface Combatant concept advanced design......    81
            Large Surface Combatant preliminary design...........    81
            Advanced surface machinery system component 
              prototyping........................................    82
            Columbia-class submarines............................    82
            Littoral Combat Ship mission modules.................    82
            U.S. Marine Corps Additive Manufacturing Logistics 
              Software Pilot Program.............................    83
            Nuclear sea-launched cruise missile..................    83
            V-22 nacelle improvement program.....................    83
            Mine Development--Quickstrike JDAM ER................    84
            Information Technology Development...................    84
            CH-53K King Stallion program.........................    84
            Ship to Shore Connector..............................    84
            Transformational Reliable Acoustic Path Systems......    84
            Intelligent Power Management Systems.................    85
        Air Force................................................    85
            High energy X-ray materials structures research......    85
            Materials research...................................    85
            Aerospace Vehicle Technologies.......................    86
            Counter unmanned aerial systems research.............    86
            Cyberspace dominance technology research.............    86
            Quantum science research.............................    86
            High power microwave research........................    87
            Metals affordability research........................    87
            Acceleration of development of hypersonic quick 
              reaction capability and hypersonic airbreathing 
              weapon.............................................    87
            Shape morphing aircraft structures development.......    88
            Combat Search and Rescue advanced prototyping........    88
            Low Cost Attributable Aircraft Technology............    88
            Aerospace propulsion and power technology............    88
            Electronic combat technology.........................    89
            Advanced spacecraft technology.......................    89
            Advanced materials and materials manufacturing.......    89
            Battlespace knowledge and development demonstration..    90
            M-Code acceleration--advanced component development & 
              prototypes.........................................    90
            Rapid repair and sustainability increase.............    90
            Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent.....................    90
            Light Attack experiment..............................    91
            Cyber National Mission Force capabilities............    91
            ETERNALDARKNESS program development..................    91
            Joint Common Access Platform.........................    92
            Protected Tactical Enterprise Service................    92
            Protected Tactical Service...........................    92
            ERWn.................................................    92
            M-Code acceleration--system development & 
              demonstration......................................    93
            Space Fence..........................................    93
            Major T&E Investment.................................    93
            Utah test range instrumentation......................    93
            Investment in hypersonic research and infrastructure.    94
            5G Military Operational Test Capability..............    94
            Advanced Battle Management System base architecture..    95
            Air Force Integrated Personnel and Pay System........    95
            HC-130 RDT&E.........................................    95
            Airborne Launch Control System Replacement...........    95
            Advanced data transport flight test..................    96
            ISR automation.......................................    96
        Defense Wide.............................................    96
            Defense Established Program to Stimulate Competitive 
              Research...........................................    96
            Submarine industrial base workforce development......    97
            Aerospace education and research.....................    97
            Computer modeling of PFAS............................    97
            Cyber Security Research..............................    97
            Artificial intelligence commercial solutions.........    98
            Joint capability technology demonstrations...........    98
            Emerging capabilities technology development.........    98
            SERDP increase.......................................    98
            Program increase to support National Defense Strategy 
              technologies.......................................    99
            ESTCP increase.......................................    99
            MDA special programs.................................   100
            Neutral particle beam................................   100
            Hypervelocity Gun Weapon System......................   100
            Strategic Capabilities Office........................   101
            Trusted and assured microelectronics.................   101
            Rapid prototyping program............................   101
            Space Development Agency missile defense programs....   101
            Hypersonic and Ballistic Tracking Space Sensor.......   102
            Joint Mission Environment Test Capability............   102
            Technical Studies, Support, and Analysis.............   103
            Systems engineering..................................   103
            Defense Digital Service development support..........   103
            Advanced manufacturing systems.......................   103
            Composite manufacturing technologies.................   103
            Printed circuit boards...............................   104
            Rare earths materials research.......................   104
            Sharkseer transfer...................................   104
            Sharkseer transfer...................................   105
            Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency 
              activities.........................................   105
            Future Vertical Lift.................................   105
            Next Generation Information Communications Technology 
              (5G)...............................................   106
            Transfer from OCO to Base............................   106
    Items of Special Interest....................................   106
        Acquisition roadmaps for certain Navy unmanned systems...   106
        Advance power electronics................................   107
        Army Futures Command research budget realignments........   107
        Artificial intelligence and sensor fusion for force 
          protection.............................................   108
        Artificial intelligence for Army air and missile defense.   108
        Back-packable Communications Intelligence System.........   108
        Battlefield situational awareness........................   109
        Briefing on detection of uncharted wires and obstacles to 
          prevent aviation incidents.............................   109
        Demonstration pilots to demonstrate cost savings and 
          enhanced performance of anti-corrosion nanotechnologies   109
        Department of Defense artificial intelligence investment 
          inventory..............................................   110
        Flame resistant military uniforms with multi-spectral 
          sensor protection......................................   110
        High powered microwave test range asset..................   110
        Historically black colleges and universities support for 
          minority women in science, technology, engineering and 
          mathematics fields.....................................   111
        Hostile fire detection technology........................   111
        Human factors modeling and simulation....................   111
        Hypersonic development...................................   112
        Importance and use of United States Active Ionospheric 
          Research Facilities....................................   112
        Interdisciplinary expeditionary cybersecurity research...   113
        Light attack experiment..................................   113
        Multifunction capability to provide communications in 
          contested environments.................................   113
        Navy laser integration plans.............................   114
        Production-ready sources for hypersonic materials........   115
        Requirement for briefing on Advanced Battle Management 
          System acquisition strategy............................   115
        Use of commercial cloud services to support high 
          performance computing needs............................   115
TITLE III--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE.............................   117
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................   117
        Authorization of appropriations (sec. 301)...............   117
    Subtitle B--Energy and Environment...........................   117
        Use of operational energy cost savings of Department of 
          Defense (sec. 311).....................................   117
        Use of proceeds from sales of electrical energy generated 
          from geothermal resources (sec. 312)...................   117
        Energy resilience programs and activities (sec. 313).....   117
        Native American Indian lands environmental mitigation 
          program (sec. 314).....................................   117
        Reimbursement of Environmental Protection Agency for 
          certain costs in connection with the Twin Cities Army 
          Ammunition Plant, Minnesota (sec. 315).................   117
        Prohibition on use of perfluoroalkyl substances and 
          polyfluoroalkyl substances for land-based applications 
          of firefighting foam (sec. 316)........................   118
        Transfer authority for funding of study and assessment on 
          health implications of per- and polyfluoroalkyl 
          substances contamination in drinking water by Agency 
          for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (sec. 317)...   118
        Cooperative agreements with States to address 
          contamination by perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl 
          substances (sec. 318)..................................   118
        Modification of Department of Defense environmental 
          restoration authorities to include Federal Government 
          facilities used by National Guard (sec. 319)...........   118
        Budgeting of Department of Defense relating to extreme 
          weather (sec. 320).....................................   118
        Pilot program for availability of working-capital funds 
          for increased combat capability through energy 
          optimization (sec. 321)................................   118
        Report on efforts to reduce high energy intensity at 
          military installations (sec. 322)......................   119
        Technical and grammatical corrections and repeal of 
          obsolete provisions relating to energy (sec. 323)......   119
    Subtitle C--Logistics and Sustainment........................   119
        Requirement for memoranda of understanding between the 
          Air Force and the Navy regarding depot maintenance 
          (sec. 331).............................................   119
        Modification to limitation on length of overseas forward 
          deployment of naval vessels (sec. 332).................   119
    Subtitle D--Reports..........................................   119
        Report on modernization of Joint Pacific Alaska Range 
          Complex (sec. 341).....................................   119
    Subtitle E--Other Matters....................................   120
        Strategy to improve infrastructure of certain depots of 
          the Department of Defense (sec. 351)...................   120
        Limitation on use of funds regarding the basing of KC-46A 
          aircraft outside the continental United States (sec. 
          352)...................................................   120
        Prevention of encroachment on military training routes 
          and military operations areas (sec. 353)...............   120
        Expansion and enhancement of authorities on transfer and 
          adoption of military animals (sec. 354)................   120
        Limitation on contracting relating to Defense Personal 
          Property Program (sec. 355)............................   121
        Prohibition on subjective upgrades by commanders of unit 
          ratings in monthly readiness reporting on military 
          units (sec. 356).......................................   121
        Extension of temporary installation reutilization 
          authority for arsenals, depots, and plants (sec. 357)..   121
        Clarification of food ingredient requirements for food or 
          beverages provided by the Department of Defense (sec. 
          358)...................................................   122
        Technical correction to deadline for transition to 
          Defense Readiness Reporting System Strategic (sec. 359)   122
    Budget Items.................................................   122
        Multi-Domain Task Force for the Indo-Pacific region......   122
        Army Base Operations Support under execution.............   123
        Army savings from revised housing cost share.............   123
        C4I life-cycle replacement at Joint Intelligence 
          Operations Center Europe Analytic Center...............   123
        Army advertising and recruiting budget decrease..........   123
        Army Other Personnel Support under execution.............   124
        Army Claims Activities under execution...................   124
        Cyber operations-peculiar capabilities--Army.............   124
        Family housing pilot program.............................   124
        Terminal High Altitude Area Defense Army sustainment.....   125
        Army National Guard facilities sustainment disaster 
          recovery increase......................................   125
        Army National Guard recruiting and advertising decrease..   125
        Navy depot maintenance unfunded requirement increase.....   125
        Posture site assessments in the Indo-Pacific region......   126
        Navy housing cost share..................................   126
        Navy advertising reduction...............................   126
        Navy administration decrease.............................   127
        Navy audit reduction.....................................   127
        Resilient Energy Program Office..........................   127
        Cyber operations-peculiar capabilities--Navy.............   127
        Cyber operations-peculiar capabilities--Marine Corps.....   128
        Air Force savings from revised housing cost share........   128
        US CYBERCOM..............................................   128
        Air Force advertising reduction..........................   128
        Cyber operations-peculiar capabilities--Air Force........   129
        Innovative Readiness Training increase...................   129
        STARBASE program.........................................   129
        Defense Information Systems Agency MilCloud..............   130
        Sharkseer transfer.......................................   130
        Assessment, monitoring, and evaluation...................   130
        Defense Security Cooperation Agency......................   130
        Consolidated adjudication facility.......................   131
        Impact aid...............................................   131
        Terminal High Altitude Area Defense Missile Defense 
          Agency sustainment.....................................   132
        Bien Hoa dioxin cleanup..................................   132
        Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nation-wide 
          human health assessment................................   132
        Department of Defense Emerging Contaminants increase.....   132
        Industrial Policy program support........................   132
        Improvement of occupational license portability for 
          military spouses through interstate compacts...........   133
        National Commission on Military Aviation Safety..........   133
        Supplemental funding for the National Commission on 
          Military, National, and Public Service.................   133
        Readiness and Environmental Protection Initiative........   134
        Defense Digital Service expert civilians.................   134
        Sharkseer transfer.......................................   134
        Foreign currency fluctuation reduction...................   135
        Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps increase.........   135
        Printing inefficiency reduction..........................   135
        Transfer of OCO to Base account..........................   135
    Items of Special Interest....................................   135
        Arctic search and rescue.................................   135
        Army Training Next virtual reality pilot program.........   136
        Battle Record Information Core Environment (BRICE) 
          maintenance application................................   136
        Cold spray technology....................................   137
        Comptroller General review of Department of Defense 
          utility resilience planning to support cybersecurity 
          threats................................................   137
        Comptroller General review of mobility in contested 
          environments...........................................   137
        Corrosion prevention briefing............................   138
        Data collection and reporting to validation of small arms 
          simulation readiness improvements and resourcing 
          planning...............................................   139
        Defense energy resilience tools for project development..   139
        Development and fielding of expeditionary energy 
          technology in the Department of Defense................   140
        Encroachment on military installations...................   140
        Extended funding obligation period for private contracted 
          ship maintenance.......................................   140
        Improving Navy radar training and readiness..............   141
        Improving oversight of pilots in non-operational staff 
          positions..............................................   141
        Liability exposure for electric companies during national 
          emergencies............................................   142
        Lightweight ammunition...................................   142
        Marine Depot Maintenance Command facilities review.......   142
        National Guard Unit equipped flying squadrons............   143
        Prepositioned Assets in the Indo-Pacific Region..........   143
        Preservation of the Force and Families initiative........   144
        Public-to-public partnerships briefing requirement.......   144
        Recycled content in clothing items.......................   145
        Report on future Combat Search and Rescue in support of 
          National Defense Strategy..............................   145
        Report on guidelines for maintenance and preservation of 
          Department of Defense historic aircraft and spacecraft.   146
        Report on Perfluorooctane Sulfonate and Perfluorooctanoic 
          Acid contamination on military installations...........   146
        Report on Special Federal Aviation Regulation waivers for 
          U.S. air carriers and recommendations to expedite re-
          designation of civil aircraft as state aircraft........   147
        Rotary-wing aviation foreign internal defense............   147
        Storm water utilities privatization......................   148
        Study on fire extinguishers..............................   148
        Westover Air Reserve Base--Defense Logistics Agency study 
          of fuel pipeline.......................................   149
        Women servicemember personal protective equipment........   149
TITLE IV--MILITARY PERSONNEL AUTHORIZATIONS......................   151
    Subtitle A--Active Forces....................................   151
        End strengths for active forces (sec. 401)...............   151
    Subtitle B--Reserve Forces...................................   151
        End strengths for Selected Reserve (sec. 411)............   151
        End strengths for Reserves on active duty in support of 
          the reserves (sec. 412)................................   151
        End strengths for military technicians (dual status) 
          (sec. 413).............................................   152
        Maximum number of reserve personnel authorized to be on 
          active duty for operational support (sec. 414).........   153
        Authorized strengths for Marine Corps Reserves on active 
          duty (sec. 415)........................................   153
    Subtitle C--Authorization of Appropriations..................   153
        Military personnel (sec. 421)............................   153
    Budget Items.................................................   153
        Military personnel funding changes.......................   153
TITLE V--MILITARY PERSONNEL POLICY...............................   155
    Subtitle A--Officer Personnel Policy.........................   155
        Repeal of codified specification of authorized strengths 
          of certain commissioned officers on active duty (sec. 
          501)...................................................   155
        Maker of original appointments in a regular or reserve 
          component of commissioned officers previously subject 
          to original appointment in other type of component 
          (sec. 502).............................................   156
        Furnishing of adverse information on officers to 
          promotion selection boards (sec. 503)..................   156
        Limitation on number of officers recommendable for 
          promotion by promotion selection boards (sec. 504).....   157
        Expansion of authority for continuation on active duty of 
          officers in certain military specialties and career 
          tracks (sec. 505)......................................   157
        Higher grade in retirement for officers following 
          reopening of determination or certification of retired 
          grade (sec. 506).......................................   157
        Availability on the Internet of certain information about 
          officers serving in general or flag officer grades 
          (sec. 507).............................................   157
    Subtitle B--Reserve Component Management.....................   158
        Repeal of requirement for review of certain Army Reserve 
          officer unit vacancy promotions by commanders of 
          associated active duty units (sec. 511)................   158
    Subtitle C--General Service Authorities......................   158
        Modification of authorities on management of deployments 
          of members of the Armed Forces and related unit 
          operating and personnel tempo matters (sec. 515).......   158
        Repeal of requirement that parental leave be taken in one 
          increment (sec. 516)...................................   158
        Digital engineering as a core competency of the Armed 
          Forces (sec. 517)......................................   158
        Modification of notification on manning of afloat naval 
          forces (sec. 518)......................................   158
        Report on expansion of the Close Airman Support team 
          approach of the Air Force to the other Armed Forces 
          (sec. 519).............................................   159
    Subtitle D--Military Justice and Related Matters.............   159
        Part I--Matters Relating to Investigation, Prosecution, 
          and Defense of Sexual Assault Generally................   159
            Department of Defense-wide policy and military 
              department-specific programs on reinvigoration of 
              the prevention of sexual assault involving members 
              of the Armed Forces (sec. 521).....................   159
            Enactment and expansion of policy on withholding of 
              initial disposition authority for certain offenses 
              under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (sec. 
              522)...............................................   159
            Training for Sexual Assault Initial Disposition 
              Authorities on exercise of disposition authority 
              for sexual assault and collateral offenses (sec. 
              523)...............................................   160
            Expansion of responsibilities of commanders for 
              victims of sexual assault committed by another 
              member of the Armed Forces (sec. 524)..............   160
            Training for commanders in the Armed Forces on their 
              role in all stages of military justice in 
              connection with sexual assault (sec. 525)..........   160
            Notice to victims of alleged sexual assault of 
              pendency of further administrative action following 
              a determination not to refer to trial by court-
              martial (sec. 526).................................   161
            Safe to report policy applicable across the Armed 
              Forces (sec. 527)..................................   161
            Report on expansion of Air Force safe to report 
              policy across the Armed Forces (sec. 528)..........   161
            Proposal for separate punitive article in the Uniform 
              Code of Military Justice on sexual harassment (sec. 
              529)...............................................   162
            Treatment of information in Catch a Serial Offender 
              Program for certain purposes (sec. 530)............   162
            Report on preservation of recourse to restricted 
              report on sexual assault for victims of sexual 
              assault following certain victim or third-party 
              communications (sec. 531)..........................   162
            Authority for return of personal property to victims 
              of sexual assault who file a Restricted Report 
              before conclusion of related proceedings (sec. 532)   163
            Extension of Defense Advisory Committee on 
              Investigation, Prosecution, and Defense of Sexual 
              Assault in the Armed Forces (sec. 533).............   163
            Defense Advisory Committee for the Prevention of 
              Sexual Misconduct (sec. 534).......................   163
            Independent reviews and assessments on race and 
              ethnicity in the investigation, prosecution, and 
              defense of sexual assault in the Armed Forces (sec. 
              535)...............................................   164
            Report on mechanisms to enhance the integration and 
              synchronization of activities of Special Victim 
              Investigation and Prosecution personnel with 
              activities of military criminal investigation 
              organizations (sec. 536)...........................   164
            Comptroller General of the United States report on 
              implementation by the Armed Forces of recent 
              statutory requirements on sexual assault prevention 
              and response in the military (sec. 537)............   164
        Part II--Special Victims' Counsel Matters................   165
            Legal assistance by Special Victims' Counsel for 
              victims of alleged domestic violence offenses (sec. 
              541)...............................................   165
            Other Special Victims' Counsel matters (sec. 542)....   165
            Availability of Special Victims' Counsel at military 
              installations (sec. 543)...........................   165
            Training for Special Victims' Counsel on civilian 
              criminal justice matters in the States of the 
              military installations to which assigned (sec. 544)   166
        Part III--Boards for Correction of Military Records and 
          Discharge Review Board Matters.........................   166
            Repeal of 15-year statute of limitations on motions 
              or requests for review of discharge or dismissal 
              from the Armed Forces (sec. 546)...................   166
            Reduction in required number of members of discharge 
              review boards (sec. 547)...........................   166
            Enhancement of personnel on boards for the correction 
              of military records and discharge review boards 
              (sec. 548).........................................   166
            Inclusion of intimate partner violence and spousal 
              abuse among supporting rationales for certain 
              claims for corrections of military records and 
              discharge review (sec. 549)........................   167
            Advice and counsel of trauma experts in review by 
              boards for correction of military records and 
              discharge review boards of certain claims (sec. 
              550)...............................................   167
            Training of members of boards for correction of 
              military records and discharge review boards on 
              sexual trauma, intimate partner violence, spousal 
              abuse, and related matters (sec. 551)..............   167
            Limitations and requirements in connection with 
              separations for members of the Armed Forces who 
              suffer from mental health conditions in connection 
              with a sex-related, intimate partner violence-
              related, or spousal abuse-related offense (sec. 
              552)...............................................   168
            Liberal consideration of evidence in certain claims 
              by boards for the correction of military records 
              and discharge review boards (sec. 553).............   168
        Part IV--Other Military Justice Matters..................   168
            Expansion of pre-referral matters reviewable by 
              military judges and military magistrates in the 
              interest of efficiency in military justice (sec. 
              555)...............................................   168
            Policies and procedures on registration at military 
              installations of civilian protective orders 
              applicable to members of the Armed Forces assigned 
              to such installations and certain other individuals 
              (sec. 556).........................................   168
            Increase in number of digital forensic examiners for 
              the military criminal investigation organizations 
              (sec. 557).........................................   169
            Survey of members of the Armed Forces on their 
              experiences with military investigations and 
              military justice (sec. 558)........................   169
            Public access to dockets, filings, and court records 
              of courts-martial and other records of trial of the 
              military justice system (sec. 559).................   169
            Pilot programs on defense investigators in the 
              military justice system (sec. 560).................   170
            Report on military justice system involving 
              alternative authority for determining whether to 
              prefer or refer charges for felony offense under 
              the Uniform Code of Military Justice (sec. 561)....   170
            Report on standardization among the military 
              departments in collection and presentation of 
              information on matters within the military justice 
              system (sec. 562)..................................   171
            Report on establishment of guardian ad litem program 
              for certain military dependents who are victim or 
              witness of offenses under the Uniform Code of 
              Military Justice involving abuse or exploitation 
              (sec. 563).........................................   171
    Subtitle E--Member Education, Training, Transition, and 
      Resilience.................................................   172
        Consecutive service of service obligation in connection 
          with payment of tuition for off-duty training or 
          education for commissioned officers of the Armed Forces 
          with any other service obligations (sec. 566)..........   172
        Authority for detail of certain enlisted members of the 
          Armed Forces as students at law schools (sec. 567).....   172
        Connections of members retiring or separating from the 
          Armed Forces with community-based organizations and 
          related entities (sec. 568)............................   172
    Subtitle F--Defense Dependents' Education and Military Family 
      Readiness Matters..........................................   172
        Part I--Defense Dependents' Education Matters............   172
            Continuation of authority to assist local educational 
              agencies that benefit dependents of members of the 
              Armed Forces and Department of Defense civilian 
              employees (sec. 571)...............................   172
            Impact aid for children with severe disabilities 
              (sec. 572).........................................   173
            Ri,katak Guest Student Program at United States Army 
              Garrison-Kwajalein Atoll (sec. 573)................   173
        Part II--Military Family Readiness Matters...............   173
            Two-year extension of authority for reimbursement for 
              State licensure and certification costs of spouses 
              of members of the Armed Forces arising from 
              relocation to another State (sec. 576).............   173
            Improvement of occupational license portability for 
              military spouses through interstate compacts (sec. 
              577)...............................................   173
            Modification of responsibility of the Office of 
              Special Needs for individualized service plans for 
              members of military families with special needs 
              (sec. 578).........................................   174
            Clarifying technical amendment on direct hire 
              authority for the Department of Defense for 
              childcare services providers for Department child 
              development centers (sec. 579).....................   174
            Pilot program on information sharing between 
              Department of Defense and designated relatives and 
              friends of members of the Armed Forces regarding 
              the experiences and challenges of military service 
              (sec. 580).........................................   174
            Briefing on use of Family Advocacy Programs to 
              address domestic violence (sec. 581)...............   175
    Subtitle G--Decorations and Awards...........................   175
        Authorization for award of the Medal of Honor to John J. 
          Duffy for acts of valor in Vietnam (sec. 585)..........   175
        Standardization of honorable service requirement for 
          award of military decorations (sec. 586)...............   175
        Authority to award or present a decoration not previously 
          recommended in a timely fashion following a review 
          requested by Congress (sec. 587).......................   175
        Authority to make posthumous and honorary promotions and 
          appointments following a review requested by Congress 
          (sec. 588).............................................   175
    Subtitle H--Other Matters....................................   176
        Military funeral honors matters (sec. 591)...............   176
        Inclusion of homeschooled students in Junior Reserve 
          Officers' Training Corps units (sec. 592)..............   176
        Sense of Senate on the Junior Reserve Officers' Training 
          Corps (sec. 593).......................................   176
    Items of Special Interest....................................   176
            Active-Duty Service Commitment for Personnel 
              Graduating Cybersecurity Courses...................   176
            Active-Duty service obligations for military service 
              academy graduates..................................   177
            Adequacy of childcare workforce and capacity across 
              the Department of Defense..........................   177
            Air battle manager accessions........................   178
            Assessment and report on expanding the eligibility 
              for the My Career Advancement Account Program......   178
            Basic training athletic shoe variant analysis for new 
              recruits...........................................   179
            Briefing on Staff Judge Advocates' trial experience..   179
            Childcare parity.....................................   180
            Command climate assessment in officer and enlisted 
              appraisal reports..................................   180
            Comptroller General Study on Effectiveness of Student 
              Loan Forgiveness Program on Readiness and 
              Recruiting.........................................   181
            Concern over hunger and food security in military 
              families...........................................   181
            Concurrent use of Montgomery G.I. Bill and Department 
              of Defense-funded tuition assistance...............   182
            Department of Defense cooperation with United States 
              Interagency Council on Homelessness................   182
            Department of Defense credentialing..................   183
            Development of strategic basing factors to support 
              military families..................................   183
            Digital engineering as a core competency of the Armed 
              Forces.............................................   183
            Duty to intervene....................................   184
            Encouraging victims of domestic violence and sex-
              related offenses to secure military and civilian 
              protection orders..................................   184
            Enlistment and accession testing and standards for 
              non-native English speaking recruits...............   185
            Expanding the Military Ballot Tracking Pilot to 
              additional military voters and their families......   186
            Expansion of the Military Spouse Employment 
              Partnership across the Department of Defense.......   187
            Expedited naturalization of non-citizen 
              servicemembers.....................................   187
            Extended paid family leave for secondary caregivers..   188
            Family Child Care home expansion.....................   188
            Full time support manpower study.....................   189
            Military childcare system study on outcomes for 
              children and parents...............................   189
            Rapidly incorporating data tools to enhance military 
              recruiting.........................................   189
            Reliability and completeness of information in 
              inspector general case management systems..........   189
            Reserve Officers' Training Corps Scholarship Program 
              and Recruiting of Future Cyber Officers............   190
            Review of support services provided to military 
              servicemembers assigned to designated remote bases.   191
            Rights of sexual assault survivors to testify at 
              court-martial sentencing proceedings...............   191
            Safe to Report policy................................   191
            Special Victims' Counsel legal consultation and 
              assistance to victims subject to retaliation.......   192
            Support for Air Force Junior Reserve Officers' 
              Training Corps Flight Academy......................   192
            Telework option for military spouses in Department of 
              Defense contracts..................................   193
            Timely response to inspector general referral of 
              reports of investigation substantiating reprisal...   193
            Training Department of Defense and military 
              department human resources personnel to assist 
              military spouses seeking employment................   194
            Transition Assistance Programs at remote and isolated 
              installations......................................   195
            Tuition assistance in the Reserves and National Guard   195
TITLE VI--COMPENSATION AND OTHER PERSONNEL BENEFITS..............   197
    Subtitle A--Pay and Allowances...............................   197
        Expansion of eligibility for exceptional transitional 
          compensation for dependents to dependents of current 
          members (sec. 601).....................................   197
    Subtitle B--Bonuses and Special and Incentive Pays...........   197
        One-year extension of certain expiring bonus and special 
          pay authorities (sec. 611).............................   197
    Subtitle C--Travel and Transportation Allowances.............   197
        Extension of pilot program on a Government lodging 
          program (sec. 621).....................................   197
        Reinvestment of travel refunds by the Department of 
          Defense (sec. 622).....................................   198
    Subtitle D--Disability Pay, Retired Pay, and Survivor 
      Benefits...................................................   198
        Contributions to Department of Defense Military 
          Retirement Fund based on pay costs per Armed Force 
          rather than on Armed Forces-wide basis (sec. 631)......   198
        Modification of authorities on eligibility for and 
          replacement of gold star lapel buttons (sec. 632)......   199
    Subtitle E--Commissary and Non-Appropriated Fund 
      Instrumentality Benefits and Operations....................   199
        Defense resale system matters (sec. 641).................   199
        Treatment of fees on services provided as supplemental 
          funds for commissary operations (sec. 642).............   200
        Procurement by commissary stores of certain locally 
          sourced products (sec. 643)............................   200
    Items of Special Interest....................................   200
        Blended Retirement System implementation study...........   200
        Commissary store operations..............................   201
        Comptroller General assessment on defense resale reform..   201
TITLE VII--HEALTH CARE PROVISIONS................................   203
    Subtitle A--Tricare and Other Health Care Benefits...........   203
        Contraception coverage parity under the TRICARE program 
          (sec. 701).............................................   203
        TRICARE payment options for retirees and their dependents 
          (sec. 702).............................................   203
        Lead level screening and testing for children (sec. 703).   203
        Provision of blood testing for firefighters of Department 
          of Defense to determine exposure to perfluoroalkyl and 
          polyfluoroalkyl substances (sec. 704)..................   204
    Subtitle B--Health Care Administration.......................   204
        Modification of organization of military health system 
          (sec. 711).............................................   204
        Support by military health system of medical requirements 
          of combatant commands (sec. 712).......................   204
        Tours of duty of commanders or directors of military 
          treatment facilities (sec. 713)........................   204
        Expansion of strategy to improve acquisition of managed 
          care support contracts under TRICARE program (sec. 714)   204
        Establishment of regional medical hubs to support 
          combatant commands (sec. 715)..........................   205
        Monitoring of adverse event data on dietary supplement 
          use by members of the Armed Forces (sec. 716)..........   205
        Enhancement of recordkeeping with respect to exposure by 
          members of the Armed Forces to certain occupational and 
          environmental hazards while deployed overseas (sec. 
          717)...................................................   205
    Subtitle C--Reports and Other Matters........................   206
        Extension and clarification of authority for Joint 
          Department of Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs 
          Medical Facility Demonstration Fund (sec. 721).........   206
        Appointment of non-ex officio members of the Henry M. 
          Jackson Foundation for the Advancement of Military 
          Medicine (sec. 722)....................................   206
        Officers authorized to command Army dental units (sec. 
          723)...................................................   206
        Establishment of Academic Health System in National 
          Capital Region (sec. 724)..............................   206
        Provision of veterinary services by veterinary 
          professionals of the Department of Defense in 
          emergencies (sec. 725).................................   207
        Five-year extension of authority to continue the DOD-VA 
          Health Care Sharing Incentive Fund (sec. 726)..........   207
        Pilot Program on civilian and military partnerships to 
          enhance interoperability and medical surge capability 
          and capacity of National Disaster Medical System (sec. 
          727)...................................................   207
        Modification of requirements for longitudinal medical 
          study on blast pressure exposure of members of the 
          Armed Forces (sec. 728)................................   207
    Items of Special Interest....................................   208
        Armed Forces Institute for Regenerative Medicine.........   208
        Chronic migraine and post-traumatic headaches............   208
        Comptroller General review of enlisted medical workforce.   208
        Department of Defense briefing on the rate and incidence 
          of pregnancy-associated deaths.........................   209
        Expansion of studies of exposure to blast in training and 
          operations and documentation of blast exposure in 
          individual longitudinal exposure records...............   209
        Healthy food options on military installations...........   210
        Home healthcare services.................................   210
        Objective diagnostic capabilities for traumatic brain 
          injury.................................................   210
        Pilot program on partnerships with civilian organizations 
          for specialized medical training.......................   211
        Prescription drug labels.................................   211
        Study on infertility in members of the Armed Forces......   211
        Survey to determine providers' attitude towards 
          contraceptive services, their knowledge on obligations 
          to dispense and counsel on contraception and assess 
          potential cultural barriers to providing contraceptive 
          services...............................................   212
        Tactical combat casualty care training...................   212
        TRICARE coverage of continuous glucose monitors..........   213
        TRICARE improper medical claims payments.................   213
TITLE VIII--ACQUISITION POLICY, ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT, AND 
  RELATED MATTERS................................................   215
    Subtitle A--Contracting and Acquisition Provisions...........   215
        Pilot program on intellectual property evaluation for 
          acquisition programs (sec. 801)........................   215
        Pilot program to use alpha contracting teams for complex 
          requirements (sec. 802)................................   215
        Modification of written approval requirement for task and 
          delivery order single contract awards (sec. 803).......   215
        Extension of authority to acquire products and services 
          produced in countries along a major route of supply to 
          Afghanistan (sec. 804).................................   216
        Modification of Director of Operational Test and 
          Evaluation report (sec. 805)...........................   216
        Department of Defense use of fixed-price contracts (sec. 
          806)...................................................   216
        Pilot program to accelerate contracting and pricing 
          processes (sec. 807)...................................   216
        Pilot program to streamline decision-making processes for 
          weapon systems (sec. 808)..............................   216
        Documentation of market research related to commercial 
          item determinations (sec. 809).........................   217
        Modification to small purchase threshold exception to 
          sourcing requirements for certain articles (sec. 810)..   217
    Subtitle B--Provisions Relating to Major Defense Acquisition 
      Programs...................................................   217
        Naval vessel certification required before Milestone B 
          approval (sec. 821)....................................   217
    Subtitle C--Industrial Base Matters..........................   217
        Modernization of acquisition processes to ensure 
          integrity of industrial base (sec. 831)................   217
        Assessment of precision-guided missiles for reliance on 
          foreign-made microelectronic components (sec. 832).....   218
        Mitigating risks related to foreign ownership, control, 
          or influence of Department of Defense contractors or 
          subcontractors (sec. 833)..............................   218
        Extension and revisions to Never Contract With the Enemy 
          (sec. 834).............................................   219
    Subtitle D--Small Business Matters...........................   219
        Reauthorization and improvement of Department of Defense 
          Mentor-Protege Program (sec. 841)......................   219
        Modification of justification and approval requirement 
          for certain Department of Defense contracts (sec. 842).   219
    Subtitle E--Provisions Related to Software-Driven 
      Capabilities...............................................   220
        Improved management of information technology and 
          cyberspace investments (sec. 851)......................   220
        Special pathways for rapid acquisition of software 
          applications and upgrades (sec. 852)...................   220
    Subtitle F--Other Matters....................................   221
        Notification of Navy procurement production disruptions 
          (sec. 861).............................................   221
        Modification to acquisition authority of the Commander of 
          the United States Cyber Command (sec. 862).............   221
        Prohibition on operation or procurement of foreign-made 
          unmanned aircraft systems (sec. 863)...................   221
        Prohibition on contracting with persons that have 
          business operations with the Maduro regime (sec. 864)..   221
        Comptroller General of the United States report on 
          Department of Defense efforts to combat human 
          trafficking through procurement practices (sec. 865)...   221
    Items of Special Interest....................................   222
        Alternatives to cost or pricing data.....................   222
        Annual report on denials of contracting officer data 
          requests...............................................   222
        Appreciation for the work of the Advisory Panel on 
          Streamlining and Codifying Acquisition Regulations.....   223
        Army strategies to manage intellectual property..........   223
        Comptroller General assessment of Internet Protocol 
          version four (IPv4) utilization........................   223
        Comptroller General review of Army's Logistics Civil 
          Augmentation Program contract..........................   224
        Contractor workplace safety..............................   224
        Implications of acquisition reform for the organic 
          industrial base........................................   225
        Notifications related to exercising an option on a 
          contract...............................................   225
        Optimizing processes and acquisition of contract writing 
          capabilities...........................................   225
        Place of performance in Department of Defense contracts..   226
        Proper evaluation of past performance and experience of 
          potential offerors.....................................   226
        Report on service contract management and oversight......   226
        Secure development operations software stacks............   227
        Stakeholder engagement practices of the Defense 
          Innovation Board.......................................   227
        Training of skilled technicians for the defense 
          industrial base........................................   228
        Uncertified cost data....................................   228
        Wider adoption of model contracts for Small Business 
          Innovation Research (SBIR) program awards..............   229
TITLE IX--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT......   231
    Subtitle A--Office of the Secretary of Defense and Related 
      Matters....................................................   231
        Headquarters activities of the Department of Defense 
          matters (sec. 901).....................................   231
        Responsibility of Under Secretary of Defense for 
          Acquisition and Sustainment for Procurement Technical 
          Assistance Cooperative Agreement Program (sec. 902)....   231
        Return to Chief Information Officer of the Department of 
          Defense of responsibility for business systems and 
          related matters (sec. 903).............................   232
        Senior Military Advisor for Cyber Policy and Deputy 
          Principal Cyber Advisor (sec. 904).....................   232
        Limitation on the transfer of Strategic Capabilities 
          Office (sec. 905)......................................   232
    Subtitle B--Organization and Management of Other Department 
      of Defense Offices and Elements............................   233
        Assistant Secretaries of the military departments for 
          Energy, Installations, and Environment (sec. 911)......   233
        Repeal of conditional designation of Explosive Ordnance 
          Disposal Corps as a basic branch of the Army (sec. 912)   233
    Subtitle C--Other Matters....................................   233
        Exclusion from limitations on personnel in the Office of 
          the Secretary of Defense and Department of Defense 
          headquarters of fellows appointed under the John S. 
          McCain Defense Fellows Program (sec. 921)..............   233
        Report on resources to implement the civilian casualty 
          policy of the Department of Defense (sec. 922).........   233
    Items of Special Interest....................................   233
        Cross-functional teams...................................   233
        Remote and isolated research and testing installations...   234
        Secretariat for Special Operations.......................   234
TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS......................................   237
    Subtitle A--Financial Matters................................   237
        General transfer authority (sec. 1001)...................   237
        Modification of required elements of annual reports on 
          emergency and extraordinary expenses of the Department 
          of Defense (sec. 1002).................................   237
        Inclusion of military construction projects in annual 
          reports on unfunded priorities of the Armed Forces and 
          the combatant commands (sec. 1003).....................   237
        Prohibition on delegation of responsibility for submittal 
          to Congress of Out-Year Unconstrained Total Munitions 
          Requirements and Out-Year Inventory numbers (sec. 1004)   237
        Element in annual reports on the Financial Improvement 
          and Audit Remediation Plan on activities with respect 
          to classified programs (sec. 1005).....................   237
        Modification of semiannual briefings on the consolidated 
          corrective action plan of the Department of Defense for 
          financial management information (sec. 1006)...........   238
        Update of authorities and renaming of Department of 
          Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Fund (sec. 
          1007)..................................................   238
    Subtitle B--Counterdrug Activities...........................   238
        Modification of authority to support a unified 
          counterdrug and counterterrorism campaign in Colombia 
          (sec. 1011)............................................   238
        Two-year extension of authority for joint task forces to 
          provide support to law enforcement agencies conducting 
          counter-terrorism activities (sec. 1012)...............   239
    Subtitle C--Naval Vessels and Shipyards......................   239
        Modification of authority to purchase vessels using funds 
          in National Defense Sealift Fund (sec. 1016)...........   239
        Senior Technical Authority for each naval vessel class 
          (sec. 1017)............................................   239
        Permanent authority for sustaining operational readiness 
          of Littoral Combat Ships on extended deployment (sec. 
          1018)..................................................   240
    Subtitle D--Counterterrorism.................................   241
        Extension of prohibition on use of funds for transfer or 
          release of individuals detained at United States Naval 
          Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to the United States 
          (sec. 1021)............................................   241
        Extension of prohibition on use of funds to construct or 
          modify facilities in the United States to house 
          detainees transferred from United States Naval Station, 
          Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (sec. 1022).......................   241
        Extension of prohibition on use of funds for transfer or 
          release of individuals detained at United States Naval 
          Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to certain countries 
          (sec. 1023)............................................   241
        Extension of prohibition on use of funds to close or 
          relinquish control of United States Naval Station, 
          Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (sec. 1024).......................   241
        Authority to transfer individuals detained at United 
          States Naval Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to the 
          United States temporarily for emergency or critical 
          medical treatment (sec. 1025)..........................   242
        Chief Medical Officer at United States Naval Station, 
          Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (sec. 1026).......................   242
    Subtitle E--Miscellaneous Authorities and Limitations........   242
        Clarification of authority of military commissions under 
          chapter 47A of title 10, United States Code, to punish 
          contempt (sec. 1031)...................................   242
        Comprehensive Department of Defense policy on collective 
          self-defense (sec. 1032)...............................   243
        Oversight of Department of Defense execute orders (sec. 
          1033)..................................................   243
        Prohibition on ownership or trading of stocks in certain 
          companies by Department of Defense officers and 
          employees (sec. 1034)..................................   243
        Policy regarding the transition of data and applications 
          to the cloud (sec. 1035)...............................   244
        Modernization of inspection authorities applicable to the 
          National Guard and extension of inspection authority to 
          the Chief of the National Guard Bureau (sec. 1036).....   244
        Enhancement of authorities on forfeiture of Federal 
          benefits by the National Guard (sec. 1037).............   244
        Modernization of authorities on property and fiscal 
          officers of the National Guard (sec. 1038).............   244
        Limitation on placement by the Under Secretary of Defense 
          for Personnel and Readiness of work with federally 
          funded research and development centers (sec. 1039)....   245
        Termination of requirement for Department of Defense 
          facility access clearances for joint ventures composed 
          of previously-cleared entities (sec. 1040).............   245
        Designation of Department of Defense Strategic Arctic 
          Ports (sec. 1041)......................................   245
        Extension of National Security Commission on Artificial 
          Intelligence (sec. 1042)...............................   246
        Authority to transfer funds for Bien Hoa dioxin cleanup 
          (sec. 1043)............................................   246
        Limitation on use of funds to house children separated 
          from parents (sec. 1044)...............................   246
    Subtitle F--Studies and Reports..............................   246
        Modification of annual reporting requirements on defense 
          manpower (sec. 1051)...................................   246
        Report on Department of Defense efforts to implement a 
          force planning process in support of implementation of 
          the 2018 National Defense Strategy (sec. 1052).........   246
        Extension of annual reports on civilian casualties in 
          connection with United States military operations (sec. 
          1053)..................................................   247
        Report on joint force plan for implementation of 
          strategies of the Department of Defense for the Arctic 
          (sec. 1054)............................................   247
        Report on use of Northern Tier bases in implementation of 
          Arctic strategy of the United States (sec. 1055).......   247
        Report on the Department of Defense plan for mass-
          casualty disaster response operations in the Arctic 
          (sec. 1056)............................................   248
        Annual reports on approval of employment or compensation 
          of retired general or flag officers by foreign 
          governments for Emoluments Clause purposes (sec. 1057).   248
        Transmittal to Congress of requests for assistance 
          received by the Department of Defense from other 
          departments (sec. 1058)................................   248
        Semiannual report on Consolidated Adjudication Facility 
          of the Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency 
          (sec. 1059)............................................   248
        Comptroller General of the United States report on post-
          government employment of former Department of Defense 
          officials (sec. 1060)..................................   249
    Subtitle G--Treatment of Contaminated Water Near Military 
      Installations..............................................   249
        Treatment of contaminated water near military 
          installations (secs. 1071-1075)........................   249
    Subtitle H--Other Matters....................................   249
        Revision to authorities relating to mail service for 
          members of the Armed Forces and Department of Defense 
          civilians overseas (sec. 1081).........................   249
        Access to and use of military post offices by United 
          States citizens employed overseas by the North Atlantic 
          Treaty Organization who perform functions in support of 
          military operations of the Armed Forces (sec. 1082)....   249
        Guarantee of residency for spouses of members of 
          uniformed services (sec. 1083).........................   250
        Extension of requirement for briefings on the national 
          biodefense strategy (sec. 1084)........................   250
        Extension of National Commission on Military Aviation 
          Safety (sec. 1085).....................................   250
    Items of Special Interest....................................   250
        Allocation of Military Forces............................   250
        Assessment of the Requirement for a Strategic Arctic Port   251
        Assignment of responsibility for the Arctic to a deputy 
          assistant secretary of defense.........................   251
        Briefing on civilian casualties..........................   252
        Combatant Command pandemic planning......................   252
        Eliminating delays in initiating support to Government 
          Accountability Office audits...........................   252
        Evaluation of modeling and simulation used for force 
          planning and theater operational requirements..........   253
        Information on Defense Spending..........................   254
        Public availability of Department of Defense reports 
          required by law........................................   254
        Report on the impacts of continuing resolutions..........   255
TITLE XI--CIVILIAN PERSONNEL MATTERS.............................   257
        Modification of temporary assignments of Department of 
          Defense employees to a private-sector organization 
          (sec. 1101)............................................   257
        Modification of number of available appointments for 
          certain agencies under personnel management authority 
          to attract experts in science and engineering (sec. 
          1102)..................................................   257
        One-year extension of temporary authority to grant 
          allowances, benefits, and gratuities to civilian 
          personnel on official duty in a combat zone (sec. 1103)   257
        One-year extension of authority to waive annual 
          limitation on premium pay and aggregate limitation on 
          pay for Federal civilian employees working overseas 
          (sec. 1104)............................................   258
        Reimbursement of Federal employees for Federal, State, 
          and local income taxes incurred during travel, 
          transportation, and relocation (sec. 1105).............   258
    Items of Special Interest....................................   258
        Analysis of competitive salary and benefits for STEM 
          professionals..........................................   258
        Appointments of retired members of the Armed Forces to 
          positions in the Department of Defense.................   259
        Promulgation and delegation of Department of Defense 
          direct hire authority..................................   260
        Report on investments in national security human capital.   260
TITLE XII--MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS...................   263
    Subtitle A--Assistance and Training..........................   263
        Extension of support of special operations for irregular 
          warfare (sec. 1201)....................................   263
        Extension of authority for cross servicing agreements for 
          loan of personnel protection and personnel 
          survivability equipment in coalition operations (sec. 
          1202)..................................................   263
        Two-year extension of program authority for Global 
          Security Contingency Fund (sec. 1203)..................   263
        Modification of reporting requirement for use of funds 
          for security cooperation programs and activities (sec. 
          1204)..................................................   263
        Institutional legal capacity building initiative for 
          foreign defense forces (sec. 1205).....................   263
        Department of Defense support for stabilization 
          activities in national security interest of the United 
          States (sec. 1206).....................................   264
    Subtitle B--Matters Relating to Afghanistan and Pakistan.....   264
        Extension of authority to transfer defense articles and 
          provide defense services to the military and security 
          forces of Afghanistan (sec. 1211)......................   264
        Afghanistan Security Forces Fund (sec. 1212).............   264
        Extension of Commanders' Emergency Response Program (sec. 
          1213)..................................................   264
        Extension and modification of reimbursement of certain 
          coalition nations for support provided to United States 
          military operations (sec. 1214)........................   264
        Support for reconciliation activities led by the 
          Government of Afghanistan (sec. 1215)..................   265
        Sense of Senate on special immigrant visa program for 
          Afghan allies (sec. 1216)..............................   265
    Subtitle C--Matters Relating to Syria, Iraq, and Iran........   265
        Modification of authority to provide assistance to vetted 
          Syrian groups (sec. 1221)..............................   265
        Extension of authority and limitation on use of funds to 
          provide assistance to counter the Islamic State of Iraq 
          and Syria (sec. 1222)..................................   265
        Extension and modification of authority to support 
          operations and activities of the Office of Security 
          Cooperation in Iraq (sec. 1223)........................   266
        Coordinator of United States Government activities and 
          matters in connection with detainees who are members of 
          the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (sec. 1224)........   266
        Report on lessons learned from efforts to liberate Mosul 
          and Raqqah from control of the Islamic State of Iraq 
          and Syria (sec. 1225)..................................   266
    Subtitle D--Matters Relating to Europe and the Russian 
      Federation.................................................   266
        Prohibition on availability of funds relating to 
          sovereignty of the Russian Federation over Crimea (sec. 
          1231)..................................................   266
        Prohibition on use of funds for withdrawal of Armed 
          Forces from Europe in the event of United States 
          withdrawal from the North Atlantic Treaty (sec. 1232)..   267
        Extension of limitation on military cooperation between 
          the United States and the Russian Federation (sec. 
          1233)..................................................   267
        Modification and extension of Ukraine Security Assistance 
          Initiative (sec. 1234).................................   267
        Extension of authority for training for Eastern European 
          national security forces in the course of multilateral 
          exercises (sec. 1235)..................................   268
        Limitation on transfer of F-35 aircraft to the Republic 
          of Turkey (sec. 1236)..................................   268
        Modifications of briefing, notification, and reporting 
          requirements relating to non-compliance by the Russian 
          Federation with its obligations under the INF Treaty 
          (sec. 1237)............................................   269
        Extension and modification of security assistance for 
          Baltic nations for joint program for interoperability 
          and deterrence against aggression (sec. 1238)..........   269
        Report on North Atlantic Treaty Organization Readiness 
          Initiative (sec. 1239).................................   270
        Reports on contributions to the North Atlantic Treaty 
          Organization (sec. 1240)...............................   270
        Future years plans for European Deterrence Initiative 
          (sec. 1241)............................................   270
        Modification of reporting requirements relating to the 
          Open Skies Treaty (sec. 1242)..........................   271
        Report on nuclear weapons of the Russian Federation and 
          nuclear modernization of the People's Republic of China 
          (sec. 1243)............................................   271
        Sense of Senate on the 70th anniversary of the North 
          Atlantic Treaty Organization (sec. 1244)...............   271
        Sense of Senate on United States force posture in Europe 
          and the Republic of Poland (sec. 1245).................   271
        Sense of Senate on United States partnership with the 
          Republic of Georgia (sec. 1246)........................   271
    Subtitle E--Matters Relating to the Indo-Pacific Region......   271
        Limitation on use of funds to reduce the total number of 
          members of the Armed Forces in the territory of the 
          Republic of Korea (sec. 1251)..........................   271
        Expansion of Indo-Pacific Maritime Security Initiative 
          (sec. 1252)............................................   272
        Modification of annual report on military and security 
          developments involving the People's Republic of China 
          (sec. 1253)............................................   273
        Report on resourcing United States defense requirements 
          for the Indo-Pacific region (sec. 1254)................   273
        Report on distributed lay-down of United States forces in 
          the Indo-Pacific region (sec. 1255)....................   274
        Sense of Senate on the United States-Japan alliance and 
          defense cooperation (sec. 1256)........................   274
        Sense of Senate on enhancement of the United States-
          Taiwan defense relationship (sec. 1257)................   274
        Sense of Senate on United States-India defense 
          relationship (sec. 1258)...............................   275
        Sense of Senate on security commitments to the 
          Governments of Japan and the Republic of Korea and 
          trilateral cooperation among the United States, Japan, 
          and the Republic of Korea (sec. 1259)..................   275
        Sense of Senate on enhanced cooperation with Pacific 
          Island countries to establish open-source intelligence 
          fusion centers in the Indo-Pacific region (sec. 1260)..   275
        Sense of Senate on enhancing defense and security 
          cooperation with the Republic of Singapore (sec. 1261).   275
    Subtitle F--Reports..........................................   276
        Report on cost imposition strategy (sec. 1271)...........   276
    Subtitle G--Others Matters...................................   276
        NATO Special Operations Headquarters (sec. 1281).........   276
        Modifications of authorities relating to acquisition and 
          cross-servicing agreements (sec. 1282).................   276
        Modification of authority for United States-Israel anti-
          tunnel cooperation activities (sec. 1283)..............   276
        United States-Israel cooperation to counter unmanned 
          aerial systems (sec. 1284).............................   276
        Modification of initiative to support protection of 
          national security academic researchers from undue 
          influence and other security threats (sec. 1285).......   277
        Independent assessment of human rights situation in 
          Honduras (sec. 1286)...................................   277
        United States Central Command posture review (sec. 1287).   277
        Reports on expenses incurred for in-flight refueling of 
          Saudi coalition aircraft conducting missions relating 
          to civil war in Yemen (sec. 1288)......................   278
        Sense of Senate on security concerns with respect to 
          leasing arrangements for the Port of Haifa in Israel 
          (sec. 1289)............................................   278
    Items of Special Interest....................................   278
        Contributions of allies and partners to costs of U.S. 
          forces stationed overseas..............................   278
        Cooperative research and development efforts of the 
          United States and Israel...............................   279
        Forward-deployed naval forces in Europe..................   279
        Matters related to Bosnia and Herzegovina................   280
        Matters related to Kosovo................................   281
        Protect Interests of Syrian Democratic Forces During U.S. 
          Withdrawal.............................................   281
        Support to the Kurdish Peshmerga.........................   282
TITLE XIII--COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION.........................   283
        Funding allocations for Department of Defense Cooperative 
          Threat Reduction Program (sec. 1301)...................   283
    Items of Special Interest....................................   283
        10-year risk planning for the Cooperative Threat 
          Reduction Program......................................   283
TITLE XIV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS..................................   285
    Subtitle A--Military Programs................................   285
        Working capital funds (sec. 1401)........................   285
        Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense (sec. 
          1402)..................................................   285
        Drug Interdiction and Counterdrug Activities, Defense-
          Wide (sec. 1403).......................................   285
        Defense Inspector General (sec. 1404)....................   285
        Defense Health Program (sec. 1405).......................   285
    Subtitle B--National Defense Stockpile.......................   285
        Modification of prohibition on acquisition of sensitive 
          materials from non-allied foreign nations (sec. 1411)..   285
    Subtitle C--Armed Forces Retirement Home.....................   285
        Authorization of appropriations for Armed Forces 
          Retirement Home (sec. 1421)............................   285
        Expansion of eligibility for residence at the Armed 
          Forces Retirement Home (sec. 1422).....................   286
    Subtitle D--Other Matters....................................   286
        Authority for transfer of funds to Joint Department of 
          Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility 
          Demonstration Fund for Captain James A. Lovell Health 
          Care Center, Illinois (sec. 1431)......................   286
    Budget Items.................................................   286
        Air Force cash corpus for energy optimization............   286
        Contraceptive coverage parity under the TRICARE program..   286
    Items of Special Interest....................................   287
        Armed Forces Retirement Home.............................   287
TITLE XV--AUTHORIZATION OF ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR OVERSEAS 
  CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS.........................................   289
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Additional Appropriations.......   289
        Purpose (sec. 1501)......................................   289
        Overseas contingency operations (sec. 1502)..............   289
        Procurement (sec. 1503)..................................   289
        Research, development, test, and evaluation (sec. 1504)..   289
        Operation and maintenance (sec. 1505)....................   289
        Military personnel (sec. 1506)...........................   289
        Working capital funds (sec. 1507)........................   289
        Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-
          wide (sec. 1508).......................................   289
        Defense Inspector General (sec. 1509)....................   290
        Defense Health Program (sec. 1510).......................   290
    Subtitle B--Financial Matters................................   290
        Treatment as additional authorizations (sec. 1521).......   290
        Special transfer authority (sec. 1522)...................   290
    Budget Items.................................................   290
        Transfer from OCO to Base Procurement....................   290
        Transfer OCO to Base RDT&E...............................   290
        Marine Corps facility sustainment increase for disaster 
          recovery...............................................   291
        Air Force facility sustainment disaster recovery increase   291
        Defense Security Cooperation Agency......................   291
        Iraq Security Cooperation................................   292
        Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative...................   292
        Transfer OCO to Base O&M.................................   292
        Counter-Islamic State of Iraq and Syria Train and Equip 
          Fund...................................................   293
TITLE XVI--STRATEGIC PROGRAMS, CYBER, AND INTELLIGENCE MATTERS...   295
    Subtitle A--Space Activities.................................   295
    Part I--United States Space Force............................   295
        United States Space Force (secs. 1601-1608)..............   295
    Part II--Other Space Matters.................................   299
        Repeal of requirement to establish Space Command as a 
          subordinate unified command of the United States 
          Strategic Command (sec. 1611)..........................   299
        Program to enhance and improve launch support and 
          infrastructure (sec. 1612).............................   299
        Modification of enhancement of positioning, navigation, 
          and timing capacity (sec. 1613)........................   301
        Modification of term of Commander of Air Force Space 
          Command (sec. 1614)....................................   302
        Annual report on Space Command and Control program (sec. 
          1615)..................................................   302
        Requirements for phase 2 of acquisition strategy for 
          National Security Space Launch program (sec. 1616).....   302
    Subtitle B--Defense Intelligence and Intelligence--Related 
      Activities.................................................   303
        Redesignation of Under Secretary of Defense for 
          Intelligence as Under Secretary of Defense for 
          Intelligence and Security (sec. 1621)..................   303
        Repeal of certain requirements relating to integration of 
          Department of Defense intelligence, surveillance, and 
          reconnaissance capabilities (sec. 1622)................   303
        Improving the onboarding methodology for certain 
          intelligence personnel (sec. 1623).....................   304
        Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency 
          activities on facilitating access to local criminal 
          records historical data (sec. 1624)....................   304
    Subtitle C--Cyberspace-Related Matters.......................   304
        Reorientation of Big Data Platform program (sec. 1631)...   304
        Zero-based review of Department of Defense cyber and 
          information technology personnel (sec. 1632)...........   304
        Study on improving cyber career paths in the Navy (sec. 
          1633)..................................................   305
        Framework to enhance cybersecurity of the United States 
          defense industrial base (sec. 1634)....................   305
        Role of Chief Information Officer in improving 
          enterprise-wide cybersecurity (sec. 1635)..............   306
        Quarterly assessments of the readiness of cyber forces 
          (sec. 1636)............................................   307
        Control and analysis of Department of Defense data stolen 
          through cyberspace (sec. 1637).........................   308
        Accreditation standards and processes for cybersecurity 
          and information technology products and services (sec. 
          1638)..................................................   309
        Extension of authorities for Cyberspace Solarium 
          Commission (sec. 1639).................................   309
        Modification of elements of assessment required for 
          termination of dual-hat arrangement for Commander of 
          the United States Cyber Command (sec. 1640)............   309
        Use of National Security Agency cybersecurity expertise 
          to support acquisition of commercial cybersecurity 
          products (sec. 1641)...................................   310
        Study on future cyber warfighting capabilities of 
          Department of Defense (sec. 1642)......................   311
        Authority to use operation and maintenance funds for 
          cyber operations-peculiar capability development 
          projects (sec. 1643)...................................   311
        Expansion of authority for access and information 
          relating to cyberattacks on Department of Defense 
          operationally critical contractors (sec. 1644).........   312
        Briefing on memorandum of understanding relating to joint 
          operational planning and control of cyber attacks of 
          national scale (sec. 1645).............................   312
        Study to determine the optimal strategy for structuring 
          and manning elements of the Joint Force Headquarters-
          Cyber organizations, Joint Mission Operations Centers, 
          and Cyber Operations-Integrated Planning Elements (sec. 
          1646)..................................................   312
        Cyber governance structures and Principal Cyber Advisors 
          on military cyber force matters (sec. 1647)............   313
        Designation of test networks for testing and 
          accreditation of cybersecurity products and services 
          (sec. 1648)............................................   313
        Consortia of universities to advise Secretary of Defense 
          on cybersecurity matters (sec. 1649)...................   313
    Subtitle D--Nuclear Forces...................................   313
        Modification of authorities relating to nuclear command, 
          control, and communications system (sec. 1661).........   313
        Expansion of officials required to conduct biennial 
          assessments of delivery platforms for nuclear weapons 
          and nuclear command and control system (sec. 1662).....   314
        Conforming amendment to Council on Oversight of the 
          National Leadership Command, Control, and 
          Communications System (sec. 1663)......................   314
        Prohibition on reduction of the intercontinental 
          ballistic missiles of the United States (sec. 1664)....   314
        Briefing on long-range standoff weapon and sea-launched 
          cruise missile (sec. 1665).............................   314
        Sense of the Senate on industrial base for Ground-Based 
          Strategic Deterrent program (sec. 1666)................   314
        Sense of the Senate on nuclear deterrence commitments of 
          the United States (sec. 1667)..........................   315
    Subtitle E--Missile Defense Programs.........................   315
        Iron Dome short-range rocket defense system and Israeli 
          cooperative missile defense program co-development and 
          co-production (sec. 1671)..............................   315
        Expansion of national missile defense policy and program 
          redesignation (sec. 1672)..............................   316
        Acceleration of the deployment of persistent space-based 
          sensor architecture (sec. 1673)........................   316
        Nonstandard acquisition processes of Missile Defense 
          Agency (sec. 1674).....................................   317
        Plan for the Redesigned Kill Vehicle (sec. 1675).........   317
        Report on improving ground-based midcourse defense 
          element of ballistic missile defense system (sec. 1676)   317
        Sense of the Senate on recent Missile Defense Agency 
          tests (sec. 1677)......................................   317
        Sense of the Senate on missile defense technology 
          development priorities (sec. 1678).....................   317
        Publication of environmental impact statement prepared 
          for certain potential future missile defense sites 
          (sec. 1679)............................................   318
    Subtitle F--Other Matters....................................   318
        Matters relating to military operations in the 
          information environment (sec. 1681)....................   318
        Extension of authorization for protection of certain 
          facilities and assets from unmanned aircraft (sec. 
          1682)..................................................   318
        Hard and deeply buried targets (sec. 1683)...............   318
    Items of Special Interest....................................   319
        Acquisition plan for Space Command and Control program...   319
        Addressing the Department of Defense's cyber red team 
          vulnerabilities........................................   319
        Airborne Launch Control System sustainment...............   320
        Assessment of replacement of E-4B and E-6 aircraft.......   320
        Assessment of the cybersecurity of Department of Defense 
          classified networks....................................   320
        Briefing on integration of commercial satellite 
          communications capabilities............................   321
        Briefing on Joint Cyber Command and Control program......   321
        Briefings on the status of replacement progress of the 
          mobile ground systems supporting the Space Based 
          Infrared Satellite system..............................   322
        Comptroller General assessment of cyber infrastructure 
          programs...............................................   322
        Comptroller General report on readiness of the nuclear 
          command, control, and communications system............   323
        Comptroller General study on weapon system cybersecurity.   323
        Coordination of election cybersecurity efforts...........   324
        Cybersecurity of commercial clouds used by Department of 
          Defense................................................   325
        Cybersecurity of industrial control systems..............   325
        Declassification of near-peer adversaries' military 
          capabilities...........................................   326
        Department of Defense endpoint management program........   327
        Foreign online influence operations......................   327
        Ground-Based Midcourse Defense system enhancements.......   328
        Independent evaluation of Air Force space command and 
          control enterprise program.............................   328
        Integrated Tactical Warning and Attack Assessment system 
          and multi-domain sensors...............................   329
        Light Detection and Ranging capabilities.................   329
        Low Power Laser Demonstrator program.....................   329
        National Security Agency Cyber Centers of Academic 
          Excellence.............................................   330
        Nuclear Posture Review implementation....................   331
        Pilot program authority to enhance cybersecurity and 
          resiliency of critical infrastructure..................   331
        Reducing barriers to service in U.S. Space Force.........   331
        Report on Mobile User Objective System...................   332
        Report on using existing intelligence sensors for 
          ballistic missile defense..............................   332
        Security and resiliency of decision-making technologies..   333
        Social network analysis for counterterrorism.............   333
        Software defined networking and network and cybersecurity 
          orchestration..........................................   333
        Space Fence Site 2.......................................   334
        Space industrial base of the People's Republic of China..   335
        Status of Military Ground User Equipment receivers.......   335
        Tactically responsive space launch operations............   336
        Terminal High Altitude Area Defense transition and 
          requirements...........................................   336
DIVISION B--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AUTHORIZATIONS.................   339
        Summary and explanation of funding tables................   339
        Short title (sec. 2001)..................................   339
        Expiration of authorizations and amounts required to be 
          specified by law (sec. 2002)...........................   339
        Effective date (sec. 2003)...............................   340
TITLE XXI--ARMY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION............................   341
        Summary..................................................   341
        Authorized Army construction and land acquisition 
          projects (sec. 2101)...................................   341
        Family housing (sec. 2102)...............................   341
        Authorization of appropriations, Army (sec. 2103)........   341
        Modification of authority to carry out certain fiscal 
          year 2019 project (sec. 2104)..........................   341
TITLE XXII--NAVY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION...........................   343
        Summary..................................................   343
        Authorized Navy construction and land acquisition 
          projects (sec. 2201)...................................   343
        Family housing (sec. 2202)...............................   343
        Improvements to military family housing units (sec. 2203)   343
        Authorization of appropriations, Navy (sec. 2204)........   343
TITLE XXIII--AIR FORCE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION.....................   345
        Summary..................................................   345
        Authorized Air Force construction and land acquisition 
          projects (sec. 2301)...................................   345
        Family housing (sec. 2302)...............................   345
        Improvements to military family housing units (sec. 2303)   345
        Authorization of appropriations, Air Force (sec. 2304)...   345
        Modification of authority to carry out certain fiscal 
          year 2015 project (sec. 2305)..........................   346
        Modification of authority to carry out certain fiscal 
          year 2016 project (sec. 2306)..........................   346
        Modification of authority to carry out certain fiscal 
          year 2017 project (sec. 2307)..........................   346
        Additional authority to carry out certain fiscal year 
          2018 projects (sec. 2308)..............................   346
        Modification of authority to carry out certain fiscal 
          year 2019 projects (sec. 2309).........................   347
TITLE XXIV--DEFENSE AGENCIES MILITARY CONSTRUCTION...............   349
        Summary..................................................   349
        Authorized Defense Agencies construction and land 
          acquisition projects (sec. 2401).......................   349
        Authorized Energy Resilience and Conservation Investment 
          Program projects (sec. 2402)...........................   349
        Authorization of appropriations, Defense Agencies (sec. 
          2403)..................................................   349
TITLE XXV--INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS................................   351
        Summary..................................................   351
    Subtitle A--North Atlantic Treaty Organization Security 
      Investment Program.........................................   351
        Authorized NATO construction and land acquisition 
          projects (sec. 2501)...................................   351
        Authorization of appropriations, NATO (sec. 2502)........   351
    Subtitle B--Host Country In-Kind Contributions...............   351
        Republic of Korea funded construction projects (sec. 
          2511)..................................................   351
TITLE XXVI--GUARD AND RESERVE FORCES FACILITIES..................   353
        Summary..................................................   353
        Authorized Army National Guard construction and land 
          acquisition projects (sec. 2601).......................   353
        Authorized Army Reserve construction and land acquisition 
          projects (sec. 2602)...................................   353
        Authorized Navy Reserve and Marine Corps Reserve 
          construction and land acquisition projects (sec. 2603).   353
        Authorized Air National Guard construction and land 
          acquisition projects (sec. 2604).......................   353
        Authorized Air Force Reserve construction and land 
          acquisition projects (sec. 2605).......................   354
        Authorization of appropriations, National Guard and 
          Reserve (sec. 2606)....................................   354
TITLE XXVII--BASE REALIGNMENT AND CLOSURE ACTIVITIES.............   355
        Summary and explanation of tables........................   355
        Authorization of appropriations for base realignment and 
          closure activities funded through Department of Defense 
          Base Closure Account (sec. 2701).......................   355
        Prohibition on conducting additional base realignment and 
          closure (BRAC) round (sec. 2702).......................   355
TITLE XXVIII--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AND GENERAL PROVISIONS.......   357
    Subtitle A--Military Construction Program....................   357
        Military installation resilience plans and projects of 
          Department of Defense (sec. 2801)......................   357
        Prohibition on use of funds to reduce air base resiliency 
          or demolish protected aircraft shelters in the European 
          theater without creating a similar protection from 
          attack (sec. 2802).....................................   357
        Prohibition on use of funds to close or return to the 
          host nation any existing air base (sec. 2803)..........   357
        Increased authority for certain unspecified minor 
          military construction projects (sec. 2804).............   357
        Technical corrections and improvements to installation 
          resilience (sec. 2805).................................   358
    Subtitle B--Land Conveyances.................................   358
        Release of interests retained in Camp Joseph T. Robinson, 
          Arkansas, for use of such land as a veterans cemetery 
          (sec. 2811)............................................   358
        Transfer of administrative jurisdiction over certain 
          parcels of Federal land in Arlington, Virginia (sec. 
          2812)..................................................   358
        Modification of requirements relating to land acquisition 
          in Arlington County, Virginia (sec. 2813)..............   358
        White Sands Missile Range Land Enhancements (sec. 2814)..   358
    Subtitle C--Other Matters....................................   359
        Equal treatment of insured depository institutions and 
          credit unions operating on military installations (sec. 
          2821)..................................................   359
        Expansion of temporary authority for acceptance and use 
          of contributions for certain construction, maintenance, 
          and repair projects mutually beneficial to the 
          Department of Defense and Kuwait military forces (sec. 
          2822)..................................................   359
        Designation of Sumpter Smith Joint National Guard Base 
          (sec. 2823)............................................   359
        Prohibition on use of funds to privatize temporary 
          lodging on installations of Department of Defense (sec. 
          2824)..................................................   360
        Pilot program to extend service life of roads and runways 
          under the jurisdiction of the Secretaries of the 
          military departments (sec. 2825).......................   360
    Items of Special Interest....................................   360
        Briefing on laboratory military construction.............   360
        Comptroller General review of privatized lodging program.   360
        Defense Access Roads.....................................   361
        Department of Defense disaster recovery..................   362
        Excess storage capacity at Army National Guard 
          installations..........................................   362
        Firearms training infrastructure.........................   363
        Long-term modernization of Lincoln Laboratory............   363
        Report on Base Realignment Closure costs.................   364
        Report on condition of facilities at Senior Reserve 
          Officers' Training Corps units at minority-serving 
          institutions...........................................   364
TITLE XXIX--OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS MILITARY CONSTRUCTION   367
        Summary..................................................   367
        Authorized Army construction and land acquisition 
          projects (sec. 2901)...................................   367
        Authorized Navy construction and land acquisition 
          projects (sec. 2902)...................................   367
        Authorized Air Force construction and land acquisition 
          projects (sec. 2903)...................................   367
        Authorized Defense Agencies construction and land 
          acquisition projects (sec. 2904).......................   367
        Disaster recovery projects (sec. 2905)...................   367
        Replenishment of certain military construction funds 
          (sec. 2906)............................................   368
        Authorization of appropriations (sec. 2907)..............   368
TITLE XXX--MILITARY HOUSING PRIVATIZATION REFORM.................   369
        Definitions (sec. 3001)..................................   369
    Subtitle A--Accountability and Oversight.....................   369
        Tenant bill of rights for privatized military housing 
          (sec. 3011)............................................   369
        Designation of Chief Housing Officer for privatized 
          military housing (sec. 3012)...........................   369
        Command oversight of military privatized housing as 
          element of performance evaluations (sec. 3013).........   370
        Consideration of history of landlord in contract renewal 
          process for privatized military housing (sec. 3014)....   370
        Treatment of breach of contract for privatized military 
          housing (sec. 3015)....................................   370
        Uniform code of basic standards for privatized military 
          housing and plan to conduct inspections and assessments 
          (sec. 3016)............................................   371
        Repeal of supplemental payments to lessors and 
          requirement for use of funds in connection with the 
          Military Housing Privatization Initiative (sec. 3017)..   371
        Standard for common credentials for health and 
          environmental inspectors of privatized military housing 
          (sec. 3018)............................................   372
        Improvement of privatized military housing (sec. 3019)...   372
        Access to maintenance work order system of landlords of 
          privatized military housing (sec. 3020)................   372
        Access by tenants of privatized military housing to work 
          order system of landlord (sec. 3021)...................   373
    Subtitle B--Prioritizing Families............................   373
        Dispute resolution process for landlord-tenant disputes 
          regarding privatized military housing and requests to 
          withhold payments (sec. 3031)..........................   373
        Suspension of Resident Energy Conservation Program (sec. 
          3032)..................................................   373
        Access by tenants to historical maintenance information 
          for privatized military housing (sec. 3033)............   374
        Prohibition on use of call centers outside the United 
          States for maintenance calls by tenants of privatized 
          military housing (sec. 3034)...........................   374
        Radon testing for privatized military housing (sec. 3035)   374
        Expansion of windows covered by requirement to use window 
          fall prevention devices in privatized military housing 
          (sec. 3036)............................................   374
        Requirements relating to move out and maintenance with 
          respect to privatized military housing (sec. 3037).....   374
    Subtitle C--Long-Term Quality Assurance......................   375
        Development of standardized documentation, templates, and 
          forms for privatized military housing (sec. 3041)......   375
        Council on privatized military housing (sec. 3042).......   375
        Requirements relating to management of privatized 
          military housing (sec. 3043)...........................   375
        Requirements relating to contracts for privatized 
          military housing (sec. 3044)...........................   376
        Withholding of incentive fees for landlords of privatized 
          military housing for failure to remedy a health or 
          environmental hazard (sec. 3045).......................   376
        Expansion of direct hire authority for Department of 
          Defense for childcare services providers for Department 
          child development centers to include direct hire 
          authority for installation military housing office 
          personnel (sec. 3046)..................................   377
        Plan on establishment of Department of Defense 
          jurisdiction over off-base privatized military housing 
          (sec. 3047)............................................   377
    Subtitle D--Other Housing Matters............................   377
        Lead-based paint testing and reporting (sec. 3051).......   377
        Satisfaction survey for tenants of military housing (sec. 
          3052)..................................................   377
        Information on legal services provided to members of the 
          Armed Forces harmed by health or environmental hazards 
          at military housing (sec. 3053)........................   378
        Mitigation of risks posed by certain items in military 
          family housing units (sec. 3054).......................   378
        Technical correction to certain payments for lessors of 
          privatized military housing (sec. 3055)................   378
        Pilot program to build and monitor use of single family 
          homes (sec. 3056)......................................   378
    Items of Special Interest....................................   378
        Compliance with housing laws.............................   378
        Comptroller General review of Basic Allowance for Housing 
          rate determination process.............................   379
        Consideration of privatized housing conditions in 
          evaluation of commanders and senior enlisted personnel.   380
        Plan for management of privatized military housing units 
          if a contract relating to those housing units is 
          rescinded..............................................   380
        Referral to Department of Justice of allegations of 
          military housing fraud.................................   381
        Report on service training for installation commanders...   381
        Review of Air Force Civil Engineer Center organizational 
          structure..............................................   382
DIVISION C--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY AUTHORIZATIONS 
  AND OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS.......................................   383
TITLE XXXI--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAMS......   383
    Subtitle A--National Security Programs and Authorizations....   383
        National Nuclear Security Administration (sec. 3101).....   383
        Defense environmental cleanup (sec. 3102)................   383
        Other defense activities (sec. 3103).....................   383
        Nuclear energy (sec. 3104)...............................   383
    Subtitle B--Program Authorizations, Restrictions, and 
      Limitations................................................   383
        Technical corrections to National Nuclear Security 
          Administration Act and Atomic Energy Defense Act (sec. 
          3111)..................................................   383
        National Nuclear Security Administration Personnel System 
          (sec. 3112)............................................   383
        Contracting, program management, scientific, engineering, 
          and technical positions at National Nuclear Security 
          Administration (sec. 3113).............................   384
        Prohibition on use of laboratory-directed research and 
          development funds for general and administrative 
          overhead costs (sec. 3114).............................   384
        Prohibition on use of funds for advanced naval nuclear 
          fuel system based on low-enriched uranium (sec. 3115)..   384
    Subtitle C--Plans and Reports................................   385
        Estimation of costs of meeting defense environmental 
          cleanup milestones required by consent orders (sec. 
          3121)..................................................   385
        Extension of suspension of certain assessments relating 
          to nuclear weapons stockpile (sec. 3122)...............   385
        Repeal of requirement for review relating to enhanced 
          procurement authority (sec. 3123)......................   385
        Determination of effect of treaty obligations with 
          respect to producing tritium (sec. 3124)...............   385
        Assessment of high energy density physics (sec. 3125)....   385
    Budget Items.................................................   386
        Federal salaries.........................................   386
        Technology maturation initiatives........................   386
        Stockpile Responsiveness Program.........................   386
        Nonproliferation Stewardship Program.....................   386
        Emergency Operations.....................................   387
        Enterprise Assessments...................................   387
        Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal...........................   387
    Items of Special Interest....................................   388
        Assessment of lithium sustainment program and production 
          project................................................   388
        Briefing on ability to meet requirements for plutonium 
          pit production.........................................   388
        Comptroller General review of applicability of Section 
          809 Panel recommendations to the Department of Energy..   389
        Comptroller General review of DOE Order 140.1............   390
        Comptroller General study of radioactive waste at West 
          Valley, New York.......................................   390
        Comptroller General to continue ongoing evaluation of the 
          Hanford Waste Treatment Plant..........................   391
        Plutonium science and metallurgy.........................   391
        Report on the Department of Energy's Office of Legacy 
          Management.............................................   391
        Report on the Department of Energy's tank closures.......   392
TITLE XXXII--DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD.............   393
        Authorization (sec. 3201)................................   393
        Improvement of management and organization of Defense 
          Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (sec. 3202)............   393
        Membership of Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board 
          (sec. 3203)............................................   394
TITLE XXXV--MARITIME ADMINISTRATION..............................   395
        Maritime Administration (sec. 3501)......................   395
DIVISION D--FUNDING TABLES.......................................   397
        Authorization of amounts in funding tables (sec. 4001)...   397
SUMMARY OF NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2020..   399
TITLE XLI--PROCUREMENT...........................................   409
        Procurement (sec. 4101)..................................   410
        Procurement for overseas contingency operations (sec. 
          4102)..................................................   456
TITLE XLII--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION..........   477
        Research, development, test, and evaluation (sec. 4201)..   478
        Research, development, test, and evaluation for overseas 
          contingency operations (sec. 4202).....................   517
TITLE XLIII--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE...........................   521
        Operation and maintenance (sec. 4301)....................   522
        Operation and maintenance for overseas contingency 
          operations (sec. 4302).................................   544
TITLE XLIV--MILITARY PERSONNEL...................................   557
        Military personnel (sec. 4401)...........................   558
        Military personnel for overseas contingency operations 
          (sec. 4402)............................................   559
TITLE XLV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS..................................   561
        Other authorizations (sec. 4501).........................   562
        Other authorizations for overseas contingency operations 
          (sec. 4502)............................................   566
TITLE XLVI--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION................................   569
        Military construction (sec. 4601)........................   570
        Military construction for overseas contingency operations 
          (sec. 4602)............................................   586
TITLE XLVII--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAMS.....   591
        Department of Energy national security programs (sec. 
          4701)..................................................   592
LEGISLATIVE REQUIREMENTS.........................................   606
        Departmental Recommendations.............................   606
        Committee Action.........................................   606
        Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate................   609
        Regulatory Impact........................................   609
        Changes in Existing Law..................................   609
        
        
        


                                                         Calendar No. 114
                                                       
116th Congress    }                                            {   Report
                                   SENATE
 1st Session      }                                            {   116-48

======================================================================

 
     TO AUTHORIZE APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2020 FOR MILITARY 
ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, FOR MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, AND 
   FOR DEFENSE ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, TO PRESCRIBE 
   MILITARY PERSONNEL STRENGTHS FOR SUCH FISCAL YEAR, AND FOR OTHER 
                                PURPOSES

                                _______
                                

                 June 11, 2019.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

           Mr. Inhofe, from the Committee on Armed Services, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                         [To accompany S. 1790]

    The Committee on Armed Services reports favorably an 
original bill (S. 1790) to authorize appropriations for fiscal 
year 2020 for military activities of the Department of Defense, 
for military construction, and for defense activities of the 
Department of Energy, to prescribe military personnel strengths 
for such fiscal year, and for other purposes, and recommends 
that the bill do pass.

                          PURPOSE OF THE BILL

    This bill would:
          (1) Authorize appropriations for (a) procurement, (b) 
        research, development, test and evaluation, (c) 
        operation and maintenance and the revolving and 
        management funds of the Department of Defense for 
        fiscal year 2020;
          (2) Authorize the personnel end strengths for each 
        military active duty component of the Armed Forces for 
        fiscal year 2020;
          (3) Authorize the personnel end strengths for the 
        Selected Reserve of each of the reserve components of 
        the Armed Forces for fiscal year 2020;
          (4) Impose certain reporting requirements;
          (5) Impose certain limitations with regard to 
        specific procurement and research, development, test 
        and evaluation actions and manpower strengths; provide 
        certain additional legislative authority, and make 
        certain changes to existing law;
          (6) Authorize appropriations for military 
        construction programs of the Department of Defense for 
        fiscal year 2020; and
          (7) Authorize appropriations for national security 
        programs of the Department of Energy for fiscal year 
        2020.

                           COMMITTEE OVERVIEW

    For the past 58 consecutive years, Congress has fulfilled 
its constitutional responsibility to ``provide for the common 
defense'' by passing the National Defense Authorization Act 
(NDAA). This annual legislation authorizes funding and provides 
authorities for the U.S. military and other critical national 
defense priorities, and ensures our troops have what they need 
to defend our nation. On May 22, 2019, the Senate Armed 
Services Committee voted overwhelmingly, 25-2, to advance the 
National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2020 to the 
Senate floor and keep our troops safe.
    The committee takes seriously its obligation to national 
security as well as to our men and women in uniform and their 
families, who represent the best of our country. The NDAA 
acknowledges their service and sacrifice, and seeks to improve 
the quality of life for those who serve.
    The committee markup of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2020, supports a total of $750 billion for 
national defense. The committee believes this authorization is 
necessary to implement the 2018 National Defense Strategy (NDS) 
and to compete, deter, and win in an era of long-term strategic 
competition.
    The committee markup:
           Authorizes critical funding for the 
        Department of Defense (DOD) to provide resources needed 
        by combatant commands to implement the 2018 NDS and 
        compete, deter, and win in an era of long-term 
        strategic competition.
           Ensures the Military Services have the 
        personnel, equipment, training, and organizational 
        structure to accelerate measurable readiness recovery 
        across the full range of assigned missions.
           Ensures the long-term viability of the all-
        volunteer force by improving the quality of life of the 
        men and women of the total force (Active Duty, National 
        Guard, and Reserve), and their families, including by 
        reforming privatized on-base housing.
           Maintains maritime and air superiority by 
        focusing on continuous fifth generation procurement 
        growth, increasing the procurement of advanced 
        munitions, and addressing critical deficiencies in land 
        forces, especially long-range precision fires and air 
        and missile defense.
           Augments the capability of the U.S. Armed 
        Forces and the security forces of allied and friendly 
        nations to counter and defeat near-peer adversaries, 
        violent extremist organizations, and other shared 
        threats to regional security, U.S. interests, and the 
        U.S. homeland.
           Enhances deterrence by recapitalizing and 
        modernizing the U.S. nuclear triad; ensuring the 
        safety, security, and reliability of our nuclear 
        stockpile, delivery systems, and infrastructure; 
        increasing capability in theater and homeland missile 
        defense; and strengthening nonproliferation programs.
           Drives DOD investment in next-generation 
        operational capabilities and advanced technologies that 
        will ensure U.S. military dominance, while protecting 
        and strengthening our National Security Innovation 
        Base.
           Improves the ability of our Armed Forces to 
        counter threats and promote U.S. freedom of action in 
        the information domain, including space, cyber, and 
        electronic warfare.
           Strengthens existing U.S. alliances and 
        partnerships, builds mutually beneficial new 
        partnerships, and leverages opportunities in 
        international cooperation to ensure U.S. success in 
        competition and conflict against other great powers.
           Implements robust oversight of past year's 
        reforms of acquisition enterprise organizations, 
        policies, and programs, while authorizing more diverse 
        and flexible contracting approaches that enable timely 
        contract awards.
           Ensures proper stewardship and 
        accountability for taxpayer dollars by promoting 
        aggressive review of DOD management policies, extract 
        efficiencies through improved business practices and/or 
        the termination of unnecessary, outdated, or redundant 
        programs, and exercising systematic oversight of the 
        defense audit.

Preamble to the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020

    The world is more unstable and dangerous than it has been 
in recent memory. Our margin of military supremacy has eroded 
and is undermined by new threats from strategic competitors 
like China and Russia. At the same time, we are confronting 
persistent threats from North Korea, Iran, and terrorist 
organizations. Rapid technological advances have fundamentally 
altered the nature of warfare, and years of sustained armed 
conflict, underfunding, and budgetary instability have harmed 
our military readiness and dulled our combat edge. Our 
Congressional duty to provide for the security of our nation, 
protect our values, and support those who defend them is all 
the more important as the tide of war has risen rather than 
receded. We must pivot to meet the needs of a nation 
increasingly at risk.
    The National Defense Strategy (NDS) and the NDS Commission 
report established a comprehensive roadmap to bolster our 
national security in light of this new challenge of strategic 
competition. Last year's defense authorization legislation, the 
John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2019, was the first NDAA to support the implementation of 
this strategy, resulting in gains in readiness and improved 
capabilities. The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2020 keeps our Armed Forces on that trajectory, and builds 
on the recognition of this new reality-strengthening our force, 
investing in innovation, and improving the combat effectiveness 
of the DOD.
    The committee continues to prioritize the timely passage of 
this legislation and predictable funding, completing its work 
on the fiscal year 2020 NDAA just over two months after 
receiving the administration's budget request. Our military 
leaders have repeatedly stated that stable, on-time, and 
adequate funding is key to implementing the recommendations of 
the NDS Commission report. The report serves to provide sharp 
guideposts to outfitting our Armed Forces with the resources 
and authorities they need to advance U.S. national security 
interests.
    However, timely and sufficient funding alone will not fix 
all of our security problems. We must establish clear 
priorities and reinforce them with strategic investments to 
pursue urgent change at significant scale. Difficult choices 
must be made and priorities established, particularly related 
to roles and missions, force employment, and resource 
allocation.
    With the NDS and NDS Commission Report as the framework, 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 
advances the following priorities:
    (1) First, the NDAA invests in a lethal, ready all-
volunteer force. The committee's top priority remains 
supporting the 2.15 million men and women who make up our all-
volunteer force, particularly those troops in harm's way. The 
NDAA ensures that our warfighters will not only be equipped 
with the best equipment and munitions, but also that our 
military infrastructure supports the mission and a stable 
quality of life for service members and their families. In 
particular, the bill profoundly changes how on-base privatized 
housing is managed, increasing accountability to our military 
families, and guaranteeing future economic viability for the 
program. As critical initiatives, the legislation also 
increases employment opportunities for military spouses and 
improves the availability of child care on installations.
    (2) Second, the NDAA works to restore our combat advantage 
through modernization, innovation, and cooperation. Our 
military superiority can no longer be taken for granted and is 
not guaranteed. For too many years, we assumed our equipment 
was better than everyone else's-but it's simply not true. 
Without increased investment, we risk falling behind, losing 
our ability to successfully deter aggression from strategic 
competitors, and inflicting lasting damage to our national 
security. To meet urgent needs across operating domains, the 
NDAA aligns service resources with the NDS-continuing to 
rebuild readiness, optimizing the force for innovation and 
effectiveness, and re-establishing warfighting dominance. 
Therefore, the NDAA authorizes investments in critical 
equipment, weapons, and missile defense platforms to improve 
munitions that enhance lethality. It modernizes key 
capabilities and increases preparedness for war.
    This includes maintaining a safe, secure, sustainable, and 
credible nuclear deterrent-updating and securing our stockpile 
and infrastructure to prevent nuclear warfare and ensure 
nuclear weapons do not end up in the hands of malign actors. No 
one should doubt the capability or political will of the United 
States.
    The NDAA passed by the committee drives innovation by 
authorizing funds and implementing policies to advance 
technology development and next-generation capabilities, 
including artificial intelligence, hypersonic weapons, and 
quantum computing. These investments will ensure our military 
is not fighting tomorrow's wars with yesterday's weapons and 
equipment.
    As the global security dynamics shift, warfare has also 
expanded to new frontiers. To meet growing threats in the space 
domain, the NDAA establishes a U.S. Space Force as a new 
component of the Air Force. Our adversaries have Space Forces--
we are behind. This new force will focus on cultivating a space 
warfighting ethos, unify command of space operations and 
activities, and improve acquisition policies for space programs 
and systems,
    Also a new frontier, the NDAA includes numerous provisions 
to advance the DOD's cybersecurity strategy and address our 
cyber warfighting capabilities. To reinforce our military 
might, the NDAA supports programs and policies that will 
cultivate key alliances and partnerships. These relationships 
will help maintain a favorable balance of power against near-
peer adversaries and counter other growing threats.
    (3) Finally, the NDAA continues efforts to improve 
effectiveness and efficiency within the Pentagon. The DOD's 
business operations provide the foundation for a responsive and 
innovative military. Building upon several years of reform, the 
NDAA continues to streamline operations-continuing acquisition 
policy reform, recalibrating contract reform, and strengthening 
program oversight. A more efficient bureaucracy will better 
utilize the full value of every taxpayer dollar spent on 
defense.
    With the National Defense Strategy Commission Report as a 
framework, the Fiscal Year 2020 National Defense Authorization 
Act keeps our Armed Forces on the trajectory established last 
year-rebuilding readiness, improving lethality, investing in 
innovation, and reforming the DOD. These efforts will reassert 
our quantitative and qualitative military advantage and 
revitalize American military power and supremacy in the new 
landscape of global competition.

                 BUDGETARY EFFECTS OF THIS ACT (SEC. 4)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
that the budgetary effects of this Act be determined in 
accordance with the procedures established in the Statutory 
Pay-As-You-Go Act of 2010 (title I of Public Law 111-139).

     SUMMARY OF DISCRETIONARY AUTHORIZATIONS AND BUDGET AUTHORITY 
                              IMPLICATION

    The administration's budget request for national defense 
discretionary programs within the jurisdiction of the Senate 
Committee on Armed Services for fiscal year 2020 was $741.6 
billion. Of this amount, $544.6 billion was requested for base 
Department of Defense (DOD) programs, $23.2 billion was 
requested for national security programs in the Department of 
Energy (DOE), and $173.8 billion was requested for Overseas 
Contingency Operations (OCO).
    The committee recommends an overall discretionary 
authorization of $741.6 billion in fiscal year 2020, including 
$642.5 billion for base DOD programs, $23.2 billion for 
national security programs in the DOE, and $75.9 billion for 
OCO.
    The two tables preceding the detailed program adjustments 
in Division D of this bill summarize the direct discretionary 
authorizations in the committee recommendation and the 
equivalent budget authority levels for fiscal year 2020 defense 
programs. The first table summarizes the committee's 
recommended discretionary authorizations by appropriation 
account for fiscal year 2020 and compares these amounts to the 
request.
    The second table summarizes the total budget authority 
implication for national defense by including national defense 
funding for items that are not in the jurisdiction of the 
defense committees or are already authorized.

            DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AUTHORIZATIONS

                          TITLE I--PROCUREMENT

              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations

Authorization of appropriations (sec. 101)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for procurement activities at the levels 
identified in section 4101 of division D of this Act.

                       Subtitle B--Army Programs

Sense of Senate on Army's approach to capability drops 1 and 2 of the 
        Distributed Common Ground System-Army program (sec. 111)
    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
Sense of the Senate on the Army's approach to capability drops 
one and two of the Distributed Common Ground System-Army 
program.
Authority of the Secretary of the Army to waive certain limitations 
        related to Distributed Common Ground System-Army Increment 1 
        (sec. 112)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 113(d) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) by striking ``Secretary 
of Defense'' and inserting ``Secretary of the Army.''
    The waiver process for capability drops into the 
Distributed Common Ground System-Army system architecture is 
overly time-consuming. Capability drop one required over 12 
months of processing time for approval. These delays slow 
progress and ultimately degrade the warfighter's ability to 
analyze and act on time-sensitive intelligence.
    Therefore, the committee recommends that the waiver 
authority be given to the Secretary of the Army for faster 
processing and approval.

                       Subtitle C--Navy Programs

Modification of prohibition on availability of funds for Navy port 
        waterborne security barriers (sec. 121)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 130 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) to 
extend the prohibition on availability of funds for Navy port 
waterborne security barriers through fiscal year 2020 and would 
require the Secretary of the Navy to notify the congressional 
defense committees if exigent circumstances, under which an 
exception is granted, are deemed to exist.

Capabilities based assessment for naval vessels that carry fixed-wing 
        aircraft (sec. 122)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Navy to conduct a capabilities-based 
assessment to clarify the future requirements for naval vessels 
that carry fixed-wing aircraft.
    The committee notes that the budget request's proposal to 
retire the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75) early would yield a 
force with 10 or fewer aircraft carriers for more than 20 
years. The budget request also includes a 7-year gap until the 
funding of the next amphibious assault ship, LHA-9, which will 
likely result in a production break. The committee is concerned 
that both the CVN-75 and LHA-9 proposals are contrary to 
current Navy force structure requirements and will result in 
significant negative impacts for the shipbuilding industrial 
base.
    The committee also notes that the Under Secretary of the 
Navy stated in February 2019, ``If $13 billion is unaffordable 
. . . what's the next carrier look like? Is it going to be as 
advanced as [the USS Gerald R. Ford] or is it going to be 
smaller? . . . We don't know the answers to that, but we're 
looking at those.''
    The committee also notes that all three future fleet 
platform architecture studies required by section 1067 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92) recommended that the Navy pursue a class of 
aircraft carriers smaller than the Ford-class. The committee 
believes that smaller aircraft carriers could both increase 
aircraft carrier capacity and provide a more efficient means to 
conduct a range of missions with lower sortie requirements, 
including support for amphibious operations.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to consult the fleet architecture studies, as well as the 
report on alternative aircraft carrier options required by 
section 128 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92), and initiate a 
capabilities-based assessment to begin the process of 
identifying requirements for the naval vessels that will carry 
fixed-wing aircraft following CVN-81 and LHA-9.

Ford-class aircraft carrier cost limitation baselines (sec. 123)

    The committee recommends a provision that would establish 
Ford-class aircraft carrier cost limitation baselines in title 
10, United States Code, and repeal a superseded provision.
    The committee notes that cost limitation baselines for 
Ford-class aircraft carriers were first enacted in section 122 
of the John Warner National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2007 (Public Law 109-364). These cost limitation 
baselines have been amended in public law three times to 
account for cost estimate adjustments. The committee further 
notes that the Secretary of the Navy raised the cost limitation 
baseline for the CVN-78 to $13.0 billion in May 2018.
    The committee believes that Ford-class cost limitation 
baselines should now be adjusted to reflect the Navy's latest 
cost estimates for each of the four ships in the class and that 
the cost limitation baseline for each such ship should be 
codified in title 10, United States Code, due to the long-term 
nature of aircraft carrier construction and the benefits of 
greater clarity in oversight requirements.
    The provision therefore would: (1) Update the cost 
limitation baseline for each Ford-class aircraft carrier; (2) 
Require notification of the congressional defense committees at 
least 30 days prior to the Secretary of the Navy's adjusting a 
limitation amount; (3) Eliminate adjustments that would be 
based on non-recurring engineering changes that are no longer 
applicable; and (4) Eliminate reporting requirements related to 
CVN-79, which would be maintained elsewhere.

Design and construction of amphibious transport dock designated LPD-31 
        (sec. 124)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of the Navy to enter into and incrementally fund 
a contract for design and construction of the amphibious 
transport dock designated LPD-31.
    The committee notes that in testimony before the Senate 
Armed Services Committee on April 7, 2019, the Secretary of the 
Navy and Chief of Naval Operations supported incremental 
funding authority for LPD-31.

LHA Replacement Amphibious Assault Ship Program (sec. 125)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of the Navy to enter into and incrementally fund 
a contract for design and construction of the LHA replacement 
ship designated LHA-9.
    The committee notes that in testimony before the Senate 
Armed Services Committee on April 7, 2019, the Secretary of the 
Navy and Chief of Naval Operations supported incremental 
funding authority for LHA-9.
    The provision would also repeal section 125 of the John 
Warner National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2007 
(Public Law 109-364).

Limitation on availability of funds for the Littoral Combat Ship (sec. 
        126)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
funds from being used to exceed the total procurement quantity 
listed in revision five of the Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) 
acquisition strategy unless the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment submits to the congressional 
defense committees a certification.
    The committee notes that the Navy force structure 
assessment requirement and LCS acquisition strategy total 
procurement quantity of 32 LCSs was met in fiscal year 2018. 
Three additional LCSs were authorized and appropriated by the 
Congress in fiscal year 2019.
    Accordingly, the provision would require that, before 
further LCS procurement, the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment certify to the congressional 
defense committees that such procurement: (1) Is in the 
national security interests of the United States; (2) Will not 
result in exceeding the low rate initial production quantity 
approved in the LCS acquisition strategy in effect at the time 
of the certification; and (3) Is necessary to maintain a full 
and open competition for the guided missile frigate (FFG(X)) 
with a single source award in fiscal year 2020.

Limitation on the next new class of Navy large surface combatants (sec. 
        127)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
that design changes identified during the full duration of the 
combat system ship qualification trials and operational test 
periods of the first Arleigh Burke-class destroyer in the 
Flight III configuration be incorporated prior to Milestone B 
approval for the next new class of Navy large surface 
combatants.
    The provision would also require that the final results of 
test programs of engineering development models or prototypes 
be incorporated into the Navy large surface combatant program 
prior to Milestone B approval.

Refueling and complex overhauls of the USS John C. Stennis and USS 
        Harry S. Truman (sec. 128)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Navy to carry out the nuclear refueling and 
complex overhaul of the USS John C. Stennis (CVN-74) and USS 
Harry S. Truman (CVN-75).
    The provision would also authorize the use of incremental 
funding for a period not to exceed 6 years after advance 
procurement funds for each nuclear refueling and complex 
overhaul effort are first obligated.
    The committee notes that in testimony before the Armed 
Services Committee of the Senate on March 14, 2019, the Acting 
Secretary of Defense stated, ``[The proposal not to refuel the 
USS Harry S. Truman] represents some of the strategic choices 
that we've made in this year's budget. . . . The funds we freed 
up from making these decisions are invested in the future 
force.'' The committee understands that this desired future 
force includes offensively armed unmanned or optionally-manned 
surface vessels, for which the budget request includes more 
than $2.7 billion to procure in fiscal years 2020 through 2024.
    While recognizing the need to modernize the U.S. military 
to support the National Defense Strategy, the committee has not 
received adequate justification to support a shift in funding 
from refueling an aircraft carrier to procuring unproven 
systems. Specifically, the committee is unaware of: a new joint 
warfighting plan that concluded that the Nation needs one fewer 
aircraft carrier; proven substitute capabilities for the combat 
power and reach of the Truman and its air wing; unmanned 
surface and undersea systems proven to be operationally 
effective and suitable in the threat environment; or a change 
in the Chief of Naval Operations' requirement for 12 aircraft 
carriers.
    The committee is also unaware of administration proposals 
to change section 8062 of title 10, United States Code, which 
requires the Navy to maintain not fewer than 11 operational 
aircraft carriers, or section 1025 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91), 
which made it the policy of the United States to achieve a 355-
ship Navy comprised of the ``optimal mix'' of ships as soon as 
practicable. The ``optimal mix'' is defined as the mix of ships 
in the Navy's 355-ship requirement, including 12 aircraft 
carriers.
    The committee also notes that the Department of Defense 
estimates that not refueling the Truman would save 
approximately $3.5 billion plus annual operating costs. The 
committee is unclear as to how these savings compare to the 
development, procurement, and annual operating costs of the 
systems that are envisioned to provide equivalent or better 
capability as compared to the Truman and its air wing. The 
committee is also unaware of the schedule necessary to field 
such systems.
    Additionally, the committee notes that the Navy's ``Report 
to Congress on the Annual Long-Range Plan for Construction of 
Naval Vessels for Fiscal Year 2020'' states, ``Unmanned and 
optionally-manned systems are not accounted for in the overall 
battle force[.] . . . The physical challenges of extended 
operations at sea across the spectrum of competition and 
conflict, the concepts of operations for these platforms, and 
the policy challenges associated with employing deadly force 
from autonomous vehicles must be well understood prior to 
replacing accountable battle force ships.'' The committee does 
not believe that this standard has been met regarding the 
budget request's Truman proposal.

Report on carrier wing composition (sec. 129)

    The committee recommends a provision that would direct the 
Secretary of the Navy to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees, no later than May 1, 2020, on the optimal 
composition of the carrier air wing in 2030 and 2040, as well 
as alternative force design concepts. The provision would also 
require the Secretary to provide a briefing on the report no 
later than March 1, 2020, to the congressional defense 
committees.
    The committee is concerned, based on a number of 
independent analyses, that the Navy's current stated goal of a 
50/50 mix of 4th and 5th generation aircraft for the future 
carrier air wing will not be sufficient to meet the 
requirements of the National Defense Strategy.
    Therefore, the report required by this provision would 
include: (1) Analysis and justification used to reach the 50/50 
mix of 4th and 5th generation aircraft for 2030; (2) Analysis 
and justification for the optimal mix of carrier aircraft for 
2040; and (3) A plan for incorporating unmanned aerial vehicles 
and associated communication capabilities to effectively 
implement the future force design.

                     Subtitle D--Air Force Programs


Requirement to align Air Force fighter force structure with National 
        Defense Strategy and reports (sec. 141)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Air Force to align the fighter force structure 
acquisition strategy with the results of the independent 
studies required by section 1064 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) and 
to transmit the new strategy in a report to the congressional 
defense committees no later than March 1, 2020. The committee 
is concerned that the Air Force's current fighter force 
structure acquisition strategy does not comport with multiple 
reports required by the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 nor the service's own stated requirements to 
meet the National Defense Strategy. The provision would 
prohibit the Air Force's deviation from this strategy in its 
acquisition programs and related force structure until the 
Secretary of the Air Force receives a waiver and justification 
from the Secretary of Defense and until 30 days after notifying 
the congressional defense committees of the proposed deviation.

Requirement to establish the use of an Agile DevOps software 
        development solution as an alternative for Joint Strike Fighter 
        Autonomic Logistics Information System (sec. 142)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish an agile software development 
activity as an alternative for the F-35 Autonomic Logistics 
Information System (ALIS). The committee is encouraged by the 
ongoing efforts to incorporate agile software development into 
the ALIS programs of record (ALIS-next and Madhatter) while 
also maintaining traditional development in order to avoid risk 
to the overall program timeline. The provision would separate 
the budget lines and require a competitive analysis of the 
efforts between ALIS, ALIS-next, and Madhatter by the Secretary 
of Defense in order to evaluate transition opportunities and 
timelines.
    Finally, the provision would direct the Secretary of the 
Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of the Air Force, 
to brief the congressional defense committees on the findings 
of the competitive analysis no later than September 30, 2020.

Report on feasibility of multiyear contract for procurement of JASSM-ER 
        missiles (sec. 143)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Air Force to produce and submit a report assessing the 
feasibility of entering into a multi-year contract for the 
procurement of the JASSM-ER. The provision would require the 
Air Force to examine multiple multi-year contract scenarios, 
including one in which the Air Force would procure an annual 
quantity of 550 missiles for 5 years. The committee notes that 
the Air Force requirement for the JASSM-ER has recently 
increased. Further, the industrial base has recently expanded 
the capacity of its production facility to 550 missiles per 
year in order to meet the increased requirements of the Air 
Force.
    The committee notes that multi-year contracts can provide 
significant cost savings and stability in funding over multiple 
years. Therefore, the report would include assessments of the 
impacts on: the cost of the missile, the industrial base, the 
Long Range Anti-Ship Missile, and future development or 
modification requirements for the JASSM-ER.

Air Force aggressor squadron modernization (sec. 144)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Air Force to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees on Air Force aggressor 
squadron modernization.

Air Force plan for the Combat Rescue Helicopter fielding (sec. 145)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Air Force to provide a plan on the Combat Rescue Helicopter 
fielding.

Military type certification for AT-6 and A-29 light attack 
        experimentation aircraft (sec. 146)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Air Force to conduct a Military Type 
Certification for AT-6 and A-29 Light Attack Experimentation 
Aircraft.

       Subtitle E--Defense-Wide, Joint, and Multiservice Matters


Limitation on availability of funds for communication systems lacking 
        certain resiliency features (sec. 151)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
funding of any current or future Department of Defense (DOD) 
communications programs of record that do not meet certain 
resiliency requirements. The committee is concerned that, in 
the face of great power competition, the DOD has not assured 
servicemembers' ability to communicate and share data securely 
and consistently in a contested environment.
    The committee defines these program resiliency requirements 
as features that: 1) Deny geo-location of a transmission that 
would allow enemy targeting of the force; 2) Securely 
communicate classified information in a jamming environment of 
like-echelon forces; and 3) Utilize a waveform that is made 
available in the DOD Waveform Information Repository.
    The committee understands that there may be very limited 
cases where DOD communications equipment will be used to 
communicate in a garrison or peacetime situation and not in 
combat environments. Therefore, the provision would allow the 
Secretaries of the military departments to waive the 
aforementioned requirements for a system with a certification 
that the system does not require resiliency due to its expected 
use.

F-35 sustainment cost (sec. 152)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
F-35 Joint Program Office (JPO) to provide quarterly 
sustainment cost data, as part of the JPO quarterly briefings 
to the congressional defense committees. The committee is 
concerned that the Department of Defense is making force 
structure decisions based on sustainment cost data that do not 
easily provide the user with valid comparable metrics. 
Therefore, the requested information should compare, in an 
itemized format, the cost of legacy aircraft to that of the F-
35 program based on a standardized set of criteria.
    The provision also requires the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Acquisition and Sustainment to: (1) Develop a plan for 
achieving significant reductions in the costs to operate and 
maintain the F-35 aircraft; (2) Submit a report on that plan; 
and (3) Provide quarterly updates on the progress of 
implementing the plan.

Economic order quantity contracting authority for F-35 Joint Strike 
        Fighter program (sec. 153)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to award F-35 contracts to procure 
material and equipment in economic order quantities for fiscal 
year 2021 (Lot 15) through fiscal year 2023 (Lot 17). The 
committee supports the Department of Defense's planning for a 
multi-year procurement for production Lots 15, 16, and 17.

Repeal of tactical unmanned vehicle common data link requirement (sec. 
        154)

    The committee recommends a provision that would strike 
section 141 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2006 (Public Law 109-163). The committee is 
concerned that the standards set in the section 141 requirement 
do not keep pace with the current high threat environment and 
is thus out of step with the National Defense Strategy. The 
repeal would help the Services form an overall architecture for 
communications that is more resilient and allows for the 
inclusion and connection of manned and unmanned aircraft and 
weapons.

                              Budget Items


                                  Army


Utility fixed wing aircraft

    The budget request included $16.0 million in line number 2 
of Aircraft Procurement, Army (APA), for utility fixed wing 
aircraft.
    The committee notes that line number 2 of APA for the 
remainder of the future years defense program contains no 
funding for the program.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $16.0 
million in line number 2 of APA for the procurement of utility 
fixed wing aircraft.

AH-64 Apache Block IIIB New Build

    The budget request included $0.0 million in line number 10 
of Aircraft Procurement, Army (APA), for AH-64 Apache Block 
IIIB New Build.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Army's 
efforts to modernize and equip both the active component and 
the Army National Guard with the most advanced and capable 
attack helicopters in support of the National Defense Strategy. 
Consequently, the Army should field the Block IIIB aircraft as 
quickly as possible across the 24 attack battalions in the 
active component and the Army National Guard.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $105.0 
million in line number 10 of APA for the procurement of three 
AH-64 Apache Block IIIB New Build aircraft.

UH-60M Blackhawk

    The budget request included $1.4 billion in line number 12 
of Aircraft Procurement, Army (APA), for 73 UH-60M Blackhawk 
aircraft.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Army's 
efforts to field the most advanced and capable utility 
helicopters in support of the National Defense Strategy. 
However, the committee is concerned about the utility 
helicopter industrial base and the dramatic downturn in 
production of UH-60M aircraft through the proposed future years 
defense program. Further, the committee believes that the Army 
should take advantage of the current multiyear contract that 
will expire in fiscal year 2021 and more equitably distribute 
procurement to limit a steep production cut from fiscal year 
2020 to fiscal year 2021.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $140.0 
million for 7 active component aircraft in line number 12 of 
APA for the procurement of UH-60M aircraft.

UH-60V Conversion

    The budget request included $169.2 million in line number 
14 of Aircraft Procurement, Army (APA), for UH-60 Blackhawk L 
and V Models.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Army's 
efforts to field the most advanced and capable utility 
helicopters for the Army National Guard in support of the 
National Defense Strategy. As such, the Army should accelerate 
the conversion of Blackhawks to the upgraded V model, which 
provides enhanced situational awareness, as quickly as possible 
to optimize training and reduce operation and sustainment 
costs.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $35.0 
million in line number 14 of APA for the conversion of 8 
additional UH-60V aircraft.

Interim Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2

    The budget request contained $0.0 million in line number 4 
of Missile Procurement, Army, for Indirect Fire Protection 
Capability (IFPC) Increment 2.
    The committee notes that, while the Army in February 2019 
issued a letter of intent to procure two batteries of Iron Dome 
to meet the requirement articulated in section 112 of the John 
S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2019 (Public Law 115-232) for an interim cruise missile defense 
capability, this decision was predicated on submission and 
approval of an above threshold reprogramming (ATR) by mid-April 
2019. Because of the delay in submission of the ATR to the 
congressional defense committees, the committee is concerned 
that the Army will be unable to meet the statutory requirement 
for interim base defense. Therefore, the committee recommends a 
realignment that would support procurement of two Iron Dome 
batteries with fiscal year 2020 funds as well as a realignment 
elsewhere in this report of research, development, test, and 
evaluation funding to support the procurement. The committee 
notes that, should the ATR be fully approved before the end of 
fiscal year 2019, this realignment would no longer be 
necessary.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $229.9 
million in line number 4 of Missile Procurement, Army, for IFPC 
Increment 2.

Terminal High Altitude Area Defense Army procurement

    The budget request did not contain any funding in Missile 
Procurement, Army, for the Terminal High Altitude Area Defense 
(THAAD) system.
    Elsewhere in this report, the committee has stated its 
views regarding the transition of the THAAD program from the 
Missile Defense Agency to the Department of the Army.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $425.9 
million in line number 5 of Missile Procurement, Army.

Stryker lethality

    The budget request included $144.4 million in line number 3 
of Weapons & Tracked Combat Vehicles (WTCV), Army, for Stryker 
modifications.
    The Army also identified on its unfunded priority list a 
shortfall in funding of $249.2 million in line number 3 of 
WTCV, Army, to fund Stryker lethality upgrades.
    The committee acknowledges the need to increase Stryker 
lethality with a 30mm gun in order to improve standoff and 
survivability and retain overmatch in support of the National 
Defense Strategy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $249.2 
million in line number 3 of WTCV, Army.

Bradley program

    The budget request included $638.8 million in line number 5 
of Weapons & Tracked Combat Vehicles (WTCV), Army, for the 
procurement of upgrades to the family of Bradley Fighting 
Vehicles.
    The committee strongly supports the Bradley A4 upgrade 
program, which is essential to ensure that the armored brigade 
combat team remains relevant for the next 3 decades. However, 
the committee notes that, according to budget documents 
provided by the Department of the Army, the program is 
historically under-executing.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $40.0 
million in line number 5 of WTCV, Army.

Abrams upgrade program

    The budget request included $1.8 billion in line number 14 
of Weapons & Tracked Combat Vehicles (WTCV), Army, for the 
upgrade of 165 Abrams tanks to the M1A2 SEPv3.
    The M1A2 SEPv3 program is vital to the lethality and 
survivability of the Army's armored brigade combat team. The 
M1A2 SEPv3 incorporates multiple improvements such as: turret 
and hull armor upgrades for enhanced crew survivability; the 
Total Integrated Engine Revitalization program and upgraded 
transmission for improved power pack reliability and 
durability; improved computer systems including 
microprocessors, color flat panel displays, and memory 
capacity; and Block 1 second generation Forward Looking Infra-
Red technology. The committee strongly supports the Abrams 
Upgrade Program and its alignment to the National Defense 
Strategy. However, the committee believes that funding could be 
better balanced throughout the future years defense program to 
reduce industrial base turbulence.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $35.0 
million in line number 14 of WTCV, Army.

Joint Light Tactical Vehicle

    The budget request included $996.0 million in line number 6 
of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for the procurement of 2,530 
Joint Light Tactical Vehicles (JLTV).
    The Army has requested a zero sum realignment of $4.5 
million from line number 6 of OPA to PE 65812A in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Army, in order to complete 
the developmental portion of the Training, Aids, Devices, 
Simulators and Simulation Hands-On Trainers requirement for the 
JLTV.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $4.5 
million in line number 6 of OPA.

Joint Light Tactical Vehicle

    The budget request included $996.0 million in line 6 of 
Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for the procurement of 2,530 
Joint Light Tactical Vehicles (JLTV).
    The JLTV is capable of performing multiple mission roles 
and is designed to provide protected, sustained, and networked 
mobility for personnel and payloads across the full range of 
military operations.
    However, the committee believes that the Army should make a 
full rate production decision as soon as possible. Therefore, 
the committee recommends a decrease of $35.0 million in line 6 
of OPA.

Q53 extended range radar

    The budget request included $16.4 million in line number 
100 of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for counterfire radars.
    The Army identified in its unfunded priority list a 
shortfall in funding of $62.5 million in line number 100 of OPA 
to fund the Q53 extended range radar.
    The committee acknowledges the need to improve current 
radar systems with gallium-nitride technology to extend the 
range capabilities for indirect fire units in support of the 
National Defense Strategy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $62.5 
million to line number 100 of OPA.

Integrated Personnel and Pay System--Army

    The budget request included $18.7 million in line number 
109 of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for the Integrated 
Personnel and Pay System--Army.
    The committee is concerned about unjustified cost growth 
and poor business process reengineering.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $18.7 
million in line number 109 of OPA.

C4I life-cycle replacement at Joint Intelligence Operations Center 
        Europe Analytic Center

    The budget request included $139.3 million in line number 
113 of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for Automated Data 
Processing Equipment.
    The committee recommends an increase of $8.0 million in 
line number 113 of OPA to support life-cycle replacement of 
command, control, communication, computer, and intelligence 
systems and infrastructure at the Joint Intelligence Operations 
Center Europe Analytic Center at RAF Molesworth, United 
Kingdom.

Army contract writing system

    The budget request included $15.0 million in line number 
116 of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for the Army Contract 
Writing System.
    The committee remains concerned about duplication among the 
Services in contract writing systems.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $15.0 
million in line number 116 of OPA.

Robotics and Applique Systems

    The budget request included $101.1 million in line number 
138 of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for Robotics and Applique 
Systems.
    The Army has requested a zero sum realignment of $12.8 
million from PE 65053A within Research, Development, Test, and 
Evaluation, Army, to line number 138 of OPA for Ground 
Robotics, Squad Multipurpose Equipment Transport (S-MET) in 
order to accelerate the production and fielding of the S-MET.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $12.8 
million in line number 138 of OPA.

                                  Navy


F-35C

    The budget request included $2.3 billion in line number 3 
of Aircraft Procurement, Navy (APN), for 20 F-35 aircraft.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Navy's and 
Marine Corps' efforts to modernize and equip themselves with 
the most advanced and capable aircraft in support of the 
National Defense Strategy. However, the committee is concerned 
about the quantity and timing of procurement of fifth 
generation aircraft and understands that the Chief of Naval 
Operations has placed additional aircraft on his unfunded 
priority list.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $215.0 
million in line number 3 of APN for the procurement of 2 
additional F-35C aircraft.

F-35B

    The budget request included $1.3 billion in line number 5 
of Aircraft Procurement, Navy (APN), for 10 F-35 aircraft.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Marine 
Corps' efforts to modernize and equip itself with the most 
advanced and capable aircraft in support of the National 
Defense Strategy. However, the committee is concerned about the 
quantity and timing of procurement of fifth generation aircraft 
and understands that the Marine Corps has placed additional 
aircraft on its unfunded priority list.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $249.1 
million in line number 5 of APN for the procurement of 2 
additional F-35B aircraft.

F-5 aircraft procurement

    The budget request included $39.7 million in line number 22 
of Aircraft Procurement, Navy (APN), for 22 F-5 aircraft.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Department 
of Defense's efforts to increase adversary air training 
capacity for the Navy and Marine Corps. However, the committee 
is concerned that the purchase of used third generation 
aircraft will not address the advanced training requirements 
laid out in the National Defense Strategy and could be met by 
the continued use of contracted adversary and close air 
support.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $39.7 
million in line number 22 of APN.

F-35B Spares

    The budget request included $2.2 billion in line number 67 
of Aircraft Procurement, Navy (APN), for aircraft spares and 
repair parts.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Navy's and 
Marine Corps' efforts to modernize and equip themselves with 
the most advanced and capable aircraft in support of the 
National Defense Strategy. However, the committee is concerned 
about the quantity and timing of procurement of fifth 
generation aircraft and understands that the Chief of Naval 
Operations has placed additional aircraft on his unfunded 
priority list.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $14.9 
million in line number 67 of APN for spares.

F-35C Spares

    The budget request included $2.2 billion in line number 67 
of Aircraft Procurement, Navy (APN), for spares and repair 
parts.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Navy's and 
Marine Corps' efforts to modernize and equip themselves with 
the most advanced and capable aircraft in support of the 
National Defense Strategy. However, the committee is concerned 
about the quantity and timing of procurement of fifth 
generation aircraft and understands that the Chief of Naval 
Operations has placed additional aircraft on his unfunded 
priority list.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $24.6 
million in line number 67 of APN.

F-35B Engine

    The budget request included $2.2 billion in line number 67 
of Aircraft Procurement, Navy (APN), for 10 F-35 aircraft.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Marine 
Corps' efforts to modernize and equip itself with the most 
advanced and capable aircraft in support of the National 
Defense Strategy. However, the committee is concerned about the 
quantity and timing of procurement of fifth generation aircraft 
and understands that the Marine Corps has placed an additional 
engine on its unfunded priority list.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $28.8 
million in line number 67 of APN for the procurement of 1 
additional F-35B engine.

Tomahawk

    The budget request included no funding in line number 3 of 
Weapons Procurement, Navy (WPN), for Tomahawk.
    The committee notes that the Department of the Navy's 
original plan was to re-certify the existing inventory of 
Tomahawk missiles. Despite investment to facilitate the 
production line's transitioning from production to re-
certification, the Navy is now requesting to re-start the 
Tomahawk production line. The committee is concerned that this 
reversal in acquisition strategy does not have a thorough plan 
or requirement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $56.3 
million in line number 3 of WPN for test equipment and support 
of concurrent production and re-certification activities and 
encourages the Department of Navy to provide an updated plan 
for the Tomahawk missile.

LCS Over-the-Horizon missile

    The budget request included no funding in line number 19 of 
Weapons Procurement, Navy (WPN), for the Littoral Combat Ship 
(LCS) Over-the-Horizon (OTH) Missile.
    The committee notes that the OTH missile acquisition 
strategy is accelerated and contains unnecessary risk.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $20.0 
million in line number 19 of WPN for the LCS OTH Missile.

MK-48 torpedo

    The budget request included no funding in line number 29 of 
Weapons Procurement, Navy (WPN), for the MK-48 Torpedo.
    The Chief of Naval Operations' unfunded priorities list 
requested an increase in procurement by 13 torpedoes to 
maximize the production line.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $16.0 
million for line number 29 of WPN for the MK-48 Torpedo.

Columbia-class submarine advance procurement

    The budget request included $1.7 billion in line number 1 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for Columbia-class 
submarine advance procurement.
    The committee believes that expanding the capabilities of 
the second- and third-tier contractors in the submarine 
industrial base should lead to greater cost savings and 
improved efficiency as production increases to meet the 
Columbia-class procurement schedule and higher requirement for 
Virginia-class attack submarines in the Navy's latest Force 
Structure Assessment.
    The committee notes that the budget request includes some 
funding for submarine industrial base expansion to ensure that 
second- and third-tier contractors are able to meet increased 
production requirements. The committee understands that an 
additional $125.0 million could be executed to further address 
such requirements.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $125.0 
million in line number 1 of SCN for Columbia-class submarine 
advance procurement.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to notify 
the congressional defense committees, in writing, within 30 
days of obligating funds provided for submarine industrial base 
expansion. The notification shall include: obligation date, 
contractor name or names, location, description of the 
shortfall to be addressed, actions to be undertaken, desired 
end state, usable end items to be procured, period of 
performance, dollar amount, projected associated savings 
including business case analysis if applicable, contract name, 
and contract number.

Carrier replacement program

    The budget request included $2.3 billion in line number 2 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for the carrier 
replacement program.
    The committee notes that the John S. McCain National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-
232) authorized the aircraft carrier designated CVN-81.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a quantity decrease 
from 1 to 0 in line number 2 of SCN for the carrier replacement 
program.

Virginia-class submarine program

    The budget request included $7.2 billion in line number 3 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for Virginia-class 
submarines.
    The committee notes that the typical procurement funding 
profile for Virginia-class submarines consists of 2 years of 
advance procurement followed by 1 year of full funding 
procurement. The committee further notes that the budget 
request's proposed procurement of a third submarine (SSN-812) 
includes funds only in fiscal year 2020 and is underfunded by 
$667.0 million. Based partially on this funding approach, SSN-
812 is scheduled to be delivered after the 2 submarines planned 
to be procured in fiscal year 2023, requiring, in effect, 3 
years of advance procurement and 1 year of full funding.
    The committee also understands that the Navy is considering 
a significant design change for SSN-812, which would require 
approximately $1.2 billion in additional funding, potentially 
bringing the total cost of SSN-812 to $5.0 billion with an 
unfunded liability of more than $1.8 billion as compared to the 
budget request.
    The committee is concerned that the budget request for SSN-
812 is significantly underfunded, departs from the traditional 
funding profile for attack submarines, may include a 
significant design change not reviewed as part of this budget 
request, and does not account for the effect of SSN-812's 
increased demand on critical suppliers already struggling to 
meet existing Navy procurement plans.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to submit an updated SSN-812 acquisition strategy to the 
congressional defense committees concurrent with the Navy's 
fiscal year 2021 budget request. This strategy shall include an 
updated Component Cost Estimate, design changes that depart 
from the Block V Virginia-class submarine design, and an 
assessment of the effect SSN-812 will have on critical 
suppliers.
    Additionally, the committee is concerned that the budget 
request's proposal to remove the Virginia Payload Module (VPM) 
from SSN-804 would introduce excessive operational and 
acquisition risk as the Navy seeks to replace the strike 
capacity of the retiring Ohio-class guided missile submarines 
with VPM on Virginia-class submarines.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $3.0 
billion for SSN-812 and an increase of $522.1 million for SSN-
804 VPM, for a net decrease of $2.5 billion, in line number 3 
of SCN for Virginia-class submarines.

Virginia-class submarine advance procurement

    The budget request included $2.8 billion in line number 4 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for Virginia-class 
submarine advance procurement.
    The committee notes that attack submarines provide critical 
capabilities necessary to execute the National Defense 
Strategy. The committee is concerned that, under current plans, 
the Navy will not meet its requirement of 66 attack submarines 
until fiscal year 2048.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $1.5 
billion in line number 4 of SCN for Virginia-class submarine 
advance procurement.

Refueling and complex overhauls of aircraft carriers

    The budget request included $647.9 million in line number 5 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for refueling and 
complex overhauls (RCOH) of aircraft carriers.
    The committee notes unjustified cost growth from the CVN-73 
RCOH to the CVN-74 RCOH in basic construction/conversion and 
ordnance.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $50.0 
million in line number 5 of SCN for refueling and complex 
overhauls of aircraft carriers.

Refueling and complex overhaul advance procurement

    The budget request included no funding in line number 6 of 
Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for refueling and 
complex overhaul (RCOH) advance procurement.
    The committee does not support the budget request's 
proposal to not refuel the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN-75).
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $16.9 
million to restore the CVN-75 RCOH in line number 6 of SCN for 
refueling and complex overhaul advance procurement.

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers

    The budget request included $5.1 billion in line number 8 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for Arleigh Burke-
class destroyer procurement.
    The committee notes that the budget request includes 
procurement of three Arleigh Burke-class destroyers, which is 
one additional destroyer in fiscal year 2020 as compared to 
last year's request. The committee has not received sufficient 
justification for the unit cost increases of the fiscal year 
2020 destroyers, as compared to last year's request. In 
addition, the committee notes that this program has available 
prior years funds, which are excess to need.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $20.0 
million in line number 8 of SCN.

Arleigh Burke-class destroyer advance procurement

    The budget request included $224.0 million in line number 9 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for Arleigh Burke-
class destroyer advance procurement.
    The committee notes that the Navy future years defense 
program includes procurement of two Arleigh Burke-class 
destroyers in fiscal year 2021, which would be procured using a 
multiyear procurement contract. The committee understands that 
advance procurement of long lead time material could reduce 
component costs and enable optimal ship construction intervals.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $260.0 
million in line number 9 of SCN.

LPD-class amphibious transport ship

    The budget request included no funding in line number 12 of 
Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for procurement of LPD 
Flight II-class amphibious transport ships.
    The committee notes that the Navy has identified LPD-30, 
which was authorized and appropriated in fiscal year 2018, as 
the first Flight II LPD. In the fiscal year 2019 budget 
request, the Navy planned to procure the next Flight II LPD, 
LPD-31, in fiscal year 2020. The committee is concerned that 
the fiscal year 2020 budget request's delay of procurement of 
LPD-31 to fiscal year 2021 could result in production 
inefficiency, increased cost, and delay in reaching the Navy's 
requirement for 38 amphibious ships.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $525.0 
million in line number 12 of SCN for incremental funding of the 
amphibious transport ship designated LPD-31.
    The committee's intent is for the Navy to use the $350.0 
million appropriated in SCN line number 13 in fiscal year 2019 
and additional fiscal year 2020 funds in SCN line number 12 to 
procure LPD-31 long-lead material and start construction as 
efficiently as possible. Consistent with the budget request, 
the committee expects the Navy to request the balance of costs 
for LPD-31 in fiscal year 2021.

LPD-class amphibious transport ship advance procurement

    The budget request included $247.1 million in line number 
13 of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for advance 
procurement of LPD Flight II-class amphibious transport ships.
    The committee recommends transferring the funds requested 
in line number 13 of SCN to line number 12 of SCN to support 
incremental funding of the amphibious transport ship designated 
LPD-31.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $247.1 
million in line number 13 of SCN for advance procurement of LPD 
Flight II-class amphibious transport ships.

LHA replacement amphibious assault ship

    The budget request included no funding in line number 15 of 
Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for procurement of LHA 
replacement amphibious assault ships.
    The committee remains concerned with the Navy procurement 
profile for large deck amphibious assault ships, which includes 
a span of 7 years until the next large deck amphibious assault 
ship (LHA-9) would be procured in fiscal year 2024.
    The committee notes that efficiencies could be gained by 
reducing this span, including steadier workflow with an 
increased learning curve, material and equipment suppliers with 
more predictable delivery contracts, and a more effective 
continuous improvement schedule.
    The committee urges the Secretary of the Navy to accelerate 
procurement of LHA-9, including putting the $356.0 million 
appropriated in fiscal year 2019 for this ship on contract to 
procure long lead-time material as soon as possible and 
leveraging the incremental funding authority provided elsewhere 
in this Act to start construction and build LHA-9 as 
efficiently as possible.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $650.0 
million in line number 15 of SCN.

Outfitting

    The budget request included $754.7 million in line number 
23 of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for outfitting.
    Based on planned delivery dates, the committee notes that 
post-delivery funding is early-to-need for LCS-21 ($5.0 
million). The committee also notes the unjustified outfitting 
cost growth for SSN-793, SSN-794, SSN-795, and SSN-796 ($20.0 
million). The committee further notes unjustified post-delivery 
cost growth for DDG-1000 ($25.0 million).
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $50.0 
million in line number 23 of SCN.

Service craft

    The budget request included $56.3 million in line number 25 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for service craft.
    In order to increase training opportunities for Surface 
Warfare Officer candidates from all accession sources, the 
committee believes that the Navy should replace the six YP-676 
class craft slated for disposal with upgraded YP-703 class 
craft that incorporate modernization, training, and 
habitability improvements derived from lessons learned with 
existing YP-703 craft.
    The committee urges the Secretary of the Navy to release a 
request for proposals for the detail design and construction of 
upgraded YP-703 class craft not later than fiscal year 2020. 
The committee notes that the Navy's current cost estimate for 
acquisition of the first upgraded YP-703 class craft is $25.5 
million.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $25.5 
million in line number 25 of SCN.

Expeditionary Fast Transport (T-EPF 14) conversion

    The budget request included $55.7 million in line number 28 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for completion of 
prior year shipbuilding programs.
    The committee notes that the Chief of Naval Operations' 
unfunded priority list states that additional funding could 
provide for the conversion of an Expeditionary Fast Transport 
(T-EPF 14) into an Expeditionary Medical Transport to better 
fulfill distributed maritime medical requirements.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $49.0 
million in line number 28 of SCN.

Ship to shore connector advance procurement

    The budget request included no funding in line number 29 of 
Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for ship to shore 
connector advance procurement.
    The committee understands that additional funding could 
provide needed stability for certain suppliers in the ship to 
shore connector program.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $40.4 
million in line number 29 of SCN.

Hull, mechanical, and electrical upgrades for Arleigh Burke-class 
        destroyers

    The budget request included $31.6 million in line number 2 
of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for surface combatant hull, 
mechanical, and electrical equipment.
    The committee notes that the Chief of Naval Operations' 
unfunded priority list states that additional funding could 
provide for reliability upgrades to the Integrated Bridge and 
Navigation and associated systems, including the addition of 
physical throttles to the ship control console, a voyage data 
recorder, and software upgrades to the steering and propulsion 
control system.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $19.0 
million in line number 2 of OPN.

Expeditionary mine countermeasures

    The budget request included $71.2 million in line number 20 
of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for underwater explosive 
ordnance disposal programs.
    The committee notes that the Mark 18 unmanned underwater 
vehicle (UUV) program is proven and remains the only mine 
countermeasures (MCM) UUV program with Milestone C approval and 
in full rate production.
    Additionally, the committee understands that the Navy has a 
validated need for eight additional expeditionary MCM (ExMCM) 
companies beyond the eight already outfitted. The committee 
further understands that $11.0 million in additional funding 
could outfit 4 additional ExMCM companies with the full 
complement of Mark 18 UUVs.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $11.0 
million in line number 20 of OPN.

Littoral Combat Ship mine countermeasures mission modules

    The budget request included $197.1 million in line number 
30 of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for the procurement of 
Littoral Combat Ship mine countermeasures mission module 
equipment.
    The committee notes that the Navy is requesting funding to 
purchase equipment that has not yet undergone operational 
testing, which is an approach that, as the Government 
Accountability Office has shown, leads to cost growth and 
schedule delays. The committee believes that the following 
requested systems would constitute excessive procurement ahead 
of satisfactory testing: 6 unmanned surface vehicle and 
minesweeping payload delivery systems, 4 minehunting payload 
delivery systems (new), 3 minehunting payload delivery systems 
(backfit), and 2 buried minehunting modules, including support 
equipment.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $129.8 
million in line number 30 of OPN.

Knifefish

    The budget request included $40.5 million in line number 34 
of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for the procurement of small 
and medium unmanned underwater vehicles.
    The committee notes that the two Knifefish systems which 
are to be procured with this funding require further testing, 
including the initial operational test and evaluation period 
that is currently scheduled for fiscal year 2021.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $29.9 
million in line number 34 of OPN.

Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program

    The budget request included $420.2 million in line number 
44 of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for the procurement of 
electronic warfare equipment.
    The committee notes that procurement of at least two of the 
three Surface Electronic Warfare Improvement Program Block 3 
units is early-to-need based on the Navy's installation plan.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $62.0 
million in line number 44 of OPN.

Ship's signal exploitation equipment expansion

    The budget request included $194.8 million in line number 
45 of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for shipboard information 
warfare exploitation.
    The committee notes that the Chief of Naval Operations' 
unfunded priority list states that additional funding could 
provide for expansion of ship's signal exploitation space and 
installation of ship's signal exploitation equipment 
modifications on Flight I Arleigh Burke-class destroyers.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $8.0 
million in line number 45 of OPN.

Next Generation Surface Search Radar

    The budget request included $168.4 million in line number 
70 of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for the procurement of 
items less than $5 million.
    The committee notes that procurement of 28 Next Generation 
Surface Search Radars is early-to-need based on the Navy's 
installation plan.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $23.8 
million in line number 70 of OPN.

Sonobuoys

    The budget request included $260.6 million in line number 
85 of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for the procurement of 
sonobuoys.
    The committee notes that greater-than-expected sonobuoy 
expenditures in fiscal year 2019 resulted in the Chief of Naval 
Operations' requesting procurement of additional sonobuoys as a 
fiscal year 2020 unfunded priority.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $50.0 
million in line number 85 of OPN.

Electronic Procurement System

    The budget request included $66.1 million in line number 
122 of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for Command Support 
Equipment, including $6.3 million for Electronic Procurement 
System.
    The committee remains concerned about unnecessarily bespoke 
contract writing systems and processes.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $6.3 
million in line number 122 of OPN.

                               Air Force


F-35A

    The budget request included $4.3 billion in line number 1 
of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for 48 F-35 
aircraft.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Air Force's 
efforts to modernize and equip itself with the most advanced 
and capable aircraft in support of the National Defense 
Strategy. However, the committee is concerned about the 
quantity and timing of procurement of fifth generation aircraft 
and understands that the Chief of Staff of the Air Force has 
placed additional aircraft on his unfunded priority list.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $1.1 
billion in line number 1 of APA for the procurement of 12 
additional F-35 aircraft.

F-35 advanced procurement

    The budget request included $655.5 million in line number 2 
of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for advanced 
procurement of F-35 aircraft.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Air Force's 
efforts to modernize and equip itself with the most advanced 
and capable aircraft in support of the National Defense 
Strategy. However, the committee is concerned about the 
quantity and timing of procurement of fifth generation aircraft 
and understands that the Chief of Staff of the Air Force has 
placed additional aircraft on his unfunded priority list.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $156.0 
million in line number 2 of APAF for advanced procurement to 
support 12 additional F-35A aircraft.

F-15X

    The budget request included $1.1 billion in line number 3 
of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for 8 F-15X 
aircraft.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Air Force's 
efforts to modernize its aging air superiority fighters. The 
committee also understands that the use of existing non-
developmental aircraft already in inventory allows for the 
continued readiness of current F-15 squadrons. However, the 
committee is concerned that the associated non-recurring 
engineering costs, as programmed, are above what should be for 
a non-developmental aircraft.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $162.0 
million in line number 3 of APAF.

KC-46

    The budget request included $2.2 billion in line number 5 
of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for 12 KC-46 
aircraft.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Air Force's 
efforts to modernize and equip itself with the most advanced 
and capable aircraft in support of the National Defense 
Strategy. However, the committee is concerned about the 
quantity and timing of procurement of tanker aircraft and 
understands that the Chief of Staff of the Air Force has placed 
additional aircraft on his unfunded priority list.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $471.0 
million in line 5 of APAF for the procurement of 3 additional 
KC-46 aircraft.

F-15 ADCP

    The budget request included $481.1 million in line number 
25 of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for the 
procurement of new avionics radars.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Air Force 
efforts to modernize the legacy 4th generation fleet in support 
of the National Defense Strategy. The committee also 
understands the Air Force's intention to recapitalize the F-15 
fleet with new F-15X aircraft.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $75.1 
million in line 25 of APAF as a reduction of the procurement of 
F-15 avionics.

F-15 IFF modernization

    The budget request included $481.1 million in line number 
25 of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for procurement 
of new IFF.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Air Force 
efforts to modernize the legacy fourth generation fleet in 
support of the National Defense Strategy. The committee also 
understands the Air Force's intention to recapitalize the F-15 
fleet with new F-15X aircraft.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $29.6 
million in line 25 of APAF as a reduction of the procurement of 
F-15 IFF.

F-15 Longerons

    The budget request included $481.1 million in line number 
25 of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for the 
procurement of 64 F-15 Longerons.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Air Force 
efforts to modernize the legacy fourth generation fleet in 
support of the National Defense Strategy. The committee also 
understands the Air Force's intention to recapitalize the F-15 
fleet with new F-15X aircraft.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $24.6 
million in line number 25 of APAF as a reduction of the 
procurement of F-15 Longerons.

F-15 Radar

    The budget request included $481.1 million in line 25 of 
Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for procurement of new 
radars.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Air Force 
efforts to modernize the legacy 4th generation fleet in support 
of the National Defense Strategy. The committee also 
understands the Air Force's intention to recapitalize the F-15 
fleet with new F-15X aircraft.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $23.7 
million in line number 25 of APAF as a reduction of the 
procurement of F-15 radars.

F-16 modernization

    The budget request included $234.8 million in line number 
26 of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF).
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Air Force's 
efforts to modernize its fourth generation fighter fleet and 
equip itself with the most advanced and capable radars in 
support of the National Defense Strategy. However, the 
committee is concerned about the quantity and timing of 
procurement of advanced radars for the entire F-16 fleet.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $75.0 
million in line number 26 of APA for the procurement of 30 
additional radars.

F-15C EPAWSS

    The budget request included $149.0 million in line number 
31 of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for F-15 Eagle 
Passive Active Warning Survivability System (EPAWSS).
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Air Force's 
efforts to modernize and equip itself with the most advanced 
electronic warfare capability available in support of the 
National Defense Strategy. However, the committee also 
understands the Air Force's intention to recapitalize the F-15 
fleet with new F-15X aircraft already equipped with the EPAWSS.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $67.2 
million in line number 31 of APAF as a reduction of the 
procurement of additional F-15 EPAWSS kits.

Command and control sustainability

    The budget request included $28.8 million in line number 58 
of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for E-8.
    The committee notes that command and control nodes are at a 
significant disadvantage due to aging communications.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $30.0 
million in line 58 of APAF for next-generation satellite 
communication radios that are both SATURN and Mobile User 
Objective System capable as well as Multifunctional Information 
Distribution System-Joint Tactical Radio System terminals.

F-35A Spares

    The budget request included $708.0 million in line number 
69 of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for spares and 
repair parts.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Air Force's 
efforts to modernize and equip itself with the most advanced 
and capable aircraft in support of the National Defense 
Strategy. However, the committee is concerned about the 
quantity and timing of procurement of fifth generation aircraft 
and understands that the Chief of Staff of the Air Force has 
placed additional aircraft on his unfunded priority list.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $96.0 
million in line number 69.

KC-46 Spares

    The budget request included $708.0 million in line number 
69 of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for spares and 
repair parts.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Air Force's 
efforts to modernize and equip itself with the most advanced 
and capable aircraft in support of the National Defense 
Strategy. However, the committee is concerned about the 
quantity and timing of procurement of tanker aircraft and 
understands that the Chief of Staff of the Air Force has placed 
additional aircraft on his unfunded priority list.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $141.0 
million in line number 69 of APAF for spares.

RQ-4 spare parts

    The budget request included $708.0 million in line number 
69 of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for spares and 
repair parts.
    The committee is concerned about the quantity and timing of 
spare parts for the RQ-4.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $25.0 
million in line number 69 of APAF.

Minuteman III Modifications

    The budget request included $50.8 million in line number 14 
of Missile Procurement, Air Force (MPAF), for Minuteman III 
modifications.
    The committee supports the request of the Air Force to re-
align certain funds from other projects to support 
implementation of the Intercontinental Ballistic Missile Crypto 
Upgrade II program.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $8.9 
million in line number 14 of MPAF for Minuteman III 
Modifications.

Air-Launched Cruise Missile

    The budget request included $77.4 million in line number 17 
in Missile Procurement, Air Force (MPAF), for the Air-Launched 
Cruise Missile.
    The committee supports the request of the Air Force to re-
align certain funds from the Support Equipment sub-project to 
support other Air Force nuclear priorities.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $8.9 
million in line number 17 of MPAF for the Air-Launched Cruise 
Missile.

F-35 training and range modernization

    The budget request included $234.0 million in line number 
32 of Other Procurement, Air Force (OPAF), for Combat Training 
Ranges.
    The committee recognizes the importance of modernizing USAF 
training ranges for 5th generation aircraft. The committee 
notes that 35 percent of the current F-35A training curriculum 
requires pilot training scenarios involving use of joint threat 
emitters (JTEs) in order to simulate combat-like training 
conditions.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $28.0 
million in Other Procurement, Air Force, for line number 32 to 
install four JTEs for F-35A training.

Air Force Integrated Personnel and Pay System

    The budget request included $20.9 million in line number 36 
of Other Procurement, Air Force (OPAF), for Integrated 
Personnel and Pay System.
    The committee is concerned about poor agile implementation 
and infrequent capability delivery.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $20.9 
million in line number 36 of OPAF.

                              Defense Wide


Sharkseer transfer

    The budget request included $3.3 million in line number 8 
of Procurement, Defense-wide, Information Systems Security.
    The committee included a provision in the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) that required the Secretary of Defense to transfer 
the operations and maintenance for the Sharkseer cybersecurity 
program from the National Security Agency to the Defense 
Information Systems Agency.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $1.4 
million in line number 8 for Procurement, Defense-wide, for the 
Sharkseer program.

Terminal High Altitude Area Defense Missile Defense Agency procurement

    The budget request included $425.9 million in line number 
28 of Procurement, Defense-wide, for Terminal High Altitude 
Area Defense (THAAD) procurement by the Missile Defense Agency 
(MDA).
    Elsewhere in this report, the committee has stated its 
views regarding the transition of the THAAD program from the 
MDA to the Department of the Army.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $425.9 
million in line number 28 of Procurement, Defense-wide.

Sharkseer transfer

    The budget request included $1.5 million in line number 44 
of Procurement, Defense-wide, Information Systems Security 
Program (ISSP).
    The committee included a provision in the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) that required the Secretary of Defense to transfer 
the operations and maintenance for the Sharkseer cybersecurity 
program from the National Security Agency to the Defense 
Information Systems Agency.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $1.4 
million in line number 44 of Procurement, Defense-wide, for the 
Sharkseer program.

Radio Frequency Countermeasure System

    The budget request included $173.4 million in line number 
61 of Procurement, Defense-wide (PDW), AC/MC-130J, of which 
$41.6 million is for the AC/MC-130J Radio Frequency 
Countermeasure System (RFCM).
    The committee understands that the RFCM program is 
experiencing schedule delays due to integration and 
compatibility issues with the technology.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $8.8 
million to line number 61 of PDW, AC/MC-130J, for a total of 
$32.8 million for RFCM. The committee notes that, elsewhere in 
the Act, there is a symmetric increase to U.S. Special 
Operations Command's future vertical lift research and 
development efforts, a high priority unfunded requirement 
identified by the command.

Transfer OCO to Base

    The budget request included $118.9 billion for Procurement 
in base funding. The committee notes that the President's 
budget request included $97.9 billion in the Overseas 
Contingency Operations (OCO) account for activities that are 
traditionally funded out of base accounts. The committee 
believes that OCO for Base funding should be transferred into 
the base accounts.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $13.5 
billion to Procurement.

                       Items of Special Interest


A-10 modernization

    The committee is encouraged that the Air Force is executing 
a modernization strategy to provide unmatched air power and 
believes that modernizing the A-10 fleet is integral to this 
strategy. The committee also believes that upgrades to weapons 
delivery, management systems, and the electronic warfare and 
communications suite that keep pace with threat advancements 
and proliferation are critical to the continued success of the 
weapons system. The committee notes that these enhancements and 
the aircraft wing replacements will maintain the effectiveness 
of the A-10C through the 2030s.
    Therefore, the committee recommends that continuous funding 
for the modernization of the A-10C be provided from fiscal year 
2020 through fiscal year 2030 in order to achieve upgrades that 
are long overdue.

Acquisition strategy for LHA-9 and LHA-10

    The committee notes that the Navy estimates that $4.0 
billion will be saved using a block buy acquisition strategy 
for the procurement of CVN-80 and CVN-81.
    The committee believes that such an approach for LHA-9 and 
LHA-10 could provide substantial cost savings as well as needed 
stability and predictability for the shipbuilder and its vendor 
base.
    Accordingly, not later than October 1, 2019, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Navy to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees on the merits of pursuing a 
block buy acquisition strategy for LHA-9 and LHA-10.
    This report shall include a business case analysis 
comparing the cost and schedule of single ship contracts for 
LHA-9 and LHA-10 with a block buy contract for such ships as 
well as a description of other key considerations that the 
Secretary deems appropriate.
    If the business case analysis shows that pursuing a block 
buy strategy for LHA-9 and LHA-10 has merit, the committee 
strongly encourages the Secretary to consider inclusion of such 
a proposal in the Navy's budget request for fiscal year 2021.

Acquisition strategy for LPD Flight II-class ships

    The committee notes that the Navy estimates that $4.0 
billion will be saved using a block buy acquisition strategy 
for the procurement of CVN-80 and CVN-81.
    The committee believes that a block buy or multiyear 
procurement approach for LPD Flight II-class amphibious 
transport ships could provide substantial cost savings as well 
as needed stability and predictability for the shipbuilder and 
its vendor base.
    Accordingly, not later than October 1, 2019, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Navy to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees on the merits of pursuing a 
block buy or multiyear procurement acquisition strategy for LPD 
Flight II-class ships.
    This report shall include a business case analysis 
comparing the cost and schedule of single ship contracts with a 
block buy or multiyear contract for such ships as well as a 
description of other key considerations that the Secretary 
deems appropriate.
    If the business case analysis shows that pursuing a block 
buy or multiyear procurement strategy for LPD Flight II-class 
ships has merit, the committee strongly encourages the 
Secretary to consider inclusion of such a proposal in the 
Navy's budget request for fiscal year 2021.

Active Protection System for Stryker

    Active Protection Systems (APS) can be a critical 
capability to protect our warfighters on the battlefield. The 
committee notes that the Army is currently procuring four 
brigade sets of Trophy for the M1 Abrams tank and that a 
decision was recently made to procure a brigade set of the Iron 
Fist system for the M2 Bradley.
    The Army has evaluated various systems for integration on 
to Stryker vehicles but has not made a final decision on what 
system is most effective and suitable for the platform. 
According to a congressionally directed report that was 
submitted in October 2018, the Army had anticipated making a 
vendor selection during the second quarter of fiscal year 2019. 
However in testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee 
Subcommittee on Airland in April 2019, senior Army leadership 
testified that it may take significantly more time for the Army 
to make a determination on whether to proceed with either of 
the systems being evaluated.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the committee by October 1, 2019, that 
provides an update on the Army's efforts to assess APS vendors 
for integration onto the Stryker platform, including the 
effectiveness of systems tested, plans for future testing, 
proposals for future development, and a timeline for fielding.

Adaptive Threat Force

    The committee notes that the Marine Corps Warfighting 
Laboratory's Adaptive Threat Force efforts in concept-based 
experimentation seek to replicate future operating environments 
and future adversaries. The committee believes that predictive 
understanding of potential asymmetric advantages of adversaries 
can be identified during experimentation through the use of red 
teams and live adversary forces. Further, the committee notes 
that these efforts can also lead to improved training of 
warfighters.

Advanced Helicopter Training System

    The committee believes that the Department of the Navy must 
rapidly develop realistic rotary training platforms to help 
ensure that the next generation of naval aviators remains 
proficient in conducting sustained air operations at sea. The 
Advanced Helicopter Training System (AHTS) addresses the 
capacity and capability gaps for the Chief of Naval Air 
Training rotary wing training pipeline. Through the AHTS 
program, the Navy will revamp its training syllabus by 
acquiring 130 helicopters and advanced simulators to produce 
more than 600 student naval aviators and execute 90,000 flight 
hours annually. The committee concurs with the Navy's 
insistence that the TH-XX be Federal Aviation Administration-
Instrument Flight Rules (FAA-IFR) certified prior to awarding a 
contract, thereby assuring that the Navy student pilot training 
benefits from safety features and standards inherent in a fully 
developed and FAA-IFR certified aircraft.

Advanced survivability modeling capability for air-launched weapons

    The emergence of great power competition is the central 
long-term planning challenge for the Department of Defense 
(DOD). More capable adversaries employing highly advanced 
integrated air defense systems can create heavily contested 
environments that deny U.S. forces the freedom to operate. Such 
integrated air defense systems present a threat not only to 
launch systems but also to their air-launched conventional 
weapons. Launch platforms and their suite of strike weapons 
must possess sufficient range, autonomy, survivability, and 
lethality for mission effectiveness in order to remain relevant 
in future scenarios.
    The committee is concerned that current air-launched 
conventional weapons do not adequately account for advanced 
terminal defense systems that often protect high-value mobile 
targets both on land and at sea. Advanced integrated air 
defenses are expected to be effective against weapons that were 
designed to be survivable by virtue of a single attribute 
(e.g., speed) rather than a combination of attributes that 
enable successful engagement of high-value targets with state-
of-the-art, close-in weapon systems.
    In addition, the committee is concerned about the fidelity 
of DOD models that simulate the effectiveness of adversary 
close-in defensive systems on conventional strike weapons. The 
committee strongly encourages the Departments of the Navy and 
Air Force to emphasize munitions survivability attributes that 
together improve probability of mission success.
    Therefore, the committee directs both the Secretary of the 
Air Force and the Secretary of the Navy to provide a briefing, 
not later than March 1, 2020, that outlines the mission 
effectiveness of current and planned air-launched conventional 
weapons for use against high-value mobile targets protected by 
advanced integrated air defense systems. The briefing must 
address the following:
          (1) Stand-off requirements;
          (2) Survivability characteristics;
          (3) Weapon lethality;
          (4) A cost-per-kill assessment to evaluate mission 
        effectiveness; and
          (5) A comparison of existing autonomous capability.

Aerospace ground equipment for B-52 Stratofortress

    The committee understands that the Air Force bomber vector 
plans to keep the B-52 weapon system available for conventional 
and nuclear missions well into the 2040s. Efforts are now 
underway to update the plane's radars, engines, communications, 
and navigation equipment. Relatively little effort has been 
given to the aerospace ground equipment that provide power, 
inert gas, munitions loading, and other support functions in 
preparation for a mission, yet this ground support equipment is 
just as important to mission success as components on the B-52. 
The committee is concerned that the failure of ground 
electrical carts can cause a delay of several hours to a bomber 
mission.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Air Force to brief the 
congressional defense committees, no later than April 30, 2020, 
on the age of the aerospace ground support equipment currently 
supporting the B-52 weapon system, their average reliability, 
and plans to replace or update this equipment in line with 
keeping the B-52 weapon system operational through 2040.

Air Force Active Association

    The committee supports the Air Force's Total Force 
Integration (TFI) concept to leverage the capabilities of both 
the Air Force Active Duty and its reserve components. The 
committee believes that Active Associations are an important 
component of TFI, providing the opportunity for Active-Duty 
pilots and personnel to access reserve component aircraft and 
train with reserve component pilots and maintenance personnel.
    The committee remains concerned about the delayed 
deliveries of the KC-46A aerial refueling tanker and the impact 
it will have on the existing tanker fleet, most notably 
extending the service of KC-135 tankers. The committee is 
further concerned about the continued operation of legacy air 
refueling platforms and the impact on the Air Force's Active 
Associations. Therefore, the committee directs the Air Force 
and Air Mobility Command to notify the congressional defense 
committees regarding any plans to draw down Active Associations 
because KC-46A deliveries have been later than planned and, if 
there are such reductions, to provide a report on plans to 
restore these existing Active Associations to full strength.

Air Force Future ISR Integration Strategy

    The committee is aware of the recent publication of the 
United States Air Force Next Generation Intelligence, 
Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) Dominance Flight Plan 
and the Air Force's desire to modernize its ISR enterprise. The 
committee is encouraged by the Air Force's intent to field a 
resilient, integrated ISR network of manned and unmanned 
systems to prevail in contested environments, and it believes 
that this goal aligns with the National Defense Strategy.
    The committee notes that the Air Force's future ISR 
enterprise will comprise both manned and unmanned systems that 
are integrated with space and cyber assets. While the fielding 
of advanced autonomous systems and ISR networks will allow for 
added resiliency, large manned platforms such as the RC-135 are 
forecasted to remain an integral part of the Air Force ISR 
system for decades to come, and they offer a unique set of 
capabilities that are central to meeting the needs of combatant 
commanders. The committee believes that the Air Force must have 
the capability to integrate information from both manned and 
unmanned assets in its future ISR enterprise in order to 
capitalize on the strengths offered by both platforms. In its 
effort to realize the goals of its Next Generation ISR 
Dominance Flight Plan, the Air Force must ensure that all 
assets and platforms are integrated into a unified concept of 
operations.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a report to the congressional defense 
committees, no later than March 1, 2020, detailing the Air 
Force's plan for integrating both manned and unmanned systems 
into its future force mix and ISR enterprise. The report shall 
detail how the Air Force plans to use manned ISR assets 
alongside unmanned platforms as well as space-based ISR 
platforms and a networked sensor architecture in support of the 
warfighter. The report shall also detail planned modernization 
and survivability upgrades to the manned assets and networks. 
The report shall:
          (1) Detail the strengths and vulnerabilities in both 
        manned and unmanned ISR elements;
          (2) Provide a detailed description of the data links 
        for both control and data processing;
          (3) Describe the next generation of data link to 
        succeed Link 16 capability; and
          (4) Provide funding data to support this concept 
        across the future years defense program.

Air Force ISR SIGINT data integration

    The committee notes the efforts of the Air Force to develop 
an integrated, capability-focused SIGINT architecture and 
investment strategy. The committee observes that the investment 
has already produced significant advances in Air Force SIGINT 
capability, particularly within the medium-altitude RC-135 
Rivet Joint program. The committee is also aware that some 
significant capability gaps exist against current threats and 
that the Air Force has not yet addressed diminishing industrial 
base issues with the high-altitude Airborne Signals 
Intelligence Payload program. Additionally, the Air Force has 
not yet achieved a unified enterprise for SIGINT processing, 
exploitation, and dissemination, despite having a distributed 
technical architecture within both the RC-135 Rivet Joint and 
Air Force distributed common ground system programs.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the congressional defense 
committees, no later than March 1, 2020, on how the Air Force 
is implementing its Next Generation Intelligence, Surveillance, 
and Reconnaissance Dominance Flight Plan in order to make Air 
Force airborne SIGINT data from the RC-I35, U-2, RQ-4, MQ-9, 
and future SIGINT capabilities discoverable and available to 
the joint warfighter. The briefing shall address, among other 
things, cloud-based technologies and distributed crew concepts.

Army rotary wing munitions capabilities, capability gaps, and solutions

    The committee is concerned that the standoff range 
advantages of U.S. rotary wing aircraft munitions have eroded 
when compared to near peer and regional adversaries like 
Russia, China, Iran, and North Korea. Munitions with greater 
standoff range and the ability to operate in a GPS-denied or -
degraded environment are critical to restoring the Army's 
dominance in air-to-surface fires.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing by October 1, 2019, on Army rotary wing 
munitions capabilities, capability gaps, and potential off-the-
shelf solutions. The briefing should include:
          (1) Current U.S. rotary wing munitions capabilities 
        and capability gaps against munitions fielded by 
        Russia, China, Iran, and North Korea;
          (2) Potential off-the-shelf solutions that would 
        bridge these capability gaps, including any munitions 
        that the U.S. tests in calendar year 2019; and
          (3) Detailed information on any testing of non-
        program of record munitions by the U.S. Army in 
        calendar year 2019, including:
                  (a) An assessment of the effectiveness of the 
                tested munitions to meet threats from near peer 
                adversaries and any operational needs 
                statements from combat aviation brigades for 
                Europe and the Indo-Pacific;
                  (b) An assessment of whether the tested 
                munitions would complement capabilities for 
                current programs of record;
                  (c) A comparison of the tested systems' 
                capabilities against current munitions; and
          (4) The cost and timeline for the Army to field the 
        necessary capability to close this gap, including:
                  (a) Interim fielding to meet current 
                requirements; and
                  (b) Potential enduring solutions.

ATACMS Requirement

    The committee is concerned that the current Army Tactical 
Missile System (ATACMS) inventory is insufficient to meet 
requirements, especially in light of the National Defense 
Strategy. The Army total munition requirement for ATACMSs is 
4,417 missiles but the current quantity is 1,725 missiles. 
Despite the shortfall, the Army's plan is to extend the life of 
existing ATACMSs rather than growing additional capacity. 
However, the Army has had a difficult time retrieving existing 
ATACMSs to put them into the shelf-life extension program and 
thus has relied on new missile production to replace existing 
inventory. The committee notes that, in the budget request for 
fiscal year 2020, $340.6 million of the $425.9 million for the 
ATACMS program is for new missile procurement.
    The committee also notes that the Army's unfunded 
priorities list requested funding for Cross-Domain ATACMSs to 
support a United States Indo-Pacific Combatant Command 
requirement. Further, the committee notes that the Precision 
Strike Missile, which would replace ATACMS, will not include 
cross-domain capabilities until fiscal year 2024 at the 
earliest. Therefore, the committee recommends that the Army 
reevaluate decisions to not grow the ATACMS inventory given: 
(1) The substantial shortfall in inventory as compared to the 
actual requirement; (2) That the Army is already procuring new 
all-up rounds; and (3) The new capabilities that the Cross-
Domain ATACMS now adds to the program.

Bomber roadmap

    The committee is concerned with the timing of multiple 
programs involving the Air Force bomber force. The committee 
notes that the strategic threat from peer competitors like 
China and Russia will only continue to increase, as highlighted 
in the National Defense Strategy, which will increase demand on 
the critical bomber force.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing, no later than February 1, 2020, to 
the congressional defense committees that delineates the 
strategy and the pathway for legacy bombers as well as the 
acquisition of the B-21 and its integration in the bomber 
force. The briefing shall include an updated Air Force bomber 
roadmap and the Air Force's plans for timing and 
synchronization of:
          (1) B-52 re-engining and modernization;
          (2) Construction of weapons generation facilities;
          (3) Basing of B-21 conventional and nuclear aircraft; 
        and
          (4) Life cycle sustainment of B-1, B-2, and B-52 
        aircraft.

Bradley program

    The budget request included $638.8 million in line 5 of 
Weapons & Tracked Combat Vehicles (WTCV), for the procurement 
of upgrades to the family of Bradley Fighting Vehicles. As an 
integral part of the Army's Armored Brigade Combat Team (ABCT), 
the Bradley is being modernized in a program approved by the 
Army Acquisition Executive in July 2011 to enhance 
survivability, mobility, and lethality by procurement of 
hardware for modifications. These modifications include two 
Engineering Change Proposals in this plan, with the Bradley A4 
upgrade being the most significant.
    As the Army works to align itself with the National Defense 
Strategy and its focus on near-peer competition, the committee 
understands that the Army plans to gradually phase out the 
Bradley and replace it with a new Optionally Manned Fighting 
Vehicle (OMFV). To achieve this strategy, the Army has 
formulated a plan to end M2A4 production in fiscal year 2022, 
following the procurement of 859 vehicles (fielding 5 ABCTs 
plus 1 prepositioned set), which will enable sufficient funding 
for the procurement of the OMFV.
    The committee supports the Army's planning and budgeting to 
achieve force modernization with the OMFV and understands that 
it will take at least 6 years to develop and begin fielding the 
OMFV. The committee also notes that the Bradley A4 upgrade 
program is essential to ensuring that the ABCT remains relevant 
for the next 3 decades. Nonetheless, the committee encourages 
the Army to ensure that the Bradley industrial base is properly 
maintained until the Army has a high level of confidence that 
the OMFV program will not be delayed.
    Therefore, the committee supports the procurement of 
upgrades for the family of Bradley Fighting Vehicle 
modernization across five ABCTs, efforts to sustain the entire 
fleet, and the incorporation of an Active Protection System 
into the fleet.

Building Partner Combat Air Capacity

    The committee understands the importance of building 
partner capacity as part of the U.S. National Security 
Strategy. The committee supports ongoing Department of Defense 
(DOD) efforts to increase the combat air capability and 
interoperability of U.S. coalition partners. Proficiency in air 
combat requires training in a realistic air-combat environment 
with the ability to provide post-mission reconstruction of 
maneuvers and tactics, participant pairings, and integration of 
range targets and simulated threats. That is achieved today 
around the world using air combat maneuvering instrumentation 
(AGMI) systems.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to brief the congressional defense committees, no later than 
180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act on DOD's 
ability to increase the utilization of U.S. approved and 
interoperable AGMI systems worldwide. The briefing shall, at a 
minimum, identify current approved world-wide AGMI locations 
and identify and prioritize locations where new AGMI systems 
could increase combat air capability of U.S. and partner 
forces.

Capability to counter supersonic and hypersonic cruise missiles

    The committee believes that the Department of Defense is 
late-to-need on dealing with the current threat of fielded or 
soon-to-be-fielded supersonic and hypersonic missiles in both 
the Indo-Pacific and European areas of responsibility.
    In addition, the committee believes there is a disconnect 
between Joint Force doctrine, the responsibility of the area 
air defense commander, which is normally the Air Component 
Commander, and the responsibility for air and missile defense, 
which resides with the U.S. Army, as established in law. This 
issue is most pronounced with theater air and missile defense, 
and it has the potential to yield a gap between joint force 
requirements and available capabilities that will only be 
increased with constrained spending.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in consultation with the Joint Force Air Component Commanders 
for U.S. Indo-Pacific Command and U.S. European Command, to 
provide a briefing, not later than January 1, 2020, to the 
congressional defense committees, on countering supersonic 
cruise missiles and hypersonic missiles. The briefing must 
include:
          (1) Currently fielded or soon-to-be fielded adversary 
        supersonic or hypersonic missiles;
          (2) An evaluation of the ability to counter 
        supersonic threats against airfields and Army 
        preposition sites by 2023, based on available forces or 
        potential programs available to be fielded in that 
        timeframe;
          (3) An evaluation of the ability to counter 
        hypersonic threats against airfields and Army 
        preposition sites by 2023, based on available forces or 
        potential programs available to be fielded in that 
        timeframe;
          (4) Any other subjects or recommendations that the 
        Secretary or Component Commanders wish to include.

Carbon fiber wheels and graphitic foam for Next Generation Combat 
        Vehicle

    The committee recognizes the recent effort related to Metal 
Matrix Composite (MMC) technologies and is encouraged by the 
U.S. Army Ground Vehicle Systems Center's (GVSC) decision to 
transition into lower-cost, wider application carbon fiber 
composite wheels and graphitic carbon foam research to support 
the Next Generation Combat Vehicle (NGCV). Carbon fiber wheels 
may reduce vehicle weight, reduce fuel consumption, increase 
payload capacity, and extend service life for the NGCV. 
Graphitic Carbon Foam may also reduce vehicle heat signatures 
and improve heat dissipation from engine and electronics 
compartments and protect against blast energy, directed energy 
weapons, and electromagnetic pulse threats. Finally, these 
products lend themselves to be produced at remote locations 
with additive manufacturing processes in support of NGCV 
operation and maintenance.
    The Defense Logistics Agency has designated both graphite 
and carbon fiber as strategic materials. The committee notes 
that the GVSC has identified low-cost mesophase pitch as a 
United States-based source of graphite that can be used to 
produce carbon fiber, graphitic carbon foam, and battery 
technologies for the NGCV. The committee acknowledges the 
versatility and broad application that carbon fiber technology 
provides for the armed services by reducing the weight of parts 
by over 50% as compared to traditional steel components.
    The committee recommends that the GVSC continue to develop, 
test, and field low-cost mesophase pitch carbon fiber and 
graphitic carbon foam components that can reduce vehicle 
weight, reduce fuel consumption, increase payload capacity, 
extend service life, improve survivability, and utilize 
additive manufacturing technology for the NGCV program.

CH-47F Block II Program

    The budget request contained $174.4 million in PE 67137A 
within Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), 
Army for the CH-47 Block II program. The CH-47F Block II 
program is designed to upgrade the current CH-47F Block I 
heavy-lift rotorcraft in order to improve readiness and 
commonality, extend the useful life of the Block I helicopter, 
and restore additional payload capacity for the airframe. The 
committee understands that the budget request fully funds the 
completion of the Engineering and Manufacturing Development 
(EMD) phase of the Block II program. The committee also 
understands that, subject to successful completion of the EMD 
phase, the Army plans to conduct a Milestone C low-rate 
production decision beginning in fiscal year 2021. However, the 
committee notes that the current Future Years Defense Program 
(FYDP) provides no additional procurement funding for the CH-47 
Block II program.
    Further, the committee notes that the formal Analysis of 
Alternatives for the CH-47 Block II indicated that, in order to 
maintain fleet readiness, the Army must begin to remanufacture 
CH-47 Block I rotorcraft between fiscal years 2024 and 2028 and 
sustain full-rate production of 12 aircraft per year by fiscal 
year 2030. The committee is concerned about the impact from the 
lack of programmed funding in the FYDP for CH-47 Block II 
production on the heavy-lift rotorcraft industrial base and the 
Army's long-term plans to maintain fleet readiness post-FYDP.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing by October 1, 2019, on the following 
topics: potential readiness impacts to the current CH-47F fleet 
should Block II production be delayed post-FYDP; a cost-benefit 
analysis comparing the CH-47 Block II upgrade program to CH-47F 
remanufacture efforts; the impacts to current MH-47G aircraft 
production given the delay of Block II production; the analysis 
the Army used to assess the strategic risk to the industrial 
base, including the supplier base; and the Army's current 
strategy for modernizing the heavy-lift rotorcraft fleet.

CH-53K King Stallion program

    The committee notes that the U.S. Marine Corps validated a 
requirement for heavy-lift expeditionary rotary wing aviation 
to support ship-to-shore, shore-to-shore, and shore-to-ship 
movement of personnel and equipment. With the existing heavy 
lift platform, the CH-53E, nearing the end of its service life, 
the Marine Corps has embarked on a procurement effort for the 
CH-53K King Stallion to maintain or improve the current 
capability. The committee notes, however, that this program is 
at least 19 months behind schedule and has experienced cost 
growth of over 20 percent above the 2005 baseline. At a cost 
now estimated to exceed $85 million per aircraft, the committee 
is concerned that the cost of this program is pulling resources 
away from other urgently needed modernization efforts.
    Therefore, the committee urges the Department of the Navy 
and the U.S. Marine Corps to ensure that this program receives 
sufficient acquisition oversight to eliminate further cost 
growth and schedule delays.

Close combat lethality task force

    In February 2018, the Secretary of Defense established the 
Close Combat Lethality Task Force (CCLTF), a cross-functional 
task force charged with improving combat capabilities of 
infantry formations to increase lethality, survivability, and 
resiliency on the battlefield. The CCLTF has focused its 
efforts on reforming manpower policy, improving training, and 
fielding cutting-edge equipment and weapons systems for these 
formations. These efforts are particularly noteworthy as 
technology proliferation has eroded the comparative advantage 
of these forces, and, with renewed great power competition, it 
is imperative that the Department of Defense focus on 
investments that support close combat formations that 
historically account for the majority of U.S. casualties.
    Therefore, the committee urges the Department to continue 
its support of the CCLTF, including through sufficient 
resourcing of the task force and by maintaining the exceptional 
quality of its leadership as well as the direct reporting 
relationship to the Secretary of Defense and the Deputy 
Secretary of Defense.

Columbia-class schedule

    The committee continues to have great interest in actions 
taken by the Department of Defense (DOD) to develop, build, and 
deploy Columbia-class ballistic missile submarines.
    The committee notes that a Government Accountability Office 
(GAO) report, published on April 8, 2019, titled ``Columbia 
Class Submarine: Overly Optimistic Cost Estimate Will Likely 
Lead To Budget Increases'' (GAO-19-947), found that challenges 
with critical new systems, including the integrated power 
system and common missile compartment, have eroded available 
lead ship schedule margin such that there is less time 
available to address issues without resulting in overall lead 
ship schedule delays.
    The committee is concerned by these challenges, as well as 
several other findings in this report, and the associated 
potential for delays in delivering the lead ship of the 
Columbia-class in fiscal year 2028 and deploying the lead ship 
in fiscal year 2031.
    The committee also notes that the GAO published a report on 
June 6, 2018, titled ``Navy Shipbuilding: Past Performance 
Provides Valuable Lessons for Future Investments'' (GAO-18-
238SP), which assessed Navy shipbuilding performance over the 
past 10 years and found that each of the 8 most recently 
delivered lead combatant ships (CVN-78, DDG-1000, LCS-1, LCS-2, 
LHA-6, LPD-17, SSN-774, and SSN-775) was delivered to the fleet 
at least 6 months late and 5 of these 8 lead ships were delayed 
by more than 2 years.
    Therefore, not later than December 1, 2019, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Navy to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees on the Columbia-class schedule 
and impact of potential lead ship delays. The report shall 
include a description of the: (1) Current schedule margin and 
critical path(s) for the lead ship in order to meet planned 
delivery and deployment dates; (2) Potential risks to the lead 
ship schedule, including the associated potential schedule 
impact for each such risk; (3) Potential operational impacts, 
shipbuilding impacts, and mitigation options if the lead ship 
delivery date is delayed by 6 months, 12 months, 2 years, or 3 
years; and (4) Recommendations for congressional or DOD action 
to reduce the likelihood or mitigate the impact of potential 
lead ship schedule delays.

DOD efforts to improve friendly force identification

    The committee acknowledges that the inadvertent loss of 
U.S. military personnel to friendly fire is a long-standing and 
tragic reality of military operations, including ongoing 
operations in Afghanistan and Iraq. While the Department of 
Defense (DOD) has made strides in processes and technologies to 
help distinguish between friendly and enemy forces, incidents 
of friendly fire continue to exist. The committee is aware that 
joint terminal air controllers use a variety of friendly force 
identification systems in close air support operations and that 
the DOD continues to seek improvements in its ability to 
identify friendly forces. The committee is also concerned that 
ongoing efforts by the DOD to upgrade these capabilities are 
not being adequately coordinated or synchronized to ensure the 
expeditious integration of new technologies and the 
interoperability of these systems as they are fielded. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to evaluate the following issues:
          (1) What actions has the DOD taken to ensure a common 
        understanding of requirements and challenges related to 
        friendly force identification by close air support 
        aircraft, including visibility over ongoing efforts to 
        meet those requirements;
          (2) What efforts does the DOD have underway to 
        enhance its friendly force identification capabilities, 
        to include efforts to identify, evaluate, and 
        incorporate new technologies in an expeditious and 
        cost-effective manner;
          (3) To what extent does the DOD coordinate and 
        communicate friendly force identification requirements 
        and evaluations to ensure that the programs it is 
        developing are complementary and interoperable; and
          (4) Any other issues that the Comptroller General 
        determines appropriate with respect to efforts to 
        improve DOD's ability to identify friendly forces and 
        minimize friendly fire incidents.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a report to the congressional defense committees not 
later than 270 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act.

Future Vertical Lift Capability Set 3 potential acceleration

    The budget request included $31.9 million in PE 63801A 
within Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), 
Army for the continued development of the Future Long Range 
Assault Aircraft (FLRAA) as part of the Army's Future Vertical 
Lift (FVL) family of systems. The FVL family of systems 
consists of aircraft across five capability sets based on size, 
and the FLRAA effort is capability set three.
    The committee understands that the FLRAA platform will 
replace a portion of the Army's utility helicopter fleet to 
provide considerable capability improvements in speed, range, 
agility, endurance, and sustainability as compared to current 
legacy utility helicopters. The committee notes that the 
current acquisition strategy for the FLRAA represents a 
traditional approach. However, the committee understands that 
the Army is considering multiple courses of action to 
accelerate this program through the use of acquisition reform 
authorities. Further, the committee understands that the Army 
is nearing completion of the Joint Multi-Role Technology 
Demonstration (JMR-TD) effort that successfully demonstrated 
several transformational vertical lift capabilities and 
technologies.
    Given the substantial investment and knowledge gained by 
the successful JMR-TD, the committee expects the Army to 
possess a much better understanding of the technology readiness 
levels required for the FLRAA development program. As such, the 
committee believes that the Army should be in a position to 
reasonably accelerate the FLRAA schedule and acquisition 
strategy. The committee encourages the Secretary of the Army to 
consider using a more tailored acquisition approach for the 
FLRAA program, to include developing prototypes to expedite the 
procurement of critical technologies. The committee expects 
that, following any such prototyping effort, the Army would 
pursue a follow-on production contract using competitive 
procedures.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing, not later than October 1, 2019, to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and House of 
Representatives that details a course of action to accelerate 
the FLRAA program, to include potential use of tailored 
acquisition strategies, procedures, and authorities with 
appropriate oversight, management, and technical rigor.

Global Broadcast System Technologies

    The committee recognizes that new Global Broadcast System 
(GBS) technologies and services may be able to augment 
satellite communication (SATCOM) bandwidth for the warfighter 
at both home-base and deployed locations where users continue 
to struggle with congested networks. The GBS is a critical 
element of the Department of Defense's (DOD) Intelligence, 
Surveillance, and Reconnaissance capability and, though its 
primary focus has been to transmit full motion video from 
unmanned aircraft systems to tactically deployed forces, it 
could have value for all types of data needed by the warfighter 
in a deployed or garrison environment. Portable, rucksack GBS 
systems could provide a cost-effective way of supporting those 
goals as the DOD moves into a new era of hybrid SATCOM 
networks, the innovative use of GBS should be considered as the 
Department decides on how to provide a holistic solution.
    The committee encourages the DOD to procure and rapidly 
field commercially-available, secure Satellite Portable Receive 
Suites and Rucksack Portable Receive Suites to test their 
ability and contribute to meeting communications requirements 
for deployed warfighter operations as well as base installation 
operational training activities.

Guided missile frigate (FFG(X))

    The committee applauds the Navy's decision to procure a 
guided missile frigate (FFG(X)) with increased lethality, 
survivability, and endurance to meet the requirement for Small 
Surface Combatants in the most recent Navy Force Structure 
Assessment. While maintaining the Navy's ``high/low'' mix of 
ships, the FFG(X) program greatly expands upon the capabilities 
of the Littoral Combat Ship program, returning to the force and 
improving on many of the multi-mission warfighting attributes 
of Oliver Hazard Perry-class frigates, including the ability to 
operate in more contested environments.
    As the Navy prepares to issue the FFG(X) request for 
proposals, the committee continues to support a full and open 
competition with a single source detail design and construction 
award in fiscal year 2020. The committee also supports the 
Navy's approach to commonality with existing Navy platforms, 
such as the Mark-41 Vertical Launch System and Enterprise Air 
Surveillance Radar, to reduce acquisition and sustainment 
costs. The committee encourages the Navy not to sacrifice 
warfighting capability for other considerations.

Improved Turbine Engine Program

    The Improved Turbine Engine Program (ITEP) is an 
acquisition program to develop a more powerful engine that 
would enhance performance at high altitudes and at elevated 
temperatures while improving operational readiness of the 
current UH-60 Blackhawk and AH-64 Apache helicopter fleets. The 
ITEP also has a goal to improve fuel efficiency, which will 
ease the mission of sustainment forces.
    The committee notes that this program represents a cost-
effective approach to modernizing aviation assets. Therefore, 
the committee encourages the Army to pursue opportunities to 
accelerate the fielding of this capability.

Improving Air Force acquisition and sustainment processes

    The committee notes that the Air Force has identified 
acquisition reform as a key priority and has made progress in 
taking advantage of authorities that the Congress has provided 
in recent National Defense Authorization Acts to accelerate 
prototyping and experimentation. The Air Force reports that it 
has cut 93 years from previous program schedules, and it cites 
this as a positive indicator of progress toward the goal of 
reducing timelines and enabling more agile fielding of systems 
and technology.
    The committee supports the Air Force's effort to fully use 
authorities provided by the Congress to improve its acquisition 
processes while ensuring that proper internal and external 
oversight over programs is maintained, deployed systems are 
operationally effective and suitable, and systems are 
developed, deployed, and sustained in the most cost-effective 
and -efficient manner. The committee encourages the Air Force 
to continue focusing on improvements in these areas while 
leveraging proven methods to accelerate acquisition and 
sustainment across the total enterprise.

Marine Corps nano vertical takeoff and landing unmanned aerial systems

    The Marine Corps has indicated a need for Nano Vertical 
Takeoff and Landing Unmanned Aerial Systems for the purpose of 
providing individual squads with an airborne intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) capability with real 
time video and imagery of the tactical environment. The Army is 
pursuing a similar solution, the Soldier Borne Sensor program, 
for its squads and small units. The committee encourages the 
Marine Corps to review the Army's effort, which may help 
facilitate development of an ISR capability that can increase 
the lethality and survivability of Marine Corps squads.

Metrics for evaluating potential impacts to airspace

    The committee is aware of ongoing discussions with 
individual project developers, military installations, and the 
Services regarding proposed energy projects and potential 
conflicts with military airspace needs. The committee urges the 
Department of Defense to also initiate non-project-specific 
policy-level discussions with industry, affected military 
installations, and military service leadership to develop 
clearly defined, objective criteria, measures, and metrics that 
provide guidance as to when potential impacts to airspace rise 
to unacceptable levels. This will help installations assess 
proposed projects and assist industry in avoiding areas of 
concern.

Mobile aircrew restraint system

    The committee noted in the the Senate report accompanying 
S. 1519 (S. Rept. 115-125) of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 that the use of the 
Mobile Aircrew Restraint System (MARS) by the U.S. Air Force on 
its fleet of HH-60 aircraft is to provide survivability 
improvements over legacy restraint systems. The committee 
encouraged the U.S. Army to utilize available testing and 
approval data from the Air Force for incorporation into the UH-
60 aircraft fleet. However, there has been little progress on 
the potential incorporation of the MARS on the Army's UH-60 
fleet.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing, not later than October 1, 2019, on the 
MARS, including: the status of the Army's Airworthiness Release 
(AWR) on the use of MARS, potential costs to implement AWR 
modifications, and the timeline to execute AWR implementation.

Modular rugged power devices

    The committee notes that National Guard units are 
frequently deployed to assist with emergency management 
situations, including responding to natural disasters. Often in 
these circumstances, the deployed servicemembers cannot depend 
upon the established electrical grid for energy needs in 
support of the mission, and mobile power generation is critical 
to support their operations. Therefore, the committee 
encourages the Chief of the National Guard Bureau to consider 
acquiring modular rugged power devices that are self-contained 
and lightweight zero-emission power generation systems to meet 
equipping and energy needs.

Mounted A-PNT solutions

    Assured Positioning, Navigation, and Timing (A-PNT) 
solutions are critical to the warfighter due to the reliance of 
military systems on the Global Positioning System (GPS) and the 
ability of near-peer competitors to deny or disrupt access to 
GPS. In order to address this challenge, the Army has 
established a cross-functional team for A-PNT to ensure that 
the Army's ground maneuver forces have access to trusted PNT 
information even in a GPS-denied environment.
    The committee understands that the Army has made progress 
in the fielding of a Mounted A-PNT solution (MAPS) for Army 
ground platforms and encourages the Army to field the most 
capable solution as quickly as possible. The committee directs 
the Secretary of the Army to provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees by October 1, 2019, on the 
status of the Army's MAPS program to include fielding 
timelines, system capabilities, and how the system will be 
scalable and compatible with future upgrades.

MQ-1 Gray Eagle briefing

    The committee notes the significant capability that the MQ-
1 Gray Eagle fleet of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) provides 
to the Army. This capability is game-changing and reduces risk 
for Army soldiers by providing extended surveillance coverage 
and the ability to self-transit to distant locations by virtue 
of its long endurance and ease of use, itself deriving from its 
automatic takeoff and landing system, which the aircraft to be 
launched and recovered with minimal operator interaction.
    The current fleet consists of over 200 Gray Eagle aircraft, 
half of which are the original configuration and the other half 
are the Gray Eagle Extended Range (GE-ER) configuration. The 
GE-ER is the next-generation advanced derivative, providing 
longer-endurance UAS surveillance, communications relay, and 
weapons delivery missions in support of maneuver.
    However, the committee is concerned that a mixed fleet of 
Gray Eagle aircraft may not be sufficient to meeting ever 
increasing operational requirements.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing, not later than October 1, 2019, to the 
Senate Armed Services Committee on the capabilities and 
capacity of the MQ-1 Gray Eagle fleet. The briefing shall 
include:
          (1) A fleet optimization plan to meet long-term 
        surveillance requirements in multi-domain operations in 
        support of the National Defense Strategy;
          (2) Potential readiness impacts to the Army of 
        operating a mixed fleet of Gray Eagle aircraft; and
          (3) Cost-benefit analysis comparing operations of the 
        current mixed fleet of aircraft to operations of a pure 
        GE-ER fleet.

Multiyear block buy for F-35

    The committee notes that both the production and 
sustainment costs for the F-35 program continue to decrease. 
However, the committee believes that further savings may be 
realized through multiyear block buy contracts.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, no later than February 
1, 2020, to deliver a report to the congressional defense 
committees that examines the business case for a combined 
domestic and international 3-to-5 year multiyear contract for 
procurement of the F-35A/B/C, beginning with Lot 15. The report 
shall include: analysis of the appropriate government furnished 
equipment, such as propulsion systems savings; an assessment of 
the design stability and technical risk, given the Block 4 
changes introduced to the baseline beginning in Lot 15; and an 
evaluation of the potential to achieve significant net savings 
for the Department of Defense and international partners 
through economies of scale. Additionally, the report shall 
articulate the optimal multiyear contract length for the F-35.

Operational energy of generator sets

    Generator sets used by the Services supply critical power 
that supports the Army's top modernization priorities to make 
its soldiers and units more lethal. The committee is pleased 
with Department of Defense (DOD) efforts to increase fuel 
efficiency, improve combat capability, decrease tactical risk, 
and reduce the cost of generators. Specifically, the committee 
is encouraged by efforts to reduce fuel requirements by 
eliminating the need to operate redundant generator sets.
    The Army and Marine Corps are incorporating microgrid 
control capability on all current 30kW to 60kW generator set 
models, which automatically start and stop generator sets based 
on load demand. This capability increases fuel savings for the 
DOD and improves system-level reliability. The committee also 
encourages the Services to incorporate an energy storage module 
with generator sets to provide more energy-efficient power. 
This ability will further increase system efficiency and 
reliability, decrease maintenance frequency, enable silent 
watch operations, and facilitate integration of renewable 
energy sources.

Persistent Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) and 
        heavy payloads

    The committee remains concerned that the combatant commands 
are not being given sufficient airborne intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) support assets to 
adequately provide force protection, situational awareness, 
maritime domain awareness (MDA), combat identification, high-
precision geolocation, and other necessary capabilities to 
support deployed forces as they execute missions. In their 
respective testimonies before the Senate Armed Services 
Committee, the Combatant Commanders of U.S. Africa Command 
(AFRICOM), U.S. European Command (EUCOM), U.S. Indo-Pacific 
Command (INDO-PACOM), and U.S. Southern Command (SOUTHCOM) all 
stated that they have significant gaps between ISR requirements 
and ISR capacity.
    Increased ISR could enhance AFRICOM's Counter-Violent 
Extremist Organizations missions, EUCOM's European Deterrence 
Initiative (EDI), INDO-PACOM's MDA, and SOUTHCOM's counter-
narcotics missions. The Commander of INDO-PACOM stated that 
``ISR is a critical need in the region'' and that ``less than 
half of my requirements are served by the ISR that's available 
in the region.'' The Commander of SOUTHCOM testified that 
SOUTHCOM is ``deficient in [its] ISR for the counter-narcotics 
mission.'' He further stated that the Joint Interagency Task 
Force-South (JIATFS) only interdicted about six percent of 
known drug movements. The committee agrees with the testimony 
of the Commander of EUCOM--that there is a global shortage of 
high demand, low density assets and that there may be 
commercial technologies that could help mitigate the capability 
gaps.
    The committee notes that there are commercial technologies 
in development that could help address many of the combatant 
commands' ISR gaps. Heavy payload, solar-powered unmanned 
aerial vehicles (UAV) are being developed that, because of 
their unique power source and electric engines, may be able to 
operate aloft and on station in an enduring, quiet, and 
persistent manner. These systems present the possibility of 
basing in friendly territory and deployment in advance of 
planned missions to provide ISR pre-mission, during the 
mission, and post-mission. Some solar-powered candidate systems 
have modular designs and payload capacities of more than 300 
pounds. These assets may be able to serve as a multi-
intelligence platform able to provide agile sensor suites in 
response to mission requirements.
    The technological challenge to realizing the potential of 
such systems would be developing payloads that have overall 
dependability and sufficient reliability to stay aloft and 
continue performing missions for long periods of time. Such 
reliability is not usually found in current airborne ISR 
systems.
    The committee supports additional resources for payload 
improvements and to evaluate a persistent, quiet, heavy 
payload, solar-powered, multi-intelligence ISR asset.

Personal recovery devices for servicemembers

    As the Army pivots to great power competition and multi-
domain operations, Assured-Position, Navigation, and Timing (A-
PNT) technologies will be critical in enabling the U.S. 
military to conduct operations in a Global Positioning System-
contested environment. Furthermore, the Personnel Recovery 
Support System (PRSS), which includes the PRSS 1b Secure 
Personal Locator Beacon, can leverage A-PNT technology to 
assist in the location of missing and captured servicemembers 
on the battlefield.
    The committee supports the Army's initial procurement and 
deployment of a personal recovery device that can operate in 
GPS-denied or -degraded environments. In addition, the 
committee notes the Army has stood up a cross-functional team 
to rapidly assess material development solutions to address the 
A-PNT mission area and potential capability gaps. Therefore, 
the committee encourages the Army to continue investment and 
deployment of proven A-PNT solutions and PRSSs.

Reliability growth of systems on Ford-class aircraft carriers

    The committee notes that the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) published a report on June 6, 2018, titled ``Navy 
Shipbuilding: Past Performance Provides Valuable Lessons for 
Future Investments'' (GAO-18-238SP), which assessed Navy 
shipbuilding performance over the past 10 years and concluded 
that ``. . . the Navy's shipbuilding programs have had years of 
construction delays and, even when the ships eventually reached 
the fleet, they often fell short of quality and performance 
expectations.''
    The committee is concerned that Navy ships are being 
delivered to the fleet with incomplete and underperforming 
systems, which often leads to the reliability of key systems 
falling short of Navy requirements.
    The reliability of key systems on the lead ship in the 
Ford-class of aircraft carriers, USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN-78), 
is particularly concerning. While the Navy accepted delivery of 
CVN-78 from the shipbuilder in May 2017, 20 months later than 
initially planned, reliability measured through September 30, 
2018, of four key systems is either orders of magnitude below 
the Navy's stated requirement or unknown.
    As reported by the Department of Defense's Director of 
Operational Test and Evaluation (DOT&E) in December 2018, 
through the first 747 shipboard launches, the Electromagnetic 
Aircraft Launch System (EMALS) suffered 10 critical failures, 
well below the requirement of 4,166 mean cycles between 
critical failures, where a cycle represents the launch of one 
aircraft. Through the first 763 attempted shipboard landings, 
the Advanced Arresting Gear (AAG) suffered 10 operational 
mission failures, well below the re-baselined reliability 
growth curve and well below the requirement of 16,500 mean 
cycles between operational mission failures, where a cycle 
represents the recovery of one aircraft. For the Dual Band 
Radar (DBR) and Advanced Weapons Elevators (AWE), only 
engineering reliability estimates, not actual data, have been 
provided by the Navy to the DOT&E.
    The committee is concerned that inadequate reliability of 
key shipboard systems, such as those on CVN-78, will result in 
degraded operational performance that will not meet combatant 
commander needs.
    Therefore, beginning on October 1, 2019, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Navy to submit quarterly reports 
to the congressional defense committees on the reliability of 
the EMALS, AAG, DBR, and AWE until each system meets its full 
reliability requirement. Each report shall utilize the DOT&E 
measures and metrics to report measured reliability for each 
system for the previous fiscal year quarter. Each report shall 
also include projected reliability growth estimates, in 
graphical and tabular form, to achieve the Navy's reliability 
requirement for each system with the associated schedule. In 
addition, the reports shall include descriptions of actions 
being taken to improve the reliability of each system.

Report on future force design alternatives for Department of the Air 
        Force

    While the committee acknowledges that the Air Force force 
structure report as directed by section 1064 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91) recommended that the Air Force grow to 386 squadrons from 
the current 312, it also observes that this recommendation 
emerged from analysis using current operations plans and 
concepts of operations. The committee believes that alternative 
force designs could significantly change the inventory 
requirements.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees, not later than March 1, 2020, on future force 
design alternatives for the Air Force. The Secretary shall 
ensure that the report includes the following matters with an 
accompanying unclassified summary:
          (1) An assessment of the analysis used to conclude 
        that the Air Force requires growth to 386 operational 
        squadrons;
          (2) An assessment of the anticipated global strategic 
        operating environment through 2040;
          (3) Required capabilities and concepts that are 
        common to all future force design alternatives;
          (4) Multi-domain command and control architectures 
        and associated communication capabilities required to 
        effectively implement the future force design;
          (5) Prioritized technologies and prototyping required 
        for development and fielding to support the future 
        force design;
          (6) Other capabilities and capacities required for 
        the Air Force to be an effective joint and coalition 
        warfighting partner; and
          (7) Other matters that the Secretary considers 
        relevant for future force designs.

Report on impact to force structure of using aircraft for missile 
        defense

    The committee notes that the 2019 Missile Defense Review 
(MDR) tasked the Secretary of the Air Force and the Director of 
the Missile Defense Agency to deliver a report on how best to 
integrate the F-35 into the missile defense system for both 
regional and homeland defense. The committee is concerned that 
the potential use of air assets to meet theater missile defense 
requirements could put additional mission demand on an already 
limited force structure and is not accounted for in the current 
Air Force force structure planning.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to conduct a study on how this additional mission 
requirement would change combatant commander requests for 
forces, including impacts to basing and Time Phased Force 
Development Data in current war plans. The Secretary shall 
provide a report consisting of the findings of this study to 
the congressional defense committees no later than January 1, 
2020.

Robotics and autonomous systems

    The committee recognizes the importance and growing role of 
robotics and autonomous systems on the battlefield. For 
example, the committee acknowledges that the Army's Robotic and 
Autonomous Systems Strategy and the Functional Concept for 
Movement and Maneuver identifies robotic systems as a critical 
enabling technology. Further, the committee understands that 
these capabilities at the Brigade Combat Team level may 
facilitate the effective execution of missions in a contested 
multi-domain environment.
    With the establishment of cross functional teams and Army 
Futures Command, the Army is bringing various Department of 
Defense stakeholders together to explore concepts, ideas, and 
develop potential solutions. The committee urges the Army to 
continue creating opportunities to explore options in the 
advancement of emerging robotic and autonomous technologies for 
fielding at echelon across all of its warfighting functions.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing, not later than October 1, 2019, on 
robotics and autonomous systems to the Senate Armed Services 
Committee. The briefing shall include:
          (1) The feasibility, acceptability, and suitability 
        of establishing a Robotic Development Center nested 
        within the Army's Maneuver Center of Excellence; and
          (2) The current and future plans to build 
        partnerships with institutions of higher education, 
        government laboratories, and industry in order to lead 
        the integrated development of prototypes.

Size, weight, power reductions of naval combat systems

    The committee understands that the Navy and Marine Corps 
are interested in options to reduce the size, weight, and power 
(SWaP) of mission systems. By migrating applications from 
multiple underutilized servers to fewer optimally-utilized 
physical servers, the Navy may be able to significantly reduce 
footprint, hardware costs, energy costs, and sustainment costs.
    To fully understand the potential opportunity of SWaP 
reductions in mission systems, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to provide a briefing to the Senate Armed 
Services Committee, not later than October 1, 2019, on the 
Department of the Navy's efforts to reduce the SWaP of such 
systems. The briefing shall include, at a minimum: (1) A 
description of ongoing SWaP reduction efforts for mission 
systems; (2) An analysis by the Program Executive Office for 
Integrated Warfare Systems (PEO IWS) of programs and projects 
that could be virtualized on existing PEO IWS hardware 
baselines; (3) An evaluation of the Navy's ability to 
virtualize and consolidate existing warfare systems onto 
virtual platforms; (4) An assessment of the Navy's ability to 
migrate applications to platforms that utilize ``cloud''-type 
technology; and (5) An estimation of savings that could be 
achieved through SWaP reduction efforts.

Small-Unit Support Vehicle replacement

    As the Department of Defense pivots to addressing the 
demands of great-power competition, the committee understands 
that the military must refocus on operating in a cold-weather 
environment. The committee acknowledges that the Small-Unit 
Support Vehicle (SUSV) is uniquely capable of supporting 
maneuver forces in cold-weather and off-road operations. With 
the capacity to transport 14 personnel and a footprint of just 
1.8 pounds per square inch, the SUSV is extremely well-equipped 
to traverse difficult terrain such as deep snow, tundra, mud, 
swamps, and wetlands.
    However, as the SUSV ages, the readiness and cost of 
maintaining the fleet of 30-year-old vehicles may become 
unsustainable. The committee notes the U.S. Army's recent 
decision to approve the Cold-Weather All-Terrain Vehicle as the 
replacement for the SUSV. The committee encourages the Army to 
procure its entire 163-vehicle Army Acquisition Objective and 
consider further fielding to attain a fleet similar in size to 
the SUSV's original fleet size. Finally, the committee 
encourages other military services to consider joining the 
Army's procurement in order to meet their cold-weather, all-
terrain vehicle transport needs.

Submarine industrial base and parts availability

    The committee commends the Navy on its efforts to evaluate 
and improve material demand visibility from submarine public 
shipyards. The committee is aware that the lack of material 
availability for Virginia-class submarine maintenance has 
contributed to an increased reliance on cannibalization of 
material from operational platforms, consequently decreasing 
readiness. The committee is also aware of efforts to improve 
and forecast material demand, which would enable more timely 
procurement actions to support the public shipyards.
    The committee encourages the Navy to better communicate the 
capability of their submarine forecasting model and its impact 
on material obsolescence and manufacturing capability in 
industry to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives. The committee also encourages the 
Navy to communicate needs in a timely fashion, such as a need 
for Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation funding, in 
order to further reduce material and parts availability issues 
at public shipyards.
    The committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
support shipbuilding industrial base initiatives in order to 
maintain readiness and a strong submarine industrial base.

Supporting and expanding the submarine sub-contracting industrial base

    The committee believes that expanding the capability and 
capacity of the submarine industrial base workforce is 
imperative to keeping pace with Navy shipbuilding requirements. 
Numerous manufacturing capabilities must be addressed, 
including the need for more qualified and Navy-certified 
welders.
    The committee is concerned that the Navy-certified welding 
workforce may be insufficient to meet Navy demands on time with 
the required quality. The committee understands that Navy-
certified welders must undergo significant training and possess 
a higher level of job skills compared to the standard welding 
workforce. The committee further understands that the welding 
of high strength submarine steel requires welders to be 
qualified to MIL-STD-1688 and that this work must be performed 
in Navy-certified facilities.
    The committee is aware of the need to support the specific 
skill sets necessary to enable the Navy to achieve the 
submarine build plan. The committee encourages the Navy to 
conduct a thorough assessment of the current workforce and 
produce a plan for closing the gaps in capability and capacity.

Survivable artillery

    The committee understands that there is a need for self-
propelled, survivable 155mm and 105mm howitzer solutions that 
can emplace, fire, and displace rapidly enough to evade enemy 
counter-battery fires. The committee strongly encourages Army 
leaders to allocate funds to acquire both systems in sufficient 
quantity to address the requesting units' immediate needs and 
to further initiate an Army-wide fielding of these enhanced 
capabilities. Light, self-propelled 155mm and 105mm artillery 
systems will substantially improve the deterrence posture of 
the U.S. Army and allied armies in Europe and Asia that will 
face sophisticated, quick-fire counterbattery systems in the 
event of a conflict.

Tactical wheeled vehicle industrial base

    The committee is concerned that the fiscal year 2020 budget 
request reduced funding from what was planned in the future 
years defense program for the majority of the Army's tactical 
wheeled vehicle fleets, including the Joint Light Tactical 
Vehicles, the Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles, and the Heavy 
Expanded Mobile Tactical Trucks. The committee acknowledges 
that reducing funding across the light, medium, and heavy 
tactical wheeled vehicle fleet could threaten the fragile 
networks of suppliers, many of which are small businesses. Such 
businesses may be forced to exit the defense industry or cease 
operations altogether. In addition, if production does not 
support minimum sustaining rates for the tactical wheeled 
vehicle industrial base, it would impact overall readiness 
rates by reducing the availability of parts and spares.
    Therefore, the committee encourages the Army to pursue 
predictable funding levels in the future for the tactical 
wheeled vehicle industrial base in order to avoid production 
breaks that could adversely impact Army readiness and 
modernization efforts.

TH-57 replacement

    The committee supports the replacement of the Department of 
the Navy's current fleet of TH-57 training helicopters with the 
Advanced Helicopter Training System, included in the 
President's budget request, to ensure continued training of the 
student naval aviators in the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast 
Guard. The committee strongly encourages the Secretary of the 
Navy to ensure predictable and sufficient funding through the 
future years defense program and to work to expedite 
procurement of the Advanced Helicopter Training System 
aircraft, thereby ensuring that rotary-wing training is not 
interrupted.

UH-1N replacement

    The committee supports the procurement and fielding of the 
MH-139 aircraft as the replacement for the UH-1N. The committee 
notes that the contract for up to 84 helicopters, training 
devices and associated support equipment, and operations, 
maintenance, training systems, and support equipment is valued 
at $2.4 billion. The committee also understands that the 
fielding of the MH-139 will close significant mission 
capability gaps associated with the current fleet of UH-1N 
aircraft. The committee strongly encourages the Secretary of 
the Air Force to maintain predictable and sufficient funding 
through the future years defense program, ensuring that the 
critical missions of nuclear deterrence and transportation of 
U.S. government and security forces are executed. The committee 
also encourages the Air Force to consider expediting 
procurement of the MH-139 aircraft.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the congressional defense 
committees on the UH-1N replacement program by October 1, 2019. 
That briefing shall include information on the following 
topics:
          (1) The timeline for procurement and fielding of the 
        MH-139 at Minuteman III bases;
          (2) Any military construction projects needed to 
        field the helicopter and cost and schedule for any such 
        projects;
          (3) The program costs to procure and operate the MH-
        139 fleet; and
          (4) The implications of potential program delay for 
        procurement or operating and support costs.

Unmanned aerial systems training locations

    The committee recognizes the vital importance of providing 
the best trained unmanned aerial systems (UAS) operators and 
maintainers in order to meet operational and training 
requirements in support of the National Defense Strategy. In 
order to meet the unique and specific training requirements for 
UAS operations, the Army needs training locations that 
possesses dedicated restricted air space, favorable weather 
conditions, access to large military operating areas, varied 
types of terrain, and available spectrum.
    Therefore, as the Army conducts its assessment of the best 
possible locations for UAS training, the committee encourages 
the Secretary of the Army to consider the attributes to select 
a training location that: (1) Best meets the requirements of 
training; and (2) Possesses the capability to increase 
throughput for both initial qualification and unit training. 
Further, before any assessment progresses to a stage where 
specific courses of action are being evaluated, the committee 
directs the Army to provide a briefing to the congressional 
defense committees on specific criteria that will be used to 
conduct the assessment.

Vehicle Reconnaissance System

    The committee is encouraged by the Army's recent award of 
the Soldier Borne Sensor (SBS) program. The committee has been 
supportive of this program due to the significant need to 
provide squads and small units with enhanced intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities.
    The committee is interested in how this program could 
further increase situational awareness in ground combat vehicle 
operations. Specifically, the committee is interested in the 
potential for adapting the SBS technology to develop a vehicle 
reconnaissance system for use on-board ground combat vehicles 
and unmanned vehicles. Such a system would allow for on-demand 
ISR ahead of vehicles and convoys on the move and around 
stationary vehicles.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretaries of the 
Army and Navy to brief the congressional defense committees, 
not later than February 1, 2020, on existing plans for 
incorporating a vehicle reconnaissance system into both manned 
and unmanned ground combat vehicles. At a minimum, this 
briefing should include an assessment of current technologies 
being examined and other efforts for incorporating such systems 
on current and future vehicle platforms.

Virginia-class hull treatment briefing

    The committee is aware of press reporting from 2011 and 
2017 that indicated problems with Virginia-class submarine hull 
treatments, including delamination.
    The committee is concerned that the Virginia-class 
submarine program may continue to experience challenges with 
hull treatments, including with the ``Mold-in-Place'' (MIP) 
material.
    Therefore the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy, 
not later than October 1, 2019, to provide a briefing to the 
Senate Armed Services Committee that describes the following 
related to the Virginia-class submarine program: (1) Past and 
current challenges with hull treatments; (2) Percentage of 
original hull treatment remaining on each delivered Virginia-
class submarine; (3) Cost of MIP repair and replacement by 
Virginia-class submarine hull number; (4) Assessment of the 
operational implications of degraded hull treatments, 
specifically reduced MIP coverage, including interruptions of 
operational tasking; (5) Root causes and corrective actions for 
hull treatment deficiencies; and (6) The approach to hull 
treatments on the Columbia-class submarine program.

Western Army Aviation Training Site (WAATS) for FMS

    The committee acknowledges that the Western Army Aviation 
Training Site (WAATS) in Marana, Arizona, is a premier rotary 
wing training location and is integral to the mission of the 
U.S. Army Aviation Center of Excellence (USAACE) to provide 
trained and ready aircrews in support the National Defense 
Strategy. However, the committee notes that the required 
increase of U.S. personnel throughput at the USAACE due to 
pilot shortages in the Active-Duty component, Army National 
Guard, and Army Reserve limits the available training quotas of 
foreign military students sent by our allies and partners.
    The WAATS currently provides both rated and nonrated crew 
flight training for both U.S. and foreign military students in 
UH-60 Blackhawk and UH-72 Lakota aircraft courses and possesses 
excess capacity to assist USAACE throughput. Additionally, the 
WAATS provides hundreds of square miles of airspace 
specifically dedicated to aviation training and an above 
average number of days allowing flight operations.
    Therefore, the committee requires the Secretary of the Army 
to brief the Senate Armed Services Committee, not later than 
October, 1, 2019, on the aviation training at the WAATS and 
include the:
    (1) Forecasted schedule for UH-60 and UH-72 flight training 
courses in fiscal years 2020-2023;
    (2) Feasibility and suitability of the WAATS to conduct all 
foreign military flight training for UH-60 and UH-72 courses;
    (3) Excess capacity at the WAATS, including classrooms, 
simulators, hangar space, and aircraft parking; and
    (4) Potential expansion of training missions at the WAATS.

         TITLE II--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION

              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations

Authorization of appropriations (sec. 201)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for research, development, test, and 
evaluation activities at the levels identified in section 4201 
of division D of this Act.

    Subtitle B--Program Requirements, Restrictions, and Limitations

Development and acquisition strategy to procure secure, low probability 
        of detection data link network capability (sec. 211)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Chief of Staff of the Air Force (CSAF) and Chief of Naval 
Operations (CNO) to develop a joint development and acquisition 
strategy to procure a resilient, low latency, and low 
probability of detection data link network capability that 
would enable effective operation in the contested environments 
highlighted in the National Defense Strategy. The strategy's 
solution should ensure that the network is affordable with 
minimal impact to existing host platforms and minimal overall 
integration costs. The CSAF and CNO would submit the strategy 
to the congressional defense committees no later than March 1, 
2020.
    Additionally, the provision would limit the obligation or 
expenditure of fiscal year 2020 funds for operation and 
maintenance for the Office of the Secretary of the Air Force 
and the Office of the Secretary of the Navy to 50 percent of 
those funds until 15 days after submission of the plan required 
in the provision.
Establishment of secure next-generation wireless network (5G) 
        infrastructure for the Nevada Test and Training Range and base 
        infrastructure (sec. 212)
    The committee recommends a provision, funded elsewhere in 
this Act, that would require the Secretary of Defense to 
establish a secure fifth generation (5G) wireless network at 
the Nevada Test and Training Range as part of the Department of 
Defense (DOD) test infrastructure in order to provide an 
advanced cellular range for the Department. The committee 
recognizes the revolutionary effect that 5G technology will 
have on the DOD. However, the committee is concerned that the 
DOD lacks the ability to test and develop tactics to leverage 
5G technology as well as to negate enemy use of this advanced 
capability.
    In addition, the provision would require the installation 
of a secure 5G base infrastructure network at a second location 
in order to improve the DOD's understanding of the impacts of 
5G technology on continental United States base operations.
Limitation and report on Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 
        2 enduring capability (sec. 213)
    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the obligation or expenditure of any funds for fiscal year 2020 
for the Army's Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2 
(IFPC Inc 2) enduring capability program until the Secretary of 
the Army submits a report to the congressional defense 
committees containing: (1) An assessment of whether the 
enduring IFPC Inc 2 requirements are still relevant for the 
threat anticipated for the period when the program would be 
fielded; (2) A list of candidate systems considered for IFPC 
Inc 2, including those developed outside of the Army; (3) An 
assessment of the systems against representative threats; (4) 
An assessment of other relevant characteristics, including cost 
of development, cost per round, technological maturity, and 
logistics and sustainment; and (5) A plan for how the Army 
would integrate the chosen system into the Integrated Air and 
Missile Defense Battle Command System.
    The provision would also require the Secretary of the Army 
to identify a program of record in the President's budget 
request for fiscal year 2021 that addresses the Army's 
responsibility per Department of Defense Directive 5100.01 to 
``conduct air and missile defense to support joint campaigns,'' 
specifically as it pertains to defense against supersonic 
cruise missiles.
    The committee notes that the Army's plan to procure two 
Iron Dome batteries in accordance with section 112 of the John 
S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2019 (Public Law 115-232) meets the intent of the Congress as 
an interim solution for defense against cruise missiles. The 
committee is concerned, however, that the Army has artificially 
constrained the options considered for the enduring program, 
including holding some candidate systems to different standards 
than other systems and excluding some options altogether. 
Further, the committee is concerned that the requirements for 
IFPC Inc 2 are not representative of the current threat posed 
to U.S. and allied air bases and other fixed sites in theater 
and will be even further disconnected from the future threat. 
The committee commends the efforts of Army Futures Command in 
this area thus far and encourages the command to aggressively 
pursue a technological solution that will provide the defense 
necessary to enable joint theater campaign plans.
Electromagnetic spectrum sharing research and development program (sec. 
        214)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Administrator of 
the National Telecommunications and Information Administration 
and the Federal Communications Commission, to establish an 
electromagnetic spectrum sharing research and development 
program for fifth-generation wireless network technologies, 
Federal systems, and non-Federal incumbent systems that would 
focus on expanding sharing of electromagnetic spectrum. The 
committee believes that this program is important in assessing 
the benefits and risks to the Department of Defense (DOD) of 
spectrum sharing and its impacts on the warfighter.
    The provision would require, within 180 days, the 
establishment of test beds to demonstrate the potential of 
cohabitation between these systems. The provision would also 
require the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the 
appropriate Federal agencies, to propose a strategy to 
integrate Federal and non-Federal electromagnetic spectrum 
enterprises not later than May 1, 2020. The Secretary of 
Defense, in consultation with the Administrator and the 
Commission, would also provide to the relevant congressional 
committees periodic briefings on the status of the test beds, 
including the incorporation of sharing technologies into 
international standards, and reports identifying 
recommendations to facilitate sharing frameworks in the bands 
of electromagnetic spectrum that are the subject of the test 
beds.
Sense of the Senate on the Advanced Battle Management System (sec. 215)
    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate on the Air Force's approach to the Advanced 
Battle Management System (ABMS). The committee is supportive of 
the Air Force's vision for the ABMS as a system of systems that 
can integrate and fuse data from disaggregated sensors. 
However, the committee remains concerned about the speed of 
fielding based on the current projected end of life for the 
Joint Surveillance and Target Attack Radar System aircraft.
Modification of proof of concept commercialization program (sec. 216)
    The committee recommends a provision that would make the 
pilot program authorized in section 1603 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 113-
66; 10 U.S.C. 2359 note) permanent. The provision would also 
add a section that includes commercialization of dual-use 
technology with a focus on priority defense technology areas 
that attract public and private sector funding as well as 
private sector investment capital, including from venture 
capital firms in the United States.
Modification of Defense quantum information science and technology 
        research and development program (sec. 217)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 234 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) by 
specifying a list of organizations to be consulted in 
developing the research and investment plan required in the 
provision and by requiring the Department of Defense to 
develop, in coordination with appropriate Federal entities, a 
taxonomy for quantum science activities and requirements for 
relevant technology and standards.
Technology and National Security Fellowship (sec. 218)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize a 
technology and national security fellowship for individuals 
that possess an undergraduate or graduate degree that focuses 
on science, technology, engineering, or mathematics course 
work.
Direct Air Capture and Blue Carbon Removal Technology Program (sec. 
        219)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of 
Homeland Security, the Secretary of Energy, and the heads of 
other Federal agencies as deemed appropriate by the Secretary 
of Defense, to carry out a program on the research, 
development, testing, evaluation, study, and demonstration of 
technologies related to blue carbon capture and direct air 
capture.

                 Subtitle C--Reports and Other Matters

National security emerging biotechnologies research and development 
        program (sec. 231)
    The committee recommends a provision that would direct the 
Department of Defense (DOD) to develop a coordinated research 
program in emerging biotechnologies. The committee notes that 
advances are occurring in biotechnology at an intersection of 
traditional biology, synthetic biology, engineering, and 
biotechnology. Advances in these areas could lead to 
improvement in many capabilities relevant to defense missions, 
including enhancing servicemembers' performance, increasing 
lethality and survivability, and improving battlefield 
healthcare. This progress could also yield commercial advances 
in areas such as gene editing, cloning, and faster development 
of new drugs and vaccines.
    Such potential advances in emerging biotechnologies 
include: new bacteria or implantable devices that could enhance 
warfighter cognitive and physical performance; improved 
information and information use to create more realistic 
computer simulations of warfighter physiology; development of 
biosensors to monitor warfighter performance or environmental 
conditions; engineered biomaterials for defense applications; 
and improved novel wound-healing or casualty care and diagnosis 
technologies and systems.
    The committee believes that the Department needs a 
coordinated research effort to ensure that programs in this 
area are consistently aligned to current DOD strategies and 
informed by global and commercial developments in the field. 
Further, since these technologies may also develop into future 
threats to the military and the Nation, the provision would 
require the Department to develop policies on the control of 
research information and products as needed to protect national 
security. The provision would further require the Secretary of 
Defense, in carrying out this program, to develop strong 
partnerships with industry, universities, and interagency 
partners so that the DOD can leverage the best investments made 
across the country and world and to ensure that the 
biotechnology research mission area is served by the best 
possible technical talent and world-class research facilities.
Cyber science and technology activities roadmap and reports (sec. 232)
    The committee recommends a provision that would direct the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering to 
develop a roadmap for the science and technology activities of 
the Department of Defense in support of the Department's cyber 
needs and missions. The provision would also require the Under 
Secretary to submit an annual report on these activities. The 
committee believes that long-term science and technology cyber 
research is critical to developing capabilities that will 
enable the warfighter to maintain dominance in cyberspace in 
the long run.
Requiring certain microelectronics products and services meet trusted 
        supply chain and operational security standards (sec. 233)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish, by January 1, 2021, supply 
chain and operational security standards and requirements for 
microelectronics and to purchase microelectronics and related 
services to the maximum practicable extent from providers that 
meet these standards. In addition, the provision would require 
that the Secretary ensure that manufacturers of secure 
microelectronics are able to use the same production lines, 
facilities, and personnel for microelectronics products and 
related services intended for both Department of Defense (DOD) 
and commercial end-uses. The provision would require the 
Secretary to take such actions as are necessary and appropriate 
to foster a competitive secure industrial base. The committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to brief the congressional 
defense committees on the supply chain and operational security 
standards not later than February 1, 2021.
    The committee believes that changes are needed to the 
traditional approach to ensuring a supply of trusted 
microelectronics. The current approach is not economical for 
existing or prospective suppliers of trusted microelectronics, 
because the DOD buys most of its microelectronics from purely 
commercial companies and prevents its trusted suppliers from 
selling commercially products that are built on trusted 
microelectronics production lines. The committee encourages the 
Secretary of Defense to work with Five Eyes partners, North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) allies, and other allies to 
promote a shared secure microelectronics industrial base for 
secure 5G and other applications.
    The committee believes that the standards and procurement 
preferences that the DOD develops for secure microelectronics 
products and services should be developed such that they are 
applicable for adoption by the Federal government, our allies, 
the carriers implementing 5G wireless networks, critical 
infrastructure, and other industrial sectors where security and 
trust are vital. The committee also encourages the Secretary of 
Defense to continue pursuing additional means to secure 
microelectronics. These include split fabrication approaches, 
design and engineering innovations to defeat theft and 
compromise, and other measures to achieve security on networks 
and using devices that are not trusted.
Technical correction to Global Research Watch Program (sec. 234)
    The committee recommends a provision that makes a technical 
correction to section 2365 of title 10, United States Code.
Additional technology areas for expedited access to technical talent 
        (sec. 235)
    The committee recommends a provision that would add rapid 
prototyping and infrastructure resilience to the technical 
areas eligible for the rapid contracting processes authorized 
under section 217 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91). The committee notes that 
these processes are intended to give Department of Defense 
(DOD) officials expedited access to world-class technical 
talent at universities, for the purposes of providing technical 
analyses, engineering support, and other expert services. The 
committee notes that the Nation's universities have significant 
capacity to support the DOD in these ways, as a complement to 
their current robust efforts in basic research, and that many 
university faculty and staff already work with industry, 
including the defense industry, in these kinds of activities. 
Finally, the committee notes that the Secretary of Defense has 
yet to comply with the mandate to establish a contractual 
mechanism to execute the original provision. The committee 
directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and 
Sustainment and the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering to jointly deliver an annotated briefing to the 
congressional defense committees on actions taken to comply 
with this mandate, no later than February 1, 2020.
Sense of the Senate and periodic briefings on the security and 
        availability of fifth-generation (5G) wireless network 
        technology and production (sec. 236)
    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate on the importance of secure fifth-
generation (5G) wireless networks for the Department of 
Defense. The provision would also include a requirement for the 
Secretary of Defense to provide quarterly briefings to the 
congressional defense committees on Department of Defense (DOD) 
activities to develop and utilize secure 5G wireless networking 
technology. The committee understands that utilization of 
secure 5G wireless networking technology will be critical to 
achieving future warfighting advantages. The committee is 
frustrated by the slow pace of DOD research and adoption of 
these technologies and encourages the DOD to brief the 
committee on all efforts underway to advance secure 5G wireless 
networks.
Transfer of Combating Terrorism Technical Support Office (sec. 237)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require, 
not later than March 1, 2020, the transfer of responsibilities 
for the authority, direction, and control of the Combating 
Terrorism Technical Support Office (CTTSO) from the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity 
Conflict to the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering (USD(R&E)). The committee believes that the mission 
of the CTTSO to ``identify and develop capabilities to combat 
terrorism and irregular adversaries and to deliver these 
capabilities to Department of Defense components and 
interagency partners through rapid research and development'' 
is better aligned with the mission and responsibilities of the 
USD(R&E). Additionally, the provision would require the 
Secretary of Defense to report on CTTSO's efforts in relation 
to the implementation of the National Defense Strategy.
Briefing on cooperative defense technology programs and risks of 
        technology transfer to China or Russia (sec. 238)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Director of 
National Intelligence, to provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees on cooperative defense 
technology programs of the Department of Defense and mitigation 
of the risk of technology transfer, relevant to these programs, 
to the People's Republic of China or the Russian Federation.
Modification of authority for prizes for advanced technology 
        achievements (sec. 239)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition 
and Sustainment to award prizes as part of competitions to 
develop or demonstrate technologies relevant to defense 
missions. The committee notes the Defense Advanced Research 
Projects Agency's and the Services' successful use of these 
types of prize competitions, which have spurred the advancement 
of robotics, driverless cars, and cybersecurity technologies.
Use of funds for Strategic Environmental Research Program, 
        Environmental Security Technical Certification Program, and 
        Operational Energy Capability Improvement (sec. 240)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to expend specific amounts appropriated 
for fiscal year 2020 for the Strategic Environmental Research 
Program, Operational Energy Capability Improvement, and 
Security Technical Certification Program.
Funding for the Sea-Launched Cruise Missile-Nuclear analysis of 
        alternatives (sec. 241)
    The committee recommends a provision that would increase 
the amount of funding available by $5.0 million for the 
Department of the Navy's analysis of alternatives regarding a 
nuclear sea-launched cruise missile (SLCM-N). The provision 
would also require the Secretary of Defense to create a program 
of record for the SLCM-N, a capability that could be carried by 
U.S. nuclear submarines in the future.
Review and assessment pertaining to transition of Department of 
        Defense-originated dual-use technology (sec. 242)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering to 
conduct a review of the Department of Defense science and 
technology enterprise's intellectual property and strategy for 
awarding exclusive commercial rights to industry partners and 
submit a report summarizing the results of this review to the 
congressional defense committees no later than May 1, 2020. 
This review would study: the Department's intellectual property 
and commercialization rights management; the Department's 
efforts to promote the commercialization of DOD-funded 
research; the potential for prize-based research as an 
alternative to traditional research funding; and the potential 
of DOD's funding of basic and applied research for public use 
and without commercialization monopolies, akin to the 
Extramural Research Program of the National Institutes of 
Health, as an alternative to traditional research funding.
    The committee understands that much of the Department of 
Defense's (DOD) science and technology investment and 
especially its basic research--for example, some of the Defense 
Advanced Research Projects Agency's cybersecurity research--is 
predicated on the transfer of DOD-originated dual-use 
technology to members of the defense industrial base and the 
broader commercial sector. The committee is also aware of a 
growing body of economics research on the frictions associated 
with intellectual property and exclusive commercialization 
monopolies.

                              Budget Items

                                  Army

Defense research sciences for counter unmanned aerial vehicle research
    The budget request included $298.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 61102A 
defense research sciences.
    The committee notes the importance of basic research in 
meeting long-term national security needs and supports 
increased counter-unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) university 
research. The committee is aware of the proliferation and 
increased capabilities of UAS, and research is needed to 
respond to this growing threat.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million, for a total of $303.0 million, in RDT&E, Army, for PE 
61102A for basic research.
3D printing research
    The budget request included $86.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 61104A 
university and industry research centers.
    The committee notes the importance of increased basic 
research for fundamental scientific knowledge related to long-
term national security needs, and the committee supports 
increased research for 3D printing.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million, for a total of $88.2 million, in RDT&E, Army, for PE 
61104A for 3D printing research.
Cyber Collaborative Research Alliance
    The budget request included $5.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 61121A 
Cyber Collaborative Research Alliance.
    The committee notes the importance of cyber basic research 
and supports increased cyber collaboration with the Cyber 
Collaboration Research Alliance. The committee believes that 
long-term science and technology cyber research is critical to 
developing capabilities that will enable the warfighter to 
maintain dominance in cyberspace in the long run.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million, for a total of $10.0 million, in RDT&E, Army, for PE 
61121A for cyber basic research.
Multi-Domain Task Force for the Indo-Pacific region
    The budget request included $115.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, & Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE62143A 
Soldier Lethality Technology.
    The committee recommends an increase of $3.0 million, for a 
total of $118.3 million, for RDT&E, Army, for PE 62143A for 
camouflage, concealment, and deception materiel in support of 
the Multi-Domain Task Force for the Indo-Pacific region. This 
increase would support essential capabilities for Multi-Domain 
Operations-Pacific as described in the Chief of Staff of the 
Army's unfunded priorities list.
    The committee supports the efforts of the Army and U.S. 
Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM) to develop capabilities and 
operational concepts to maintain or restore the comparative 
military advantage of the United States in the Indo-Pacific 
region and to reduce the risk of executing contingency plans of 
the Department of Defense. As it develops, the Multi-Domain 
Task Force will have significant implications for force 
posture, force structure, and procurement priorities. Going 
forward, the committee urges the Department of the Army and 
INDOPACOM to keep the committee fully apprised of developments 
relating to activities associated with the Multi-Domain Task 
Force.

Advanced materials manufacturing processes

    The budget request included $35.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62144A 
ground technology.
    The committee is aware that advances in novel manufacturing 
could allow for the development of materials and components 
with superior properties and performance. The committee 
understands that the application of modeling tools in the 
development of new manufacturing techniques, such as additive 
manufacturing, could enable the production of new materials 
that provide increased strength, hardness, and ductility. These 
alloys could be useful in applications such as armor and would 
be a critical enabling technology that could increase 
warfighter protection.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62144A for advanced materials 
manufacturing processes research.

Biopolymer structural materials research

    The budget request included $35.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62144A 
ground technologies.
    The committee notes the importance of earthen structures to 
support force protection missions for deployed forces. To 
improve the protective capacities of these structures, reduce 
potential harmful medical impacts of many structural materials, 
and reduce costs of building and maintaining these structures, 
the committee notes the value of research in the use of soil 
microbiological systems and biopolymers to improve native soils 
for military earthen structures construction. This type of 
research is also consistent with the Department of Defense's 
emphasis on the importance of synthetic biology and 
biotechnology to defense missions.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62144A for applied research on 
biopolymer structural materials.

Advanced materials for infrastructure

    The budget request included $35.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62144A 
for applied research on ground technology.
    The committee notes the importance of biology research to 
meet long-term national security needs and supports increased 
research on cellulose structural materials that will improve 
Army force projection capabilities through the development and 
deployment of rapidly manufacturable, lightweight, and low-cost 
construction materials, structural systems, and bridging 
systems, including identification and characterization of 
materials that could be sourced locally during deployment.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.5 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62144A for research in cellulose 
nanocomposite-based structural materials for light weight, 
lower life cycle and logistics costs, and increased use of 
local materials to meet Army requirements.

Next Generation Combat Vehicle technology

    The budget request included $219.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62145A 
Next Generation Combat Vehicle Technology.
    The Department of Defense faces growing challenges in 
providing increasingly efficient operational energy, when and 
where it is needed to meet the demands of the National Defense 
Strategy. The committee understands that the Energy Storage and 
Power Systems incorporate composite flywheel-based technology 
and may address several energy objectives for the Army, such 
as: (1) Increased power efficiencies; (2) Maximized use of 
renewables; (3) Reduced system energy consumption with improved 
size, weight, and power; (4) Extended operational duration, 
reducing the need for energy resupply; and (5) Enhanced 
environmental characteristics.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $15.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62145A.

Composite tube and propulsion research

    The budget request included $74.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62147A 
long range precision fires technology.
    The committee notes the need for improved artillery tubes 
and improved propulsion for 105mm and 155mm howitzers. The 
committee believes that research to develop technologies for 
lighter, shorter tubes could potentially support stronger 
propulsion and extend the range of projectiles in support of 
the National Defense Strategy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62147A for composite tube and 
propulsion research.

Printed armament components

    The budget request included $74.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62147A 
long range precision fires technology.
    The committee is aware of continued investment in additive 
manufacturing technologies to rapidly design, prototype, and 
manufacture critical novel printed armaments components. These 
technologies could be used to print replacement parts, 
customizable grenades, and embedded electronics. The committee 
is encouraged by progress made toward the eventual goal of 
fully printing munitions on a single production line in an 
ammunition plant.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62147A for applied research in 
long range precision fires technology.

C3I Applied Cyber

    The budget request included $18.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62213A 
C3I Applied Cyber.
    The committee believes that long-term science and 
technology cyber research is critical to developing 
capabilities that will enable the warfighter to maintain 
dominance in cyberspace in the long run.
    The committee recommends an increase of $5.0 million, for a 
total of $23.9 million, in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62213A for 
applied cyber research.

Female warfighter performance research

    The budget request included $99.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62787A 
medical technologies.
    The committee notes the importance of leveraging academic 
research to better understand the unique challenges facing the 
female warfighter. The committee notes that additional research 
and technology development must be conducted to optimize 
equipment, protective gear, medical treatments, and nutrition 
for female warfighters. The committee also notes that there is 
a lack of data on female warfighter performance in previous 
studies, which for the most part only included males as 
research subjects--leaving servicewomen largely unresearched 
and yielding a gap in the scientific literature on female 
performance outcomes under different stresses.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million, for a total of $102.2 million, in RDT&E, Army, for PE 
62787A for additional research on performance of the female 
warfighter,

Long duration battery storage

    The budget request included $12.1 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, of which $66.1 
million was for the PE 0603119A Ground Advanced Technology.
    The committee believes that, in order to improve combat 
capability and resilience on installations, the Department of 
Defense must invest in and acquire on-site long duration 
battery storage for at least 100 hours, in the event of an 
intentional or unintentional power outage.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 0603119A for the development and 
eventual demonstration of a 100-hour battery for distributed 
energy assets.

Computational manufacturing engineering

    The budget request included $12.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63119A 
for ground advanced technology.
    The committee understands that defense components are often 
designed and manufactured with assumptions made about the 
environment in which they will be used. The committee notes 
that collecting data on these systems can be used to optimize 
their designs through the use of computational materials 
engineering software.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 63119A for computational 
manufacturing engineering.

Lightweight protective and hardening materials research

    The budget request included $12.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63119A 
ground advanced technology.
    The committee understands the importance of conducting 
material development research to develop lightweight protective 
and hardening materials usable as either a standalone or 
composite protective element. These materials can be applied to 
a wide range of field conditions and environments.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 63119A for increased research in 
lightweight protective and hardening materials.

Robotic construction research

    The budget request included $12.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63119A 
ground advanced technology.
    The committee is aware of the challenges in constructing 
expeditionary structures for the Department of Defense (DOD). 
The current methods for building structures on the battlefield 
present numerous challenges to ensuring warfighter safety, 
security, and efficiencies. The committee understands that 
development of a robotic arm and robotic vehicle could 
potentially allow larger structures to be built. Therefore, the 
committee supports an increase in robotic construction 
research.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 63119A for robotic construction 
research.

Ground vehicle sustainment research

    The budget request included $160.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63462A 
Next Generation Combat Vehicle Advanced Technology Development.
    The committee notes the potential for using emerging 
additive manufacturing techniques for on-demand production of 
replacement parts, in both depot repair and deployed 
environments. The committee notes that more work remains to be 
done to improve these manufacturing techniques, understand the 
materials being produced by these techniques, and ensure that 
the materials meet all safety and reliability standards.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 63462A for ground vehicle 
sustainment research on the use of additive manufacturing for 
advanced technology development.

Next generation combat vehicle advanced technology for fuel cell 
        propulsion and autonomous driving control

    The budget request included $160.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63462A 
Next Generation Combat Vehicle Advanced Technology.
    The committee notes the importance of hydrogen fuel cell 
propulsion and autonomous driving control and encourages the 
Department of Defense to continue research in this area to 
maintain a military advantage.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $20.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 63462A for advanced technology 
development in fuel cell propulsion and autonomous driving 
control.

Hypersonics testing research

    The budget request included $174.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63464A 
long range precision fires advanced technology.
    The committee notes that the development of hypersonics 
capabilities is a key element of the National Defense Strategy 
and represents an area of intense technological competition 
between the United States, People's Republic of China, and 
Russian Federation.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $4.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 63464A for hypersonics research 
and testing.

Future Long Range Assault Aircraft (FLRAA)

    The budget request included $459.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63801A 
Aviation Advanced Development, of which $31.9 million is for 
the Future Long Range Assault Aircraft (FLRAA) and Capability 
Set 3 (CS3).
    The Army also identified on the unfunded priority list a 
shortfall in funding of $75.6 million for PE 63801A to 
accelerate the CS3 program.
    The committee notes that the current acquisition strategy 
for FLRAA/CS3 represents a traditional approach; however, the 
committee understands that the Army is considering multiple 
courses of action to accelerate this program through the use of 
acquisition reform authorities. Further, the committee 
understands that the Army recently completed the Joint Multi-
Role Technology Demonstration effort that successfully 
demonstrated several transformational vertical lift 
capabilities and technologies. As such, the committee believes 
that the Army should be in a position to reasonably accelerate 
the FLRAA/CS3 schedule and acquisition strategy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $75.6 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 63801A.

Hypersonic weapon system

    The budget request included $228.0 million in in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 64182A 
Hypersonics. The Chief of Staff of the Army identified a 
shortfall in funding for this program in his unfunded 
priorities list.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $130.6 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 64182A to accelerate the 
development of hypersonic weapon systems.

Next Generation Squad Weapon--Automatic Rifle

    The budget request included $106.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 64601A 
Infantry Support Weapons, of which $33.1 million is for Next 
Generation Squad Weapon--Automatic Rifle.
    The Army also identified a shortfall in funding of $19.9 
million for PE 64601A to fund rapid prototyping agreements on 
the unfunded priority list.
    The committee acknowledges the need to improve close combat 
lethality in support of the National Defense Strategy and the 
need to field weapon systems that improve standoff, ballistics, 
and penetrating power.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $19.9 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 64601A.

Integrated Personnel and Pay System--Army

    The budget request included $142.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, & Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 65018A 
Integrated Personnel and Pay System--Army.
    The committee is concerned about unjustified cost growth 
and poor business process reengineering.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $142.8 
million, for a total of $0.0 million, in RDT&E, Army, for PE 
65018A.

Army contract writing system

    The budget request included $19.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 65047A 
Army Contract Writing System.
    The committee remains concerned about duplication among the 
Services in contract writing systems.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $19.7 
million, for a total of $0.0 million, in RDT&E, Army, for PE 
65047A.

Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2

    The budget request contained $243.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 65052A 
Indirect Fire Protection Capability (IFPC) Increment 2--Block 
1. Of this, $73.2 million was requested to support the interim 
IFPC solution and $39.3 million was proposed to support the 
enduring solution, in accordance with section 112 of the John 
S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2019 (Public Law 115-232).
    The committee notes that, while the Army in February 2019 
issued a letter of intent to procure two batteries of Iron Dome 
to meet the requirement articulated in section 112 of the John 
S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2019 (Public Law 115-232) for an interim cruise missile defense 
capability, this decision was predicated on submission and 
approval of an above threshold reprogramming (ATR) by mid-April 
2019. Because of the delay in submission of the ATR to the 
congressional defense committees, the committee is concerned 
that the Army will be unable meet the statutory requirement for 
interim base defense. Therefore, the committee recommends a 
realignment elsewhere in this report that would support 
procurement of two Iron Dome batteries with fiscal year 2020 
funds. The committee notes that, should the ATR be fully 
approved before the end of fiscal year 2019, this realignment 
would no longer be necessary.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $20.6 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 65052A for IFPC Increment 2 for 
Iron Dome testing and delivery.

Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2 EMAM

    The budget request included $243.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 65052A 
Indirect Fire Protection Capability (IFPC) Increment 2--Block 
1. The request includes $124.2 million for the development of 
the Expanded Mission Area Missile interceptor. The committee 
believes that funds for the development of the interceptor, 
before a defined solution for the enduring IFPC Increment 2 is 
selected, are ahead of need.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $124.2 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 65052A.

Multi-Domain Artillery

    The budget request included $243.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 65052A 
Indirect Fire Protection Capability (IFPC) Increment 2--Block 
1. The Chief of Staff of the Army requested funding for Multi-
Domain Artillery in his unfunded priorities list.
    The committee supports the efforts of the Army and U.S. 
Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM) to develop capabilities and 
operational concepts to maintain or restore the comparative 
military advantage of the United States in the Indo-Pacific 
region and to reduce the risk of executing contingency plans of 
the Department of Defense. As it develops, the command's Multi-
Domain Task Force will have significant implications for force 
posture, force structure, and procurement priorities. Going 
forward, the committee urges the Department of the Army and 
INDOPACOM to keep the committee fully apprised of developments 
relating to activities associated with the Multi-Domain Task 
Force.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 65052A for multi-domain 
artillery.

Ground Robotics Squad Multipurpose Equipment Transport (S-MET)

    The budget request included $41.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 65053A 
Ground Robotics, Squad Multipurpose Equipment Transport (S-
MET).
    The Army has requested a zero sum realignment of $12.8 
million from PE 65053A within RDT&E, Army, for S-MET to line 
138 of Other Procurement, Army (OPA).
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $12.8 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 65053A.

Next Generation Combat Vehicle 50mm gun

    The budget request included $378.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 65625A 
Manned Ground Vehicle.
    The Army also identified a shortfall in funding of $40.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 65625A on the unfunded priority 
list for the procurement of 15 XM-913 weapon systems (50mm gun, 
ammunition handling system, and fire control hardware).
    The committee acknowledges the need to improve lethality 
for the Next Generation Combat Vehicle to retain overmatch in 
support of the National Defense Strategy and the need to field 
weapon systems that improve standoff and survivability.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $40.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 65625A for 50mm gun upgrades.

Joint Light Tactical Vehicle

    The budget request included $2.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 65812A 
Joint Light Tactical Vehicle (JLTV) Engineering and 
Manufacturing Development.
    The Army has requested a zero sum realignment of $4.5 
million from line number 6 of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), to 
PE 65812A in RDT&E, Army.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $4.5 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 65812A.

Cybersecurity threat simulation research

    The budget request included $14.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 64256A 
Threat Simulator Development.
    The committee notes the importance of cybersecurity to 
long-term national security needs and supports increased 
research in cybersecurity threat simulation to model emerging 
and proliferating threats to weapons systems and networks.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 64256A.

Directed energy test capabilities

    The budget request included $334.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 65601A 
Army Test Ranges and Facilities.
    The committee notes that directed energy is a key 
technology for the implementation of the National Defense 
Strategy. The committee further notes that the FY 2018-FY 2028 
Strategic Plan for DOD T&E Resources indicated that the demand 
for directed energy test capabilities will soon expand from 
demand for testing to address specific objectives of laboratory 
demonstrations to demand for testing to address requirements 
for validating a weapon system for operational use. The plan 
also indicated that past and projected activities point to the 
necessity for growth in directed energy test capability and 
workforce and called for increased collaboration across the 
directed energy technology development and test communities.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $15.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 65601A to fund directed energy 
test range capabilities.

CD ATACMS

    The budget request included no funding in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 23802A 
Other Missile Product Improvement Programs.
    The committee notes that the Chief of Staff of the Army 
requested funding in his unfunded priorities list for Cross-
Domain Army Tactical Missile Systems (CD ATACMS).
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $24.1 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 23802A for the CD ATACMS.

Nanoscale materials manufacturing

    The budget request included $59.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 78045A 
End Item Industrial Preparedness Activities to support Army 
manufacturing technology activities.
    The committee notes that the government-wide National 
Nanotechnology Initiative (NNI), which includes the Department 
of Defense, has highlighted that nanotechnology research, and 
the eventual nanomanufacturing of products, requires advanced 
and often very expensive equipment and facilities. Further the 
NNI program has indicated that, in order to realize the 
potential of nanotechnology, agencies should invest heavily in 
nanomanufacturing research and infrastructure.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 78045A to increase Army efforts 
in developing nanoscale materials manufacturing capabilities.

                                  Navy


University Research Initiatives

    The budget request included $116.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 61103N 
University Research Initiatives.
    The committee notes the importance of basic research in 
supporting long-term national security needs and supports 
increasing cyber basic research. The committee believes that 
long-term science and technology cyber research is critical to 
developing capabilities that will enable the warfighter to 
maintain dominance in cyberspace in the long run.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million, for a total of $126.9 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
61103N for basic research.

Carbon capture increase

    The budget request included $20.3 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which 
$119.5 million was for PE 62123N Force Protection Applied 
Research.
    The committee notes that elsewhere in this Act the 
committee recommends a provision that requires the Secretary of 
Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of Homeland 
Security, the Secretary of Energy, and the heads of such other 
Federal agencies as the Secretary of Defense considers 
appropriate, to carry out a program on research, development, 
testing, evaluation, study, and demonstration of technologies 
related to blue carbon capture and direct air capture.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $8.0 
million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 62123N for electric propulsion 
research for carbon capture.

Electric propulsion research

    The budget request included $20.3 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which 
$119.5 million was for PE 62123N Force Protection Applied 
Research.
    The committee supports increased electronic propulsion 
research to support the Navy's emerging need to align platform 
electric power systems with mission systems development and to 
address the importance of energy management and storage as part 
of integrated power and energy systems solutions for naval 
ships and vessels.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.5 
million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 62123N for electric propulsion 
research.

Energy resilience research

    The budget request included $20.3 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which 
$119.5 million was for PE 62123N Force Protection Applied 
Research.
    The committee notes that, as the Navy develops and fields 
increasing numbers of high-power sensors and weapon systems, 
the importance of the energy resilience of these systems 
continues to increase. Energy resilient systems will improve 
performance, reduce costs, and reduce logistical burdens on 
operational forces.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 62123N for energy resilience 
research.

Force protection applied research

    The budget request included $119.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 62123N 
Force Protection Applied Research.
    The committee supports a program reduction to increase 
coordination of activities in material research across the 
Department of Defense to reduce duplication of effort.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 62123N.

Test bed for autonomous ship systems

    The budget request included $20.3 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which 
$119.5 million was for PE 62123N Force Protection Applied 
Research.
    The committee understands that autonomous naval vessels 
could be required to operate for more than a month between 
performances of human-assisted maintenance. As a result, the 
machinery on such vessels must be robust, resilient, and 
reliable, requiring the ability to avoid failures, repair 
damage, and redirect systems as needed.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $8.0 
million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 62123N.

Interdisciplinary cyber research

    The budget request included $56.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 62131M 
Marine Corps Landing Force Technology.
    The committee notes the importance of cybersecurity to 
long-term national security needs and supports increased 
interdisciplinary cybersecurity research. The committee 
believes that long-term science and technology cyber research 
is critical for developing capabilities that will enable the 
warfighter to maintain dominance in cyberspace in the long run.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million, for a total of $59.6 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
62131M for interdisciplinary cyber research.

Common picture applied research

    The budget request included $49.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 62235N 
Common Picture Applied Research.
    The committee supports a program reduction in common 
picture applied research and encourages the Navy to increase 
coordination of space activities with other research activities 
throughout the Department of Defense.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $5.0 
million, for a total of $44.3 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
62235N.

Applied warfighter safety and performance research

    The budget request included $63.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 62236N 
Warfighter Sustainment Applied Research.
    The committee notes the importance of warfighter safety and 
performance research in enhancing the individual performance of 
elite operators under adverse and extreme conditions. The 
committee is aware that research to study and mitigate the 
effects of stresses to human safety, performance, and 
resilience, especially undersea, will result in better care for 
warfighters conducting missions that require exposure to 
extreme environments. The committee supports increased research 
to address undersea diving stresses, including: pressure 
extremes, extended low temperature exposure, neurologic 
dysfunction, and chemical and oxygen toxicity.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million, for a total of $65.8 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
62236N for applied warfighter safety and performance research.

Electromagnetic systems applied research

    The budget request included $83.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 62271N 
Electromagnetic Systems Applied Research.
    The committee supports a program reduction in 
electromagnetic systems applied research and encourages the 
Navy to increase coordination in electronic warfare activities 
with the rest of the Department of Defense's related activities 
to reduce duplication of effort.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $5.0 
million, for a total of $78.5 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
62271N.

Navy industry-university undersea vehicle technologies

    The budget request included $57.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 62747N 
Undersea Warfare Applied Research.
    The committee notes that the Center for Strategic and 
Budgetary Assessment's recent report titled ``The Emerging Era 
In Undersea Warfare'' noted that ``America's superiority in 
undersea warfare is the product of decades of research and 
development (R&D), a sophisticated defense industrial base, 
operational experience, and high-fidelity training. This 
superiority, however, is far from assured.'' The committee 
notes the importance of industry-university partnerships and 
recognizes their valuable role in advancing undersea vehicle 
technology to support undersea warfare capabilities.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $7.5 
million, for a total of $64.6 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
62747N for university-industry partnerships in applied research 
to support undersea warfare capabilities.

USMC Advanced Technology Demonstration (ATD)

    The budget request included $172.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 63640M 
United States Marine Corps Advanced Technology Demonstration.
    The committee supports a program reduction in order to 
consolidate efforts in artificial intelligence, machine 
learning, and similar areas in which separate research and 
development activities are occurring across the Services and to 
ensure coordination and reduce duplication of effort across the 
Department of Defense.
    The committee recommends a decrease of $5.0 million in 
RDT&E, Navy, for PE 63640M.

Mobile Unmanned/Manned Distributed Lethality Airborne Network

    The budget request included $172.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 63640M 
United States Marine Corps Advanced Technology Demonstration.
    The committee supports the development of capabilities to 
further the ability of aircraft, sensors, and command and 
control assets to share information and recognizes that the 
mobile unmanned/manned distributed lethality airborne network, 
one such capability, is listed on the Chief of Naval 
Operations' unfunded priority list. The committee is concerned 
that the lack of funding in fiscal year 2020 will delay the 
development of an objective system.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $9.0 
million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 63640M for the continued 
maturation and development of the mobile unmanned/manned 
distributed lethality airborne network.

Innovative Naval Prototypes (INP) advance technology development

    The budget request included $133.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 63801N 
Innovative Naval Prototypes advance technology development.
    The committee supports a program reduction in innovative 
naval prototype development in the area of electronic maneuver 
and encourages continued coordination of these efforts across 
the Department of Defense.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $5.0 
million, for a total of $127.3 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
63801N for naval prototype development in the area of 
electronic maneuver.

Littoral battlespace sensing autonomous undersea vehicle

    The budget request included $20.3 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $32.6 
million was for PE 63207N Air and Ocean Tactical Applications.
    The committee understands that additional funding could 
provide for the procurement of 1 additional REMUS 600 littoral 
battlespace sensing autonomous undersea vehicle, which would 
accelerate the achievement of Navy inventory goals.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $6.0 
million, for a total of $38.6 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
63207N.

Large unmanned surface vessels

    The budget request included $20.3 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which 
$507.0 million was for PE 63502N Surface and Shallow Water Mine 
Countermeasures.
    The committee notes that the budget request for this 
program element provides for the prototyping and testing of 
Large Unmanned Surface Vessels (LUSV), including procurement of 
two additional LUSVs in conjunction with a Strategic 
Capabilities Office (SCO) initiative, in project 3066. The 
committee understands that the two LUSVs procured by the SCO 
beginning in fiscal year 2018, at a cost of $237 million, are 
sufficient to achieve the objectives of the SCO initiative, 
which is scheduled to be completed in the fourth quarter of 
fiscal year 2021.
    The committee is concerned that the budget request's 
concurrent approach to LUSV design, technology development, and 
integration as well as a limited understanding of the LUSV 
concept of employment, requirements, and reliability for 
envisioned missions pose excessive acquisition risk for 
additional LUSV procurement in fiscal year 2020. The committee 
is also concerned by the unclear policy implications of LUSVs, 
including ill-defined international unmanned surface vessel 
standards and the legal status of armed or potentially armed 
LUSVs.
    Additionally, the committee notes that the Navy's ``Report 
to Congress on the Annual Long-Range Plan for Construction of 
Naval Vessels for Fiscal Year 2020'' acknowledges similar 
issues: ``Unmanned and optionally-manned systems are not 
accounted for in the overall battle force[.] . . . The physical 
challenges of extended operations at sea across the spectrum of 
competition and conflict, the concepts of operations for these 
platforms, and the policy challenges associated with employing 
deadly force from autonomous vehicles must be well understood 
prior to replacing accountable battle force ships.''
    The committee believes that further procurement of LUSVs 
should occur only after the lessons learned from the current 
SCO initiative have been incorporated into the next 
solicitation to enable incremental risk reduction.
    In addition, the committee believes that the LUSV program, 
which appears likely to exceed the Major Defense Acquisition 
Program cost threshold, would benefit from a more rigorous 
requirements definition process, analysis of alternatives, and 
deliberate acquisition strategy.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $372.5 
million, for a total of $134.5 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
63502N.

Advanced submarine system development

    The budget request included $20.3 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which 
$148.8 million was for PE 63561N Advanced Submarine System 
Development.
    The committee understands that emergent repairs are needed 
at the Acoustic Research Detachment located in Bayview, Idaho, 
to prevent delays in critical test programs.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million, for a total of $153.8 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
63561N.

Large Surface Combatant concept advanced design

    The budget request included $20.3 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $81.8 
million was for PE 63563N Ship Concept Advanced Design.
    The committee notes that the Chief of Naval Operations 
stated in March 2019, referring to the next Large Surface 
Combatant (LSC) class of ships, that the ``. . . first question 
that we have to do is prove to ourselves that we need a large 
surface combatant. What is the unique contribution of something 
like that in the face of all these emerging technologies? Right 
now the discussions point to the fact that it brings a unique 
capability in terms of hous[ing] larger types of weapons, 
larger missiles; you certainly get more aperture on a bigger 
sensor[.]''
    Given the uncertain requirements for the next LSC class of 
ships and the lack of clarity on the new systems under 
consideration for such class, including the associated 
technical maturity of such systems, the committee believes that 
funding design efforts for a new LSC class is early to need.
    The committee urges the Navy to identify capability gaps, 
set LSC requirements, and engage in robust component-level 
prototyping of potential new critical systems, including those 
related to propulsion, electrical distribution, radar, and 
missile launching systems, prior to initiating LSC design 
efforts.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $24.0 
million, for a total of $57.8 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
63563N.

Large Surface Combatant preliminary design

    The budget request included $20.3 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $69.1 
million was for PE 63564N Ship Preliminary Design and 
Feasibility Studies.
    The committee notes that the Chief of Naval Operations 
stated in March 2019, referring to the next Large Surface 
Combatant (LSC) class of ships, that the ``... first question 
that we have to do is prove to ourselves that we need a large 
surface combatant. What is the unique contribution of something 
like that in the face of all these emerging technologies? Right 
now the discussions point to the fact that it brings a unique 
capability in terms of hous[ing] larger types of weapons, 
larger missiles; you certainly get more aperture on a bigger 
sensor[.]''
    Given the uncertain requirements for the next LSC class of 
ships and the lack of clarity on the new systems under 
consideration for such class, including the associated 
technical maturity of such systems, the committee believes that 
funding design efforts for a new LSC class is early to need.
    The committee urges the Navy to identify capability gaps, 
set LSC requirements, and engage in robust component-level 
prototyping of potential new critical systems, including those 
related to propulsion, electrical distribution, radar, and 
missile launching systems, prior to initiating LSC design 
efforts.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $46.6 
million, for a total of $22.5 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
63564N.

Advanced surface machinery system component prototyping

    The budget request included $20.3 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $25.4 
million was for PE 63573N Advanced Surface Machinery Systems.
    The committee notes the Chief of Naval Operations stated in 
March 2019, referring to the next Large Surface Combatant (LSC) 
class of ships, that the ``. . . first question that we have to 
do is prove to ourselves that we need a large surface 
combatant. What is the unique contribution of something like 
that in the face of all these emerging technologies? Right now 
the discussions point to the fact that it brings a unique 
capability in terms of hous[ing] larger types of weapons, 
larger missiles; you certainly get more aperture on a bigger 
sensor[.]''
    In addition, in testimony before the Subcommittee on 
Seapower on March 27, 2019, the Assistant Secretary of the Navy 
for Research, Development, and Acquisition stated in response 
to a question related to actions necessary to improve 
acquisition performance on lead ships, ``The second piece is 
really improved sub-system prototyping like we have done on 
Columbia. Try and get everything prototyped as soon as we can. 
[The Navy] learn[ed] some lessons on Ford by not having land-
based prototypes for all the subsystems.'' The committee 
supports the Assistant Secretary's intent to improve sub-system 
prototyping well in advance of difficult-to-reverse ship design 
decision points.
    The committee urges the Navy to identify capability gaps, 
set LSC requirements, and engage in robust component-level 
prototyping of potential new critical systems, including those 
related to propulsion, electrical distribution, radar, and 
missile launching systems, prior to initiating LSC design 
efforts.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $125.0 
million, for a total of $150.4 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
63573N for advanced surface machinery system component 
prototyping.

Columbia-class submarines

    The budget request included $20.3 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which 
$419.1 million was for PE 63595N Columbia-class submarines.
    The committee understands that additional funding could 
enable reductions in the production time and cost of propulsor 
components for Columbia-class submarines through development of 
composites technology.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $15.0 
million, for a total of $434.1 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
63595N.

Littoral Combat Ship mission modules

    The budget request included $20.3 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which 
$108.5 million was for PE 63596N Littoral Combat Ship (LCS) 
mission modules.
    The committee notes that an operational testing period of 
the surface warfare mission package was delayed from fiscal 
year 2018 to fiscal year 2019.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $5.0 
million, for a total of $103.5 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
63596N for LCS mission modules.

U.S. Marine Corps Additive Manufacturing Logistics Software Pilot 
        Program

    The budget request included $4.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 64289M 
Next Generation Logistics.
    The committee notes that the U.S. Marine Corps (USMC) has 
fielded 165 3D Printers, 5 metal printers, and 1 prototype 
concrete printer across the fleet and is seeing great benefit 
from their use through innovative programs like Marine Maker. 
However, the digital infrastructure to create, support, 
document, and provide a digital thread, digital twin, and 
augmented reality capability for the parts being manufactured 
and used is non-existent. The USMC needs an Additive 
Manufacturing Logistics Software Pilot Program and formally 
highlighted this need in its unfunded priorities list. The 
pilot program would use commercial-off-the-shelf software and 
services to support several use cases and lay the groundwork 
for providing the digital infrastructure for all USMC next 
generation additive manufacturing activities. Funding would 
cover government costs, software procurement, and services 
support work at multiple US locations.
    The committee recommends an increase of $9.0 million, for a 
total of $13.4 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 64289M to fund 
the USMC Additive Manufacturing Logistics Software Pilot 
Program.

Nuclear sea-launched cruise missile

    The budget request included $20.3 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $19.7 
million was for PE 64659N for the Precision Strike Weapon 
Development Program. Of this, $5.0 million was designated for a 
nuclear sea-launched cruise missile analysis of alternatives 
(AoA).
    The committee recommends an increase of $5.0 million for 
this AoA, for a total of $24.7 million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
64659N.

V-22 nacelle improvement program

    The budget request included $185.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 64262N 
for the V-22.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Common 
Configuration-Readiness and Modernization (CC-RAM) nacelle 
improvement program for better reliability and commonality 
across the fleet of V-22s. Reduced vibrations in nacelles 
decreases maintenance degraders and costs while increasing 
readiness rates. The committee encourages the Navy and Marine 
Corps to test, develop, and incorporate active vibration 
control systems for the V-22 nacelles as part of the overall 
nacelle improvement program.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.5 
million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 64262N for nacelle improvements 
on the V-22.

Mine Development--Quickstrike JDAM ER

    The budget request included $29.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 64601N 
Mine Development. The Chief of Naval Operations requested 
funding in his unfunded priorities list for the Quickstrike 
Joint Direct Attack Munition Extended Range (JDAM ER).
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $71.3 
million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 64601N for the Quickstrike JDAM 
ER.

Information Technology Development

    The budget request included $384.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 65013N 
Information Technology Development, including $55.4 million for 
Electronic Procurement System.
    The committee is concerned about developing unnecessarily 
bespoke contract writing systems and processes.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $55.4 
million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 65013N.

CH-53K King Stallion program

    The budget request included $517.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 65212M 
CH-53K RDTE.
    The committee recognizes that the U.S. Marine Corps 
validated a requirement for heavy-lift expeditionary rotary 
wing aviation to support ship-to-shore, shore-to-shore, and 
shore-to-ship movement of personnel and equipment. The 
committee recently approved an above-threshold reprogramming 
request for additional funding to continue developmental 
testing external to the fiscal year 2020 budgeting cycle.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $10.0 
million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 65212M.

Ship to Shore Connector

    The budget request included $20.3 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $4.9 
million was for PE 65220N Ship to Shore Connector.
    The committee understands that additional funding could 
enable quality improvements and cost reductions in the Ship to 
Shore Connector and Landing Craft Air Cushioned programs 
through expanded development and use of composite materials.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $15.0 
million, for a total of $19.9 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
65220N.

Transformational Reliable Acoustic Path Systems

    The budget request included $20.4 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $88.4 
million was requested for PE 24311N Integrated Surveillance 
System.
    The committee notes that, since fiscal year 2015, the Navy 
has utilized Transformational Reliable Acoustic Path Systems 
(TRAPS) in anti-submarine warfare missions. The committee 
understands that these deployable systems have performed 
satisfactorily and comprise a critical element of the Navy's 
overall integrated undersea surveillance system. The committee 
is concerned that capability or capacity gaps may result if 
additional TRAPS units are not procured in fiscal year 2020.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $15.0 
million, for a total of $103.4 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
24311N for TRAPS.

Intelligent Power Management Systems

    The budget request included $37.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 26624M 
Marine Corps Combat Services Support, of which $3.0 million is 
for Marine Air Ground Task Force (MAGTF) Combat Service Support 
Element & Supporting Establishment (CSSE & SE).
    The committee recognizes the need for the Marine Corps to 
reduce logistical requirements in forward deployed areas. 
Intelligent Power Management Systems (IPMS) provide a robust, 
modular, and scalable solution to interconnect, control, store, 
and distribute power from various sources. As a result, with 
IPMS, power requirements will be met in a more efficient manner 
by matching power production to load demand, reducing spinning 
reserve, extending maintenance cycle times, and reducing fuel 
consumption.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 26624M for MAGTF CSSE & SE.

                               Air Force


High energy X-ray materials structures research

    The budget request included $128.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
62102F applied research in advanced materials.
    The committee notes the importance of advanced materials 
high energy X-ray research for better understanding the 
characteristics and performance of advanced materials and 
structures for Air Force missions, including high temperature 
engine materials, advanced sensors, and aerodynamic systems. 
The committee notes that the Department of Defense would 
benefit from leveraging National Science Federation and 
Department of Energy investments in facilities to support Air 
Force research needs.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $4.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 62102F for high energy x-
ray materials structures research.

Materials research

    The budget request included $128.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
62102F applied research in materials.
    The committee notes that there is duplicative funding for 
material research within the budget request and encourages 
increased coordination within the Department of Defense.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $10.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 62102F.

Aerospace Vehicle Technologies

    The budget request included $147.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
62201F aerospace vehicle technologies.
    The committee believes that the increase of these 
activities is not fully aligned with other efforts and supports 
a reduction in program growth for aerospace vehicle 
technologies.
    The committee recommends a decrease of $10.0 million in 
RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 62201F.

Counter unmanned aerial systems research

    The budget request included $181.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
62788F dominant information sciences and methods.
    The committee notes that counter-swarm capabilities are 
becoming more critical for Department of Defense (DOD) force 
protection. Currently, various development and acquisition 
activities are underway to counter the swarming unmanned 
aircraft systems (UAS) threat, and DOD entities are currently 
testing several potential system solutions, but, to date, no 
approach provides a complete answer to the threat. The 
committee further notes the importance of increased cyber 
research and supports increasing cyber and communications 
research to support counter-UAS capabilities.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.5 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 62788F for counter-UAS 
research.

Cyberspace dominance technology research

    The budget request included $181.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
62788F dominant information sciences and methods.
    The committee notes the importance of increased support for 
academic cyber institutes to meet long-term national security 
needs in support of the National Defense Strategy. The 
committee believes that long-term science and technology cyber 
research is critical to developing capabilities that will 
enable the warfighter to maintain dominance in cyberspace in 
the long run. The committee also understands that the 
Department of Defense requires technologies to deliver a full 
range of options in cyberspace, akin to its current air and sea 
dominance programs, to achieve cyber dominance.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 62788F for research in 
cyberspace dominance technology research.

Quantum science research

    The budget request included $181.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
62788F dominant information sciences and methods.
    The committee notes the importance of quantum science 
research for the implementation of the National Defense 
Strategy and in the priorities of the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Research and Engineering. This technical area shows 
great promise in enhancing defense capabilities in 
communications, computing, cryptography, and countless other 
areas. The committee notes that there is a global competition 
for preeminence in this emerging field.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 62788F for quantum science 
research.

High power microwave research

    The budget request included $44.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
62890F High Energy Laser Research.
    The committee supports increased research in high power 
microwaves as an element of an emerging set of directed energy 
technologies that support the National Defense Strategy and the 
priorities of the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering. High powered microwave capabilities could defeat 
adversary electronics systems and create other battlefield 
effects.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 62890F for additional high 
powered microwave research.

Metals affordability research

    The budget request included $36.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
63112F Advanced Materials for Weapon Systems.
    The committee notes that the Metals Affordability 
Initiative is a collaborative effort, which includes the entire 
domestic specialty aerospace metals industrial manufacturing 
base, to ensure the continued advancement of metals 
technologies for the defense and commercial sectors and 
continues to grow a robust and responsive aerospace metals 
domestic supply base that provides critical turbine engine, 
airframe, and space components at lower cost and with shortened 
production lead times.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million, for a total of $38.6 million, in RDT&E, Air Force, for 
PE 63112F for metals affordability research.

Acceleration of development of hypersonic quick reaction capability and 
        hypersonic airbreathing weapon

    The budget request included $102.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
63211F Aerospace Technology Development/Demonstration.
    The committee notes that the development of hypersonics 
capabilities is a key element of the National Defense Strategy 
and represents an area of intense technological competition 
between the United States, People's Republic of China, and 
Russian Federation. The committee is encouraged by and 
supportive of the Air Force's activities in hypersonic weapons.
    However, the committee is concerned that there is a lack of 
focus on air-launched and air-breathing hypersonic capability 
inside the Department of Defense. Therefore, the committee 
recommends an increase of $75.0 million in RDT&E, Air Force, 
for PE 63211F for the continued development and transition of 
the Hypersonic Air Breathing Weapons Concept.

Shape morphing aircraft structures development

    The budget request included $102.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
63211F Aerospace Technology Development/Demonstrations.
    The committee notes ongoing research that supports the 
design and manufacture of shape-morphing aircraft control 
surfaces, including wings, winglets, inlets, and stabilizers 
that have demonstrated reduced drag, increased fuel savings, 
and decreased maintenance requirements for Air Force platforms. 
The committee believes that research in this area will support 
improving the performance of and reducing operational and life 
cycle costs for air platforms.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 63211F for research in 
shape morphing materials for active winglets.

Combat Search and Rescue advanced prototyping

    The budget request included $102.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
63211F Aerospace Technology Development/Demonstration.
    The committee supports the Chief of Staff of the Air 
Force's request for additional funds for a high speed vertical 
lift demonstration, such as Agility Prime, to prove the 
employment of non-runway jet operations in a contested 
environment, which could be crucial to the Air Force's ability 
to develop a lethal, agile, and resilient force posture and 
employment.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $25.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 63211F for the continued 
development of Agility Prime.

Low Cost Attributable Aircraft Technology

    The budget request included $102.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
63211F Aerospace Technology Development/Demonstration.
    The committee supports the Assistant Secretary of the Air 
Force for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics' intent to 
accelerate the Air Force Research Laboratory's Low-Cost 
Attributable Aircraft Technology (LCAAT) program for 
collaborative pairing with manned platforms, potentially 
including the F-35. The committee views the combined 
application of commercial technology, autonomy, and artificial 
intelligence as an innovative solution to meeting the demands 
of the National Defense Strategy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $100.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 63211F for the continued 
development and transition of the LCAAT.

Aerospace propulsion and power technology

    The budget request included $114.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
63216F Aerospace Propulsion and Power Technology.
    The committee understands the importance of developing and 
demonstrating core engine technologies for small turbines used 
in current and future aircraft, missile, and remotely piloted 
aircraft propulsion systems. The committee believes that 
improved technologies in this area could reduce cost, improve 
mission flexibility, and increase aircraft range.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million, for a total of $124.0 million, in RDT&E, Air Force, 
for PE 63216F.

Electronic combat technology

    The budget request included $48.4 million for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
63270F Electronic Combat Technology.
    The committee notes that there is duplicative electronic 
warfare and positioning, navigation, and timing research being 
performed across the Department of Defense and encourages 
increased coordination to reduce duplication of effort.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $10.0 
million, for a total of $38.4 million, in RDT&E, Air Force, for 
PE 63270F.

Advanced spacecraft technology

    The budget request included $70.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
63401F Advanced Spacecraft Technology.
    The committee understands that the Department of Defense 
(DOD) relies extensively on weapons and communication systems 
that must operate in environments with high levels of ambient 
radiation. The committee notes a lack of commercially available 
technologies that meet these requirements and also notes the 
importance of DOD research on strategic radiation hardened 
microelectronic processors.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million, for a total of $73.5 million, in RDT&E, Air Force, for 
PE 63401F for advanced research on radiation-tolerant systems.

Advanced materials and materials manufacturing

    The budget request included $43.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
63680F Manufacturing Technology Program.
    The committee notes the importance of supporting 
mitigations for industrial base vulnerabilities, including 
those identified in the September 2018 Department of Defense 
report titled ``Assessing and Strengthening the Manufacturing 
and Defense Industrial Base and Supply Chain Resiliency of the 
United States'' and the August 2018 MITRE Corporation report 
titled ``Deliver Uncompromised: A Strategy for Supply Chain 
Security and Resilience in Response to the Changing Character 
of War.'' The committee notes that strong partnerships between 
academia and the aerospace industry can support original 
equipment manufacturers with research and development in 
advanced materials.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $7.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 63680F.

Battlespace knowledge and development demonstration

    The budget request included $56.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
63788F Battlespace Knowledge Development and Demonstration.
    The committee notes the importance of increased cyber 
applied research and supports increasing cyber and command and 
control research. The committee believes that long-term science 
and technology cyber research is critical to developing 
capabilities that will enable the warfighter to maintain 
dominance in cyberspace in the long run.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million, for a total of $64.4 million, in RDT&E, Air Force, for 
PE 63788F for increased cyber applied research.

M-Code acceleration--advanced component development & prototypes

    The budget request included $92.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
64201F Positioning, Navigation, and Timing Resiliency, 
Modifications, and Improvements.
    The committee understands the importance of the ability of 
the Global Positioning System (GPS) to provide resilient 
position, navigation, and timing capability to the Joint Force 
and acknowledges GPS Military-Code receiver development's 
presence on the Chief of Staff of the Air Force's unfunded 
priorities list.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $32.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 64201F for Embedded GPS/
Inertial Navigation System modernization.

Rapid repair and sustainability increase

    The budget request included $128.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
64858F Tech Transition Program.
    The committee notes that advanced repair and qualification 
processes can repair parts damaged, worn, or corroded in 
service without introducing undesirable distortion. The 
committee further notes that additional funds are needed to 
establish a means to qualify repair components to increase 
readiness by bringing systems back into service faster.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $6.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 64858F for rapid repair and 
sustainability.

Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent

    The budget request included $570.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
65230F Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent (GBSD).
    The committee understands that the Air Force has chosen to 
consolidate an existing program into a similar element of the 
GBSD and that this approach will reduce risk and may save $850 
million across the life of the programs.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $22.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 65230F.

Light Attack experiment

    The budget request included $35.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
27100F Light Attack Armed Reconnaissance Squadrons.
    The committee supports the increase of combat capability 
and readiness at a reduced cost and the development of advanced 
capabilities for close air support, armed reconnaissance, 
strike coordination and reconnaissance, airborne forward air 
control, and interdiction. The committee also supports the 
Department of Defense's intent to lower the cost of countering 
violent extremism in accordance with the National Security 
Strategy. However, the committee is concerned that the pace of 
research and prototyping in this area has not kept pace with 
the threat or the current capability available to the 
Department.
    Additionally, the committee is aware that, on a modern 
battlefield, it is expected that friendly forces will be in 
close proximity to the enemy and will require integrated joint 
fires in order to achieve the effects demanded by the Joint 
Force Commander. The committee believes that the Department of 
Defense has been slow to develop and field capabilities to 
provide battlefield situational awareness of enemy and friendly 
actors. The committee is also aware of current technical 
solutions that would provide the required identification of 
friend and foe in environments, like that in which close air 
support is demanded, in which the friendly forces are in close 
proximity to the enemy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $50.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE27100F to conduct additional 
RDT&E.

Cyber National Mission Force capabilities

    The budget request included $198.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
36250F Cyber Operations Technology Development.
    The committee is aware of the growing capabilities needed 
to counter adversaries in the cyberspace domain as highlighted 
in the National Defense Strategy. The committee supports 
continued development of capabilities for the cyber warfighter 
and understands the importance of improving the capabilities of 
the Cyber Mission Force. The committee therefore supports the 
request of U.S. Cyber Command to increase funding for the Cyber 
National Mission Force Capability Acceleration Plan.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $13.6 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 36250F to accelerate the 
development of Cyber National Mission Force capabilities.

ETERNALDARKNESS program development

    The budget request included $198.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
36250F Cyber Operations Technology Development.
    The committee is aware of the growing capabilities needed 
to counter adversaries in the cyberspace domain as highlighted 
in the National Defense Strategy. The committee supports 
continued development of capabilities for the cyber warfighter 
and understands the importance of improving the capabilities of 
the Cyber Mission Force. The committee therefore supports the 
request of U.S. Cyber Command to increase funding to develop 
the ETERNALDARKNESS program.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $7.1 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 36250F for the 
ETERNALDARKNESS program.

Joint Common Access Platform

    The budget request included $198.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
36250F Cyber Operations Technology Development.
    The committee is aware of the growing capabilities needed 
to counter adversaries in the cyberspace domain as highlighted 
in the National Defense Strategy. The committee supports 
continued development of capabilities for the cyber warfighter 
and understands the importance of improving the capabilities of 
the Cyber Mission Force. The committee therefore supports the 
request of U.S. Cyber Command to increase funding to develop 
the Joint Common Access Platform to be used by the Cyber 
Mission Force.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $20.5 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 36250F for the Joint Common 
Access Platform.

Protected Tactical Enterprise Service

    The budget request included $105.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
1206760F Protected Tactical Enterprise Service (PTES).
    The committee is concerned that the prototype development 
of PTES, which constitutes $72.5 million of the overall 
request, has experienced unjustified growth.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $10.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 1206760F.

Protected Tactical Service

    The budget request included $173.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
1206761F Protected Tactical Service (PTS).
    The committee is concerned that the rapid prototyping of 
PTS, which constitutes $111.8 million of the overall request, 
has experienced unjustified growth.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $10.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 1206761F.

ERWn

    The budget request included $246.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
64200F Aerospace Technology Development/Demonstration.
    The committee acknowledges the importance of the mission of 
the Extended Range Weapons program; however, the committee 
understands that the Air Force is moving away from prototyping 
to an ongoing analysis of alternatives to better understand 
alternative technical solutions.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $149.1 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 64200F.

M-Code acceleration--system development & demonstration

    The budget request included $67.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
64201F Positioning, Navigation, and Timing Resiliency, 
Modifications, and Improvements.
    The committee understands the importance of the ability of 
the Global Positioning System (GPS) to provide resilient 
position, navigation, and timing capability to the Joint Force 
and acknowledges GPS Military-Code receiver development's 
presence on the Chief of Staff of the Air Force's unfunded 
priorities list.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $81.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 64201F for system 
development and demonstration.

Space Fence

    The budget request included no funding in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
1206426F Space Fence.
    The committee understands that the Air Force is still 
considering procurement of a second Space Fence site, which is 
an option in the Department of Defense's Space Fence contract. 
Given the knowledge gained during the development of the first 
Space Fence site and the importance of developing an effective 
space situational awareness capability, the committee 
recommends that the Air Force evaluate construction of a second 
Space Fence site.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $20.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 1206426F for the completion 
of the second Space Fence design in order to fully understand 
its associated costs.

Major T&E Investment

    The budget request included $181.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
64759F Major Test and Evaluation Investment.
    The committee recognizes the important role that space test 
infrastructure plays in initially testing and evaluating the 
capability and resilience of Department of Defense space 
systems in a contested environment. The committee also notes 
the presence of foundational infrastructure elements used to 
test both terrestrial and space-based assets on the Chief of 
Staff of the Air Force's unfunded priorities list. The 
committee believes that this infrastructure should support 
testing of a comprehensive survey of systems.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase in $36.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 64759F for space test 
infrastructure.

Utah test range instrumentation

    The budget request included $181.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
64759F Major Test and Evaluation Investment.
    The committee notes that the Department of Defense has 
indicated that the capability to conduct test and evaluation 
over broad geographic areas must include net-centric and 
distributed test capability. Modernized test facility data 
systems must integrate modeling and simulation with operations, 
training, and flight tests to achieve the required level of 
complexity and realism.
    The committee recommends an increase of $15.0 million in 
RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 64759F for enhancements of Utah test 
range instrumentation for software-configurable test systems 
that address current and future Department of Defense data 
requirements.

Investment in hypersonic research and infrastructure

    The budget request included $717.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
65807F Test and Evaluation Support.
    The committee notes that the development of hypersonic 
capabilities is a key element of the National Defense Strategy 
and represents an area of intense technological competition 
between the United States, People's Republic of China, and 
Russian Federation. The committee remains concerned that more 
attention needs to be focused on the expedient development and 
maturation of key hypersonic flight technologies. In addition 
to the need to improve ground-based test facilities such as 
wind tunnels, the Department of Defense (DOD) also needs to 
increase its flight test rate to expedite the maturation and 
fielding of hypersonic technologies. The combination of ground-
based testing and flight testing is critical to fully maturing 
the fundamental technologies needed to field a hypersonic 
flight system. High-rate hypersonic flight test programs would 
help mature six critical technology areas:
          (1) Thermal protection systems and high temperature 
        flight structures;
          (2) Seekers and sensors for hypersonic vehicles;
          (3) Advanced navigation, guidance, and control;
          (4) Communications and data links;
          (5) High speed aerodynamic characterization; and
          (6) Advanced avionics and vehicle communication 
        systems for hypersonic vehicles.
    To address this concern, the committee believes that the 
DOD must increase investment in research and test 
infrastructure. Therefore, the committee recommends an 
additional $5.0 million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 65807F for 
the High-Speed Systems Test activity. Further, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to report to the congressional 
defense committees, by June 1, 2020, on how the DOD plans to 
improve its test infrastructure and increase its flight test 
rate in fiscal year 2020 and beyond and the budget profile 
necessary to implement this plan.

5G Military Operational Test Capability

    The budget request included $717.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
65807F Test and Evaluation Support.
    The committee notes the Defense Science Board's 
recommendation to build a secure fifth generation (5G) wireless 
network on a Department of Defense (DOD) installation. The 
committee recognizes the revolutionary effect that 5G 
technology will have on the Department but is concerned that 
the DOD lacks the ability to test and develop tactics to 
leverage 5G technology as well as to negate enemy use of this 
advanced capability.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $49.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 65807F for the 
establishment of a 5G test network and associated 
infrastructure at the Nevada Test and Training Range.

Advanced Battle Management System base architecture

    The budget request included $35.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
64003F Advanced Battle Management System (ABMS).
    The committee notes the potential of secure fifth 
generation (5G) wireless networks for moving large amounts of 
data with very low latency. The Defense Science Board 
recommended building secure 5G wireless networks on a base in 
order to understand the potential of these advanced networks. 
The committee recognizes the revolutionary effect that 5G 
technology will have on the Department of Defense and the 
potential for use for data transfer for the ABMS. However, the 
committee is concerned that the Department lacks the base 
infrastructure to test, develop, and leverage 5G technology.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $49.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 64003F for the 
establishment of a 5G base network that could be used for ABMS 
at an Air Force installation in the continental U.S.

Air Force Integrated Personnel and Pay System

    The budget request included $40.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
65018F Air Force Integrated Personnel and Pay System.
    The committee is concerned about poor agile implementation 
and infrequent capability delivery.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $40.6 
million, for a total of $0.0 million, in RDT&E, Air Force, for 
PE 65018F.

                              HC-130 RDT&E

    The budget request included $17.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
65278F HC/MC-130 Recapitalization RDT&E.
    The committee supports the program and the modernization of 
current aircraft to meet the requirements of the National 
Defense Strategy. The committee understands that the program 
requirements have changed and that the current request is above 
need for this fiscal year.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $12.4 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 65278F.

Airborne Launch Control System Replacement

    The budget request included $129.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
11213F Minuteman Squadrons, which includes the Airborne Launch 
Control System-Replacement (ALCS-R) program.
    The committee understands that the Air Force has chosen to 
consolidate the ALCS-R program into the Ground-Based Strategic 
Deterrent program and that this approach will reduce risk and 
may save $850 million across the life of the programs. The 
committee encourages the Air Force to ensure careful 
sustainment of the existing ALCS systems before they are 
replaced.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $22.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 11213F.

Advanced data transport flight test

    The budget request included $0.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
31004F.
    The committee supports the development of capabilities to 
advance the ability of aircraft, sensors, and command and 
control assets to share information. The committee also 
understands that the development of this type of capability 
requires live flight testing.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $21.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 31004F to conduct live 
flight testing of the concept and associated capabilities.

ISR automation

    The budget request included $19.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
35022F Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance 
Modernization and Automation Development.
    The committee supports the idea of modernizing the 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance enterprise and 
the continued use of prototyping to reduce technological risk.
    However, the committee is concerned with the fidelity of 
the current plan. Therefore, the committee recommends a 
decrease of $19.0 million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 35022F.

                              Defense Wide


Defense Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research

    The budget request included $48.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
61110D8Z basic research initiatives.
    The committee notes the importance of basic research in 
meeting long-term national security needs and supports the 
Defense Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research 
(DEPSCOR) efforts to expand the base of universities and states 
that support defense research and innovation missions. The 
committee notes that this program is attempting to engage 
faculty and students from DEPSCOR state universities through 
partnerships with defense research programs and defense 
laboratories.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million, for a total of $58.9 million, in RDT&E, Defense-wide, 
for PE 61110D8Z for DEPSCOR.

Submarine industrial base workforce development

    The budget request included $92.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
61120D8Z National Defense Education Program.
    The committee notes the current shortfall in Columbia-class 
technical workforce and supports increased submarine industrial 
base workforce training and education to make up for this 
shortfall.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million, for a total of $102.1 million, in RDT&E, Defense-wide, 
for PE 61120D8Z for submarine industrial base workforce 
development.

Aerospace education and research

    The budget request included $30.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
61228D8Z basic research at historically black colleges and 
universities and minority institutions.
    The committee notes the importance of fundamental 
scientific knowledge and the pipeline of highly qualified 
technical talent related to long-term national security needs. 
The committee supports increased funding for aerospace 
education and research activities at Historically Black 
Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions to promote the 
expansion of the future aerospace technical workforce, 
especially among U.S. citizens and to enhance research in areas 
including fatigue damage tolerance, experimental aerodynamics, 
and the performance of materials and components under extreme 
environmental conditions.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million, for a total of $32.7 million, in RDT&E, Defense-wide, 
for PE 61228D8Z for aerospace education and research.

Computer modeling of PFAS

    The budget request included $62.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
62251D8Z applied research for the advancement of science and 
technology priorities.
    The committee notes the potential for advanced computer 
modeling to improve the characterization and understanding of 
per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and supports an 
increase in applied research in computational biology research 
efforts to meet long-term national security needs in support of 
the National Defense Strategy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 62251D8Z for government-
university-industry partnerships in computer modeling of PFAS.

Cyber Security Research

    The budget request included $15.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
62668D8Z cyber security research.
    The committee notes the importance of increased support for 
academic cyber institutes in meeting long-term national 
security needs in support of the National Defense Strategy. The 
committee believes that long-term science and technology cyber 
research is critical to developing capabilities that will 
enable the warfighter to maintain dominance in cyberspace in 
the long run.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million, for a total of $25.1 million, in RDT&E, Defense-wide, 
for PE 62668D8Z.

Artificial intelligence commercial solutions

    The budget request included $29.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test and Evaluation, Defense-wide, for PE 
0603342D8Z Defense Innovation Unit (DIU).
    The committee notes the importance of accelerating 
Artificial Intelligence (AI) applications in support of the 
Joint Artificial Intelligence Center's (JAIC) National Mission 
Initiatives, including disaster response and predictive 
maintenance. The committee supports the use of commercial 
artificial intelligence (AI) solutions and urges the DIU to 
coordinate with the JAIC to identify problem sets facing the 
Department of Defense and to seek commercial AI solutions.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $7.5 
million for PE 0603342D8Z to accelerate AI commercial 
solutions.

Joint capability technology demonstrations

    The budget request included $107.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
63648D8Z joint capability technology demonstrations.
    The committee supports a program reduction in joint 
capability technology demonstrations due to a lack of 
coordination of activities across the Department of Defense.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $17.5 
million, for a total of $89.9 million, in RDT&E, Defense-wide, 
for PE 63648D8Z.

Emerging capabilities technology development

    The budget request included $80.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
63699D8Z emerging capabilities technology development.
    The committee supports a program reduction in emerging 
capability technology development due to concerns about 
duplication of efforts across the Department of Defense.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $10.0 
million, for a total of $70.9 million, in RDT&E, Defense-wide, 
for PE 63699D8Z.

SERDP increase

    The budget request included $5.2 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, of 
which $66.2 million was for PE 63716D8Z Strategic Environmental 
Research and Development Program (SERDP).
    The committee notes that both SERDP and the Environmental 
Security Technology Certification Program (ESTCP) develop, 
demonstrate, and validate the most promising innovative 
technologies that can meet the Department's most urgent 
requirements, provide a return on investment, and are executed 
through free and open competitions. The committee directs the 
Department to use the increases in SERDP to address the 
following urgent concerns: (1) Help ensure the safety and 
welfare of the servicemembers and their dependents by 
eliminating or reducing the generation of pollution and use of 
hazardous materials and reducing the cost of remedial actions 
and compliance with environmental laws and regulations, 
specifically as it relates to per- and polyfluoroakyl 
substances; (2) Develop, demonstrate, validate, and field 
fluorine-free firefighting foam; (3) Develop, demonstrate, and 
validate long-term energy storage batteries tied to distributed 
energy assets; and (4) Develop other technologies deemed 
appropriate.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 63716D8Z for SERDP.

Program increase to support National Defense Strategy technologies

    The budget request included $175.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
63941D8Z test and evaluation science and technology.
    The committee notes that the Department of Defense 
established the Test and Evaluation/Science and Technology 
Program in recognition of the development of advanced 
technology and transformational weapon systems, such as 
directed energy weapons and hypersonics, without corresponding 
advances in test technologies, such as means to measure 
directed energy effects or security testing of cloud computing 
environments. The committee further notes that in 2018 the 
People's Republic of China announced the construction of a 265 
meter long wind tunnel, which is to be complete by 2020, to 
simulate the acceleration environment from Mach 10 to Mach 25. 
China already has tunnels capable of simulating conditions 
between Mach 5 to 9. In contrast, the committee notes that, 
although the U.S. has hypersonic tunnels, most are small and 
designed for tests lasting less than a few seconds.
    The committee recommends an increase of $10.0 million in 
RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 63941D8Z to fund development of 
test capabilities to support high-priority National Defense 
Strategy technology development efforts.

ESTCP increase

    The budget request included $5.2 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, of 
which $66.6 million was for PE 63851D8Z Environmental Security 
Technology Certification Program (ESTCP).
    The committee notes that both the Strategic Environmental 
Research and Development Program (SERDP) and ESTCP develop, 
demonstrate, and validate the most promising innovative 
technologies that can meet the Department's most urgent 
requirements, provide a return on investment, and are executed 
through free and open competitions. The committee directs the 
Department to use the increases in SERDP to address the 
following urgent concerns: (1) Help ensure the safety and 
welfare of the servicemembers and their dependents by 
eliminating or reducing the generation of pollution and use of 
hazardous materials and reducing the cost of remedial actions 
and compliance with environmental laws and regulations, 
specifically as it relates to per- and polyfluoroakyl 
substances; (2) Develop, demonstrate, validate, and field 
fluorine-free firefighting foam; (3) Develop, demonstrate, and 
validate long-term energy storage batteries tied to distributed 
energy assets; and (4) Develop other technologies deemed 
appropriate.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 63716D8Z for SERDP.

MDA special programs

    The budget request included $377.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
63891C Missile Defense Agency (MDA) special programs.
    The committee recommends an increase of $125.0 million, for 
a total of $502.1 million, in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 
63891C.

Neutral particle beam

    The budget request included $303.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, in PE 
64115C for Missile Defense Agency (MDA) Technology Maturation 
Initiatives, of which $34.0 million was for a Neutral Particle 
Beam program.
    The committee notes that this program, intended for an on-
orbit demonstration within 5 years, would constitute a space-
based interceptor capability. The committee also notes that the 
2019 Missile Defense Review (MDR) tasked the MDA with a study 
of development and fielding of a space-based intercept 
capability, to be delivered to the Under Secretaries of Defense 
for Policy and Research and Engineering. According to the MDR, 
this study will, along with another study directed by the 
Deputy Secretary of Defense on boost-phase intercept 
capability, inform considerations regarding a space-based 
intercept layer for boost-phase defense. The committee believes 
that proceeding with any single technology program is premature 
before these studies are completed, the associated policy 
decisions are made concerning the operation of such a 
capability in space, and the relevant space-based sensor 
architecture is finalized.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $34.0 
million in PE 64115C, RDT&E, Defense-wide, Technology 
Maturation Initiatives, for a total of $269.5 million.

Hypervelocity Gun Weapon System

    The budget request contained $1.3 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
64250D8Z advanced innovative technologies of the Strategic 
Capabilities Office (SCO), of which no funds were requested for 
the Hypervelocity Gun Weapon System (HGWS).
    The committee notes that this system may be a promising 
pathway to provide more cost-effective point defense in theater 
and encourages the SCO to continue to prove out the capability 
in order to facilitate transition to one or more military 
departments.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $81.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 64250D8Z for HGWS.

Strategic Capabilities Office

    The budget request included $1.3 billion in Research, 
Development, Testing, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for 
PE 64250D8Z Advanced Innovative Technologies.
    The committee notes that the Strategic Capabilities Office 
(SCO) was established to support rapid development, 
prototyping, and deployment of operational capabilities to meet 
emerging threats in the U.S. Indo-Pacific area of 
responsibility. Since then, the SCO has drifted from its 
original purpose and has seen significant budget growth not 
commensurate with its transition success and has undertaken 
projects with questionable technical merit and operational 
utility. The committee recommends reductions in the following 
projects, LiTE Saber, Quiet Riot, and StormSystem.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a reduction of $50.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 64250D8Z.

Trusted and assured microeletronics

    The budget request included $542.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
64294D8Z trusted and assured microelectronics.
    The committee notes the importance of trusted and assured 
microelectronics research for many applications, including 
fifth-generation wireless networking microelectronics. The 
committee believes that it is important to develop technologies 
that could help in supply chain risk management.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million, for a total of $547.4 million, in RDT&E, Defense-wide, 
for PE 64294D8Z.

Rapid prototyping program

    The budget request included $101.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
64331D8Z rapid prototyping program.
    The committee notes that the Services and Defense Agencies 
are aggressively investing in prototyping activities, through 
programs using ``Section 804'' acquisition authorities, rapid 
capability offices, and shifting science and technology 
programs toward prototyping and away from innovation 
activities. The committee further notes that the Rapid 
Prototyping Fund, previously authorized by the Congress, is 
also funding prototyping activities. Finally, the committee 
notes that there is no central coordinating body in the 
Department of Defense to oversee its many prototyping efforts 
and ensure that they are focused on key issues, such as 
informing requirements development and assessing the technical 
feasibility of proposed technological approaches.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $50.0 
million, for a total of $51.0 million, in RDT&E, Defense-wide, 
for PE 64331D8Z.

Space Development Agency missile defense programs

    The budget request included $85.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, in PE 
1206410SDA, for Space Development Agency (SDA) Space Technology 
Development and Prototyping, of which $15.0 million was for a 
Space-Based Interceptor Study and $15.0 million was for a 
Space-Based Discrimination Study.
    The committee notes that the SDA was unable to provide 
further details on these two efforts at the time of the budget 
release. The committee further notes that elements of both 
studies appear to be duplicative of ongoing efforts within the 
Missile Defense Agency.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $30.0 
million in PE 1206410SDA, RDT&E, Defense-wide, Space Technology 
Development and Prototyping, for a total of $55.0 million.

Hypersonic and Ballistic Tracking Space Sensor

    The budget request included $27.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
1206895C Ballistic Missile Defense System (BMDS) Space Programs 
of the Missile Defense Agency (MDA), of which no funding was 
requested for a space-based sensor layer for missile defense 
purposes.
    The committee is deeply concerned about the growing threat 
posed by hypersonic glide and cruise missiles, which challenge 
existing sensor capabilities for both homeland and theater 
missile defenses. Integral to any defense against this threat 
is the ability to track low-flying or maneuverable missiles and 
glide vehicles, a mission that can only be performed 
effectively from space. The committee also notes that the 
space-based sensor technology would be required before a space-
based intercept layer-which was included in the budget request-
could be deployed.
    The committee notes that, after several years of consistent 
testimony from senior Department of Defense officials regarding 
the importance of space-based sensors for a missile defense 
capability, the Congress has strongly supported MDA's space-
based sensor program. Both the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) and 
the Department of Defense Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 
2019 (Public Law 115-245) increased funding for the Space 
Sensor Layer program from $0.0 to $73.0 million.
    Finally, the committee notes that this program, now called 
the Hypersonic and Ballistic Tracking Space Sensor, was 
included in the unfunded requirements lists of the MDA Director 
and the Commander of U.S. Strategic Command.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $108.0 
million, for a total of $135.6 million, in RDT&E, Defense-wide, 
for PE 1206895C.

Joint Mission Environment Test Capability

    The budget request included $83.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
65100D8Z Joint Mission Environment Test Capability.
    The committee notes the importance of cyber range 
development to meet future national security needs. The 
committee believes that cyber test range capabilities will be 
critical in training our warfighters to effectively counter the 
threats posed by our adversaries as specified in the National 
Defense Strategy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $6.0 
million, for a total of $89.1 million, in RDT&E, Defense-wide, 
for PE 65100D8Z.

Technical Studies, Support, and Analysis

    The budget request included $18.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
65104D8Z for technical studies and analyses.
    The committee recommends a reduction of $5.0 million in 
RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 65104D8Z.

Systems engineering

    The budget request included $37.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
65142D8Z systems engineering.
    The committee supports a program reduction in systems 
engineering due to the lack of coordination of efforts across 
the Department of Defense.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $5.0 
million, for a total of $32.1 million, in RDT&E, Defense-wide, 
for PE 65142D8Z for management support.

Defense Digital Service development support

    The budget request included $1.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
66589D8W Defense Digital Service (DDS) Development Support.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Defense 
Digital Service in helping the Department of Defense to build, 
buy, and deploy technology and digital services.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 66589D8W for additional 
development support activities.

Advanced manufacturing systems

    The budget request included $10.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
67210D8Z Industrial Base Analysis and Sustainment Support.
    The committee notes that the university research community 
has contributed significantly to the development of new defense 
capabilities, including in advanced manufacturing. The 
committee believes that the U.S. academic research enterprise 
should play a bigger role in promoting innovation in the 
defense industrial base.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 67210D8Z for 
interdisciplinary centers for research on advanced 
manufacturing.

Composite manufacturing technologies

    The budget request included $10.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
67210D8Z industrial base analysis and sustainment support.
    The committee notes that the September 2018 Department of 
Defense report titled ``Assessing and Strengthening the 
Manufacturing and Defense Industrial Base and Supply Chain 
Resiliency of the United States''' stressed the ``imperative 
that producers and supply chains of materials deemed essential 
to U.S. defense and civilian demand are robust, resilient, 
competitive, and responsive to support current and long-term 
economic security, current military operations, future wartime 
mobilization, and unanticipated surge demand.''
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $15.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 67210D8Z to fund the 
development of composite manufacturing technologies.

Printed circuit boards

    The budget request included $10.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
67210D8Z industrial base analysis and sustainment support.
    The committee notes that the September 2018 Department of 
Defense report titled ``Assessing and Strengthening the 
Manufacturing and Defense Industrial Base and Supply Chain 
Resiliency of the United States''' stated, ``90% of worldwide 
printed circuit board production is in Asia, over half of which 
occurring in China; and the U.S. printed circuit board sub-
sector is aging, constricting, and failing to maintain the 
state of the art for rigid and rigid-flex printed circuit board 
production capability.''
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $15.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense wide, for PE 67210D8Z to fund printed 
circuit board manufacturing.

Rare earths materials research

    The budget request included $10.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
67210D8Z industrial base analysis and sustainment support.
    The committee notes the importance of supporting 
mitigations for continuous and growing industrial base 
shortfalls and vulnerabilities, including those identified in 
the September 2018 Department of Defense report titled 
``Assessing and Strengthening the Manufacturing and Defense 
Industrial Base and Supply Chain Resiliency of the United 
States.'' This report specifically recommended expanding direct 
investment in the lower tier of the industrial base through the 
Department's Industrial Base Analysis and Sustainment program 
to address critical bottlenecks, support fragile suppliers, and 
mitigate single points-of-failure. It further noted that 
``China's domination of the rare earth element market 
illustrates the potentially dangerous interaction between 
Chinese economic aggression guided by its strategic industrial 
policies and vulnerabilities and gaps in America's 
manufacturing and defense industrial base.''
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $3.5 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 67210D8Z to fund 
development of capability to produce rare earth elements from 
coal ash.

Sharkseer transfer

    The budget request included $289.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
33140G Information Systems Security Program.
    The committee included a provision in the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) that required the Secretary of Defense to transfer 
the operations and maintenance for the Sharkseer cybersecurity 
program from the National Security Agency to the Defense 
Information Systems Agency.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $1.9 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 33140G for the Sharkseer 
program.

Sharkseer transfer

    The budget request included $42.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
33140K Information Systems Security Program.
    The committee included a provision in the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) that required the Secretary of Defense to transfer 
the operations and maintenance for the Sharkseer cybersecurity 
program from the National Security Agency to the Defense 
Information Systems Agency.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $1.9 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 33140K for the Sharkseer 
program.

Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency activities

    The budget request included $2.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
0305128V Security and Investigative Activities.
    The committee recommends an increase of $15.0 million in 
RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 0305128V for the Defense 
Counterintelligence and Security Agency to carry out a set of 
activities relating to facilitating access by the Agency to 
local criminal records historical data.

Future Vertical Lift

    The budget request included $245.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
1160403BB aviation systems, of which $1.2 million is for the 
development and integration of special operations-unique 
equities and requirements into a multi-service future vertical 
lift (FVL) capability set 3 (CS3) aircraft.
    The committee understands that U.S. Special Operations 
Command (SOCOM) is working with the Army to identify specific 
special operations-unique requirements early in the design 
phase of the FVL CS3 in order to reduce duplication of design, 
engineering, and post-production costs. The committee notes 
that the SOCOM Program Executive Officer-Rotary Wing and the 
Army Program Manager-FVL estimate that there could be 
approximately $188 million in RDT&E savings resulting from this 
co-development approach as compared to making post-production 
modifications to the aircraft.
    The committee also understands that the Army's decision to 
accelerate FVL CS3 development has resulted in a shortfall in 
SOCOM's related development efforts, an identified high 
priority unfunded requirement for the command. Therefore, the 
committee recommends an additional $8.8 million in RDT&E, 
Defense-wide, for PE 1160403BB, for the development and 
integration of special operations-unique equities and 
requirements into a multi-service FVL CS3 aircraft.

Next Generation Information Communications Technology (5G)

    The budget request included no funding in Research, 
Development, Testing, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for 
PE 64011D8Z Next Generation Information Communications 
Technology.
    The committee believes that fifth-generation wireless 
networks and associated technologies will be a foundation for 
future economic growth, will have an important nexus with 
national security, and should be of high interest to the 
Department of Defense. The committee is aware that, in future 
wireless networks, the ability to use dynamic spectrum sharing 
technologies will be critical to more efficient spectrum use.
    The committee recommends an increase of $25.0 million, for 
a total of $25.0 million, in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 
64011D8Z in support of a Department of Defense spectrum sharing 
program.

Transfer from OCO to Base

    The budget request included $102.6 billion for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E) in base funding. The 
committee notes that the President's budget request included 
$97.9 billion in the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) 
account for activities that are traditionally funded out of 
base accounts. The committee believes that OCO for Base funding 
should be transferred into the base accounts.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $748.0 
million to RDT&E base funding.

                       Items of Special Interest


Acquisition roadmaps for certain Navy unmanned systems

    The committee notes that the Navy's fiscal year 2020 future 
years defense program (FYDP) includes a substantial increase in 
funding for various unmanned systems, including unmanned 
surface vessels (USVs) and unmanned underwater vessels (UUVs). 
The committee further notes that Navy leaders envision some of 
these systems' operating autonomously with the ability to 
employ weapons.
    While recognizing the need for prototypes to reduce 
acquisition risk, the committee is concerned that the 
acquisition strategies for the Large USV, Medium USV, Orca UUV, 
and Snakehead UUV could lead to procurement of an excessive 
number of systems before the Navy is able to determine if the 
USVs and UUVs meet operational needs.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees, not 
later than November 1, 2019, that provides acquisition roadmaps 
for the Large USV, Medium USV, Orca UUV, and Snakehead UUV. 
Each roadmap shall: (1) Identify the applicable requirements 
document (e.g., Top Level Requirements); (2) Describe the 
threshold and objective values for each characteristic, key 
performance parameter (KPP), or other measure in the applicable 
requirements document; (3) Identify increments of vessels in 
each program; (4) For each such increment, identify specific 
entrance and exit criteria that build toward the specified 
requirements (e.g., characteristic, KPP, or other measure), 
including demonstrated hardware and software functionality; (5) 
Identify the quantity of vessels needed in each increment to 
perform the required testing or meet operational needs; (6) 
Describe the concept of operations for each increment; (7) 
Identify the key pieces of hardware and software needed for 
each increment, including communications security material, 
off-board line-of-sight and satellite communications, and 
military datalinks; (8) Describe the extent to which each 
increment of vessels will be equipped with weapons, enumerate 
such weapons, and describe the associated target detect-to-
engage sequence of events for each such weapon; (9) Provide the 
subsystem-level prototyping plan for each increment, including 
for each such effort the planned cost, schedule, and 
performance; and (10) Provide the acquisition plan for each 
increment, including the planned cost, schedule, and 
performance.

Advance power electronics

    The committee supports the Navy's efforts in developing 
advanced power electronics, including silicon carbide power 
modules, which could reduce the size and weight of power 
conversion modules and other electronic systems needed to power 
advanced sensors and weapon systems. The committee recognizes 
that available space and power density will continue to be a 
concern when fielding naval systems on legacy Navy ships.
    The committee encourages the Navy to continue its efforts 
to develop silicon carbide power modules to support planned 
deployment of high-power, mission critical systems on Navy 
platforms.

Army Futures Command research budget realignments

    The committee understands that the Army has reorganized 
certain research offices, laboratories, and engineering centers 
within the Combat Capability Development Command (CCDC), a 
subordinate command of Army Futures Command. The committee is 
aware that, as part of this reorganization, certain program 
elements for basic research, applied research, and advanced 
technology development were realigned from research, 
development, and engineering centers to Army Futures Command 
headquarters.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to enter 
into an agreement with the National Academy of Sciences to 
evaluate these changes and their impact on the Army's ability 
to efficiently and effectively develop and deploy needed 
capabilities and new technologies in the near, mid, and far 
terms. The review should also include recommendations for 
policy and organizational options that would better optimize 
the Army research enterprise to support Army missions in the 
near, mid, and far terms. The committee directs that this study 
be delivered to the congressional defense committees no later 
than February 1, 2021.

Artificial intelligence and sensor fusion for force protection

    The committee acknowledges the success of ongoing rapid 
fielding of commercially-available technologies that use 
artificial intelligence and sensor fusion to deliver enhanced 
force protection for Department of Defense (DOD) personnel and 
installations. The committee notes that recent advances in 
commercially available technology, including artificial 
intelligence, computer vision, and sensor technology, have made 
it possible to develop, manufacture, and deploy reconnaissance, 
surveillance, and target acquisition technologies that are far 
more effective, more efficient, and lower cost than legacy 
systems. The committee is aware that artificial intelligence 
can significantly improve situational awareness and security 
for DOD personnel through faster and better processing and 
exploitation of sensor data, recognition and classification of 
potential threats, and dissemination of that information to 
human operators for the purposes of enhanced self-defense.
    The committee believes that artificial-intelligence- and 
sensor-fusion-based technologies for personnel security and 
base defense will reduce manpower and improve operators' 
ability to detect, classify, and respond to threats. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the DOD to review the 
application of artificial intelligence that could improve the 
safety of DOD personnel and installations and prioritize such 
efforts as appropriate.

Artificial intelligence for Army air and missile defense

    The committee supports the Army's efforts to conduct 
operationally realistic assessments of Army Air and Missile 
Defense (AMD) performance, identify system vulnerabilities, and 
develop mitigations against threats across the cyber and 
electromagnetic spectrum. The committee remains concerned about 
any potential vulnerabilities in AMD weapon systems and 
understands the importance of conducting periodic assessments 
of these weapon systems. The committee is also aware that the 
Army is developing tools, including modeling and simulation and 
virtual models of critical hardware and software to allow for 
testing in a lab environment. The committee encourages the Army 
to look at methods for incorporating artificial intelligence 
and machine learning into assessments of AMD weapon systems to 
help identify and mitigate current and future threats.

Back-packable Communications Intelligence System

    The committee is aware of expressed support by United 
States Army Special Operations Command (USASOC) for continued 
development of the Back-packable Communications Intelligence 
System (BPCS), an ultra-capable, low size, weight, and power, 
high-frequency direction finding system currently managed by 
the U.S. Army. The committee understands that BPCS performance 
was demonstrated at the Special Operations Forces Acquisition, 
Technology and Logistics (SOF AT&L) Technical Experiment 18-3 
and encourages USASOC to continue working in close coordination 
with SOF AT&L and the Army to advance BPCS development and 
testing.

Battlefield situational awareness

    The committee is aware that, on a modern battlefield, it is 
expected that friendly forces will be in close proximity to the 
enemy and will require integrated joint fires in order to 
achieve the effects demanded by the Joint Force Commander. The 
committee believes that the Department of Defense has been slow 
to develop and field capabilities to provide battlefield 
situational awareness of enemy and friendly forces. The 
committee is also aware of current technical solutions that 
could provide the required identification of friend and foe in 
environments such as battlefield interdiction, close combat 
attack, or close air support.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Chairman of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff, in consultation with the service chiefs, to 
provide a briefing, no later than March 30, 2020, on a 
technical solution and an acquisition strategy that would 
provide the Joint Force with continuous battlefield situational 
awareness to identify friendly and enemy personnel in both 
highly contested and permissive environments.

Briefing on detection of uncharted wires and obstacles to prevent 
        aviation incidents

    Uncharted wires and obstacles pose a threat to rotary wing 
and tiltrotor aircraft particularly in degraded visual 
environments. This problem can be exacerbated for special 
operations and combat search and rescue (CSAR) aircraft that 
often operate in non-permissive conditions.
    The committee understands that multiple systems that may 
increase visibility for aircrews in order to avoid obstacles in 
both low altitude flying and landing environments are currently 
in development. However, the committee is concerned that the 
Department of Defense has not taken demonstrable steps toward 
fielding such technology. Furthermore, the development and 
fielding of such a capability should be fully coordinated 
across the Services to expeditiously field this technology to 
aircrews.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Research and Engineering, in coordination with the 
Chief of Staff of the Army, the Chief of Staff of the Air 
Force, the Chief of Naval Operations, the Commandant of the 
United States Marine Corps, and the Commander, U.S. Special 
Operations Command, to provide a briefing to the committee no 
later than October 1, 2019, on efforts to identify, develop, 
and procure capabilities for rotary wing and tiltrotor aircraft 
to detect and avoid uncharted wires and obstacles. The briefing 
shall include an evaluation of current commercially available 
systems as well as an estimate of the funding required to, if 
necessary, develop and acquire such a system for rotary wing 
and tiltrotor aircraft.

Demonstration pilots to demonstrate cost savings and enhanced 
        performance of anti-corrosion nanotechnologies

    The committee is aware of new advances in nanotechnology 
being used in the commercial sector, particularly in the 
aviation and energy industries, that reduce corrosion, improve 
performance, and reduce costs. The committee is concerned that, 
although the fundamental science was developed in part by the 
Department of Defense, the Department has failed to even try 
these new materials that could significantly reduce the 
military's operating costs while improving readiness and 
performance.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment and the Under Secretary 
of Defense for Research and Engineering to brief the committee, 
no later than February 1, 2020, on the economic, performance, 
and readiness impacts regarding the potential for testing and 
applying these technologies in various operating assets, like 
pipelines, heat exchangers, fuel storage tanks, water lines, 
aircraft, and others deemed appropriate by the Department.

Department of Defense artificial intelligence investment inventory

    The committee believes that it is important that the 
Department of Defense (DOD) has accurate insight as to the 
nature and extent of investments made in artificial 
intelligence (AI). The committee is aware that one impediment 
to such insight is that AI Research, Development, Test, and 
Evaluation (RDT&E) is spread throughout generally titled 
program elements (PEs) and incorporated into funding for larger 
systems with AI components or even extends beyond RDT&E into 
Operation and Maintenance and Procurement.
    The committee therefore directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense (Comptroller) to brief the congressional defense 
committees by September 1, 2019, on the total array of AI 
investments, to include PEs, line numbers, and funding amounts 
with sufficient detail and description of those investments. 
The committee also expects the Under Secretary to include the 
methodology for tracking AI investments in future budget 
requests. Further, the committee recommends that the Department 
consider summarizing these AI investments in the annual 
information technology budget exhibit.

Flame resistant military uniforms with multi-spectral sensor protection

    The committee notes that infrared and multi-spectral sensor 
detection is an emerging threat to members of the Armed Forces. 
Soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines are under an ever 
increasing threat of long-range detection by these sensors in 
use by hostile near-peer as well as non-state actors. Given 
recent technical developments in sensor technologies and sensor 
mitigation, the committee feels that it is in the best interest 
of the Services to explore multi-spectral sensor mitigation 
technologies and to incorporate them into the current suite of 
flame resistant (FR) uniforms presently in use by the Services.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army, 
in coordination with the Secretaries of the Navy and the Air 
Force, to conduct a feasibility study on incorporating these 
mitigation technologies into FR uniforms and to provide a 
briefing to the congressional defense committees on this study 
by December 1, 2019.

High powered microwave test range asset

    The committee supports the transitioning of new and game-
changing directed energy technologies to the warfighter. An 
enduring testing and evaluation capability for high powered 
microwaves (HPM) would help the Services develop the doctrine 
and concepts of operation that will bring these technologies to 
operational use. Currently, an enduring frequency agile and 
tunable HPM asset is not available at Major Range and Test 
Facility Bases for evolving doctrine and HPM Directed Energy 
Concept of Operations. The committee supports the Air Force's 
development of such an asset at the Nation's test ranges.

Historically black colleges and universities support for minority women 
        in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields

    The committee acknowledges the ongoing efforts of the 
Department of Defense (DOD) to increase the participation of 
women and other underserved populations in science, technology, 
engineering and mathematics-related (STEM) areas of research. 
The committee urges the DOD to continue funding for center of 
excellence efforts at historically black colleges and 
universities (HBCUs) that support training and education of 
minority women in STEM fields of interest to the military, 
particularly through research funding, fellowships, and 
internships and cooperative work experiences at defense 
laboratories. The committee recommends that the Department of 
Defense consider increasing investments in these kinds of 
activities in future budgets to support administration 
initiatives on HBCUs.

Hostile fire detection technology

    The committee is aware of advancements in the development 
of hostile fire detection technology and the importance of 
these capabilities in providing deployed forces with the 
ability to quickly detect, locate, and discriminate hostile 
fire and related threats. The committee believes that efforts 
to reduce the size, weight, power requirements, and cost for 
hostile fire detection technologies could provide important 
benefits to battlefield effectiveness and survivability of our 
forces. The committee therefore directs the Commander of U.S. 
Special Operations Command (SOCOM) to provide to the committee 
a briefing not later than October 1, 2019, on SOCOM's current 
requirements for hostile fire detection and an assessment of 
available technologies that may fulfill these requirements.

Human factors modeling and simulation

    The committee notes that section 227 of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) required the Secretary of Defense to develop and 
provide for the execution of human factors modeling and 
simulation activities with the purpose of accelerating research 
and development that enhances capabilities for human 
performance, human-systems integration, and training for the 
warfighter.
    The committee directs the Secretary to provide a briefing 
on the status of this requirement and activities taken to 
fulfill the requirement no later than 90 days after the date of 
the enactment of this Act. The briefing shall include 
information on the extent of the activities that are being 
carried out, the effects of these activities with respect to 
their purpose, activity participants, locations where 
activities are being carried out, and the plan to sustain these 
activities in the future.

Hypersonic development

    The committee understands that developing hypersonic 
technology is a high priority modernization effort for the 
Department of Defense (DOD). The committee recognizes that, in 
an effort to accelerate the development of hypersonics and to 
coordinate simultaneous development efforts across the DOD, the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering signed 
a memorandum of agreement with the Services, with each 
contributing to and collaborating on the land-, sea-, and air-
based prototyping of hypersonic technology.
    The committee notes that, for over 30 years, Sandia 
National Laboratories (SNL) has made significant contributions 
to the prototyping and testing of hypersonic vehicles. SNL 
houses experienced scientists and engineers in the development 
of this technology, who utilize SNL's hypersonic wind tunnel 
and advanced laser diagnostic technology. Over 7 years ago, 
Sandia conducted a successful flight test of a hypersonic 
concept for the U.S. Army Space and Missile Defense Command. 
This test provided SNL with significant additional data on 
hypersonic boost-glide technologies and test range performance 
for long-range atmospheric flight with an emphasis on 
aerodynamics, navigation, guidance and control, and thermal 
protection technologies.
    SNL is now integrating artificial intelligence into the 
designing and planning stages, which may significantly expedite 
the development and design process.
    The committee believes that the technical expertise at SNL 
and the laboratory has been and will continue to be 
instrumental to the development and eventual production of 
hypersonics. Therefore, the committee encourages the Department 
to utilize the technical and scientific expertise at labs, 
including SNL, necessary for the development of prototypes and 
to assist commercial industry in manufacturing.

Importance and use of United States Active Ionospheric Research 
        Facilities

    The committee recognizes the unique importance of U.S. 
active ionospheric research facilities, also known as 
``ionospheric heaters.'' These facilities transmit high 
frequency (HF) radio waves and play a crucial role in the 
research of ionospheric effects on national security systems. 
The research possible at these facilities is useful to national 
security in the realms of domain awareness, radar, atmospheric 
effects on space systems, and over-the-horizon communications. 
The committee recognizes that, while there are four ionospheric 
research facilities in the world, two are in the United States, 
including the High-frequency Active Auroral Research Program 
(HAARP) in Gakona, Alaska, and the HF heater at the Arecibo 
Observatory (AO) in Arecibo, Puerto Rico. Both of these centers 
are available to support scientific investigations and national 
security programs for the Department of Defense, Department of 
Energy, and the National Science Foundation.
    The committee is aware that the HAARP has supported 
investigations of ionospheric effects on high latitude 
communications and navigation capabilities and the remediation 
of high energy ``killer'' electrons in the magnetosphere as a 
result of an extreme solar event or a high-altitude nuclear 
detonation. The HAARP facility supports strategic applications 
for over-the-horizon radar, global communication, and 
diagnostics for satellite communication. The committee is aware 
that the AO facility supports investigations of ionospheric 
effects at mid- and- low latitudes with applications including 
radio communications and radar detection. These experimental 
sites provide insights and diagnostics for ionospheric effects 
that are extremely challenging to obtain.
    The committee encourages continued use of these facilities 
and believes that these facilities can be used, when 
appropriate, to support the national security space program.

Interdisciplinary expeditionary cybersecurity research

    The committee is encouraged by current research efforts to 
understand expeditionary cyber challenges. The committee 
understands the challenge of operating within a complex and 
evolving cyber and physical environment where warfighters are 
in close proximity and contact with adversaries and believes 
that this is simultaneously a growing threat and opportunity. 
The committee believes that an interdisciplinary approach to 
developing new capabilities for cyber systems while including 
consideration of the role of human behavior in the tactical 
cyber environment is critical. The committee encourages the 
Department of Defense to continue to conduct multidisciplinary 
research in the areas of: dynamic cyber defense; tactical 
cyberspace operations and signals intelligence; sensing; and 
computation and communications.

Light attack experiment

    The committee supports the increase of combat capability 
and readiness at a reduced cost and the development of advanced 
capabilities for close air support, armed reconnaissance, 
strike coordination and reconnaissance, airborne forward air 
control, and interdiction. The committee also supports the 
Department of Defense's intent to lower the cost of countering 
violent extremism in accordance with the National Security 
Strategy. However, the committee is concerned that the pace of 
research and prototyping in this area has not kept up with the 
threat or the current capability available to the Department.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to deliver a briefing, no later than March 30, 2020, to 
the congressional defense committees on the acceleration of the 
light attack experiment using existing aircraft and any other 
aircraft that the Chief of Staff of the Air Force deems 
appropriate and capable of reaching initial operating 
capability by 2023.

Multifunction capability to provide communications in contested 
        environments

    The committee is concerned about the ability of the 
Department of Defense to maintain its advantage in full 
spectrum operations in the future. Recent conflicts have 
highlighted our adversaries' increasing abilities to geolocate, 
jam, and intercept electronic communications, putting at risk 
the U.S. military's ability to communicate and conduct 
effective command and control in contested environments.
    To better prepare for future combat operations against a 
near-peer adversary, the committee believes that the DOD needs 
to expedite testing of multi-domain capabilities and systems 
that provide distributed, shared, full spectrum situational 
awareness and spectrum maneuver. This testing should include 
cognitive machine learning or artificial intelligence 
applications to assess new and unknown electronic signals in 
real-time. Such testing would also demonstrate advanced 
technologies, such as modern waveforms that are designed to be 
low-probability-of-intercept, low-probability-of-detection, and 
ultra-wideband radio frequency converged apertures that permit 
the U.S. to maintain spectrum dominance. These systems should 
also enable secure communications across networks with 
different security levels and between both legacy and advanced 
systems.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide the congressional defense committees with a 
briefing, no later than March 1, 2020, on the plan for the 
conduct of live testing of technologies and capabilities 
designed to permit secure full spectrum operations in the 
fiscal years 2020-2021 timeframe.

Navy laser integration plans

    The committee is greatly encouraged by the Navy's rapid 
demonstration of laser weapon systems on surface ships. In 
2014, the Navy deployed a 30 kW Laser Weapon System (LaWS) on 
USS Ponce, which will be followed by a 150 kW LaWS on USS 
Portland (LPD-27), planned for 2019. The committee understands 
that the improvements in power and beam quality make the 150 kW 
LaWS nearly a 100-fold improvement in lethality.
    The committee is also encouraged by the Navy's plans to 
integrate the 60 kW High Energy Laser and Integrated Optical-
dazzler with Surveillance (HELIOS) program into Arleigh Burke-
class destroyers beginning in 2021.
    If the HELIOS effort succeeds, the committee believes there 
may be additional opportunities to integrate High Energy Laser 
(HEL) systems on large capital ships, including aircraft 
carriers and large amphibious ships, to increase the defensive 
capabilities and lethality of our carrier strike groups and 
expeditionary forces.
    If the Navy has continued positive results at increased 
radiated power, there may also be broader applications of laser 
weapons for providing capability for fleet air defense from 
more Navy vessels.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a briefing to the Senate Armed Services Committee, 
not later than October 1, 2019, describing the path forward for 
shipboard integration of HEL systems and the risk reduction 
plan to achieve improved technology and manufacturing readiness 
levels for such higher power systems. The committee also 
directs the Secretary to provide briefings on the progress of 
laser systems development and testing every 6 months through 
fiscal year 2021.

Production-ready sources for hypersonic materials

    Hypersonic systems require high performance, heat resistant 
materials to survive demanding flight regimes. For mission 
critical structures such as radomes and apertures, currently 
available materials and manufacturing infrastructure cannot 
meet anticipated requirements for hypersonic systems. The 
committee notes that the September 2018 Report of the 
Interagency Task Force in fulfillment of Executive Order 13806 
recommends that the Department of Defense expand direct 
investment in the lower tier of the industrial base through 
Title III of the Defense Production Act (Public Law 81-774), 
Department of Defense Manufacturing Technology, and Industrial 
Base Analysis and Sustainment programs to address critical 
bottlenecks, support fragile suppliers, and mitigate single 
points-of-failure. The committee strongly agrees with this 
recommendation and directs the Department to use the respective 
authorities and funding within these programs to accelerate 
material qualification and establishment of production ready 
sources for critical materials and components to support 
hypersonic systems.

Requirement for briefing on Advanced Battle Management System 
        acquisition strategy

    The committee is concerned with the progress of the 
Advanced Battle Management System (ABMS). The Air Force has 
taken a significant amount of time to hire what they refer to 
as an architect to analyze the problem and produce a solution 
that would be fielded at Robins Air Force Base. The committee 
understands that the problem is currently well-defined to 
include potential sensor and communication requirements for a 
disaggregated solution to battle management. However, the 
committee remains concerned that the ABMS comprises a number of 
programs and, as a result, may cross multiple program elements.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to biannually provide briefings to the congressional 
defense committees on the progress of the ABMS acquisition. The 
first briefing shall be provided no later than January 1, 2020, 
and the subsequent briefings shall be provided once every 6 
months until system is fielded.
    These briefings shall include: (1) the ABMS acquisition 
strategy; (2) Progress made in meeting that strategy; (3) An 
unclassified plan that lays out a personnel transition strategy 
in order to develop the initial cadre for the ABMS from the 
current workforce, including active duty, Reserve, Air National 
Guard, and civilians, at Robins Air Force Base; and (4) The 
plan to fill the capability gap that could emerge post-JSTARS 
and pre-ABMS.

Use of commercial cloud services to support high performance computing 
        needs

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense (DOD) 
has many needs for high performance computing systems to 
support weapons design and testing, weather forecasting, 
scientific research, data analysis, and other missions. The 
committee further notes that commercial cloud computing 
services may provide a novel, efficient, and lower cost method 
for obtaining high performance computing capabilities. The 
committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Research 
and Engineering (USD(R&E)) and the Chief Information Officer 
(CIO) to jointly develop a report analyzing the potential use 
of cloud computing capabilities, including commercial services, 
to help support the high performance computing needs of the 
DOD. The committee directs that the report be delivered to the 
congressional defense committees no later than January 1, 2021.

                  TITLE III--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations

Authorization of appropriations (sec. 301)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for operation and maintenance activities at 
the levels identified in section 4301 of division D of this 
Act.

                   Subtitle B--Energy and Environment

Use of operational energy cost savings of Department of Defense (sec. 
        311)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2912 of title 10, United States Code, to require that 
operational energy cost savings realized by the Department of 
Defense be used for the implementation of additional 
operational energy cost saving methods.
Use of proceeds from sales of electrical energy generated from 
        geothermal resources (sec. 312)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2916(b) of title 10, United States Code, to provide the 
Department of Defense more flexibility when using geothermal 
revenue.
Energy resilience programs and activities (sec. 313)
    The committee recommends a provision that would make 
technical corrections to the Annual Energy Management and 
Resilience Report, would require a report on funding levels for 
certain energy program offices, and would establish targets for 
reduction in water use.
Native American Indian lands environmental mitigation program (sec. 
        314)
    The committee recommends a provision, as requested by the 
Department of Defense (DOD), that would amend chapter 160 of 
title 10, United States Code, to allow the Secretary of Defense 
to establish a program to mitigate the environmental impacts of 
DOD activities on Native American Indian lands.
Reimbursement of Environmental Protection Agency for certain costs in 
        connection with the Twin Cities Army Ammunition Plant, 
        Minnesota (sec. 315)
    The committee recommends a provision that would allow the 
Secretary of Defense to reimburse the Environmental Protection 
Agency for remedial actions performed at the Twin Cities Army 
Ammunition Plant (TCAAP). The committee understands that this 
authority will be used to satisfy the interagency agreement for 
the TCAPP.
Prohibition on use of perfluoroalkyl substances and polyfluoroalkyl 
        substances for land-based applications of firefighting foam 
        (sec. 316)
    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the Department of Defense from procuring firefighting foam that 
contains perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances after 
October 1, 2022.
Transfer authority for funding of study and assessment on health 
        implications of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances 
        contamination in drinking water by Agency for Toxic Substances 
        and Disease Registry (sec. 317)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 316(a) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) to extend the authority of 
the Secretary of Defense to transfer funds to the Secretary of 
Health and Human Services for the study and assessment of the 
health implications of per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances.
Cooperative agreements with States to address contamination by 
        perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances (sec. 318)
    The committee recommends a provision that would encourage 
the Secretary of Defense to work expeditiously to finalize a 
cooperative agreement upon request from the governor of a State 
if there is suspected contamination from perfluoroalkyl and 
polyfluoroalkyl substances. If an agreement is not finalized or 
amended within 1 year, the Secretary of Defense is required to 
submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees.

Modification of Department of Defense environmental restoration 
        authorities to include Federal Government facilities used by 
        National Guard (sec. 319)

    The committee recommends a provision that would establish 
environmental restoration accounts for the Army National Guard 
and the Air National Guard.

Budgeting of Department of Defense relating to extreme weather (sec. 
        320)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to include a dedicated budget line item 
for adaptation to and mitigation of effects of extreme weather 
on military networks, systems, installations, facilities, and 
other assets and capabilities of the Department of Defense in 
the annual budget submission of the President.

Pilot program for availability of working-capital funds for increased 
        combat capability through energy optimization (sec. 321)

    The committee recommends a provision that would allow the 
Secretary of Defense and the military departments to use the 
working capital fund established pursuant to section 2208 of 
title 10, United States Code, to conduct a pilot program for 
energy optimization initiatives. Further, this provision would 
require the Secretary of Defense to submit an annual report to 
the congressional defense committees on the use of the 
authority during the preceding fiscal year. The annual report 
would be required to be submitted not later than 60 days after 
the President's budget is submitted to the Congress.

Report on efforts to reduce high energy intensity at military 
        installations (sec. 322)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to 
submit a report on efforts to achieve cost savings at military 
installations with high energy intensity to the congressional 
defense committees not later than September 1, 2020.

Technical and grammatical corrections and repeal of obsolete provisions 
        relating to energy (sec. 323)

    The committee recommends a provision that would provide 
technical corrections to title 10, United States Code.

                 Subtitle C--Logistics and Sustainment


Requirement for memoranda of understanding between the Air Force and 
        the Navy regarding depot maintenance (sec. 331)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require a 
joint memorandum of understanding in such cases where one 
military service would provide depot maintenance for an air 
platform of another military service. The memorandum would 
address the requirements and oversight responsibilities for 
administration, supply, and maintenance and would be executed 
by officials of both services in a grade of O-7 or higher with 
responsibilities for administration, supply, and maintenance.
    The committee wants to ensure that the different 
maintenance practices required by the Navy and the Air Force 
are well-understood by both services.

Modification to limitation on length of overseas forward deployment of 
        naval vessels (sec. 332)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 323 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) 
relating to the limitation on length of overseas forward 
deployment of naval vessels.

                          Subtitle D--Reports


Report on modernization of Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex (sec. 
        341)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Air Force to submit to the congressional 
defense committees a report on the long-term modernization of 
the Joint Pacific Alaska Range Complex.

                       Subtitle E--Other Matters


Strategy to improve infrastructure of certain depots of the Department 
        of Defense (sec. 351)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to deliver a comprehensive strategy to the 
congressional defense committees, no later than October 1, 
2020, for improving the depot infrastructure of the military 
departments with the objective of ensuring that the depots have 
the capacity and capability to support the readiness and 
material availability goals of current and future weapon 
systems of the Department of Defense. The provision would 
require that the strategy include a review of the current 
conditions and performance of each depot, a business-case 
analysis comparing the minimum investment necessary required 
under section 2476 of title 10, United States Code, with the 
actual investment needed to execute the planned mission and a 
plan to improve the conditions and performance utilizing this 
data.
    The provision would also require the Comptroller General of 
the United States to review and submit to the congressional 
defense committees, no later than January 1, 2021, a report on 
the extent to which the submitted strategy meets the 
requirements set forth.
    The committee notes that, although section 2476e of title 
10, United States Code, established minimum investment 
requirements for the military departments' depots, the 
committee is aware that recent reporting by the Comptroller 
General indicates that the condition of depot facilities is 
poor and the age of depot equipment is often past its expected 
useful life. The intent of section 2476e was to require a 
minimum level of investment to ensure that the military depots 
would receive adequate investment in facilities, equipment, and 
processes. The committee is concerned, however, that this 
requirement may not be adequate to maintain the organic 
industrial base infrastructure over its useful life.

Limitation on use of funds regarding the basing of KC-46A aircraft 
        outside the continental United States (sec. 352)

    The committee recommends a provision that would limit Air 
Force funds until the Secretary of the Air Force submits to the 
Congress a report on the projected plan and timeline for 
strategic basing of the KC-46A aircraft outside the continental 
United States.

Prevention of encroachment on military training routes and military 
        operations areas (sec. 353)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
projects to file 1 year before construction if they are 
proposed within wide area surveillance over-the-horizon radar. 
Additionally, the provision allows the governor of a State to 
recommend geographical areas of concern to the Secretary of 
Defense.

Expansion and enhancement of authorities on transfer and adoption of 
        military animals (sec. 354)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2583 of title 10, United States Code, to require 
veterinary screening and care for military working dogs prior 
to retirement or transfer to law enforcement agencies. The 
provision would also, as requested by the Department of 
Defense, extend transfer and adoption authorities to 
Department-owned mules and donkeys, in order to provide 
consistency for use of the word ``transfer'' throughout this 
section of law.

Limitation on contracting relating to Defense Personal Property Program 
        (sec. 355)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the Secretary of Defense from entering into or awarding any 
contract for the Defense Personal Property Program (DP3) any 
sooner than 60 days after the Comptroller General of the United 
States delivers a report to Congress, previously directed, on 
DP3. The provision would allow the Secretary of Defense to 
review and evaluate any solicited or unsolicited proposal 
intended to improve DP3.
    The committee notes the concerns and frustration of 
servicemembers across the Department of Defense with the 
delivery of services under the current DP3 structure. The 
committee understands that U.S. Transportation Command 
(TRANSCOM) has efforts underway to improve servicemember 
experiences for the 2019 and 2020 peak moving seasons and 
develop a long-term solution for managing the DP3 system 
through a single contractor. While the committee is encouraged 
by TRANSCOM's desire to improve the program's delivery of 
services to servicemembers, the committee believes that both 
TRANSCOM and the Congress need additional information before 
making a determination on the best path forward.

Prohibition on subjective upgrades by commanders of unit ratings in 
        monthly readiness reporting on military units (sec. 356)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the commander of a military unit who is responsible for monthly 
reporting of readiness from making any subjective upgrade of 
the overall rating of the unit. The provision would also 
include a waiver authority if the first flag or general officer 
above the reporting unit in the chain of command approves of 
the upgrade. Finally, the provision would require that any such 
waiver, and subsequent upgrades, be included in the Quarterly 
Readiness Report to Congress.
    The committee notes that too often certain military 
services have abused the flexible authority of subjective 
upgrades, with the Department of Defense and the Congress 
lacking a truly accurate portrayal of unit readiness as a 
result.

Extension of temporary installation reutilization authority for 
        arsenals, depots, and plants (sec. 357)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 345(d) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91; 10 U.S.C. 2667 note) by 
striking ``September 30, 2020'' and inserting ``September 30, 
2025.''
    The committee notes that the permissive authority that 
would be extended under this provision allows to the Secretary 
of the Army to authorize leases and contracts for up to 25 
years under section 2667 of title 10, United States Code, if 
the Secretary determines that a lease or contract will promote 
the national defense by maintaining the viability of an 
arsenal, depot, plant, or military installation on which such 
facility is located. The committee further notes that any lease 
is subject to a 90-day hold period for the purposes of review 
by the Army real property manager.

Clarification of food ingredient requirements for food or beverages 
        provided by the Department of Defense (sec. 358)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to publish a notice of proposed action 
before making any final rule, statement, or determination on 
the limitation or prohibition of a food or beverage ingredient 
provided by the Department of Defense (DOD).
    The committee notes that the Department of Defense and the 
Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) are engaging with private 
industry regarding decisions made that impact food supply 
chains. In order to assess the impact of these decisions on 
farms, vendors, suppliers, and supply chain activities, the 
committee directs the Comptroller General of the United States 
to evaluate the current DOD/DLA joint subsistence policy board, 
DOD menu standards, and DLA's process map designed to ensure 
industry engagement. The committee further directs the 
Comptroller General to provide a briefing to the committee on 
the preliminary observations of this review, not later than 
February 1, 2020, and to submit a report on a date agreed to at 
the time of the briefing.

Technical correction to deadline for transition to Defense Readiness 
        Reporting System Strategic (sec. 359)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 358(c) of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) by 
striking ``October 1, 2019'' and replacing it with ``October 1, 
2020.''
    The committee notes that the original provision required 
the Services to complete a transition to the Defense Readiness 
Reporting System Strategic no later than October 1, 2019. The 
technical correction to October 1, 2020 adjusts the deadline to 
conform with the report language and original intent.

                              Budget Items


Multi-Domain Task Force for the Indo-Pacific region

    The budget request included $417.1 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), for SAG 122 Land Forces System 
Readiness.
    The committee recommends an increase of $29.2 million in 
OMA for SAG 122 in support of exercises and experimentation, 
wargaming, concept development, and other activities associated 
with the Multi-Domain Task Force for the Indo-Pacific region. 
This increase would support essential capabilities for Multi-
Domain Operations-Pacific as described in the Chief of Staff of 
the Army's unfunded priorities list.
    The committee supports the efforts of the Army and U.S. 
Indo-Pacific Command to develop capabilities and operational 
concepts to maintain or restore the comparative military 
advantage of the United States in the Indo-Pacific region and 
to reduce the risk of executing contingency plans of the 
Department of Defense. As it develops, the Multi-Domain Task 
Force will have significant implications for force posture, 
force structure, and procurement priorities. Going forward, the 
committee urges the Department of the Army and U.S. Indo-
Pacific Command to keep the committee fully apprised of 
developments relating to activities associated with the Multi-
Domain Task Force.

Army Base Operations Support under execution

    The budget request included $22.8 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), of which $0.0 million was for SAG 131 
Base Operations Support. The committee notes that the budget 
request included a transfer of $8.0 billion from base to 
overseas contingency operations for SAG 131 Base Operations 
Support.
    The committee notes according to analysis conducted by the 
Government Accountability Office, Base Operations Support has 
historically under executed.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $46.0 
million in OMA to SAG 131 Base Operations Support.

Army savings from revised housing cost share

    The budget request included $22.8 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), of which $0.0 million was for SAG 131 
Base Operations Support. The committee notes that the budget 
request included a transfer of $8.0 billion from base to 
overseas contingency operations for SAG 131 Base Operations 
Support.
    The committee notes that this Act contains a provision that 
would amend the 5 percent cost share requirement for the 
Services to 2 percent with the additional 3 percent left to the 
discretion of the Secretary of the relevant military department 
on a project by project basis.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $50.4 
million in OMA for SAG 131 Base Operations Support.

C4I life-cycle replacement at Joint Intelligence Operations Center 
        Europe Analytic Center

    The budget request included $146.4 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), for SAG 142 US European Command.
    The committee recommends an increase of $7.8 million in OMA 
for SAG 142 to support life-cycle replacement of command, 
control, communication, computer, and intelligence systems and 
infrastructure at the Joint Intelligence Operations Center 
Europe Analytic Center at RAF Molesworth, United Kingdom.

Army advertising and recruiting budget decrease

    The budget request included $22.8 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), of which $716.1 million was for SAG 
331 Recruiting and Advertising.
    The committee notes that the Army requested $73.2 million 
in addition to its baseline advertising budget of $256.5 
million and $36.9 million in addition to its baseline 
recruiting budget of $349.9 million. The committee further 
notes that the request represents a 28.5 percent increase to 
advertising and a 10.5 percent increase to recruiting. When 
compared to its end strength increases over the future years 
defense program, the committee believes that this request is 
ahead of need.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $80.0 
million in OMA to SAG 331 Recruiting and Advertising. The 
committee notes that the specific decreases recommended are 
$70.0 million for advertising and $10.0 for recruiting.

Army Other Personnel Support under execution

    The budget request included $22.8 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), of which $391.9 million was for SAG 
434 Other Personnel Support.
    The committee notes according to analysis conducted by the 
Government Accountability Office, Other Personnel Support has 
historically under executed.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $28.0 
million in OMA to SAG 434 Other Personnel Support.

Army Claims Activities under execution

    The budget request included $22.8 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), of which $198.8 million was for SAG 
436 Army Claims Activities.
    The committee notes according to analysis conducted by the 
Government Accountability Office, Army Claims Activities has 
historically under executed.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $15.0 
million in OMA to SAG 436 Army Claims Activities.

Cyber operations-peculiar capabilities--Army

    The budget request included $22.8 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA).
    Elsewhere in this Act, the committee recommended a 
provision that would allow the Secretaries of the military 
departments to use money authorized for appropriation for 
Operation and Maintenance (O&M) up to $3.0 million to develop 
cyber operations-peculiar capabilities. The provision would 
allow the Department of Defense to use its O&M funds for the 
rapid creation, testing, fielding, and operation of cyber 
capabilities that would be developed and used within the 1-year 
appropriation period.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an undistributed 
increase of $3.0 million in OMA for cyber operations-peculiar 
capabilities.

Family housing pilot program

    The budget request included $22.8 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA).
    The committee notes that in title XXX in this Act, the 
committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Army to carry out a pilot program to build and 
monitor the use of not fewer than five single family homes for 
members of the Army and their families.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an undistributed 
increase of $1.0 million to OMA for the single family home 
pilot program.

Terminal High Altitude Area Defense Army sustainment

    The budget request included $22.8 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), of which no funds were for Terminal 
High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) sustainment.
    Elsewhere in this report, the committee has stated its 
views regarding the transition of the THAAD program from the 
Missile Defense Agency to the Department of the Army.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an undistributed 
increase of $99.8 million in OMA for THAAD sustainment.

Army National Guard facilities sustainment disaster recovery increase

    The budget request included $3.3 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army National Guard (OMARNG), of which $1.1 
billion was for SAG 132 Facilities Sustainment, Restoration & 
Modernization.
    The committee notes that the Army National Guard has 
increasing facilities sustainment costs due to the catastrophic 
flooding in Nebraska impacting Camp Ashland and other guard 
equities.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $7.2 
million in OMARNG for SAG 132 Facilities Sustainment, 
Restoration & Modernization for disaster recovery.

Army National Guard recruiting and advertising decrease

    The budget request included $3.3 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army National Guard (OMARNG), of which $250.4 
million was for SAG 434 Other Personnel Support.
    The committee notes that the Army National Guard requested 
$3.5 million in addition to its baseline marketing budget of 
$77.5 million and $3.5 million in addition to its baseline 
recruiting budget of $7.9 million. The committee further notes 
that the request represents a 4.5 percent increase to marketing 
and a 44.3 percent increase to recruiting. When compared to its 
end strength increases over the future years defense program, 
the committee believes that this request is ahead of need.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $3.0 
million in OMARNG for SAG 434. The committee notes that the 
specific decreases recommended are $1.5 million for marketing 
and $1.5 million for recruiting.

Navy depot maintenance unfunded requirement increase

    The budget request included $53.0 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy (OMN), of which $0.0 billion was for SAG 1B4B 
Ship Depot Maintenance. The committee notes that the budget 
request included a transfer of $8.0 billion from base to 
overseas contingency operations for SAG 1B4B Ship Depot 
Maintenance.
    The committee notes that the Chief of Naval Operations' 
unfunded priority list included depot maintenance that directly 
impacts readiness through both submarine and ship maintenance.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $814.0 
million in OMN for SAG 1B4B to improve both submarine and ship 
maintenance.

Posture site assessments in the Indo-Pacific region

    The budget request included $25.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy (OMN), of which $94.0 million was for SAG 
1CCM Combatant Commanders Direct Mission Support.
    The committee notes the National Defense Strategy's 
emphasis on evolving United States force posture to meet the 
challenges of strategic competition. In particular, the 
National Defense Strategy prioritizes forward force maneuver, 
posture resilience, and resilient and agile logistics. The 
committee is concerned with the insufficient pace of the 
transition from large, centralized, and unhardened 
infrastructure to smaller, dispersed, resilient, and adaptive 
basing in the Indo-Pacific region. Accelerating this transition 
and reducing the risk of executing Department of Defense 
contingency plans will require support site assessments, 
planning and design, and follow-on military construction 
investments.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in OMN for SAG 1CCM to support the conduct of posture 
site assessments in the Indo-Pacific region.

Navy housing cost share

    The budget request included $25.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy (OMN), of which $0.0 billion was for SAG BSS1 
Base Operating Support. The committee notes that the budget 
request included a transfer of $4.4 billion from base to 
overseas contingency operations for SAG BSS1 Base Operating 
Support.
    The committee notes that this Act contains a provision that 
would amend the 5 percent cost share requirement for the 
Services to 2 percent with the additional 3 percent left to the 
discretion of the Secretary of the relevant military department 
on a project by project basis. The committee further notes that 
the Navy did not request this funding in its base request and 
instead treated this cost share mandate as an unfunded 
requirement.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $18.8 
million in OMN for SAG BSS1 Base Operating Support.

Navy advertising reduction

    The budget request included $25.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy (OMN), of which $209.3 million was for SAG 
3C1L Recruiting and Advertising.
    The committee notes that the Navy requested $27.9 million 
in addition to its baseline advertising budget of $183.4 
million. The committee further notes that the request 
represents a 15.2 percent increase to advertising. When 
compared to its end strength increases over the future years 
defense program, the committee believes that this request is 
ahead of need.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $20.0 
million in OMN for SAG 3C1L Recruiting and Advertising.

Navy administration decrease

    The budget request included $25.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy (OMN), of which $1.1 billion was for SAG 4A1M 
Administration.
    The committee recommends a decrease of $1.0 million in OMN 
for SAG 4A1M.

Navy audit reduction

    The budget request included $25.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy (OMN), of which $1.1 billion was for SAG 4A1M 
Administration.
    The committee notes that within this request was an 
increase of $158.4 million for audit efforts, which has a 
baseline of $370.9 million. The committee notes that the 
Department of Defense has reported to the committee that the 
Navy is ranked last among 27 organizations within the DOD for 
progress in achieving a clean audit. While the committee notes 
the importance of the audit to making the Department of Defense 
more efficient, the committee believes that this increase is 
unjustified.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $50.0 
million in OMN for SAG 4A1M for Navy audit efforts.

Resilient Energy Program Office

    The budget request included $25.9 billion in the Operation 
and Maintenance, Navy (OMN), of which $485.3 million was for 
SAG 4B2N Planning, Engineering, and Program Support.
    The committee continues to strongly support the Navy's 
Resilient Energy Program Office (REPO), which has successfully 
executed over 49 energy resilience projects leveraging non-
Department of Defense funding in Texas, Tennessee, Mississippi, 
Florida, North Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, South Carolina, 
Arizona, Nevada, California, Maryland, New Jersey, New York, 
Connecticut, Rhode Island, Washington, Hawaii, Italy, and 
Japan. However, the committee understands that some fiscal year 
2020 projects are at risk due to lack of funding in Texas, 
North Carolina, and several other states.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in OMN for SAG 4B2N for the REPO office to ensure that 
all fiscal year 2020 projects are executed.

Cyber operations-peculiar capabilities--Navy

    The budget request included $25.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy (OMN).
    Elsewhere in this Act, the committee recommended a 
provision that would allow the Secretaries of the military 
departments to use money authorized for appropriation for 
Operation and Maintenance (O&M) up to $3.0 million to develop 
cyber operations--peculiar capabilities. The provision would 
allow the Department of Defense to use its O&M funds for the 
rapid creation, testing, fielding, and operation of cyber 
capabilities that would be developed and used within the 1-year 
appropriation period.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an undistributed 
increase of $3.0 million in OMN for cyber operations--peculiar 
capabilities.

Cyber operations--peculiar capabilities--Marine Corps

    The budget request included $3.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Marine Corps (OMMC).
    Elsewhere in this Act, the committee recommended a 
provision that would allow the Secretaries of the military 
departments to use money authorized for appropriation for 
Operation and Maintenance (O&M) up to $3.0 million to develop 
cyber operations--peculiar capabilities. The provision would 
allow the Department of Defense to use its O&M funds for the 
rapid creation, testing, fielding, and operation of cyber 
capabilities that would be developed and used within the 1-year 
appropriation period.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an undistributed 
increase of $3.0 million in OMMC for cyber operations--peculiar 
capabilities.

Air Force savings from revised housing cost share

    The budget request included $21.2 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force (OMAF), of which $0.0 million was for 
SAG 011Z Base Support. The committee notes that the budget 
request included a transfer of $7.2 billion from base to 
overseas contingency operations for SAG 011Z Base Support.
    The committee notes that this Act contains a provision that 
would amend the 5 percent cost share requirement for the 
Services to 2 percent with the additional 3 percent left to the 
discretion of the Secretary of the relevant military department 
on a project by project basis.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $32.4 
million in OMAF for SAG 011Z Base Support.

US CYBERCOM

    The budget request included $323.1 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force (OMAF), for SAG 015E US CYBERCOM.
    The committee is aware of the growing capabilities needed 
to counter adversaries in the cyberspace domain as highlighted 
in the National Defense Strategy. The committee recognizes the 
need to improve the capabilities of Cyber National Mission 
Force and therefore supports the request of U.S. Cyber Command 
(CYBERCOM) to re-align certain funds to support the Cyber 
National Mission Force Capability Acceleration Plan. The 
committee also supports CYBERCOM's request to increase funding 
for the Cyber National Mission Force Mobile and Modular Hunt 
Forward Kit and the ETERNALDARKNESS program.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $1.5 
million to accelerate the development of Cyber National Mission 
Force capabilities, an increase of $5.3 million for the Cyber 
National Mission Force Mobile and Modular Hunt Forward Kit, and 
an increase of $18.0 million for ETERNALDARKNESS in OMAF for 
SAG 015E.

Air Force advertising reduction

    The budget request included $21.2 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force (OMAF), of which $167.7 million was for 
SAG 033A Recruiting and Advertising.
    The committee notes that the Air Force requested $9.1 
million in addition to its baseline advertising budget of $96.7 
million. The committee further notes that the request 
represents a 9.4 percent increase to advertising. When compared 
to its end strength increases over the future years defense 
program, the committee believes that this request is ahead of 
need.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease in OMAF of 
$6.0 million for SAG 033A for Recruiting and Advertising.

Cyber operations--peculiar capabilities--Air Force

    The budget request included $21.2 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force (OMAF).
    Elsewhere in this Act, the committee recommended a 
provision that would allow the Secretaries of the military 
departments to use money authorized for appropriation for 
Operation and Maintenance (O&M) up to $3.0 million to develop 
cyber operations--peculiar capabilities. The provision would 
allow the Department of Defense to use its O&M funds for the 
rapid creation, testing, fielding, and operation of cyber 
capabilities that would be developed and used within the 1-year 
appropriation period.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an undistributed 
increase of $3.0 million in OMAF for cyber operations--peculiar 
capabilities.

Innovative Readiness Training increase

    The budget request included $37.4 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide (OMDW), of which $165.7 million was 
for SAG 4GT3 Civil Military Programs.
    The committee notes that $15.7 million of the request for 
Civil Military Programs was for Innovative Readiness Training 
(IRT). The committee is aware that the Armed Forces continue to 
face readiness challenges due to budgetary constraints. The 
committee continues to recognize the value of IRT, which 
affords to the Armed Forces the most realistic joint training 
opportunities for National Guard, Reserve, and Active-Duty 
members.
    The committee understands that IRT offers complex and 
challenging training opportunities for domestic and 
international crises. The committee is also aware that Alaska, 
Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Indiana, 
Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, 
Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, 
North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, and 
Wyoming all use IRT.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $14.3 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GT3 for IRT.

STARBASE program

    The budget request included $34.7 billion for Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $165.7 million was 
for SAG 4GT3 Civil Military Programs.
    The committee notes that the Science and Technology 
Academies Reinforcing Basic Aviation and Space Exploration 
(STARBASE) program is a highly effective program that improves 
the knowledge and skills of students in kindergarten through 
12th grade in science, technology, engineering, and 
mathematics. Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of 
$15.0 million for SAG 4GT3 Civil Military Programs for the 
STARBASE program.

Defense Information Systems Agency MilCloud

    The budget request included $2.0 billion in OMA for SAG 
4GT9 Defense Information Systems Agency.
    The committee recommends a reduction of $5.0 million for 
SAG 4GT9 for MilCloud.

Sharkseer transfer

    The budget request included $601.2 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide(OMDW), SAG 4GU9 Defense Information 
Systems Agency--Cyber.
    The committee included a provision in the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) that required the Secretary of Defense to transfer 
the operations and maintenance for the Sharkseer cybersecurity 
program from the National Security Agency to the Defense 
Information Systems Agency.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $35.1 
million in OMDW, SAG 4GU9 for the Sharkseer program.

Assessment, monitoring, and evaluation

    The budget request includes $697.0 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTD Defense Security 
Cooperation Agency, of which $9.1 million is for assessment, 
monitoring, and evaluation (AM&E).
    The committee notes that section 383 of title 10, United 
States Code, requires the Secretary of Defense to maintain an 
AM&E program of the security cooperation programs and 
activities of the Department of Defense (DOD). This requirement 
was included as an integral component of the security 
cooperation reforms contained in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) to 
ensure that the DOD allocates sufficient emphasis and 
resourcing to developing and implementing an AM&E program that 
is rigorous and comprehensive, that provides for the continuous 
review of security cooperation programs from inception to 
completion, and that measures outcomes against clearly defined 
objectives. DOD's progress to date in developing the 
organizational capacity and expertise to conduct AM&E across 
the security cooperation enterprise is wholly inadequate. The 
committee notes that the Defense Security Cooperation Agency's 
fiscal year 2020 base and overseas contingency operations 
budget request for its security cooperation account, the Indo-
Pacific Maritime Security Initiative, and the Ukraine Security 
Assistance Initiative--all programs largely focused on 
providing equipment and training to tactical and operational-
level forces of foreign partners--is approximately $1.6 billion 
while its budget request for AM&E is $9.1 million.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $11.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTD for AM&E.

Defense Security Cooperation Agency

    The budget request included $697.0 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-Wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTD Defense Security 
Cooperation Agency, of which $397.0 million is for the security 
cooperation account.
    The committee notes that the reforms to the Department of 
Defense's (DOD) security cooperation enterprise required by the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328) sought to rationalize and streamline the 
authorities and associated funding available for security 
cooperation and enhance the effectiveness of DOD planning, 
execution, and oversight. Additionally, that law emphasized the 
critical importance of non-materiel solutions to the 
effectiveness of DOD security cooperation efforts, namely 
through an increased emphasis on building the institutional 
capacity of foreign partners to more competently manage and 
sustain their own forces and the equipment and related 
assistance provided by the United States. The reforms also 
highlighted the need to mature the DOD security cooperation 
workforce and the development and implementation of a rigorous 
assessment, monitoring, and evaluation (AM&E) program to ensure 
that DOD programs are appropriately scoped and meeting clearly 
defined objectives.
    However, while funding for DSCA's security cooperation 
account--which is primarily used to provide equipment and 
training to foreign partners to build capacity at the tactical 
and operational levels--has grown from approximately $895 
million in fiscal year 2018 for base and OCO to the $1.2 
billion requested for fiscal year 2020 for base and OCO, the 
DOD continues to insufficiently prioritize and resource 
congressionally-mandated efforts relating to DOD security 
cooperation workforce development, AM&E, and institutional 
capacity building. The committee believes that this imbalance 
inhibits appropriate security cooperation program design, 
execution, and oversight, which could lead to suboptimal 
outcomes and wasted taxpayer dollars.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $11.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTD for the security cooperation 
account.

Consolidated adjudication facility

    The budget requested included $889.7 million in Operations 
and Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTE Defense 
Security Service.
    The committee recommends an increase of $10.0 million for 
the Consolidated Adjudication Facility of the Defense 
Counterintelligence and Security Agency, for a total of $899.7 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTE Defense Security Service.

Impact aid

    The budget request included $45.8 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $2.9 billion was for 
SAG 4GTJ Department of Defense Education Activity. The amount 
authorized to be appropriated for OMDW includes the following 
changes from the budget request. The provisions underlying 
these changes in funding levels are discussed in greater detail 
in title V of this committee report.

                    [Changes in millions of dollars]
 
 
 
Impact aid for schools with military dependent                     +40.0
 students.............................................
Impact aid for children with severe disabilities......             +10.0
    Total.............................................             +50.0
 

Terminal High Altitude Area Defense Missile Defense Agency sustainment

    The budget request included $37.4 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $522.5 million was 
for SAG011A Missile Defense Agency (MDA).
    Elsewhere in this report, the committee has stated its 
views regarding the transition of the Terminal High Altitude 
Area Defense program from the MDA to the Department of the 
Army.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $99.8 
million in OMDW for SAG011A MDA.

Bien Hoa dioxin cleanup

    The budget request included $1.6 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTN Office of the 
Secretary of Defense, of which no funds were proposed for Bien 
Hoa dioxin cleanup in Vietnam.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $15.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN for Bien Hoa dioxin cleanup.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nation-wide human health 
        assessment

    The budget request included $1.6 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTN Office of the 
Secretary of Defense, of which no funds were proposed for the 
ongoing Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 
Nation-wide human health assessment related to contaminated 
sources of drinking water from per- and poly-fluoroalkyl 
substances.
    The committee continues to strongly support the ongoing 
human health assessment. Accordingly, the committee recommends 
an increase of $10.0 million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN for the 
ongoing CDC assessment.

Department of Defense Emerging Contaminants increase

    The budget request included $1.6 billion in the Operation 
and Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTN Office of 
the Secretary of Defense, of which no funds were for the 
Department of Defense (DOD) Emerging Contaminants.
    The committee continues to support the mission of the 
office to study, analyze and evaluate threats to warfighters 
and their families. However, the committee is also concerned 
that the DOD has not allocated enough resources to the office 
given its workload and the likelihood that the DOD will have to 
address an increasing number of emerging contaminants in the 
future--for example, 1,4 Dioxane, Perfluorohexane sulfonic 
acid, and 1,2,3 Trichloropropane--much like it has with per- 
and polyfluoroalkyl substances in sources of drinking water.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $1.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN for the DOD Emerging Contaminants.

Industrial Policy program support

    The budget request included $1.6 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTN Office of the 
Secretary of Defense, including funds for Industrial Policy 
program support.
    The committee notes that the September 2018 Department of 
Defense report titled ``Assessing and Strengthening the 
Manufacturing and Defense Industrial Base and Supply Chain 
Resiliency of the United States'' includes numerous 
recommendations for addressing risks in the industrial base.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $15.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN to fund Industrial Policy program 
support to facilitate the acquisition of tools and performance 
of analysis needed to address industrial base risks.

Improvement of occupational license portability for military spouses 
        through interstate compacts

    The budget request included $1.6 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTN Office of the 
Secretary of Defense.
    The committee remains concerned about the lack of 
portability of employment licenses and credentials across State 
lines, which hinders military spouse employment. Due to the 
delays and expense involved in re-licensure and re-
credentialing, many military spouses decide not to practice 
their professions. This becomes a financial and career choice 
issue for military families, impacting servicemembers' desire 
to stay in the military.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $4.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN, for the activities outlined in 
title V of this Act. The relevant provision would require the 
Secretary of Defense to enter into a cooperative agreement with 
the Council of State Governments to assist with the funding and 
development of interstate compacts on licensed occupations.

National Commission on Military Aviation Safety

    The budget request included $1.6 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTN Office of the 
Secretary of Defense.
    Elsewhere in this Act, the committee is recommending a 
provision that extends the term for the National Commission on 
Military Aviation Safety. The committee notes that this 
extension will require additional funding.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN for the National Commission on 
Military Aviation Safety.

Supplemental funding for the National Commission on Military, National, 
        and Public Service

    The budget request included $1.6 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTN Office of the 
Secretary of Defense.
    As required by law, the National Commission on Military, 
National, and Public Service is expected to deliver its final 
report in the spring of 2020. This unique commission will make 
important recommendations that, if realized, could affect every 
American. Due to the breadth of the Commission's mandate and 
the extensive outreach required to engage with Americans across 
the country, the commission may exceed its original funding 
authorization by a modest amount.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $1.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN to provide supplemental funding 
for the National Commission on Military, National, and Public 
Service.

Readiness and Environmental Protection Initiative

    The budget request included $1.6 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTN Office of the 
Secretary of Defense, of which $75.0 million was for the 
Readiness and Environmental Protection Initiative (REPI).
    The committee notes that encroachment resulting from 
incompatible development and loss of habitat continues to pose 
a long-term threat to readiness and to the viability of 
military installations, ranges, and airspace throughout the 
country. The REPI involves partnerships between the Department 
of Defense (DOD), State and local governments, and conservation 
organizations to share the costs of acquiring proactive 
easements from willing landowners.
    The committee continues to support the mission of the REPI 
and believes that the program has proven to be highly effective 
in addressing encroachment. The committee supports REPI's 
mission to ``protect mission capability by cost-sharing the 
long-term protection of high-value habitat and limiting 
incompatible land uses around DOD ranges and installations'' 
and to ``help avoid more expensive costs, such as the need for 
training workarounds or segmentation and future military 
construction to modify or relocate training assets to less-
restricted locations.''
    However, the committee is concerned that the DOD continues 
to underfund the REPI despite its success to date and the high 
degree of leverage from partner contributions. The Department 
has expressed concerns about the growing need to protect key 
installations, ranges, and airspace yet has failed to match 
those concerns with adequate resources.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $25.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN for the REPI and strongly 
encourages the Department to reflect in future REPI budget 
requests the urgency of the problem of encroachment and the 
success the REPI has achieved in addressing this problem.

Defense Digital Service expert civilians

    The budget request included $324.0 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTQ Washington 
Headquarters Services.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Defense 
Digital Service in helping the Department of Defense to build, 
buy, and deploy technology and digital services.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in OMA for SAG 4GTQ Washington Headquarters Services 
for the Defense Digital Service.

Sharkseer transfer

    The budget request included $15.7 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), SAG 9999 Classified Programs.
    The committee included a provision in the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) that required the Secretary of Defense to transfer 
the operations and maintenance for the Sharkseer cybersecurity 
program from the National Security Agency to the Defense 
Information Systems Agency.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $35.1 
million in OMDW, SAG 9999 for the Sharkseer program.

Foreign currency fluctuation reduction

    The budget request included $158.1 billion for Operation 
and Maintenance.
    The committee believes that, when foreign currency 
fluctuation (FCF) rates are determined by the Department of 
Defense, the balance of the FCF funds should be considered. 
Accordingly, the committee recommends an undistributed decrease 
of $607.0 million for FCF.

Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps increase

    The budget request included $292.8 billion in total 
Operations and Maintenance funding, of which $316.3 million was 
for Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps (JROTC).
    The committee believes that JROTC programs are an important 
program for the Nation and have historically been underfunded 
by the Department of Defense.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $25.0 
million in Operations and Maintenance, to be allocated to the 
Services for Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps programs.

Printing inefficiency reduction

    The budget request included $158.1 billion for Operation 
and Maintenance.
    The committee notes that a recent Government Accountability 
Report found numerous inefficiencies in the printing operating 
of the Department of Defense.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an undistributed 
decrease of $8.0 million for printing inefficiencies.

Transfer of OCO to Base account

    The budget request included $123.9 billion for Operation 
and Maintenance in base funding. The committee notes that the 
President's budget request included $97.9 billion in the 
Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) account for activities 
that are traditionally funded out of base accounts. The 
committee believes that OCO for Base funding should be 
transferred into the base accounts.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $81.3 
billion to Operation and Maintenance base funding.

                       Items of Special Interest


Arctic search and rescue

    The committee is aware that growing international interest 
and changing environmental conditions in the Arctic have led to 
increased commercial and governmental activity in the High 
North. With this steady surge, the committee believes the 
capabilities of the United States to conduct search and rescue 
operations throughout the Arctic needs to be commensurate for 
the activity in the region. The committee notes that the 
Department of Defense's Report to Congress on Strategy to 
Protect United States National Security Interests in the Arctic 
Region, a report required by section 1068 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92), identified the need for additional personnel recovery 
capability in this region. Specifically, the report calls for 
``forward-deployed/based assets in a sustainable location and/
or rapidly deployable air drop response/sustainment packages 
suitable to remote land, cold water, or ice pack operating 
environments.''
    The committee understands that the 176th Wing of the Alaska 
National Guard is the closest and only dedicated response force 
with the refueling capability to respond to a search and rescue 
incident in the Arctic. The committee notes that the unit 
currently possesses 2 air-dropped, palletized Arctic 
Sustainment Packages to enable the survival of 50 individuals 
for 3 or more days in extreme Arctic conditions.
    Accordingly, the committee encourages the Department of 
Defense to review how additional resources could benefit search 
and rescue operations throughout the Arctic region.

Army Training Next virtual reality pilot program

    The committee recognizes the advantages of augmenting 
rotary wing initial entry aviator training with virtual reality 
flight capabilities. The United States Army Aviation Center of 
Excellence is executing a series of pilot programs to validate 
the effectiveness and potential cost savings of virtual flight 
training throughout fiscal year 2019. The committee is 
encouraged by the Army's adoption of this training approach, 
which will increase frequency and repetitions of basic flight 
maneuvers using a low-cost commercial off-the-shelf virtual 
training solution.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the committee no later than January 1, 
2020, comparing the results of the three pilot programs to the 
traditional training curriculum and detailing the results of 
the three separate iterations with an emphasis on student 
proficiency, comprehension, progress, and cost avoidance.

Battle Record Information Core Environment (BRICE) maintenance 
        application

    The committee is encouraged by the Air Force's Battle 
Record Information Core Environment program (BRICE), which was 
developed in partnership with industry and validated to the 
National Security Agency's National Information Assurance 
Partnership standard. This has enabled BRICE to become the 
Department of Defense's (DOD) first connected mobile 
application authorized for mission-enabling tasks to be 
performed with DOD controlled unclassified information 
leveraging both cloud (United States Air Force Cloud Computing 
Environment) and legacy mainframe systems. The limited 
introduction of BRICE to the Air Force Reserve Center aircraft 
maintenance community at Davis Monthan AFB has resulted in time 
savings per maintenance action, improved data accuracy, and 
increased efficiency in repairs and maintenance on A-10 
aircraft. The committee is encouraged by the Air Force's BRICE 
program and its mission to increase flight readiness while 
driving down the cost of maintaining the fleet of A-10 
aircraft. The committee recommends that the Air Force examine 
opportunities to expand the BRICE iOS app to all Active-Duty 
and reserve maintainers that support the A-10 and the F-16 
fleets.

Cold spray technology

    The committee recognizes the advancements of cold spray 
technologies and the need to accelerate the delivery of 
technical capabilities to impact the warfighter and to advance 
dominant technologies in a timely manner. The committee notes 
that the use of cold spray technologies in certain applications 
during the production, repair, and maintenance process may lead 
to significant cost savings for the Department of Defense. The 
committee strongly recommends continued development and use of 
this technology across the Services to include science and 
technology, manufacturing, and procurement programs.

Comptroller General review of Department of Defense utility resilience 
        planning to support cybersecurity threats

    The committee recognizes that on-base utilities systems 
within the Department of Defense (DOD) are increasingly being 
connected to the internet. The benefits of such connection 
could include improved utilities efficiencies and the 
collection of more near-real-time data for improved utilities 
management. At the same time, the connectivity could expose DOD 
utilities systems to cyber threats that could undermine 
installation mission capability. Accordingly, the committee 
directs the Comptroller General of the United States to 
evaluate: (1) To what extent have the military departments 
implemented a DOD instruction to enhance the cybersecurity of 
industrial control systems and what, if anything, remains 
incomplete as of the time of the start of this review; (2) What 
challenges have the military departments encountered in 
implementing DOD Instruction 8510.01 and how effectively have 
the challenges been overcome; (3) How effectively have the 
military departments implemented industry leading practices to 
enhance utilities industrial control systems cybersecurity; and 
(4) How effectively do the military departments conduct tests 
of the cybersecurity of industrial control systems and 
implement improvements to security to counter any identified 
weaknesses.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to provide a briefing on the preliminary 
findings to the congressional defense committees not later than 
March 1, 2020, with a final report to be provided at a mutually 
agreed upon time.

Comptroller General review of mobility in contested environments

    The committee recognizes that the United States has the 
most advanced military equipment and the best-trained troops in 
the world. The committee notes, however, that military strength 
means little if the United States cannot deploy and sustain its 
forces wherever they are needed. Moving U.S. troops and 
military cargo is the role of strategic mobility-airlift to fly 
cargo and personnel, sealift to steam cargo and equipment from 
the United States, and ships or warehouses based abroad that 
pre-position key equipment and sustainment supplies. The 
committee understands that future military conflicts are 
increasingly likely to occur in an environment contested across 
all domains, subsequently restricting freedom of mobility 
assets and putting these forces at risk. Operational plans must 
reflect the anticipated attrition of both combat and mobility 
assets and associated personnel. The committee notes that the 
Department of Defense is in the process of a critical 
examination of how it executes mobility in contested 
environments, but it remains concerned that strategic mobility 
requirements may not be fully addressed.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Comptroller General 
of the United States to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees to address the following: (1) How are 
strategic mobility mission requirements evolving, and what 
implications, if any, are there for strategic mobility force 
structure; (2) What challenges does the Department face in 
protecting strategic mobility forces, and what impact, if any, 
do these have on maintaining needed warfighting capabilities 
and readiness; (3) To what extent has the Department developed 
mitigation plans to address any challenges and risk areas, to 
include relevant training, exercises, and concept development; 
and (4) Any other related matters deemed appropriate in order 
to provide a comprehensive examination of mobility in contested 
environments.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a preliminary classified briefing to the Senate Armed 
Services Committee not later than February 1, 2020, with the 
report to be submitted at a date to be determined at the time 
of the briefing.

Corrosion prevention briefing

    The committee is aware of the significant problem caused by 
corrosion, which can lead to costly repairs and decreased 
readiness of military forces. The committee notes that 
according to a 2016 Department of Defense report, corrosion 
costs in 2016 alone were $20.6 billion, and the Government 
Accountability Office has produced numerous report citing the 
direct correlation between corrosion and readiness. The 
committee believes that, to most effectively meet mission-
critical demands for military painter training at bases across 
the United States, which directly impacts corrosion, the 
Department could establish a competitive bidding process for a 
National Center for Military Painter Training and Applied 
Research. The committee believes that such a program could 
enable the Department to maximize readiness, safety, and cost 
savings through corrosion prevention and control by meeting the 
demand for trained military painters, growing partnerships in 
the military paint industry, and expanding the role of 
technology in painter training and certification.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Department to 
provide a briefing, no later than November 1, 2019, to the 
congressional defense committees on the following: (1) A list 
of facilities, labs, and universities focused on corrosion 
prevention, to include a description of work for each location; 
(2) Current funding sources for each location; (3) Return on 
investment, if applicable, for each location; and (4) A 
determination by the Department if a National Center for 
Military Painter Training and Applied Research could benefit 
the Department, and, if so, the cost, steps, and process 
required to create and establish such a center.

Data collection and reporting to validation of small arms simulation 
        readiness improvements and resourcing planning

    The committee continues to recognize that substantial value 
can be gained through small arms simulation training systems 
that use biometrics, advanced human performance techniques, and 
robust data collection and reporting to maximize and verify 
improved lethality and readiness requirements. The committee 
particularly notes the importance of next generation internet 
technology-based systems capable of automatically collecting 
and reporting on hundreds of points of trainee data, such as 
shooter baselines, rounds fired, target engagement, live-fire 
readiness, and qualification standards outcomes. Some of these 
systems also use algorithms to determine remediation 
requirements.
    The committee believes that this type of data collection 
and analysis is essential to validating that the appropriate 
military servicemembers are receiving the lethality and 
warfighter readiness training that they require and to driving 
more data-informed resourcing determinations during the 
planning, programming, and budgeting process. The committee is 
concerned, however, that there continues to be a reliance 
across the Services on legacy small arms training systems and 
programs of record that are not capable of, or are not required 
to, deliver advanced human performance, biometrics, and overall 
trainee data collection and reporting capabilities, making it 
difficult to validate a system's true training effectiveness, 
its cost savings (in ammunition, reduced training time, travel, 
and range safety), and overall justification for system 
sustainment and budget submissions.
    Accordingly, the committee directs each of the Secretaries 
of the military departments to provide a report, no later than 
February 1, 2020, detailing plans to ensure that all existing 
and new small arms training systems, or training-as-a-service 
contracts, are capable of delivering advanced human performance 
techniques, biometrics, and robust shooter data collection, to 
include descriptions of how these data will be used to: (1) 
Validate each system's effectiveness in delivering readiness, 
lethality requirements, and measurable live fire qualification 
improvements; and (2) Drive more informed determinations for 
training and readiness resourcing across the planning, 
programming, budget, and execution process.

Defense energy resilience tools for project development

    The committee is encouraged by the progress made by the 
Office of the Secretary of Defense and the Secretaries of the 
military departments to standardize tools to encourage the 
implementation of policies that accelerate energy resilience 
project development, such as the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology, Lincoln Laboratories (MIT-LL) life-cycle cost 
analysis tool. The tool allows the Department of Defense to 
align its mission requirements with cost effective energy 
resilience solutions and to meet National Defense Strategy 
objectives. The committee notes that senior leaders across the 
Department have stated that the Department is developing and 
implementing this life-cycle cost analysis tool for use across 
the enterprise.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide an implementation plan for the MIT-LL life cycle 
cost analysis tool to ensure the effective adoption of mission-
based decision-making and for the successful implementation of 
energy resilience projects across the Department of Defense. At 
a minimum, the committee directs that the Department provide 
the list of military installations that have and will implement 
the life-cycle cost analysis tool, along with the funding 
required by fiscal year to implement the tool's adoption and 
use. This plan shall include the necessary partnerships needed 
to develop, implement, and integrate the life-cycle cost 
analysis tool in the most cost-effective manner. The Secretary 
shall provide this plan to the Senate Armed Services Committee 
no later than February 1, 2020.

Development and fielding of expeditionary energy technology in the 
        Department of Defense

    The committee acknowledges the significant logistical 
burden that fossil fuel generators place on expeditionary 
forces operating at home and abroad. Further, the committee 
understands the necessity of increasing agility in the future 
operating environment by reducing the logistical footprint 
required to sustain forces. Therefore, the committee encourages 
the Department of Defense to invest broadly in emerging 
technology to harness, integrate, and store energy from 
multiple energy sources to extend the operational reach of 
Active-Duty, reserve, and National Guard forces.

Encroachment on military installations

    The committee notes that the Military Aviation and 
Installation Assurance Siting Clearinghouse was established 
years ago to deconflict and strike a balance with potential 
encroachment from energy projects near military installations 
while assuring that military operations and training continue 
unabated and with minimal impact. The committee strongly 
encourages the Clearinghouse to continue to ensure mission 
compatibility and appropriately collaborate with individual 
military installations, States, and developers on any 
mitigation measures. Lastly, the committee encourages the 
Clearinghouse to consider future military requirements when 
reviewing and approving any energy projects to ensure that such 
projects are consistent with the National Defense Strategy.

Extended funding obligation period for private contracted ship 
        maintenance

    The committee notes that the administration submitted a 
legislative proposal that would enable the Navy to conduct a 
ship depot maintenance pilot program to evaluate the benefits 
of an extended funding obligation period for private contracted 
ship maintenance.
    This pilot program would include an extension of the 
obligation period of fiscal year 2020 funding for private 
contracted ship maintenance through September 30, 2021.
    The committee supports the inclusion of this administration 
legislative proposal in the Defense Appropriations Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020.
    The committee believes that the pilot program would 
demonstrate that the performance of lengthy maintenance 
availabilities, which often cross fiscal years, improves with 
additional flexibility to more efficiently employ funds 
appropriated by the Congress, before, during, and after 
scheduled maintenance availabilities.

Improving Navy radar training and readiness

    The committee is aware that the Navy currently lacks 
schoolhouse radar training assets for three ship classes, 
resulting in no hands-on training for sailors destined for 
these ships before reporting aboard ship. The committee notes 
the criticality of radar to a ship's defensive capabilities and 
that a lack of training has the potential to impact both 
overall readiness and combat capability of the fleet. The 
committee believes that sailors will be best positioned to 
operate, maintain, and fully utilize the capabilities of the 
radar with enhanced hands-on training prior to reporting aboard 
ship.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to provide a report to the congressional defense 
committees no later than February 1, 2020, with a plan to 
determine what schoolhouse training assets are required for all 
ship radar systems to include what resources would be required. 
The report shall include at a minimum a complete listing of all 
Navy radar systems, land-based assets used to train sailors on 
those radar systems, radar systems that do not currently have 
land-based radar training assets, and a timeline to acquire 
missing land-based radar training assets.

Improving oversight of pilots in non-operational staff positions

    The committee has been concerned about the Air Force's 
ability to sustain the required numbers of aviators in the face 
of competing demands for their services, including increased 
demand for aviators in remotely piloted aircraft (RPA) 
operating units and continued demand for rated officers in non-
flying positions. The committee commends the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) for its report, published in 
February 2019, titled ``Unmanned Aerial Systems: Air Force 
Pilot Promotion Rates Have Increased but Oversight Process of 
Some Positions Could Be Enhanced'' (GAO-19-155).
    In the report, the GAO observed that ``[t]he Air Force has 
not reviewed its oversight process to ensure that it is 
efficiently managing its non-operational staff positions that 
require aviator expertise. Air Force officials explained that 
over the last 10 years, the Air Force reduced the number of 
squadrons but had not reviewed the number of non-operational 
staff positions. Similarly, the Air Force has had no widely 
accessible oversight process to monitor whether it had 
established an accurate number of non-operational staff 
positions required to support the new RPA career field.'' As a 
result, the committee believes that, at a minimum, the Air 
Force must regularly review justifications for non-operational 
staff positions requiring pilot expertise as part of a broader 
strategy to address the pilot shortage.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to establish a mechanism to review the justifications for 
non-operational staff positions requiring pilot expertise at 
regular intervals and to report to the committee by September 
30, 2020, on the mechanism to be established to accomplish 
these periodic reviews. The Secretary's review and report shall 
include evaluation of the mix of positions requiring pilot 
expertise as well as the mix of operational positions and 
support positions required to support operations.

Liability exposure for electric companies during national emergencies

    The committee understands that the Department of Defense's 
(DOD) Mission Assurance Strategy emphasizes the importance of 
grid-provided power and the ability of DOD installations to 
execute their full range of missions. The committee is 
concerned that in the event of intentional or unintentional 
power outages, DOD installations may not be currently 
structured to have assured access to such energy as needed to 
implement the National Defense Strategy. Accordingly, the 
committee strongly encourages the DOD, in coordination with 
other federal agencies, to work with the Congress to find a 
solution.

Lightweight ammunition

    The committee is aware of continued progress in reducing 
weight for vehicle, helicopter, and soldier platforms through 
the development and qualification of polymer ammunition and 
polymer link systems. These developments support urgent 
requirements in reducing the weight burden on all weapon 
systems and, in particular, helicopter systems. Further, the 
committee understands that, over the last several years, 
initial polymer ammunition and polymer links have been 
qualified, fielded, and combat proven. There remains a 
continued urgent need for further polymer ammunition and 
polymer link weight reduction. As such, the committee 
recommends continued support to develop and qualify further 
weight savings in polymer ammunition and polymer link systems.

Marine Depot Maintenance Command facilities review

    The committee notes the organic industrial base serves as 
the backbone of our Nation's military readiness. Specific to 
the Marine Corps, the committee notes that the Marine Corps' 
Marine Depot Maintenance Command (MDMC), comprised of 
Production Plant Albany and Production Plant Barstow, provides 
worldwide expeditionary logistics support to the Fleet Marine 
Force, other forces, and agencies. The committee understands 
that the MDMC is responsible for the maintenance, repair, and 
overhaul of ground equipment that keeps the Nation's fighting 
forces' weapon systems in a constant state of readiness.
    The committee notes that the facilities at Production Plant 
Albany average 26 years, which hinders its ability to adopt and 
sustain innovative processes and equipment solutions, thereby 
hampering its overall effectiveness and hurting the overall 
readiness of the Marine Corps. For example, the committee 
understands that automation and robotics in the blast and paint 
processes would greatly improve throughput but the current 
facilities will not support the technology. The committee 
further notes that welding operations need welding positions to 
increase safety, efficiency, and quality but the facilities do 
not have sufficient space and overhead clearance.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to review the current facilities of the MDMC and provide a 
briefing to the congressional defense committees, not later 
than February 1, 2020, on how the facilities at Production 
Plant Albany and Production Plant Barstow impact the Marine 
Corps' ability to adopt and sustain innovative process and 
equipment solutions. The briefing shall include cost estimates 
and timelines for improving throughput and increasing 
efficiency with items such as but not limited to automation, 
robotics, and welding positions.

National Guard Unit equipped flying squadrons

    The committee recognizes that the Air National Guard 
enterprise is based on established capstone principles that 
notionally set the foundational framework for mission 
allocation in the 54 states and territories. One of those 
Capstone Principles is to allocate at least one unit-equipped 
wing and flying squadron to each State. New Mexico is one of 
three states-the others being Virginia and Washington-that have 
an operational flying mission, but, due to the classic 
associate construct, it lacks ownership of aircraft. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force, in 
consultation with the Chief of the National Guard Bureau, to 
report to the committee within 60 days of the date of the 
enactment of this Act to present additional options for 
achieving an operational flying mission in each State.

Prepositioned Assets in the Indo-Pacific Region

    The committee understands that the Department of Defense 
(DOD) positions billions of dollars' worth of assets, including 
combat vehicles, rations, medical supplies, and repair parts, 
at strategic locations around the world to use during early 
phases of operations. In the 2018 National Defense Strategy, 
the DOD acknowledged an increasingly complex global security 
environment, characterized by the re-emergence of long-term, 
strategic competition among nations such as China and Russia. 
In addition, the strategy emphasized the need for investments 
to prioritize prepositioned stocks in order to enable resilient 
and agile logistics during initial operations. In February 
2019, the Commander of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM) 
called China and Russia-with their expanding and modernizing 
militarizes-key threats to the region. For many years, the 
Government Accountability Office has identified the potential 
for duplication among the Services' prepositioned stock 
programs due to limited joint oversight and fragmented 
management within the DOD. Further, the committee has had an 
ongoing interest in DOD's strategy and oversight of its 
propositioning programs.
    Accordingly, given these issues and the National Defense 
Strategy's priorities, the committee directs the Comptroller 
General of the United States to evaluate the following: (1) 
What types of equipment and materiel does the DOD preposition 
in the Pacific region and what is the condition of these 
assets; (2) To what extent has DOD assessed its strategy for 
prepositioning assets in the Pacific region based on the 2018 
National Defense Strategy; (3) To what extent do the Services 
coordinate their prepositioning programs in the Pacific region 
in order to achieve efficiencies and reduce unnecessary 
duplication; (4) What challenges, if any, does DOD face in 
prepositioning assets in the Pacific region; (5) What do the 
Services' operational and logistics concepts mean for future 
prepositioning requirements; (6) What types of equipment is 
necessary and at what locations; and (7) Are future plans being 
coordinated by the Services and informed by INDOPACOM 
contingency plans?
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the committee on the preliminary 
observations of this review, not later than February 1, 2020, 
and to submit a report on a date agreed to at the time of the 
briefing.

Preservation of the Force and Families initiative

    The committee notes that nearly 2 decades of continuous 
combat operations and the associated effects of an 
extraordinarily high operational tempo in physically and 
mentally demanding environments has placed enormous stress on 
our special operations forces (SOF) and their families. In 
response to the unique requirements of SOF, U.S. Special 
Operations Command (SOCOM) established the Preservation of the 
Force and Families (POTFF) initiative in order to provide 
holistic physiological, psychological, family, and spiritual 
performance support programs at all echelons of SOCOM and the 
SOF components. The committee strongly supports the POTFF 
program and believes that it is integral for ensuring the 
readiness, health, and mission effectiveness of SOF while also 
providing SOF families with support to deal with the unique 
challenges that they face, including unpredictable training and 
deployment cycles. The committee encourages SOCOM to continue 
to prioritize the POTFF program and seek innovative 
opportunities to ensure POTFF remains effective and responsive 
to the needs of SOF and their families.

Public-to-public partnerships briefing requirement

    The committee recognizes the Department of Defense's 
continuing efforts to control costs and increase reliability in 
its installation utility systems. Whether through energy 
savings performance contracts, utility energy savings 
contracts, or some other contract vehicle, the committee 
commends the Department for leveraging private partnerships to 
reduce costs and enhance installation resiliency.
    The committee notes with interest that the Department 
commissioned a report in 2016 on the use of public-to-public 
partnerships by military installations. Such partnerships, 
including intergovernmental service agreements, may be one 
approach to sustaining operations and services for military 
installations. The committee believes that public-to-public 
partnerships should continue to be a tool for the Services to 
increase installation readiness and resiliency and to enhance 
military families' quality of life.
    The committee recommends that the Department work with 
State and local communities to lower barriers that inhibit 
consideration or implementation of public-to-public 
partnerships. The committee is interested in novel approaches 
to installation readiness and resiliency and is willing to 
consider providing new authorities to support such efforts. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Department to provide a 
briefing to the congressional defense committees, not later 
than December 1, 2019, on current public-to-public 
partnerships. The briefing shall include at a minimum the 
number of public-to-public partnerships in place, the estimated 
cost savings such partnerships provide, barriers preventing 
broader use of such partnerships, and partnerships that are 
currently under consideration.

Recycled content in clothing items

    The committee commends the Department of Defense (DOD) on 
its most recent update to DOD Instruction 4105.11, 
``Procurement of Sustainable Goods and Services,'' dated August 
31, 2018. Further, the committee supports the DOD's efforts to 
give preference to the procurement of sustainable goods and 
recycled content products. These efforts were highlighted in 
the DOD's October 2012 Report to Congress on the Preference for 
Uniforms, Organizational Clothing, and Personal Equipment that 
Contain Recycled Materials, a report required by the Senate 
report accompanying S. 1253 (S. Rept. 112-26) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012. This report 
cited four military clothing items that, at the time, used 
recycled materials, including the Protective Combat Uniform for 
the Special Forces, the Third Generation Extended Cold Weather 
Clothing System, underwear, and the Army fleece jacket. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees, not 
later than February 1, 2020, on the feasibility of 
incorporating more recycled content products into these 
clothing items and other environmental protection clothing 
items.

Report on future Combat Search and Rescue in support of National 
        Defense Strategy

    The committee acknowledges that the Air Force is the only 
service with a Combat Search and Rescue (CSAR) capability to 
provide to a Joint Force Commander and is concerned with 
maintaining this critical mission in the face of great power 
competition. Therefore, the committee directs the Chief of 
Staff of the Air Force to complete a comprehensive study on the 
future combat search and rescue mission in the near peer threat 
environment expected in the 2030s. Prior to any realignment of 
rescue assets and by September 30, 2020, the Chief of Staff of 
the Air Force shall present the findings and recommendations of 
the study to the congressional defense committees. This study 
shall address:
          (1) The evolving threat environment and its 
        significance to the CSAR mission;
          (2) The optimal organizational responsibility for 
        CSAR and components of a task force;
          (3) Alternative solutions to maintaining the social 
        contract with isolated personnel (IP) that a rescue 
        force is available to return the IP to friendly forces;
          (4) Title 10 service responsibilities and joint force 
        mission sets, to include command and control, planning 
        and execution, and IP recovery; and
          (5) Any other matters that the Chief of Staff deems 
        relevant.

Report on guidelines for maintenance and preservation of Department of 
        Defense historic aircraft and spacecraft

    The committee is concerned that the Department of Defense 
lacks clear and consistent guidelines for maintaining and 
disposing historic aircraft and spacecraft. The national 
collection of historic military aircraft and spacecraft is an 
important asset that helps honor our veterans and educates the 
public about key milestones in American history and military 
technology. However, there have been recent instances of 
historical aircraft being destroyed or sold for scrap without 
opportunity for the Department or an aviation museum to 
consider their preservation. It is in the best interest of the 
public to ensure that the Department has a clear process to 
determine disposition of historic aircraft and spacecraft given 
their historical value.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to conduct a study that reviews the existing process for 
retiring and disposing historical military aircraft and 
spacecraft. The study shall also recommend a strategy with 
clear and consistent guidelines for the preservation, 
restoration, or disposition of historic aircraft and 
spacecraft. In addition, the study shall consider the merits of 
creating a review board comprised of representatives from 
service aviation museums and other public aircraft museums to 
ensure that deliberations relating to historic aircraft and 
spacecraft are inclusive of various perspectives. The Secretary 
shall present the results of the study in a report to the 
congressional defense committees no later than February 1, 
2020.

Report on Perfluorooctane Sulfonate and Perfluorooctanoic Acid 
        contamination on military installations

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Commandant of the Coast Guard, to submit 
to the congressional defense committees, not later than March 
1, 2020, a report listing military and Coast Guard 
installations or facilities potentially germane to the 
Perfluorooctane Sulfonate (PFOS) and Perfluorooctanoic Acid 
Lifetime Drinking Water (PFOA) Health Advisories established by 
the Environmental Protection Agency and those whose drinking 
water supply may exceed the PFOA and PFOS levels recommended in 
these advisories. The Secretary shall consult with the 
Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency and 
affected States, tribes, and local governments, using 
information on PFOA and PFOS manufacturing and use.

Report on Special Federal Aviation Regulation waivers for U.S. air 
        carriers and recommendations to expedite re-designation of 
        civil aircraft as state aircraft

    The committee is aware that there are cases in which U.S. 
forces do not have organic capacity to provide for personnel 
recovery and medical evacuation and are forced to rely on 
contract aircraft and aircrew to meet this critical mission 
requirement. The committee encourages the Department of Defense 
(DOD) to utilize U.S. companies to fill the mission requirement 
to the maximum extent possible. Additionally, the committee is 
concerned that the existing process for DOD to obtain Special 
Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) waivers for U.S. air 
carriers prevents the Department from executing critical 
missions in a safe, effective, and timely manner.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to promptly notify the congressional defense committees, 
beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act, on Special 
Federal Aviation Regulation (SFAR) waivers requested by the DOD 
from the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) that are: (1) 
Approved; (2) Denied; or (3) Still awaiting action from the FAA 
15 days after the original request date. The committee also 
directs the Secretary to conduct a study on the existing 
process for DOD's re-designating civil aircraft as state 
aircraft and, based on the findings, to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees, not later than February 1, 
2020, with recommendations that would expedite the designation 
process.

Rotary-wing aviation foreign internal defense

    The committee notes that, in 2012, U.S. Special Operations 
Command (SOCOM) decided to transfer responsibility for the 
rotary-wing aviation foreign internal defense (RW AvFID) 
mission from U.S. Air Force Special Operations Command to U.S. 
Army Special Operations Command (USASOC). At the time, the 
committee expressed concern about the planned transfer of 
responsibility and the potential degradation of the quality and 
availability of special operations-unique RW capabilities to 
meet the requirements of the geographic combatant commanders, 
particularly those capabilities resident in the 160th Special 
Operations Aviation Regiment (SOAR). While the committee 
understands the importance of training partner nation aviation 
forces and supports the broader AvFID mission, there remain 
concerns about whether the current designation of USASOC and, 
in particular, the use of the 160th SOAR as the principal 
special operations forces aviation unit for RW AvFID is the 
most efficient and effective approach to meet related 
requirements. Therefore, the committee directs the Commander of 
SOCOM to provide a briefing not later than July 1, 2019, on 
SOCOM's current approach to the RW AvFID mission. The briefing 
shall address, at a minimum, the following:
          (1) A description of SOCOM's current RW AvFID 
        requirements;
          (2) A description of any changes to USASOC's 
        organization, manning, and resourcing as a result of 
        its assumption of the RW AvFID mission;
          (3) An assessment of USASOC's operational readiness 
        and ability to meet RW AvFID requirements;
          (4) An assessment of the impact of USASOC's assuming 
        the RW AvFID mission on its ability to meet its other 
        non-FID-related RW operational and training 
        requirements;
          (5) Any other matters that the Commander deems 
        relevant.

Storm water utilities privatization

    The committee has repeatedly expressed its support for the 
utilities privatization (UP) program, which enhances energy 
supply, efficiency, reliability, and resilience. Privatization 
of storm water systems is especially important, particularly in 
light of recent devastating storms that imperil base 
infrastructure inland and along the coasts. Despite clear 
direction from the Congress, elements of the Department have 
taken positions on storm water privatization that contravene 
the intent of the Congress and prevent the Services from 
realizing the financial and readiness benefits of UP. The 
Army's policy, however, has been a welcome exception to this 
general recalcitrance. The Army successfully privatized storm 
water systems at Fort Knox pursuant to section 2688 of title 
10, United States Code, in 2004. Because the committee supports 
a data-driven approach as outlined in the Department's 
supplemental guidance on UP issued in February 2019, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide a 
report, no later than March 1, 2020, analyzing the savings and 
efficiencies that it has realized from the Fort Knox 
privatization effort. The report shall be submitted in 
unclassified form and for public distribution, but it may 
contain a restricted annex.

Study on fire extinguishers

    The committee is aware that portable fire extinguishers are 
essential to the safety of members of the Armed Forces and 
their families. The committee notes that protection of 
servicemembers and their families is imperative to the 
readiness of the force. Every Department of Defense building 
should apply building and fire codes that are in line with 
national model codes and State building and fire codes. The 
committee notes that national model codes promulgated by the 
National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) and the 
International Code Council (ICC) have been adopted by almost 
every State in the Nation. The committee is concerned that the 
removal of these devices and subsequent adherence to the change 
in Unified Facilities Criteria (UFC) has the potential to harm 
force readiness and protection across the Services.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to deliver a report to the congressional defense committees, no 
later than March 1, 2020, on the current fire suppression 
mechanisms, with emphasis on the need for portable fire 
extinguishers, employed by the Department. The study should 
include but not be limited to: (1) A breakdown of all fire 
codes that the Department follows in accordance with 
requirements set forth by the national model fire codes 
developed by the NFPA and the ICC; (2) Any fire codes the 
Department does not follow with justification for why it is 
waived; (3) The types of buildings that currently employ both 
sprinklers and extinguishers; (4) A list of high-risk types of 
buildings that would benefit from redundant fire suppression 
that include risks to personnel or egress concerns; (5) 
Specific to on-base housing, what, if any, fire extinguishers 
are supplied for cooking areas by either the Department or 
private contractors; (6) Recommendations, including a timeline, 
on how to implement redundant fire suppression mechanisms and 
what changes to the UFC would be required.

Westover Air Reserve Base--Defense Logistics Agency study of fuel 
        pipeline

    The committee is concerned that the Defense Logistics 
Agency (DLA) has chosen to transition fuel services to Westover 
Air Reserve Base (ARB) from pipeline services to tank trucks as 
a delivery method. The DLA solicited a jet fuel requirement and 
evaluated both the Buckeye pipeline and tank truck services, 
utilizing a bid evaluation model (BEM) and a mixed integer 
linear optimization program that evaluates a variety of 
factors, including product prices, transportation costs, 
additive costs, and excessive throughput charges. The committee 
understands that, after utilizing the BEM, the laid-down cost 
for fuel tank truck services was over 1 cent lower than the 
laid-down cost for pipeline delivery, and the resultant savings 
were $42,000. The committee notes that the DLA claims that the 
Buckeye jet fuel pipeline to Westover ARB is still available 
for use in the event of delivery interruptions.
    The committee needs to understand the strategic impacts of 
this action to Department of Defense operators who may rely on 
this pipeline during surge conditions and contingency 
operations, especially given that Westover ARB is the largest 
reserve airbase in the country. Part of its core mission and 
function is to provide surge capacity to the expeditionary Air 
Force during any rapid deployment to Europe, the Middle East, 
and elsewhere. The committee notes that Westover ARB has 
demonstrated this surge capacity during real world 
contingencies in the past. The decision to switch from pipeline 
to truck delivery was based solely on cost, and the savings, 
while noteworthy, are not significant. The committee is 
concerned that this action could have profound impacts during 
an emergency and questions whether the movement from pipeline 
to fuel trucks may increase risk for rather small cost savings.
    Therefore, the committee directs the DLA to provide a 
report to the congressional defense committees, no later than 
February 1, 2020, on: (1) How emergency and contingencies were 
factored into the DLA's analysis; (2) How emergencies and 
contingencies will be handled when there is a rapid increase in 
the need for fuel; (3) How quickly the Buckeye pipeline can be 
activated during an emergency or during any day-to-day 
disruptions of fuel delivery to Westover; and (4) Whether there 
would be any cost implications of re-activating the fuel 
pipeline to Westover ARB.

Women servicemember personal protective equipment

    The committee understands that a leading cause of injury 
among servicemembers is ill-fitting personal protective 
equipment (PPE) and combat gear and that women 
disproportionately incur such injuries. The committee further 
recognizes that properly fitting equipment enhances performance 
and reduces safety risks. The committee believes that all 
servicemembers should be properly equipped with correctly 
fitting PPE and combat gear during training and deployment, 
especially given that consistent physical training with PPE 
used in a combat environment has been demonstrated to decrease 
the likelihood of injury. Although the committee acknowledges 
recent progress made by the Services to provide appropriate PPE 
and combat gear for a variety of body types, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to identify and address 
barriers to equipment access and delays in delivery, 
particularly when servicemembers require custom or nonstandard-
size equipment.
    Accordingly, the committee encourages the Department to 
prioritize testing, contracting, procuring, and fielding new 
PPE-particularly with regard to appropriate sizes for women 
servicemembers--to ensure operational readiness and safety, 
which will enhance performance, lethality, and combat readiness 
while improving gender integration across the Services. The 
Secretary should in turn encourage the Services to pay 
particular attention to women-specific body armor, helmets--
including those used by tankers and pilots--and coveralls in 
sizes that fit women mechanics, tankers, and pilots. 
Additionally, the committee encourages the Services to make 
available lightweight, adjustable, and modular ruck frames 
being used by the Marine Corps but not available in other 
Services. Lastly, the committee believes that the Department 
should ensure that all equipment is sourced in quantities that 
allow them to be issued at initial training and used during 
deployment.

              TITLE IV--MILITARY PERSONNEL AUTHORIZATIONS

                       Subtitle A--Active Forces

End strengths for active forces (sec. 401)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
Active-Duty end strengths for fiscal year 2020, as shown below:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     FY 2020                  Change from
                                                  FY 2019  -----------------------------------------------------
                    Service                     Authorized                              FY 2020       FY 2019
                                                             Request   Recommendation   Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army..........................................     487,500    480,000         480,000          0          -7,500
Navy..........................................     335,400    340,500         340,500          0          +5,100
Marine Corps..................................     186,100    186,200         186,200          0            +100
Air Force.....................................     329,100    332,800         332,800          0          +3,700
                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------
    DOD Total.................................   1,338,100  1,339,500       1,339,500          0          +1,400
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                       Subtitle B--Reserve Forces

End strengths for Selected Reserve (sec. 411)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
Selected Reserve end strengths for fiscal year 2020, as shown 
below:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     FY 2020                  Change from
                                                  FY 2019  -----------------------------------------------------
                    Service                     Authorized                              FY 2020       FY 2019
                                                             Request   Recommendation   Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard...........................     343,500    336,000         336,000          0          -7,500
Army Reserve..................................     199,500    189,500         189,500          0         -10,000
Navy Reserve..................................      59,100     59,000          59,000          0            -100
Marine Corps Reserve..........................      38,500     38,500          38,500          0               0
Air National Guard............................     107,100    107,700         107,700          0             600
Air Force Reserve.............................      70,000     70,100          70,100          0             100
                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------
    DOD Total.................................     817,700    800,800         800,800          0               0
Coast Guard Reserve...........................       7,000      7,000           7,000          0               0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

End strengths for Reserves on active duty in support of the reserves 
        (sec. 412)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
full-time support end strengths for fiscal year 2020, as shown 
below:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     FY 2020                  Change from
                                                  FY 2019  -----------------------------------------------------
                    Service                     Authorized                              FY 2020       FY 2019
                                                             Request   Recommendation   Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard...........................      30,595     30,595          30,595          0               0
Army Reserve..................................      16,386     16,511          16,511          0             125
Navy Reserve..................................      10,110     10,155          10,155          0              45
Marine Corps Reserve..........................       2,261      2,386           2,386          0             125
Air National Guard............................      19,861     22,637          22,637          0           2,776
Air Force Reserve.............................       3,849      4,431           4,431          0             582
                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------
    DOD Total.................................      83,062     86,715          86,715          0           3,653
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

End strengths for military technicians (dual status) (sec. 413)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
military technicians (dual status) for the reserve components 
of the Army and Air Force for fiscal year 2020, as shown below:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     FY 2020                  Change from
                                                  FY 2019  -----------------------------------------------------
                    Service                     Authorized                              FY 2020       FY 2019
                                                             Request   Recommendation   Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard...........................      22,294     22,294          22,294          0               0
Army Reserve..................................       6,492      6,492           6,492          0               0
Air National Guard............................      15,861     13,569          13,569          0          -2,292
Air Force Reserve.............................       8,880      8,938           8,938          0              58
                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------
    DOD Total.................................      53,527     51,293          51,293          0          -2,234
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The provision would prohibit under any circumstances the 
coercion of a military technician (dual status) by a State into 
accepting an offer of realignment or conversion to any other 
military status, including as a member of the Active, Guard, 
and Reserve program of a reserve component. The provision would 
further specify that if a technician declines to participate in 
such a realignment or conversion, no further action may be 
taken against the individual or the individual's position. The 
provision would require the Chief of the National Guard Bureau 
to certify by January 1, 2020, to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and House of Representatives the number 
of positions realigned from military technician (dual status) 
to a position in the Active, Guard, and Reserve (AGR) program 
of the Air National Guard during fiscal year 2019. Finally, the 
provision would specify that if the number so certified is less 
than 3,190, that the authorized strength for Air National Guard 
military technicians be increased by the difference between the 
number certified and 3,190 (with a maximum increase of 2,292) 
and that authorized AGR strength for the Air National Guard be 
decreased by that same amount.
    The committee is concerned that the Air National Guard did 
not properly validate its requirements under its realignment 
initiative, relying instead on a wishlist from the States 
rather than a rigorous and analytical process to determine what 
positions should be realigned, could be realigned, and what 
should remain technician. While the committee tentatively 
supports the Administration's request for fiscal year 2020, 
subject to the adjustment mechanism provided in the provision, 
the committee reserves the right to reassess this authorization 
as the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 
moves through the legislative process, based on the reporting 
requirements set forth below.
    The committee directs the Chief of the National Guard 
Bureau to provide to the committee quarterly reports on the 
number of positions that have been realigned from technician to 
AGR, by state, occupational specialty, and grade, beginning 
immediately with data available for fiscal year 2019 and 
continuing quarterly through May 1, 2021.

Maximum number of reserve personnel authorized to be on active duty for 
        operational support (sec. 414)

    The committee recommends a provision that would establish 
limits on the number of reserve personnel authorized to be on 
Active Duty for operational support under section 115(b) of 
title 10, United States Code, as of September 30, 2020, as 
shown below:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     FY 2020                  Change from
                                                  FY 2019  -----------------------------------------------------
                    Service                     Authorized                              FY 2020       FY 2019
                                                             Request   Recommendation   Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard...........................      17,000     17,000          17,000          0               0
Army Reserve..................................      13,000     13,000          13,000          0               0
Navy Reserve..................................       6,200      6,200           6,200          0               0
Marine Corps Reserve..........................       3,000      3,000           3,000          0               0
Air National Guard............................      16,000     16,000          16,000          0               0
Air Force Reserve.............................      14,000     14,000          14,000          0               0
                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------
    DOD Total.................................      69,200     69,200          69,200          0               0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Authorized strengths for Marine Corps Reserves on active duty (sec. 
        415)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 12011(a)(1) and section 12012(a) of title 10, United 
States Code, by adjusting the controlled grade caps for field 
grade officers and senior enlisted marines to account for 
increased end strength in the Marine Corps Active Reserve 
Program. The provision would also expand the field grade 
officer and senior enlisted strength tables to allow for future 
end strength increases.

              Subtitle C--Authorization of Appropriations


Military personnel (sec. 421)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for military personnel activities at the 
levels identified in section 4401 of division D of this Act.

                              Budget Items


Military personnel funding changes

    The amount authorized to be appropriated for military 
personnel programs includes the following changes from the 
budget request:

                    [Changes in millions of dollars]
 
 
 
Military personnel underexecution.....................           -918.98
    Total.............................................           -918.98
 

    The committee recommends a total reduction in the Military 
Personnel (MILPERS) appropriation of $918.98 million. This 
amount includes: (1) A reduction of $918.98 million to reflect 
the Government Accountability Office's most recent assessment 
of average annual MILPERS under execution.

                   TITLE V--MILITARY PERSONNEL POLICY

                  Subtitle A--Officer Personnel Policy

Repeal of codified specification of authorized strengths of certain 
        commissioned officers on active duty (sec. 501)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 523 of title 10, United States Code, to require the 
Congress to authorize annually the number of officers serving 
on Active Duty in the grades of major, lieutenant colonel, and 
colonel in the Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps or lieutenant 
commander, commander, and captain in the Navy. This provision 
would take effect in fiscal year 2021 and repeal the authorized 
officer strength table, including all of the previous 
exceptions to the officer strength table.
    The committee notes the officer strength table was 
originally included as a fundamental feature of the Defense 
Officer Personnel Management Act (DOPMA) (Public Law 96-513). 
The strength table was designed to serve as an effective 
limitation on the number of mid-grade officers within each 
service. The House report to accompany the legislation (H. 
Rept. 96-1462) explained that the table would be adjusted over 
time to align with emerging officer manpower requirements. 
However, in practice, the authorized strength table is rarely 
updated and it is no longer linked to strategy or actual 
officer requirements.
    As of the end of fiscal year 2018, each service is largely 
unaffected by the limitations imposed by the strength table. 
For example, the Army finished fiscal year 2018 at 
approximately 78 percent of its authorization for officers 
serving in the grade of major. Majors in the Air Force and 
Marine Corps were respectively at 94 percent and 89 percent of 
authorized levels. The Navy finished fiscal year 2018 at 89 
percent of authorized levels in the grade of lieutenant 
commander. While each service operates more closely to the 
strength table limit for progressively higher grades (e.g., the 
Army was manned at approximately 86 percent of authorized 
lieutenant colonel end strength), the table does not 
effectively limit the Services in the manner envisioned by the 
original DOPMA legislation.
    The committee authorizes annual end strength levels for the 
overall active and reserve components and numerous other 
subsets of total force manpower. This allows end strength to 
fluctuate to meet strategic and budgetary necessities. 
Similarly, this provision would require each military service 
annually to justify required mid-grade officer manpower needs 
to support an annual authorization from Congress. This 
provision would provide greater flexibility to the military, 
while also ensuring Congress continues to perform its vital 
oversight role in ensuring the officer corps is effectively 
managed.
    The provision would not take effect until fiscal year 2021, 
which would provide the Department of Defense the amount of 
time necessary to include an officer end strength request in 
the fiscal year 2021 budget request.
Maker of original appointments in a regular or reserve component of 
        commissioned officers previously subject to original 
        appointment in other type of component (sec. 502)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 531 of title 10, United States Code, to require the 
Secretary of Defense to make regular officer transfer 
appointments onto the Active-Duty list for reserve officers 
currently included on the reserve active-status list.
    The provision would also amend section 12203 of title 10, 
United States Code, to require the Secretary of Defense to make 
reserve officer transfer appointments onto the reserve active-
status list for regular officers currently included on the 
Active-Duty list. The provision would also deem an officer who 
receives an original appointment as a regular commissioned 
officer in a grade under section 531 of title 10, United States 
Code, to have also received an original appointment as a 
reserve officer.
    The committee notes that each of the military departments 
has expressed a desire to expedite the transfer of officers 
between the active and reserve components. One hurdle in the 
current transfer process is the requirement for separate 
appointments into each component. This requirement sometimes 
results in a break-in-service for officers who are attempting 
to transfer from the active component into the reserve 
component, which can adversely affect a servicemember's pay and 
benefits. Additionally, the delay experienced by many officers 
as a result of the current transfer process sometimes 
discourages officers from transitioning into a different 
component.
    Of particular importance is retaining regular officers as 
they transition off of Active Duty. As a practical matter, the 
Services have only one opportunity to retain an officer as a 
member of a reserve component. It is rare for an officer to 
return to the reserve component after fully separating from the 
military. Therefore, the committee believes that removing 
barriers that unnecessarily delay the active-to-reserve 
transfer process is an important step in retaining well-trained 
officer personnel.
Furnishing of adverse information on officers to promotion selection 
        boards (sec. 503)
    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 615 of title 10, United States Code, to expand the 
grades of officers for which credible information of an adverse 
nature must be furnished to a promotion selection board. In 
addition, the provision would require that credible information 
of an adverse nature be furnished to a promotion selection 
board and its members at each stage or phase of the board, 
concurrent with the screening, rating, assessment, evaluation, 
discussion, or other consideration of the officer or of the 
officer's official military personnel file.
Limitation on number of officers recommendable for promotion by 
        promotion selection boards (sec. 504)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 616 of title 10, United States Code, to limit the 
number of officers who may be recommended for promotion by a 
promotion selection board to no more than 95 percent of 
officers who are in a given promotion zone.
Expansion of authority for continuation on active duty of officers in 
        certain military specialties and career tracks (sec. 505)
    The committee recommends a provision that would correct a 
technical oversight in section 506 of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) by amending section 637a of title 10, United 
States Code, to authorize each of the Secretaries of the 
military departments to continue certain officers serving in 
the pay grades of O-3 and O-4 in an occupational specialty, 
rating, or specialty code, as designated by the relevant 
secretary, who are not yet retirement eligible but would 
otherwise be subject to statutory separation to complete up to 
40 years of active service.

Higher grade in retirement for officers following reopening of 
        determination or certification of retired grade (sec. 506)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 1370 of title 10, United States Code, to require that 
any increase in the retired grade of an officer resulting from 
the reopening of the determination or certification of that 
officer's retired grade be made by the Secretary of Defense, by 
and with the advice and consent of the Senate. Any associated 
modification of the officer's retired pay would go into effect 
on the effective date of the increase in the officer's retired 
grade and would not be retroactive to the date of the officer's 
retirement. The provision would apply to any increase in 
retired grade that occurs after the date of the enactment of 
this Act, regardless of when the officer retired.

Availability on the Internet of certain information about officers 
        serving in general or flag officer grades (sec. 507)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
each of the Secretaries of the military departments to make 
available on a public website certain biographical, assignment-
related information about the relevant military department's 
general and flag officers, including public notice when a 
general or flag officer has been reassigned to a new duty 
position. Each secretary may decline to publish such 
information only for reasons of risk to the individual officer 
or to national security and only after informing the Committees 
on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives in writing.

                Subtitle B--Reserve Component Management


Repeal of requirement for review of certain Army Reserve officer unit 
        vacancy promotions by commanders of associated active duty 
        units (sec. 511)

    The committee recommends a provision that would repeal 
section 1113 of the Army National Guard Combat Readiness Reform 
Act of 1992, which was included in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1993 (Public Law 102-484). 
This section required the review of a recommended unit vacancy 
promotion of an officer in the Selected Reserve by the 
commander of the Active-Duty unit associated with the Selected 
Reserve unit of that officer.

                Subtitle C--General Service Authorities


Modification of authorities on management of deployments of members of 
        the Armed Forces and related unit operating and personnel tempo 
        matters (sec. 515)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 991 of title 10, United States Code, to limit the 
ability of the Secretary of Defense to delegate deployment 
threshold exceptions to Senate-confirmed civilian officials 
within the Department of Defense. The provision would also 
require the Secretary of Defense to prescribe a separate policy 
to track dwell time for reserve members of the Armed Forces.

Repeal of requirement that parental leave be taken in one increment 
        (sec. 516)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 701 of title 10, United States Code, to remove the 
requirement that military leave taken in connection with the 
birth or adoption of a child be taken only in one increment.

Digital engineering as a core competency of the Armed Forces (sec. 517)

    The committee recommends a provision that would establish a 
policy of the Department of Defense to promote and maintain 
digital engineering as a core competency of the civilian and 
military workforces of the Department. The provision would 
require the Secretary of Defense to appoint a civilian official 
of the Department of Defense, at a level no lower than 
assistant secretary of defense, for the development and 
discharge of the policy. The provision would also require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit an implementation plan to the 
congressional defense committees not later than June 1, 2020.

Modification of notification on manning of afloat naval forces (sec. 
        518)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 525 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) to 
make technical changes to congressional notifications germane 
to the manning of afloat naval forces.

Report on expansion of the Close Airman Support team approach of the 
        Air Force to the other Armed Forces (sec. 519)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretaries of the military departments to submit to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives a joint report on the feasibility and 
advisability of expanding the Close Airman Support team 
approach employed by the Air Force for use by the other Armed 
Forces.

            Subtitle D--Military Justice and Related Matters


Part I--Matters Relating to Investigation, Prosecution, and Defense of 
                        Sexual Assault Generally


Department of Defense-wide policy and military department-specific 
        programs on reinvigoration of the prevention of sexual assault 
        involving members of the Armed Forces (sec. 521)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to promulgate a comprehensive policy to 
reinvigorate the prevention of sexual assault among members of 
the Armed Forces, within 180 days after enactment of this Act.
    The provision would require in the comprehensive policy 
inclusion of programs that: (1) Provide education and training 
on the prevention of sexual assault; (2) Promote healthy 
relationships; (3) Are designed to empower and enhance the role 
of non-commissioned officers in the prevention of sexual 
assault; (4) Foster social courage to promote interventions to 
prevent sexual assault; (5) Address behaviors across the 
continuum of harm; (6) Counter alcohol abuse, including binge 
drinking; and (7) Encompass such other matters as the Secretary 
of Defense deems appropriate.

Enactment and expansion of policy on withholding of initial disposition 
        authority for certain offenses under the Uniform Code of 
        Military Justice (sec. 522)

    The committee recommends a provision that would vest only 
in a commissioned officer in a grade not below 0-6, who is 
authorized to convene special courts-martial, the authority to 
determine the disposition of specified offenses under the 
Uniform Code of Military Justice (Chapter 47 of title 10, 
United States Code).
    The provision would establish that, when the victim of any 
such offense is in a different chain of command than the 
subject, only an officer of like grade with special court-
martial convening authority in the chain of command of the 
victim may determine the disposition of offenses in connection 
with the victim's alleged misconduct arising out of the 
incident.
    The permissible dispositions determinations that may be 
rendered by such an officer include: (1) No action; (2) 
Administrative action; (3) Imposition of non-judicial 
punishment; (4) Preferral of charges; (5) Dismissal or referral 
of charges to court-martial for trial if charges were preferred 
by a subordinate; or (6) Forwarding the charges to a superior 
or subordinate authority for further disposition.
    Generally, if an officer's disposition determination 
differs from the recommendation made by the officer's legal 
advisor, the matter will be referred to a Special Victim 
Prosecutor, Senior Trial Counsel, or Regional Trial Counsel not 
in the chain of command of the officer making the initial 
disposition determination for review and recommendation to a 
staff judge advocate in the chain of command. That staff judge 
advocate would advise the next superior commander, who will 
decide whether to endorse or supersede the initial disposition 
determination.
    The training provided to commissioned officers in the 
grades of 0-6 and above on the exercise of such disposition 
determination authority must include specific training on 
sexual harassment, sexual assault, and family abuse and 
domestic violence, as the Secretary of Defense deems 
appropriate, to inform such disposition determinations.

Training for Sexual Assault Initial Disposition Authorities on exercise 
        of disposition authority for sexual assault and collateral 
        offenses (sec. 523)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
comprehensive training for Sexual Assault Initial Disposition 
Authorities, as defined by the April 20, 2012, Secretary of 
Defense memorandum, ``Withholding Initial Disposition Authority 
Under the Uniform Code of Military Justice in Certain Sexual 
Assault Cases,'' on the exercise of their authorities in such 
cases, with a view to enhancing the capabilities of such 
authorities and promoting trust and confidence in the military 
justice system.

Expansion of responsibilities of commanders for victims of sexual 
        assault committed by another member of the Armed Forces (sec. 
        524)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
commander of a member of the Armed Forces who is the victim of 
a sexual assault by another member of the Armed Forces to 
provide notification to the victim of every significant event 
associated with the investigation and prosecution of the sexual 
assault and, as applicable, to the confinement of the offender. 
Commanders would not be required to provide such notifications 
to a victim who elects not to receive them. Commanders would be 
charged to document any notifications provided to a victim as 
well as any election by a victim not to receive notifications.
    Further, were an alleged offender subject to prosecution by 
both court-martial and Federal or State civilian court, the 
provision would require the commander to create and maintain 
documentation of the victim's preference as to the forum in 
which the alleged offender should be prosecuted.

Training for commanders in the Armed Forces on their role in all stages 
        of military justice in connection with sexual assault (sec. 
        525)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
training provided to all military commanders to include 
comprehensive training on the role of a commander: (1) In all 
stages of the military justice process in connection with 
sexual assault committed by a member of the Armed Forces, 
including investigation and prosecution; (2) In ensuring that a 
victim of sexual assault is informed of, and has the 
opportunity to obtain, the assistance available by law; (3) In 
ensuring that the victim is afforded all due process rights and 
protections authorized under law; (4) In preventing 
retaliation; (5) In establishing and maintaining a healthy 
command climate; and (6) In any other matters in connection 
with sexual assault deemed appropriate by the Secretary of 
Defense.
    The provision would further require that the training 
provided to commanders incorporate best practices in all 
matters covered. These best practices should be identified and 
brought current through periodic surveys and reviews.

Notice to victims of alleged sexual assault of pendency of further 
        administrative action following a determination not to refer to 
        trial by court-martial (sec. 526)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to promulgate regulations to require a 
commander who determines not to refer a case of alleged sexual 
assault for trial by court-martial to provide the victim with 
notification, no less frequently than monthly, of the status of 
any further action in the case, including non-judicial 
punishment, administrative action, or no action, until a final 
determination of such further action is made.

Safe to report policy applicable across the Armed Forces (sec. 527)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to prescribe a Safe to Report policy 
applicable to all members of the Armed Forces, across both 
active and reserve components, and to cadets and midshipmen at 
the military service academies. A Safe to Report policy is one 
in which a victim of sexual assault who may have committed 
minor collateral misconduct at or about the time of the assault 
or whose minor collateral misconduct is discovered only as the 
result of the investigation of the sexual assault may report 
the assault to authorities without fear of discipline, except 
in cases in which aggravating circumstances increase the 
gravity of the minor collateral misconduct or its impact on 
military good order and discipline.
    The provision would define minor collateral misconduct as 
including: (1) Improper use and possession of alcohol; (2) 
Consensual intimate behavior, including adultery or 
fraternization; (3) Presence in off-limits areas; and (4) Other 
misconduct specified in the regulations promulgated.
    The provision would further require that the regulations 
promulgated by the Secretary specify the aggravating 
circumstances that would increase the gravity of minor 
collateral misconduct or its impact on good order and 
discipline.

Report on expansion of Air Force safe to report policy across the Armed 
        Forces (sec. 528)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Secretaries of 
the military departments and the Secretary of Homeland 
Security, to submit a report assessing the feasibility and 
advisability of applying across the Armed Forces, the Safe to 
Report policy currently applicable only in the Air Force to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives within 180 days of the enactment of this Act.
    The Safe to Report policy currently in effect in the Air 
Force provides that a member of the Armed Forces who is a 
victim of a sexual assault committed by another member of the 
Armed Forces but who may have committed minor collateral 
misconduct at or about the time of the sexual assault or whose 
minor collateral misconduct is discovered only as a result of 
the investigation of the sexual assault may report the assault 
to authorities without fear or receipt of discipline in 
connection with that minor collateral misconduct.

Proposal for separate punitive article in the Uniform Code of Military 
        Justice on sexual harassment (sec. 529)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Joint Service Committee on Military Justice to submit to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives a report setting forth legislative and 
administrative actions required to establish a punitive article 
on sexual harassment in the Uniform Code of Military Justice. 
The report would be required to be submitted within 180 days of 
the date of the enactment of this Act.

Treatment of information in Catch a Serial Offender Program for certain 
        purposes (sec. 530)

    The committee recommends a provision that would exclude 
reports filed with the Catch a Serial Offender Program from 
application of the Freedom of Information Act (5 U.S.C. 552).
    Further, the provision would make plain that transmittal or 
receipt of a restricted report of sexual assault to or by the 
Catch a Serial Offender Program would not terminate the 
report's treatment or status as restricted.

Report on preservation of recourse to restricted report on sexual 
        assault for victims of sexual assault following certain victim 
        or third-party communications (sec. 531)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives a 
report on the feasibility and advisability of a Department of 
Defense policy that would permit a victim of a sexual assault, 
when the victim is a member of the Armed Forces or an adult 
dependent of such a member, to have a report of the assault 
made by the victim to a member of the Armed Forces in the 
victim's or victim's sponsor's chain of command, or to military 
law enforcement, treated as a restricted report. A report on 
the assault made by any individual other than the victim would 
be similarly treated. In preparing the report, which would be 
due not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of 
this Act, the Secretary would be required to consult with the 
Defense Advisory Committee on Investigation, Prosecution, and 
Defense of Sexual Assault in the Armed Forces.

Authority for return of personal property to victims of sexual assault 
        who file a Restricted Report before conclusion of related 
        proceedings (sec. 532)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 586 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2012 (Public Law 112-81) to require the Secretary 
of Defense to prescribe procedures under which a victim of 
sexual assault who files a restricted report may, at any time 
and on a confidential basis, request the return of the victim's 
personal property obtained as part of the sexual assault 
forensic examination. Any such request on the part of the 
victim would not affect the restricted nature of the victim's 
report of sexual assault. The provision would also require a 
Sexual Assault Response Coordinator or Sexual Assault 
Prevention and Response Victim Advocate to inform the victim of 
his or her right to request the return of personal property 
under these procedures but also that any such return might 
negatively affect a subsequent adjudication of the case, should 
the victim later decide to convert the restricted report to an 
unrestricted report. The provision would not affect the 
requirement to retain a sexual assault forensic examination kit 
for the period required in law.

Extension of Defense Advisory Committee on Investigation, Prosecution, 
        and Defense of Sexual Assault in the Armed Forces (sec. 533)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 546(f)(1) of the Carl Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' 
McKeon National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 
(Public Law 113-291) to extend the term of the Defense Advisory 
Committee on Investigation, Prosecution, and Defense of Sexual 
Assault in the Armed Forces by 5 years.

Defense Advisory Committee for the Prevention of Sexual Misconduct 
        (sec. 534)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish and maintain within the 
Department of Defense a Defense Advisory Committee on the 
Prevention of Sexual Misconduct. The Advisory Committee would 
be established not later than 180 days after the enactment of 
this Act and would comprise of not fewer than 20 members, 
including persons with expertise in the prevention of sexual 
assault and behaviors on the sexual assault continuum of harm, 
the prevention of suicide, and the change in culture of large 
organizations. The Advisory Committee would coordinate with the 
Defense Advisory Committee on Investigation, Prosecution, and 
Defense of Sexual Assault in the Armed Forces on matters of 
joint interest and, not later than March 30 of each year, would 
submit an annual report on its activities to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives.

Independent reviews and assessments on race and ethnicity in the 
        investigation, prosecution, and defense of sexual assault in 
        the Armed Forces (sec. 535)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Defense Advisory Committee on Investigation, Prosecution, and 
Defense of Sexual Assault in the Armed Forces to conduct a 
review and assessment of the race and ethnicity of 
servicemembers accused, charged, or convicted of certain sexual 
offenses.

Report on mechanisms to enhance the integration and synchronization of 
        activities of Special Victim Investigation and Prosecution 
        personnel with activities of military criminal investigation 
        organizations (sec. 536)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives a 
report setting forth proposals to enhance the integration and 
synchronization of Special Victim Investigation and Prosecution 
personnel with the activities of military criminal 
investigative organizations in investigations in which both may 
be involved, together with the legislative and administrative 
actions required to implement those proposals.

Comptroller General of the United States report on implementation by 
        the Armed Forces of recent statutory requirements on sexual 
        assault prevention and response in the military (sec. 537)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Comptroller General of the United States to study the Armed 
Forces' implementation of statutory requirements on sexual 
assault prevention and response enacted by the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2004 (Public Law 108-136) and 
each succeeding National Defense Authorization Act through the 
John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232). The provision also would 
require the Comptroller General to submit a report on this 
study to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the 
House of Representatives. For each statutory requirement still 
in force, the report would include an assessment of: (1) 
Whether the requirement has been or is being implemented; (2) 
The actions taken by the Armed Forces to determine whether the 
actions taken pursuant to each requirement have proven 
effective in meeting the intended objective; and (3) Any other 
matters deemed appropriate. Finally, the provision would 
require the Comptroller General to provide to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives, 
not later than May 1, 2020, one or more briefings on the status 
of the study, including any findings and recommendations 
generated by the study to date.

               Part II--Special Victims' Counsel Matters


Legal assistance by Special Victims' Counsel for victims of alleged 
        domestic violence offenses (sec. 541)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretaries of the military departments to provide Special 
Victims' Counsel services to certain military and military-
affiliated civilian personnel who are the victims of an alleged 
domestic violence offense, if a given secretary determines that 
resources are available for this purpose without impairing 
capacity to provide such services to the victims of alleged 
sex-related offenses already authorized by law to receive them. 
The provision would also authorize a given secretary to extend 
the provision of Special Victims' Counsel services, under the 
same terms and conditions, to certain civilian persons who are 
the victims of an alleged sex-related offense or alleged 
domestic violence offense but who are not currently authorized 
to receive such services.

Other Special Victims' Counsel matters (sec. 542)

    The committee recommends a provision that would expand the 
legal assistance authorized to be provided by Special Victims' 
Counsel to include legal consultation and assistance in 
connection with an incident of retaliation, whether occurring 
before, during, or after the conclusion of any criminal 
proceedings.
    The provision would also codify the Special Victims' 
Counsel's duty to solicit the preference of a victim of an 
alleged sex-related offense as to whether the offense should be 
prosecuted by court-martial or in a civilian court with 
jurisdiction over the offense and to advise appropriate 
military prosecutors of the victim's preference.
    Finally, within 120 days of enactment of this Act, the 
provision would require the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives, detailing the manner-including 
the additional personnel, resources, and training required-in 
which the Department of Defense would extend eligibility for 
Special Victims' Counsel services to certain military and 
military-affiliated civilian victims of alleged domestic 
violence offenses and to certain other civilian victims of an 
alleged sex-related or domestic violence offenses, were 
expansion of the program to be authorized in law.

Availability of Special Victims' Counsel at military installations 
        (sec. 543)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
that, in circumstances in which a Special Victims' Counsel is 
not available at a military installation to provide services to 
a member of the Armed Forces who requests such a Counsel, such 
a Counsel be made available not later than 72 hours after the 
member's request.
    Further, the provision would require each of the 
Secretaries of the military departments to submit to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives a report assessing the feasibility and 
advisability of establishing for each Special Victims' Counsel, 
one or more civilian positions to support the Counsel and to 
ensure continuity and the preservation of institutional 
knowledge related to the provision of Special Victims' Counsel 
services. The report would be submitted not later than 180 days 
after enactment of this Act.

Training for Special Victims' Counsel on civilian criminal justice 
        matters in the States of the military installations to which 
        assigned (sec. 544)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
that, on the assignment of a Special Victims' Counsel 
(including a Victim Legal Counsel of the Navy) to a military 
installation in the United States, such Counsel will be 
provided appropriate training on the law and policies governing 
criminal justice matters in the State or States in which the 
military installation is located. Such training would include: 
(1) Victim rights; (2) Protective orders; (3) Prosecution of 
criminal offenses; and (4) Sentencing for conviction of a 
criminal offense.

   Part III--Boards for Correction of Military Records and Discharge 
                          Review Board Matters


Repeal of 15-year statute of limitations on motions or requests for 
        review of discharge or dismissal from the Armed Forces (sec. 
        546)

    The committee recommends a provision that would eliminate 
the 15-year statute of limitations on requests by or on behalf 
of a former servicemember for review by a discharge review 
board of the member's discharge or dismissal from the Armed 
Forces.

Reduction in required number of members of discharge review boards 
        (sec. 547)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1553 of title 10, United States Code, to reduce the 
minimum number of members comprising a Discharge Review Board 
from five to three.

Enhancement of personnel on boards for the correction of military 
        records and discharge review boards (sec. 548)

    The committee recommends a provision that would expand the 
types of healthcare professionals whose provision of medical 
evidence or diagnosis that a current or former servicemember is 
or has experienced post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic 
brain injury, or another mental health disorder must be 
accorded consideration by a board for the correction of 
military records or discharge review board in the matter of 
such an applicant to include social workers with training on 
mental health issues connected with post-traumatic stress 
disorder, traumatic brain injury, or other trauma as well as 
psychologists, psychiatrists, or other specially-trained 
physicians, as currently permitted in law.
    Further, the provision would expand the types of health 
care professionals authorized to render a medical advisory 
opinion to a board for the correction of military records or to 
be a member of a discharge review board considering the 
application of such a servicemember to include social workers 
with training on mental health issues connected with post-
traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, or other 
trauma as well as psychologists, psychiatrists, or other 
specially-trained physicians, as currently permitted in law.

Inclusion of intimate partner violence and spousal abuse among 
        supporting rationales for certain claims for corrections of 
        military records and discharge review (sec. 549)

    The committee recommends a provision that would expand the 
types of cases in which boards for the correction of military 
records and discharge review boards must accord liberal 
consideration to the evidence presented by the servicemember or 
former servicemember in support of an application to the board 
and/or grant expedited consideration of such an application to 
include cases in which post-traumatic stress disorder or 
traumatic brain injury related to sexual trauma, intimate 
partner violence, spousal abuse, or combat serves as all or 
part of the justification for the member or former member's 
request for relief.

Advice and counsel of trauma experts in review by boards for correction 
        of military records and discharge review boards of certain 
        claims (sec. 550)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require a 
board for the correction of military records or a discharge 
review board reviewing a case in which a current or former 
servicemember's request for relief is based on post-traumatic 
stress disorder or traumatic brain injury to seek advice and 
counsel from a psychiatrist, psychologist, or social worker 
with training on mental health issues associated with post-
traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, or other 
trauma.
    The provision would further require that, if the member or 
former member applicant claims sexual trauma, intimate partner 
violence, or spousal abuse, the board seek advice and counsel 
from an expert in trauma specific to sexual assault, intimate 
partner violence, or spousal abuse.

Training of members of boards for correction of military records and 
        discharge review boards on sexual trauma, intimate partner 
        violence, spousal abuse, and related matters (sec. 551)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
that the curriculum of training for members of boards for the 
correction of military records and discharge review boards 
include training in sexual trauma, intimate partner violence, 
spousal abuse, and the various responses of individuals to 
trauma.
    Further, the provision would require that, to the extent 
practicable, any such training be uniform across the Armed 
Forces.

Limitations and requirements in connection with separations for members 
        of the Armed Forces who suffer from mental health conditions in 
        connection with a sex-related, intimate partner violence-
        related, or spousal abuse-related offense (sec. 552)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
that, before a member of the Armed Forces--who was the victim 
of a sex-related, intimate partner violence-related, or spousal 
abuse-related offense during the period of the member's 
military service and who has a mental health condition not 
amounting to a disability--is separated, discharged, or 
released from military service based on that condition, the 
diagnosis of the condition must be both corroborated by a 
competent mental health care professional at or above the level 
of the healthcare professional rendering the diagnosis and 
endorsed by the Surgeon General of the military department 
concerned.
    This provision would apply to all separations, discharges, 
and releases from the Armed Forces that occur on or after the 
date that is 180 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act.

Liberal consideration of evidence in certain claims by boards for the 
        correction of military records and discharge review boards 
        (sec. 553)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
military department boards for the correction of military 
records and discharge review boards to review all claims 
relating to a claimant's discharge or dismissal, or the 
characterization of that discharge or dismissal, with liberal 
consideration of all evidence and information presented by or 
on behalf of the former servicemember.

                Part IV--Other Military Justice Matters


Expansion of pre-referral matters reviewable by military judges and 
        military magistrates in the interest of efficiency in military 
        justice (sec. 555)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
article 30a of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. 
830a) to require the President to prescribe regulations 
governing proceedings related to an expanded set of matters 
that would be authorized to be conducted by military judges and 
military magistrates prior to the referral of court-martial 
charges. Such expanded matters would include the pre-trial 
confinement of, mental capacity of, or responsibility of an 
accused and an accused's request for individual military 
counsel.

Policies and procedures on registration at military installations of 
        civilian protective orders applicable to members of the Armed 
        Forces assigned to such installations and certain other 
        individuals (sec. 556)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish policies and procedures for 
the registration at military installations of any civilian 
protective order issued against: (1) A member of the Armed 
Forces assigned to the installation; (2) A civilian employee 
employed at the installation; or (3) A spouse or intimate 
partner of a member of the Armed Forces on Active Duty assigned 
to the installation or of a civilian employee employed at the 
installation.
    The provision would specify that the policies and 
procedures established by the Secretary must include a 
requirement for notice between and among the commander, 
installation military law enforcement elements, and military 
criminal investigative elements, whenever such a civilian 
protective order is registered. The provision would require 
that a failure to register a civilian protective order may not 
be offered as justification for a lack of enforcement of the 
order by military law enforcement and other personnel who have 
knowledge of it.
    Further, the provision would require that, as soon as 
practicable after establishing the requisite policies and 
procedures, the Secretary of Defense submit to the Committees 
on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives a letter describing those policies and 
procedures and certifying that they have been implemented on 
each military installation.

Increase in number of digital forensic examiners for the military 
        criminal investigation organizations (sec. 557)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
each of the Secretaries of the military departments to increase 
the number of digital forensic examiners in each military 
criminal investigative organization (MCIO) under that 
secretary's jurisdiction by not fewer than 10 examiners above 
the baseline number of digital forensic examiners in each MCIO 
as of September 30, 2019.

Survey of members of the Armed Forces on their experiences with 
        military investigations and military justice (sec. 558)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to conduct a periodic survey--at least 
once every 4 years but not more frequently than once every 2 
years--to be known as the Military Investigation and Justice 
Experience Survey, on the experience of members of the Armed 
Forces with military investigations and military justice. Those 
surveyed would include members of the Armed Forces who are 
victims of an alleged sex-related offense and who made an 
unrestricted report of that offense. Participants would be 
surveyed on their experience with a Special Victims' Counsel 
and, if charges in the victim's case were referred to court-
martial, with the prosecutor and the court-martial in general.

Public access to dockets, filings, and court records of courts-martial 
        and other records of trial of the military justice system (sec. 
        559)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
Article 140a of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. 
940a) to clarify that the Secretary of Defense must act in 
coordination with the Secretary of Homeland Security to apply 
to the United States Coast Guard the uniform standards and 
criteria governing the administration of the military justice 
system, including those associated with: (1) The collection and 
analysis of data; (2) Case processing and management; (3) 
Timely, efficient, and accurate production and distribution of 
records of trial; and (4) Facilitating public access to docket 
information, filings, and records of court-martial proceedings. 
The provision would also clarify that the Privacy Act (5 U.S.C. 
552a) would not apply to court-martial records of trial or to 
docket information, filings, and records made accessible to the 
public as prescribed. As practicable, public access to 
personally identifiable information of minors and victims of 
crime, including victims of sexual assault and domestic 
violence, would be redacted, however. Finally, the provision 
would affirm that its public access requirement would not apply 
to court-martial docket information, filings, or records that 
are classified, subject to a judicial protective order, or 
ordered sealed.

Pilot programs on defense investigators in the military justice system 
        (sec. 560)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
each of the Secretaries of the military departments to execute 
a pilot program to determine whether the presence and 
utilization of defense investigators makes the military justice 
system more fair and efficient and more effective in 
determining the truth. Defense investigators engaged in each 
secretary's pilot shall participate in the military justice 
system in a manner similar to that in which defense 
investigators participate in civilian criminal justice systems, 
and the personnel and activities of pilot program defense 
investigators should be uniform across all military 
departments, to the extent practicable.
    The provision would specify that a defense investigator 
participating in the pilot may question a victim only upon a 
request made through a Special Victims' Counsel or other 
counsel of the victim or the trial counsel.
    Further, the provision would require that, not later than 3 
years after the date of the enactment of this Act, the 
Secretary of Defense submit to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives a consolidated 
report on the defense investigator pilot program with an 
assessment of the feasibility and advisability of establishing 
and maintaining defense investigators as a permanent element of 
the military justice system.

Report on military justice system involving alternative authority for 
        determining whether to prefer or refer charges for felony 
        offense under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (sec. 561)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives a 
report setting forth the results of a study on the feasibility 
and advisability of an alternative military justice system in 
which determinations to prefer or refer charges for trial by 
court-martial offenses for which the maximum punishment 
includes confinement for more than one year under the Uniform 
Code of Military Justice (Chapter 47 of title 10, United States 
Code) would be made by a judge advocate officer in a grade of 
0-6 or higher, who has significant experience in criminal 
litigation and is outside the chain of command of the member of 
the Armed Forces who is the subject of the charges, rather than 
by a commanding officer in the subject's chain of command. The 
report would further assess the feasibility and advisability of 
conducting a pilot program to assess any such alternative 
military justice system and would be required to be submitted 
not later than 300 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act.

Report on standardization among the military departments in collection 
        and presentation of information on matters within the military 
        justice system (sec. 562)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives, 
describing plans to standardize across the military 
departments, to the extent practicable, the collection and 
presentation of matters within their military justice systems, 
including information collected and maintained to facilitate 
public access to court-martial docket information, filings, and 
records and for other purposes set forth in article 140 of the 
Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. 940a). In 
particular, the provision would require the Secretary to assess 
the feasibility and advisability of establishing and 
maintaining a single, Department of Defense-wide military 
justice data management system. The report would be submitted 
not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act.

Report on establishment of guardian ad litem program for certain 
        military dependents who are victim or witness of offenses under 
        the Uniform Code of Military Justice involving abuse or 
        exploitation (sec. 563)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives a 
report on the feasibility and advisability of establishing a 
guardian ad litem program for military dependents, under 12 
years of age or who lack mental or other capacity, who are 
victims or witnesses to an offense under the Uniform Code of 
Military Justice (Chapter 47 of title 10, United States Code) 
that involves an element of abuse or exploitation. Should the 
Secretary determine that establishment of such a program is 
feasible and advisable, the report must include a description 
of: (1) The administrative requirements, including resources, 
required for the program; (2) Best practices, determined in 
consultation with civilian experts on child advocacy; and (3) 
Recommendations for legislative and administrative action 
required to implement the program. The report would be required 
to be submitted not later than 1 year after the date of the 
enactment of this Act.

   Subtitle E--Member Education, Training, Transition, and Resilience


Consecutive service of service obligation in connection with payment of 
        tuition for off-duty training or education for commissioned 
        officers of the Armed Forces with any other service obligations 
        (sec. 566)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2007 of title 10, United States Code, to require that 
an Active-Duty service obligation incurred by an officer for 
the acceptance of tuition assistance for off-duty training or 
education be served sequentially with any other service 
obligation already incurred by the officer.

Authority for detail of certain enlisted members of the Armed Forces as 
        students at law schools (sec. 567)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 2004 of title 10, United States Code, to permit the 
detail of certain enlisted members, as well as officers as 
authorized by current law, as students at law schools for a 
period of training leading to a juris doctor degree. The 
provision would limit the number of enlisted persons and 
officers so detailed to 25 per year and would retain the 
requirement for the competitive selection of detailees. To 
qualify for such detail, an enlisted person must: (1) Have 
served on Active Duty for not less than 4 and nor more than 8 
years; (2) Be in the pay grade E-5, E-6, or E-7 as of the time 
law school training begins; (3) Meet all requirements for 
acceptance of a commission as a commissioned officer in the 
Armed Forces; (4) Agree to accept transfer to be a judge 
advocate, upon completion of law school; and (5) Agree to serve 
on Active Duty for a period of 2 years for each year or partial 
year of legal training received.

Connections of members retiring or separating from the Armed Forces 
        with community-based organizations and related entities (sec. 
        568)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretaries of Defense and Veterans Affairs to enter jointly 
into a memorandum of understanding or other agreements with 
State veterans agencies to transmit information from Department 
of Defense form DD-2648 on individuals undergoing retirement, 
discharge, or release from the Armed Forces, if elected by such 
individuals, to provide or connect veterans to benefits or 
services.

Subtitle F--Defense Dependents' Education and Military Family Readiness 
                                Matters


             Part I--Defense Dependents' Education Matters


Continuation of authority to assist local educational agencies that 
        benefit dependents of members of the Armed Forces and 
        Department of Defense civilian employees (sec. 571)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
$40.0 million in Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide, for 
continuation of the Department of Defense (DOD) assistance 
program to local educational agencies impacted by enrollment of 
dependent children of military members and DOD civilian 
employees.

Impact aid for children with severe disabilities (sec. 572)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
$10.0 million in Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide, for 
impact aid payments for children with disabilities (as enacted 
by Public Law 106-398; 114 Stat. 1654A-77; 20 U.S.C. 7703a), 
using the formula set forth in section 363 of the Floyd D. 
Spence National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001 
(Public Law 106-398), for continuation of Department of Defense 
assistance to local educational agencies that benefit eligible 
dependents with severe disabilities. Subsection (b) of the 
provision would allow the Secretary of Defense to use $5.0 
million of the total amount authorized for payments to local 
educational agencies with higher concentrations of military 
children with severe disabilities at the Secretary's discretion 
and without regard to the section 343 formula.

Ri'katak Guest Student Program at United States Army Garrison-Kwajalein 
        Atoll (sec. 573)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of the Army to conduct an assistance program to 
educate up to five local national students per grade, per 
academic year, on a space-available basis at the contractor-
operated schools on United States Army Garrison-Kwajalein 
Atoll. Under this provision, the Secretary would be authorized 
to provide: (1) Classroom instruction; (2) Extracurricular 
activities; (3) Student meals; and (4) Transportation.

               Part II--Military Family Readiness Matters


Two-year extension of authority for reimbursement for State licensure 
        and certification costs of spouses of members of the Armed 
        Forces arising from relocation to another State (sec. 576)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 476(p)(4) of title 37, United States Code, to extend 
the authority for reimbursement of state licensure and 
certification costs of military spouses arising from relocation 
to another State to December 31, 2024, due to the delayed 
implementation of this authority.

Improvement of occupational license portability for military spouses 
        through interstate compacts (sec. 577)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1784 of title 10, United States Code, to require the 
Secretary of Defense to enter into a cooperative agreement with 
the Council of State Governments to assist with the funding and 
development of interstate compacts on licensed occupations.
    The committee understands that the lack of portability of 
employment licenses and credentials across State lines hinders 
military spouse employment. According to the most recent survey 
data, in 2018, 30 percent of military spouses were unemployed 
and actively seeking work, and approximately 34 percent of 
working military spouses require an occupational license for 
their work. Occupational licenses and credentials often have 
State-specific conditions and processes, causing lengthy 
employment and re-employment delays and high costs for military 
spouses moving between States.
    Due to the delays and expense involved in re-licensure and 
re-credentialing, many military spouses decide not to practice 
their chosen professions. This becomes a financial and career 
choice issue for military families, impacting servicemembers' 
desire to stay in the military. This provision supports the 
process of developing State-based solutions to these issues, 
helping to alleviate the burdens military spouses face when 
moving to new locations in the country and impediments to their 
continued gainful employment.

Modification of responsibility of the Office of Special Needs for 
        individualized service plans for members of military families 
        with special needs (sec. 578)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
subparagraph (F) of section 1781(c)(d)(4) of title 10, United 
States Code, to require the Department of Defense to develop an 
individualized service plan for military family members with 
special needs when requested in connection to the completion of 
a family needs assessment.

Clarifying technical amendment on direct hire authority for the 
        Department of Defense for childcare services providers for 
        Department child development centers (sec. 579)

    The committee recommends a provision that would clarify 
section 559(e) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) by including family 
childcare coordinator services and school age childcare 
coordinator services.

Pilot program on information sharing between Department of Defense and 
        designated relatives and friends of members of the Armed Forces 
        regarding the experiences and challenges of military service 
        (sec. 580)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, within 1 year of the date of the 
enactment of this Act, to enter into an agreement with the 
American Red Cross to conduct a pilot program to encourage 
members of the Armed Forces to designate up to 10 persons to 
whom certain information regarding the military service of each 
such member would be shared. The provision would require the 
Secretary, within 2 years after the pilot program begins, to 
administer a survey to persons who elected to receive 
information under the program to receive feedback on the 
quality of the information they received. Finally, the 
provision would require the Secretary to submit a final report 
on the pilot program to the congressional defense committees 
within 3 years after the program begins.

Briefing on use of Family Advocacy Programs to address domestic 
        violence (sec. 581)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
that, not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment 
of this Act, the Secretary of Defense provide to the Committees 
on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives a briefing on the various mechanisms by which 
the Family Advocacy Programs of the military departments could 
be used and enhanced to end domestic violence among members of 
the Armed Forces and to support survivors of such violence and 
their dependents.

                   Subtitle G--Decorations and Awards


Authorization for award of the Medal of Honor to John J. Duffy for acts 
        of valor in Vietnam (sec. 585)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the President, notwithstanding the time limitations specified 
in section 3744 of title 10, United States Code, or any other 
time limitation with respect to awarding certain medals to 
members of the Armed Forces, to award the Medal of Honor under 
section 3741 of such title to John J. Duffy for acts of valor 
during the Vietnam War.

Standardization of honorable service requirement for award of military 
        decorations (sec. 586)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
Chapter 57 of title 10, United States Code, to standardize the 
requirement for honorable service for awards of medals, 
crosses, bars, and associated emblems. Currently, the 
requirements for honorable service for awards given in 
recognition of distinguished acts vary among the military 
departments, creating confusion and resulting in inequitable 
treatment of servicemembers. This provision would establish a 
single statutory standard that would provide parity in 
treatment of servicemembers across the Department of Defense.

Authority to award or present a decoration not previously recommended 
        in a timely fashion following a review requested by Congress 
        (sec. 587)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1130 of title 10, United States Code, authorizing the 
Secretary of Defense to present an award or decoration 
following the favorable review of a proposal upon request of a 
Member of Congress.

Authority to make posthumous and honorary promotions and appointments 
        following a review requested by Congress (sec. 588)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1563 of title 10, United States Code, to authorize the 
Secretary of Defense to prescribe regulations to make a 
posthumous or honorary promotion following the submission to 
the requesting Member of Congress and to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
of a determination as to the merits of approving the posthumous 
or honorary promotion or appointment. The promotion or 
appointment would not affect retired pay or other benefits 
based upon the individual's military service.

                       Subtitle H--Other Matters


Military funeral honors matters (sec. 591)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1491(b) of title 10, United States Code, to require the 
Secretaries of the military departments to provide full 
military honors for the funeral of a veteran who: (1) Is first 
interred or inurned in Arlington National Cemetery after the 
date of the enactment of this Act; (2) Was awarded the medal of 
honor or the prisoner-of-war medal; and (3) Is not entitled to 
full military honors by the grade of that veteran. 
Additionally, the provision would require each commander of a 
relevant military installation to maintain and carry out a plan 
for the provision, upon request, of full military funeral 
honors at funerals for veterans for whom funeral honors details 
are authorized under section 1491 of title 10, United States 
Code. The provision would prescribe elements of the required 
plans, including the provision of a gun salute by either 
appropriate personnel of the installation, reserve component 
members, or members of veterans' organizations or other 
organizations referred to in section 1491(b)(2) of such title.

Inclusion of homeschooled students in Junior Reserve Officers' Training 
        Corps units (sec. 592)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2031 of title 10, United States Code, to require public 
secondary educational institutions that maintain a Junior 
Reserve Officers' Training Corps unit to permit membership in 
the unit of home-schooled students residing in the area served 
by the institution and who would otherwise be qualified for 
membership in the unit if they were enrolled in the 
institution.

Sense of Senate on the Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps (sec. 
        593)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate on the Junior Reserve Officers' Training 
Corps.

                       Items of Special Interest


Active-Duty Service Commitment for Personnel Graduating Cybersecurity 
        Courses

    The committee remains concerned about recruitment and 
retention of cybersecurity personnel. Of particular concern is 
retention of cybersecurity personnel with significant 
qualifications derived from the Department of Defense's 
institutional training programs. Given the heavy demand for 
these personnel from both the private sector and the public 
sector outside of the uniformed services, the committee directs 
that, not later than February 1, 2020, the Department complete 
an analysis of the desirability of one or more Active-Duty 
service obligations for these personnel. This analysis should 
include an assessment of recruitment impacts. The committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to brief the congressional 
defense committees on the results of the analysis by March 1, 
2020.

Active-Duty service obligations for military service academy graduates

    The committee notes that it has been over 20 years since 
initial Active-Duty service obligations for service academy 
graduates have been modified. Since that time, the real cost 
per graduate has increased by nearly 20 percent. Recent studies 
suggest service academy graduates have lower junior officer 
retention rates then other officer commissioning sources. 
Meanwhile, the increasingly technical nature of officer careers 
results in new officers' spending less time at their first duty 
stations due to lengthier, more demanding, initial skills 
training courses.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in coordination with the Secretaries of the military 
departments, to submit a report, no later than April 1, 2020, 
that answers the following questions:
          (1) How has the real cost per military service 
        academy graduate changed since 1996;
          (2) How do service academy graduate retention rates 
        compare to those of other commissioning sources after 
        servicemembers' initial Active Duty service obligation 
        is complete;
          (3) What effect would an increase in the initial 
        Active Duty service obligation for service academy 
        graduates have on academy application rates;
          (4) How could service academies implement a policy 
        that awards preference for admission to a service 
        academy in exchange for an agreement to serve on Active 
        Duty longer than the required amount of time; and
          (5) What other policies could the Services implement 
        to ensure an adequate return on investment for a 
        service academy graduate?

Adequacy of childcare workforce and capacity across the Department of 
        Defense

    The committee remains concerned that the Department of 
Defense (DOD) and the Services are not adequately prioritizing 
the childcare needs of military families. There is demand for 
highly qualified childcare providers and increased child 
development center (CDC) capacity across the DOD. With 7,000 
military family children requiring but not receiving childcare, 
the Services should further prioritize childcare to improve 
military family readiness.
    The committee understands that 68 percent of the childcare 
need across the DOD is clustered in four geographic regions--
San Diego, the National Capital Region, Hawaii, and Norfolk. At 
some of these locations, there is an insufficient workforce 
available to staff CDCs. At other locations, there is a highly 
qualified workforce available; however, local military 
installations do not have the facility space to expand CDC 
capacity.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to review the CDCs in these four geographic regions and to 
submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than March 
1, 2020, that includes the following: (1) Data on CDC 
waitlists, workforce inadequacies, and facility capacities in 
each region; (2) Specific locations where either CDC 
construction or public-private partnerships with private sector 
childcare providers would increase capacity; and (3) Monetary 
and non-monetary incentives that could be utilized to recruit 
and retain childcare providers at those CDCs.

Air battle manager accessions

    The committee recognizes the important role that air battle 
managers have in establishing command and control in 
battlespace and ensuring that American and allied combat 
aircraft find, identify, and destroy their targets. The 
committee is concerned by the lack of air battle manager 
accessions over the last 5 years compared to what is 
recommended for a sustainable inventory.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives a briefing on current 
accession and retention rates for members of the Air Force 
assigned to the Air Force Specialty Code of Air Battle Manager 
by December 1, 2019. The briefing shall include: (1) A 
description and assessment of plans of the Air Force to meet 
Air Battle Manager requirements as provided by Headquarters of 
the Air Force guidance letters; and (2) A comparison of 
aviation retention bonus take rates for pilots versus air 
battle managers and an explanation of how current air battle 
manager retention bonus amounts were determined.

Assessment and report on expanding the eligibility for the My Career 
        Advancement Account program

    The committee shares the Department of Defense's (DOD) 
commitment to military family readiness, part of which is 
improving military spouse education and employment 
opportunities. In the 2018 Blue Star Families Military Family 
Lifestyle Survey, 30 percent of military spouses reported they 
were unemployed and actively seeking work, while 56 percent of 
employed military spouses stated they were underemployed. When 
compared to the current national unemployment rate of 3.8 
percent, it is clear military spouses experience greater 
impediments when seeking full-time employment than their 
civilian counterparts.
    The My Career Advancement Account (MyCAA) program offers 
eligible military spouses, who are pursuing licenses, 
certifications, or associate's degrees in portable career 
fields, financial assistance toward completing their studies. 
The program is currently open to spouses of certain junior 
servicemembers to jump-start their career paths. The committee 
was encouraged to see the RAND Corporation's study on the MyCAA 
program, ``An Early Evaluation of the My Career Advancement 
Account Scholarship for Military Spouses,'' which found: (1) 
MyCAA program users were more likely to find employment; (2) 
MyCAA scholarships reach the intended population; and (3) MyCAA 
usage positively affects servicemember retention.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to conduct an assessment and to report on the feasibility and 
advisability of expanding the MyCAA program. The assessment 
should include: (1) Analysis of a tailored expansion of program 
eligibility for military spouses, to include but not be limited 
to extending MyCAA financial assistance through the completion 
of users' educational programs; (2) Analysis on expanding 
scholarship eligibility to include vocational schools, 
professional licensure, and medical field clinical supervision 
hours; (3) Costs associated with categories identified for 
potential expansion; (4) Impact on the program if eligibility 
is expanded; (5) Suggestions for improved data collection, to 
include but not be limited to data on program completion after 
a military spouse transitions out of the eligibility window; 
and (6) A determination on whether or not expansion is feasible 
and advisable. The Secretary of Defense shall submit the report 
to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives no later than March 1, 2020.

Basic training athletic shoe variant analysis for new recruits

    The committee notes that the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) required the 
Services to provide American-made athletic shoes at no cost to 
recruits to provide higher quality footwear and to reduce 
injuries during basic training. In order to accommodate 
different sizes and running styles, the Defense Logistics 
Agency awarded contracts for three different variants of 
athletic shoes. The committee is aware, however, that the 
Services vary on how they conduct assessments to determine the 
best shoe variant for each recruit. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Services to brief the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives no later than 
January 1, 2020, on the analysis or assessment provided to new 
recruits to determine the most appropriate shoe variant for 
them. This briefing shall include an assessment of whether 
exchange store retail clerks are trained to conduct a basic 
foot and gait analysis of recruits and to recommend the best 
shoe variant for recruits.

Briefing on Staff Judge Advocates' trial experience

    The committee notes that Article 34 of the Uniform Code of 
Military Justice (10 U.S.C. 834) requires that, before referral 
of charges and specifications to a general court-martial, the 
general court-martial convening authority must submit the 
matter to his or her staff judge advocate. The staff judge 
advocate is required to provide written advice to the convening 
authority, including a recommendation as to disposition of the 
charges and specifications.
    The committee perceives that in order to provide the best 
advice on these matters, it is important that a staff judge 
advocate possess significant knowledge of and experience in the 
military justice system.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretaries of the 
military departments to brief the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than 
December 6, 2019, on the military justice experience required 
for assignment as a staff judge advocate in their respective 
services. As to the judge advocates assigned as a staff judge 
advocate in the military service(s) under the jurisdiction of 
such secretary at any time over the 5 years preceding the date 
of the enactment of this Act, the report shall include the 
average time assigned to perform duties as a trial counsel, 
defense counsel, chief of military justice, chief of defense 
services, or military judge and to other duties that 
contributed to the breadth and depth of the military justice 
knowledge and experience of the officer.

Childcare Parity

    The committee is concerned about the lack of availability 
of childcare for Active-Duty servicemembers on military 
installations and the Services' implementation of childcare 
eligibility priority lists, which dictate the order in which 
children are allocated available spaces in Department of 
Defense (DOD) childcare facilities. In those facilities, over 
3,500 Active-Duty families appear on waiting lists for 
childcare, especially infant care. In DOD Instruction 6060.02, 
the Department has established a priority list to ensure that 
children of Active-Duty servicemembers receive childcare before 
other eligible beneficiary categories. However, the children of 
DOD civilian employees often fill slots in DOD childcare 
facilities, even as Active-Duty servicemembers find themselves 
on waiting lists for many months. Additionally, DOD's priority 
list does not sufficiently address the childcare needs of 
Active-Duty servicemembers who may be single, unmarried, 
separated, or divorced parents.
    The committee is aware that each of the Services treats 
single, unmarried, separated, or divorced parents differently 
regarding their priority for childcare. The committee believes 
that military family stability is an important pillar of 
military family readiness. Therefore, the committee strongly 
encourages the Department to: (1) Standardize the childcare 
eligibility policies of the Services to ensure that single, 
unmarried, separated, or divorced servicemembers receive the 
same opportunities as married servicemembers for childcare, 
regardless of the individual servicemember's residency or 
geographic location; and (2) Ensure the Department prioritizes 
childcare for Active-Duty servicemembers over the childcare 
needs of DOD civilians. The committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a briefing to the committee, no later than 
February 1, 2020, on changes the DOD will make to ensure equity 
in the delivery of its childcare benefits.

Command climate assessment in officer and enlisted appraisal reports

    Section 508 of the Carl Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public 
Law 113-291) requires that that the performance appraisals of a 
commanding officer indicate the extent to which the commanding 
officer has or has not established a command climate in which 
allegations of sexual assault are properly managed and fairly 
evaluated and the extent to which a victim of criminal 
activity, including sexual assault, can report the criminal 
activity without fear of retaliation, including ostracism and 
group pressure from other members of the command. The committee 
believes that these are not ``check-the-block'' requirements. 
They should be given serious consideration when evaluating 
these commanding officers and accurately reflected in 
performance appraisals.
    The committee recognizes that the command climate of an 
organization is greatly influenced by officer and enlisted 
leadership of that organization. Accordingly, the committee 
encourages the Secretaries of the military departments to 
require that all officer and enlisted evaluations include a 
meaningful assessment of the rated officer or enlisted member's 
contribution to a positive command climate.

Comptroller General Study on Effectiveness of Student Loan Forgiveness 
        Program on Readiness and Recruiting

    The committee recognizes the importance of the mission of 
the Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF) program, authorized 
in section 455(m) of the Higher Education Act of 1965 (Public 
Law 89-329), to encourage more Americans to pursue careers 
serving their communities in critical jobs-including careers in 
military service and civilian careers at the Department of 
Defense. The committee further recognizes that a well-
administered PSLF program allows members of the uniformed 
services with student loans to serve their country without 
spending decades repaying federal student loan debt and 
contributes to the successful recruitment and retention of 
highly qualified and educated recruits by eliminating a barrier 
to entry to military or civilian service. For the Services, 
this broadens the supply of eligible recruits, which, in the 
long term, can reduce recruiting and retention costs.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to provide to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and House of Representatives, not later 
than June 30, 2020, a report assessing the effectiveness of the 
PSLF program at promoting military readiness and the effect of 
the PSLF program on military and civilian recruitment. The 
committee further directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to make any recommendations to strengthen military 
readiness and military and civilian recruitment the Comptroller 
General deems appropriate to the Congress and to the Secretary 
of Education regarding the implementation of the PSLF program.

Concern over hunger and food security in military families

    Since 2000, the Congress has worked to ensure that military 
families, particularly those of lower ranking enlisted 
servicemembers, do not have to endure the painful reality of 
food insecurity. Various programs at the Federal, State, and 
Department of Defense levels have attempted to address this 
issue, yet the committee continues to hear reports that 
problems remain.
    The committee notes that the Quadrennial Review of Military 
Compensation, underway and expected to report next year, is 
assessing the adequacy of military compensation in order to 
obtain better demographic fidelity about the usage of benefits 
under the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program by 
servicemembers. The committee urges the Department to give this 
issue a thorough review and to continue to work collaboratively 
with the Congress to further study the root causes of food 
insecurity and hunger in military families and develop lasting 
solutions in order to protect the families of those who protect 
the Nation.

Concurrent use of Montgomery G.I. Bill and Department of Defense-funded 
        tuition assistance

    The benefits provided by the Montgomery G.I. Bill and 
Department of Defense-funded tuition assistance are valuable 
incentives that can help the military meet its recruiting and 
retention goals by providing financial means for servicemembers 
to complete college courses. The committee is aware that due to 
a Department of Defense (DOD) policy change to DOD Instruction 
1322.25 in July 2014, reserve component members receiving 
tuition assistance are no longer allowed to receive Montgomery 
G.I. Bill--Selected Reserve (MGIB-SR) benefits for the same 
college course. The committee is aware that tuition assistance 
is paid directly to schools and is authorized only for tuition 
while the MGIB-SR benefits are paid directly to servicemembers 
and may be used to cover education-related costs such as books, 
fees, and housing. Therefore, the committee encourages the DOD 
to re-evaluate this policy and strongly consider reinstating 
simultaneous use of tuition assistance and MGIB-SR for reserve 
component members.

Department of Defense cooperation with United States Interagency 
        Council on Homelessness

    The committee is aware that the Subcommittee on 
Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and Related 
Agencies (THUD) of the Senate Appropriations Committee, in the 
Senate report accompanying S. 2844 (S. Rept. 114-243) of the 
THUD Appropriations Bill for Fiscal Year 2017, required that 
the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness (USICH) 
work with the Department of Defense (DOD) and the Department of 
Veterans Affairs (VA) to evaluate and report to the Committees 
on Appropriations of the Senate and House of Representatives on 
how the process of becoming a veteran can be improved to 
minimize veteran homelessness. The committee recently became 
aware that DOD's cooperation with the USICH in this regard may 
have partially contributed to an unsatisfactory report.
    The committee believes that eliminating veteran 
homelessness must be a national effort that crosses executive 
agency jurisdictions. The committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to ensure that the DOD works with the USICH to report 
by October 1, 2019, to the Subcommittee on THUD and the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and House of 
Representatives on DOD's progress in identifying transitioning 
servicemembers who may not have viable post-transition housing 
plans and on steps taken to ensure that each of those 
servicemembers receives a useful referral to the VA or the 
Department of Labor (DOL). Additionally, the committee directs 
the DOD to provide to USICH the following data for fiscal year 
2018 and 2019:
          (1) The number and percentage of transitioning 
        servicemembers evaluated regarding their post-
        transition housing plan;
          (2) The number and percentage of transitioning 
        servicemembers identified as not having a viable post-
        transition housing plan;
          (3) The number and percentage of transitioning 
        servicemembers identified as not having a viable post-
        transition housing plan and referred to the appropriate 
        VA liaison; and
          (4) The number and percentage of transitioning 
        servicemembers who are evaluated as not having a viable 
        post-transition housing plan and referred to the 
        appropriate DOL Liaison.
    Further, the committee directs the Secretary to provide 
data records to the VA and DOL that will enable those agencies 
to track actions and report outcomes associated with such 
referrals.

Department of Defense credentialing

    The committee strongly encourages the Secretary of Defense 
to integrate an open registry of credentials and descriptive 
schema into existing Department of Defense (DOD) credentialing 
databases. The committee believes that the Department should 
provide better metrics and data on quality indicators and 
outcomes to include: (1) The extent to which credentials will 
improve a veteran's ability to gain employment; (2) Which 
credentials are transferable across state lines; and (3) 
Locations and regions where certain credentials are in demand. 
Finally, the committee believes that these data could inform 
which programs are eligible for education benefits administered 
by the DOD and the Department of Veterans Affairs.

Development of strategic basing factors to support military families

    The committee notes that on February 23, 2018, the 
Secretaries of the military departments sent a memorandum to 
the National Governors Association, expressing their intent to 
consider the quality of education in local schools and 
reciprocity of professional licensure for military spouses in 
future basing or mission alternative decisions. The committee 
applauds the Services for their efforts to address the needs of 
military families. Additionally, the committee salutes the 
Department of the Air Force for taking the lead in developing 
strategic basing factors to support military families while 
engaging community stakeholders for feedback relevant to K-12 
education and military spouse license reciprocity. The 
committee encourages the Departments of the Army and Navy to 
work collaboratively with the Air Force on strategic basing 
factors to ensure military children receive a high quality 
education and to relieve military spouses of the burdens that 
come with re-licensure and re-credentialing with every 
permanent change of station move.

Digital engineering as a core competency of the Armed Forces

    The committee notes that, in June 2018, the Under Secretary 
of Defense for Research and Engineering released a Digital 
Engineering Strategy that seeks to incorporate the use of 
digital computing, analytical capabilities, and new 
technologies to conduct engineering in more integrated model-
based environments. The Department of Defense correctly notes 
that defense programs are becoming increasingly complex, as 
evidenced by the complex and continuously changing software and 
electronics needed to operate nearly every major platform 
fielded by the military. The responsibility to understand, 
manage, and use these complex systems resides not just with the 
Department's scientists and laboratories but is increasingly 
relevant to personnel on the battlefield and in every facet of 
military service. Accordingly, the committee believes that, as 
a general matter, the Department and the Services should 
consider promoting and maintaining digital engineering as a 
core competency of the Armed Forces and increasing the digital 
and technical skills of all servicemembers. The committee 
believes that the Department should consider the development, 
maintenance, and integration of increased capability among all 
members of the Armed Forces, in every branch and occupational 
specialty, in digital engineering and related digital 
competencies (including, but not limited to, data science, 
machine learning, software engineering, software product 
management, and user experience design). This effort should 
include the development and maintenance of training, education, 
talent management, incentives, and promotion policies in 
support of members at all levels.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to enter into an arrangement with an independent research 
organization or study board for an identification of policy 
options and cost-benefit analysis of these options to 
strengthen digital engineering and related capabilities of the 
DOD civilian and military workforces. The report shall be 
delivered to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives no later than July 1, 2020.

Duty to intervene

    The committee notes that Department of Defense annual 
reports on sexual assault in the military have consistently 
concluded that sexual assaults are more likely to occur in 
units with a command climate that tolerates sexual harassment. 
The fiscal year 2018 report found that ``women who experienced 
sexual harassment were at 3 times greater risk for sexual 
assault than average'' and men who experienced sexual 
harassment were at 12 times greater risk for sexual assault 
than average.
    Current bystander intervention programs do not appear to be 
effective in reducing tolerance for sexual harassment and 
sexual assaults. Servicemember bystanders should have a duty to 
intervene when they observe conduct that constitutes sexual 
misconduct, including sexual harassment and sexual assault, or 
retaliation for reporting harassment and assault.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of 
the Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than 
December 6, 2019, on the feasibility of establishing a legally 
enforceable duty to intervene when a servicemember witnesses 
sexual misconduct.

Encouraging victims of domestic violence and sex-related offenses to 
        secure military and civilian protection orders

    The committee believes that a Military Protection Order 
(MPO) and a Civilian Protection Order (CPO), taken together, 
afford a victim of domestic violence or a sex-related offense 
the most comprehensive protection available under law from 
further abuse, assault, or harm.
    Further, the committee is aware that Federal law requires 
military commanders and installation law enforcement personnel 
to take all reasonable measures necessary to ensure that a CPO 
is given full force and effect on all Department of Defense 
(DOD) installations. But in order to enforce a CPO involving a 
military servicemember or other affiliated person, commanders, 
military law enforcement officers, and Family Advocacy Program 
personnel must know that such an order exists. Although DOD 
policy provides military commanders the option to establish 
procedures for registering CPOs on a DOD installation, few 
commanders have done so.
    Therefore, the committee encourages the Family Advocacy 
Program, Special Victims' Counsel Program, and other victim 
advocate programs of the DOD to provide victims in their care 
with advice and assistance in obtaining both an MPO and a CPO, 
as expeditiously as possible. In addition, the committee 
encourages all military commanders to establish procedures for 
registering and sharing CPOs with all appropriate installation 
personnel and programs, with a view toward ensuring victim 
safety through consistent, across-the-board awareness and 
enforcement of any such protective order.

Enlistment and accession testing and standards for non-native English 
        speaking recruits

    The committee is concerned about the shrinking pool of 
qualified recruits interested in military service. The all-
volunteer force is now over 45 years old, and, while it has 
served the Nation well, its limits are being tested after 17 
years of war. The challenge is most acute in military service 
recruitment efforts. The Services continue to pay more each 
year for fewer Active-Duty servicemembers. In November 2013, 
the Chief of Staff of the Army testified that the cost of an 
Army soldier had doubled since 2001 and would double again by 
2025. While the percentage of the Department of Defense's total 
budget spent on military personnel has remained generally 
steady since 1980, at roughly one third, the cost of military 
personnel, in real dollars, has soared. It buys far less today 
than it did then. In 1980, the active component end strength of 
the Armed Forces was 2.1 million. The Department's request for 
fiscal year 2020, the largest in history in budgetary terms, 
included 1.33 million Active-Duty servicemembers. The Army in 
particular has struggled, and it will miss its 2019 authorized 
strength by 8,000 soldiers. All of this results from having to 
pay more to attract qualified recruits in an ever shrinking 
pool of candidates. Portending a different, perhaps more 
serious, problem, those who do join are increasingly culled 
from a homogeneous pool of military-connected families that are 
not representative of the Nation as a whole. It is clear to the 
committee that money alone cannot solve this issue and that the 
Nation, as a matter of national security, must rethink how and 
who it recruits.
    The committee recently met with a number of the Army's top 
recruiters to hear about their experiences and challenges in 
recruiting today and to explore what we might do differently. 
Among many topics discussed, the Armed Services Vocational 
Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) was a particular source of 
frustration. While the ASVAB identifies qualified recruits, it 
leaves many would-be highly qualified recruits behind, 
specifically those who do not speak English as a native 
language. Due to the timed nature of the test and nuances of 
language, many non-native English speakers do not pass, even 
though their academic records in American high schools are 
strong.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to review the effectiveness of current enlistment testing 
practices, including the ASVAB, in identifying high-potential 
recruits for military service, specifically among the non-
native English speaking population of the United States 
eligible to enlist, in light of evolving standards and methods 
in civilian education of measuring mental ability and academic 
potential. This review should analyze and take into account 
methods of measuring academic potential being used across local 
school districts in the United States to ensure that current 
testing methodologies used by the Department and the Services 
comport with best practices in the field and serve to identify 
to the fullest range possible those individuals who are likely 
to succeed in their terms of military service. The review shall 
include a survey of the latest research on academic achievement 
of non-native English speakers. The Department shall report to 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and House of 
Representatives by no later than April 1, 2020, on the results 
of this review. The Secretary may utilize the services of 
outside, independent organizations, including federally funded 
research and development centers, as the Secretary determines 
appropriate, to access the expertise and research necessary to 
conduct this review.

Expanding the Military Ballot Tracking Pilot to additional military 
        voters and their families

    The committee commends the Department of Defense Federal 
Voting Assistance Program (FVAP) for its initiatives to counter 
the myth that absentee ballots cast by military members and 
their eligible family members are considered for tabulation and 
counted only in close elections. FVAP, in conjunction with the 
United States Postal Service, piloted two-way military ballot 
tracking for overseas military members during the 2016 general 
election. The Military Ballot Tracking Pilot (MBTP) allowed 
members of the military to track their ballots in the same way 
that consumers track commercial packages. The MBTP was 
successful--85 to 90 percent of all ballots were successfully 
delivered with end-to-end tracking--and surveys of 
servicemembers who voted with absentee ballots indicated 
significant satisfaction with being able to track their 
ballots. The committee believes that servicemembers and their 
families should be able to track their ballots from the time of 
mailing until they are received by election officials. The 
continuation of the MBTP will help to improve customer service 
and will facilitate the acquisition of valuable data that can 
be used to assess the overall reliability of military mail.
    The committee encourages the FVAP to continue and expand 
the MBTP to additional military voters and their eligible 
family members. The committee directs the Director, FVAP, to 
submit to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives, the Senate Committee on Rules and 
Administration, and the House Committee on Administration, not 
later than January 29, 2021, a report on the expanded MBTP. 
This report shall include: (1) The scope and cost of the 
expanded program; (2) The projected cost of extending this 
program to all eligible voters under the Uniformed and Overseas 
Citizens Absentee Voting Act (Public Law 99-410); (3) The 
organizations that provided the FVAP substantial support in 
conducting the pilot, a description of the support, and costs 
associated with that support; and (4) Recommendations on the 
process and steps necessary to expand the program to all 
eligible overseas members and their families. The committee 
also directs the Director, FVAP, to provide an interim briefing 
to the committees listed not later than February 3, 2020.

Expansion of the Military Spouse Employment Partnership across the 
        Department of Defense

    The Military Spouse Employment Partnership (MSEP), a 
program established by the Department of Defense (DOD), creates 
a strong network for military spouses and industry, providing 
companies and agencies with direct access to military spouses 
seeking career opportunities. The MSEP currently has more than 
390 industry and government partners that have hired over 
130,000 military spouses. However, the committee notes that 
only five DOD agencies partner with the MSEP to post employment 
opportunities for military spouses online-the Defense 
Commissary Agency, Defense POW/MIA Accounting Agency, 
Department of Defense Education Activity, Commander, Navy 
Installations Command-NAF, and Department of the Air Force. The 
committee recognizes the unique challenges military spouses 
face to maintain suitable employment with frequent moves 
between duty stations. Therefore, the committee encourages the 
DOD to expand MSEP Department-wide and to: (1) Streamline 
access for hiring managers across the Department to improve 
utilization and communication about military spouse hiring; (2) 
Ensure military spouses are made aware of all potential 
employment opportunities available to them as they undergo 
moves between duty stations; and (3) Ensure DOD prioritizes the 
training of hiring managers in military spouse hiring 
authorities and preferences.

Expedited naturalization of non-citizen servicemembers

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense (DOD) 
provides non-citizen servicemembers an expedited path to 
naturalization upon: (1) Successful completion of basic 
training; (2) Completion of 180 consecutive days of Active-Duty 
service, including service in basic training; and (3) Honorable 
characterization of their military service. Section 530 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public 
Law 115-91) requires the Secretary of Defense to ensure that 
members of the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps, who are 
lawful permanent residents, are informed of the availability of 
and process for naturalization through service in the military 
and that resources are available to assist qualified members in 
applying for naturalization. The committee encourages the 
Secretaries of the military departments to establish procedures 
to identify all non-citizen servicemembers, who will be 
eligible for expedited naturalization upon fulfillment of the 
requirements discussed above, to take affirmative action to 
inform these servicemembers of their eligibility to apply for 
citizenship upon fulfillment of these requirements and to 
assist such servicemembers in applying for and obtaining 
citizenship, to the maximum extent practicable.

Extended paid family leave for secondary caregivers

    The committee notes that the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) increased the 
maximum allowed leave for secondary caregivers of newborn 
infants from 10 to 21 days and that the military's expanded 
primary caregiver parental leave program went into effect in 
March 2018. The committee notes that the Services continue to 
differ in how they implement this new policy. Now that the 
policy has been in effect for more than 1 year, the committee 
directs the Services to brief the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives no later than 
May 1, 2020, on the impact that this policy change has had in 
the following areas: recruitment; retention; readiness; health 
and family wellness; and morale.

Family Child Care home expansion

    For many years, Family Child Care (FCC) homes have been an 
essential element of the military childcare system. Operated by 
military spouses in on-base housing, FCC homes relieve demand 
for care at installation child development centers (CDCs), 
provide a reliable childcare option for families who prefer in-
home care or need flexible scheduling, and offer employment 
opportunities for military spouses. FCC providers receive 
rigorous training through the Department of Defense (DOD), must 
be licensed, and must pass background checks and regular 
inspections.
    Unfortunately, the number of FCC homes in operation has 
declined over time. Currently, there are fewer than 1,000 homes 
in the program. With the demand for childcare continuing to 
increase, the DOD is educating military families on all of the 
options available to them and encouraging families to enroll 
their children in FCC homes. The DOD also encourages military 
spouses to consider enrolling their homes in the FCC program, 
as an employment opportunity, while expanding childcare 
capacity on an installation.
    The committee has heard reports, however, of military 
spouses operating unlicensed childcare centers from their on-
base homes. These unlicensed childcare centers may not adhere 
to the strict standards required of CDCs and licensed FCC 
homes, putting the health and safety of military children at 
risk. When faced with long waiting lists at CDCs and few 
affordable options off base, some families feel that their only 
option is an unlicensed care provider.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to produce data on the number of unlicensed childcare centers 
in military homes and to determine the barriers preventing 
childcare providers from entering the FCC program. The 
Department shall brief the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives on these data and 
barriers no later than March 1, 2020.

Full time support manpower study

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to conduct a 
manpower study of the full time support requirements of the 
Department of Defense to determine the proper allocation of 
military technicians (dual status), Active Guard and Reserve 
personnel, and Federal civilian employees employed under title 
5, United States Code, under the supervision of State Adjutants 
General. The Secretary shall submit the results of this review 
to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and House of 
Representatives by no later than April 1, 2021.

Military childcare system study on outcomes for children and parents

    The committee recognizes the importance of providing 
childcare services to servicemembers. Data on the positive 
effects of the Department of Defense's childcare program on 
children and servicemembers provide important information on 
the program's best practices and the benefits of the program's 
focus on affordability, quality, and access. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Comptroller General of the United States 
to provide to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate 
and the House of Representatives, not later than January 1, 
2023, a report with an assessment of the positive effects of 
the Department's childcare program on children, servicemembers, 
and military families. The assessment shall include: (1) A 
comparison to services provided in the private sector; (2) An 
evaluation of children's developmental outcomes, school 
readiness, and performance in school; (3) Parental outcomes 
such as productivity and military family engagement; (4) An 
examination of how affordability, access, quality, and 
childcare workforce training and requirements contribute to the 
program's success; and (5) An assessment as to how the 
Department's investments in these areas promote military 
readiness.

Rapidly incorporating data tools to enhance military recruiting

    The committee notes that while the Services, and in 
particular the Army, are making progress in effective 
marketing, advertising, and recruiting investments, much more 
remains to be done. One major part of solving recruiting 
shortfalls is the integration of commercial data analytics into 
existing military marketing and advertising practices. The 
committee understands that the Under Secretary of the Army is 
presently evaluating such commercial tools, commends this 
initiative, and directs the Army and the other services to move 
as expeditiously as is feasible to incorporate these 
capabilities into the Services' suite of marketing, 
advertising, and recruitment tools while taking steps necessary 
to ensure that such data analytics tools are free of gender or 
racial bias.

Reliability and completeness of information in inspector general case 
        management systems

    Department of Defense (DOD) component inspectors general 
serve a critical role by providing an independent and impartial 
channel outside of the chain of command through which 
servicemembers can report fraud, waste, abuse, and other 
misconduct. The committee believes that it is important that 
all matters reported to the DOD Office of Inspector General and 
DOD component inspectors general and investigated, whether by 
an inspector general or the command, are properly documented 
and retained in accordance with records retention policies 
applicable to inspector general case management systems, 
regardless of the subject's rank and the disposition of the 
matter and even when the matter might also be documented in a 
non-inspector general system of records.
    This committee and the DOD must have confidence in the 
integrity, reliability, and completeness of the data in the DOD 
component inspector general case management systems. The DOD 
Office of Inspector General and DOD component inspector general 
case management systems are searched in support of personnel 
actions that require Presidential, Secretary of Defense, and 
Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness approval 
and Senate confirmation. These systems are also searched for 
service promotion boards and professional military education 
boards, and their data are screened for command and appointment 
to other sensitive positions, including inspectors general, 
recruiters, and sexual assault response coordinators.
    Inspector general case management systems are also 
important as a comprehensive source for assessing multiple 
complaints against the same subject, even if each individual 
complaint against a subject is not substantiated. The 
completeness and reliability of these databases are also 
important to analyses of trends in misconduct across the 
Department.
    Therefore, the committee believes that, at a minimum, the 
DOD Inspector General and DOD component inspector general case 
management systems should include: (1) The subject's name in 
the corresponding subject data field; (2) The allegation(s) in 
the corresponding allegation data field; (3) Whether the 
allegation(s) are substantiated or not substantiated; and (4) 
Corrective action(s) taken in the corresponding corrective 
action data field.

Reserve Officers' Training Corps Scholarship Program and Recruiting of 
        Future Cyber Officers

    Section 1649 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) amended chapter 112 of 
title 10, United States Code, to establish the Department of 
Defense Cyber Scholarship Program. The committee believes that 
the Cyber Scholarship program may help alleviate the challenges 
that the Department of Defense is experiencing in recruiting 
and retaining cybersecurity personnel. The committee also 
believes that Reserve Officers' Training Corps (ROTC) programs 
at universities that offer degrees in cyber studies and related 
fields provide an opportunity to leverage and expand 
partnerships to assist in closing the gap of trained cyber 
warriors in the military. The committee directs the Secretary 
of Defense to provide a briefing to the Senate Armed Services 
Committee by February 1, 2020, on potential means to leverage 
the ROTC scholarship program to help alleviate the challenges 
that the Department is experiencing in recruiting and retaining 
cybersecurity personnel.

Review of support services provided to military servicemembers assigned 
        to designated remote bases

    The committee has received concerning anecdotal reports 
about the Department of Defense's (DOD) inconsistent approach 
to designating installations as remote or isolated and the 
implications for support services available at such 
installations. The committee notes that remote or isolated 
installations often have reduced medical and Morale, Welfare, 
and Recreation (MWR) services. While servicemembers and 
dependents appear to be screened before being assigned to these 
installations, it is unclear whether the support services 
available are sufficient to meet their needs, particularly 
regarding medical services. It also remains unclear whether the 
DOD has standard metrics for designating installations as 
``remote'' and ensuring that resources are distributed evenly 
across such installations.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to conduct a study assessing the process by 
which the DOD designates installations as ``remote'' or 
``isolated'' and the process for ensuring the sufficiency of 
support services provided at those installations. The study 
shall review: (1) DOD's process for defining remote and 
isolated installations; (2) DOD's process for defining the type 
and level of support services, such as medical, MWR, 
educational, housing, and childcare, at such installations; (3) 
How those support services provided at such installations 
differ, if at all, across the Services; and (4) DOD's process 
for assessing the sufficiency of support services at such 
locations, including the extent to which the DOD measures the 
needs of the assigned military population and their dependents 
and assesses the capabilities of the local community to meet 
those needs. The Comptroller General shall brief, at a minimum, 
preliminary observations from the study no later than February 
28, 2020, to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives.

Rights of sexual assault survivors to testify at court-martial 
        sentencing proceedings

    The committee recognizes the importance of providing 
survivors of sexual assault an opportunity to provide a full 
and complete description of the impact of the assault on the 
survivor during court-martial sentencing hearings related to 
the offense. The committee is concerned by reports that that 
some military judges have interpreted Rule for Courts-Martial 
(RCM) 1001A too narrowly, limiting what survivors are permitted 
to say during sentencing hearings in ways that do not fully 
inform the court of the impact of the crime on the survivor.
    Therefore, the committee urges military judges to provide 
great deference to victims of crimes who exercise their right 
to be heard under RCM 1001A at sentencing hearings. Military 
judges should also be lenient in permitting other witnesses to 
testify about the impact of the crime under RCM 1001.

Safe to Report policy

    One of the most significant and recurring barriers to the 
reporting of sexual assaults is assault victims' concern about 
being punished for collateral misconduct. The committee 
commends the Safe to Report policy of the United States Air 
Force Academy (USAFA). This policy requires commanders to 
consider each instance of collateral misconduct by a victim of 
sexual assault on a case-by-case basis. In addition to the 
seriousness of the collateral misconduct, a commander is 
required to consider whether he or she would have been aware of 
the collateral misconduct had the victim not reported the 
assault. In the absence of aggravating circumstances, USAFA 
cadets who report a sexual assault are not punished for 
violations of Air Force Cadet Wing instructions involving 
alcohol use or possession, consensual intimate behavior in the 
cadet area, unprofessional relationships/fraternization among 
cadets, or exceeding cadet-area limits. The Safe to Report 
policy encourages common-sense limits on punishing victims of 
sexual assault--all in an effort to encourage victims to report 
assaults so that the Academy can address that significantly 
more serious criminal misconduct. The committee encourages the 
Secretaries of the military departments to consider whether 
collateral misconduct policies akin to USAFA's Safe to Report 
policy could be adapted to other organizations and contexts.

Special Victims' Counsel legal consultation and assistance to victims 
        subject to retaliation

    The Special Victims' Counsel (SVC) and Victims' Legal 
Counsel (VLC) play critical roles in the military justice 
system, providing survivors of alleged sex-related offenses 
with legal representation and advocacy, legal consultation and 
assistance, and support. The offense of retaliation, as 
established in section 932 of title 10, United States Code, and 
in the laws and cases governing equal employment opportunity 
and non-discrimination, is not expressly cited in section 1044a 
of title 10, United States Code, which enumerates the scope of 
services that an SVC or VLC is authorized to provide. While 
SVCs and VLCs will generally assist victims who are subject to 
incidents of retaliation, the committee is aware that victims 
may not be aware that this additional support is available, 
particularly when the retaliatory acts occur after the 
conclusion of any military justice proceedings associated with 
the sex-related offense.
    Therefore, the committee recommends the expansion of the 
guiding principles and regulations applicable to the SVC/VLC 
programs to require an SVC/VLC to inform his or her client of 
the availability of legal consultation and assistance in 
connection with any incident of retaliation to which the victim 
may be subject, including incidents that occur after any 
military justice proceedings in regard to a sex-related offense 
have concluded.

Support for Air Force Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps Flight 
        Academy

    As the United States confronts a shortage of pilots and 
aviation professionals, both the military and the private 
sector must look to increase awareness and enthusiasm for 
aviation-related careers among today's youth. The committee 
supports the Air Force's attempts to boost interest in aviation 
professions through its Air Force Junior Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps (ROTC) Flight Academy program.
    First year results of the program are promising. 85 percent 
of participants completed the required curriculum and obtained 
a private pilot's license. Additionally, 20 participants are 
now enrolled in university ROTC programs and on a path to 
earning commissions as Air Force officers. More than 33 percent 
of participants come from historically underrepresented groups 
in the aviation community.
    The committee encourages the Air Force to expand this 
important program. As pilot shortages continue to grow in the 
other services, this program should serve as a model to 
motivate young Americans to pursue careers in military 
aviation.

Telework option for military spouses in Department of Defense contracts

    The committee is aware that Department of Defense (DOD) 
contracts do not normally allow for offsite work options like 
telework, which hinders the entire workforce and notably, 
military spouses. If a military spouse employed by a DOD 
contractor moves with their servicemember on government orders, 
regardless of their employment performance, they are typically 
unable to continue working for a DOD contractor in a remote 
capacity due to standard contract requirements written by the 
DOD.
    Telework has expanded across the Federal government because 
it improves employee morale, enhances work-life balance for 
employees, improves recruiting and retention of the best and 
brightest workforce, and maximizes organizational productivity. 
DOD policy, Department of Defense Instruction 1035.01, states 
that ``telework shall be: Used to help create employment and 
return-to-work opportunities for veterans, people with 
disabilities, and spouses of Service members and employees 
being relocated.'' Meanwhile, telework is performed routinely 
in the private sector to the benefit of companies and employees 
alike.
    Military families continually make sacrifices to support 
the missions of servicemembers and should not be further 
disadvantaged in employment due to an outdated contract 
requirement for onsite work. Military spouses have an 
unemployment rate of 30 percent, more than 7 times the 
unemployment rate for the United States as a whole. Therefore, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to review the 
inclusion of an offsite work option in DOD contracts to 
encourage continuity of employment for workforces that often 
include military spouses and to brief the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives on the 
review no later than March 1, 2020.

Timely response to inspector general referral of reports of 
        investigation substantiating reprisal

    The committee is aware that a report of investigation 
documenting an allegation of reprisal substantiated by an 
inspector general must be referred to the Secretary of Homeland 
Security or the Secretary of the military department concerned 
for review and appropriate action. Although applicable law 
affords the secretary concerned the authority to determine that 
corrective or disciplinary action against the perpetrator is 
not warranted in a particular case, the law does not permit the 
secretary's determination that an act of reprisal did not 
occur, contrary to the inspector general's finding. The law 
further prescribes strict timelines within which the receiving 
secretary must review the report of investigation, determine 
whether or not corrective or disciplinary action is warranted, 
and advise others of that determination, including the 
Secretary of Defense, the relevant inspector general, and the 
complainant in the case.
    The committee is aware of numerous reprisal cases in which 
a secretary's response to the relevant inspector general has 
been delayed by months or years. Furthermore, in some of those 
late cases, the secretary's response advised that no corrective 
or disciplinary action had been taken against the perpetrator 
because of a belief that the inspector general's substantiation 
determination was erroneous or improper.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Department of Defense 
Inspector General and the Inspector General of the Department 
of Homeland Security, as applicable, to include in their 
semiannual reports to the Congress a listing of the 
substantiated reprisal cases in which: (1) More than 180 days 
have elapsed since the relevant inspector general provided the 
report of investigation to the secretary concerned, without 
response; (2) More than 180 days have elapsed between the date 
on which the relevant inspector general provided the report of 
investigation to the secretary concerned and the date on which 
the secretary's response was received by the inspector general; 
and (3) the secretary's response takes issue with the inspector 
general's determination that an act of reprisal occurred. Each 
listing shall include: (1) The case name and number; (2) The 
date on which the inspector general provided the case to the 
secretary concerned; (3) Whether the inspector general received 
the response of the secretary concerned and the date of that 
response; and (4) The name, grade, and duty position of the 
officer or employee who took issue with the inspector general's 
determination that an act of reprisal occurred, as applicable, 
together with any explanation, rationale, or comments on the 
matter provided by that officer or employee.

Training Department of Defense and military department human resources 
        personnel to assist military spouses seeking employment

    Military spouse employment is an essential component of 
military family readiness. Bringing qualified, highly-motivated 
military spouses into the Department of Defense (DOD) civilian 
workforce also benefits the Department. The committee is aware 
that human resources systems and practices within the DOD 
continue to pose significant barriers to military spouse 
employment. Specifically, DOD human resources personnel have 
demonstrated a lack of familiarity with the authorities and 
processes for the non-competitive appointment of military 
spouses to DOD positions for which they are qualified. 
Notwithstanding the issuance of Executive Order (EO) 13473, 
dated September 25, 2018, which allowed agencies to make 
noncompetitive appointments of certain military spouses of 
members of the Armed Forces, and the enactment of section 573 
of the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232), which expanded non-
competitive appointment eligibility to all spouses of Active-
Duty servicemembers through 2023, the committee is aware of 
circumstances in which DOD human resources personnel have 
advised military spouse applicants that their only option for 
securing employment with the DOD is to compete for appointment 
via USAJobs.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing on the processes it has or will employ: 
(1) To disseminate information about military spouse non-
competitive appointment policies and processes throughout the 
DOD; (2) To train and educate DOD and military department human 
resources personnel--from headquarters to the installation 
level--to apply such policies and processes to hiring actions 
for individual military spouse applicants; and (3) To modify 
human resources systems to better accommodate military spouse 
employment actions. In addition, the briefing shall detail the 
oversight mechanisms that each of the Services and the Office 
of the Secretary of Defense have applied or will apply to 
assess policy compliance by human resources personnel across 
the Department and to measure both military spouse and hiring 
official satisfaction with the hiring process. The briefing 
shall be provided to the committee no later than February 1, 
2020.

Transition Assistance Programs at remote and isolated installations

    The committee notes the importance of ensuring that 
military skills and experience can be applied to gainful 
civilian employment after separation and discharge. The 
committee is aware that Transition Assistance Programs (TAPs) 
provide transitioning servicemembers with job skills training 
and apprenticeships that could help prevent above average rates 
of suicide, drug addiction, and unemployment found in veteran 
populations. The committee encourages military installation 
commanders to consider these factors--especially at more remote 
and isolated permanent military installations where these 
issues compound--when considering civilian training 
opportunities for transitioning servicemembers. The committee 
also encourages installation commanders to ensure that TAPs are 
accessible to servicemembers and to allow them to use 
appropriate time off to pursue civilian training.

Tuition assistance in the Reserves and National Guard

    Tuition assistance is a valuable incentive that can help 
the military meet its recruiting and retention goals. The 
committee is aware that there may be differences in how each 
military department implements its tuition assistance program, 
particularly as it pertains to the Reserves and National Guard, 
which often struggle to achieve authorized end strength levels. 
Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary of the Air 
Force and the Secretary of the Army to review their respective 
tuition assistance policies to identify and rectify any 
inconsistencies that may adversely affect the Air National 
Guard, Air Force Reserve, Army National Guard, and Army 
Reserve.

          TITLE VI--COMPENSATION AND OTHER PERSONNEL BENEFITS

                     Subtitle A--Pay and Allowances

Expansion of eligibility for exceptional transitional compensation for 
        dependents to dependents of current members (sec. 601)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1059(m) of title 10, United States Code, to authorize 
the Secretaries of the military departments to provide 
transitional compensation, in exceptional circumstances, to 
certain dependents before an eligible servicemember is 
discharged from Active Duty. By eliminating the requirement 
that a servicemember be separated from Active Duty before a 
secretary of a military department may authorize exceptional 
eligibility for transitional compensation, this provision would 
ensure that all dependents and former dependents who have been 
subjected to dependent abuse are treated in a fair, equitable, 
and similar manner.

           Subtitle B--Bonuses and Special and Incentive Pays

One-year extension of certain expiring bonus and special pay 
        authorities (sec. 611)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend, 
through December 31, 2020, various expiring bonus and special 
pay authorities for military personnel. The provision would 
extend special pay and bonus authority for reserve personnel, 
military healthcare professionals, and nuclear officers and 
consolidated pay authorities for officer and enlisted 
personnel. The provision would also extend the authority to 
provide temporary increases in the rate of Basic Allowance for 
Housing in certain circumstances.

            Subtitle C--Travel and Transportation Allowances

Extension of pilot program on a Government lodging program (sec. 621)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 453 of title 37, United States Code, to extend by 1 
year the Secretary of Defense's authority to execute a 
Department of Defense (DOD) lodging program.
    The Carl Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-
291) originally authorized a 5-year DOD lodging pilot program. 
The pilot program successfully demonstrated increased hotel 
quality and substantial discounts in room rates paid by the 
government. Additionally, overall traveler satisfaction remains 
high. In 2017, the pilot program achieved average savings of 16 
percent across 189 participating hotels.
    The Department has informed the committee that it will 
submit its final report on the lodging pilot program by May 31, 
2019. Based on current information, the committee expects to be 
satisfied that the pilot program accomplished its stated goal 
of achieving significant savings while increasing the quality 
of temporary lodging for DOD-funded travelers.
Reinvestment of travel refunds by the Department of Defense (sec. 622)
    The committee recommends a provision that would provide the 
Secretary of Defense with the authority to receive and 
effectively reinvest miscellaneous receipts obtained through a 
travel rebate or refund program, a repayment of inaccurate 
charges, or a collection of an unused travel segment (e.g., 
airline ticket).

     Subtitle D--Disability Pay, Retired Pay, and Survivor Benefits

Contributions to Department of Defense Military Retirement Fund based 
        on pay costs per Armed Force rather than on Armed Forces-wide 
        basis (sec. 631)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1465 of title 10, United States Code, to require the 
Secretary of Defense to make contributions to the Military 
Retirement Fund based on an actuarial calculation of each 
service's planned pension obligations, beginning with fiscal 
year 2021.
    The committee notes that, since 1984, the Department of 
Defense (DOD) has funded its military retirement program using 
a financing procedure in which the DOD makes monthly 
contributions based on percentages of basic pay. This method of 
funding, known as accrual accounting, requires the Department 
to set aside funds from current budgets for retirement 
annuities that will eventually be received by today's military 
personnel.
    Current law requires the DOD to develop a single 
contribution rate across the Department for all Active-Duty 
personnel and a single rate for all reserve component 
personnel. For example, in fiscal year 2017, the Department 
contributed an amount equal to 28.9 percent of Active-Duty 
personnel basic pay and an amount equal to 22.8 percent of 
selected reserve personnel basic pay to the Military Retirement 
Fund.
    The committee notes that the current system produces a 
disparity between the Services. Those services that have fewer 
personnel who reach full retirement eligibility, like the 
Marine Corps, contribute more to the Military Retirement Fund 
than needed to pay for retired marines' pensions. Meanwhile, 
those Services that have larger numbers of personnel who reach 
full retirement eligibility, like the Air Force, effectively 
receive a discount on their Military Retirement Fund 
contributions by paying less than the service will need to fund 
retired airmen's pensions.
    The Government Accountability Office (GAO) published a 
report on December 4, 2018, titled ``Military Retirement: 
Service Contributions Do Not Reflect Service Specific Estimated 
Costs and Full Effect of Proposed Legislation is Unknown'' 
(GAO-19-195R). The GAO found that ``the mandated single, 
aggregate contribution rate does not reflect service specific 
retirement costs.'' Additionally, the GAO found that ``the 
estimated probability of reaching 20 years of service was 
almost 15 percentage points higher--and more than three times 
higher--for the Air Force than the Marine Corps.'' Further, a 
recent DOD Office of Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation 
assessment of the Military Retirement Fund contribution method 
found that the current procedure creates ``large cross-
subsidies among the services''' and ``does not provide clear 
signals and incentives for shaping an efficient experience mix 
of personnel.''
    As each service updates its overall force profile to 
support the National Defense Strategy and implement other 
reforms, like those to the Blended Retirement System, the 
committee believes that it is critical that senior leaders in 
the DOD accurately account for the fully-burdened life-cycle 
cost of each service's manpower plans.
Modification of authorities on eligibility for and replacement of gold 
        star lapel buttons (sec. 632)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1126 of title 10, United States Code, to authorize the 
Department of Defense to determine the eligible recipients of 
the gold star lapel button. Additionally, the provision would 
authorize the Department to replace a lapel button upon 
application and without cost.

   Subtitle E--Commissary and Non-Appropriated Fund Instrumentality 
                        Benefits and Operations

Defense resale system matters (sec. 641)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness, in 
coordination with the Chief Management Officer of the 
Department of Defense, to maintain oversight of the business 
transformation efforts of the defense commissary system and the 
exchange stores system to ensure: (1) Development of an inter-
component business strategy that maximizes efficiencies and 
results in a viable defense resale system in the future; (2) 
Preservation of patron savings and satisfaction from and in the 
defense commissary system and exchange stores system; and (3) 
Sustainment of financial support of the defense commissary and 
exchange systems for morale, welfare, and recreation services 
of the Armed Forces. The provision would require the Executive 
Resale Board of the Department to advise the Under Secretary on 
the implementation of sustainable, complementary operations of 
the defense commissary system and the exchange stores system. 
Additionally, the provision would require the Defense 
Commissary Agency and the Military Exchange Service to identify 
and implement best commercial business practices and shared-
services systems while integrating certain services provided by 
the exchange stores system within commissary system facilities. 
The provision would also require the modernization of 
information technology and implementation of cutting-edge 
marketing in the defense resale system. Finally, the provision 
would amend section 2483(b) of title 10, United States Code, to 
authorize inclusion of advertising expenses in the operating 
expenses of commissary stores.
    The committee notes that military commissaries and 
exchanges provide a critical and highly valued in-kind benefit 
to military personnel and their families as they help to 
supplement servicemembers' incomes through savings on purchases 
of food and household items. As the Department implements 
changes to the defense resale system to ensure its long-term 
viability, the committee anticipates that future modernization 
efforts will result in a system that can compete with the 
private sector while preserving the in-kind benefit that 
patrons expect.
Treatment of fees on services provided as supplemental funds for 
        commissary operations (sec. 642)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2483(c) of title 10, United States Code, to authorize 
retention of fees collected on services provided to secondary 
patron groups, such as Department of Defense contractors living 
overseas, by the Defense Commissary Agency to offset commissary 
operating costs.
Procurement by commissary stores of certain locally sourced products 
        (sec. 643)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to ensure that dairy products, fruits, and 
vegetables procured for defense commissary stores are, to the 
extent practicable, locally sourced.

                       Items of Special Interest

Blended Retirement System implementation study
    The committee notes that the period for eligible members to 
elect whether to transition to the new Blended Retirement 
System (BRS) has concluded and that all new recruits are now 
automatically enrolled in the system. To monitor the 
effectiveness of the BRS on both recruitment and retention of 
the all-volunteer force, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, in coordination with the Secretaries of the military 
departments and the service chiefs, to review the 
implementation of the BRS and provide details regarding ongoing 
decisions associated with the new retirement system by 
submitting a report, no later than May 1, 2020, that provides 
the following information:
          (1) An assessment of the BRS transition period, to 
        include:
                  (a) An enumeration of members who elected to 
                transition into the BRS broken out by service, 
                grade, gender, race, marital status, 
                occupation, duty location, and other pertinent 
                demographics;
                  (b) The proportion of members who elected to 
                transition by demographic; and
                  (c) Whether the differences in choice 
                structure (e.g., marines were required to elect 
                to either remain in the legacy retirement 
                system or switch to BRS) contributed to 
                disparities in enrollment rates between the 
                Services.
          (2) An analysis of Thrift Savings Plan (TSP) matching 
        contributions, to include:
                  (a) The TSP contribution level of 
                servicemembers enrolled in the BRS broken out 
                by demographic information;
                  (b) Whether servicemembers who receive 
                special pay or incentives are more inclined to 
                contribute and receive matching contributions;
                  (c) The extent to which the Services are 
                supporting servicemembers in making sound 
                financial decisions regarding matching 
                contributions; and
                  (d) Whether actual TSP contribution rates and 
                investment choices are creating a wealth 
                disparity in retirement among servicemembers.
          (3) An explanation of planned continuation pay 
        policy, to include:
                  (a) The method the Services will use to 
                determine continuation pay levels, to include 
                details on how the Services will determine when 
                a member will receive notification of the 
                continuation pay offer, the amount of the 
                multiplier, the timing of payment, whether the 
                pay will vary by occupation, skill, or other 
                factors, and the duration of the required 
                service obligation; and
                  (b) An econometric analysis of possible 
                methods to increase the effectiveness and 
                efficiency of continuation pay.
          (4) An analysis of BRS impacts, including:
                  (a) Whether the BRS has affected or is likely 
                to affect historic recruitment and retention 
                trends; and
                  (b) An assessment of the tools inherent in 
                DOD BRS policy that will allow the Services to 
                achieve necessary recruitment and retention 
                levels; and
          (5) Recommendations for statutory change necessary to 
        address issues of fairness and equity identified by the 
        review.

Commissary store operations

    The committee recognizes the importance of commissary 
stores to military families, who rely on these stores for 
purchase of food and dry goods at substantial discounts. When 
commissaries either undergo periods of closure or reductions of 
operating hours, military families cannot use this important 
in-kind benefit. Moreover, with prolonged closures during 
government shutdowns, military families dependent on 
commissaries face even greater hardship. Therefore, the 
committee strongly urges the Department of Defense to maintain 
commissary operations during any future government shutdowns.

Comptroller General assessment on defense resale reform

    The committee directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to conduct an assessment of the Department of Defense's 
efforts to reform the business operations of the defense resale 
system and to provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives no 
later than December 1, 2019. The assessment shall include 
reviews of: (1) The potential impact of reform on the Defense 
Commissary Agency's (DECA) overall sales, expenses, customer 
satisfaction, and expense structure; (2) The potential courses 
of action that may increase competitiveness, reduce the DECA's 
reliance on annual appropriations, and position commissaries 
and military exchanges for annual sales growth; (3) Positive 
and negative effects of reform on commissary and military 
exchange patrons and employees; (4) The potential of the 
military exchanges to increase financial support to the 
Services' morale, welfare, and recreation programs; and (5) 
Accounting procedures pertaining to the sources and uses of 
funds generated by and allocated to commissaries to ensure that 
sufficient internal controls are in place to safeguard funding.

                   TITLE VII--HEALTH CARE PROVISIONS

           Subtitle A--TRICARE and Other Health Care Benefits

Contraception coverage parity under the TRICARE program (sec. 701)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
sections 1074d(b)(3), 1075(c), 1075a(b), and 1074g(a)(6) of 
title 10, United States Code, to require coverage of 
contraception services for covered beneficiaries under the 
TRICARE program. The provision would prohibit cost-sharing for 
any method of contraception provided by a network provider 
under TRICARE Select or a provider under TRICARE Prime. 
Additionally, a beneficiary would pay no cost-share for any 
prescription contraceptive on the uniform formulary that is 
provided by a network retail pharmacy provider or the mail-
order pharmacy program. The effective date of this provision 
would be January 1, 2020.
TRICARE payment options for retirees and their dependents (sec. 702)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1099 of title 10, United States Code, to require that a 
premium owed by a member, former member, or dependent, eligible 
for medical and dental care under section 1074(b) or 1076 of 
such title, be withheld, to the maximum extent practicable, 
from the individual's retired, retainer, or equivalent pay. The 
provision would authorize the Secretary of Defense to determine 
the method and frequency of payment when circumstances prevent 
payment through an allotment from retired, retainer, or 
equivalent pay. The amendments in this provision would apply to 
health care coverage beginning on or after January 1, 2021.
Lead level screening and testing for children (sec. 703)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish clinical practice guidelines 
(CPGs) for Department of Defense healthcare providers on 
screening, testing, and reporting of blood lead levels in 
children. The provision would require dissemination of the CPGs 
within 1 year of the date of the enactment of this Act. 
Additionally, the provision would require the Secretary to 
share test results with the parent or guardian of the child, 
the health department for the State in which the child resides 
in the United States, or the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention and the appropriate in-country authority if the 
child lives outside the United States. Finally, the provision 
would require the Secretary to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees on the number of children 
screened, tested, and treated for elevated blood lead levels 
beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act up to the 
date of the report.
Provision of blood testing for firefighters of Department of Defense to 
        determine exposure to perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl 
        substances (sec. 704)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, beginning on October 1, 2020, to provide 
blood testing to determine and document potential exposure to 
perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl substances for firefighters 
of the Department of Defense during their annual physical 
exams.

                 Subtitle B--Health Care Administration

Modification of organization of military health system (sec. 711)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1073c of title 10, United States Code, to make 
clarifying and technical amendments on the administration of 
the Defense Health Agency and military medical treatment 
facilities.
Support by military health system of medical requirements of combatant 
        commands (sec. 712)
    The committee recommends a provision would amend section 
712 of the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-332) to modify and clarify 
the military health system's support to the medical 
requirements of the combatant commands.

Tours of duty of commanders or directors of military treatment 
        facilities (sec. 713)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, not later than January 1, 2021, to 
establish a minimum length of 4 years for tours of duty, with 
limited exceptions, for commanders or directors of military 
treatment facilities to ensure greater stability in health 
system executive management at each facility and throughout the 
military health system.
    The committee remains concerned that military treatment 
facility commanders or directors typically rotate to new duty 
stations every 2 years and that these frequent transfers lead 
to great instability in the management of hospitals and 
clinics. The rapid turnover of military hospital commanders and 
directors creates turmoil in hospital executive leadership and 
management, negatively affecting the performance of the local 
facility and the overall performance of the military health 
system. The committee believes that this provision would steady 
the executive management of military hospitals and clinics and 
improve the performance of those facilities.

Expansion of strategy to improve acquisition of managed care support 
        contracts under TRICARE program (sec. 714)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 705(c)(1) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) to include overseas 
medical support contracts in the strategy to improve the 
acquisition of managed care support contracts under the TRICARE 
program.

Establishment of regional medical hubs to support combatant commands 
        (sec. 715)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, not later than October 1, 2022, to 
establish up to four regional medical hubs, consistent with 
section 712 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232), to 
support the operational medical requirements of the combatant 
commands. Under this provision, each regional hub would include 
a major military medical center to provide complex, specialized 
medical services in that region. The regional medical center 
would be geographically located to maximize medical support to 
combatant commands. The provision would authorize the Secretary 
to establish or maintain additional medical centers in 
locations with large beneficiary populations or locations that 
serve as the primary readiness platforms of the Armed Forces.

Monitoring of adverse event data on dietary supplement use by members 
        of the Armed Forces (sec. 716)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to modify the Department's electronic 
health record (EHR) system to include data regarding use of 
dietary supplements by members of the Armed Forces and any 
adverse events associated with such use. The provision would 
also require the Secretary to educate healthcare providers in 
the military health system on the importance of including 
adverse event data in the EHR and reporting those data to the 
Food and Drug Administration.

Enhancement of recordkeeping with respect to exposure by members of the 
        Armed Forces to certain occupational and environmental hazards 
        while deployed overseas (sec. 717)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1074f of title 10, United States Code, to require the 
Department of Defense to include occupational or environmental 
health exposures during deployment in its medical tracking 
system. The provision would also require the Department to 
provide healthcare providers with questions to ask 
servicemembers about occupational or environmental health 
exposures during post-deployment health assessments and to 
ensure that the medical records of servicemembers include 
information on the external cause relating to a medical 
diagnosis of the member. Finally, the provision would require 
the Secretary of Defense to ensure that the Department's 
medical personnel have access to information in the burn pit 
registry maintained by the Department of Veterans Affairs.

                 Subtitle C--Reports and Other Matters


Extension and clarification of authority for Joint Department of 
        Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility 
        Demonstration Fund (sec. 721)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend title 
XVII of the National Defense Authorization for Fiscal Year 2010 
(Public Law 111-84) to make certain technical corrections to 
such title. Additionally, the provision would permit the James 
A. Lovell Federal Health Care Center to enter into personal 
services contracts to carry out healthcare responsibilities at 
the Center to the same extent and subject to the same 
conditions and limitations as in medical treatment facilities 
of the Department of Defense. Finally, the provision would 
extend the authority for the joint Department of Defense-
Department of Veterans Affairs Demonstration Fund from 
September 30, 2020, to September 30, 2021.

Appointment of non-ex officio members of the Henry M. Jackson 
        Foundation for the Advancement of Military Medicine (sec. 722)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
subparagraph (C) of paragraph (1) of section 178(c) of title 
10, United States Code, to authorize the appointment of a 
member of the council of the Henry M. Jackson Foundation for 
the Advancement of Military Medicine by currently serving 
members upon the expiration of the term of a member. The 
provision would also amend paragraph (2) of such section to 
repeal an obsolete authority establishing staggered terms of 
members of the council. The provision would not terminate or 
otherwise alter the appointment or term of service of council 
members serving on the date of the enactment of this Act.

Officers authorized to command Army dental units (sec. 723)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 7081(d) of title 10, United States Code, to authorize 
Army Medical Department Officers to command Army dental units. 
The provision would give the Secretary of the Army greater 
flexibility in managing officers within the Army Medical 
Department.

Establishment of Academic Health System in National Capital Region 
        (sec. 724)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
chapter 104 of title 10, United States Code, by inserting a new 
section that would authorize the Secretary of Defense to 
establish an Academic Health System in the National Capital 
Region to integrate the healthcare, health professions 
education, and health research activities of the military 
health system in that region. The provision would authorize the 
Secretary to appoint employees of the Department of Defense to 
leadership positions in the Academic Health System in addition 
to similar leadership positions for members of the Armed 
Forces. Moreover, the provision would authorize the Secretary 
to use the authorities under chapter 104 for the administration 
of the Academic Health System.

Provision of veterinary services by veterinary professionals of the 
        Department of Defense in emergencies (sec. 725)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
chapter 53 of title 10, United States Code, to authorize a 
licensed veterinary professional of the Department of Defense 
(DOD) to provide veterinary services in any state, the District 
of Columbia, and any territory or possession of the United 
States, if the services provided fall within the scope of 
authorized duties of the veterinary professional for the DOD. 
This provision would ensure that the DOD can rapidly respond to 
requests for veterinary services assistance from lead Federal 
departments and agencies supporting emergency management 
responses.

Five-year extension of authority to continue the DOD-VA Health Care 
        Sharing Incentive Fund (sec. 726)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 8111(d)(3) of title 38, United States Code, to extend 
the authorization of the Department of Defense-Department of 
Veterans Affairs Health Care Sharing Incentive Fund to 
September 30, 2025.

Pilot Program on civilian and military partnerships to enhance 
        interoperability and medical surge capability and capacity of 
        National Disaster Medical System (sec. 727)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to conduct a pilot program for no more 
than 5 years to establish partnerships with public, private, 
and non-profit health care organizations, institutions, and 
entities in collaboration with the Secretaries of Veterans 
Affairs, Health and Human Services, Homeland Security, and 
Transportation to enhance interoperability and medical surge 
capability and capacity of the National Disaster Medical 
System. Under this pilot, the Secretary of Defense would 
establish these partnerships at no fewer than five major 
aeromedical transport hub regions of the Department of Defense 
in the United States. The provision would require, if the pilot 
were to proceed, the Secretary of Defense to submit an initial 
report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives, not later than 180 days after 
commencement of the pilot program, and a final report to the 
same committees within 180 days of the completion of the 
program.

Modification of requirements for longitudinal medical study on blast 
        pressure exposure of members of the Armed Forces (sec. 728)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 734 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) to modify the requirements 
of the Longitudinal Medical Study on Blast Pressure Exposure on 
Members of the Armed Forces. The provision would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit annual status reports on the 
study to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the 
House of Representatives not later than January 1 of each year 
until completion of the study.

                       Items of Special Interest


Armed Forces Institute for Regenerative Medicine

    The Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine (AFIRM) 
is a multi-institutional, interdisciplinary network of 
universities, military health system laboratories, and 
investigators designed to promote regenerative medicine 
therapies. The AFIRM is dedicated to repairing battlefield 
injuries with regenerative medicine technology, and it has 
supported several clinical trials treating hundreds of patients 
with novel therapeutic strategies in wound repair and tissue 
replacement. The committee understands that fiscal year 2019 is 
the final year of funding for the AFIRM and encourages the 
Department of Defense to build upon AFIRM's successes by 
renewing the program, using a public-private consortium model, 
for another 5-year term.

Chronic Migraine and Post-Traumatic Headaches

    The committee understands that chronic migraine (CM) is 
often associated with post-traumatic headaches (PTH) of 
patients who suffer from traumatic brain injury (TBI). There 
appear to be minimal data, however, on the follow-up and 
treatment of PTH and post-traumatic chronic migraine beyond 2 
years after a TBI. Furthermore, there is very little 
biochemical understanding of these disease processes and their 
interrelationships, and no biomarkers exist to help diagnose, 
classify, and monitor these headache disorders. Therefore, the 
committee encourages the Department of Defense to support 
research to develop biomarkers useful in diagnosing and 
monitoring TBI patients with CM or PTH.

Comptroller General Review of Enlisted Medical Workforce

    The committee notes that enlisted medical personnel, such 
as medics and corpsmen, represent over half of the total 
medical force and that they are essential to maintaining the 
Department of Defense's (DOD) substantial health care delivery 
capability in both an operational setting and at home for 
military families and retirees. At the direction of Congress, 
the DOD has taken initial steps to review the readiness of 
medical providers. The DOD has also provided some opportunities 
for its military physicians to practice at civilian hospitals; 
however, many of its enlisted medical personnel are often 
utilized differently than comparable professionals in civilian 
hospitals and are not required to obtain many of the same 
certifications or licenses. Therefore, enlisted medical 
personnel may have fewer such opportunities. Given the efforts 
that the DOD has initiated to address medical provider 
readiness and to ensure that enlisted medical personnel have 
skills that are easily transferable to the civilian sector, the 
committee is concerned about the overall readiness of the 
enlisted medical workforce.
    The committee therefore directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to conduct a study assessing the enlisted 
medical workforce. The study shall review DOD's: (1) Metrics to 
assess the clinical currency and readiness of the enlisted 
medical workforce; (2) Plans for providing the medical workload 
and training necessary to maintain clinical currency and 
readiness of enlisted medical personnel, including the DOD's 
use of the direct care system; and (3) Enlisted medical 
workforce reenlistment rates and efforts to retain those 
personnel. The Comptroller General shall present preliminary 
observations from the study to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives no later than 
March 27, 2020.

Department of Defense Briefing on the Rate and Incidence of Pregnancy-
        Associated Deaths

    The committee believes that caring for servicemembers and 
their families is the essential foundation of readiness. The 
committee is aware that the United States is the only 
industrialized nation with a rising maternal mortality rate. 
Data suggest more than half of pregnancy-related deaths are 
preventable, and approximately half of maternal injuries could 
be reduced or eliminated with better care and enhanced maternal 
mortality information systems.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of 
the Senate and the House of Representatives by February 1, 
2020, reporting the rate and incidence of pregnancy-associated 
deaths, defined as the death of a woman while pregnant or 
during the 1-year period following the date of the end of 
pregnancy, and severe maternal morbidities, defined as 
unintended outcomes of pregnancy, labor, or delivery that 
result in significant short- or long-term consequences to a 
woman's health. The briefing should also disaggregate data by 
cause of death, race, age, and rank of the woman (if 
applicable).

Expansion of Studies of Exposure to Blast in Training And Operations 
        and Documentation of Blast Exposure in Individual Longitudinal 
        Exposure Records

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) affects the mood and memory of 
more than 260,000 servicemembers, often disrupting one's 
ability to continue to serve, maintain a job, reenter the 
community, or even reconnect with family upon returning home 
from deployment. The committee is aware of the novel research 
undertaken by U.S. Special Operations Command and the Uniformed 
Services University of the Health Sciences to identify and 
measure the effects on brain and spine health of repeated 
exposure to the blast and acceleration effects associated with 
military training and operations. The committee commends and 
encourages continued innovative experimentation in emerging 
strategies and technologies for the prevention of TBI.
    Therefore, the committee urges the Department to: (1) 
Expand its blast and acceleration effects research and 
assessment protocols to other military occupations, weaponry 
and equipment, and training experiences, as appropriate; (2) 
Formalize the documentation of servicemembers' measurable 
exposures to blast and acceleration effects in a longitudinal 
exposure record, individual to each servicemember and able to 
be shared with the Department of Veterans Affairs; and (3) Take 
appropriate actions to inform servicemembers of opportunities 
to participate in the programs of the Department of Defense's 
Center for Neuroscience and Regenerative Medicine brain tissue 
repository to advance traumatic brain injury research.

Healthy Food Options on Military Installations

    The committee remains concerned about the growing obesity 
crisis in the Nation and its potential impact on our national 
defense. The lack of healthy food options on military 
installations, coupled with servicemembers' poor eating habits, 
negatively affects force readiness and retention. Military 
dining facilities are currently the healthiest food option on 
installations; however, the committee understands that young 
servicemembers eat fewer than half of their meals at these 
facilities. Instead, they choose to purchase less healthy food 
at other on- or off-base venues.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of 
the Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than 
November 1, 2019, on the feasibility of continuing and 
expanding food service transformation efforts, focusing on 
nutritious food options, with the goal of modernizing the on-
installation food service system. The briefing should include a 
plan for improving on-base accessibility to healthful prepared 
and pre-prepared food, leveraging leading practices from 
college and university dining facilities and lessons learned 
from previous Department of Defense food service transformation 
efforts. In addition, the plan should include a description of 
the potential to establish partnerships with local communities 
to improve the food service environment on military 
installations and to encourage healthful eating. Finally, the 
plan should include tests of various business models that 
increase the availability, affordability, and acceptability of 
healthy performance foods.

Home healthcare services

    The committee supports the adoption of a program that would 
authorize a parent or family member to become a certified 
nursing assistant (CNA) to provide approved and medically-
necessary skilled services for an eligible dependent child of 
that parent or family member under the TRICARE program. The 
parent or family member would be required to complete all 
required education and clinical training to become a licensed 
CNA before being authorized to provide physician-ordered care 
to the child. By authorizing family members to become certified 
home health care providers, the TRICARE program might 
experience a reduction in direct costs associated with the 
provision of home health care services.

Objective diagnostic capabilities for traumatic brain injury

    The committee commends the Department of Defense (DOD) for 
its significant efforts to improve the diagnosis of traumatic 
brain injury (TBI). Nevertheless, the DOD must do more work to 
develop advanced capabilities to diagnose TBI in all its forms, 
including mild TBI (mTBI)/concussion, which accounts for the 
vast majority of TBIs. To maintain the readiness of the total 
force and to protect service personnel better, it is imperative 
that the Department deploy capabilities that provide objective 
diagnostics for TBI in all its forms, particularly mTBI/
concussion. Therefore, the committee encourages the DOD to 
deploy mTBI/concussion multi-modal diagnostic devices, already 
cleared by the Food and Drug Administration, for echelons four 
and five medical care.

Pilot program on partnerships with civilian organizations for 
        specialized medical training

    The committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
conduct a pilot program to assess the feasibility and 
advisability of establishing partnerships with public, private, 
and non-profit organizations and institutions to provide short-
term specialized medical training to advance the medical skills 
and capabilities of military medical providers.
    If the Secretary determines to conduct the pilot program, 
the Secretary should first establish metrics to evaluate the 
effectiveness of the program. The committee considers such a 
pilot program an important element in helping military medical 
providers advance their skills and capabilities in medical 
specialties, such as orthopedic surgery, which would improve 
the medical readiness of the total force.

Prescription drug labels

    As prescription drug manufacturers consider adoption of e-
labels for some of their products, the committee encourages the 
Department of Defense to ensure that prescription drugs made 
available through the facilities of the uniformed services are 
accompanied by printed labels that are physically located on or 
within the package from which the drug is dispensed. These 
labels importantly provide adequate directions for a drug's 
intended purposes. In situations where servicemembers are 
stationed in remote, internet-free locations, physical labels 
can often provide more reliable access to information than 
electronic labels.

Study on infertility in members of the Armed Forces

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to conduct a 
study on the incidence of infertility among members of the 
Armed Forces and provide a report, not later than June 1, 2020, 
to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives. The study shall include the following 
elements: (1) Determination of the numbers of currently serving 
members of the Armed Forces who have been diagnosed with a 
common cause of infertility; (2) Determination of the number of 
servicemembers whose infertility has no known cause; (3) 
Determination of the incidence of miscarriage among female 
servicemembers by service and military occupation; (4) 
Comparison of infertility rates of female servicemembers to the 
infertility rates of their civilian counterparts; (5) 
Determination of demographic information about such 
servicemembers to include race, ethnicity, sex, age, military 
occupation, and possible hazardous environmental exposures 
during service; (6) Determination of the availability of 
infertility services for those servicemembers who desire such 
treatment, including waitlist times at the military treatment 
facilities providing those services; (7) Criteria used by each 
of the Services to determine service-connection for 
infertility, including whether screenings for environmental 
toxins were performed when the cause of infertility could not 
be determined; and (8) Current policies of the Department of 
Defense for ensuring geographic stability during the treatment 
of servicemembers' undergoing medical treatment for 
infertility.

Survey to determine providers' attitude towards contraceptive services, 
        their knowledge on obligations to dispense and counsel on 
        contraception and assess potential cultural barriers to 
        providing contraceptive services

    The committee recognizes that access to contraception 
contributes to operational force readiness by ensuring that 
servicemembers can utilize contraception to prevent unintended 
pregnancies, manage their menstrual cycles, and for other non-
contraceptive benefits. The committee is also aware that 
menstruation can be problematic during deployment and access to 
contraception, including for menstrual suppression, is a 
critical part of women's preventive health care. The committee 
is pleased that the Armed Forces have made significant strides 
in improving access to contraception for military 
servicemembers, including ensuring that military facilities 
stock a broad range of Food and Drug Administration-approved 
methods of contraception and allowing contraception to be 
provided for the length of a servicemember's deployment. 
However, the committee is concerned that misconceptions remain 
among both servicemembers and military healthcare providers 
about limitations on access to contraception for and during 
deployment.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to conduct a survey of active military and civilian healthcare 
providers who may counsel on or provide contraception in 
military treatment facilities, assessing their knowledge on 
prescribing and providing contraception for and during 
deployment. The survey should include questions on: (1) Whether 
the provider dispenses contraceptives in deployment settings; 
(2) Whether the provider believes that it is permitted to 
dispense contraception when a General Order prohibits sexual 
activity during deployment; (3) How large a supply of 
contraceptives a provider believes that it is authorized to 
dispense at a time; and (4) Circumstances under which the 
provider may not dispense requested contraception. 
Additionally, the survey should address the training a provider 
has received in contraceptive counseling, including whether the 
provider is knowledgeable about and provides information on the 
use of contraception for menstrual suppression and other 
deployment-relevant aspects of contraceptive methods such as 
shelf life and storage requirements. The survey shall 
disaggregate data by service branch.
    The Department shall provide a briefing on the survey 
results to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives no later than 90 days after the 
completion of the survey.

Tactical combat casualty care training

    Department of Defense (DOD) Instruction 1322.24 requires 
all warfighters to complete Tactical Combat Casualty Care 
(TCCC) training as part of basic mobilization readiness, 
because TCCC is an important step in ensuring that military 
personnel receive the best pre-hospital medical care available. 
The committee has received reports, however, of substantial 
variation in TCCC training, including the teaching of 
incomplete or incorrect TCCC concepts. To address this 
variation, the committee strongly encourages the Secretary of 
Defense to: (1) Evaluate best practices for TCCC in the 
Services; and (2) Establish standards to ensure uniform TCCC 
training for military personnel, to include training standards 
for best instructional practices for personnel conducting TCCC 
training.

TRICARE coverage of continuous glucose monitors

    Approximately 420,000 military members or their family 
members have diabetes, with 180,000 of these patients currently 
using insulin. If not treated, diabetics face higher risks of 
heart disease, kidney failure, limb amputations, and blindness. 
The committee is aware that innovations in diabetes treatment 
options include recent technological advancements to continuous 
glucose monitoring systems (CGMS). These devices provide 
continuous glucose readings for patients and their physicians, 
allowing for more effective prevention strategies and better 
health outcomes. In 2017, Medicare expanded its diabetes 
treatment coverage for beneficiaries to include CGM coverage 
for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, among other criteria. The 
Veterans Health Administration subsequently updated its 
criteria for determining eligibility for CGM in January 2019, a 
change that has the potential to make this life-improving and 
cost-saving technology available to more veterans. Private 
payers are also providing coverage for these devices at an 
increasing rate. Given the detrimental health impact of 
diabetes as well as the increased costs incurred for direct 
treatment and co-morbid medical complications of this disease, 
TRICARE should ensure that its beneficiaries have appropriate 
access to innovative and effective diabetes treatment options, 
access at least comparable to that enjoyed by veterans and 
Medicare beneficiaries. The committee encourages the Secretary 
of Defense to update the TRICARE criteria for use for CGMS and 
directs the Secretary to provide an update on its progress not 
later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act.

TRICARE improper medical claims payments

    The committee remains concerned about improper payments to 
TRICARE network providers. The Government Accountability Office 
published a report on February 18, 2015, titled ``Improper 
Payments: TRICARE Measurements and Reduction Efforts Could 
Benefit from Adopting Medical Record Reviews'' (GAO-15-269), 
that recommended that the Department of Defense implement more 
comprehensive TRICARE improper payment measurement methods that 
include medical record reviews. The Department concurred with 
this recommendation. Almost 4 years after the publication of 
this report, however, the Department has yet to implement this 
recommendation.
    Therefore, not later than November 1, 2019, the Secretary 
of Defense shall submit to the Committees on Armed Services of 
the Senate and the House of Representatives a comprehensive 
report detailing: (1) The extent to which the Department will 
conduct medical record reviews; (2) The processes to request 
and receive such records from civilian network providers; (3) 
The manner in which cases will be coded if medical records are 
not returned; and (4) How the Department plans to use the 
results of the medical record reviews to improve its processes 
to identify improper payments and to lower the improper payment 
error rate. Additionally, within 270 days of the Department's 
submission of this report, the Comptroller General of the 
United States shall provide a report to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives on the 
extent to which the Department's plan for including medical 
record reviews in its improper payment error rate calculation 
addresses the four areas outlined above and whether the 
Department's medical record reviews process will result in a 
more robust and meaningful measure of improper medical claims 
payments by TRICARE.

  TITLE VIII--ACQUISITION POLICY, ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT, AND RELATED 
                                MATTERS

           Subtitle A--Contracting and Acquisition Provisions

Pilot program on intellectual property evaluation for acquisition 
        programs (sec. 801)
    The committee recommends a provision that would permit the 
Secretary of Defense and the Secretaries of the military 
departments to jointly carry out a pilot program evaluating 
intellectual property in acquisition programs, using 
commercially available intellectual property valuation analysis 
and techniques, in order to determine these techniques' utility 
in the formation of strategies and in assessing the value and 
costs of intellectual property during acquisition and 
sustainment activities. The committee notes that this provision 
is based on the recommendation of the Congressionally-mandated 
Technology Data Rights Study (``Section 813'') panel.
    Under the provision, if the pilot program were to be 
carried out, the Secretary of Defense would submit a report on 
the pilot to the congressional defense committees not later 
than November 1, 2020, and annually thereafter through 2023.
Pilot program to use alpha contracting teams for complex requirements 
        (sec. 802)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish a pilot program to use third-
party industry, academia, or not-for-profit technical 
organizations as part of alpha contracting teams for complex 
technical requirements for services. The committee notes that 
this construct revives in a modern context the ``alpha 
contracting'' concept that is more than a decade old. Further, 
it brings together all government personnel involved in the 
functions that support acquisition actions, to include 
contracting staff as well as technical staff, operators, and 
cost personnel. This is intended to ensure that technical 
requirements are appropriately valued and that the most 
effective acquisition strategy to achieve these requirements is 
identified.
Modification of written approval requirement for task and delivery 
        order single contract awards (sec. 803)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2304a(d)(3) of title 10, United States Code, to 
eliminate the requirement that single award task or delivery 
order contracts over $100.0 million receive additional approval 
when already authorized under one of the exceptions to full and 
open competition.
Extension of authority to acquire products and services produced in 
        countries along a major route of supply to Afghanistan (sec. 
        804)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authority to acquire products and services produced in 
countries along a major route of supply to Afghanistan until 
December 31, 2021.
Modification of Director of Operational Test and Evaluation report 
        (sec. 805)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Director of Operational Test and Evaluation to solicit comments 
from the Secretaries of the military departments for inclusion 
in the Director's annual report to Congress, retaining the 
Director's discretion to issue the report without comments if 
they are not timely. This provision does not change or alter 
any Director of Operational Test and Evaluation authorities.
Department of Defense use of fixed-price contracts (sec. 806)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to 
review how the Department of Defense uses fixed-price 
contracts, including fixed-price incentive contracts, to 
support acquisition objectives. The committee is concerned 
about the extent to which the Department is using fixed-price 
contracts in situations in which other contract types would be 
more appropriate. Under this provision, the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment would provide a 
briefing to the congressional defense committees on the results 
of this review not later than February 1, 2020.
    The provision would further require the Comptroller General 
of the United States to submit a report on the Department's use 
of fixed-price contracts over time, to include costs, 
incentives, duration, and close-out procedures, to the 
congressional defense committees no later than February 1, 
2021.
    Finally, the provision would delay the implementation of 
regulations requiring the use of fixed-price contracts for 
foreign military sales until after 2020.
Pilot program to accelerate contracting and pricing processes (sec. 
        807)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend a 
pilot established in section 890 of the John S. McCain National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-
232). That law authorized the Secretary of Defense to reform 
and accelerate the contracting and pricing processes for 10 
programs on a pilot basis. The amendment would remove the 10-
program limitation and would delay the program's sunset from 
January 2, 2021, to January 2, 2022.
Pilot program to streamline decision-making processes for weapon 
        systems (sec. 808)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
service acquisition executive for each military department to 
recommend at least one major defense acquisition program to 
participate in the pilot program not later than February 1, 
2020, and require the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment to brief the congressional defense 
committees on these programs not later than May 1, 2020.
    The committee is aware that Department of Defense (DOD) 
weapon system programs often proceed slowly through the 
acquisition milestone decision process. In 2015, the 
Comptroller General of the United States recommended that the 
Secretary of Defense direct efforts to improve this process by 
piloting different approaches to streamline acquisition 
milestone decisions in major defense acquisition programs, with 
results that could be evaluated on and reported for potentially 
wider use. The committee notes that this reflects the ``Skunk 
Works'' approach described in DOD's ``Better Buying Power 3.0'' 
memorandum. To date, the Government Accountability Office 
reports that only two weapon systems programs have participated 
in this program.
Documentation of market research related to commercial item 
        determinations (sec. 809)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2377(c) of title 10, United States Code, to require 
that market research be documented, at a level appropriate to 
the size and complexity of the acquisition, when procuring 
commercial products and services.
Modification to small purchase threshold exception to sourcing 
        requirements for certain articles (sec. 810)
    The committee recommends a provision that would lower the 
threshold for which the Department of Defense must comply with 
the rules of section 2533a of title 10, United States Code, 
known as the Berry Amendment, to $150,000. The committee 
further directs the Secretary of Defense to provide an annual 
briefing on the impacts of this provision to: Department of 
Defense costs and procurement efficiency and the health of the 
affected portions of the domestic industrial base.

 Subtitle B--Provisions Relating to Major Defense Acquisition Programs

Naval vessel certification required before Milestone B approval (sec. 
        821)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require a 
certification of compliance with section 8669b of title 10, 
United States Code, for naval vessel programs prior to 
Milestone B approval.

                  Subtitle C--Industrial Base Matters

Modernization of acquisition processes to ensure integrity of 
        industrial base (sec. 831)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to modernize mitigation of risks to the 
integrity of the supply chain, to include those cited in recent 
studies on the defense industrial base.
    The committee observes that contracting is the mechanism by 
which the Department of Defense operationalizes its 
relationship with the defense industrial base/national security 
innovation base.
    The committee notes that certain risks to the defense 
industrial base are not being appropriately considered. These 
include but are not limited to risks associated with: 
insufficient insight into ownership structures, fragile sources 
of supply, and cybersecurity concerns, as well as contractors' 
violations of law pertaining to fraud, human trafficking, and 
worker health and safety.
    The committee further notes that, even where risks may be a 
high priority, the existing acquisition processes and 
procedures are not effective or timely in mitigating such 
risks. As such, the provision would require the Department to 
rigorously optimize the policy, processes, and procedures 
throughout the contracting life cycle, beginning with market 
research, responsibility determination, technical evaluation/
award, mobilization, contract administration, contract 
management and oversight (to include contractor business 
systems reviews), and contract audit for closeout. It is 
critical that this optimization incorporate modern sources of 
data and methods to conduct appropriate and continuous risk 
assessment for contractors doing business with DOD.
    The provision would also require the Comptroller General of 
the United States to coordinate individual reviews in these 
risk areas, report on them collectively, and begin annual 
reviews of the Department's progress in this area.

Assessment of precision-guided missiles for reliance on foreign-made 
        microelectronic components (sec. 832)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Air Force to assess its reliance on foreign sources for all 
microelectronics in precision guided munitions currently in 
production. The Air Force would be required to identify which 
tier subcontractor supplied the microelectronics and evaluate 
the cybersecurity risk to precision guided munitions posed by 
foreign-made microelectronics. The provision would require the 
Air Force to brief the findings of its assessment to the 
congressional defense committees no later than August 31, 2020.

Mitigating risks related to foreign ownership, control, or influence of 
        Department of Defense contractors or subcontractors (sec. 833)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to amend policy and regulation to take 
steps to enhance the process for assessing and mitigating risks 
related to foreign ownership, control, or influence (FOCI).
    The committee is concerned by the growing threat to the 
integrity of the defense industrial base from strategic 
competitors, like the Russian Federation, the People's Republic 
of China, and their proxies, seeking to gain access to 
sensitive defense information or technology through contractors 
or subcontractors. The committee recognizes the need for the 
Department's acquisition community to have greater visibility 
into the potential FOCI of contractors and subcontractors 
seeking to do business with the Department to ensure that they 
do not pose a risk to the security of sensitive data, systems, 
or processes such as personally identifiable information, 
cybersecurity systems, or national security systems.
    In order to aid in identifying the actual individual or 
individuals owning or controlling each contractor or 
subcontractor, the provision would require the companies to 
make certain disclosures. Such disclosures would then be 
considered in determining the responsibility of the contractor 
being considered for a contract or subcontract and standards 
under which a contract or subcontract could be terminated due 
to unmitigable risks.

Extension and revisions to Never Contract With the Enemy (sec. 834)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
Never Contract With the Enemy program through 2023 and would 
provide for various expansions, including the contracts covered 
and the authorities of the combatant commands to mitigate 
threats posed by vendors supporting operations outside the 
United States.

                   Subtitle D--Small Business Matters


Reauthorization and improvement of Department of Defense Mentor-Protege 
        Program (sec. 841)

    The committee recommends a provision that would make the 
Department of Defense's Mentor-Protege Program (MPP) permanent 
and repeal the half-size standard restriction for protege 
participants, restoring eligibility to disadvantaged small 
business concerns. The committee notes that the Government 
Accountability Office published a report on April 11, 2017, 
titled ``Small Business Contracting: DOD Should Take Actions To 
Ensure that Its Pilot Mentor-Protege Program Enhances the 
Capabilities of Protege Firms'' (GAO-17-172), which recommended 
that the Department take steps to ensure that the MPP achieves 
its mission by conducting periodic reviews of the processes for 
approving agreements and by developing performance goals and 
measures. Accordingly, the provision would also require the 
Secretary of Defense to direct the Defense Business Board to 
study the effectiveness of the program and make recommendations 
for program improvements.

Modification of justification and approval requirement for certain 
        Department of Defense contracts (sec. 842)

    The committee recommends a provision that would revise 
authorities relating to Department of Defense approval of 
certain sole source awards to 8(a) firms, which include tribes, 
Alaska Native, and Hawaiian firms. Specifically, the threshold 
for requiring justification and approval would be increased to 
$100.0 million and the approving authority would be the head of 
procuring activity or a designee. The provision would also 
require the Department of Defense to collect data and the 
Comptroller General of the United States to report to the 
congressional defense committees on the impact of the 
provision.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to ensure 
compliance with all appropriate acquisition regulations and 
Small Business Administration rules, including those regarding 
ownership of 8(a) firms and in managing the subcontracting of 
work contracted to 8(a) firms. In ensuring such compliance, the 
committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment to establish mechanisms to collect 
and analyze relevant data.

     Subtitle E--Provisions Related to Software-Driven Capabilities


Improved management of information technology and cyberspace 
        investments (sec. 851)

    The committee is concerned that the Department of Defense's 
process to account for, manage, and report its information 
technology and cyberspace investments--which account for at 
least $50.0 billion annually--is inefficient. Further, the 
committee believes that the process results in unnecessary 
delays in preparing the annual budget exhibit and in regulatory 
reporting under the Federal Information Technology Acquisition 
Reform Act of 2015, incorporated into the Howard P. ``Buck'' 
McKeon National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 
(Public Law 113-291). After years of legislation and 
regulation, the definitions pertaining to and the methods of 
grouping and accounting for spending on these investments have 
become cumbersome and obscure and as such hinder, rather than 
assisting with, insight into and oversight of spending plans 
and portfolio management.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a provision that 
would require the Chief Information Officer (CIO) to work with 
the Chief Data Officer to optimize this process. Such 
optimization should include alternative methods of presenting 
budget justification materials to the public and congressional 
staff to more accurately communicate when, how, and with what 
frequency capability is delivered to end users, in accordance 
with best practices for managing and reporting on information 
technology investments. The committee directs the CIO to brief 
the congressional defense committees and recommend any 
necessary legislative changes not later than February 3, 2020.

Special pathways for rapid acquisition of software applications and 
        upgrades (sec. 852)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish guidance, not later than 180 
days after the enactment of this Act, authorizing the use of 
special pathways for the rapid acquisition of software 
applications and upgrades that are intended to be fielded 
within 1 year. These new pathways would prioritize continuous 
integration and delivery of working software in a secure manner 
and prioritize continuous oversight from automated analytics.
    Further, the committee commends the work of the Defense 
Innovation Board (DIB) in conducting its ``Software Acquisition 
and Practices'' study and further commends the Under Secretary 
of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment's commitment to 
adopting the DIB's recommendations. The committee agrees with 
the premise outlined in the report that ``software is never 
done'' and with the emphasis on the distinct role of software 
development in both applications and embedded systems. The 
committee categorically agrees with the three themes of the 
report: ``Speed and cycle time are the most important metrics 
for managing software''; ``Software is made by people and for 
people, so digital talent matters''; and ``Software is 
different than hardware (and not all software is the same).''

                       Subtitle F--Other Matters


Notification of Navy procurement production disruptions (sec. 861)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Navy to require prime contractors of any Navy 
procurement program to report, within 15 calendar days of any 
contractor or subcontractor stop work order or within 15 days 
of a contractor or subcontractor manufacturing disruption that 
has lasted 15 calendar days, to the respective program manager 
and Navy technical authority. The provision would also require 
the Secretary of the Navy to provide a quarterly notification 
of such disruptions to the congressional defense committees.
    The committee is concerned by the delay in reporting of 
recent stop work orders and other manufacturing disruptions to 
Navy program management officials. The committee notes that 
multiple shipbuilding programs have been negatively impacted by 
unacceptable delays in reporting such disruptions. The 
committee believes that more timely notifications of such 
disruptions will decrease the time required to initiate and 
complete corrective actions necessary to resume production.

Modification to acquisition authority of the Commander of the United 
        States Cyber Command (sec. 862)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 807 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92), which established the 
acquisition authority of the Commander of U.S. Cyber Command, 
to change the applicability of the annual limit to new contract 
efforts.

Prohibition on operation or procurement of foreign-made unmanned 
        aircraft systems (sec. 863)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the operation or procurement of foreign-made unmanned aircraft 
systems by the Department of Defense.

Prohibition on contracting with persons that have business operations 
        with the Maduro regime (sec. 864)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the Department of Defense from awarding contracts to certain 
persons and entities affiliated with the illegitimate Maduro 
regime of Venezuela.

Comptroller General of the United States report on Department of 
        Defense efforts to combat human trafficking through procurement 
        practices (sec. 865)

    The committee recommends a provision that would direct the 
Comptroller General of the United States to report on the 
Department of Defense's efforts to combat trafficking in 
persons through procurement practices.

                       Items of Special Interest


Alternatives to cost or pricing data

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense (DOD) 
produces and develops many goods and services outside of 
traditional commercial markets, often in situations where there 
is only one customer and one or few viable vendors. In the 
absence of market forces, the Department is forced to use other 
mechanisms to ensure that it is obtaining the best value and 
paying a fair price for these goods and services. This commonly 
requires the delivery of certified cost or pricing data from 
vendors to achieve this necessary goal. However, this creates a 
time and cost burden on both the vendors and the government 
customer, which in some cases slows procurement processes. 
Ultimately this leads to operational systems and technologies 
being behind the pace of global innovation and is unnecessarily 
expensive for the taxpayer. In addition, the government-unique 
activities associated with this practice often create a barrier 
to entry into the defense market for potential commercial and 
small business suppliers.
    The committee notes that there may be alternative practices 
that could speed the process of determining fair prices and 
best value for customers in the absence of a market but that 
these practices require research, development, prototyping, and 
testing before they can be employed at scale. The committee 
directs that the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and 
Sustainment and the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering jointly develop a university research program, 
modeled on the current university basic research activities of 
the DOD, with experts in academia to explore and develop 
alternatives to certified cost or pricing data. The committee 
notes that these academic researchers should be partnered with 
the Defense Acquisition University and other DOD organizations 
to promote the sharing of relevant data and the transition of 
research products into practice. The committee further notes 
that the Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Fund account 
is already authorized to fund research of this type and 
recommends the use of this funding to support these activities. 
The committee directs the Department to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees on activities to support this 
effort not later than February 1, 2020, as well as any research 
products that result from these activities over time.

Annual report on denials of contracting officer data requests

    The committee is encouraged that, in response to 
recommendations from a 2019 Department of Defense (DOD) 
Inspector General report on price reasonable determinations, 
the Acting Principal Director for Defense Pricing and 
Contracting agreed to: (1) Update policy on reporting 
requirements for contractor denial of cost data and establish a 
framework for quarterly reporting on such denials; and (2) 
Recommend that a group of experts assess the data reported to 
identify contractors a high-risk for unreasonable pricing. The 
committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment to submit to the congressional 
defense committees an annual report detailing instances where 
potential contractors denied requests by the DOD to provide 
contracting officers with requested uncertified cost or pricing 
data to allow for the determination of fair and reasonable 
pricing for acquisitions. The report should contain at a 
minimum a summary of the individual cases in which contracting 
officers were denied requested data by potential contractors. 
The initial report shall be submitted not later than December 
31, 2020.

Appreciation for the work of the Advisory Panel on Streamlining and 
        Codifying Acquisition Regulations

    The committee commends the work of the Advisory Panel on 
Streamlining and Codifying Acquisition Regulations, established 
by section 809 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92). The committee notes that, 
since the Panel was established, it has made 98 recommendations 
across 3 report volumes and continues to identify areas where 
United States Code can be reorganized for clarity and 
efficiency. The Congress has enacted a number of the 
recommendations from the first two volumes in prior National 
Defense Authorization Acts. This committee continues to 
carefully consider the recommendations of the Panel.

Army strategies to manage intellectual property

    The committee notes that the Army has recently approved a 
new intellectual property management policy that seeks to 
address the shortcomings of how the Army has managed 
intellectual property with previous acquisition programs. The 
committee believes that, as the Army pursues its major 
modernization priorities, it is important to appropriately 
determine rights and access related to intellectual property 
and technical data to facilitate the sustainment of these new 
systems for the next several years, and the committee 
encourages the Army to pursue innovative strategies to do so.

Comptroller General assessment of Internet Protocol version four (IPv4) 
        utilization

    The committee directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to submit a report to the appropriate congressional 
committees, no later than March 1, 2020, on the Department of 
Defense's utilization of Internet Protocol version four (IPv4) 
addresses. The report's elements shall include: (1) Actual 
utilization, comparing IPv4 addresses assigned vs. those being 
used; (2) Statutory, policy, and security requirements 
affecting the Department's ability to grant or sell 
underutilized addresses to the private sector (whether due to 
underutilization or post-transition to Internet Protocol 
version six (IPv6)); (3) Status of transition from IPv4 to 
IPv6; and (4) Additional matters that the Comptroller General 
determines appropriate.

Comptroller General review of Army's Logistics Civil Augmentation 
        Program contract

    The committee notes that the U.S. military has long relied 
on contractors to support deployed U.S. forces, especially 
under the Army's Logistics Civil Augmentation Program (LOGCAP), 
a contract which provides for food service, sanitation, 
billeting, maintenance, and power generation for military 
operations and associated civilian support. The Department has 
persistently faced challenges with such contracts, to include: 
limited insight into the nature and extent of reliance on 
contractors; cost and requirements growth; and military 
commanders' inconsistent understanding of their roles and 
responsibilities in theater.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Comptroller General 
of the United States to assess the following: (1) What lessons 
the Department learned from prior LOGCAP contracts and how 
these lessons were incorporated into the requirements and 
acquisition strategy for LOGCAP V; (2) Whether the Department 
developed plans to transition services being provided under 
LOGCAP IV to the LOGCAP V contract and the sufficiency of those 
plans; (3) The Army's construct for LOGCAP V planners and the 
extent to which it is sufficient; (4) The sufficiency of the 
Army's plans to designate and train contracting officer 
representatives; and (5) Any other issues that the Comptroller 
General determines appropriate with respect to the LOGCAP 
program.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide a briefing to the congressional defense committees not 
later than February 28, 2020, on the preliminary findings of 
this review and to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees on a date agreed to at the time of the briefing.

Contractor workplace safety

    The committee notes the September 2018 Department of 
Defense report titled ``Assessing and Strengthening the 
Manufacturing and Defense Industrial Base and Supply Chain 
Resiliency of the United States,'' which cited diminishing 
manufacturing sources and material shortages as risks and the 
corresponding need to expand certain domestic manufacturing to 
address these risks.
    The committee is therefore concerned by a February 2019 
Government Accountability Office report, ``Defense Contracting: 
Enhanced Information Needed on Contractor Workplace Safety'' 
(GAO-19-235), which detailed violations of certain workplace 
safety and health regulations by Department contractors in 
high-risk industries, including construction and manufacturing. 
Among the recommendations were advising all contracting 
officials of the availability of data published by the 
Occupational Safety and Health Administration and exploring the 
feasibility of requiring a safety performance rating for 
contracts in high-risk industries.
    The committee strongly supports a thriving defense 
industrial base, especially in manufacturing, where the 
Department expects to see growth to address risks and 
objectives of the National Defense Strategy. Given that the 
Department agreed with the GAO recommendations, the committee 
expects the Department to fully and expeditiously implement 
them.
    The committee further recommends that the Department 
explore other measures to ensure that data on contractors' 
compliance with workplace safety and health regulations are 
available and assessed during the acquisition process in an 
efficient and effective manner.

Implications of acquisition reform for the organic industrial base

    The committee notes that, in September 2018, the Department 
of Defense (DOD) released the report ``Assessing and 
Strengthening the Manufacturing and Defense Industrial Base and 
Supply Chain Resiliency of the United States.'' The report 
stated that, while commercial industry is the dominant 
component of the industrial base, the DOD organic industrial 
base--composed of government-owned, government-operated 
maintenance depots, shipyards, and manufacturing arsenals--is 
critical to our defense. The report also noted that prior 
acquisition reforms have had unintended negative impacts on the 
DOD organic industrial base.
    To fully understand the impacts of these changes, the 
committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment, with inputs from the sustainment 
commands of the Services, to assess the effects that 
acquisition changes over the last 5 years have had on the DOD 
organic industrial base. This assessment shall be provided to 
the congressional defense committees not later than February 1, 
2020.

Notifications related to exercising an option on a contract

    The committee observes that regulation requires the 
government, on an active contract, to notify the contractor if 
it will exercise an option on the contract 60 days prior to the 
exercise date. The committee is concerned that 60 days notice 
may create hardship for some contractors doing business with 
the Department of Defense and encourages the cognizant 
contracting official at the Department of Defense to the 
maximum extent practicable to notify the contractor whether or 
not the Department intends to exercise the option earlier than 
60 days prior to the option exercise date.

Optimizing processes and acquisition of contract writing capabilities

    The committee notes that significant direction was provided 
to the Department of Defense to rationalize the business 
portfolio area of contract-writing in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) and 
the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232). This direction included 
funding reductions, reporting requirements, and required 
commitments by the Services to reduce the number of contract-
writing systems in use from 17 to 1 by 2020.
    The committee further notes that, despite this direction, 
there are still two different solutions and three different 
contracting arrangements being pursued by the Department. The 
committee remains concerned about the inability of disparate 
acquisition strategies to leverage common requirements, 
commercial processes, and solutions for writing contracts. As 
such, elsewhere in this Act, the committee recommends a number 
of specific reductions in funds for contract-writing systems to 
encourage the Department to complete the rationalization of 
contract-writing systems.

Place of performance in Department of Defense contracts

    The committee is aware that contracts awarded by the 
Department of Defense sometimes include place of performance 
clauses that can be advantageous to areas that have higher 
costs and higher populations. To understand the logistical and 
national security necessity of these place of performance 
clauses, the committee directs the Chief Management Officer to 
commission a study that analyzes the number of contracts 
awarded that include place of performance clauses. 
Additionally, the study should include analysis of the labor, 
real estate, cost of living, contractor retention rates, and 
other financial costs and benefits of including such a 
requirement in Department of Defense contracts.

Proper evaluation of past performance and experience of potential 
        offerors

    The committee notes that changing business models and 
corporate practices have led to alternative ownership 
structures and partnership arrangements for potential and 
current defense contractors. The committee also notes that 
current acquisition regulations give the Department of Defense 
flexibility in evaluating past performance information 
regarding predecessor companies, key personnel who have 
relevant experience, or subcontractors that will perform major 
or critical aspects of requirements when such information is 
relevant to the acquisition. The committee, however, also 
recognizes that there are concerns about the consistency and 
clarity in how the Department, as well as other federal 
agencies, are considering the past performance and experience 
of parent, subsidiary, and sister organizations of firms, 
including those associated with Alaskan Native Corporation/
Tribal/Native Hawaiian corporations, when soliciting and 
evaluating potential offers to meet federal requirements.
    The committee believes that providing additional guidance 
and training to contracting personnel to ensure that 
solicitations clearly state the extent to which and how the DOD 
will consider the past performance and experience of these 
sister organizations during the evaluation of an offeror's bid 
will reduce miscommunication and frustration with the federal 
procurement process, lead to more informed selection of 
vendors, help establish more strategic relationships with high 
performing vendors, and support improved performance by 
contractors. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to: (1) Develop policies to ensure that solicitations 
are clear and transparent; and (2) Provide training to its 
contracting personnel to ensure the proper consideration of the 
past performance and experience of predecessor companies, 
sister subsidiaries, and key personnel that will perform major 
or critical aspects of the requirement when soliciting and 
evaluating offers.

Report on service contract management and oversight

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
consultation with the Chief Management Officer, the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, and the 
Secretaries of the military departments, to review current 
mechanisms for overseeing defense service contracts, including 
the service contract inventories, and to identify ways to 
update the approach to improve the management and oversight of 
service contracts. The committee notes that the Section 809 
Panel ``Report of the Advisory Panel on Streamlining and 
Codifying Acquisition Regulations'' recommends that the 
Department of Defense center its service contracts reporting on 
broad strategic purposes, objectives, and key performance 
results of the contracts being assessed.
    The Department's review shall leverage the expertise of the 
Chief Data Officer to ensure that the approaches identified 
align with and support the analytic capabilities of the 
Department of Defense. Further, the review shall ensure the 
implementation of continuous business process changes and 
supporting information technology investments to deploy and 
sustain a capability to continuously monitor, analyze, and 
oversee these types of contracts and associated spending. 
Finally, the Department's review shall address how the 
identified approaches support the oversight, data analytics, 
and outcome measurements for service contracts specified in 
section 2329 of title 10, United States Code. This report shall 
be submitted to the congressional defense committees no later 
than December 1, 2019.
    The committee directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to assess the Department's report and its proposed 
approach to determine the extent to which they have the 
potential to improve the Department's management of service 
contracts. This assessment would consider prior reviews of the 
Department's service contracts, including the service contract 
inventories. The Comptroller General shall report to the 
congressional defense committees no later than March 1, 2020, 
or 3 months after the Department's report is submitted to 
Congress, whichever occurs later.

Secure development operations software stacks

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense has 
several programs and activities underway to explore the 
concepts, technologies, roles and responsibilities, and 
procedures associated with secure development operations or 
DevSecOps. The committee encourages the Department to continue 
these activities and, in doing so, recommends that the 
Secretary of Defense designate a single official responsible 
for coordinating these activities to identify best practices 
and recommend policy and guidance to unify the activities 
across the Department.

Stakeholder engagement practices of the Defense Innovation Board

    The committee commends the Defense Innovation Board's 
process for conducting its study on software acquisition and 
practices under section 872 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for 2018 (Public Law 115-91). The committee 
notes the benefit of the Board's process for identifying 
stakeholders and encouraging their active engagement in the 
Board's work, to include: the formulation of working 
hypotheses; iteratively publishing draft content and white 
papers; exposing potential recommendations; encouraging 
meaningful public dialogue and enabling transparency; and 
prioritizing content and recommendations for inclusion in the 
final report. This engagement resulted in a refined product 
whose premises had been tested and improved by a deep bench of 
knowledge both within and outside the Department of Defense. 
This yielded recommendations pertaining to Congress' role that 
were relevant, actionable, and useful to this committee.

Training of skilled technicians for the defense industrial base

    The committee notes that the September 2018 Department of 
Defense report ``Assessing and Strengthening the Manufacturing 
and Defense Industrial Base and Supply Chain Resiliency of the 
United States'' stated: ``Without concerted action that 
provides both a ready workforce and a continuously charged 
pipeline of new employees, the U.S. will not be able to 
maintain the large, vibrant, and diverse machine tools sector 
needed to produce the required number and types of products 
when needed.''
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to develop a plan, cost estimate, and schedule for a pilot 
program to train skilled technicians for immediate placement in 
the Defense Industrial Base, including critical shipbuilding 
skills such as welding, metrology, quality assurance, 
machining, and additive manufacturing. The committee notes that 
these activities may benefit from partnering with State-level 
efforts to leverage investment and infrastructure in training 
and education and existing workforce development partnerships 
with the Defense Industrial Base as well as relevant federal 
programs, such as the National Network of Manufacturing 
Institutes and the Department of Defense Industrial Base 
Analysis and Sustainment program. The committee directs the 
Secretary to provide an annotated briefing on the plan, cost 
estimate, and schedule for a potential pilot program to the 
Senate Armed Services Committee no later than September 15, 
2020.

Uncertified cost data

    The committee notes that the Truth in Negotiations Act 
authorizes the contracting officer to require that other than 
certified data be submitted when deemed necessary to determine 
price reasonableness. Contracting officers have this authority 
even as it relates to commercial items. The committee also 
notes that the Congress strengthened the Department of 
Defense's ability to get uncertified data in section 808 of the 
Strom Thurmond National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 1999 (Public Law 105-261) by directing that the Federal 
Acquisition Regulation be amended to provide that a 
contractor's ``compliance with a requirement to submit data for 
a contract or subcontract in accordance with section 
2306a(d)(l) of title 10, United States Code . . . shall be a 
condition for the offeror to be eligible to enter into the 
contract or subcontract, subject to such exceptions as the 
Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council determines 
appropriate.''
    Other statutory authorities are available to the Department 
of Defense to ensure price reasonableness, including the 
Defense Production Act (Public Law 81-774), as amended, and 
section 2304(b) of title 10, United States Code, which 
authorizes the head of an agency to exclude a particular source 
in order to establish an alternative source of supply if doing 
so would ``likely result in reduced overall costs for such 
procurement, or for any anticipated procurement, of property or 
services.'' The committee directs the Department to use all 
applicable authorities to protect the taxpayer from predatory 
practices by companies that refuse to provide data to establish 
price reasonableness. The committee further encourages the 
Department to take all steps necessary to ensure that the 
acquisition workforce is sufficiently trained on and empowered 
to use available authorities to protect the Department and 
taxpayers from price gouging.

Wider adoption of model contracts for Small Business Innovation 
        Research (SBIR) program awards

    The committee notes that the Air Force is using model 
contracts and ``pitch days''' for Small Business Innovation 
Research (SBIR) program awards. This simplifies and accelerates 
awards in ways that are critical to small businesses. The 
committee encourages other military services and offices 
awarding SBIR contracts to consider similar approaches to 
improve efficiency.

      TITLE IX--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

   Subtitle A--Office of the Secretary of Defense and Related Matters

Headquarters activities of the Department of Defense matters (sec. 901)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
subsection 921(b) of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) to 
repeal the certification of cost savings under that subsection 
and to require periodic assessments from the Secretary of 
Defense, through the Chief Management Officer, on enterprise 
business operations of the Department of Defense and efforts 
taken to minimize duplication of efforts and to maximize 
efficiency and effectiveness in mission execution. The first 
such assessment would be required not later than January 1, 
2020, with subsequent assessments to occur not less frequently 
than once every 5 years thereafter.
    The provision would also require the Secretary to report, 
not later than January 1, 2020, on the total number of civilian 
and military employees assigned or employed in the Office of 
the Chief, National Guard Bureau, and on the National Guard 
Joint Staff, together with a recommendation on the number of 
employees necessary to execute the missions and functions of 
the National Guard Bureau and National Guard Joint Staff.
    The provision would repeal certain outdated provisions of 
law and would further amend sections 143, 155, 7014, 8014, and 
9014 of title 10, United States Code, to provide modest 
increases in the statutory caps on the number of personnel that 
may be employed in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, the 
Joint Staff, and the Offices of the Secretary of the Army, 
Secretary of the Navy, and Secretary of the Air Force, 
respectively.
    Finally, the provision would clarify that the requirements 
of section 346 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92), relative to Major 
Headquarters Activity spending, sunset at the end of fiscal 
year 2019.
Responsibility of Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and 
        Sustainment for Procurement Technical Assistance Cooperative 
        Agreement Program (sec. 902)
    The committee recommends a provision that would make the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, 
rather than the Director of the Defense Logistics Agency, 
responsible for the Procurement Technical Assistance 
Cooperative Agreement Program.
Return to Chief Information Officer of the Department of Defense of 
        responsibility for business systems and related matters (sec. 
        903)
    The committee recommends a provision that would return the 
responsibilities for business systems from the Chief Management 
Officer back to the Chief Information Officer and would realign 
the Chief Data Officer to report to the Chief Information 
Officer instead of the Chief Management Officer. This 
realignment would facilitate the Department of Defense's 
implementation of the Foundations for Evidence-Based 
Policymaking Act of 2018 (Public Law 115-435) and ensure the 
Chief Data Officer's visibility into all data across the 
enterprise. The provision would further explicitly provide that 
the Chief Data Officer has access to all Department of Defense 
data.
Senior Military Advisor for Cyber Policy and Deputy Principal Cyber 
        Advisor (sec. 904)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
designation of a general or flag officer of the Armed Forces to 
serve within the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Policy as the Senior Military Advisor for Cyber Policy and, 
concurrently, as the Deputy Principal Cyber Advisor. As a 
result of the level of responsibility and complexity of the 
duties associated with these functions, the committee 
recommends that the military individual fulfilling these two 
roles be designated from among qualified commissioned regular 
officers of the Armed Forces in the grade of major general or 
rear admiral. The committee believes that Department of Defense 
cyber policy is uniquely advanced through the coupling of 
civilian and military expertise at the Office of the Secretary 
of Defense-level. Finally, the committee recognizes the 
critical work of the Principal Cyber Advisor, the Deputy 
Principal Cyber Advisor, and its cross-functional team and 
believes that this effective model should be sustained.

Limitation on the transfer of Strategic Capabilities Office (sec. 905)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
any reorganization to the Department of Defense (DOD) that 
would impact the Strategic Capabilities Office (SCO) until the 
Chief Management Officer provides to the congressional defense 
committees a report assessing the impacts of such an 
organizational change. Specifically, the report shall assess at 
a minimum the following options: (1) Transferring the SCO so 
that the Director of the SCO reports directly to the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment; (2) 
Maintaining the current arrangement such that the Director of 
the SCO reports directly to the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Research and Engineering; and (3) Transferring the SCO to the 
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency.
    The report should include the justification for any 
organizational changes and detail how specific changes would 
impact SCO's ability to execute its traditional missions, 
including: (1) Responding to combatant commanders' critical 
needs, (2) Augmenting cross-DOD efforts with respect to 
developing strategic capabilities; (3) Developing new and 
innovative ways to counter advanced threats; and (4) Partnering 
with and responding to senior leadership across the DOD.

Subtitle B--Organization and Management of Other Department of Defense 
                          Offices and Elements


Assistant Secretaries of the military departments for Energy, 
        Installations, and Environment (sec. 911)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
sections 3016(a), 5016(a), and 8016(a) of title 10, United 
States Code, to require that each military department maintain 
an assistant secretary for energy, installations, and 
environment.
    The committee believes that any person nominated for these 
positions should have relevant experience in the energy, 
installations, and environment portfolio.

Repeal of conditional designation of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Corps 
        as a basic branch of the Army (sec. 912)

    The committee recommends a provision that would repeal 
section 582 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91), which established the 
conditional designation of explosive ordnance disposal as a 
basic branch of the Army.

                       Subtitle C--Other Matters


Exclusion from limitations on personnel in the Office of the Secretary 
        of Defense and Department of Defense headquarters of fellows 
        appointed under the John S. McCain Defense Fellows Program 
        (sec. 921)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 932(f)(3) of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) to 
stipulate that an individual appointed to a fellowship under 
this section shall not count against the limitation on the 
number of Office of the Secretary of Defense personnel in 
section 143 of title 10, United States Code, or any similar 
limitation in law on the number of personnel in headquarters of 
the Department of Defense.

Report on resources to implement the civilian casualty policy of the 
        Department of Defense (sec. 922)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require, 
not later than 30 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act, the Secretary of Defense to submit to the congressional 
defense committees a report on the resources necessary to 
fulfill the requirements of section 936 of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) over the future years defense plan.

                       Items of Special Interest


Cross-functional teams

    The committee notes that section 911 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328) expressly empowered and directed Department of Defense 
(DOD) leadership to establish cross-functional teams (CFTs) and 
that the law defined the characteristics and authorities common 
to such teams. The committee understands, however, that the DOD 
has not established a single CFT under that law and that it is 
severely delinquent in meeting the provision's requirements and 
milestones.
    Although DOD components have established various task 
forces and working groups, including the Close Combat Lethality 
Task Force and the Protecting Critical Technology Task Force, 
none of these entities were established under section 911 
authorities. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide the committee, not later than February 1, 
2020, an explanation as to why section 911 authorities have not 
been utilized to date.

Remote and isolated research and testing installations

    The committee recommends that the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Research and Engineering and the Chief Management 
Officer jointly establish a working group to identify and 
develop solutions to immediate and long-term programmatic 
challenges facing remote and isolated installations. The effort 
should be focused on research and testing organizations and 
address issues that would have negative impacts on innovation, 
streamlined and successful development and acquisition efforts, 
and support for National Defense Strategy goals. This working 
group should provide a briefing to the congressional defense 
committees no later than December 1, 2019.
    The committee notes that a number of organizations that 
perform critical research and testing missions are located on 
installations that are remote and isolated from population 
centers and have limited access to goods, services, and 
technical talent. For example, the committee notes that both 
the Army's Dugway Proving Grounds and the Navy's Atlantic 
Undersea Test and Evaluation Center face these types of 
challenges while attempting to maintain robust test 
capabilities to support the National Defense Strategy. Remote 
and isolated installations face challenges in maintaining 
adequate government and support contractor personnel and 
capabilities and often experience negative impacts when 
attempting to implement government-wide, Department of Defense-
wide, or service-wide policies and regulations that are 
designed for more traditional and larger installations and not 
always appropriate or applicable to the unique circumstances of 
these smaller installations.

Secretariat for Special Operations

    The committee strongly supports continued efforts to 
implement section 922 of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) to enable greater 
oversight of and advocacy for special operations forces by the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low-
Intensity Conflict (ASD SOLIC). While important progress has 
been made in implementing these reforms, the Department has 
been unable to fully realize the Congress' intent for the ASD 
SOLIC to act as the ``service secretary-like'' civilian 
counterpart to the Commander of U.S. Special Operations Command 
more than 2 years after the law's passage.
    In particular, the committee is concerned that the 
Department of Defense has failed to establish clear timelines 
for the implementation of tasks necessary to fully implement 
the ASD SOLIC reforms. Additionally, the committee is concerned 
that sufficient efforts have not been made to update and 
clarify Departmental guidance to accurately reflect the ASD 
SOLIC's enhanced role with respect to the oversight and 
advocacy of special operations forces.
    Lastly, while the committee is encouraged by efforts to 
more adequately staff the ASD SOLIC Secretariat for Special 
Operations, the committee is concerned that new personnel 
actions are not adequately tied to a strategic workforce plan, 
potentially leading to the hiring of staff that may not have 
the requisite experience or may be serving only in a temporary 
capacity. The committee is also concerned that the title and 
grade of personnel leading the day-to-day operations of the 
Secretariat for Special Operations may not be commensurate with 
their responsibilities.
    Therefore, the committee encourages the Department to 
address these issues expeditiously and would welcome 
legislative or other proposals to remove any remaining 
challenges to full implementation of the ASD SOLIC reforms.

                      TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS

                     Subtitle A--Financial Matters


General transfer authority (sec. 1001)

    The committee recommends a provision that would allow the 
Secretary of Defense to transfer up to $4.0 billion of fiscal 
year 2020 funds authorized in division A of this Act to 
unforeseen higher priority needs in accordance with normal 
reprogramming procedures. Transfers of funds between military 
personnel authorizations would not be counted toward the dollar 
limitation in this provision.

Modification of required elements of annual reports on emergency and 
        extraordinary expenses of the Department of Defense (sec. 1002)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 127 of title 10, United States Code, to modify the 
annual reporting requirement.

Inclusion of military construction projects in annual reports on 
        unfunded priorities of the Armed Forces and the combatant 
        commands (sec. 1003)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 222a of title 10, United States Code, to require the 
Services and combatant commands to submit separate lists of 
unfunded priorities for military construction. The provision 
would require the lists to be in priority order.

Prohibition on delegation of responsibility for submittal to Congress 
        of Out-Year Unconstrained Total Munitions Requirements and Out-
        Year Inventory numbers (sec. 1004)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 222c of title 10, United States Code, by prohibiting 
the chief of staff of each of the Services from delegating the 
munitions reporting requirement established in that section 
outside the service concerned. The committee notes that, for 
the fiscal year 2020 budget submission, the Joint Staff and the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment 
delivered the required report on behalf of the Services, 
despite statutory requirements, and as a result have failed to 
meet the requirement in a timely manner.

Element in annual reports on the Financial Improvement and Audit 
        Remediation Plan on activities with respect to classified 
        programs (sec. 1005)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 240b(b)(1) of title 10, United States Code, to include 
audit results and activities for classified programs in the 
Financial Improvement and Audit Remediation Plan. The plan 
shall remain unclassified and include a classified annex, if 
required.

Modification of semiannual briefings on the consolidated corrective 
        action plan of the Department of Defense for financial 
        management information (sec. 1006)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 240b(b) of title 10, United States Code, to require the 
Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) to track the costs of 
the audit corrective action plans.

Update of authorities and renaming of Department of Defense Acquisition 
        Workforce Development Fund (sec. 1007)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1705 of title 10, United States Code, to rename the 
Defense Acquisition Workforce Development Fund to the Defense 
Acquisition Workforce Development Account in recognition that 
it is funded by appropriations.

                   Subtitle B--Counterdrug Activities


Modification of authority to support a unified counterdrug and 
        counterterrorism campaign in Colombia (sec. 1011)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1021 of the Ronald W. Reagan National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2005 (Public Law 108-375), as 
most recently amended by section 1011 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91), to 
modify authorized assistance to the Government of Colombia to 
address the emergence of new threats.
    The committee strongly supports the partnership between the 
United States and Colombia and notes the remarkable security 
gains that the Government of Colombia has achieved over nearly 
2 decades and its ongoing contributions to regional security. 
The committee believes that an enduring security relationship 
between the United States and Colombia is essential to 
sustaining and building on these gains and supporting the 
successful implementation of the 2016 peace accord. However, 
the committee notes with concern reports of record high yields 
of coca and the emergence of other illegally armed groups, 
ranging from terrorist organizations to drug trafficking 
organizations, that threaten peace, stability, and security in 
Colombia and the broader region. In light of the continuing 
threat posed by drug trafficking and illegal armed groups, it 
is imperative that the Department of Defense's (DOD's) 
authorities to engage with and provide support to the 
Government of Colombia are reflective of the evolving nature of 
the security environment. In particular, the splintering of 
armed groups since the 2016 peace agreement poses challenges to 
the applicability of the existing DOD authority to provide 
support to the Government of Colombia. The committee intends 
for the modifications contained in this provision to ensure 
that United States support to the Government of Colombia 
remains relevant and effective against these serious and 
evolving threats. Further, the committee notes that the 
modifications contained in this provision would not alter the 
prohibition of U.S. persons' engaging in combat operations.

Two-year extension of authority for joint task forces to provide 
        support to law enforcement agencies conducting counter-
        terrorism activities (sec. 1012)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend for 
2 years the authority established in section 1022(b) of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2004 (Public 
Law 108-136).

                Subtitle C--Naval Vessels and Shipyards


Modification of authority to purchase vessels using funds in National 
        Defense Sealift Fund (sec. 1016)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2218(f)(3) of title 10, United States Code, in 
subparagraph (E) by striking ``10 new sealift vessels'' and 
inserting ``10 new sealift vessels, auxiliary vessels, or a 
combination of such vessels''.

Senior Technical Authority for each naval vessel class (sec. 1017)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
designation of a Senior Technical Authority for each class of 
naval vessels.
    The committee notes the Government Accountability Office 
(GAO) published a report on June 6, 2018, titled ``Navy 
Shipbuilding: Past Performance Provides Valuable Lessons for 
Future Investments'' (GAO-18-238SP), which assessed Navy 
shipbuilding performance over the past 10 years and concluded 
that ``[the Navy] has received $24 billion more in funding than 
originally planned but has 50 fewer ships in its inventory 
today, as compared to the goals it first established in [2007.] 
. . . Ship costs exceed[ed] estimates by over $11 billion 
during this time frame.''
    This report found that lead ships in new classes of naval 
vessels regularly failed to meet expectations. For the 8 most 
recently delivered lead combatant ships (CVN-78, DDG-1000, LCS-
1, LCS-2, LHA-6, LPD-17, SSN-774, and SSN-775), the report 
found that: a total of $8 billion more than the initial budget 
was required to construct these ships; each lead ship 
experienced cost growth of at least 10 percent, and 3 lead 
ships exceeded their initial budgets by 80 percent or more; 
each lead ship was delivered to the fleet at least 6 months 
late with 5 lead ships delayed by more than 2 years; and most 
lead ships had dozens of uncorrected deficiencies when accepted 
by the Navy.
    As this report highlights, a key step in successful 
shipbuilding programs is technology development: the maturation 
of key technologies into actual system prototypes and 
demonstration of them in a realistic environment prior to the 
detailed design of the lead ship. This type of technology 
maturation was not performed effectively on the CVN-78, DDG-
1000, LCS-1, LCS-2, and LPD-17 programs.
    The committee also notes that the Navy is planning the 
largest fleet expansion in over 30 years with several costly 
and complex acquisitions planned for the coming years, 
including the Columbia-class ballistic missile submarines and 
new classes of guided missile frigates and fast attack 
submarines. The Chief of Naval Operations has also called for 
the first Large Surface Combatant, Large Unmanned Surface 
Vehicle, Future Small Auxiliary, and Future Large Auxiliary 
(CHAMP) to each be on contract in 2023. Additionally, large and 
extra large undersea vehicles are projected to transition from 
research and development to procurement within the next decade.
    While recognizing the importance of modernizing the fleet 
to face growing threats, the committee finds the Comptroller 
General's findings to be compelling and believes that 
additional actions are needed to improve shipbuilding cost, 
schedule, and performance outcomes, particularly of lead ships.
    If such outcomes are not improved, the committee is 
concerned that the trends of the past 10 years will continue 
and that the Navy battle force could lack the capability and 
capacity necessary to prevail in great power competition as 
described in the National Defense Strategy.
    Accordingly, this provision would establish a Senior 
Technical Authority (STA) for each class of naval vessels. Each 
STA would be responsible for establishing, monitoring, and 
approving technical standards, tools, and processes for the 
class of naval vessels for which he or she is designated under 
this section in conformance with applicable Department of 
Defense and Department of the Navy policies, requirements, 
architectures, and standards.
    In addition, beginning on October 1, 2020, funds authorized 
to be appropriated for Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy, could 
not be obligated on the lead vessel in a new class of naval 
vessels until the Secretary of the Navy has submitted a 
certification containing information from the STA on such class 
of vessels.
    The committee recognizes that implementation of this 
provision may require additional government employees, 
including senior executives, in the Naval Systems Engineering 
Directorate of the Naval Sea Systems Command (SEA 05) and would 
support such increases as may be warranted.

Permanent authority for sustaining operational readiness of Littoral 
        Combat Ships on extended deployment (sec. 1018)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 8680 of title 10, United States Code, to provide the 
Secretary of the Navy with additional flexibility to maintain 
Littoral Combat Ships (LCS) by allowing government or 
contractor personnel to conduct maintenance on deployed LCS 
vessels regardless of ship location.
    This provision would codify the authorities successfully 
employed in a pilot program authorized by section 1025 of the 
Carl Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291).
    The pilot program was conducted to evaluate maintenance 
options for LCS vessels on extended deployments from December 
2014 to September 2016. The Navy's assessment of the pilot 
program, which was submitted in a March 2017 report to the 
Congress, stated, ``Based on the pilot program results, cost 
savings are expected to be notable. Even more importantly, the 
flexibility to provide timely maintenance in support of 
schedule changes and mission execution is crucial to long-term 
success of the LCS Fleet[.]''
    The committee concurs with the Navy's assessment of the 
pilot program and recommends codifying the associated 
authorities in title 10, United States Code.

                      Subtitle D--Counterterrorism


Extension of prohibition on use of funds for transfer or release of 
        individuals detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
        Bay, Cuba, to the United States (sec. 1021)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
until December 31, 2020, the prohibition on the use of funds 
provided to the Department of Defense to transfer or release 
individuals detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
Bay, Cuba, to the United States.

Extension of prohibition on use of funds to construct or modify 
        facilities in the United States to house detainees transferred 
        from United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (sec. 
        1022)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
until December 31, 2020, the prohibition on the use of funds 
provided to the Department of Defense to construct or modify 
facilities in the United States to house detainees transferred 
from United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Extension of prohibition on use of funds for transfer or release of 
        individuals detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
        Bay, Cuba, to certain countries (sec. 1023)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
until December 31, 2020, the prohibition on the use of funds 
provided to the Department of Defense to transfer or release 
individuals detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
Bay, Cuba, to Libya, Somalia, Syria, and Yemen.

Extension of prohibition on use of funds to close or relinquish control 
        of United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (sec. 
        1024)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
until fiscal year 2020 the prohibition on the use of funds 
provided to the Department of Defense: (1) To close or abandon 
United States Naval Station, Guantanamo; (2) To relinquish 
control of Guantanamo Bay to the Republic of Cuba; or (3) To 
implement a material modification to the Treaty between the 
United States of America and Cuba signed at Washington, D.C., 
on May 29, 1934, which modification would constructively close 
United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay.

Authority to transfer individuals detained at United States Naval 
        Station Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to the United States temporarily 
        for emergency or critical medical treatment (sec. 1025)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the temporary transfer of individuals detained at United States 
Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to the United States for 
emergency or critical medical treatment not available at 
Guantanamo.

Chief Medical Officer at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, 
        Cuba (sec. 1026)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
establishment of a Chief Medical Officer (CMO) at United States 
Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to conduct oversight of 
medical care provided to individuals detained at Guantanamo to 
ensure that such medical care meets the standard of care as 
defined in the provision. The CMO would report directly to the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs and hold a 
grade not below that of colonel, or captain in the Navy. The 
CMO would make medical determinations, including: (1) Decisions 
regarding assessment, diagnosis, and treatment; and (2) 
Determinations concerning medical accommodations to living 
conditions and operating procedures for detention facilities. 
In the event of the commander of Joint Task Force Guantanamo's 
declination to follow a determination of the CMO, the provision 
would require the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special 
Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict and the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs to jointly resolve the 
matter of such determination within 7 days of receipt of the 
notification of such declination. Additionally, the provision 
would authorize the CMO to secure access from the Department of 
Defense to any individual, information, or assistance that the 
CMO considers necessary to carry out the duties of the 
position.
    The committee believes that detainees at Guantanamo should 
receive timely access to appropriate medical care. The 
committee is concerned that medical providers at Guantanamo may 
not have access to information in certain medical records that 
would inform diagnosis and treatment of medical conditions of 
detainees. The committee believes that this provision would 
help to ensure that detainees receive timely assessment, 
diagnosis, and treatment of their medical conditions.

         Subtitle E--Miscellaneous Authorities and Limitations


Clarification of authority of military commissions under chapter 47A of 
        title 10, United States Code, to punish contempt (sec. 1031)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
subchapter IV of chapter 47A of title 10, United States Code, 
to permit a judge of the United States Court of Military 
Commission Review or a military judge detailed to a military 
commission to punish contempt. The provision would also provide 
that the punishment for contempt may not exceed confinement for 
30 days, a fine of $1,000, or both and would establish the 
conditions under which punishment for contempt is reviewable.

Comprehensive Department of Defense policy on collective self-defense 
        (sec. 1032)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require, 
not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act, the Secretary of Defense to promulgate a comprehensive 
written policy, detailing all aspects of the Department of 
Defense's approach to authorizing and providing collective 
self-defense by any member or unit of the U.S. Armed Forces to 
designated foreign nationals, their facilities, and their 
property, and to provide such comprehensive written policy to 
the congressional defense committees.
    The committee understands that the Department of Defense 
defines collective self-defense as the defense of designated 
non-U.S. military forces, irregular partner forces, and/or 
their property from a hostile act or demonstrated hostile 
intent. Furthermore, the committee understands that the 
Department views collective self-defense as an extension of 
U.S. unit self-defense, regardless of whether U.S. personnel or 
facilities are threatened themselves.
    The committee unquestionably supports the inherent right of 
U.S. military forces to defend themselves whenever and wherever 
they are deployed. However, the committee seeks greater 
understanding of the legal and policy basis for the provision 
of collective self-defense to designated foreign nationals, 
their facilities, and their property. This is especially true 
in situations in which U.S. personnel and facilities are not 
directly threatened. The committee believes that such issues 
merit detailed review by the Department and the promulgation of 
a comprehensive written policy to ensure appropriate clarity.

Oversight of Department of Defense execute orders (sec. 1033)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, except in extraordinary circumstances, to 
provide the congressional defense committees with an execute 
order approved by the Secretary of Defense or a combatant 
commander for review within 30 days of receiving a written 
request from the Chairman or Ranking Member of any such 
committee.

Prohibition on ownership or trading of stocks in certain companies by 
        Department of Defense officers and employees (sec. 1034)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
Department of Defense officials who participated personally and 
substantially in an acquisition valued in excess of $10,000,000 
and occupy a position on the Executive Schedule, are a member 
of the Senior Executive Service, or are a General or Flag 
Officer or who served as program manager, deputy program 
manager, procuring contracting officer, administrative 
contracting officer, source selection authority, member of a 
source selection evaluation board, or chief of a financial or 
technical evaluation team for a contract in excess of $10.0 
million from owning or trading a publicly traded stock of a 
company that, during the preceding calendar year, received more 
than $1.0 billion in revenue from the Department of Defense, 
including through contracts with the Department.
    The provision would further provide that no officer or 
employee of the Department of Defense may own or trade a 
publicly traded stock of a company that is a contractor or 
subcontractor of the Department, if the Standards of Conduct 
Office of the Office of the General Counsel of the Department 
of Defense determines that the value of the stock may be 
directly or indirectly influenced by any official act of that 
officer or employee.
    Any official who knowingly fails to comply with these 
requirements would be subject to administrative action by the 
Secretary of Defense. The definition of publicly traded stock 
does not included a widely-held investment fund, for purposes 
of this provision.

Policy regarding the transition of data and applications to the cloud 
        (sec. 1035)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Chief Information and Chief Data Officers of the Department of 
Defense to develop and implement a policy relating to the 
transition of data and applications to the cloud under the 
Department's cloud strategy.

Modernization of inspection authorities applicable to the National 
        Guard and extension of inspection authority to the Chief of the 
        National Guard Bureau (sec. 1036)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 105 of title 32, United States Code, to authorize the 
Chief of the National Guard Bureau to conduct inspections to 
determine whether units and members of the Army National Guard 
and Air Force National Guard comply with Federal law and policy 
applicable to the National Guard.

Enhancement of authorities on forfeiture of Federal benefits by the 
        National Guard (sec. 1037)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 108 of title 32, United States Code, to provide that 
the availability of Federal funds provided to the National 
Guard of individual States is contingent upon compliance with 
Federal law and policy applicable to the National Guard. The 
provision would also authorize the President to withdraw 
Federal recognition of National Guard units and members for 
failure to comply with Federal law and policy and would 
authorize the President to bar units and individuals from 
receiving Federal funds if the unit or individuals fail to 
comply with Federal law and policy.

Modernization of authorities on property and fiscal officers of the 
        National Guard (sec. 1038)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 708 of title 32, United States Code, to require the 
Chief of the National Guard Bureau, subject to the approval of 
the secretary of the military department concerned, to assign, 
designate, or detail property and fiscal officers for each 
State, each territory, and the District of Columbia.

Limitation on placement by the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel 
        and Readiness of work with federally funded research and 
        development centers (sec. 1039)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness from 
placing any work with a federally funded research and 
development center (FFRDC) until a report containing a list of 
all studies, reports, and other analyses being undertaken for 
the Under Secretary is submitted to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives.
    Federally funded research and development centers are 
closely monitored by the Congress due to their unique access to 
sensitive, pre-decisional government information. Every year, 
the Department of Defense must submit a report outlining the 
number of staff years of technical effort and funding allocated 
to each FFRDC. In fiscal year 2017, the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Personnel and Readiness spent in excess of $50 
million on FFRDC products.
    In performing its oversight role over the Department of 
Defense, the committee frequently receives pre-decisional, 
sensitive, and confidential information. For hardware 
acquisition, the committee reviews analyses of alternatives and 
requirements documents to determine whether a particular 
acquisition strategy is appropriate. For personnel management, 
the committee is entitled to similar information related to 
assessments of possible policy decisions.
    The committee emphasizes the continued importance of FFRDC 
analyses. The limitation included in this provision is not 
intended to harm or otherwise threaten any particular FFRDC.

Termination of requirement for Department of Defense facility access 
        clearances for joint ventures composed of previously-cleared 
        entities (sec. 1040)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the requirement for joint ventures that are composed entirely 
of entities that already have been granted facility clearances 
to obtain an additional clearance for the venture.

Designation of Department of Defense Strategic Arctic Ports (sec. 1041)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Chairman of the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Commanding General of the United 
States Army Corps of Engineers, the Commandant of the Coast 
Guard, and the Administrator of the Maritime Administration, to 
submit a report to the congressional defense committees 
evaluating potential sites for one or more strategic ports in 
the Arctic region. The provision would also require the 
Secretary of Defense to designate one or more ports as 
Department of Defense Strategic Arctic Ports not later than 90 
days after the submission of the report.

Extension of National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence 
        (sec. 1042)

    The committee recommends a provision that would delay the 
termination of the National Security Commission on Artificial 
Intelligence to March 1, 2021. The provision also modifies the 
due date of the initial report to not later than August 1, 
2019, requires two interim reports that shall be submitted not 
later than December 1, 2019, and December 1, 2020, and requires 
a final report that shall be submitted not later than March 1, 
2021.

Authority to transfer funds for Bien Hoa dioxin cleanup (sec. 1043)

    The committee recommends a provision that would allow the 
Secretary of Defense to transfer to the Secretary of State, for 
use by the United States Agency for International Development, 
funds to be used for the Bien Hoa dioxin cleanup.

Limitation on use of funds to house children separated from parents 
        (sec. 1044)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the use of funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act to 
house a child separated from a parent.

                    Subtitle F--Studies and Reports


Modification of annual reporting requirements on defense manpower (sec. 
        1051)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 115a of title 10, United States Code, to rename, change 
the due date of, and modify the elements of the Defense 
Manpower Requirements Report. The provision would also require 
that the (renamed) Defense Manpower Profile Report be delivered 
to the Congress each year by April 1. Additionally, the 
provision would repeal reporting requirements related to 
contractor personnel, major military force unit justifications, 
support and overhead manpower functions, overseas manpower, 
medical personnel, and the military technician program. 
Finally, the provision would set separate due dates for 
reporting requirements related to major Department of Defense 
headquarters activities and the diversity of the Armed Forces.

Report on Department of Defense efforts to implement a force planning 
        process in support of implementation of the 2018 National 
        Defense Strategy (sec. 1052)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Policy to provide a report, not 
later than February 1, 2020, on Department of Defense efforts 
to institute a force planning process that supports the 
implementation of the National Defense Strategy.
    The National Defense Strategy asserts that the U.S. 
military advantage with respect to strategic competition with 
the People's Republic of China and the Russian Federation has 
been eroding. The strategy concludes that the Department must 
pursue ``urgent change at significant scale'' to avoid a joint 
force that is irrelevant to the threats it will face. The 
Department must make difficult choices to prioritize rapid 
adaptation of the joint force to meet these challenges. 
Furthermore, the lack of a rigorous analytical force planning 
process that includes joint analytical capability makes it 
difficult to overcome the interests of the Services in 
protecting their force structure equities.
    Key products of the force planning process include concepts 
of operations that the Services can use to help evaluate their 
individual force structure requirements. The National Defense 
Strategy Commission report highlights that ``[o]perational 
concepts constitute an essential link between strategic 
objectives and the capability and budgetary priorities needed 
to advance them.'' The commission concluded, ``Unfortunately, 
the innovative operational concepts we need do not currently 
appear to exist.''
    The committee notes that the Government Accountability 
Office made three recommendations in a March 2019 report titled 
``Revised Analytic Approach Needed to Support Force Structure 
Decision-Making'' (GAO-19-385) to improve the Department's 
analytic approach to force planning: (1) Determine the analytic 
products needed at the right level of detail; (2) The Secretary 
of Defense should ensure that specific guidance requiring the 
Services to explore a range of innovative force structure 
approaches is given; and (3) The Secretary of Defense should 
establish an approach for conducting joint analyses in addition 
to current disparate service-specific analyses.
    The committee is concerned that an anemic force planning 
process that does not provide a rigorous analytical basis to 
evaluate and prioritize force structure approaches will at 
worst preclude successful implementation of the National 
Defense Strategy and will at best make the process inefficient.

Extension of annual reports on civilian casualties in connection with 
        United States military operations (sec. 1053)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
through December 31, 2025, the reporting requirement 
established by section 1057 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91).

Report on joint force plan for implementation of strategies of the 
        Department of Defense for the Arctic (sec. 1054)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with Secretaries of the 
military departments, to submit a joint force plan for 
implementing the Department of Defense's December 2016 Report 
to Congress on the Strategy to Protect United States National 
Security Interests in the Arctic Region and the updated Arctic 
strategy to improve and enhance joint operations, which was 
mandated in the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232).

Report on use of Northern Tier bases in implementation of Arctic 
        strategy of the United States (sec. 1055)

    The committee recommends a provision that would direct the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees on the use of bases in northern latitudes, 
including Northern Tier bases, for implementing the 
recommendations in the December 2016 ``Report to Congress on 
Strategy to Protect United States National Security Interests 
in the Arctic Region'' and the updated Arctic strategy required 
to be submitted to the congressional defense committees under 
section 1071 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232).

Report on the Department of Defense plan for mass-casualty disaster 
        response operations in the Arctic (sec. 1056)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of 
Homeland Security, to submit a report on the plan of the 
Department of Defense for assisting mass-casualty disaster 
response operations in the Arctic.

Annual reports on approval of employment or compensation of retired 
        general or flag officers by foreign governments for Emoluments 
        Clause purposes (sec. 1057)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 908 of title 37, United States Code, to require the 
Secretaries of the military departments to submit annually to 
appropriate committees and Members of Congress a joint report 
enumerating each approval issued during the preceding year for 
a retired general or flag officer to accept civil employment or 
compensation for which the consent of Congress is required by 
the last paragraph of Section 9 of Article I of the 
Constitution, related to acceptance of emoluments, offices, or 
titles from a foreign government. The provision would require 
the first report to cover the 5-year period preceding the year 
in which the report is submitted.

Transmittal to Congress of requests for assistance received by the 
        Department of Defense from other departments (sec. 1058)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to transmit electronically requests for 
assistance received from the Department of Homeland Security or 
the Department of Health and Human Services to the Committees 
on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives not later than 7 calendar days after receiving 
those requests. The provision also requires the Secretary to 
transmit any responses to such requests.

Semiannual report on Consolidated Adjudication Facility of the Defense 
        Counterintelligence and Security Agency (sec. 1059)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require, 
not less frequently than semi-annually until the Director of 
the Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency (DCSA) 
determines that a steady-state level has been achieved for the 
Consolidated Adjudication Facility of the Agency, the Director 
to submit to the congressional defense committees a report on 
inventory and timeliness metrics relating to such facility. The 
committee notes that elsewhere in this Act is a recommended 
increase of $10.0 million to support the Consolidated 
Adjudication Facility of the DCSA.

Comptroller General of the United States report on post-government 
        employment of former Department of Defense officials (sec. 
        1060)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Comptroller General of the United States to initiate a review, 
not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act, updating the information and findings contained in the 
Government Accountability Office report titled ``Defense 
Contracting: Post-Government Employment of Former DOD Officials 
Needs Greater Transparency'' (GAO-08-485).

Subtitle G--Treatment of Contaminated Water Near Military Installations


Treatment of contaminated water near military installations (secs. 
        1071-1075)

    The committee recommends a series of provisions (secs. 
1071-1075) that would allow the Secretaries of the military 
departments to provide uncontaminated water sources or to treat 
water contaminated with perfluoroalkyl and polyfluoroalkyl 
substances if the water is used for agricultural purposes 
leading to products destined for human consumption. 
Additionally, these provisions would authorize the Secretary of 
the Air Force to acquire real property that has shown signs of 
contamination from perfluorooctanoic and perfluorooctane 
sulfonate.

                       Subtitle H--Other Matters


Revision to authorities relating to mail service for members of the 
        Armed Forces and Department of Defense civilians overseas (sec. 
        1081)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 3401 of title 39, United States Code, to clarify that 
Active-Duty servicemembers and Department of Defense civilian 
employees providing support to military operations are 
authorized to mail personal correspondence at no cost when 
deployed for a contingency operation in an area designated by 
the President. The provision would also extend the free mail 
program to all hospitalized servicemembers wounded in a 
designated area. Finally, the provision would allow certain 
mail between military post offices or from a military post 
office to a point of entry into the United States to be 
transported by surface shipment.

Access to and use of military post offices by United States citizens 
        employed overseas by the North Atlantic Treaty Organization who 
        perform functions in support of military operations of the 
        Armed Forces (sec. 1082)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 406 of title 39, United States Code, to permit the 
Secretary of Defense to authorize the use of military post 
offices in locations outside the United States by citizens of 
the United States who are employed by the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization and who perform functions in support of the Armed 
Forces.

Guarantee of residency for spouses of members of uniformed services 
        (sec. 1083)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend Title 
VI of the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (Public Law 108-189; 
50 U.S.C. 4021 et seq.) to allow military spouses to use the 
same residences as their servicemembers for any purpose, 
regardless of the date on which the marriage occurred.

Extension of requirement for briefings on the national biodefense 
        strategy (sec. 1084)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1086(d) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) by extending to March 1, 
2025, the requirement for annual briefings on the status and 
implementation plan of the National Biodefense Strategy.
    The committee recognizes the broad spectrum of stakeholders 
in the biodefense sector and directs the Secretary of Defense 
to solicit and consider input from these stakeholders as it 
develops and implements the National Biodefense Strategy. 
Stakeholders include private industry partners responsible for 
the development and production of medical countermeasures, 
experts with relevant expertise in biological and emerging 
infectious diseases, State and local public health departments, 
and other organizations, as appropriate.
    The committee also directs the Comptroller General of the 
United States to conduct a review of Department of Defense 
investments in biodefense. This review shall include assessment 
of historical funding levels, an analysis of investments in 
research and development, and an analysis of investments in 
procurement. The Comptroller General shall provide a briefing 
on the preliminary findings to the congressional defense 
committees not later than March 1, 2020, with a final report to 
be provided at a mutually agreed upon time.

Extension of National Commission on Military Aviation Safety (sec. 
        1085)

    The committee recommends a provision that would delay the 
due date of the report of the National Commission on Military 
Aviation Safety by 9 months to December 1, 2020. The committee 
believes that the Secretary of Defense should take all 
appropriate actions to increase aircraft maintenance 
availability and pilot training and proficiency to ensure the 
highest levels of flight safety. The committee is concerned 
that the current due date would not afford the commission the 
time needed to fully examine and make recommendations regarding 
military mishaps.

                       Items of Special Interest


Allocation of Military Forces

    The committee notes, and in general concurs with, the 
concerns of the 2018 National Defense Strategy Commission, 
which was charged with reviewing the National Defense Strategy 
and making recommendations to Congress. Specifically, the 
Commission raised significant concerns about the current state 
of civilian-military relationships, particularly in the 
decision-making process for allocating military forces. As the 
Commission states, ``Put bluntly, allocating priority-and 
allocating forces-across theaters of warfare is not solely a 
military matter. It is an inherently political-military task, 
decision authority for which is the proper competency and 
responsibility of America's civilian leaders.'' The Commission 
further recommends that, ``It is critical that DoD--and 
Congress--reverse the unhealthy trend in which decision-making 
is drifting away from civilian leaders on issues of national 
importance.''
    The principle of civilian control of the Armed Forces is 
the bedrock of civilian-military relations, and it is one of 
the defining tenets of our democracy. While this committee has 
previously supported enhancing the responsibilities and 
functions of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, we 
underscore that the Chairman serves in an advisory role to the 
President and the Secretary of Defense and remains outside the 
chain of command. Therefore, the committee restates that it is 
appropriate and necessary that the decision-making authority 
for force allocation resides with the civilian leadership of 
the Department of Defense and notes the requirement elsewhere 
in this Act to reestablish a more robust and analytically sound 
force planning process to support that decision-making.

Assessment of the Requirement for a Strategic Arctic Port

    The Committee notes that the report titled ``Department of 
Defense Assessment of Requirement for a Strategic Arctic 
Port,'' which was mandated in section 1095 of the Fiscal Year 
2017 National Defense Authorization Act (Public Law 114-840) 
and delivered to the congressional defense committees in early 
2018, concluded that, ``existing [Department of Defense] 
infrastructure in the [Arctic] region is adequate to meet its 
current operational requirements.'' The committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to update the committee on whether the 
conclusion of this report has changed.

Assignment of responsibility for the Arctic to a deputy assistant 
        secretary of defense

    The committee notes that the strategic importance of the 
Arctic continues to increase as the United States and other 
countries recognize the military significance of the Arctic's 
sea lanes and choke points and its potential for power 
projection into multiple regions. The committee also recognizes 
that the Department of Defense's mission requirements in the 
Arctic are expected to grow, as increases in human and maritime 
activity bring heightened risk of maritime accidents, oil 
spills, illegal fishing, harvesting of other natural resources 
in the exclusive economic zone of the United States, and other 
potential threats or challenges to United States sovereignty.
    Therefore, the committee strongly urges the Secretary of 
Defense to assign to an existing deputy assistant secretary of 
defense the primary responsibility for the Arctic region, in 
order to coordinate the formation of Arctic defense policy with 
relevant Department of Defense entities.
    The committee also notes that a similar request was made in 
the Senate report accompanying S. 2987 (S. Rept. 115-262) of 
the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2019; the Department has yet to act on this 
request.

Briefing on civilian casualties

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide, 
not later than August 1, 2019, a briefing to the Senate Armed 
Services Committee on the most recent annual report on civilian 
casualties in connection with United States military operations 
that has been submitted to Congress pursuant to section 1057 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 
(Public Law 115-91), as most recently amended by section 1062 
of the John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232), which shall include, at 
a minimum, a discussion of the roles of manned and unmanned 
aircraft in operations that were confirmed to have resulted in 
civilian casualties and lessons learned from such operations.

Combatant command pandemic planning

    The committee directs the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees no later than March 31, 2021, on efforts at each 
combatant command for pandemic planning. This report shall be 
coordinated with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 
as well as other appropriate federal agencies that the 
combatant commanders deem appropriate.

Eliminating delays in initiating support to Government Accountability 
        Office audits

    The ability of the Congress to conduct effective oversight 
of federal agencies, including the Department of Defense (DOD), 
is enhanced through the timely completion of Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) audits. Longstanding GAO protocols, 
coordinated with the DOD and other federal agencies and updated 
most recently in 2019, establish general principles governing 
GAO's relationships with audited agencies. These protocols 
require agencies to assist the GAO in scheduling an initial 
meeting, called an entrance conference, within 14 calendar days 
of receiving notice of a new GAO audit. This initial meeting 
allows the GAO to communicate the initial objectives for its 
audit, and enables keys agencies to task points of contact to 
support GAO's work. The DOD has not been meeting the protocol 
target for the timely conduct of entrance conferences, and a 
number of entrance conferences and the associated audits have 
been unduly delayed.
    Therefore, for a 1-year period, beginning on October 1, 
2019, the committee directs the GAO and the DOD to provide 
quarterly updates to congressional defense committees on the 
extent to which entrance conferences with the DOD are being 
scheduled in accordance with GAO protocols and held in a timely 
manner.
    GAO's update shall include the following information for 
the prior 3-month period: (1) The number of new GAO audits for 
which the GAO requested an entrance conference with the DOD 
during the period; (2) The unique identifier for each audit for 
which an entrance conference was not scheduled within 14 
calendar days of the DOD's being notified of GAO's request for 
an entrance conference; and (3) The unique identifier for each 
audit for which an entrance conference was not held within 30 
calendar days of the DOD's being notified of the request for an 
entrance conference.
    The GAO shall provide this report to the congressional 
defense committees and the DOD within 30 calendar days of the 
end of each 3-month period. The DOD shall deliver a written 
response to the committees and the GAO not later than 15 
calendar days after the GAO provides its report to the DOD.
    DOD's response shall include the following information: (1) 
Of the entrance conferences that the GAO identified as not 
having been scheduled within 14 calendar days or not having 
been held within 30 calendar days, which entrance conferences, 
by unique GAO audit identifier, have since been scheduled and/
or held; (2) The factors that contributed to delays in 
scheduling and holding entrance conferences; and (3) Actions 
the DOD has taken or plans to take to address factors that 
contributed to delays and to ensure future adherence to the 
established timeframes for entrance conferences.

Evaluation of modeling and simulation used for force planning and 
        theater operational requirements

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense uses a 
large number and variety of computer models and simulations to 
support decision-making about force structure, resource 
allocation, war gaming, and priority weapons platforms and 
technologies to develop and deploy in support of likely 
operational scenarios. These models are used to develop 
information to brief decision makers, including the Congress, 
about, for example, the current state of the balance of forces 
in the Pacific and European theaters, the outcomes of likely 
war scenarios, and the need for investments in advanced 
technologies and new warfighting capabilities.
    The committee is concerned that the quality, accuracy, and 
dependability of these models, given their important role in 
decision making processes, has not been adequately validated. 
The committee notes that technical and engineering computer 
models used to develop systems such as body armor and missiles 
are rigorously verified and validated for veractiy of 
assumptions and technical accuracy using real world data. Other 
models, such as those used in the financial sector, are 
developed using expertise from a variety of disciplines, 
including economics, sociology, and advanced mathematics. The 
committee is concerned that the models used by organizations 
including the Joint Staff, Office of Net Assessment, war 
colleges, and service-level planning entities are simplistic by 
comparison and not subject to the same level of scrutiny.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to establish an independent team of academic and industry 
modeling and subject matter experts to review the quality of 
modeling and simulation used for force planning, war gaming, 
resource allocation, and other senior leader decision-making 
associated with implementation of the National Defense 
Strategy. The team shall review the technical quality of models 
currently in use, including their ability to simulate as 
required by application: physics and engineering, socio-
economic impact, readiness, global financial markets, politics, 
and other relevant inputs and outputs. The team shall assess 
the quality of these models and make recommendations for 
investments or policy changes needed to enhance and 
continuously validate current and future modeling and 
simulation tools employed to enable senior-level decision-
making.
    The committee directs the Secretary to support the team 
with expertise as needed from the Joint Staff, Office of Net 
Assessment, Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering, and other relevant organizations. The Secretary 
shall ensure that the team has sufficient resources and access 
to all data and records necessary to perform its analysis. The 
committee directs the Secretary to deliver a report on the 
independent team's assessments and recommendations with any 
additional comments, and a specific concurrence or non-
concurrence for each recommendation, to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and House of Representatives no later 
than December 31, 2020.

Information on Defense Spending

    The committee notes that past years' appropriations bills 
have required recipients of funds from the Departments of 
Defense, Agriculture, Education, Health and Human Services, and 
Labor to disclose in statements, press releases, and other 
documents that describe projects or programs the total cost of 
the activities that were paid for with federal dollars. This 
requirement no longer applies to the Department of Defense and 
Department of Agriculture. The committee believes this 
requirement should again apply to the Department of Defense. 
The committee believes that this would ensure transparency in 
Department of Defense spending on grants and individual 
projects.
    The committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense 
(Comptroller) to provide a briefing to the congressional 
defense committees, no later than March 1, 2020, on how the 
Department would implement such a requirement.

Public availability of Department of Defense reports required by law

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense is 
required by section 122a of title 10, United States Code, to 
ensure that reports are made available to the public, to the 
maximum extent practicable, by posting the reports on a 
publicly accessible website. Although the committee understands 
that exceptions to such posting requirements exist for reports 
containing classified or proprietary information, or 
information exempt from disclosure under the Freedom of 
Information Act (Public Law 89-487; 5 U.S.C. 552) the committee 
believes that the Department should make at least reasonable 
efforts to post all other reports on a publicly accessible 
website. Were the Department to demonstrate compliance with 
section 122a, the committee would be interested in exploring 
means of reducing the administrative burden to the Department 
associated with generating and delivering hard copy paper 
reports to the committee.

Report on the impacts of continuing resolutions

    The committee is concerned by the lack of stability and 
predictability associated with the congressional budget and 
appropriations process and, specifically, the effect that 
Continuing Resolutions (CRs) have on the operations of the 
Department of Defense (DOD). While the Department often 
identifies anecdotal detrimental effects of CRs, the DOD has 
never conducted a comprehensive study that analyzes the exact 
damage caused by a CR or series of CRs. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) 
to provide a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and House of Representatives by March 2, 2020, detailing 
the impacts of CRs on the DOD.
    The report shall, at a minimum, include assessments of how 
CRs affect: (1) Operations and activities of the Services; (2) 
Operations and activities of the combatant commands; (3) 
Acquisition and contracting, including the awarding of new 
contracts, obligations, and expenditures; (4) The defense 
industrial base; (5) Budgets, with an estimate of the 
additional costs to the DOD caused by CRs; and (6) Such other 
operations, programs, projects, and activities as the Secretary 
considers appropriate in order to provide to the Congress a 
comprehensive understanding of the full impacts of CRs.

                  TITLE XI--CIVILIAN PERSONNEL MATTERS

Modification of temporary assignments of Department of Defense 
        employees to a private-sector organization (sec. 1101)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1599g(e)(2)(A) of title 10, United State Code, to allow 
the Department of Defense to temporarily transfer or reassign 
other personnel within the Department to perform the normal 
duties and functions of employees who are participating in a 
public-private talent exchange.
Modification of number of available appointments for certain agencies 
        under personnel management authority to attract experts in 
        science and engineering (sec. 1102)
    The committee recommends a provision that would increase 
the number of section 1599h billets available to the Defense 
Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) by 30, bringing the 
total from 100 to 130, and decreasing the number of section 
1599h billets available to the laboratories of the military 
departments from 40 to 10. Consistent with its support of the 
National Defense Strategy, the DARPA is accelerating its work 
in hypersonics, artificial intelligence, and microelectronics 
and is standing up rapid deployment efforts with other parts of 
the Department of Defense (DOD), all of which require bringing 
on additional specialized expertise.
    The committee believes that it is important for the DOD to 
be able to hire experts in science and engineering. Section 
1599h of title 10, United States Code, authorizes an expedited 
hiring processes in order to attract and quickly employ world-
class experts from the private sector and academia. The 
committee understands that allocating additional billets to the 
DARPA for this expedited hiring process is critical in 
developing emerging technologies critical to the DOD.
One-year extension of temporary authority to grant allowances, 
        benefits, and gratuities to civilian personnel on official duty 
        in a combat zone (sec. 1103)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend by 1 
year the discretionary authority of the head of a Federal 
agency to provide allowances, benefits, and gratuities 
comparable to those provided to members of the Foreign Service 
to the agency's civilian employees on official duty in a combat 
zone.
One-year extension of authority to waive annual limitation on premium 
        pay and aggregate limitation on pay for Federal civilian 
        employees working overseas (sec. 1104)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1101 of the Duncan Hunter National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 (Public Law 110-417), as 
most recently amended by section 1104 of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232), to extend through 2020 the authority of heads of 
executive agencies to waive limitations on the aggregate of 
basic and premium pay of employees who perform work in an 
overseas location that is in the area of responsibility of the 
commander of U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM), or a location that 
was formerly in CENTCOM but is now in the area of 
responsibility of the Commander, U.S. Africa Command, in 
support of a military operation or an operation in response to 
a declared emergency.
Reimbursement of Federal employees for Federal, State, and local income 
        taxes incurred during travel, transportation, and relocation 
        (sec. 1105)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 5724b of title 5, United States Code, to authorize 
Federal agencies to reimburse individuals associated with the 
Federal civil service for all taxes incurred as a result of 
travel, transportation, or relocation expenses reimbursed, or 
furnished in-kind, by the agency concerned. This provision 
would apply to travel, transportation, or relocation expenses 
incurred on or after the date of the enactment of this Act.

                       Items of Special Interest

Analysis of competitive salary and benefits for STEM professionals
    As the Department of Defense (DOD) continues to field 
increasingly sophisticated equipment and technology, it is 
crucial that the Department build a workforce that is capable 
of maximizing the benefit such new technology provides. The 
committee recognizes that the military and civilian personnel 
required in the future must be well-trained in the fields of 
science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Despite this 
well-known need, the committee believes that the Department of 
Defense is currently poorly suited to attracting personnel who 
have the necessary STEM backgrounds. The committee notes that 
new authorities to enhance competition for a small set of 
technical experts can help balance a compensation mismatch with 
the private sector but will not be enough to match private 
sector salaries. The committee notes that only the institution 
of improved ``total compensation packages,'' including student 
loan repayments, flexibility in schedules and work 
environments, professional development experiences and 
opportunities, and other non-financial rewards, will enable the 
government to compete with the private sector and foreign 
governments for a limited pool of global STEM talent.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Personnel and Readiness to coordinate with the 
Office of Personnel Management and Bureau of Labor Statistics 
to conduct an analysis of compensation for the STEM workforce 
required by the Department of Defense. The analysis shall 
include: (1) An identification of the categories of STEM 
workers the DOD will require to meet the needs of the National 
Defense Strategy; (2) A comparison of private-sector 
compensation and the compensation provided by the Department of 
Defense for the identified STEM worker categories, including an 
assessment of the level of compensation necessary to recruit 
and retain qualified STEM workers in the DOD; and (3) Policy 
options and recommendations to improve DOD's ability to provide 
competitive total compensation packages to the STEM workforce. 
The committee notes that the Department has a need to hire STEM 
experts at the entry-, mid-career, and senior technical and 
managerial levels, and thus the analysis should reflect this 
diversity of needs and recommend appropriately differentiated 
policy options. The Under Secretary shall provide a briefing on 
the results of this analysis to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives by 
April 1, 2020.
Appointments of retired members of the Armed Forces to positions in the 
        Department of Defense
    Section 1111 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) repealed the authority of 
the Secretaries of the military departments to waive the 
restriction on the appointment of retired members of the Armed 
Forces to positions in the civil service in the Department of 
Defense within 180 days of a servicemember's retirement based 
on a state of national emergency. At the time, the committee 
was concerned that the Department was abusing the national 
security waiver and undermining the long-standing merit 
principles upon which the Federal civil service is based.
    The committee remains supportive of this change and notes 
that the relevant statute provides a straightforward process to 
the Secretaries of the military departments in the event that 
they wish to hire retired servicemembers within the 180-day 
post-retirement timeframe. In particular, section 3326(c) of 
title 5, United States Code, outlines the process that the 
Secretaries of the military departments must perform to hire a 
recently retired servicemember. The assurances provided in this 
process guarantee that the best qualified applicant, regardless 
of prior military service, is hired into a vacant Department of 
Defense civil service position. In short, the Secretaries of 
the military departments must demonstrate that minimum 
competitive procedures were followed in assessing the pool of 
eligible and interested applicants prior to making the 
selection.
    The committee notes that current law does not prevent 
retirees from applying for a position within the 180-day post-
retirement timeframe nor does the law prohibit the hiring of 
such individual. The law merely requires that the Secretaries 
of the military departments give due consideration to other 
qualified and interested candidates prior to making the 
selection. The committee urges the Secretaries of the military 
departments to make full use of the existing process for hiring 
recently retired servicemembers, consistent with applicable 
law, policy, and merit principles.
Promulgation and delegation of Department of Defense direct hire 
        authority
    Section 1101 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) 
provided direct hire authority for an extensive number of 
Department of Defense (DOD) civil service positions, giving the 
Secretary of Defense the necessary tools to expedite hiring of 
civilian personnel into positions involving maintenance, 
depots, cybersecurity, acquisition, and science, technology, 
and engineering.
    The authority to hire qualified personnel using this 
authority can and should be delegated to Secretaries of the 
military departments, directors of Defense Agencies, and 
directors of DOD field activities. The committee encourages the 
Secretary of Defense to delegate this authority to the lowest 
practical level to ensure that the Department achieves the 
maximum benefit of this authority while ensuring proper 
oversight.

Report on investments in national security human capital

    The committee acknowledges the clear recommendations of the 
National Defense Strategy, National Defense Strategy Commission 
Report, and Defense Innovation Board report emphasizing the 
growing need for investment in human capital to support U.S. 
national security objectives. Further, the committee 
acknowledges and supports the substantial investments made by 
the Department of Defense and others to better develop 
expertise in critical national security-related career fields. 
The committee is eager to identify additional opportunities to 
support initiatives with the goal of increasing the number of 
Americans who have the skills required to advance national 
security.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Personnel and Readiness, in consultation with the 
Chief Information Officer, to provide a report to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives no later than March 1, 2020, that discusses 
investments in national security human capital. This report 
shall identify and summarize programs that currently exist to 
educate and recruit personnel who possess critical skills. 
Critical skills include, but are not limited to, those in 
cybersecurity, science, technology, engineering, math, 
innovation, computer science, and critical languages. The 
report shall evaluate the effectiveness of each program and 
identify common factors that contribute to programs' successes 
or failures to achieve their goals. In addition, this report 
shall: (1) Identify opportunities to facilitate, enhance, 
streamline, or enable these programs; (2) Assess the 
feasibility of those options; and (3) Provide recommendations 
to improve the overall outreach and effectiveness of these 
programs through reorganization and additional investment or 
resources.
    Specific attention should be paid to efforts to recruit 
recent graduates with the necessary security clearances and 
propensity to serve in national security-related fields, in 
both uniformed and civilian capacities. In preparing this 
report, opportunities to align and enhance ongoing research and 
development partnerships or other national security innovation 
activities with education and recruiting activities through 
consortia or other methods should also be considered.

             TITLE XII--MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS

                  Subtitle A--Assistance and Training

Extension of support of special operations for irregular warfare (sec. 
        1201)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend for 
5 years section 1202 of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91).
Extension of authority for cross servicing agreements for loan of 
        personnel protection and personnel survivability equipment in 
        coalition operations (sec. 1202)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authority for cross-servicing agreements for loan of personnel 
protection and survivability equipment in coalition operations 
in Afghanistan through 2024.
Two-year extension of program authority for Global Security Contingency 
        Fund (sec. 1203)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend for 
2 years section 1207 of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2012 (Public Law 112-81; 22 U.S.C. 2151 note), 
relating to the Global Security Contingency Fund.
Modification of reporting requirement for use of funds for security 
        cooperation programs and activities (sec. 1204)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 381(b) of title 10, United States Code, to change the 
deadline for submission of the quarterly report on the use of 
security cooperation funds from 30 days after the end of each 
calendar quarter to 60 days after the end of each calendar 
quarter.
Institutional legal capacity building initiative for foreign defense 
        forces (sec. 1205)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to carry out, consistent with section 
332 of title 10, United States Code, a program of institutional 
legal capacity building with one or more foreign countries to 
enhance the capacity to organize and administer the military 
legal institutions of such country or countries. The committee 
notes that this provision is consistent with the direction of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
(Public Law 114-328) for the Department of Defense to 
prioritize institutional capacity building as a critical 
component of its security cooperation efforts with foreign 
partners.
Department of Defense support for stabilization activities in national 
        security interest of the United States (sec. 1206)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense, with the concurrence of the Secretary 
of State and in consultation with the Administrator of the 
United States Agency for International Development, to provide 
certain support for the stabilization activities of other 
Federal agencies.

        Subtitle B--Matters Relating to Afghanistan and Pakistan

Extension of authority to transfer defense articles and provide defense 
        services to the military and security forces of Afghanistan 
        (sec. 1211)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
authority to transfer defense articles and provide defense 
services to the military and security forces of Afghanistan 
through December 31, 2021.
Afghanistan Security Forces Fund (sec. 1212)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriation of funds for the Afghanistan Security Forces 
Fund for fiscal year 2020. The provision would also authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to accept any equipment that was 
procured using funds appropriated for the Afghanistan Security 
Forces Fund that the security forces of Afghanistan did not 
accept. The provision would authorize a portion of the amount 
appropriated to the Afghanistan Security Forces Fund to be used 
for recruiting and integrating women into the Afghan National 
Defense and Security Forces.
    The committee understands that the Resolute Support Mission 
leadership, and in particular the Combined Security Transition 
Command--Afghanistan, has conducted significant analysis to 
ensure that our advisory efforts, both at the institutional and 
the operational levels, are right-sized and effectively aligned 
to refocus the advisory effort on strategic capabilities 
development. The committee commends the command for this 
examination and seeks further information regarding this 
realignment and refocus.

Extension of Commanders' Emergency Response Program (sec. 1213)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authorization for the Commanders' Emergency Response Program in 
Afghanistan through December 31, 2020, and would authorize $5.0 
million for that program for use during calendar year 2020.

Extension and modification of reimbursement of certain coalition 
        nations for support provided to United States military 
        operations (sec. 1214)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authority for reimbursement of certain coalition nations for 
support provided to United States military operations through 
December 31, 2020. The provision would also modify this 
authority to eliminate the authorization of these 
reimbursements for Pakistan, as reimbursements for Pakistan's 
efforts to sustain security along its border with Afghanistan 
are already authorized under section 1213 of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232).

Support for reconciliation activities led by the Government of 
        Afghanistan (sec. 1215)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Department of Defense to provide support for bottom-up, 
Government of Afghanistan-led reconciliation activities.

Sense of Senate on special immigrant visa program for Afghan allies 
        (sec. 1216)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express 
support for the special immigrant visa program for Afghan 
allies. The committee views this program as vital to the United 
States mission in Afghanistan. Afghans routinely risk their 
lives to assist United States military and diplomatic personnel 
and further U.S. interests. The committee supports making an 
additional 4,000 visas available to those eligible for special 
immigrant status under the Afghan Allies Protection Act of 2009 
(8 U.S.C. 1101 note).

         Subtitle C--Matters Relating to Syria, Iraq, and Iran


Modification of authority to provide assistance to vetted Syrian groups 
        (sec. 1221)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 1209 of the Carl Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public 
Law 113-291) by extending the authority to provide assistance 
to vetted Syrian groups through 2020. The provision would 
additionally modify the authority to support the temporary 
detention and repatriation of Islamic State of Iraq and Syria 
(ISIS) foreign terrorist fighters in accordance with the Laws 
of Armed Conflict and Geneva Conventions. The provision would 
also expand the section 1209 reporting requirement to include: 
a description of the training and support provided to 
appropriately vetted Syrian groups, a description of U.S. 
government stabilization activities being carried out in areas 
that these groups control, and a description of U.S. government 
support provided to facilitate the repatriation of ISIS foreign 
terrorist fighters.

Extension of authority and limitation on use of funds to provide 
        assistance to counter the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (sec. 
        1222)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authority to provide assistance to counter the Islamic State of 
Iraq and Syria through December 31, 2021. The provision would 
authorize the use of Overseas Contingency Operations funds to 
this effect. However, under this provision, not more than 
$375.0 million authorized for such purposes could be obligated 
or expended until the Secretary of Defense submits a report to 
the congressional defense committees that includes: an 
identification of specific units of the Iraqi Security Forces 
to be trained and equipped; a plan for normalizing security 
assistance to the Iraqi Security Forces under permanent 
authorities; an explanation of efforts to transition 
responsibility for funding the Iraqi Security Forces to the 
Iraqi government in future years; and other matters. The 
committee supports a transition towards a normalized and 
sustainable bilateral defense relationship with Iraq. The 
committee remains strongly committed to Iraq's internal 
security and stability and urges the Department of Defense to 
continue assistance to the Iraqi government for such purposes, 
including through cooperative defense programs.

Extension and modification of authority to support operations and 
        activities of the Office of Security Cooperation in Iraq (sec. 
        1223)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authorization for the Office of Security Cooperation in Iraq 
through Fiscal Year 2020 and would amend the Office's authority 
to support security cooperation activities in Iraq. The 
provision would reduce the funds available for this authority 
from $45.3 million to $30.0 million. The committee expects the 
Office of Security Cooperation in Iraq to transition to a 
normalized security cooperation office and directs the 
department to report on its strategy for implementing this 
transition.

Coordinator of United States Government activities and matters in 
        connection with detainees who are members of the Islamic State 
        of Iraq and Syria (sec. 1224)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
President, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense, the 
Secretary of State, the Director of National Intelligence, and 
the Attorney General, to designate an existing official within 
the Executive Branch as a senior-level coordinator to 
coordinate all matters for the United States Government 
relating to the long-term disposition of members of the Islamic 
State of Syria and Iraq and associated forces.

Report on lessons learned from efforts to liberate Mosul and Raqqah 
        from control of the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (sec. 1225)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees on lessons learned from coalition operations 
to liberate Mosul, Iraq, and Raqqah, Syria, from control of the 
Islamic State of Iraq and Syria.

   Subtitle D--Matters Relating to Europe and the Russian Federation


Prohibition on availability of funds relating to sovereignty of the 
        Russian Federation over Crimea (sec. 1231)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act or otherwise 
made available for fiscal year 2020 for the Department of 
Defense to be obligated or expended to implement any activity 
that recognizes the sovereignty of the Russian Federation over 
Crimea.

Prohibition on use of funds for withdrawal of Armed Forces from Europe 
        in the event of United States withdrawal from the North 
        Atlantic Treaty (sec. 1232)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act to be 
obligated, expended, or reprogrammed for the withdrawal of the 
United States Armed Forces from Europe during the 1-year period 
beginning on the date that the President should ever provide 
notice of withdrawal of the United States from the North 
Atlantic Treaty, done at Washington, D.C. on April 4, 1949, 
pursuant to Article 13 of the treaty.

Extension of limitation on military cooperation between the United 
        States and the Russian Federation (sec. 1233)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
through fiscal year 2020 the prohibition established in section 
1232 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2017 (Public Law 114-328), as most recently amended by the John 
S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2019 (Public Law 115-232). This section prohibits funds 
authorized to be appropriated for the Department of Defense 
from being used for bilateral military-to-military cooperation 
between the United States and the Russian Federation without 
certain certifications by the Secretary of Defense, made in 
coordination with the Secretary of State, or unless certain 
waiver conditions are met.

Modification and extension of Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative 
        (sec. 1234)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
through December 31, 2022, the authority under section 1250 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 
(Public Law 114-92), as amended by section 1246 of the John S. 
McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 
(Public Law 115-232), for the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretary of State, to provide security 
assistance, including defensive lethal assistance, and 
intelligence support to military and other security forces of 
the Government of Ukraine. The provision would also add coastal 
defense cruise missiles and anti-ship missiles to the 
categories of appropriate security assistance and intelligence 
support. The provision would authorize up to $300.0 million in 
fiscal year 2020 to provide security assistance to Ukraine, of 
which $100.0 million would be available only for lethal 
assistance.
    The committee believes that the November 25, 2018, Russian 
attack on and seizure of 3 Ukrainian naval vessels and the 
capture of 24 Ukrainian sailors in that incident represent a 
provocative escalation of Russia's violation of Ukrainian 
sovereignty and is in contravention of international law and 
numerous Russian commitments. The committee calls on Russia to 
immediately release the Ukrainian sailors and vessels it 
continues to unjustly detain, end its harassment of Ukrainian 
and international shipping transiting the Kerch Strait between 
the Black Sea and the Sea of Azov, and cease its violations of 
Ukrainian sovereignty and territorial integrity, including 
those against Ukrainian territorial waters.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to keep the 
congressional defense committees fully informed of the security 
situation in the Black Sea, including by promptly informing the 
committees regarding further aggressive acts by Russia in the 
region. The committee remains concerned about the impact of 
this Russian escalation on U.S., North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization (NATO), and Ukrainian interests in and around the 
Black Sea and supports ongoing military and diplomatic steps to 
protect those interests. Such steps include the provision of 
assistance by the United States and NATO allies, individually 
and collectively, to Ukraine to build its capabilities to 
defend its territorial waters.

Extension of authority for training for Eastern European national 
        security forces in the course of multilateral exercises (sec. 
        1235)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
through December 31, 2022, the authority provided in section 
1251 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2016 (Public Law 114-92), as amended by section 1205 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public 
Law 115-91), for the Secretary of Defense, with the concurrence 
of the Secretary of State, to provide multilateral or regional 
training, and pay the incremental expenses of participating in 
such training, for countries in Eastern Europe that are 
signatories to the Partnership for Peace Framework Documents 
but not members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
(NATO) or that became NATO members after January 1, 1999.

Limitation on transfer of F-35 aircraft to the Republic of Turkey (sec. 
        1236)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act or otherwise 
made available for the Department of Defense to be used to: (1) 
Transfer, or facilitate the transfer, of F-35 aircraft to the 
territory of the Republic of Turkey; (2) Transfer equipment, 
intellectual property, or technical data necessary for or 
related to any maintenance or support of the F-35 aircraft to 
the territory of the Republic of Turkey; or (3) Construct 
facilities for, or otherwise associated with, the storage of F-
35 aircraft in the territory of the Republic of Turkey. The 
provision would permit the Secretary of Defense, with the 
concurrence of the Secretary of State, to waive this limitation 
upon a written certification to the congressional defense 
committees and the Foreign Relations Committee of the Senate 
and the congressional defense committees and Foreign Affairs 
Committee of the House of Representatives that: (1) The 
Government of Turkey has not accepted delivery of the S-400 air 
and missile defense system from the Russian Federation; and (2) 
The Government of Turkey has provided reliable assurances that 
it will not accept delivery of the S-400 air and missile 
defense system from the Russian Federation in the future.

Modifications of briefing, notification, and reporting requirements 
        relating to non-compliance by the Russian Federation with its 
        obligations under the INF Treaty (sec. 1237)

    The committee recommends a provision that would terminate a 
number of congressional reporting, briefing, and notification 
requirements germane to the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces 
Treaty if the treaty is no longer in force.
    The committee expects that the intelligence community will 
continue to track closely and report in intelligence channels 
the development and deployment of Russian weapons systems that 
were previously prohibited under the treaty.

Extension and modification of security assistance for Baltic nations 
        for joint program for interoperability and deterrence against 
        aggression (sec. 1238)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1279D of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) by modifying and extending 
the authority of the Secretary of Defense, with the concurrence 
of the Secretary of State, to conduct or support a single joint 
program of the Baltic nations to improve interoperability and 
build their capacity to deter and resist aggression by the 
Russian Federation. The provision would modify the authority 
by: adding command, control, communications, computers, 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance equipment to 
defense articles and services eligible for a joint program; 
increasing the total amount of assistance that may be provided 
under the authority to $125.0 million; requiring that the 
amount of assistance provided may not exceed the aggregate 
amount contributed to the joint program by the Baltic nations; 
and extending the date of termination of the authority to 
December 31, 2022.
    According to the annual report of the Secretary General of 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), Estonia, Latvia, 
and Lithuania each spend at least 2 percent of gross domestic 
product on defense, focusing their investments on the 
capabilities necessary to deter and resist Russian aggression. 
They have also made other important contributions to the 
alliance. Each Baltic nation hosts one of NATO's Enhanced 
Forward Presence battlegroups, for which they provide critical 
host nation support. Moreover, all three countries contribute 
troops to the NATO-led Resolute Support Mission in Afghanistan.
    However, despite a demonstrated commitment to defense 
investment and burden-sharing in the NATO alliance, Estonia, 
Latvia, and Lithuania have significant unmet defense 
requirements that are unlikely to be met solely through their 
individual national defense budgets. The committee believes 
that joint procurement could enable Estonia, Latvia, and 
Lithuania to strengthen security cooperation, improve key 
military capabilities, and realize cost savings through 
economies of scale. With support from the United States, such 
as assistance provided by the section 1279D authority, as well 
as participation by other allies and partners, a joint program 
could accelerate the ability of the Baltic nations to address 
their unmet defense requirements and bolster deterrence against 
Russian aggression.

Report on North Atlantic Treaty Organization Readiness Initiative (sec. 
        1239)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees on the North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
Readiness Initiative not later than October 1, 2020.

Reports on contributions to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
        (sec. 1240)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to certain congressional 
committees a report containing a summary of the key findings of 
the annual report of the Secretary General of the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) as well as assessments of 
various elements of burden-sharing and defense cooperation with 
and among NATO allies.

Future years plans for European Deterrence Initiative (sec. 1241)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Commander of 
United States European Command (EUCOM), to submit to the 
congressional defense committees a future years plan on 
activities and resources of the European Deterrence Initiative 
(EDI) for fiscal year 2020 and not fewer than the 4 succeeding 
fiscal years. The provision would require that the plan 
include: a description of the objectives of the EDI, including 
a description of the intended force structure and posture of 
the assigned and allocated forces within the area of 
responsibility of EUCOM for the last fiscal year of the plan 
and the manner in which such force structure and posture 
support the implementation of the National Defense Strategy; an 
assessment of capabilities requirements to achieve the 
objectives of the EDI; an assessment of logistics requirements, 
including personnel, equipment, supplies, storage, and 
maintenance needs, to achieve the objectives of the EDI; an 
identification of required infrastructure and military 
construction investments to achieve the objectives of the EDI, 
including potential infrastructure investments by host nations; 
an assessment of security cooperation investments required to 
achieve the objectives of the EDI; and a plan to fully resource 
United States force posture and capabilities, including a 
detailed assessment of the resources necessary to address the 
aforementioned requirements with specific cost estimates for 
each project in the EDI and a detailed timeline to achieve the 
intended force structure and posture for the last fiscal year 
of the plan.
    The provision would further require that, not later than 
the date on which the Secretary of Defense submits to Congress 
the budget request for the Department of Defense for fiscal 
year 2021, the Secretary, in consultation with the Commander of 
EUCOM, submit to the congressional defense committees a future 
years plan on activities and resources of the EDI for fiscal 
year 2021 and not fewer than the 4 succeeding fiscal years.

Modification of reporting requirements relating to the Open Skies 
        Treaty (sec. 1242)

    The committee recommends a provision that would realign an 
annual report required by section 1235 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) with 
the calendar year planning process of the Open Skies Treaty. 
The provision would also reduce the frequency of the submission 
of a report required by section 1236 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) 
from quarterly to annually.

Report on nuclear weapons of the Russian Federation and nuclear 
        modernization of the People's Republic of China (sec. 1243)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Director of 
National Intelligence and the Secretary of State, to submit to 
the appropriate congressional committees a report describing: 
Russia's deployed non-strategic nuclear weapons; Russia's 
nuclear weapons in development that would not be covered by the 
New START if deployed; Russia's non-deployed strategic weapons; 
China's nuclear modernization program; and the implications 
thereof on the New START central limits.

Sense of Senate on the 70th anniversary of the North Atlantic Treaty 
        Organization (sec. 1244)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate in commemoration of the 70th anniversary of 
the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's establishment.

Sense of Senate on United States force posture in Europe and the 
        Republic of Poland (sec. 1245)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate that the United States should increase the 
persistent presence of United States forces in the Republic of 
Poland, including key combat enabler units such as warfighting 
headquarters elements, in order to enhance deterrence against 
Russian aggression and reduce the risk of executing Department 
of Defense contingency plans.

Sense of Senate on United States partnership with the Republic of 
        Georgia (sec. 1246)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate that the United States should promote its 
enduring strategic partnership with the Republic of Georgia.

        Subtitle E--Matters Relating to the Indo-Pacific Region


Limitation on use of funds to reduce the total number of members of the 
        Armed Forces in the territory of the Republic of Korea (sec. 
        1251)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the use of funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act to 
reduce the total number of members of the Armed Forces in the 
territory of the Republic of Korea (ROK) below 28,500 until 90 
days after the date on which the Secretary of Defense certifies 
to the congressional defense committees that: such a reduction 
is in the national security interests of the United States and 
will not significantly undermine the security of United States 
allies in the region; such a reduction is commensurate with a 
reduction in the threat posed to the security of the United 
States and its allies in the region by the conventional 
military forces of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea 
(DPRK); and the Secretary has appropriately consulted with 
allies of the United States, including the ROK and Japan, 
regarding such a reduction.
    The committee recognizes that U.S. military forces deployed 
on the Korean Peninsula remain vital to deterring and, if 
necessary, defeating aggression by the DPRK, which continues to 
threaten the national security interests of the United States 
and the peace and stability of the Indo-Pacific region through 
both its conventional forces and weapons of mass destruction. 
While the committee supports diplomatic efforts to achieve the 
complete, verifiable, and irreversible denuclearization of the 
DPRK, the committee believes that the significant removal of 
United States military forces from the Korean Peninsula is non-
negotiable in such efforts.
    The committee believes that the U.S.-ROK alliance remains 
fundamental to peace and security in the Indo-Pacific region 
and to U.S. national security interests. As diplomatic efforts 
concerning denuclearization continue, the committee believes 
that the United States and the ROK should prioritize preserving 
and strengthening the alliance and reject cynical efforts by 
other nations to undermine it.
    The committee commends the ROK for its significant 
``burden-sharing'' contributions. At approximately 2.5 percent 
of gross domestic product, ROK defense spending is among the 
highest of any U.S. ally. This level of investment is reflected 
in the advanced capabilities and high readiness of the ROK 
military. Moreover, the ROK has made substantial financial 
contributions to strengthening common security, including 
through direct cost-sharing and other alliance-related 
expenditures, such as the construction of Camp Humphreys for 
U.S. forces. Therefore, the committee believes that it is 
critical that negotiations concerning a new Special Measures 
Agreement between the United States and the ROK covering 2020 
and beyond should be conducted in a spirit of common interest 
and mutual respect and with due consideration of the ROK's 
significant contributions.
    The committee also encourages the ROK and Japan to renew 
their commitment to bilateral and multilateral security 
cooperation, which is beneficial for both nations and the 
security of the Indo-Pacific region.

Expansion of Indo-Pacific Maritime Security Initiative (sec. 1252)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 1263(b) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92) to include as recipient 
countries for assistance and training under the Indo-Pacific 
Maritime Security Initiative the following: the Federated 
States of Micronesia, the Kingdom of Tonga, Papua New Guinea, 
the Republic of Fiji, the Republic of the Marshall Islands, the 
Republic of Palau, the Republic of Vanuatu, and the Solomon 
Islands.
    The committee notes the National Defense Strategy's (NDS) 
emphasis on strengthening alliances and attracting new 
partners. In particular, the NDS calls for expanding Indo-
Pacific alliances and partnerships, including through regional 
security cooperation mechanisms, in order to develop a 
networked security architecture capable of deterring 
aggression, maintaining stability, and ensuring free access to 
common domains. The committee also notes the testimony of the 
Commander, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, before the committee on 
February 12, 2019, concerning the importance of deepening 
engagement with countries in Oceania, in which he cited 
``opportunities to partner with our strong allies, Australia 
and France, and strong friend, New Zealand, to improve 
information-sharing and maritime cooperation as the Pacific 
Island Countries address the challenges associated with 
Illegal, Unreported, and Unregulated (IUU) fishing, natural 
disasters, narcotics trafficking, and economic coercion from 
Beijing.'' To seize these opportunities, in a March 22, 2019, 
letter to the congressional defense committees, the Commander 
recommended a maritime security program for countries in 
Oceania.
    The committee recognizes that strengthening alliances and 
partnerships in Oceania is critical for supporting the 
implementation of the National Defense Strategy in the Indo-
Pacific. The committee believes that the inclusion of the 
aforementioned eight countries in Oceania in the Indo-Pacific 
Maritime Security Initiative would support this effort.

Modification of annual report on military and security developments 
        involving the People's Republic of China (sec. 1253)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
paragraph 26 of section 1202(b) of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000 (Public Law 106-65; 10 
U.S.C. 113 note) by modifying reporting requirements concerning 
the relationship between Chinese overseas investment, including 
the Belt and Road Initiative and the Digital Silk Road, and 
Chinese security and military objectives.

Report on resourcing United States defense requirements for the Indo-
        Pacific region (sec. 1254)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Commander, United States Indo-Pacific Command, to submit to the 
congressional defense committees a report containing the 
independent assessment of the Commander with respect to the 
activities and resources required for fiscal years 2022 through 
2026 to achieve the following objectives: the implementation of 
the National Defense Strategy with respect to the Indo-Pacific 
region; the maintenance or restoration of the comparative 
military advantage of the United States with respect to the 
People's Republic of China; and the reduction of the risk of 
executing contingency plans of the Department of Defense. The 
report would include a plan to fully resource U.S. force 
posture and capabilities in the Indo-Pacific region, including 
specific cost estimates for priority investments or projects. 
The provision would require, following the submission of the 
report, two joint briefings on assessments of the report with a 
focus on the feasibility and advisability of the resource plan 
provided by the Commander. The first briefing would be provided 
by the Secretary of Defense, the Director of Cost Assessment 
and Program Evaluation, and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff. The second would be provided by the Secretary of the Air 
Force, the Secretary of the Army, and the Secretary of the 
Navy.
    The committee believes that effective implementation of the 
National Defense Strategy and addressing the challenge of 
strategic competition with China require urgent change at 
significant scale. However, while the Department of Defense has 
made progress toward this goal, the pace and scale of change 
have been insufficient. The Department of Defense needs a 
unified, comprehensive, and long-term vision of its 
requirements in the Indo-Pacific region as well as the 
necessary resources and a feasible timeline to achieve them. 
The committee is committed to partnering with the Department of 
Defense to develop and implement such a vision. To that end, 
the required report and the subsequent briefings will inform 
the committee's review of the Department of Defense's 
development and submission of a fiscal year 2022 budget request 
and associated future years defense program with a focus on the 
National Defense Strategy and strategic competition with China.

Report on distributed lay-down of United States forces in the Indo-
        Pacific region (sec. 1255)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Government of 
Japan and other foreign governments as necessary, to conduct a 
review of the planned distribution of members of the United 
States Armed Forces in the Indo-Pacific region as contemplated 
by the United States and Japan in past agreements. The 
provision would also establish certain certification, 
notification, and reporting requirements related to the results 
of the review.
    The committee acknowledges the pressing need to reduce the 
presence of United States Marine Corps on Okinawa, Japan, and 
to accelerate adjustments to United States force posture in the 
Indo-Pacific region. The committee believes that it is critical 
that the United States pursue these objectives in close 
consultation with the Government of Japan.

Sense of Senate on the United States-Japan alliance and defense 
        cooperation (sec. 1256)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate concerning the United States-Japan alliance 
and opportunities for enhancing defense cooperation.

Sense of Senate on enhancement of the United States-Taiwan defense 
        relationship (sec. 1257)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate concerning the enhancement of the United 
States-Taiwan defense relationship. The committee believes that 
the 40th anniversary of the Taiwan Relations Act (Public Law 
96-8) provides a fitting opportunity to evaluate the future of 
the United States-Taiwan defense relationship, particularly 
given the Department of Defense's focus on implementation of 
the National Defense Strategy and on strategic competition with 
China.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Policy, not later than December 31, 2019, to brief 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives in person and provide: an assessment of the 
role of relations with Taiwan in implementation of the National 
Defense Strategy; a description of Department of Defense 
policies related to defense cooperation, military exchanges, 
combined defense planning, and combined exercises and training 
with Taiwan; a description of how other executive branch 
policies related to relations with Taiwan affect the Department 
of Defense; and the objectives of the Department of Defense 
concerning the United States-Taiwan defense relationship.

Sense of Senate on United States-India defense relationship (sec. 1258)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate that the United States should strengthen 
and enhance its major defense partnership with India and work 
toward mutual security objectives.

Sense of Senate on security commitments to the Governments of Japan and 
        the Republic of Korea and trilateral cooperation among the 
        United States, Japan, and the Republic of Korea (sec. 1259)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate with respect to security commitments to the 
Governments of Japan and the Republic of Korea and trilateral 
cooperation between the United States, Japan, and the Republic 
of Korea.

Sense of Senate on enhanced cooperation with Pacific Island countries 
        to establish open-source intelligence fusion centers in the 
        Indo-Pacific region (sec. 1260)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate that U.S. Indo-Pacific Command should 
pursue the establishment of one or more open-source 
intelligence fusion centers in the Indo-Pacific region to 
enhance cooperation with Pacific Island countries.

Sense of Senate on enhancing defense and security cooperation with the 
        Republic of Singapore (sec. 1261)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate that robust defense and security 
cooperation between the United States and the Republic of 
Singapore is crucial to promoting peace and stability in the 
Indo-Pacific region.

                          Subtitle F--Reports


Report on cost imposition strategy (sec. 1271)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require, 
not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this 
Act, the Secretary of Defense to submit to the congressional 
defense committees a report describing the cost imposition 
strategies of the Department of Defense with respect to the 
People's Republic of China and the Russian Federation.

                       Subtitle G--Others Matters


NATO Special Operations Headquarters (sec. 1281)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend for 
5 years the authority established in section 1244 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public 
Law 111-84), as most recently amended by section 1280 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92).

Modifications of authorities relating to acquisition and cross-
        servicing agreements (sec. 1282)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 2342 of title 10, United States Code to improve 
management, transparency, and oversight of Department of 
Defense acquisition and cross-servicing agreements.

Modification of authority for United States-Israel anti-tunnel 
        cooperation activities (sec. 1283)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1279 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92) to modify the authority 
for United States-Israel anti-tunnel cooperation activities. 
The provision would remove countering unmanned aerial systems 
from the section 1279 authority. Elsewhere in this Act, the 
committee recommends a provision that would establish a 
separate authority for United States-Israel cooperation 
regarding countering unmanned aerial systems. The provision 
would also authorize the Secretary of Defense to use amounts 
available under the section 1279 authority, which are in excess 
of the amount contributed by the Government of Israel, for 
costs associated with unique national requirements identified 
by the United States with respect to anti-tunnel capabilities.

United States-Israel cooperation to counter unmanned aerial systems 
        (sec. 1284)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to carry out joint research, 
development, test, and evaluation to establish capabilities for 
countering unmanned aerial systems (C-UAS) that threaten the 
United States or Israel.
    The John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) included a provision that 
modified the authority for United States-Israel anti-tunneling 
cooperation activities, provided by section 1279 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public 
Law 114-92), to include C-UAS activities. Elsewhere in this 
Act, the committee recommends a provision that would strike 
that modification. This provision would establish a separate 
authority to conduct joint C-UAS efforts with Israel to ensure 
dedicated support for both anti-tunneling and C-UAS cooperation 
as well as to ensure proper oversight and transparency of C-UAS 
cooperation through reporting and certification requirements.

Modification of initiative to support protection of national security 
        academic researchers from undue influence and other security 
        threats (sec. 1285)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1286 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) to 
require the Secretary of Defense to develop a list of academic 
institutions of the People's Republic of China and the Russian 
Federation that are: (1) Associated with a defense program of 
the People's Republic of China or the Russian Federation, 
including any university heavily engaged in military research; 
(2) Are known to recruit individuals for the purpose of 
advancing the talent and capabilities of such a defense program 
or to provide misleading transcripts or otherwise attempt to 
conceal the connections of an individual or institution to such 
a defense program; or (3) Pose a serious risk of intangible 
transfers of defense or engineering technology and research. 
The provision would require that the list be developed in 
consultation with the Bureau of Industry and Security of the 
Department of Commerce, the Director of National Intelligence, 
and United States academic institutions that conduct 
significant Department of Defense research or engineering 
activities.

Independent assessment of human rights situation in Honduras (sec. 
        1286)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to enter into an agreement with an 
independent think tank or a federally funded research and 
development center to conduct an analysis and assessment of the 
compliance of the military and security forces of Honduras with 
international human rights laws and standards.

United States Central Command posture review (sec. 1287)

    The committee recommends a provision that would mandate a 
comprehensive United States Central Command posture review, 
which would assess the extent to which the United States 
possesses the force posture and capabilities for countering 
threats emanating from and affecting the United States Central 
Command's area of responsibility. While the committee views a 
continuous force presence in U.S. Central Command's area of 
responsibility as necessary for countering a wide range of 
threats, the committee supports the National Defense Strategy's 
(NDS) emphasis on the importance of alliances and partnerships. 
As stated in the NDS, ``By working together with allies and 
partners we amass the greatest possible strength for the long-
term advancement of our interests, maintaining favorable 
balances of power that deter aggression and support the 
stability that generates economic growth. When we pool 
resources and share responsibility for our common defense, our 
security burden becomes lighter.'' The committee urges the 
Secretary of Defense to work toward increased burden-sharing 
with our regional and European partners in countering threats 
emanating from and affecting U.S. Central Command's area of 
responsibility and in pursuing shared security objectives.

Reports on expenses incurred for in-flight refueling of Saudi coalition 
        aircraft conducting missions relating to civil war in Yemen 
        (sec. 1288)

    The committee recommends a provision that would mandate a 
report detailing the expenses incurred by the United States in 
providing in-flight refueling services for Saudi or Saudi-led 
coalition non-United States aircraft conducting missions as 
part of the civil war in Yemen from March 1, 2015, to November 
11, 2018, and the extent to which such expenses have been 
reimbursed by members of the Saudi-led coalition.

Sense of Senate on security concerns with respect to leasing 
        arrangements for the Port of Haifa in Israel (sec. 1289)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate that the United States has an interest in 
the future forward presence of United States naval vessels at 
the Port of Haifa in Israel but has serious security concerns 
with respect to current the leasing arrangements of the Port of 
Haifa. Therefore, the provision would express the view that the 
United States should urge the Government of Israel to consider 
the security implications of foreign investment in Israel.

                       Items of Special Interest


Contributions of allies and partners to costs of U.S. forces stationed 
        overseas

    The committee recognizes that a credible forward force 
posture and assured access to critical military locations 
around the world are necessary elements of any effective 
strategy for defending the security and interests of the United 
States. Moreover, neither are possible without the willingness 
of allies and partners to host U.S. forces. Indeed, the 
National Defense Strategy underscores that allies and partners 
``provide access to critical regions, supporting a widespread 
basing and logistics system that underpins the [Department of 
Defense's] global reach.'' Posture and access are central 
issues of U.S. defense policy, essential for meaningful power 
projection, and serve as important reminders that the value of 
U.S. alliances and partnerships cannot be measured in dollars 
and cents alone.
    The committee remains concerned about media reports and 
other statements regarding consideration of maximalist 
approaches to cost-sharing and host-nation support. While the 
committee believes that allies and partners should contribute 
an equitable share to mutually beneficial collective security, 
such approaches are likely to result in significant long-term 
damage to U.S. force posture, power projection capabilities, 
alliances and partnerships, and national security.
    The committee notes the testimony of the Acting Secretary 
of Defense to the committee on March 14, 2019: ``We won't do 
cost-plus-50 percent. . . . We're not going to run a business, 
and we're not going to run a charity.'' While the Acting 
Secretary told the committee that allies need to ``pay their 
fair share,'' he emphasized that ``it is not about cost-plus-50 
percent.''
    Not later than October 1, 2019, the Secretary of Defense, 
in consultation with the Secretary of State, shall provide to 
the congressional defense committees a briefing on allied and 
partner contributions toward the cost of stationing U.S. forces 
overseas, including the U.S. approach to upcoming cost-sharing 
negotiations through the end of fiscal year 2020.

Cooperative research and development efforts of the United States and 
        Israel

    The committee recognizes the important contributions of 
cooperative research and development efforts to the national 
security of the United States and Israel, most notably with 
respect to missile defense and anti-tunneling capabilities. 
Given the National Defense Strategy's emphasis on working 
together with allies and partners and on accelerating 
modernization to maintain or restore the competitive military 
advantage of the United States, the committee seeks to better 
understand the Department of Defense's approach to future 
cooperative research and development efforts with Israel, 
including in emerging or advanced technology areas such as 
directed energy, hypersonic weapons, and space systems.
    The committee directs the Department to provide a report to 
the congressional defense committees not later than March 1, 
2020, on the feasibility and desirability of enhanced 
cooperative research and development efforts with Israel. The 
analysis should include but not necessarily be limited to the 
following: (1) An identification of shared capability gaps of 
the United States and Israel; (2) An assessment of the relative 
priority assigned to addressing such capability gaps by the 
United States and Israel; (3) An assessment of the extent to 
which cooperative projects would address such capability gaps 
in a timely and efficient manner, including in comparison with 
unilateral efforts; and (4) An identification of new 
authorities, regulatory or policy changes, or additional 
resources that would be required to undertake cooperative 
projects deemed to be feasible and desirable.

Forward-deployed naval forces in Europe

    The committee supports the continued forward-basing of four 
United States Navy destroyers in Rota, Spain. These ships are 
among the most dynamically-employed naval forces-performing 
ballistic missile defense missions, carrying out strikes in 
Syria, boosting U.S. presence across the European theater in 
support of allies and partners, and monitoring increasing 
Russian naval activities. At the same time, these ships have 
maintained high readiness, in part due to rigorous maintenance 
practices.
    In a January 14, 2019, interview, the Commander, U.S. Sixth 
Fleet, stated that the forward presence provided by the four 
destroyers at Rota ``is the bedrock of our ability to reassure 
allies and respond to any threats that come up.'' She added, 
``There is no substitute for having that kind of forward 
presence in Europe.'' The Commander also observed that the 
``solid'' operational model for these ships has enabled them to 
maintain ``exceptional'' readiness as well as their training 
and certifications. Furthermore, the four ships have been able 
to ``conduct all the intermediate maintenance and the extended 
maintenance availabilities [needed] to stay ready and stay 
focused while on patrol.''
    The committee is concerned about increasing Russian naval 
activity in the European theater, which is now at its highest 
level since the Cold War. The committee is also aware of the 
significant advances in Russian naval capability, especially as 
it relates to its attack submarines.
    Due in part to these developments, the Commander, U.S. 
European Command, testified to the committee on March 5, 2019, 
that he has recommended adding two destroyers at Rota, Spain. 
The Commander stated that, in order ``to remain dominant in the 
maritime domain and particularly under sea,'' the United States 
``need[s] greater capability, particularly given the 
modernization and the growth of the Russian fleets in Europe.'' 
Furthermore, the President's nominee to be the next commander 
of U.S. European Command testified to the committee on April 2, 
2019, that he agreed with the current commander's 
recommendation.
    Therefore, not later than October 1, 2019, the committee 
directs the Chief of Naval Operations and the Commander, U.S. 
European Command, to provide a joint briefing to the Committees 
on Armed Services of the Senate and House on the merit and 
feasibility of basing two additional destroyers at Rota, Spain, 
including an assessment of whether such an enhancement to U.S. 
force posture in Europe would enhance the ability of the United 
States to deter aggression, flexibly and proactively shape the 
strategic environment, improve readiness to respond to 
contingencies, and ensure long-term warfighting readiness.

Matters related to Bosnia and Herzegovina

    The committee shares the longstanding commitment of the 
United States to Bosnia and Herzegovina's sovereignty, 
territorial integrity, stability, and prosperity. The committee 
continues to support Bosnia and Herzegovina's aspirations to 
join the European Union and the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization (NATO) as well as efforts to achieve reforms 
necessary to realize those goals, including strengthening the 
rule of law, safeguarding an independent judiciary, tackling 
corruption, and improving financial accountability and 
transparency. Moreover, the committee welcomes the decision by 
NATO allies to accept the submission of Bosnia and 
Herzegovina's first annual national program as part of the 
Membership Action Plan process. However, the committee remains 
concerned about the potential for renewed violent conflict, 
especially in light of Russia's destabilizing activities in 
Bosnia and Herzegovina, as well as those of nationalist forces.
    Therefore, not later than December 31, 2019, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide to the Committees 
on Armed Services of the Senate and House a briefing on the 
contingency plans and readiness of U.S. and NATO forces to 
support and supplement EUFOR in the event of a violent 
conflict.

Matters related to Kosovo

    The committee fully supports efforts to normalize relations 
between Kosovo and Serbia through the European Union-led, U.S.-
supported dialogue process. Normalization of relations between 
Kosovo and Serbia is in the interest of Kosovars and Serbs 
alike. Furthermore, it is vital to Kosovo's and Serbia's shared 
European future and the stability of the Western Balkans. 
Therefore, the committee urges both Kosovo and Serbia to 
embrace the historic opportunity for an enduring peace and 
reconciliation and refrain from any actions that would make a 
comprehensive normalization agreement more difficult to 
achieve.
    The committee continues to support U.S. assistance to the 
Kosovo Security Force as the latter makes the gradual 
transition to a transparent and multi-ethnic army for the 
Republic of Kosovo that is interoperable with North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization (NATO) members. The committee believes that 
it is critical that this transformation take place in close 
coordination with NATO allies and partners through an inclusive 
and transparent process, which respects the rights and concerns 
of all of Kosovo's citizens, promotes regional security and 
stability, and supports Kosovo's aspirations for eventual full 
membership in NATO.
    The committee also fully supports the continued mission of 
NATO's Kosovo Force (KFOR), which plays an indispensable role 
in maintaining security and stability in Southeastern Europe. 
Together with our allies and partners, the United States should 
maintain its commitment to KFOR and take all appropriate steps 
to ensure that it has the necessary personnel, capabilities, 
and resources to perform its critical mission.

Protect Interests of Syrian Democratic Forces During U.S. Withdrawal

    The committee believes that the security and stability of 
eastern Syria and continued engagement with the Syrian 
Democratic Forces (SDF) is in the national security interest of 
the United States and important to regional stability. The 
committee notes that the SDF, including both Kurdish and Arab 
components, have made significant sacrifices and contributions 
to the liberation of areas controlled by ISIS and the defeat of 
the so-called physical caliphate. The committee also notes that 
ISIS remains a considerable security threat and that continued 
counterterrorism operations in partnership with the SDF will be 
necessary to ensure the enduring defeat of the group.
    The committee is concerned that a premature withdrawal of 
U.S. forces from Syria could negatively impact the security and 
stability of eastern Syria and put at risk the gains achieved 
by the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS. Additionally, such a 
withdrawal would cede critical competitive geopolitical space 
to Russia and Iran that could significantly alter the regional 
balance of power in ways contrary to U.S. national security 
interests. Therefore, the committee urges the President to 
consider fully the direct and indirect effects of any decision 
related to a reduction of U.S. forces in Syria on security and 
stability in eastern Syria, including but not limited to:
          (1) The safety of Kurdish and Arab elements of the 
        SDF and civilians in areas under their control;
          (2) Local governance efforts;
          (3) Protection of internally displaced people and 
        other vulnerable populations;
          (4) Facilitation of international stabilization and 
        reconstruction activities; and
          (5) Detention and repatriation of ISIS foreign 
        terrorist fighters.

Support to the Kurdish Peshmerga

    The committee notes that the United States-led coalition 
known as the Combined Joint Task Force-Operation Inherent 
Resolve (CJTF-OIR) in partnership with the Iraqi Security 
Forces (ISF), including the Kurdish Peshmerga, successfully 
liberated significant Iraqi territory from the control of the 
Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS). While the committee 
applauds this significant achievement, it also expresses 
concern that ISIS continues to pose a significant threat to 
Iraq, the region, and potentially the U.S. homeland.
    According to the most recent Lead Inspector General report 
for OIR, CJTF-OIR has expressed concern that ISIS has 
transitioned to ``operating as an insurgent organization,'' 
including ``operating primarily in rural parts of northern and 
western Iraq where security forces have little reach.'' In its 
report, the Lead Inspector General also highlighted concerns 
that ``ISIS has been able to exploit the physical security gaps 
between the ISF and the Peshmerga, and increased coordination 
between the two sides is necessary to counter-ISIS 
activities.''
    The committee believes a lasting defeat of ISIS is critical 
to maintaining a stable and tolerant Iraq in which all faiths, 
sects, and ethnicities are afforded equal protection and full 
integration into the Government and society of Iraq and 
supports the provision of U.S. security and other assistance 
for such purposes. As part of those efforts, the committee 
supports continued assistance to Kurdish Peshmerga forces with 
the objective of enabling them to more effectively partner with 
the ISF, the United States, and other international partners. 
The committee strongly supports continuation of the partnership 
between the U.S. military and the Kurdish Peshmerga in 
furtherance of our shared interests, including through the 
signing of a new memorandum of understanding between the 
Department of Defense and the Ministry of Peshmerga. The 
committee also strongly supports actions by the Government of 
Iraq to assume responsibility for paying for the salaries and 
sustainment of Peshmerga forces. In the coming years, the 
committee encourages the Department to normalize its support to 
the Peshmerga by focusing assistance on reform and 
professionalization at the ministerial and unit level.

                TITLE XIII--COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION

Funding allocations for Department of Defense Cooperative Threat 
        Reduction Program (sec. 1301)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
$338.7 million for the Cooperative Threat Reduction (CTR) 
program, define the funds as authorized to be appropriated in 
section 301 of this Act, and authorize CTR funds to be 
available for obligation for fiscal years 2020, 2021, and 2022.

                       Items of Special Interest


10-year risk planning for the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees, not later than 
April 30, 2021, on the risks and vulnerabilities over the next 
10 years associated with containing the proliferation of 
weapons of mass destruction and associated technologies to 
guide future programmatic efforts of the Cooperative Threat 
Reduction Program. The report shall be unclassified with a 
classified annex, if required.

                    TITLE XIV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS

                     Subtitle A--Military Programs

Working capital funds (sec. 1401)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for the defense working capital funds at the 
levels identified in section 4501 of division D of this Act.
Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense (sec. 1402)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for Chemical Agents and Munitions 
Destruction, Defense, at the levels identified in section 4501 
of division D of this Act.
Drug Interdiction and Counterdrug Activities, Defense-Wide (sec. 1403)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for Drug Interdiction and Counterdrug 
Activities, Defense-wide, at the levels identified in section 
4501 of division D of this Act.
Defense Inspector General (sec. 1404)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for the Office of the Inspector General of 
the Department of Defense at the levels identified in section 
4501 of division D of this Act.
Defense Health Program (sec. 1405)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
appropriations for the Defense Health Program activities at the 
levels identified in section 4501 of division D of this Act.

                 Subtitle B--National Defense Stockpile

Modification of prohibition on acquisition of sensitive materials from 
        non-allied foreign nations (sec. 1411)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2533c of title 10, United States Code, to include 
tantalum in the definition of covered materials.

                Subtitle C--Armed Forces Retirement Home

Authorization of appropriations for Armed Forces Retirement Home (sec. 
        1421)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
an appropriation of $64.3 million from the Armed Forces 
Retirement Home Trust Fund for fiscal year 2020 for the 
operation of the Armed Forces Retirement Home.
Expansion of eligibility for residence at the Armed Forces Retirement 
        Home (sec. 1422)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1512(a) of the Armed Forces Retirement Home Act of 1991 
(24 U.S.C. 412(a)) to: (1) Expand eligibility to retired 
veterans under age 60 and retired members of the National Guard 
and Reserves (NGR); and (2) Provide parity of fees for veterans 
eligible for active military service and those newly eligible 
through NGR service by requiring the income used for fee 
determination for an NGR-eligible resident to be not less than 
an Active-Duty resident's military retirement pay at the same 
grade and length of service. The provision would also amend 
section 1514(c) of the Armed Forces Retirement Home Act of 1991 
(24 U.S.C. 414(c)) to provide parity for monthly withholding 
from pay of NGR members and Active-Duty members by applying the 
withholding across the total force, as well as requiring newly 
eligible NGR residents to pay a fee upon admission for years 
prior to the date of the enactment of this Act when the 
withholding was not taken from pay.

                       Subtitle D--Other Matters

Authority for transfer of funds to Joint Department of Defense-
        Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration 
        Fund for Captain James A. Lovell Health Care Center, Illinois 
        (sec. 1431)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to transfer $127.0 million from the 
Defense Health Program to the Joint Department of Defense-
Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration 
Fund, established by section 1704 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-84), for 
the operation of the Captain James A. Lovell Federal Health 
Care Center.

                              Budget Items

Air Force cash corpus for energy optimization
    The budget request included $92.4 million in Working 
Capital Fund, Air Force.
    The committee continues to recognize the urgent requirement 
to constantly innovate and improve combat capability and 
operational effectiveness for the warfighter via targeted and 
competitive operational energy science and technology 
investments.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in Air Force Working Capital Fund 493003F to create a 
cash corpus for the purposes of energy optimization 
initiatives.
Contraceptive coverage parity under the TRICARE program
    The budget request included $31.8 billion in the Operation 
and Maintenance account for the Defense Health Program (DHP). 
The amount authorized to be appropriated for the DHP includes 
the following change from the budget request. The provision 
underlying this change in funding level is discussed in greater 
detail in title VII of this committee report.

                     [Change in millions of dollars]
 
 
 
Contraception coverage parity under the TRICARE                    +11.0
 Program..............................................
    Total.............................................             +11.0
 

                       Items of Special Interest

Armed Forces Retirement Home

    The committee recognizes the critical role of the Armed 
Forces Retirement Home (AFRH) in providing residences and 
related services for certain retired and former members of the 
Armed Forces. The committee notes that the AFRH plans to lease 
80 acres of underutilized land for development on its 
Washington, D.C., campus.
    As the AFRH's management, the General Services 
Administration, and the United States Army Corps of Engineers 
review development proposals, the committee encourages them to: 
(1) Conduct the review and selection process in a fair and open 
manner; (2) Give preference to shovel-ready proposals that 
conform to the ``AFRH-W Master Plan''; (3) Give preference to 
proposals that include innovative measures that would enhance 
services for AFRH residents; (4) Give preference to proposals 
that maximize value to the AFRH through balancing financial 
priorities such as near-term cash flow and long-term 
appreciated value; and (5) Give preference to proposals that 
include certified audits of revenues and expenses by the 
developers.

   TITLE XV--AUTHORIZATION OF ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR OVERSEAS 
                         CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS

         Subtitle A--Authorization of Additional Appropriations

Purpose (sec. 1501)
    The committee recommends a provision that would establish 
this title and make available authorized appropriations upon 
enactment of this Act for the Department of Defense, in 
addition to amounts otherwise authorized in this Act.
Overseas contingency operations (sec. 1502)
    The committee recommends a provision that would designate 
authorization of appropriations in this title as overseas 
contingency operations.
Procurement (sec. 1503)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the additional appropriation for procurement activities at the 
levels identified in section 4102 of division D of this Act.
Research, development, test, and evaluation (sec. 1504)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the additional appropriation for research, development, test, 
and evaluation activities at the levels identified in section 
4202 of division D of this Act.
Operation and maintenance (sec. 1505)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the additional appropriation for operation and maintenance 
activities at the levels identified in section 4302 of division 
D of this Act.
Military personnel (sec. 1506)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the additional appropriation for military personnel activities 
at the levels identified in section 4402 of division D of this 
Act.
Working capital funds (sec. 1507)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the additional appropriation for the Defense Working Capital 
Funds at the levels identified in section 4502 of division D of 
this Act.
Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-wide (sec. 1508)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the additional appropriation for the Drug Interdiction and 
Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-wide at the levels identified 
in section 4502 of division D of this Act.
Defense Inspector General (sec. 1509)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the additional appropriation for the Office of the Inspector 
General of the Department of Defense identified in section 4502 
of division D of this Act.
Defense Health Program (sec. 1510)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the additional appropriation for the Defense Health Program 
activities identified in section 4502 of division D of this 
Act.

                     Subtitle B--Financial Matters

Treatment as additional authorizations (sec. 1521)
    The committee recommends a provision that would state that 
the amounts authorized to be appropriated in this title are in 
addition to amounts otherwise authorized to be appropriated by 
this Act.
Special transfer authority (sec. 1522)
    The committee recommends a provision that would allow the 
Secretary of Defense to transfer up to $2.5 billion of overseas 
contingency operations funding authorized for fiscal year 2020 
in this title to unforeseen higher priority needs in accordance 
with normal reprogramming procedures. This transfer authority 
would be in addition to the authority provided to the Secretary 
elsewhere in this Act.

                              Budget Items

Transfer from OCO to Base Procurement
    The budget request included $23.1 billion for Procurement 
in Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) funding. The committee 
notes that the President's budget request included $97.9 
billion in the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) account 
for activities that are traditionally funded out of base 
accounts. The committee believes that OCO for Base funding 
should be transferred into the base accounts.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $13.5 
billion to Procurement OCO.
Transfer OCO to Base RDT&E
    The budget request included $1.6 billion for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E) in Overseas 
Contingency Operations (OCO) funding. The committee notes that 
the President's budget request included $97.9 billion in the 
Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) account for activities 
that are traditionally funded out of base accounts. The 
committee believes that OCO for Base funding should be 
transferred into the base accounts.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $748.0 
million to RDT&E OCO.
Marine Corps facility sustainment increase for disaster recovery
    The budget request included $5.1 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Marine Corps Overseas Contingency Operations 
(OMMCOCO), of which $443.3 million was requested for SAG BSM1 
Sustainment, Restoration, & Modernization.
    The committee notes the ongoing recovery efforts in the 
mid-Atlantic region at installations such as Camp Lejeune, 
Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point, and Marine Corps 
Logistics Base Albany. The committee believes that additional 
funds are needed to assist in those efforts.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase in 
OMMCOCO of $340.0 million for SAG BSM1 to specifically augment 
disaster recovery.
Air Force facility sustainment disaster recovery increase
    The budget request included $33.0 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force Overseas Contingency Operations 
(OMAFOCO), of which $4.3 billion was requested for SAG 011R 
Facilities, Sustainment, Restoration, & Modernization.
    The committee notes the ongoing recovery efforts at Tyndall 
Air Force Base, Eglin Air Force Base, Warner Robins Air 
Logistics Center, and Offutt Air Force Base due to recent 
hurricanes and flooding. The committee believes that additional 
funds are needed to assist in those efforts.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase in 
OMAFOCO of $340.0 million for SAG 011R to specifically augment 
disaster recovery.
Defense Security Cooperation Agency
    The budget request included $1.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), Overseas Contingency 
Operations (OCO), for SAG 4GTD, the Defense Security 
Cooperation Agency, of which $812.0 million is for the security 
cooperation account.
    The committee notes that the reforms to the Department of 
Defense's (DOD) security cooperation enterprise required by the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328) sought to rationalize and streamline the 
authorities and associated funding available for security 
cooperation and enhance the effectiveness of DOD planning, 
execution, and oversight. Additionally, that law emphasized the 
critical importance of non-materiel solutions to the 
effectiveness of DOD security cooperation efforts, namely 
through an increased emphasis on building the institutional 
capacity of foreign partners to more competently manage and 
sustain their own forces and the equipment and related 
assistance provided by the United States. The reforms also 
highlighted the need to mature the DOD security cooperation 
workforce and the development and implementation of a rigorous 
assessment, monitoring, and evaluation (AM&E) program to ensure 
that DOD programs are appropriately scoped and meeting clearly 
defined objectives.
    However, while funding for DSCA's security cooperation 
account--which is primarily used to provide equipment and 
training to foreign partners to build capacity at the tactical 
and operational levels--has grown from approximately $895 
million in fiscal year 2018 for base and OCO to the $1.2 
billion requested for fiscal year 2020 for base and OCO, the 
DOD continues to insufficiently prioritize and resource 
congressionally-mandated efforts relating to DOD security 
cooperation workforce development, AM&E, and institutional 
capacity building. The committee believes that this imbalance 
inhibits appropriate security cooperation program design, 
execution, and oversight, which could lead to suboptimal 
outcomes and wasted taxpayer dollars.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $100.0 
million in OMDW, OCO, for SAG 4GTD, the Defense Security 
Cooperation Agency, for the security cooperation account, for a 
total of $712.0 million.
Iraq Security Cooperation
    The budget request included $1.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), Overseas Contingency 
Operations (OCO), for SAG 4GTD Defense Security Cooperation 
Agency.
    The committee understands that a substantial portion of the 
funds requested for Iraq Train and Equip Requirements is for 
capacity building of the Iraqi Security Forces as opposed to 
operational support and immediate reconstitution of units 
degraded in the fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and 
Syria. The committee believes that, as the United States seeks 
to normalize its security assistance relationship with the 
Government of Iraq, traditional capacity building activities 
should be funded via standing authorities for such purposes, 
such as section 333 of title 10, United States Code.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $100.0 
million in OMDW, OCO, for SAG 4GTD for capacity building of the 
Iraqi Security Forces. The committee notes that, elsewhere in 
this Act, there is a commensurate decrease in the Counter-ISIS 
Train and Equip Fund.
Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative
    The budget request included $1.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), Overseas Contingency 
Operations, for SAG 4GTD, the Defense Security Cooperation 
Agency, of which $250.0 million was for the Ukraine Security 
Assistance Initiative.
    The committee recommends an increase of $50.0 million to 
SAG4GTD Defense Security Cooperation Agency for the Ukraine 
Security Assistance Initiative.
Transfer OCO to Base O&M
    The budget request included $133.1 billion for Operation 
and Maintenance (O&M) in Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) 
funding. The committee notes that the President's budget 
request included $97.9 billion in the OCO account for 
activities that are traditionally funded out of base accounts. 
The committee believes that OCO for Base funding should be 
transferred into the base accounts.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $81.3 
billion to O&M OCO.
Counter-Islamic State of Iraq and Syria Train and Equip Fund
    The budget request included $1.0 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), Overseas Contingency 
Operations (OCO), for the Counter-Islamic State of Iraq and 
Syria Train and Equip Fund, of which $745.0 million is for SAG 
110 Iraq Train and Equip Requirements.
    The committee understands that a substantial portion of the 
funds requested for Iraq Train and Equip Requirements is for 
capacity building of the Iraqi Security Forces as opposed to 
operational support and immediate reconstitution of units 
degraded in the fight against the Islamic State of Iraq and 
Syria. The committee believes that, as the United States seeks 
to normalize its security assistance relationship with the 
Government of Iraq, traditional capacity building activities 
should be funded via standing authorities for such purposes, 
such as section 333 of title 10, United States Code.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $100.0 
million in OMDW, OCO, for SAG 110 Iraq Train and Equip 
Requirements. The committee notes that, elsewhere in this Act, 
there is a commensurate increase for the Defense Security 
Cooperation Agency for Iraq Train and Equip Requirements.

     TITLE XVI--STRATEGIC PROGRAMS, CYBER, AND INTELLIGENCE MATTERS

                      Subtitle A--Space Activities

                   Part I--United States Space Force

United States Space Force (secs. 1601-1608)
    The committee recommends a series of provisions (sec. 1601-
1608) that would establish the U.S. Space Force (USSF) and make 
changes to the organization of, authorities of, and acquisition 
associated with space forces assigned to the Department of 
Defense (DOD). The committee is concerned that the United 
States' assets and interests in space are increasingly at risk 
and that space has become a contested domain. In an era of 
great power competition, the DOD must appropriately organize 
itself to maintain, grow, and optimize U.S. competitive 
advantage in the space warfighting domain. The committee 
believes that these provisions would organize the Department to 
maximize warfighting capacity while minimizing the bureaucratic 
and taxpayer burden of an initial reorganization and providing 
a structured framework and roadmap to develop the USSF over the 
long-term.
    The committee intends for these provisions to: (1) Retain 
space capabilities and efficiencies developed by current 
organizational constructs; (2) Consolidate and integrate space 
acquisition resources and intellectual capital to realize 
economies of scale, streamline procurement timelines, and 
accelerate the deployment of U.S. capabilities in the space 
warfighting domain; (3) Transition DOD space warfighting assets 
from a strictly supporting role to an active warfighting 
capability and develop unity of command in the space domain; 
and (4) Foster and further develop space warfighting culture.
    These provisions would expand and change the role of the 
Principal Assistant to the Secretary of the Air Force for Space 
by renaming it the Principal Assistant to the Secretary of the 
Air Force for Space Acquisition and Integration (SAF/SP) and 
establishing the position as the senior space acquisition 
executive (SSAE) for all space acquisition across the Air 
Force, separate from the existing Air Force senior acquisition 
executive. The SAF/SP, as the SSAE, would report to the 
Secretary of the Air Force for all Air Force space acquisition 
programs and would have oversight and control over all Air 
Force space acquisition activities, including all major defense 
acquisition programs relating to warfighting in space. All 
space acquisition projects currently managed by the Assistant 
Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition would be 
transitioned to the SAF/SP. These provisions would also elevate 
the SAF/SP to a civilian 4-star equivalent position. The 
committee believes that the expansion of the responsibilities 
and elevation of the position of the SAF/SP would help to 
minimize the statutory and bureaucratic seams that exist 
between space acquisition authorities and officials spread 
across the DOD.
    These provisions would transition control of the manpower, 
agencies, and budgets within the Space and Missile Systems 
Center, the Space Rapid Capabilities Office, and the Space 
Development Agency to the SAF/SP, as the SSAE, upon the 
enactment of this Act. The committee believes that assigning to 
the SAF/SP this acquisition authority and organizational 
responsibility would reduce bureaucracy, improve oversight, and 
minimize interagency gaps. These provisions would require the 
Secretary of the Air Force to provide quarterly briefings to 
the congressional defense committees on this transition's 
progress and the need, if any, for further congressional 
action. The first briefing would be provided not later than 
March 31, 2020, and this requirement would expire on March 31, 
2022.
    These provisions would also establish a Space Force 
Acquisition Council (SAC) within the Department of the Air 
Force, which would oversee, direct, and manage Air Force 
acquisitions for space in order to ensure integration across 
the national security space enterprise. These provisions would 
establish the SAF/SP as the chair of Council, which would act 
as an approval and clearinghouse authority to move space 
operations projects to orbit faster and provide warfighter 
access and operational utility. The Under Secretary of the Air 
Force, the Commander, U.S. Space Command (SPACECOM), the 
Commander, United States Space Force (USSF), the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Space Policy, and the Director of the 
National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) would also be members of 
the Council. The committee believes that the inclusion of the 
Director of the NRO on the SAC would help to minimize the space 
acquisition seam that exists between the NRO and the Air Force. 
The SAC would meet not less frequently than monthly. These 
provisions would require the SAC to submit to the congressional 
defense committees, not later than 30 days after the end of 
each calendar year quarter through the first calendar year 
quarter of 2025, a report on the activities of the Council 
during the previous calendar year quarter.
    As the Air Force implements these changes, the committee 
encourages the Secretary of the Air Force to examine and 
consider the model that the NRO uses for acquisition. The 
committee acknowledges that, by utilizing its small-sized staff 
and a streamlined acquisition process, the NRO is able to move 
with agility and acquire assets rapidly. The committee intends 
for these provisions to better position the Air Force to gain 
the same efficiencies in space acquisition as the NRO.
    These provisions would also redesignate the Commander, Air 
Force Space Command, as the Commander, USSF. This 4-star 
commander would have a 4-year term of command and 
responsibility to organize, train, and equip space forces, 
serving as the primary force provider for SPACECOM. The 
Commander, USSF, would exercise authority for doctrine, 
organization, training, materiel, leadership and education, 
personnel, facilities, and policy responsibilities, utilizing 
the existing structure of the Air Force for administrative 
support as the new USSF structure is established and further 
defined. The Commander, USSF, would report through the Chief of 
Staff of the Air Force to the Secretary of the Air Force during 
the 1-year period beginning on the date of the enactment of 
this Act. After 1 year, the Commander, USSF, would report 
directly to the Secretary of the Air Force. The Commander, 
USSF, would participate in the Joint Chiefs of Staff at the 
discretion of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, as 
topics dictate and issues require, for the 1-year period 
beginning on the data of enactment of this Act. After 1 year, 
the Commander, USSF, would be a member of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff. These provisions would also designate the Vice 
Commander, Air Force Space Command, as the Vice Commander, 
USSF. The Vice Commander would be elevated to a Senate-
confirmed 4-star position and would support the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff at the request of the Commander, USSF. Finally, these 
provisions would require that, as the Secretary of the Air 
Force establishes the USSF, the Secretary use existing military 
and civilian personnel within the Air Force; these provisions 
do not authorize additional military billets or additional 
employment of civilian personnel.
    These provisions would provide the Secretary of Defense 
with the authority to establish a dual-hatted arrangement 
wherein the Commander, USSF, would also serve as the Commander, 
SPACECOM, during the 1-year period beginning on the date of the 
enactment of this Act, an authority that the committee expects 
the Secretary to utilize. Should the Secretary elect to 
establish this dual-hat arrangement, the committee recommends 
that, after this 1-year authority expires, the Secretary 
appoint a new individual to serve as Commander, SPACECOM, and 
the previously dual-hatted Commander retain his position as 
Commander, USSF. These provisions would require the Secretary 
to evaluate not later than 1 year after the enactment of this 
Act, as both the USSF and SPACECOM mature, the advisability of 
permitting the Commander, USSF, to serve concurrently as the 
Commander, SPACECOM, and to submit a report to the 
congressional defense committees on the evaluation results. 
These provisions would also require the Comptroller General of 
the United States to review the Secretary of Defense's reports 
and to provide briefings to the congressional defense 
committees on those reviews not later than 30 days after the 
Secretary submits such report.
    These provisions would require the Secretary of the Air 
Force to move existing space professionals within the Air Force 
to the USSF, thereby provisioning to the Commander, USSF, a 
space cadre in order to organize current Air Force space 
personnel under the entity responsible for their manning, 
training, and equipping and to further develop a service-like 
space warfighting ethos and culture. While this would include 
Air Force servicemembers on assignment in other components of 
the Department and the intelligence community, Space Force 
members would continue to rotate through assignment to the NRO. 
These provisions would require the Secretary of the Air Force 
to provide quarterly briefings to the congressional defense 
committees on this transition's progress and the need, if any, 
for further congressional action. The first briefing would be 
provided not later than March 31, 2020, and this requirement 
would expire on March 31, 2022.
    Further, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force and the Commander, USSF, to review the role of the 
reserve components within the USSF, consulting with the Chief, 
National Guard Bureau, on matters pertaining to the National 
Guard and the States, to ensure that reserve component 
personnel currently assigned to perform space duties continue 
to perform those duties in the USSF. The committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to report the results of this review 
to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives no later than March 1, 2020, including the 
employment of reserve component personnel performing space 
duties before and after the creation of the USSF.
    These provisions would also require the Secretary of 
Defense, in coordination with the Director of National 
Intelligence, to review and establish processes to provide more 
effective integration of capabilities across the National 
Security Agency (NSA), National Geospatial Intelligence Agency 
(NGA), and SPACECOM in support of joint operations without 
impairing the authorities or responsibilities of the Director 
of National Intelligence. The Secretary would submit to the 
congressional defense committees a report on the findings of 
such review not later than 180 days after the enactment of this 
Act. The committee is sensitive to concerns that these 
provisions' reforms may disrupt command and control of both DOD 
and NRO space assets but notes that the tasking of NRO overhead 
assets today is not under the control of the Director of the 
NRO; instead, it is in the purview of tasking organizations 
subordinate to the Directors of the NSA and the NGA. Both of 
these agencies are already designated as combat support 
agencies under the Goldwater-Nichols Department of Defense 
Reorganization Act (Public Law 99-433).
    The committee is also concerned with the lack of unity in 
space command and control operations. Currently, the Director 
of the NRO operates the NRO's assets and capabilities involved 
in space intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) 
activities independently of the Commander, SPACECOM. This is a 
unity of command seam that must be addressed in the space 
warfighting domain. The committee notes that this issue is 
vital for the warfighter and therefore urges the Secretary of 
Defense, the Director of National Intelligence, and the 
Secretary of the Air Force to consider potential solutions, 
including the designation of the NRO as a combat support agency 
for space ISR command and control operations. Additionally, the 
committee expects the Commander, SPACECOM, to continue to 
maintain open lines of communication with the intelligence 
community.
    These provisions would also establish the position of the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Space Policy within the 
Office of the Secretary of Defense. The Assistant Secretary 
would be responsible for managing, implementing, and advising 
the Secretary of Defense on all policy decisions germane to the 
space domain. The committee believes that establishing a 
civilian in the Office of the Secretary of Defense with the 
primary responsibility for the oversight of space policy would 
help to better integrate and synchronize space warfighting 
doctrine and policy within the Department.
    The committee is aware that the DOD originally proposed 
establishment and appointment of the Under Secretary of the Air 
Force for Space. To reduce bureaucracy and increase 
efficiencies as the U.S. Space Force is established, these 
provisions would instead require the Secretary of the Air Force 
to evaluate the tasks and operations of the staff in support of 
the space warfighting mission. These provisions would require 
the Secretary to provide an assessment to the congressional 
defense committees as to whether the establishment of the Under 
Secretary of the Air Force for Space is required, due not later 
than 180 days after the enactment of this Act.
    The committee believes that these provisions embody the 
core intent of the Department of Defense's proposed 
reorganization of space forces while excluding additive 
bureaucracy and minimizing organizational seams. The committee 
acknowledges that this reorganization is a phased approach that 
emphasizes continued coordination with the Department by 
requiring the Department to provide assessments to the 
committee on future needs or changes required to ensure that 
this reorganization incorporates all assets necessary to 
conduct operations in the space warfighting domain. The 
committee notes that space dominance is undeniably a vital 
national interest and that space has become a contested domain. 
The committee believes that these provisions support the 
National Defense Strategy's priority of addressing the threats 
in the space domain posed by our great power competitors by 
quickly streamlining and minimizing gaps in the space 
enterprise.

                      Part II--Other Space Matters

Repeal of requirement to establish Space Command as a subordinate 
        unified command of the United States Strategic Command (sec. 
        1611)
    The committee recommends a provision that would repeal 
section 169 of title 10, United States Code, which established 
U.S. Space Command (SPACECOM) as a subordinate unified command 
of U.S. Strategic Command. The committee believes that the 
Commander of SPACECOM will be better able to integrate space 
operations with terrestrial operations of geographic combatant 
commands, improve the combatant command lexicon's incorporation 
of the space domain, and advance the goal of security 
cooperation in space.
Program to enhance and improve launch support and infrastructure (sec. 
        1612)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to carry out a program to enhance 
infrastructure and improve support activities for the 
processing and launch of Department of Defense (DOD) small-
class and medium-class payloads. The program would be used to:
          (1) Make investments in infrastructure to improve 
        operations at ranges and Federal Aviation 
        Administration (FAA)-licensed spaceports consistent 
        with usage by the DOD;
          (2) Take measures to normalize processes, systems, 
        and products across ranges and spaceports to minimize 
        burden on launch providers; and
          (3) Improve transparency, flexibility, and 
        responsiveness for launch scheduling, factoring in 
        proximity to and quantity of existing commercial 
        airline flight patterns.
    The provision would require the Secretary to submit to the 
congressional defense committees, not later than 270 days after 
the enactment of this Act, a report on the plan for such 
program. The report would include:
          (1) A description of plans and the resources needed 
        to improve launch support infrastructure, utilities, 
        support equipment, and range operations;
          (2) A description of plans to streamline and 
        normalize processes, systems, and products at ranges 
        and FAA-licensed spaceports to ensure consistency for 
        range users; and
          (3) Recommendations for improving transparency, 
        flexibility, and responsiveness.
    The committee continues to recognize the unique importance 
of FAA-licensed spaceports and encourages the use of such 
spaceports and launch and range complexes, when appropriate, 
for mid-to-low inclination orbits or polar high-inclination 
orbits in support of national security space priorities. The 
committee recognizes that DOD and future national security 
space missions are focused on using smaller, less expensive 
satellites and launch vehicles for rapid reconstitution and 
resilience. Spaceports have proven small launch capability and 
offer the DOD less costly launch sites and services for these 
missions, an alternative to Vandenberg Air Force Base (AFB), 
and the use of commercial business practices to expedite DOD 
test and development programs across a variety of mission sets 
and a variety of launch and landing methods.
    The committee believes that these federally-licensed, non-
federally owned launch facilities, including the Spaceport 
America in New Mexico, Pacific Spaceport Complex-Alaska (PSCA), 
the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport (MARS), Spaceport Camden in 
Georgia, and Oklahoma Air & Space Port, are available to help 
meet the requirements for the national security space program 
for Air Force Space Command, the Space Rapid Capabilities 
Office, the Missile Defense Agency, and Space Development 
Agency. The committee notes that such spaceports improve the 
resiliency of U.S. launch infrastructure and help ensure 
consistent access to space to support national security space 
priorities.
    The committee recognizes the number of unique benefits that 
each FAA-licensed spaceport provides to the national security 
space program. The PSCA remains the only commercial polar 
launch range available in the United States, offering both 
orbital and sub-orbital capabilities. The committee applauds 
the use of the PSCA to conduct tests of both the Terminal High 
Altitude Area Defense system in 2017 as well as the Space and 
Missile Defense Command Advanced Hypersonic Weapon in 2014. 
PSCA has become a force multiplier in being the alternative 
West Coast range to Vandenberg AFB, providing additional 
capacity to test national security missions from an existing 
spaceport.
    The MARS at Wallops Island, Virginia, provides medium-class 
and small-class launch capabilities for the DOD with its agency 
partners. The MARS provides assured and responsive access to 
mid-to-low inclination orbits for payloads up to 15,300 lbs. 
The committee supports the National Reconnaissance Office's 
planned launches of the L-111 and L-129 missions from MARS by 
the end of 2019.
    The Oklahoma Air & Space Port, near Burns Flat, Oklahoma, 
is the only spaceport in the United States to have a civilian 
FAA-approved Space Flight Corridor in the National Airspace 
System. This Space Flight corridor is unique because it is not 
within Military Operating Areas or within restricted airspace, 
which provides an operational capability for space launch 
operations and associated industries specialized in space-
related activities.
    Spaceport America in New Mexico is a licensed inland 
spaceport that provides surface-to-space open sky launches 
landing in restricted flight zones. The New Mexico Spaceport is 
located next to White Sands Missile Range (WMSR) where the DOD 
controls the only restricted airspace in the country besides 
the White House. The committee notes that the DOD has studied 
hypervelocity testing at WSMR and its neighbor Spaceport 
America, which has horizontal and vertical launch and landing 
capabilities that hypervelocity vehicles require. The WSMR is 
preparing environmental impact statements for inland flight 
corridors that will be able to provide apogee-to-end-game 
suborbital instrumented flight solutions.
    The committee believes that it is also important for the 
Department to diversify its launch options and capabilities to 
include inland sites, as secure multimodal spaceports are 
advantageous for future hypervelocity development. Significant 
investments have been made at inland spaceports, which already 
have the infrastructure in place to accommodate smaller space 
launches for the Department.

Modification of enhancement of positioning, navigation, and timing 
        capacity (sec. 1613)

    The committee recommends a provision that would direct the 
Secretary of the Air Force to ensure that military Global 
Positioning System (GPS) user equipment terminals can 
incorporate signals from the European Union's Galileo and 
Japan's QZSS satellites, beginning with the implementation of 
open system architecture solutions to provide for robust 
positioning, navigation, and timing (PNT). The provision would 
enable the Secretary to waive this requirement on a case-by-
case basis if certain criteria are met.
    The provision would also direct the Secretary to ensure 
that military GPS terminals can receive allied and non-allied 
PNT signals, provided that analysis indicates that the benefits 
outweigh the risks or that the risks can be appropriately 
mitigated. The committee encourages the Secretary, in carrying 
out this provision, to engage with relevant U.S. allies to 
ensure technical compatibility and ability to receive the 
signals.

Modification of term of Commander of Air Force Space Command (sec. 
        1614)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2279c(a)(2) of title 10, United States Code, to change 
the term of the Commander, Air Force Space Command, from 6 
years to 4 years. The committee is aware that the requirement 
for the Commander to serve at least 6 years was established to 
address fragmented and diffuse space leadership 
responsibilities. However, the committee believes that progress 
has been made in the renewed focus on space operations 
leadership and that stability has been restored, and thus the 
6-year requirement is no longer needed.

Annual report on Space Command and Control program (sec. 1615)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Air Force to provide annually a report on 
progress in executing the acquisition strategy and assessment 
of risk for the Space Command and Control program. The 
acquisition strategy, including schedule and other performance 
metrics, is that required by the Item of Special Interest on 
Space Command and Control specified elsewhere in the committee 
report. The report would be provided to the congressional 
defense committees with the annual submission of the budget 
request for fiscal year 2021 through fiscal year 2025.
    The provision would also direct the Comptroller General of 
the United States to review the acquisition strategy and annual 
reports of the Secretary of the Air Force and provide a report 
on the review at a time mutually agreed upon between the 
congressional defense committees and the Comptroller General.
    The committee notes that the Space Command and Control 
program is more ambitious than its predecessor, the failed 
Joint Space Operations Center Mission System program. Given the 
increased scope, complexity, and ambition of the program, as 
well as the checkered history of previous programs, the 
committee believes that heightened oversight is required during 
development.

Requirements for phase 2 of acquisition strategy for National Security 
        Space Launch program (sec. 1616)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
changes to the National Security Space Launch Program (NSSL) 
Phase 2 procurement. This provision would ensure that the 
original mission performance requirements proposed by the 
acquisition authority remain as specified in support of agile 
and effective launch support to the warfighter. The provision 
would also limit awards for national security space launches 
under the Launch Services Procurement Other Transaction 
Authority agreement to a downselect of no more than two 
providers. Finally, the provision would require the Secretary 
of the Air Force to ensure that launch services are procured 
from industry providers that utilize launch vehicles or 
families of vehicles that meet all government requirements with 
respect to delivery of required payloads to reference orbits.
    The committee commends the Secretary of the Air Force for 
demonstrated commitment to the policy of assured access to 
space and for good stewardship of financial resources in the 
Launch Services Agreement program. Assured access to space and 
disciplined defense spending have increased importance in great 
power competition with China and Russia.
    The committee recognizes that unreliable commercial launch 
market forecasts that do not adequately account for competition 
and industrial base concerns have contributed to suboptimal 
government decisions. Phase 2 must be conducted in a manner 
that ensures that launch providers remain viable competitors 
and strong contributors to the space industrial base.

  Subtitle B--Defense Intelligence and Intelligence-Related Activities


Redesignation of Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence as Under 
        Secretary of Defense for Intelligence and Security (sec. 1621)

    The committee recommends a provision that would redesignate 
the Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence and the Deputy 
Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence as the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Intelligence and Security and Deputy 
Under Secretary of Defense for Intelligence and Security 
respectively and make conforming changes to existing law.
    The committee notes that the Office of the Under Secretary 
of Defense for Intelligence has assumed additional 
responsibilities, to include personnel security, physical 
security, industrial security, protection of classified 
information and controlled unclassified information, and 
security clearance investigations, and believes that the 
redesignation more appropriately reflects its current 
responsibilities. The committee does not intend for this 
provision to modify the authorities, responsibilities, roles, 
or missions of the aforementioned Under Secretary.

Repeal of certain requirements relating to integration of Department of 
        Defense intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance 
        capabilities (sec. 1622)

    The committee recommends a provision that would repeal 
section 426 of title 10, United States Code, which requires the 
establishment of the Intelligence, Surveillance, and 
Reconnaissance (ISR) Integration Council. The committee notes 
that the Department of Defense established the Defense 
Intelligence and Security Integration Council (DISIC). The 
DISIC is chaired by the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Intelligence and its membership comprises officials from the 
defense intelligence enterprise; the DISIC is responsible for 
conducting recurring reviews to improve integration and 
coordination across the defense intelligence enterprise. In 
light of the establishment of the DISIC as a successor 
organization to the ISR Integration Council, the committee 
believes that the statutory requirement in section 426 of title 
10, United States Code, is no longer necessary. The committee 
expects the Secretary of Defense to periodically update the 
committee on the activities of the DISIC.

Improving the onboarding methodology for certain intelligence personnel 
        (sec. 1623)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense and the Director of National Intelligence, 
consistent with Department of Defense Instruction 1400.25, as 
in effect on the day before the date of the enactment of this 
Act, to provide several reports relating to the onboarding 
methodology for certain intelligence personnel.

Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency activities on 
        facilitating access to local criminal records historical data 
        (sec. 1624)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Director of the Defense Counterintelligence and Security 
Agency to carry out a set of activities relating to 
facilitating access by the Agency to local criminal records 
historical data in support of its personnel security mission. 
The committee notes that elsewhere in this Act is an increase 
of $15.0 million in Research, Development, Test, and 
Evaluation, Defense-wide, to support the set of activities 
authorized in this section.

                 Subtitle C--Cyberspace-Related Matters


Reorientation of Big Data Platform program (sec. 1631)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to reorient the Department of Defense's 
Big Data Platform program by establishing a common baseline and 
security classification scheme for the collection, querying, 
analysis, and accessibility of a common and comprehensive set 
of metadata from sensors, applications, and systems deployed 
across the Department of Defense Information Network.
    The committee recognizes the potential of the Big Data 
Platform technology as a cyber situational awareness tool but 
is frustrated by the current status of its use across the 
Department of Defense. Big Data Platform instances are not fed 
key metadata for analysis and querying, are segregated from one 
another, and function, within the Department's cybersecurity 
architecture, largely as incident response tools at the 
component-level rather than real-time situational awareness 
tools at the enterprise-level.

Zero-based review of Department of Defense cyber and information 
        technology personnel (sec. 1632)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
heads of Department of Defense departments, agencies, and 
components to complete zero-based reviews of the cyber and 
information technology personnel in those departments, 
agencies, and components. The reviews would: (1) Assess 
military, civilian, and contractor positions and personnel 
performing cyber and information technology missions in the 
Department for efficacy, efficiency, and relevance; (2) Analyze 
capability gaps; and (3) Recommend road maps for correcting 
these gaps. The committee is aware of the growth of 
cybersecurity personnel in the Department of Defense over the 
past few years but is concerned that some of these roles may be 
duplicative or no longer necessary as cybersecurity approaches 
have evolved.
    The provision would require that these reviews be completed 
and submitted to the Principal Cyber Adviser (PCA), Chief 
Information Officer (CIO), and Under Secretary of Defense for 
Personnel and Readiness (USD (P&R)) by January 1, 2021. After 
receiving the findings of these reviews, the PCA, CIO, and USD 
(P&R) would provide recommendations on the implementation of 
these road maps to the heads of the Department of Defense 
departments, agencies, and components and would oversee and 
assist in the implementation of these roadmaps and 
recommendations.

Study on improving cyber career paths in the Navy (sec. 1633)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Navy to conduct a study on improving cyber 
career paths in the Navy. The provision would also require the 
Secretary to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees, no later than October 1, 2020, on the findings of 
the study.
    The committee is aware of the independent Cybersecurity 
Readiness Review that was commissioned by the Secretary of the 
Navy, and completed earlier this year, to examine cybersecurity 
readiness across the Navy in the areas of culture, people, 
structure, processes, and resources. The committee applauds the 
Navy for conducting this review to recommend areas where the 
Navy can improve its cybersecurity readiness. The committee 
believes that conducting this review is an important step in 
increasing the Navy's cybersecurity and encourages the 
Secretary to quickly develop an implementation plan to address 
the recommendations in the review. The committee is 
particularly concerned about the findings related to the cyber 
workforce. The committee is concerned that the Navy lags behind 
the Army and the Air Force in charting career paths for 
military and civilian personnel designed to generate expertise 
in offensive and defensive cyber warfare.

Framework to enhance cybersecurity of the United States defense 
        industrial base (sec. 1634)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to develop a consistent, comprehensive 
framework to enhance the cybersecurity of the U.S. defense 
industrial base and to provide the congressional defense 
committees a briefing on the framework not later than March 11, 
2020. The provision would require the Secretary, in the 
development of this framework, to consult with industry groups 
and contractors in the defense industrial base as well as the 
Director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology 
(NIST). The framework would include: (1) Identification of 
cybersecurity standards and requirements imposed on the defense 
industrial base; (2) Responsibilities of the prime contractor 
and all subcontractors in the supply chain for implementing 
those standards and requirements; (3) A plan to provide 
cybersecurity guidance and assistance to contractors; and (4) 
Methods and programs for defining and managing controlled 
unclassified information.
    The provision would also mandate that the Department of 
Defense (DOD): (1) Provide a plan that includes direct 
technical support or assistance to contractors in complying 
with the new framework; (2) Consider how to tailor 
cybersecurity requirements for small contractors based on risk; 
(3) Consider how to provide additional assistance to small 
companies in the form of training, mentoring, and other 
measures; and (4) Evaluate both incentives and penalties for 
prime contractors and subcontractors for cybersecurity 
performance. Finally, the provision requires that the Secretary 
of Defense provide quarterly updates on the status of 
development and implementation of the framework. The committee 
recognizes that small companies are in general challenged by a 
lack of resources, both monetary and technical, to meet 
cybersecurity requirements. The committee emphasizes that the 
DOD must exercise care to ensure that its policies and 
procedures preserve and protect its industrial base rather than 
diminish it.
    The committee is concerned that contractors within the 
defense industrial base are an inviting target for our 
adversaries, who have been conducting cyberattacks to steal 
critical military technologies. Currently, the Department of 
Defense mandates that defense contractors meet the requirements 
of NIST Special Publication 800-171 but does not audit 
compliance to this standard. The committee is concerned that 
prime contractors are not overseeing their subcontractors' 
compliance with these cybersecurity requirements through the 
entire supply chain and that the Department lacks access to 
information about its contractors' subcontractors. The 
committee believes that prime contractors need to be held 
responsible and accountable for securing Department of Defense 
technology and sensitive information and for delivering 
products and capabilities that are uncompromised. Developing a 
framework to enhance the cybersecurity of the defense 
industrial base will serve as an important first step toward 
securing the supply chain.

Role of Chief Information Officer in improving enterprise-wide 
        cybersecurity (sec. 1635)

    The committee recommends a provision that would specify the 
responsibilities of the Chief Information Officer (CIO) as they 
relate to the Department of Defense's (DOD) cybersecurity. 
Section 909 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) clarified that the CIO is 
responsible for the information technology, networking, 
information assurance, cybersecurity, and cyber capability 
architectures of the DOD and provided a budget review authority 
to the CIO to carry out these responsibilities. This provision 
would levy additional responsibilities on the CIO for these 
architectures, including the modernization of the Department's 
cybersecurity architecture, the mandating of cybersecurity data 
sharing, and the acquisition of additional computing 
infrastructure to meet the Department's cybersecurity needs.
    The committee is encouraged by the current CIO's commitment 
to moving the Department's computing infrastructure to the 
cloud, to driving forward its artificial intelligence 
initiative, and to modernizing its cybersecurity. The committee 
believes that the latter in particular is of paramount 
importance and demands the CIO's highest priority. The 
Department has for years struggled to achieve private sector-
standard cybersecurity of its unclassified networks despite 
considerable investment and efforts. Much of this is due to the 
sheer size and diversity of the Department's networks, which 
pose substantial challenges to cybersecurity architects and 
operators at the enterprise-level.
    As a result, the Department maintains extensive and 
expensive cybersecurity capabilities on its perimeter; manages 
network operations through the Joint Regional Security Stacks, 
which the most recent Director of Operational Test and 
Evaluation report described as ``unable to help network 
defenders protect the network against operationally realistic 
[cyberattacks]''; relies on cybersecurity service providers' 
security operations centers to monitor local network activity; 
deploys cyber protection teams to critical networks, often in 
response to suspected malicious activity; and relies on myriad 
endpoint defense products to defend against cyberattacks at the 
edge. These layers are typically disjointed and connected only 
through manual instructions from operator to operator. The 
Department's cybersecurity architecture is thus characterized 
by inconsistency, opacity, confusion, labor-intensity, and 
misalignment of resources.
    The committee recognizes that management of this 
architecture necessarily requires coordination with the 
Principal Cyber Advisor and the Commander of U.S. Cyber Command 
but reiterates that the responsibility for the architecture 
lies, in statute, with the CIO. The committee thus urges the 
CIO to aggressively work to modernize the Department's 
cybersecurity architecture to improve enterprise-level 
visibility, command and control, and operations. This 
modernization will require substantial reconfiguration of 
component-level budgets and activities; the committee expects 
the CIO to use his budget authority widely and effectively to 
effect this necessary transformation. This modernization will 
also require reevaluation and rationalization of existing 
Department-wide cybersecurity programs, capabilities, and 
operations, including the Joint Regional Security Stacks, Host 
Based Security System, Joint Forces Headquarters-Department of 
Defense Information Network, the cyber protection teams, and 
the cybersecurity service providers.

Quarterly assessments of the readiness of cyber forces (sec. 1636)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to develop metrics for the assessment of 
the readiness of the Cyber Mission Force and to brief the 
congressional defense committees on these metrics within 90 
days of the enactment of this Act. The provision would also 
require the briefing of readiness of the Cyber Mission Force, 
informed by these metrics, as part of the quarterly cyber 
operations updates, effective 180 days after the enactment of 
this Act.
    The committee applauds the Cyber Mission Force's recent 
achievement of full operational capability. As these teams 
continue to mature, the committee believes that it is important 
to develop and report a standard set of metrics to address the 
Department's ability to conduct cyberspace operations based on 
capability and capacity of personnel, equipment, training, and 
equipment condition. The committee believes that these 
readiness reporting metrics should be standard across the 
Services and should be consistent with readiness reporting 
throughout the Department. The committee also believes that it 
is important for these metrics to be reported as part of the 
quarterly cyber operations briefings to provide context to 
current operations. The committee recognizes that the Cyber 
Mission Force's mission posture--including the accesses and 
tools developed by and available to the National Mission Teams 
and Combat Mission Teams, the responsiveness of the Cyber 
Protection Teams, and the operational effectiveness of these 
teams--is distinct from its readiness but also expects to be 
kept apprised of this mission posture through its cyber 
quarterly briefings.

Control and analysis of Department of Defense data stolen through 
        cyberspace (sec. 1637)

    The committee recommends a provision that would define 
requirements for the Department of Defense (DOD) in the event 
that DOD data have been stolen or are suspected to have been 
stolen via cyber means. The provision provides a series of 
requirements for the DOD when it directly controls the data or 
access to the data. The provision would further require that, 
when the DOD does not have unilateral control of the data and 
when law enforcement or intelligence community information 
controls have been imposed on the handling of and access to the 
data, the Secretary of Defense coordinate with the Director of 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) or Director of 
National Intelligence (DNI), as appropriate, to carry out the 
same series of requirements.
    The committee is aware of a number of incidents in which 
critical data were stolen from DOD contractors but the 
Department was very slow to: (1) Inform the appropriate 
leadership in the Department; (2) Inform the Congress; (3) 
Assess the damage resulting from the breach; and (4) Launch 
counterintelligence and other remediation efforts to correct 
the damage. In some cases, the Congress has learned of such 
breaches from media reports months after the events, only to 
find that DOD leaders remain in the dark. One reason for this 
unacceptable pattern of tardiness is that law enforcement and 
intelligence community controls are placed on access to the 
data and on knowledge of the breach. Access to the data may be 
limited to a small number of DOD subject matter experts who 
have to be cleared for access to the data and physically 
deployed to a hosted repository with limited query and analysis 
tools.
    The committee believes that for all significant breaches 
involving the loss or potential loss of critical DOD 
information, the Department should gain control of the data 
that have been or potentially have been exfiltrated, place in a 
modern data center, apply modern information technology tools 
to analyze the data rapidly to determine the nature and 
severity of the incident, ensure that appropriate officials are 
fully informed, and devise and implement rapid countermeasures 
and remediation measures. These data transfers, analyses, and 
countermeasures can and must be conducted in a highly secure 
manner, with access limited to those with an appropriate need-
to-know. These measures, and DOD's security controls, do not 
need to interfere with law enforcement investigations, and 
DOD's national security equities must be given just weight by 
DOD's partners in dealing with serious breaches.
    The committee thus urges the Secretary of Defense to 
institutionalize the requirements of this provision through 
formal agreements with the Director of the FBI and the DNI that 
accommodate all parties' relevant counterintelligence and 
mission requirements.

Accreditation standards and processes for cybersecurity and information 
        technology products and services (sec. 1638)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Department of Defense (DOD) Chief Information Officer (CIO) to 
assess the accreditation standards and processes of the 
military departments and other components of the DOD for 
cybersecurity and information technology products and services. 
The provision would also require the CIO to submit a report to 
the congressional defense committees on the assessment by April 
1, 2020.
    The committee is aware that the DOD utilizes different 
accreditation standards (e.g., Risk Management Framework, 
Development Security Operations or DevSecOps) and processes 
(e.g., reciprocity) for cybersecurity and information 
technology products and services, depending on whether they are 
custom-built or commercial off-the-shelf products. Disparity in 
standards and duplication of testing often result in delays, 
complexity, and inefficiency. The committee believes that it is 
important to streamline the accreditation process to enable the 
DOD to more quickly adopt cutting-edge cybersecurity tools 
across the DOD enterprise.

Extension of authorities for Cyberspace Solarium Commission (sec. 1639)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1652 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) by 
making a technical correction and changing the final due date 
for the Cyberspace Solarium Commission's final report to 
February 1, 2020. The committee recognizes that the commission 
had its first meeting in early April and needs an extension in 
order to fully study the immensely complex issues that it has 
been tasked to contemplate. The committee hopes to receive the 
commission's final report and the Secretary of Defense's, the 
Director of National Intelligence's, and the Secretary of 
Homeland Security's assessments of the report's findings in 
time to inform the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2021.

Modification of elements of assessment required for termination of 
        dual-hat arrangement for Commander of the United States Cyber 
        Command (sec. 1640)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1642 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) by requiring the 
Secretary of Defense and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, 
prior to the termination of the dual-hatted arrangement in 
which the Commander of United States Cyber Command serves as 
the Director of the National Security Agency (NSA), to certify 
that: (1) Processes to deconflict military cyber operations and 
national intelligence operations have been put in place; (2) 
Tools, weapons, and accesses used in and available for military 
cyber operations are sufficient for achieving required effects 
and United States Cyber Command is capable of acquiring or 
developing these tools, weapons, and accesses; and (3) The 
Cyber Mission Force has demonstrated the capacity to execute 
the cyber missions of the Department, including the execution 
of national-level missions through cyberspace, defense of the 
Department of Defense Information Network, and support for 
other combatant commands, including targeting of adversary 
military assets.
    The committee is encouraged by recent mission successes of 
Cyber Command, enabled by close cooperation with the NSA. The 
committee believes that Cyber Command is, however, still 
maturing as a combatant command and still relies on a strong 
partnership with NSA to execute the Department of Defense's 
cyber strategy. The committee therefore believes that 
eliminating the dual-hat arrangement would be premature at this 
time. As Cyber Command becomes increasingly active, it will 
continue to rely on the NSA's intelligence, tools, and weapons. 
The termination of the Cyber Command-NSA dual-hat could 
complicate this critical relationship. The committee therefore 
believes that the dual-hat should be preserved until Cyber 
Command demonstrates the ability to acquire its own 
capabilities and carry out its missions effectively.

Use of National Security Agency cybersecurity expertise to support 
        acquisition of commercial cybersecurity products (sec. 1641)

    The committee recommends a provision that would establish 
as a mission of the National Security Agency (NSA) the advising 
and assistance of the Department of Defense (DOD) in its 
acquisition and adaptation of cybersecurity products and 
services from industry, especially the commercial cybersecurity 
sector.
    The committee believes that the entire DOD, and especially 
the NSA, should leverage the considerable investment, 
development, and talent in the commercial cybersecurity 
industry to satisfy the Department's cybersecurity 
requirements. The Congress has legislated the formal preference 
for the acquisition of commercial items in the past, most 
notably in section 8104 of the Federal Acquisition Streamlining 
Act of 1994 (Public Law 103-355), but the Department too often 
continues to develop its own hardware and software, including 
for cybersecurity capabilities. The Department still relies on 
internally engineered solutions and custom-developed products 
and services from traditional defense contractors, despite the 
fact that commercial cybersecurity products and services often 
outperform these capabilities, scale better, tend to be more 
supportable, and ultimately cost less. The committee believes 
that the Department must therefore become a more educated 
consumer of commercially available and deployed cybersecurity 
products and services. In order to do so effectively, the NSA 
must assist the Department. As the Department's largest center 
of technical cybersecurity expertise, the NSA is uniquely 
positioned to do so, as shown by their successful utilization 
of commercially-available cybersecurity products in SharkSeer.

Study on future cyber warfighting capabilities of Department of Defense 
        (sec. 1642)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to direct the Defense Science Board to 
carry out a study on the future cyber warfighting capabilities 
of the Department of Defense (DOD). The provision would also 
require the Secretary to provide the Board with timely access 
to appropriate resources to conduct the analysis. The provision 
would require the Board to submit a final report on the study 
to the Secretary no later than October 1, 2021, and would 
direct the Secretary to submit the report to the congressional 
defense committees, along with any comments he may have, no 
later than November 1, 2021. The Board's study would include: 
(1) A technical evaluation of the Joint Cyber Warfighting 
Architecture (JCWA) of the DOD; (2) A technical evaluation of 
the Department's tool development and acquisition programs; (3) 
An evaluation of the operational planning and targeting of U.S. 
Cyber Command; and (4) Recommendations for legislative and 
administrative action relating to the DOD's future cyber 
warfighting capabilities.
    The committee supports the acquisition of cutting-edge 
cyberspace warfighting capabilities in the development of the 
JCWA but is concerned that the effort to develop this joint 
warfighting vision is disjointed. Specifically, the committee 
is concerned that aspects of the JCWA, including the Unified 
Platform, Joint Cyber Command and Control, and Persistent Cyber 
Training Environment, may lack cohesion with the Cyber Mission 
Force and that individual components controlled by the Services 
are not appropriately synchronized with the JCWA vision. 
Therefore, the committee expects that these and the 
Department's other future programs, capabilities, and 
operations support U.S. Cyber Command's joint warfighting 
strategy and the Department's larger cyber strategy.

Authority to use operation and maintenance funds for cyber operations-
        peculiar capability development projects (sec. 1643)

    The committee recommends a provision that would allow the 
Secretaries of military departments to use money authorized for 
appropriation for Operation and Maintenance (O&M) to develop 
cyber operations-peculiar capabilities up to $3.0 million 
annually. The provision would allow the Department of Defense 
(DOD) to use its O&M funds for the rapid creation, testing, 
fielding, and operation of cyber capabilities that would be 
developed and used within the 1-year appropriation period.
    The committee believes that cyberspace threats are a 
continuing concern for the DOD, and, while the Services are 
working to develop agile teams to respond to cyberspace threats 
and opportunities, cyber capability development is hamstrung by 
an acquisition funding process that is often incompatible with 
real-time operations and innovation. The committee understands 
that current law often requires coordinated use of up to three 
different types of funding: Research, Development, Testing, and 
Evaluation, O&M, and Procurement. Coordinated use of multiple 
types of funds can lead to bureaucratic requirements and 
reviews that ultimately hamper cyber capability development 
within operationally relevant timeframes. The committee 
believes that using O&M funds for these purposes can increase 
operational flexibility and reduce planning and budgeting 
overhead.

Expansion of authority for access and information relating to 
        cyberattacks on Department of Defense operationally critical 
        contractors (sec. 1644)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 391 of title 10, United States Code, to extend the 
ability of the Department of Defense (DOD) to react immediately 
to reports of intrusions that may affect critical DOD data. The 
committee understands the importance of commercial service 
providers to the DOD and believes that the security and 
integrity of these providers is absolutely critical to the 
effective management of the worldwide logistics enterprise, 
especially during a contingency or wartime. Therefore, the 
committee believes that the same level of proactive DOD support 
in responding to cyber incidents should be authorized with 
respect to these providers as that authorized for cleared 
defense contractors.

Briefing on memorandum of understanding relating to joint operational 
        planning and control of cyber attacks of national scale (sec. 
        1645)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing, not later than 
March 1, 2020, to the congressional defense and homeland 
security committees on the Joint Department of Defense (DOD) 
and Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Memorandum of 
Understanding (MOU), signed by the Secretary of Defense on 
October 6, 2018.
    The committee supports the DOD-DHS MOU but is concerned 
that it does not fully address the need for joint operational 
planning for major cyberattacks on the country or for unity of 
effort and rapid response to such attacks. The committee is 
also unclear as to whether the National Cyber Strategy, 
published in September 2018, provides for a standing joint 
multi-agency organization and staff to plan and direct 
operational responses to cyberattacks of national scale.

Study to determine the optimal strategy for structuring and manning 
        elements of the Joint Force Headquarters-Cyber organizations, 
        Joint Mission Operations Centers, and Cyber Operations-
        Integrated Planning Elements (sec. 1646)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Department of Defense Principal Cyber Advisor (PCA) to conduct 
a study to determine the optimal strategy for structuring and 
manning elements of the following: (1) Joint Force 
Headquarters-Cyber organizations; (2) Joint Mission Operations 
Centers; and (3) Cyber Operations-Integrated Planning Elements. 
The provision would require the PCA to submit a report on the 
study to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the 
House of Representatives no later than 180 days after the date 
of the enactment of this Act.

Cyber governance structures and Principal Cyber Advisors on military 
        cyber force matters (sec. 1647)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
each secretary of the military departments to designate a 
Principal Cyber Advisor to act as the principal advisor to the 
secretary on the cyber forces, cyber programs, and 
cybersecurity matters of the military department, including 
matters relating to weapons systems, enabling infrastructure, 
and the defense industrial base. The committee encourages the 
secretaries to consider designating an existing official, such 
as the deputy undersecretary of the military department or the 
chief information officer of the military department. The 
provision would require each secretary to review the military 
department's current governance model for cybersecurity with 
respect to current authorities and responsibilities. The 
provision would also require each secretary to brief the 
congressional defense committees on the findings of the review 
no later than February 1, 2021.

Designation of test networks for testing and accreditation of 
        cybersecurity products and services (sec. 1648)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to designate three test networks for the 
testing and accreditation of cybersecurity products and 
services. The committee understands the importance of test 
networks in facilitating the consistent and timely 
accreditation of cutting-edge cybersecurity tools for the 
defense of the Department of Defense networks.

Consortia of universities to advise Secretary of Defense on 
        cybersecurity matters (sec. 1649)

    The committee recommends a provision that would establish 
one or more consortia to advise and assist the Secretary of 
Defense on matters relating to cybersecurity. The consortium or 
consortia established under shall consist of universities that 
have been designated as centers of academic excellence by the 
Director of the National Security Agency or the Secretary of 
Homeland Security. The functions of the consortium are (1) to 
provide to the Secretary access to the expertise of the members 
of the consortium on matters relating to cybersecurity; (2) to 
align the efforts of consortia members in support of the 
Department of Defense; and (3) to act as a facilitator in 
responding to Department requests relating to advice and 
assistance on matters relating to cybersecurity and to provide 
feedback to the Secretary from members of the consortium.

                       Subtitle D--Nuclear Forces


Modification of authorities relating to nuclear command, control, and 
        communications system (sec. 1661)

    The committee recommends a provision that would transfer 
statutory responsibility for policy, oversight, and 
coordination for nuclear command, control, and communications 
(NC3) programs from the Chief Information Officer of the 
Department of Defense to the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment. This change would align the 
statute to reflect the Department's plan to improve governance 
of the NC3 system and the re-assignment of the NC3 Principal 
Staff Assistant role to the Under Secretary of Acquisition and 
Sustainment.

Expansion of officials required to conduct biennial assessments of 
        delivery platforms for nuclear weapons and nuclear command and 
        control system (sec. 1662)

    The committee recommends a provision that would add the 
Commander of the United States Air Forces in Europe to a list 
of officials required to report biennially on the safety, 
security, reliability, sustainability, performance, and 
military effectiveness of the delivery platforms for nuclear 
weapons and nuclear command and control systems for which each 
official has responsibility.
    The committee does not intend to create a requirement for 
additional inspections. Instead, this provision is intended to 
require the aggregation and submittal to the Congress of data 
gathered on the current inspection schedule.

Conforming amendment to Council on Oversight of the National Leadership 
        Command, Control, and Communications System (sec. 1663)

    The committee recommends a provision that would make 
certain conforming changes to the governing statute of the 
Council on Oversight of the National Leadership Command, 
Control, and Communications System, section 171a of title 10, 
United States Code.

Prohibition on reduction of the intercontinental ballistic missiles of 
        the United States (sec. 1664)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the obligation or expenditure of fiscal year 2020 funds to 
reduce the responsiveness, alert level, or quantity of deployed 
U.S. intercontinental ballistic missiles to fewer than 400. The 
provision would provide an exception to this prohibition for 
activities related to maintenance and sustainment and 
activities to ensure safety, security, or reliability.

Briefing on long-range standoff weapon and sea-launched cruise missile 
        (sec. 1665)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, in 
consultation with the Administrator for Nuclear Security, to 
provide to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives a briefing on opportunities to 
increase commonality between the long-range standoff weapon 
(LRSO) and the nuclear sea-launched cruise missile (SLCM-N) and 
to leverage technologies developed in the course of the LRSO 
program for the SLCM-N.

Sense of the Senate on industrial base for Ground-Based Strategic 
        Deterrent program (sec. 1666)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate that maintaining a viable domestic 
industrial base for large solid rocket motors is in the 
national security interest of the United States and that, in 
carrying out the Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent program, the 
Secretary of Defense should strive to maintain competition and 
otherwise act to preserve the industrial base.

Sense of the Senate on nuclear deterrence commitments of the United 
        States (sec. 1667)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate that dual-capable aircraft (DCA) provide 
visible assurance to allies and serve as a tangible 
demonstration of U.S. extended deterrence guarantees.
    As part of its commitment to the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization (NATO), the United States currently maintains a 
small number of forward-deployed DCA and nonstrategic nuclear 
weapons in European countries. Though limited in size, the 
committee continues to believe the DCA mission is an essential 
component of U.S. and NATO defense postures. The Department 
plans to sustain this capability by replacing the current aging 
DCA with nuclear-capable F-35 aircraft, and the President's 
budget request for fiscal year 2020 included $71.3 million as 
part of an ongoing effort to certify the F-35A for this 
mission.
    The 2018 Nuclear Posture Review introduced two new 
supplemental nuclear capabilities in response to a 
deteriorating threat environment and perceived gaps in U.S. 
deterrence posture. The committee believes that the F-35A, 
particularly when armed with the life-extended B61-12 nuclear 
bomb, will significantly enhance regional deterrence posture 
and that accelerating the deployment of this capability could 
provide a treaty-compliant response to changing threat 
conditions that also assures NATO allies of U.S. commitment to 
their security.
    Accordingly, not later than January 15, 2020, the committee 
directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and 
Sustainment, in consultation with the Secretary of the Air 
Force, to provide a report assessing the feasibility and 
advisability of accelerating activities necessary to certify 
the F-35A to perform DCA operations.

                  Subtitle E--Missile Defense Programs


Iron Dome short-range rocket defense system and Israeli cooperative 
        missile defense program co-development and co-production (sec. 
        1671)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
not more than $95.0 million for the Missile Defense Agency 
(MDA) to provide to the Government of Israel to procure 
components for the Iron Dome short-range rocket defense system 
through co-production of such components in the United States. 
The provision would also authorize $50.0 million for the MDA to 
provide to the Government of Israel for the procurement of the 
David's Sling Weapon System and $55.0 million for the Arrow 3 
Upper Tier Interceptor Program, including for co-production of 
parts and components in the United States by U.S. industry. The 
provision would also provide a series of certification 
requirements relating to implementation of the below relevant 
bilateral agreements before disbursal of these funds. These 
funds are a subset of the $500.0 million total authorized to be 
appropriated for cooperative missile defense programs with 
Israel within this Act.
    The committee acknowledges that the September 14, 2016, 
Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the United States and 
Israel commits $500.0 million in U.S. funding for cooperative 
missile defense programs annually, beginning in fiscal year 
2019 and ending in fiscal year 2028. According to the MOU, the 
United States and Israel jointly understand that any U.S. funds 
provided for such programs should be made available according 
to separate bilateral agreements for the Iron Dome, David's 
Sling, and Arrow 3 Upper Tier Interceptor Program and should 
maximize co-production of parts and components in the United 
States at a level equal to or greater than 50 percent of U.S.-
appropriated funds for production. Additionally, Israel commits 
not to seek additional missile defense funding from the United 
States for the duration of the MOU, except in exceptional 
circumstances as may be jointly agreed by the United States and 
Israel. The committee expects to continue to receive annual 
updates on all cooperative defense programs, as delineated in 
the MOU, to include progress reports and spending plans as well 
as the top-line figures of the Israel Missile Defense 
Organization budget for these programs.

Expansion of national missile defense policy and program redesignation 
        (sec. 1672)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate regarding the threat to U.S. national 
security from ballistic, cruise, and hypersonic missiles. The 
provision would also modify the statement of policy contained 
in section 1681 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) to include defense 
against cruise and hypersonic missiles and would require the 
Secretary of Defense to redesignate all strategies, policy, 
programs, and systems to reflect this policy.

Acceleration of the deployment of persistent space-based sensor 
        architecture (sec. 1673)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate that the Secretary of Defense should 
rapidly develop and deploy a persistent, space-based sensor 
architecture as soon as technically feasible. The provision 
would also require the Secretary of Defense to assign to the 
Director of the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) the primary 
responsibility for the development and deployment of a 
hypersonic and ballistic tracking space sensor (HBTSS). The 
provision would also require the Comptroller and the Director 
for Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation to certify to the 
congressional defense committees whether the HBTSS program is 
fully funded in the future years defense program submitted with 
the fiscal year 2021 budget request. The provision would also 
require the Director of the MDA to begin on-orbit testing of an 
HBTSS no later than December 31, 2021, with allowance for a 
waiver if the Secretary of Defense submits to the congressional 
defense committees a report including a number of elements. 
Finally, the provision would require the Secretary to submit a 
report on efforts relating to space-based sensing and tracking 
capabilities for missile defense at the MDA, the Defense 
Advanced Research Projects Agency, the Air Force, and the Space 
Development Agency.

Nonstandard acquisition processes of Missile Defense Agency (sec. 1674)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate in support of the nonstandard acquisition 
processes used by the Missile Defense Agency (MDA). The 
provision would also prohibit obligation or expenditure of 
funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act to change these 
processes until the Secretary of Defense has consulted with a 
number of senior defense officials with responsibility for 
aspects of missile defense, submitted a report to the 
congressional defense committees, and allowed 270 days to 
elapse after submittal of the report.

Plan for the Redesigned Kill Vehicle (sec. 1675)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Director of the Missile Defense Agency (MDA) to submit to the 
congressional defense committees a report on the delay in the 
Redesigned Kill Vehicle (RKV) program, including: (1) A 
description of the reason for the delay; (2) An overview of the 
revised program schedule; (3) Any recommendations for 
accelerating the fielding schedule; (4) A timeline, any 
additional funding required, and a risk assessment for such 
recommendations; and (5) Any recommendations suggested by 
contractors to the Director that were not adopted and an 
explanation as to why.
    The committee supports the MDA's efforts to continue to 
improve the reliability, producibility, and maintainability of 
a more effective kill vehicle for the ground-based midcourse 
defense system, including by leveraging mature technologies 
from fielded systems when appropriate, in order to better 
defend the homeland from long-range ballistic missile threats.

Report on improving ground-based midcourse defense element of ballistic 
        missile defense system (sec. 1676)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Director of the Missile Defense Agency to submit a report on 
options to increase the capability, capacity, and reliability 
of the ground-based midcourse defense element of the U.S. 
ballistic missile defense system.

Sense of the Senate on recent Missile Defense Agency tests (sec. 1677)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate on a highly successful 2018 Missile Defense 
Agency flight test campaign.

Sense of the Senate on missile defense technology development 
        priorities (sec. 1678)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate on the importance of advanced missile 
defense technologies to preventing and defeating the rapidly 
expanding offensive missile threat.

Publication of environmental impact statement prepared for certain 
        potential future missile defense sites (sec. 1679)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to make available to the public the 
Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared in accordance 
with section 227(b) of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2013 (Public Law 112-239).
    The committee notes that section 227 required the Missile 
Defense Agency (MDA) to evaluate candidate sites for a 
potential future deployment of additional ground-based 
interceptors for homeland missile defense, including 
preparation of the EIS for each potential Continental 
Interceptor Site. This provision would require the Secretary to 
publish the EIS in a publicly available format.

                       Subtitle F--Other Matters


Matters relating to military operations in the information environment 
        (sec. 1681)

    The committee recommends a provision that would affirm the 
authority of the Secretary of Defense to conduct military 
operations in the information environment, including 
clandestine operations, to defend the United States, its 
allies, and its interests, including in response to malicious 
activities carried out against the United States or a United 
States person by a foreign power. The provision would also 
clarify that military operations in the information environment 
are traditional military activities for the purposes of section 
503(e)(2) of the National Security Act of 1947 (Public Law 80-
253).
    The committee believes that military operations in the 
information environment are traditional military activities and 
are essential contributors to military effectiveness in modern 
warfare. The committee thus sees military operations in the 
information environment as key to the National Defense Strategy 
and its implementation.

Extension of authorization for protection of certain facilities and 
        assets from unmanned aircraft (sec. 1682)

    The committee recommends a provision that would provide an 
extension of the authorization for protection of certain 
facilities and assets from unmanned aircraft.

Hard and deeply buried targets (sec. 1683)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to submit to the 
congressional defense committees a classified report on hard 
and deeply buried targets, including an estimate of the total 
number of high-value targets and an assessment of the current 
ability to hold such targets at risk using existing and 
projected U.S. nuclear and conventional capabilities. The 
provision would also require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop a plan to ensure that the United States is able to hold 
such targets at risk by 2025 and to certify annually that such 
plan is being implemented.

                       Items of Special Interest


Acquisition plan for Space Command and Control program

    The committee is concerned that the Space Command and 
Control program is more ambitious than its failed predecessor, 
the Joint Space Operations Center Mission System (JMS) program. 
The Space Command and Control program is software-intensive and 
intended to replace numerous legacy program requirements that 
the JMS failed to address. Due to the increased scope and 
ambition of the program, as well as the checkered history of 
previous program development, the committee believes that 
heightened oversight is required during the early phases of 
development.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to develop an acquisition strategy for the Space Command 
and Control program and provide a report on this strategy to 
the congressional defense committees, the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, and the Comptroller 
General of the United States no later than October 31, 2019.
    The report on the acquisition strategy shall include: (1) 
An acquisition schedule over the next future years defense 
program; (2) The requirements for each phase of acquisition, 
including critical management events; (3) A description of the 
structure of the program, including development, testing, 
production, integration, and life-cycle support for the 
program; (4) The metrics to be tracked and evaluated and the 
means and manner in which such metrics shall be reported, 
including any necessary software to be developed or acquired; 
and (5) The assignment of management and oversight 
responsibilities and authorities to ensure coordination and 
synchronization of development efforts across Air Force 
components; and (6) The amount of funds necessary to carry out 
the program across the future years defense program and a 
description of the contracting and business strategies to be 
implemented, including the integration of commercially 
available products.
    The committee notes the requirement for continued annual 
reports with reviews and reports by the Comptroller General of 
the United States is found elsewhere in this Act.

Addressing the Department of Defense's cyber red team vulnerabilities

    The committee recognizes the importance of crowdsourced 
security testing programs, such as Hack the Pentagon, that 
utilize technology platforms and ethical security researchers 
to test for cyber vulnerabilities within the Department of 
Defense (DOD). Third party security researchers could offer the 
DOD supplemental manpower and expertise needed to find cyber 
vulnerabilities in weapon platforms, databases of personally 
identifiable information, health data repositories, and other 
critical DOD systems in order to fix these vulnerabilities. The 
committee is aware that the Department funded a multi-year 
effort to enhance the