[Senate Report 116-236]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]


                                                    Calendar No. 483

116th Congress  }                                       {    Report
                               SENATE                 
2d Session      }                                       {   116-236
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     

                                                       

        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2021

                              R E P O R T

                         [TO ACCOMPANY S. 4049]

                                   ON

     TO AUTHORIZE APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2021 FOR MILITARY 
ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, FOR MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, AND 
   FOR DEFENSE ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, TO PRESCRIBE 
   MILITARY PERSONNEL STRENGTHS FOR SUCH FISCAL YEAR, AND FOR OTHER 
                                PURPOSES

                               ----------                              

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES
                          UNITED STATES SENATE









                 June 24, 2020.--Ordered to be printed
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 
                 

        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2021
        
        
        
        
        
        
                                                       Calendar No. 483
                                                       
        
116th Congress   }                                           {  Report
                               SENATE                          
2d Session       }                                           {  116-236
_______________________________________________________________________

                                     

                                                       
 
        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2021

                              R E P O R T

                         [TO ACCOMPANY S. 4049]

                                   ON

     TO AUTHORIZE APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2021 FOR MILITARY 
ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, FOR MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, AND 
   FOR DEFENSE ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, TO PRESCRIBE 
   MILITARY PERSONNEL STRENGTHS FOR SUCH FISCAL YEAR, AND FOR OTHER 
                                PURPOSES

                               __________

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES

                          UNITED STATES SENATE







                 June 24, 2020.--Ordered to be printed
                 
                 
                 
                 
                             ______                      


             U.S. GOVERNMENT PUBLISHING OFFICE 
 40-613               WASHINGTON : 2020 
 

  

                      COMMITTEE ON ARMED SERVICES

                  JAMES M. INHOFE, Oklahoma, Chairman
ROGER F. WICKER, Mississippi         JACK REED, Rhode Island
DEB FISCHER, Nebraska                JEANNE SHAHEEN, New Hampshire
TOM COTTON, Arkansas                 KIRSTEN E. GILLIBRAND, New York
MIKE ROUNDS, South Dakota            RICHARD BLUMENTHAL, Connecticut
JONI ERNST, Iowa                     MAZIE K. HIRONO, Hawaii
THOM TILLIS, North Carolina          TIM KAINE, Virginia
DAN SULLIVAN, Alaska                 ANGUS S. KING, Jr., Maine
DAVID PERDUE, Georgia                MARTIN HEINRICH, New Mexico
KEVIN CRAMER, North Dakota           ELIZABETH WARREN, Massachusetts
MARTHA McSALLY, Arizona              GARY C. PETERS, Michigan
RICK SCOTT, Florida                  JOE MANCHIN, West Virginia
MARSHA BLACKBURN, Tennessee          TAMMY DUCKWORTH, Illinois
JOSH HAWLEY, Missouri                DOUG JONES, Alabama
                    John A. Bonsell, Staff Director
               Elizabeth L. King, Minority Staff Director

                                  (II)

  
                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
REPORT TO ACCOMPANY S. 4049
Purpose of the Bill..............................................     1
Committee Overview...............................................     2
Budgetary Effects of This Act (Sec. 4)...........................     4
Summary of Discretionary Authorizations and Budget Authority 
  Implication....................................................     4
DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AUTHORIZATIONS.................     7
TITLE I--PROCUREMENT.............................................     7
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................     7
        Authorization of appropriations (sec. 101)...............     7
    Subtitle B--Army Programs....................................     7
        Integrated Air and Missile Defense assessment (sec. 111).     7
        Report and limitation on Integrated Visual Augmentation 
          System acquisition (sec. 112)..........................     7
        Modifications to requirement for an interim cruise 
          missile defense capability (sec. 113)..................     8
    Subtitle C--Navy Programs....................................     8
        Contract authority for Columbia-class submarine program 
          (sec. 121).............................................     8
        Limitation on Navy medium and large unmanned surface 
          vessels (sec. 122).....................................     9
        Extension of prohibition on availability of funds for 
          Navy waterborne security barriers (sec. 123)...........    10
        Procurement authorities for certain amphibious 
          shipbuilding programs (sec. 124).......................    10
        Fighter force structure acquisition strategy (sec. 125)..    10
        Treatment of weapon systems added by Congress in future 
          President's budget requests (sec. 126).................    11
        Report on carrier wing composition (sec. 127)............    11
        Report on strategy to use ALQ-249 Next Generation Jammer 
          to ensure full spectrum electromagnetic superiority 
          (sec. 128).............................................    12
    Subtitle D--Air Force Programs...............................    12
        Economic order quantity contracting authority for F-35 
          Joint Strike Fighter program (sec. 141)................    12
        Minimum aircraft levels for major mission areas (sec. 
          142)...................................................    12
        Minimum operational squadron level (sec. 143)............    13
        Minimum Air Force bomber aircraft level (sec. 144).......    13
        F-35 gun system (sec. 145)...............................    13
        Prohibition on funding for Close Air Support Integration 
          Group (sec. 146).......................................    14
        Limitation on divestment of KC-10 and KC-135 aircraft 
          (sec. 147).............................................    14
        Limitation on retirement of U-2 and RQ-4 aircraft (sec. 
          148)...................................................    14
        Limitation on divestment of F-15C aircraft in the 
          European theater (sec. 149)............................    14
        Air base defense development and acquisition strategy 
          (sec. 150).............................................    14
        Required solution for KC-46 aircraft remote visual system 
          limitations (sec. 151).................................    15
        Analysis of requirements and Advanced Battle Management 
          System capabilities (sec. 152).........................    15
        Studies on measures to assess cost-per-effect for key 
          mission areas (sec. 153)...............................    16
        Plan for operational test and utility evaluation of 
          systems for Low-Cost Attributable Aircraft Technology 
          program (sec. 154).....................................    16
        Prohibition on retirement or divestment of A-10 aircraft 
          (sec. 155).............................................    16
    Subtitle E--Defense-Wide, Joint, and Multiservice Matters....    16
        Budgeting for life-cycle cost of aircraft for the Navy, 
          Army, and Air Force: annual plan and certification 
          (sec. 171).............................................    16
        Authority to use F-35 aircraft withheld from delivery to 
          Government of Turkey (sec. 172)........................    17
        Transfer from Commander of United States Strategic 
          Command to Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff of 
          responsibilities and functions relating to 
          electromagnetic spectrum operations (sec. 173).........    17
        Cryptographic modernization schedules (sec. 174).........    18
        Prohibition on purchase of armed overwatch aircraft (sec. 
          175)...................................................    18
        Special Operations armed overwatch (sec. 176)............    18
        Autonomic Logistics Information System redesign strategy 
          (sec. 177).............................................    19
        Contract aviation services in a country or in airspace in 
          which a Special Federal Aviation Regulation applies 
          (sec. 178).............................................    19
        F-35 aircraft munitions (sec. 179).......................    19
        Airborne intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance 
          acquisition roadmap for United States Special 
          Operations Command (sec. 180)..........................    20
        Requirement to accelerate the fielding and development of 
          counter unmanned aerial system efforts across the Joint 
          Force (sec. 181).......................................    20
        Joint All-Domain Command and Control requirements (sec. 
          182)...................................................    21
    Budget Items.................................................    21
        Army.....................................................    21
            MQ-1.................................................    21
            CH-47 Cargo Helicopter Modifications.................    21
            Procurement of PAC-3 MSE missiles....................    22
            Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2......    22
            Armored Multi-Purpose Vehicle........................    22
            Bradley Program Modifications........................    23
            M88 Family of Vehicle Modification...................    23
            Joint Assault Bridge.................................    23
            Multi-Domain Task Force Tactical Network Technology..    23
            U.S. Africa Command force protection upgrades 
              transportable tactical command communications......    23
            Multi-Domain Task Force Tactical Command 
              Communications.....................................    24
            U.S. Africa Command force protection upgrades combat 
              communications.....................................    24
            Spider Anti-Personnel Munition.......................    24
            Multi-Domain Task Force Defensive Cyber Operations...    24
            U.S. Africa Command unfunded requirement force 
              protection upgrades long haul communications.......    25
            Multi-Domain Task Force Counterintelligence/Security 
              Countermeasures....................................    25
            U.S. Africa Command force protection upgrades 
              indirect fire protection...........................    25
            Multi-Domain Task Force Electronic Warfare Tools.....    26
            WMD Civil Support Team Equipping.....................    26
            U.S. Africa Command force protection upgrades 
              physical security systems..........................    26
            Expeditionary Solid Waste Disposal System............    26
        Navy.....................................................    27
            F-35C................................................    27
            F-35B................................................    27
            CH-53K...............................................    27
            CH-53 Advanced Procurement...........................    28
            MQ-4.................................................    28
            Marine Corps aviator body armor vest.................    28
            F-35B/C Spares.......................................    28
            Tomahawk.............................................    29
            LRASM................................................    29
            Surface ship torpedo defense.........................    29
            MK-54 torpedo modifications..........................    29
            Submarine supplier stability.........................    29
            Virginia-class submarines............................    30
            Virginia-class submarine advance procurement.........    30
            Arleigh Burke-class destroyers.......................    31
            Surface ship supplier stability......................    31
            LPD Flight II........................................    31
            LPD Flight II advance procurement....................    32
            LHA replacement amphibious assault ship..............    32
            Landing craft utility................................    32
            Outfitting...........................................    33
            Yard patrol craft....................................    33
            LCAC service life extension..........................    33
            Hybrid electric drive................................    33
            DDG modernization....................................    34
            LCS common mission module equipment..................    34
            LCS mine countermeasures mission modules.............    34
            LCS anti-submarine warfare mission modules...........    34
            Small and medium unmanned underwater vehicles........    34
            Surface electronic warfare improvement program.......    35
            Cooperative engagement capability....................    35
            Next generation surface search radar.................    35
            Sonobuoys............................................    35
            Ground-Based Anti-Ship Missile.......................    35
        Air Force................................................    36
            F-35A................................................    36
            MQ-9.................................................    36
            B-1..................................................    36
            B-1B.................................................    36
            F-16 Radar...........................................    37
            T-38 Ejection Seat...................................    37
            E-4B Survivable Super High Frequency program.........    37
            E-8 (JSTARS).........................................    37
            CV-22 ABSS...........................................    38
            F-35A initial spares.................................    38
            Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile (JASSM)........    38
            Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM).................    38
            Cobra Dane service life extension....................    38
            PDI: Mission Partner Environment (MPE) local 
              upgrades, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command................    39
            PDI: Mission Partner Environment (MPE) local 
              upgrades, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command................    39
            Energy efficient small shelters upgrades.............    39
        Defense Wide.............................................    40
            Joint Regional Security Stacks SIPR funding--
              Procurement........................................    40
            Terminal High Altitude Area Defense..................    40
            SM-3 IIA procurement.................................    40
            Armed Overwatch......................................    41
            DHC-8 combat loss replacement........................    41
            Aircraft maintenance support combat loss replacement.    41
            Special Operations Tactical Communication/Next 
              Generation Tactical Communications.................    42
            Multi-Mission Payload................................    42
            Syria exfiltration reconstitution....................    42
        Items of Special Interest................................    42
            A-10.................................................    42
            Active Protection Systems updated plans for M2 
              Bradley and Stryker combat vehicles................    43
            Advanced Battle Management System bridge report......    43
            Advanced combat search and rescue capability.........    43
            Air Force pilot training.............................    44
            Anti-ship missile development........................    44
            Army Radio Modernization.............................    45
            Assessment of Navy anti-submarine warfare training 
              targets............................................    45
            C-17 maintenance.....................................    46
            Comptroller General report on the Supervisor of 
              Shipbuilding.......................................    46
            Comptroller General review of Navy shipbuilding and 
              ship maintenance...................................    47
            Counter unmanned aircraft systems matters............    48
            DDG-51 destroyer multi-year procurement..............    49
            E-8 strategy.........................................    49
            E-8C modernization...................................    50
            Electronic warfare red team..........................    50
            F-35 basing requirements.............................    50
            Flame retardant vehicle soft armor and materiel......    51
            Future Vertical Lift long-term cost and schedule 
              assessment.........................................    51
            Guided missile frigate...............................    51
            HMMWV rollover mitigation............................    52
            Hospital ship modernization..........................    52
            Hybrid electric drive on Arleigh Burke-class 
              destroyers.........................................    52
            Improved Turbine Engine Program......................    53
            Integrated air and missile defense in the U.S. 
              Central Command area of responsibility.............    53
            Joint and service exercises..........................    54
            Joint electronic warfare training range..............    54
            Live-virtual-constructive and game-based training 
              environment training...............................    55
            M2 Bradley Fighting Vehicle program assessment.......    55
            Marine Corps integrated air and missile defense 
              capabilities.......................................    55
            Mission command systems..............................    56
            Mission planning and force structure for hypersonic 
              weapon systems.....................................    56
            Mk93 machine gun mount upgrade program...............    57
            Next-generation crypto key loader....................    57
            Pacific Air Force air base resiliency................    57
            Polymer based magazines..............................    58
            Preservation of Department of Defense historic 
              aircraft and spacecraft............................    58
            Report on availability of repair for aircraft parts..    59
            Report on Unmet ISR Requirements, RC-135 Integration, 
              and KC-135 Conversion..............................    59
            Requirements and budgeting for precisely geolocated 
              3D imagery.........................................    60
            Self-propelled lightweight howitzers.................    61
            Shoulder-launched munitions procurement strategy.....    61
            Specialization of carrier based squadrons............    61
            Tactical Combat Training System......................    62
            Tactical wheeled vehicle industrial base.............    62
            Tactical wheeled vehicle strategy....................    62
            Taser X-26 non-lethal conducted electrical weapon 
              upgrade............................................    63
            UH-60V Black Hawk conversions........................    64
            UH-72 Communications and Monitoring Systems..........    64
            Use of Navy and Marine Corps aircraft for NOBLE EAGLE    64
            USMC Aviator Body Armor Vest.........................    65
            Variable depth sonar systems.........................    65
TITLE II--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION............    67
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................    67
        Authorization of appropriations (sec. 201)...............    67
    Subtitle B--Program Requirements, Restrictions, and 
      Limitations................................................    67
        Designation and activities of senior officials for 
          critical technology areas supportive of the National 
          Defense Strategy (sec. 211)............................    67
        Governance of fifth-generation wireless networking in the 
          Department of Defense (sec. 212).......................    68
        Application of artificial intelligence to the defense 
          reform pillar of the National Defense Strategy (sec. 
          213)...................................................    69
        Extension of authorities to enhance innovation at 
          Department of Defense laboratories (sec. 214)..........    70
        Updates to Defense Quantum Information Science and 
          Technology Research and Development program (sec. 215).    70
        Program of part-time and term employment at Department of 
          Defense science and technology reinvention laboratories 
          of faculty and students from institutions of higher 
          education (sec. 216)...................................    70
        Improvements to Technology and National Security 
          Fellowship of Department of Defense (sec. 217).........    71
        Department of Defense research, development, and 
          deployment of technology to support water sustainment 
          (sec. 218).............................................    71
        Development and testing of hypersonic capabilities (sec. 
          219)...................................................    71
        Disclosure requirements for recipients of Department of 
          Defense research and development grants (sec. 220).....    72
    Subtitle C--Plans, Reports, and Other Matters................    72
        Assessment on United States national security emerging 
          biotechnology efforts and capabilities and comparison 
          with adversaries (sec. 231)............................    72
        Independent comparative analysis of efforts by China and 
          the United States to recruit and retain researchers in 
          national security-related fields (sec. 232)............    73
        Department of Defense demonstration of virtualized radio 
          access network and massive multiple input multiple 
          output radio arrays for fifth generation wireless 
          networking (sec. 233)..................................    74
        Independent technical review of Federal Communications 
          Commission Order 20-48 (sec. 234)......................    74
        Report on and limitation on expenditure of funds for 
          micro nuclear reactor programs (sec. 235)..............    75
        Modification to Test Resource Management Center strategic 
          plan reporting cycle and contents (sec. 236)...........    76
        Limitation on contract awards for certain unmanned 
          vessels (sec. 237).....................................    76
        Documentation relating to Advanced Battle Management 
          System (sec. 238)......................................    77
        Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery Test special 
          purpose adjunct to address computational thinking (sec. 
          239)...................................................    77
    Budget Items.................................................    77
        Army.....................................................    77
            Artificial Intelligence Human Performance 
              Optimization.......................................    77
            Increase in basic research, Army.....................    77
            Pandemic Vaccine Response............................    78
            Hybrid additive manufacturing........................    78
            Pathfinder Air Assault...............................    79
            Harnessing Emerging Research Opportunities to Empower 
              Soldiers Program...................................    79
            Metal-based display technologies.....................    79
            Pathfinder Airborne..................................    79
            Ground technology advanced manufacturing, materials, 
              and process technologies...........................    80
            Ground Combat Vehicle Platform Electrification.......    80
            Immersive virtual modeling and simulation techniques.    80
            Next Generation Combat Vehicle modeling and 
              simulation.........................................    81
            Backpackable communications intelligence system......    81
            Defense resiliency platform against extreme cold 
              weather............................................    81
            Multi-drone multi-sensor intelligence, surveillance, 
              and reconnaissance capability......................    82
            Quantum computing based materials optimization.......    82
            Composite artillery tube and propulsion prototyping..    82
            Counter Unmanned Aerial System threat research and 
              development........................................    82
            Counter unmanned aircraft systems research...........    83
            Coronavirus nanovaccine research.....................    83
            3D Advanced Manufacturing............................    83
            Cybersecurity for industrial control systems and 
              building automation................................    84
            Graphene applications for military engineering.......    84
            High performance computing modernization.............    84
            Carbon fiber and graphitic composites for Next 
              Generation Combat Vehicle program..................    85
            Cyber and connected vehicle innovation research......    85
            Small unit ground robotic capabilities...............    85
            Virtual Experimentations Enhancement.................    86
            Hyper velocity projectile extended range technologies    86
            Electromagnetic effects research to support long 
              range precision fires and air and missile defense 
              cross functional teams.............................    86
            Development and fielding of high energy laser 
              capabilities--Army.................................    86
            Hypersonic hot air tunnel test environment...........    87
            Future Long Range Assault Aircraft (FLRAA)...........    87
            Operational Fires program reduction, Army............    87
            Hypersonic program reduction, Army...................    87
            Joint Counter Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems Office.    88
            Counter Unmanned Aerial Systems for Special 
              Operations Forces..................................    88
            Counter small unmanned aircraft systems operational 
              demonstrations.....................................    89
            Next Generation Squad Weapon.........................    89
            Bradley and Stryker Active Protection Systems........    89
            Integrated Data Software Pilot Program...............    90
            Army cyber situational understanding capability......    90
            Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2......    91
            Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle...................    91
            Directed energy test and evaluation capabilities.....    91
            Precision Strike Missile.............................    92
            Guided Multiple-Launch Rocket System.................    92
            Advanced manufacturing technologies..................    92
        Navy.....................................................    93
            Defense University Research and Instrumentation 
              Program............................................    93
            Increase in basic research, Navy.....................    93
            Predictive modeling for undersea vehicles............    93
            Direct air capture and blue carbon removal technology 
              program............................................    94
            Electric propulsion for military craft and advanced 
              planning hulls.....................................    94
            Expeditionary unmanned systems launch and recovery...    94
            Testbed for autonomous ship systems..................    95
            Interdisciplinary Cybersecurity Research.............    95
            Humanoid robotics research...........................    95
            Social networks and computational social science.....    96
            Naval academic undersea vehicle research partnerships    96
            Thermoplastic materials..............................    96
            Mission planning advanced technology demonstration...    96
            Unmanned surface vessel development..................    97
            Advanced combat systems technology...................    98
            Surface and shallow water mine countermeasures.......    98
            Advanced submarine system development................    98
            Ship concept advanced design.........................    98
            Large Surface Combatant preliminary design...........    99
            Littoral Combat Ship.................................    99
            LCS mission modules..................................    99
            Conventional munitions...............................    99
            Surface Navy Laser Weapon System.....................   100
            Large unmanned undersea vehicles.....................   100
            Advanced undersea prototyping........................   100
            Hypersonic program reduction, Navy...................   100
            Conventional prompt strike...........................   101
            Submarine tactical warfare systems...................   101
            Advanced degaussing..................................   101
            Lightweight torpedo development......................   102
            Submarine acoustic warfare development...............   102
            Integrated surveillance system.......................   102
            LCAC composite component development.................   102
            G/ATOR demonstration.................................   103
            Attack and utility replacement aircraft vehicle......   103
            Cyber tool development...............................   103
        Air Force................................................   104
            Increase in basic research, Air Force................   104
            High Energy Synchrotron X-Ray program................   104
            Materials maturation for high mach systems...........   105
            Metals Affordability Initiative......................   105
            Qualification of additive manufacturing processes....   105
            Technologies to repair fasteners.....................   106
            Hypersonic materials.................................   106
            Golden Horde Vanguard program reductions.............   106
            Fixed-wing improvements..............................   106
            AETP/NGAP............................................   107
            Directed energy counter-Unmanned Aerial Systems 
              (CUAS).............................................   107
            Advanced Hypersonic Air-breathing Weapon.............   107
            KC-135 operational energy increases..................   107
            Polar communications.................................   108
            Low-Cost Attritable Aircraft Technology..............   108
            Long Endurance UAS...................................   108
            Rapid repair of high performance materials...........   109
            Small satellites.....................................   109
            Air Force Open Systems Integration...................   109
            SLATE/VR Training....................................   109
            Gulf Test Range modernization........................   110
            Enterprise Resource Planning Common Services.........   110
            Advanced Air to Air capability.......................   110
            Air Force Integrated Personnel and Pay System........   110
            B-1B Squadrons.......................................   110
            PDI: Mission Partner Environment (MPE) local 
              upgrades, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command................   111
            C-17 microvanes......................................   111
            Logistics Information Technology.....................   111
            Small satellite mission operations center............   111
            GPS User Equipment...................................   112
            National Security Space Launch technology development   112
            Cobra Dane service life extension....................   112
            Commercial space domain awareness....................   112
            Global Positioning System III--Operational Control 
              Segment............................................   113
        Defense Wide.............................................   113
            Defense Established Program to Stimulate Competitive 
              Research...........................................   113
            Minerva Research Initiative..........................   113
            Traumatic brain injury medical research..............   114
            Aerospace, education, research, and innovation 
              activities.........................................   114
            Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority 
              Institutions.......................................   115
            Emerging biotech research............................   115
            Operational Fires program reduction, Defense-wide....   115
            Hypersonic program reduction.........................   115
            Stratospheric balloon research.......................   116
            Rapid prototyping using digital manufacturing........   116
            Defense supply chain technologies....................   116
            Steel Performance Initiative.........................   117
            Network-Centric Warfare Technology program reduction.   117
            Operational Energy Capability Improvements...........   117
            Funding for long-duration demonstration initiative 
              and joint program..................................   117
            Advanced technologies................................   118
            Defense Modernization and Prototyping program 
              reduction..........................................   118
            Homeland Defense Radar-Hawaii........................   118
            Next Generation Interceptor..........................   118
            PDI: Guam Defense System.............................   119
            Hypersonic and Ballistic Tracking and Custody Layer..   120
            Hybrid space.........................................   120
            Hypersonic and Ballistic Tracking Space Sensor.......   120
            Stryker Nuclear Biological Chemical Reconnaissance 
              Vehicle Sensor Suite Upgrade.......................   121
            Infrastructure to assess counter-small UAS commercial 
              solutions..........................................   121
            Telemetry range extension wave glider relay..........   122
            National Academies study on comparison of talent 
              programs...........................................   122
            Defense Technical Information Center.................   122
            Advanced machine tool research.......................   123
            Cold spray manufacturing technologies................   123
            Domestic organic light emitting diode manufacturing..   123
            Implementation of radar supplier resiliency plan.....   124
            Manufacturing for reuse of NdFeB magnets.............   124
            Submarine Construction Workforce Training Pipeline...   124
            Workforce transformation cyber initiative pilot 
              program............................................   125
            Cyber orchestration pilot............................   125
            Joint Regional Security Stacks SIPR funding--RDT&E...   125
            Multi-Mission Payload................................   126
            Advanced satellite navigation receiver...............   126
            Joint Test and Evaluation Program....................   126
        Items of Special Interest................................   127
            Advanced powertrain demonstrator.....................   127
            Anti-corrosion and nano technologies.................   127
            Artificial intelligence and machine learning 
              technologies and systems...........................   127
            Carbon fiber and graphitic foam for Special 
              Operations Forces tactical vehicles................   128
            Carbon fiber wheels and graphitic foam for Next 
              Generation Combat Vehicle..........................   129
            Close Combat Lethality Task Force....................   130
            Collaboration on research to counter foreign malign 
              influence operations...............................   131
            Comptroller General review of Artificial Intelligence 
              Activities of the Department of Defense............   131
            Cyber Operations for Base Resilient Architecture.....   132
            Emerging biotechnology for national security.........   132
            Ground Vehicle Systems Center modeling and simulation   133
            High-energy laser weapons systems....................   133
            Implement National Academics of Science Army 
              Information Science report recommendations.........   133
            Joint Artificial Intelligence Center reporting 
              structure..........................................   134
            Nanotechnology research..............................   134
            National Guard research, development, test and 
              evaluation activities..............................   135
            National Security Innovation Network.................   135
            Open Systems Architecture for the Army's Future 
              Vertical Lift programs.............................   136
            Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle requirements and 
              acquisition strategy...............................   136
            Pandemic resilience technologies.....................   137
            Predictive maintenance algorithm.....................   137
            Reimbursable work at Army Combat Capabilities 
              Development Command laboratories and engineering 
              centers............................................   137
            Review of barriers to innovation.....................   138
            Soldier Enhancement Program..........................   139
            Strategic Capabilities Office activities.............   139
            Ultra-compact hyperspectral imagery..................   139
            Unmanned Aerial Systems in Great Power Competition...   140
TITLE III--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE.............................   141
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations..................   141
        Authorization of appropriations (sec. 301)...............   141
    Subtitle B--Energy and Environment...........................   141
        Modifications and technical corrections to ensure 
          restoration of contamination by perfluorooctane 
          sulfonate and perfluorooctanoic acid (sec. 311)........   141
        Readiness and Environmental Protection Integration 
          Program technical edits and clarification (sec. 312)...   141
        Survey and market research of technologies for phase out 
          by Department of Defense of use of fluorinated aqueous 
          film-forming foam (sec. 313)...........................   141
        Modification of authority to carry out military 
          installation resilience projects (sec. 314)............   142
        Native American Indian lands environmental mitigation 
          program (sec. 315).....................................   142
        Energy resilience and energy security measures on 
          military installations (sec. 316)......................   142
        Modification to availability of energy cost savings for 
          Department of Defense (sec. 317).......................   142
        Long-duration demonstration initiative and joint program 
          (sec. 318).............................................   142
        Pilot program on alternative fuel vehicle purchasing 
          (sec. 319).............................................   142
    Subtitle C--Logistics and Sustainment........................   143
        Repeal of statutory requirement for notification to 
          Director of Defense Logistics Agency three years prior 
          to implementing changes to any uniform or uniform 
          component (sec. 331)...................................   143
        Clarification of limitation on length of overseas forward 
          deployment of currently deployed naval vessels (sec. 
          332)...................................................
    Subtitle D--Reports..........................................   143
        Report on impact of permafrost thaw on infrastructure, 
          facilities, and operations of the Department of Defense 
          (sec. 351).............................................   143
        Plans and reports on emergency response training for 
          military installations (sec. 352)......................   143
        Report on implementation by Department of Defense of 
          requirements relating to renewable fuel pumps (sec. 
          353)...................................................   143
        Report on effects of extreme weather on Department of 
          Defense (sec. 354).....................................   144
    Subtitle E--Other Matters....................................   144
        Prohibition on divestiture of manned intelligence, 
          surveillance, and reconnaissance aircraft operated by 
          United States Special Operations Command (sec. 371)....   144
        Information on overseas construction projects in support 
          of contingency operations using funds for operation and 
          maintenance (sec. 372).................................   144
        Provision of protection to the National Museum of the 
          Marine Corps, the National Museum of the United States 
          Army, the National Museum of the United States Navy, 
          and the National Museum of the United States Air Force 
          (sec. 373).............................................   145
        Inapplicability of congressional notification and dollar 
          limitation requirements for advanced billings for 
          certain background investigations (sec. 374)...........   146
        Repeal of sunset for minimum annual purchase amount for 
          carriers participating in the Civil Reserve Air Fleet 
          (sec. 375).............................................   146
        Improvement of the Operational Energy Capability 
          Improvement Fund of the Department of Defense (sec. 
          376)...................................................   146
        Commission on the naming of items of the Department of 
          Defense that commemorate the Confederate States of 
          America or any person who served voluntarily with the 
          Confederate States of America. (sec. 377)..............   147
        Modifications to review of proposed actions by Military 
          Aviation and Installation Assurance Clearinghouse (sec. 
          378)...................................................   147
        Adjustment in availability of appropriations for unusual 
          cost overruns and for changes in scope of work (sec. 
          379)...................................................   147
        Requirement that Secretary of Defense implement security 
          and emergency response recommendations relating to 
          active shooter or terrorist attacks on installations of 
          Department of Defense (sec. 380).......................   147
        Clarification of food ingredient requirements for food or 
          beverages provided by the Department of Defense (sec. 
          381)...................................................   147
    Budget Items.................................................   148
        Joint Counter-Unmanned Aerial Systems initial operating 
          capability acceleration................................   148
        Child Development Center playground equipment and 
          furniture increases....................................   148
        Child Youth Service improvements.........................   148
        Army Facilities, Sustainment, Restoration, and 
          Modernization increase.................................   149
        EUCOM and INDOPACOM Multi-Domain Task Force increases....   149
        Revitalization of Army deployment infrastructure.........   150
        U.S. Africa Command force protection upgrades personnel 
          recovery/casualty evacuation...........................   150
        U.S. Africa Command intelligence, surveillance, and 
          reconnaissance.........................................   150
        United States Africa Command personnel recovery, casualty 
          evacuation, and trauma care............................   150
        United States Cyber Command Access and operations........   151
        Service-wide transportation..............................   151
        Other personnel support..................................   151
        Servicewomen's commemorative partnerships................   151
        Pilot program on the remote provision by the National 
          Guard for cybersecurity................................   152
        PDI: Asia Pacific Regional Initiative, U.S. Indo-Pacific 
          Command................................................   152
        PDI: Joint Task Force Indo-Pacific, U.S. Indo-Pacific 
          Command................................................   152
        PDI: Counterterrorism Information Facility in Singapore, 
          U.S. Indo-Pacific Command..............................   153
        PDI: Countering Chinese malign influence, U.S. Indo-
          Pacific Command........................................   153
        USNS Mercy MTF improvements..............................   153
        Energy Security Programs Office..........................   154
        A-10 Aircraft............................................   154
        Air Force Facilities Sustainment, Restoration, and 
          Modernization increases................................   154
        Transfer to OCO..........................................   155
        Slowing Air Force KC-135 and KC-10 tanker fleet 
          divestment.............................................   155
        PDI: Mission Partner Environment (MPE) local upgrades, 
          U.S. Indo-Pacific Command..............................   155
        Hunt Forward missions....................................   156
        Securing the Department of Defense Information Network...   156
        Air Force marketing reduction............................   156
        COVID-related throughput decrease........................   157
        Syria exfiltration reconstitution........................   157
        Contractor logistics support.............................   157
        U.S. Special Operations Command flying hours.............   158
        Innovative Readiness Training increase...................   158
        Starbase.................................................   159
        Defense Contract Management Agency.......................   159
        DWR restore: Congressional oversight.....................   159
        Joint Regional Security Stacks SIPR funding - O&M........   160
        DWR restore: blankets for homeless program...............   160
        Defense Institute of International Legal Studies.........   160
        Institute for Security Governance........................   161
        PDI: Indo-Pacific Maritime Security Initiative...........   161
        PDI: Indo-Pacific Maritime Security Initiative...........   162
        Staffing of Department of Defense Education Activity 
          schools................................................   163
        Impact aid...............................................   163
        Defense Community Infrastructure Program.................   163
        National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence..   163
        Bien Hoa dioxin cleanup..................................   164
        Energy Resilience Readiness Exercises....................   164
        Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nation-wide 
          human health assessment................................   164
        Funding for commission relating to Confederate symbols...   164
        Cooperative program for Vietnam personnel MIA............   165
        DWR restore: Congressional background investigations.....   165
        Energy performance contracts.............................   165
        Personnel in the Office of Assistant Secretary of Defense 
          Sustainment and Environment, Safety, and Occupational 
          Health.................................................   165
        Improvement of occupational license portability for 
          military spouses through interstate compacts...........   166
        National Cyber Director independent study funding........   166
        Readiness and Environmental Protection Initiative........   166
        DWR restore: support to commissions......................   167
        Biological Threat Reduction Program......................   167
        Acquisition Workforce Development Account................   167
        Operation and maintenance adjustments....................   167
        Bulk fuel adjustment.....................................   168
        Foreign currency adjustment..............................   168
    Items of Special Interest....................................   168
        Adversary air............................................   168
        Air Force aerospace ground equipment.....................   169
        Air Force Reserve runway infrastructure..................   169
        Air Force Special Operations Command total force 
          utilization............................................   170
        Assessment of potential transfer of real property, 
          equipment and facilities in the Assembled Chemical 
          Weapons Alternative Program............................   171
        Backup power technology..................................   171
        Briefing on contested logistics in support of the 
          National Defense Strategy..............................   171
        Briefing on microturbine technology for military 
          applications...........................................   172
        Cold spray applications for Department of Defense 
          sustainment and medical activities.....................   172
        Consideration for local broadcasting and traditional 
          media for Department of Defense advertising............   173
        Consideration of variable refrigerant flow systems.......   173
        Defense Personal Property Program........................   173
        Defense Personal Property Program........................   174
        Defense Readiness Reporting Reform briefing..............   175
        Diverse training for special operations forces...........   175
        Eastern Gulf Test and Training Range (EGTTR).............   176
        Electronic component failures............................   176
        Emerging viral threats...................................   177
        Engine optimization initiatives at Tinker Air Force Base.   177
        Improving depot best practice sharing....................   178
        Informing War Plans Through Accurate War Gaming..........   179
        Infrared uniform management..............................   179
        Installation energy......................................   180
        Installation Utility and Energy Authority Integration....   180
        Joint Military Information Support Operations WebOps 
          Center.................................................   181
        Military Munitions Response Program......................   181
        Military working dogs Comptroller General review.........   181
        National all-domain warfighting center...................   182
        Naval expeditionary sustainment and repair...............   182
        Navy Converged Enterprise Resource Planning..............   183
        Navy shipyard infrastructure optimization................   183
        Partnerships with industrial base for hypersonic and 
          directed energy programs...............................   184
        Preservation of the Force and Families program...........   184
        Readiness and Environmental Protection Integration 
          program................................................   185
        Red Hill.................................................   185
        Report on Department of Defense small arms training 
          system capabilities....................................   186
        Software to automate manufacturing.......................   186
        Utilities privatization..................................   187
        Water and energy infrastructure..........................   188
TITLE IV--MILITARY PERSONNEL AUTHORIZATIONS......................   189
    Subtitle A--Active Forces....................................   189
        End strengths for active forces (sec. 401)...............   189
        End strength level matters (sec. 402)....................   190
    Subtitle B--Reserve Forces...................................   190
        End strengths for Selected Reserve (sec. 411)............   190
        End strengths for Reserves on active duty in support of 
          the reserves (sec. 412)................................   190
        End strengths for military technicians (dual status) 
          (sec. 413).............................................   191
        Maximum number of reserve personnel authorized to be on 
          active duty for operational support (sec. 414).........   191
        Separate authorization by Congress of minimum end 
          strengths for non-temporary military technicians (dual 
          status) and maximum end strengths for temporary 
          military technicians (dual status) (sec. 415)..........   191
    Subtitle C--Authorization of Appropriations..................   192
        Military personnel (sec. 421)............................   192
    Budget Items.................................................   192
        Military personnel funding changes.......................   192
Title V--Military Personnel Policy...............................   193
    Subtitle A--Officer Personnel Policy.........................   193
        Repeal of codified specification of authorized strengths 
          of certain commissioned officers on active duty (sec. 
          501)...................................................   193
        Temporary expansion of availability of enhanced 
          constructive service credit in a particular career 
          field upon original appointment as a commissioned 
          officer (sec. 502).....................................   193
        Requirement for promotion selection board recommendation 
          of higher placement on promotion list of officers of 
          particular merit (sec. 503)............................   194
        Special selection review boards for review of promotion 
          of officers subject to adverse information identified 
          after recommendation for promotion and related matters 
          (sec. 504).............................................   194
        Number of opportunities for consideration for promotion 
          under alternative promotion authority (sec. 505).......   195
        Mandatory retirement for age (sec. 506)..................   195
        Clarifying and improving restatement of rules on the 
          retired grade of commissioned officers (sec. 507)......   195
        Repeal of authority for original appointment of regular 
          Navy officers designated for engineering duty, 
          aeronautical engineering duty, and special duty (sec. 
          508)...................................................   196
    Subtitle B--Reserve Component Management.....................   197
        Exclusion of certain reserve general and flag officers on 
          active duty from limitations on authorized strengths 
          (sec. 511).............................................   197
    Subtitle C--General Service Authorities......................   197
        Increased access to potential recruits (sec. 516)........   197
        Temporary authority to order retired members to active 
          duty in high-demand, low-density assignments during war 
          or national emergency (sec. 517).......................   198
        Certificate of release or discharge from Active Duty (DD 
          Form 214) matters (sec. 518)...........................   198
        Evaluation of barriers to minority participation in 
          certain units of the Armed Forces (sec. 519)...........   198
    Subtitle D--Military Justice and Related Matters.............   198
        Part I--Investigation, Prosecution, and Defense of Sexual 
          Assault and Related Matters............................   198
            Modification of time required for expedited decisions 
              in connection with applications for change of 
              station or unit transfer of members who are victims 
              of sexual assault or related offenses (sec. 521)...   198
            Defense Advisory Committee for the Prevention of 
              Sexual Misconduct (sec. 522).......................   199
            Report on ability of Sexual Assault Response 
              Coordinators and Sexual Assault Prevention and 
              Response Victim Advocates to perform duties (sec. 
              523)...............................................   199
            Briefing on Special Victims' Counsel program (sec. 
              524)...............................................   199
            Accountability of leadership of the Department of 
              Defense for discharging the sexual harassment 
              policies and programs of the Department (sec. 525).   199
            Safe-to-report policy applicable across the Armed 
              Forces (sec. 526)..................................   199
            Additional bases for provision of advice by the 
              Defense Advisory Committee for the Prevention of 
              Sexual Misconduct (sec. 527).......................   200
            Additional matters for reports of the Defense 
              Advisory Committee for the Prevention of Sexual 
              Misconduct (sec. 528)..............................   200
            Policy on separation of victim and accused at 
              military service academies and degree-granting 
              military educational institutions (sec. 529).......   200
            Briefing on placement of members of the Armed Forces 
              in academic status who are victims of sexual 
              assault onto Non-Rated Periods (sec. 530)..........   200
        Part II--Other Military Justice Matters..................   200
            Right to notice of victims of offenses under the 
              Uniform Code of Military Justice regarding certain 
              post-trial motions, filings, and hearings (sec. 
              531)...............................................   200
        Consideration of the evidence by Courts of Criminal 
          Appeals (sec. 532).....................................   201
        Preservation of records of the military justice system 
          (sec. 533).............................................   201
        Comptroller General of the United States report on 
          implementation by the Armed Forces of recent GAO 
          recommendations and statutory requirements on 
          assessment of racial, ethnic, and gender disparities in 
          the military justice system (sec. 534).................   201
        Briefing on mental health support for vicarious trauma 
          for certain personnel in the military justice system 
          (sec. 535).............................................   201
        Guardian ad litem program for minor dependents of members 
          of the Armed Forces (sec. 536).........................   202
    Subtitle E--Member Education, Training, Transition, and 
      Resilience.................................................   202
        Training on religious accommodation for members of the 
          Armed Forces (sec. 541)................................   202
        Additional elements with 2021 certifications on the 
          Ready, Relevant Learning initiative of the Navy (sec. 
          542)...................................................   202
        Report on standardization and potential merger of law 
          enforcement training for military and civilian 
          personnel across the Department of Defense (sec. 543)..   202
        Quarterly Report on Implementation of the Comprehensive 
          Review of Special Operations Forces Culture and Ethics 
          (sec. 544).............................................   202
        Information on nominations and applications for military 
          service academies (sec. 545)...........................   203
        Pilot programs in connection with Senior Reserve 
          Officers' Training Corps units at Historically Black 
          Colleges and Universities and minority institutions 
          (sec. 546).............................................   203
        Expansion of Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps 
          program (sec. 547).....................................   203
        Department of Defense STARBASE program (sec. 548)........   204
    Subtitle F--Decorations and Awards...........................   204
        Award or presentation of decorations favorably 
          recommended following determination on merits of 
          proposals for decorations not previously submitted in a 
          timely fashion (sec. 551)..............................   204
        Honorary promotion matters (sec. 552)....................   204
    Subtitle G--Defense Dependents' Education and Military Family 
      Readiness Matters..........................................   204
        Part I--Defense Dependents' Education Matters............   204
            Continuation of authority to assist local educational 
              agencies that benefit dependents of members of the 
              Armed Forces and Department of Defense civilian 
              employees (sec. 561)...............................   204
            Impact aid for children with severe disabilities 
              (sec. 562).........................................   205
            Staffing of Department of Defense Education Activity 
              schools to maintain maximum student-to-teacher 
              ratios (sec. 563)..................................   205
            Matters in connection with free appropriate public 
              education for dependents of members of the Armed 
              Forces with special needs (sec. 564)...............   206
            Pilot program on expanded eligibility for Department 
              of Defense Education Activity Virtual High School 
              program (sec. 565).................................   206
            Pilot program on expansion of eligibility for 
              enrollment at domestic dependent elementary and 
              secondary schools (sec. 566).......................   206
            Comptroller General of the United States report on 
              the structural condition of Department of Defense 
              Education Activity schools (sec. 567)..............   207
        Part II--Military Family Readiness Matters...............   207
            Responsibility for allocation of certain funds for 
              military child development programs (sec. 571).....   207
            Improvements to Exceptional Family Member Program 
              (sec. 572).........................................   207
            Procedures of the Office of Special Needs for the 
              development of individualized services plans for 
              military families with special needs (sec. 573)....   208
            Restatement and clarification of authority to 
              reimburse members for spouse relicensing costs 
              pursuant to a permanent change of station (sec. 
              574)...............................................   208
            Improvements to Department of Defense tracking of and 
              response to incidents of child abuse involving 
              military dependents on military installations (sec. 
              575)...............................................   208
            Military child care and child development center 
              matters (sec. 576).................................   208
            Expansion of financial assistance under My Career 
              Advancement Account program (sec. 577).............   209
    Subtitle H--Other Matters....................................   209
        Removal of personally identifying and other information 
          of certain persons from investigative reports, the 
          Department of Defense Central Index of Investigations, 
          and other records and databases (sec. 586).............   209
        National emergency exception for timing requirements with 
          respect to certain surveys of members of the Armed 
          Forces (sec. 587)......................................   209
        Sunset and transfer of functions of the Physical 
          Disability Board of Review (sec. 588)..................   210
        Extension of reporting deadline for the annual report on 
          the assessment of the effectiveness of activities of 
          the federal voting assistance program (sec. 589).......   210
        Pilot programs on remote provision by National Guard to 
          State governments and National Guards in other States 
          of cybersecurity technical assistance in training, 
          preparation, and response to cyber incidents (sec. 590)   210
        Plan on performance of funeral honors details by members 
          of other Armed Forces when members of the Armed Force 
          of the deceased are unavailable (sec. 591).............   211
        Limitation on implementation of Army Combat Fitness Test 
          (sec. 592).............................................   211
    Items of Special Interest....................................   211
        Air Force Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps Flight 
          Academy................................................   211
        Air Ground Operations Wings..............................   212
        Ban on unsafe products at Department of Defense Child 
          Development Centers....................................   212
        Briefing on current efforts to reduce non-essential 
          training...............................................   213
        Comptroller General report on the dual status military 
          technician workforce...................................   213
        Comptroller General review on Department of Defense's 
          accreditation of confinement and other detention 
          facilities.............................................   214
        Grade of Director of the Joint Artificial Intelligence 
          Center.................................................   214
        Interagency cooperation impacting recruiting.............   215
        Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps computer science 
          and cybersecurity education............................   215
        Mental health discrimination during accession............   215
        Military Family Readiness and Command Climate Surveys....   216
        Plan for enhancement of recruitment for the Armed Forces 
          among rural, isolated, and native populations..........   216
        Senior officer accountability and use of "proximate 
          cause" standard........................................   217
        Status of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Culture and Process 
          Improvement Program....................................   217
        Supporting innovations for 21st century servicemember and 
          family readiness and resiliency........................   218
        The Veterans Metrics Initiative Study....................   219
TITLE VI--COMPENSATION AND OTHER PERSONNEL BENEFITS..............   221
    Subtitle A--Pay and Allowances...............................   221
        Reorganization of certain allowances other than travel 
          and transportation allowances (sec. 601)...............   221
        Hazardous duty pay for members of the Armed Forces 
          performing duty in response to the Coronavirus Disease 
          2019 (sec. 602)........................................   221
    Subtitle B--Bonuses and Special and Incentive Pays...........   221
        One-year extension of certain expiring bonus and special 
          pay authorities (sec. 611).............................   221
        Increase in special and incentive pays for officers in 
          health professions (sec. 612)..........................   221
    Subtitle C--Disability Pay, Retired Pay, and Survivor 
      Benefits...................................................   222
        Inclusion of drill or training foregone due to emergency 
          travel or duty restrictions in computations of 
          entitlement to and amounts of retired pay for non-
          regular service (sec. 621).............................   222
        Modernization and clarification of payment of certain 
          Reserves while on duty (sec. 622)......................   222
    Subtitle D--Other Matters....................................   222
        Permanent authority for and enhancement of the Government 
          lodging program (sec. 631).............................   222
        Approval of certain activities by retired and reserve 
          members of the uniformed services (sec. 632)...........   223
    Items of Special Interest....................................   223
        Commissary and Exchange loyalty programs.................   223
        Comptroller General report on the impact of reforms in 
          the defense commissary system..........................   223
        Operation of commissaries during government shutdowns....   224
        Special operations special and incentive pay.............   224
TITLE VII--HEALTH CARE PROVISIONS................................   225
    Subtitle A--Tricare and Other Health Care Benefits...........   225
        Authority for Secretary of Defense to manage provider 
          type referral and supervision requirements under 
          TRICARE program (sec. 701).............................   225
        Removal of Christian Science providers as authorized 
          providers under the TRICARE Program (sec. 702).........   225
        Waiver of fees charged to certain civilians for emergency 
          medical treatment provided at military medical 
          treatment facilities (sec. 703)........................   225
        Mental health resources for members of the Armed Forces 
          and their dependents during the COVID-19 pandemic (sec. 
          704)...................................................   226
        Transitional health benefits for certain members of the 
          National Guard serving under orders in response to the 
          coronavirus (COVID-19) (sec. 705)......................   226
        Extramedical maternal health providers demonstration 
          project (sec. 706).....................................   226
        Pilot program on receipt of non-generic prescription 
          maintenance medications under TRICARE pharmacy benefits 
          program (sec. 707).....................................   226
    Subtitle B--Health Care Administration.......................   227
        Modifications to transfer of Army Medical Research and 
          Development Command and public health commands to 
          Defense Health Agency (sec. 721).......................   227
        Delay of applicability of administration of TRICARE 
          dental plans through Federal Employees Dental and 
          Vision Insurance Program (sec. 722)....................   227
        Authority of Secretary of Defense to waive requirements 
          during national emergencies for purposes of provision 
          of health care (sec. 723)..............................   227
    Subtitle C--Reports and Other Matters........................   228
        Extension of authority for Joint Department of Defense-
          Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility 
          Demonstration Fund (sec. 741)..........................   228
        Membership of Board of Regents of Uniformed Services 
          University of the Health Sciences (sec. 742)...........   228
        Military health system Clinical Quality Management 
          Program (sec. 743).....................................   228
        Modifications to pilot program on civilian and military 
          partnerships to enhance interoperability and medical 
          surge capability and capacity of National Disaster 
          Medical System (sec. 744)..............................   228
        Study on force mix options and service models to enhance 
          readiness of medical force of the Armed Forces to 
          provide combat casualty care (sec. 745)................   229
        Comptroller General study on delivery of mental health 
          services to members of the reserve components of the 
          Armed Forces (sec. 746)................................   229
        Review and report on prevention of suicide among members 
          of the Armed Forces stationed at remote installations 
          outside the contiguous United States (sec. 747)........   230
        Audit of medical conditions of tenants in privatized 
          military housing (sec. 748)............................   230
        Comptroller General study on prenatal and postpartum 
          mental health conditions among members of the Armed 
          Forces and their dependents (sec. 749).................   230
        Plan for evaluation of flexible spending account options 
          for members of the uniformed services and their 
          families (sec. 750)....................................   230
        Assessment of receipt by civilians of emergency medical 
          treatment at military medical treatment facilities 
          (sec. 751).............................................   231
    Items of Special Interest....................................   231
        Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis research of the Department 
          of Defense.............................................   231
        Clinical performance management system...................   231
        Diagnostic medical devices for traumatic brain injury....   231
        Ensure eating disorder treatment for servicemembers and 
          dependents.............................................   232
        Improve academic collaboration and streamline traumatic 
          brain injury funding streams...........................   232
        Improvements to the TRICARE Extended Care Health Option 
          program................................................   233
        Military health clinical readiness.......................   233
        Modification of Post Deployment Health Assessment (DD 
          Form 2796) to increase reporting of exposure to burn 
          pit smoke..............................................   234
        Musculoskeletal injury prevention........................   234
        Rare cancer research and treatment.......................   234
        Remote health capabilities in the tactical environment...   235
        Status of pilot program to treat post-traumatic stress 
          disorder resulting from sexual trauma..................   235
        Substance abuse prevention...............................   236
        TBI medical research.....................................   236
        Telehealth and virtual health technology implementation..   236
        Traumatic brain injury treatment.........................   237
        TRICARE managed care support contract structure..........   237
TITLE VIII--ACQUISITION POLICY, ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT, AND 
  RELATED MATTERS................................................   238
    Subtitle A--Industrial Base Matters..........................   238
        Policy recommendations for implementation of Executive 
          Order 13806 (Assessing and Strengthening the 
          Manufacturing and Defense Industrial Base and Supply 
          Chain Resiliency) (sec. 801)...........................   238
        Assessment of national security innovation base (sec. 
          802)...................................................   238
        Improving implementation of policy pertaining to the 
          national technology and industrial base (sec. 803).....   239
        Modification of framework for modernizing acquisition 
          processes to ensure integrity of industrial base (sec. 
          804)...................................................   239
        Assessments of industrial base capabilities and capacity 
          (sec. 805).............................................   240
        Analyses of certain materials and technology sectors for 
          action to address sourcing and industrial capacity 
          (sec. 806).............................................   240
        Microelectronics manufacturing strategy (sec. 807).......   241
        Additional requirements pertaining to printed circuit 
          boards (sec. 808)......................................   242
        Statement of policy with respect to supply of strategic 
          minerals and metals for Department of Defense purposes 
          (sec. 809).............................................   243
        Report on strategic and critical minerals and metals 
          (sec. 810).............................................   243
        Stabilization of shipbuilding industrial base workforce 
          (sec. 811).............................................   243
        Miscellaneous limitations on the procurement of goods 
          other than United States goods (sec. 812)..............   243
        Use of domestically sourced star trackers in national 
          security satellites (sec. 813).........................   243
        Modification to small purchase threshold exception to 
          sourcing requirements for certain articles (sec. 814)..   244
    Subtitle B--Acquisition Policy and Management................   244
        Report on acquisition risk assessment and mitigation as 
          part of Adaptive Acquisition Framework implementation 
          (sec. 831).............................................   244
        Comptroller General report on implementation of software 
          acquisition reforms (sec. 832).........................   245
    Subtitle C--Amendments to General Contracting Authorities, 
      Procedures, and Limitations................................   245
        Authority to acquire innovative commercial products and 
          services using general solicitation competitive 
          procedures (sec. 841)..................................   245
        Truth in Negotiations Act threshold for Department of 
          Defense contracts (sec. 842)...........................   246
        Revision of proof required when using an evaluation 
          factor for defense contractors employing or 
          subcontracting with members of the selected reserve of 
          the reserve components of the Armed Forces (sec. 843)..   246
        Contract authority for advanced development of initial or 
          additional prototype units (sec. 844)..................   246
        Definition of business system deficiencies for contractor 
          business systems (sec. 845)............................   246
        Repeal of pilot program on payment of costs for denied 
          Government Accountability Office bid protests (sec. 
          846)...................................................   247
    Subtitle D--Provisions Relating to Major Defense Acquisition 
      Programs...................................................   247
        Implementation of Modular Open Systems Architecture 
          requirements (sec. 861)................................   247
        Sustainment reviews (sec. 862)...........................   247
        Recommendations for future direct selections (sec. 863)..   248
        Disclosures for certain shipbuilding major defense 
          acquisition program offers (sec. 864)..................   248
    Subtitle E--Small Business Matters...........................   248
        Prompt payment of contractors (sec. 871).................   248
        Extension of pilot program for streamlined awards for 
          innovative technology programs (sec. 872)..............   248
    Subtitle F--Provisions Related to Software-Driven 
      Capabilities...............................................   249
        Inclusion of software in government performance of 
          acquisition functions (sec. 881).......................   249
        Balancing security and innovation in software development 
          and acquisition (sec. 882).............................   249
        Comptroller General report on intellectual property 
          acquisition and licensing (sec. 883)...................   250
    Subtitle G--Other Matters....................................   250
        Safeguarding defense-sensitive United States intellectual 
          property, technology, and other data and information 
          (sec. 891).............................................   250
        Domestic comparative testing activities (sec. 892).......   251
        Repeal of apprenticeship program (sec. 893)..............   251
    Items of Special Interest....................................   251
        Army Combat Fitness Test equipment.......................   251
        Comptroller General review on the impact of small 
          business Federal contracting programs..................   252
        Contracting for non-traditional defense contractors......   253
        Development of domestic unmanned aircraft systems 
          industry...............................................   253
        Domestic procurement of military working dogs............   253
        Domestic sources for corrosion control chemicals.........   254
        Improving information available to contracting officials 
          regarding contractor workplace safety violations.......   254
        Procurement Technical Assistance Program and COVID-19....   255
        Report on battery supply chain security..................   255
        Report on satellite power sourcing.......................   256
        Risks associated with contractor ownership...............   256
        Secure sources of supply for rare earth elements.........   257
        Shipbuilding industrial base.............................   258
        Sustainment of munitions.................................   258
TITLE IX--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT......   261
    Subtitle A--Office of the Secretary of Defense and Related 
      Matters....................................................   261
        Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and 
          Low-Intensity Conflict and related matters (sec. 901)..   261
        Redesignation and codification in law of Office of 
          Economic Adjustment (sec. 902).........................   262
        Modernization of process used by the Department of 
          Defense to identify, task, and manage Congressional 
          reporting requirements (sec. 903)......................   262
        Inclusion of Vice Chief of the National Guard Bureau as 
          an advisor to the Joint Requirements Oversight Council 
          (sec. 904).............................................   263
        Assignment of Responsibility for the Arctic region within 
          the Office of the Secretary of Defense (sec. 905)......   263
    Subtitle B--Department of Defense Management Reform..........   263
        Termination of position of Chief Management Officer of 
          the Department of Defense (sec. 911)...................   263
        Report on assignment of responsibilities, duties, and 
          authorities of Chief Management Officer to other 
          officers or employees of the Department of Defense 
          (sec. 912).............................................   263
        Performance Improvement Officer of the Department of 
          Defense (sec. 913).....................................   264
        Assignment of certain responsibilities and duties to 
          particular officers of the Department of Defense (sec. 
          914)...................................................   264
        Assignment of responsibilities and duties of Chief 
          Management Officer to officers or employees of the 
          Department of Defense to be designated (sec. 915)......   265
        Definition of enterprise business operations for title 
          10, United States Code (sec. 916)......................   265
        Annual report on enterprise business operations of the 
          Department of Defense (sec. 917).......................   265
        Conforming amendments (sec. 918).........................   265
    Subtitle C--Space Force Matters..............................   265
        Part I--Amendments To Integrate the Space Force Into Law.   265
        Clarification of Space Force and Chief of Space 
          Operations authorities (sec. 931)......................   265
        Amendments to Department of the Air Force provisions in 
          title 10, United States Code (sec. 932)................   265
        Amendments to other provisions of title 10, United States 
          Code (sec. 933)........................................   266
        Amendments to provisions of law relating to pay and 
          allowances (sec. 934)..................................   266
        Amendments relating to provisions of law on veterans' 
          benefits (sec. 935)....................................   266
        Amendments to other provisions of the United States Code 
          (sec. 936).............................................   266
        Applicability to other provisions of law (sec. 937)......   266
        Part II--Other Matters...................................   266
            Matters relating to reserve components for the Space 
              Force (sec. 941)...................................   266
            Transfers of military and civilian personnel to the 
              Space Force (sec. 942).............................   267
            Limitation on transfer of military installations to 
              the jurisdiction of the Space Force (sec. 943).....   267
    Subtitle D--Organization and Management of Other Department 
      of Defense Offices and Elements............................   267
        Annual report on establishment of field operating 
          agencies (sec. 951)....................................   267
TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS......................................   269
    Subtitle A--Financial Matters................................   269
        General transfer authority (sec. 1001)...................   269
        Application of Financial Improvement and Audit 
          Remediation Plan to fiscal years following fiscal year 
          2020 (sec. 1002).......................................   269
    Subtitle B--Counterdrug Activities...........................   269
        Codification of authority for joint task forces of the 
          Department of Defense to support law enforcement 
          agencies conducting counterterrorism or counter-
          transnational organized crime activities (sec. 1011)...   269
    Subtitle C--Naval Vessels and Shipyards......................   269
        Modification of authority to purchase used vessels with 
          funds in the National Defense Sealift Fund (sec. 1021).   269
        Waiver during war or threat to national security of 
          restrictions on overhaul, repair, or maintenance of 
          vessels in foreign shipyards (sec. 1022)...............   270
        Modification of waiver authority on prohibition on use of 
          funds for retirement of certain legacy maritime mine 
          countermeasure platforms (sec. 1023)...................   270
        Extension of authority for reimbursement of expenses for 
          certain Navy mess operations afloat (sec. 1024)........   270
        Sense of Congress on actions necessary to achieve a 355-
          ship Navy (sec. 1025)..................................   270
    Subtitle D--Counterterrorism.................................   270
        Extension of prohibition on use of funds for transfer or 
          release of individuals detained at United States Naval 
          Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to the United States 
          (sec. 1031)............................................   270
        Extension of prohibition on use of funds to close or 
          relinquish control of United States Naval Station, 
          Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (sec. 1032).......................   271
        Extension of prohibition on use of funds for transfer or 
          release of individuals detained at United States Naval 
          Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, to certain countries 
          (sec. 1033)............................................   271
        Extension of prohibition on use of funds to construct or 
          modify facilities in the United States to house 
          detainees transferred from United States Naval Station, 
          Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (sec. 1034).......................   271
    Subtitle E--Miscellaneous Authorities and Limitations........   271
        Inclusion of disaster-related emergency preparedness 
          activities among law enforcement activities authorities 
          for sale or donation of excess personal property of the 
          Department of Defense (sec. 1041)......................   271
        Expenditure of funds for Department of Defense 
          clandestine activities that support operational 
          preparation of the environment (sec. 1042).............   272
        Clarification of authority of military commissions under 
          chapter 47A of title 10, United States Code, to punish 
          contempt (sec. 1043)...................................   272
        Prohibition on actions to infringe upon First Amendment 
          rights of peaceable assembly and petition for redress 
          of grievances (sec. 1044)..............................   272
        Arctic planning, research, and development (sec. 1045)...   272
        Consideration of security risks in certain 
          telecommunications architecture for future overseas 
          basing decisions of the Department of Defense (sec. 
          1046)..................................................   273
        Foreign military training programs (sec. 1047)...........   273
        Reporting of adverse events relating to consumer products 
          on military installations (sec. 1048)..................   273
        Inclusion of United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps among 
          youth and charitable organizations authorized to 
          receive assistance from the National Guard (sec. 1049).   273
        Department of Defense policy for the regulation of 
          dangerous dogs (sec. 1050).............................   273
        Sense of Congress on basing of KC-46A aircraft outside 
          the contiguous United States (sec. 1051)...............   273
    Subtitle F--Studies and Reports..............................   274
        Report on potential improvements to certain military 
          educational institutions of the Department of Defense 
          (sec. 1061)............................................   274
        Reports on status and modernization of the North Warning 
          System (sec. 1062).....................................   274
        Studies on the force structure for Marine Corps aviation 
          (sec. 1063)............................................   274
    Subtitle G--Other Matters....................................   274
        Department of Defense strategic Arctic ports (sec. 1081).   274
        Personal protective equipment matters (sec. 1082)........   275
        Estimate of damages from Federal Communications 
          Commission Order 20-48 (sec. 1083).....................   275
        Modernization effort (sec. 1084).........................   276
    Items of Special Interest....................................   276
        21st Century Integrated Digital Experience Act 
          implementation.........................................   276
        American Red Cross.......................................   276
        Comptroller General assessment of Defense Logistics 
          Agency disposal of surplus equipment...................   277
        COVID-19 and security forces relationships...............   277
        Demonstration of current Department of Defense budget and 
          program data visualization (sec.)......................   277
        Enabling congressional oversight of defense-wide agency 
          spending (sec. ).......................................   278
        Enhancing security cooperation...........................   279
        Incentives to promote Department of Defense audit 
          activities.............................................   279
        Intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance support...   280
        Inventory of systems integral to the Planning, 
          Programming, Budgeting, and Execution process (sec. )..   280
        Mission-based budgeting (sec. )..........................   280
        Presentation of defense budget materials by military 
          services...............................................   281
        Reciprocity of security clearances.......................   282
        Civilian casualties......................................   282
        United States Army High Containment Facility at Fort 
          Detrick................................................   283
        Update to Digital Modernization Strategy and investments 
          to improve resiliency in sustaining mission-essential 
          functions..............................................   284
        State Partnership Program foreign travel expenses........   285
        Strategic evaluation of the State Partnership Program....   285
TITLE XI--CIVILIAN PERSONNEL MATTERS.............................   287
    Subtitle A--Department of Defense Matters....................   287
        Enhanced pay authority for certain acquisition and 
          technology positions in the Department of Defense (sec. 
          1101)..................................................   287
        Enhanced pay authority for certain research and 
          technology positions in the science and technology 
          reinvention laboratories of the Department of Defense 
          (sec. 1102)............................................   287
        Extension of enhanced appointment and compensation 
          authority for civilian personnel for care and treatment 
          of wounded and injured members of the Armed Forces 
          (sec. 1103)............................................   287
        Extension of overtime rate authority for Department of 
          the Navy employees performing work aboard or dockside 
          in support of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier 
          forward deployed in Japan (sec. 1104)..................   287
        Expansion of direct hire authority for certain Department 
          of Defense personnel to include installation military 
          housing office positions supervising privatized 
          military housing (sec. 1105)...........................   288
        Extension of sunset of inapplicability of certification 
          of executive qualifications by qualification 
          certification review board of Office of Personnel 
          Management for initial appointments to Senior Executive 
          Service positions in Department of Defense (sec. 1106).   288
        Pilot program on enhanced pay authority for certain high-
          level management positions in the Department of Defense 
          (sec. 1107)............................................   288
        Pilot program on expanded authority for appointment of 
          recently-retired members of the Armed Forces to 
          positions in the Department of Defense (sec. 1108).....   288
        Direct hire authority and relocation incentives for 
          positions at remote locations (sec. 1109)..............   289
        Modification of direct hire authority for certain 
          personnel involved with Department of Defense 
          maintenance activities (sec. 1110).....................   289
        Fire Fighters Alternative Work Schedule demonstration 
          project for the Navy Region Mid-Atlantic Fire and 
          Emergency Services (sec. 1110A)........................   289
    Subtitle B--Government-Wide Matters..........................   289
        One-year extension of temporary authority to grant 
          allowances, benefits, and gratuities to civilian 
          personnel on official duty in a combat zone (sec. 1111)   289
        One-year extension of authority to waive annual 
          limitation on premium pay and aggregate limitation on 
          pay for Federal civilian employees working overseas 
          (sec. 1112)............................................   290
        Technical amendments to authority for reimbursement of 
          Federal, State, and local income taxes incurred during 
          travel, transportation, and relocation (sec. 1113).....   290
    Items of Special Interest....................................   290
        Classified ready workforce...............................   290
        Report prior to transfer of Defense Finance and 
          Accounting Service functions...........................   290
TITLE XII--MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS...................   293
    Subtitle A--Assistance and Training..........................   293
        Authority to build capacity for additional operations 
          (sec. 1201)............................................   293
        Authority to build capacity for air sovereignty 
          operations (sec. 1202).................................   293
        Modification to the Inter-European Air Forces Academy 
          (sec. 1203)............................................   294
        Modification to support of special operations for 
          irregular warfare (sec. 1204)..........................   294
        Extension and modification of authority to support border 
          security operations of certain foreign countries (sec. 
          1205)..................................................   294
        Modification of authority for participation in 
          multinational centers of excellence (sec. 1206)........   294
        Implementation of the Women, Peace, and Security Act of 
          2017 (sec. 1207).......................................   294
        Ted Stevens Center for Arctic Security Studies (sec. 
          1208)..................................................   294
        Functional Center for Security Studies in Irregular 
          Warfare (sec. 1209)....................................   295
    Subtitle B--Matters Relating to Afghanistan and Pakistan.....   295
        Extension and modification of authority for reimbursement 
          of certain coalition nations for support provided to 
          United States military operations (sec. 1211)..........   295
        Extension and modification of Commanders' Emergency 
          Response Program (sec. 1212)...........................   295
        Extension and modification of support for reconciliation 
          activities led by the Government of Afghanistan (sec. 
          1213)..................................................   295
        Sense of Senate on special immigrant visa program for 
          Afghan allies (sec. 1214)..............................   296
        Sense of Senate and report on United States presence in 
          Afghanistan (sec. 1215)................................   296
    Subtitle C--Matters Relating to Syria, Iraq, and Iran........   296
        Extension of authority and limitation on use of funds to 
          provide assistance to counter the Islamic State of Iraq 
          and Syria (sec. 1221)..................................   296
        Extension and modification of authority to provide 
          assistance to vetted Syrian groups and individuals 
          (sec. 1222)............................................   296
        Extension and modification of authority to support 
          operations and activities of the Office of Security 
          Cooperation in Iraq (sec. 1223)........................   297
    Subtitle D--Matters Relating to Europe and the Russian 
      Federation.................................................   297
        Extension of limitation on military cooperation between 
          the United States and the Russian Federation (sec. 
          1231)..................................................   297
        Prohibition on availability of funds relating to 
          sovereignty of the Russian Federation over Crimea (sec. 
          1232)..................................................   297
        Modification and extension of Ukraine Security Assistance 
          Initiative (sec. 1233).................................   297
        Report on capability and capacity requirements of 
          military forces of Ukraine and resource plan for 
          security assistance (sec. 1234)........................   298
        Sense of Senate on North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
          enhanced opportunities partner status for Ukraine (sec. 
          1235)..................................................   298
        Extension of authority for training for Eastern European 
          national security forces in the course of multilateral 
          exercises (sec. 1236)..................................   299
        Sense of Senate on Kosovo and the role of the Kosovo 
          Force of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (sec. 
          1237)..................................................   299
        Sense of the Senate on strategic competition with the 
          Russian Federation and related activities of the 
          Department of Defense (sec. 1238)......................   300
        Report on Russian Federation support of racially and 
          ethnically motivated violent extremists (sec. 1239)....   300
        Participation in European program on multilateral 
          exchange of surface transportation services (sec. 1240)   300
        Participation in programs relating to coordination or 
          exchange of air refueling and air transportation 
          services (sec. 1241)...................................   300
    Subtitle E--Matters Relating to the Indo-Pacific Region......   301
        Pacific Deterrence Initiative (sec. 1251)................   301
        Sense of Senate on the United States-Vietnam defense 
          relationship (sec. 1252)...............................   302
        Authority to transfer funds for Bien Hoa dioxin cleanup 
          (sec. 1253)............................................   302
        Cooperative program with Vietnam to account for 
          Vietnamese personnel missing in action (sec. 1254).....   302
        Provision of goods and services at Kwajalein Atoll, 
          Republic of the Marshall Islands (sec. 1255)...........   302
        Authority to establish a Movement Coordination Center 
          Pacific in the Indo-Pacific region and participate in 
          an Air Transport and Air-to-Air Refueling and other 
          Exchanges of Services program (sec. 1256)..............   303
        Training of ally and partner air forces in Guam (sec. 
          1257)..................................................   303
        Statement of policy and sense of Senate on the Taiwan 
          Relations Act (sec. 1258)..............................   303
        Sense of Congress on port calls in Taiwan with the USNS 
          Comfort and USNS Mercy (sec. 1259).....................   304
        Limitation on use of funds to reduce total number of 
          members of the Armed Forces serving on active duty who 
          are deployed to the Republic of Korea (sec. 1260)......   304
        Sense of Congress on co-development with Japan of a long-
          range ground-based anti-ship cruise missile system 
          (sec. 1261)............................................   304
    Subtitle F--Reports..........................................   304
        Review of and report on overdue acquisition and cross-
          servicing agreement transactions (sec. 1271)...........   304
        Report on burden sharing contributions by designated 
          countries (sec. 1272)..................................   304
        Report on risk to personnel, equipment, and operations 
          due to Huawei 5G architecture in host countries (sec. 
          1273)..................................................   305
    Subtitle G--Others Matters...................................   305
        Reciprocal patient movement agreements (sec. 1281).......   305
        Extension of authorization of non-conventional assisted 
          recovery capabilities (sec. 1282)......................   305
        Extension of Department of Defense support for 
          stabilization activities in national security interest 
          of the United States (sec. 1283).......................   305
        Notification with respect to withdrawal of members of the 
          Armed Forces participating in the Multinational Force 
          and Observers in Egypt (sec. 1284).....................   306
        Modification to initiative to support protection of 
          national security academic researchers from undue 
          influence and other security threats (sec. 1285).......   306
        Establishment of United States-Israel Operations-
          Technology Working Group (sec. 1286)...................   307
    Items of Special Interest....................................   307
        Barriers to security cooperation.........................   307
        Defense cooperation with Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania..   307
        Destabilizing activities of the Russian Federation.......   308
        Forward deployed naval forces in Europe..................   308
        GAO briefing of the USMC distributed laydown.............   309
        Global Engagement Center.................................   310
        Increasing exchange student slots at military 
          institutions...........................................   310
        Interagency Cooperation for Addressing Great Power 
          Competition in the Arctic..............................   310
        PDI: State Partnership Program...........................   311
        Support for Peshmerga....................................   311
        Taiwan National Defense University feasibility report....   312
        U.S. Army force posture in Europe........................   312
        United States Africa Command.............................   313
        United States Central Command forces briefing............   314
        United States Indo-Pacific Command Fusion Centers........   314
        Use of the Secretarial Designee Program for 
          rehabilitation of Ukrainian wounded warriors...........   315
TITLE XIII--COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION.........................   317
    Funding allocations for Department of Defense Cooperative 
      Threat Reduction Program (sec. 1301).......................   317
TITLE XIV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS..................................   319
    Subtitle A--Military Programs................................   319
        Working capital funds (sec. 1401)........................   319
        Chemical Agents and Munitions Destruction, Defense (sec. 
          1402)..................................................   319
        Drug Interdiction and Counterdrug Activities, Defense-
          wide (sec. 1403).......................................   319
        Defense Inspector General (sec. 1404)....................   319
        Defense Health Program (sec. 1405).......................   319
    Subtitle B--Armed Forces Retirement Home.....................   319
        Authorization of appropriations for Armed Forces 
          Retirement Home (sec. 1411)............................   319
        Periodic inspections of Armed Forces Retirement Home 
          facilities by nationally recognized accrediting 
          organization (sec. 1412)...............................   320
        Expansion of eligibility for residence at the Armed 
          Forces Retirement Home (sec. 1413).....................   320
    Subtitle C--Other Matters....................................   320
        Authority for transfer of funds to Joint Department of 
          Defense-Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Facility 
          Demonstration Fund for Captain James A. Lovell Health 
          Care Center, Illinois (sec. 1421)......................   320
    Budget Items.................................................   320
        Working Capital Fund reductions..........................   320
        Air Force cash corpus for energy optimization............   321
        PDI: Joint Interagency Task Force--West..................   321
        Pilot program on civilian and military partnerships to 
          enhance interoperability and medical surge capability 
          and capacity of National Disaster Medical System.......   323
TITLE XV--AUTHORIZATION OF ADDITIONAL APPROPRIATIONS FOR OVERSEAS 
  CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS.........................................   325
    Subtitle A--Authorization of Additional Appropriations.......   325
        Purpose (sec. 1501)......................................   325
        Overseas contingency operations (sec. 1502)..............   325
        Procurement (sec. 1503)..................................   325
        Research, development, test, and evaluation (sec. 1504)..   325
        Operation and maintenance (sec. 1505)....................   325
        Military personnel (sec. 1506)...........................   325
        Working capital funds (sec. 1507)........................   325
        Drug Interdiction and Counter-Drug Activities, Defense-
          wide (sec. 1508).......................................   325
        Defense Inspector General (sec. 1509)....................   326
        Defense Health Program (sec. 1510).......................   326
    Subtitle B--Financial Matters................................   326
        Treatment as additional authorizations (sec. 1521).......   326
        Special transfer authority (sec. 1522)...................   326
    Subtitle C--Other Matters....................................   326
        Afghanistan Security Forces Fund (sec. 1531).............   326
        Transition and enhancement of inspector general 
          authorities for Afghanistan reconstruction (sec. 1532).   326
    Budget Items.................................................   327
        Procurement of PAC-3 MSE missiles........................   327
        EDI: NATO Response Force (NRF) networks..................   327
        EDI: Improvements to living quarters for rotational 
          forces in Europe.......................................   327
        EDI: Mission Partner Environment (MPE)...................   328
        EDI: Support to deterrent activities.....................   328
        Commander's Emergency Response Program...................   328
        EDI: Continuity of operations............................   328
        EDI: Modernizing Mission Partner Environment (MPE).......   329
        EDI: Globally Integrated Exercise 20-4/Austere Challenge 
          21.3...................................................   329
        EDI: Marine European training program....................   329
        Transfer from base.......................................   329
        Office of Security Cooperation in Iraq...................   330
        Contractor logistics support.............................   330
        Defense Security Cooperation Agency for Iraq Train and 
          Equip Requirements.....................................   331
        Counter-Islamic State of Iraq and Syria Train and Equip 
          Fund...................................................   331
TITLE XVI--STRATEGIC PROGRAMS, CYBER, AND INTELLIGENCE MATTERS...   333
    Subtitle A--Space Activities.................................   333
        Resilient and survivable positioning, navigation, and 
          timing capabilities (sec. 1601)........................   333
        Distribution of launches for phase two of acquisition 
          strategy for National Security Space Launch program 
          (sec. 1602)............................................   333
        Development efforts for National Security Space Launch 
          providers (sec. 1603)..................................   333
        Timeline for nonrecurring design validation for 
          responsive space launch (sec. 1604)....................   334
        Tactically responsive space launch operations (sec. 1605)   334
        Conforming amendments relating to reestablishment of 
          Space Command (sec. 1606)..............................   335
        Space Development Agency development requirements and 
          transfer to Space Force (sec. 1607)....................   335
        Space launch rate assessment (sec. 1608).................   335
        Report on impact of acquisition strategy for National 
          Security Space Launch program on emerging foreign space 
          launch providers (sec. 1609)...........................   335
    Subtitle B--Cyberspace-Related Matters.......................   335
        Modification of position of Principal Cyber Advisor (sec. 
          1611)..................................................   335
        Framework for cyber hunt forward operations (sec. 1612)..   336
        Modification of scope of notification requirements for 
          sensitive military cyber operations (sec. 1613)........   336
        Modification of requirements for quarterly Department of 
          Defense cyber operations briefings for Congress (sec. 
          1614)..................................................   337
        Rationalization and integration of parallel cybersecurity 
          architectures and operations (sec. 1615)...............   337
        Modification of acquisition authority of Commander of 
          United States Cyber Command (sec. 1616)................   338
        Assessment of cyber operational planning and 
          deconfliction policies and processes (sec. 1617).......   339
        Pilot program on cybersecurity capability metrics (sec. 
          1618)..................................................   339
        Assessment of effect of inconsistent timing and use of 
          Network Address Translation in Department of Defense 
          networks (sec. 1619)...................................   340
        Matters concerning the College of Information and 
          Cyberspace at National Defense University (sec. 1620)..   341
        Modification of mission of cyber command and assignment 
          of cyber operations forces (sec. 1621).................   341
        Integration of Department of Defense user activity 
          monitoring and cybersecurity (sec. 1622)...............   342
        Defense industrial base cybersecurity sensor architecture 
          plan (sec. 1623).......................................   342
        Extension of Cyberspace Solarium Commission to track and 
          assess implementation (sec. 1624)......................   343
        Review of regulations and promulgation of guidance 
          relating to National Guard responses to cyber attacks 
          (sec. 1625)............................................   344
        Improvements relating to the quadrennial cyber posture 
          review (sec. 1626).....................................   344
        Report on enabling United States Cyber Command resource 
          allocation (sec. 1627).................................   344
        Evaluation of options for establishing a cyber reserve 
          force (sec. 1628)......................................   345
        Ensuring cyber resiliency of nuclear command and control 
          system (sec. 1629).....................................   345
        Modification of requirements relating to the Strategic 
          Cybersecurity Program and the evaluation of cyber 
          vulnerabilities of major weapon systems of the 
          Department of Defense (sec. 1630)......................   345
        Defense industrial base participation in a cybersecurity 
          threat intelligence sharing program (sec. 1631)........   346
        Assessment on defense industrial base cybersecurity 
          threat hunting (sec. 1632).............................   346
        Assessing risk to national security of quantum computing 
          (sec. 1633)............................................   347
        Applicability of reorientation of Big Data Platform 
          program to Department of Navy (sec. 1634)..............   347
        Expansion of authority for access and information 
          relating to cyber attacks on operationally critical 
          contractors of the Armed Forces (sec. 1635)............   347
        Requirements for review of and limitations on the Joint 
          Regional Security Stacks activity (sec. 1636)..........   348
        Independent assessment of establishment of a National 
          Cyber Director (sec. 1637).............................   348
        Modification of authority to use operation and 
          maintenance funds for cyber operations-peculiar 
          capability development projects (sec. 1638)............   349
        Personnel management authority for Commander of United 
          States Cyber Command and development program for 
          offensive cyber operations (sec. 1639).................   349
        Implementation of information operations matters (sec. 
          1640)..................................................   350
        Report on Cyber Institutes Program (sec. 1641)...........   350
        Assistance for small manufacturers in the defense 
          industrial supply chain on matters relating to 
          cybersecurity (sec. 1642)..............................   351
    Subtitle C--Nuclear Forces...................................   351
        Modification to responsibilities of Nuclear Weapons 
          Council (sec. 1651)....................................   351
        Responsibility of Nuclear Weapons Council in preparation 
          of National Nuclear Security Administration budget 
          (sec. 1652)............................................   351
        Modification of Government Accountability Office review 
          of annual reports on nuclear weapons enterprise (sec. 
          1653)..................................................   351
        Prohibition on reduction of the intercontinental 
          ballistic missiles of the United States (sec. 1654)....   351
        Sense of the Senate on nuclear cooperation between the 
          United States and the United Kingdom (sec. 1655).......   351
    Subtitle D--Missile Defense Programs.........................   352
        Iron Dome short-range rocket defense system and Israeli 
          cooperative missile defense program co-development and 
          co-production (sec. 1661)..............................   352
        Acceleration of the deployment of hypersonic and 
          ballistic tracking space sensor payload (sec. 1662)....   352
        Extension of prohibition relating to missile defense 
          information and systems (sec. 1663)....................   353
        Report on and limitation on expenditure of funds for 
          layered homeland missile defense system (sec. 1664)....   353
        Extension of requirement for Comptroller General review 
          and assessment of missile defense acquisition programs 
          (sec. 1665)............................................   353
        Repeal of requirement for reporting structure of Missile 
          Defense Agency (sec. 1666).............................   354
        Ground-based midcourse defense interim capability (sec. 
          1667)..................................................   354
    Items of Special Interest....................................   354
        Bi-static radar..........................................   354
        Clearance process for National Nuclear Security 
          Administration employees and contractors working on the 
          Long Range Stand Off Weapon............................   354
        Comptroller General review of Department of Defense 
          Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification 
          implementation.........................................   355
        Comptroller General review of the Air Force's nuclear 
          certification program..................................   355
        Continued Comptroller General review of Ground-Based 
          Strategic Deterrent program............................   356
        Continued Comptroller General review of nuclear command, 
          control, and communications systems....................   356
        Coordination and oversight of the Joint Cyber Warfighting 
          Architecture components................................   357
        Cyber training capabilities for the Department of Defense   357
        Cyber vulnerability of the Air Force Satellite Control 
          Network................................................   358
        Demonstration of interoperability and automated 
          orchestration of cybersecurity systems.................   358
        Department of Defense cyber hygiene......................   359
        Department of Defense network external visibility........   360
        Ground vehicle cybersecurity.............................   361
        Homeland Defense Radar-Hawaii............................   361
        Hybrid space infrastructure..............................   362
        Integrated Ground-Based Strategic Deterrent test plan....   362
        Long range launch and range complexes....................   363
        Maintain independence of Space Rapid Capabilities Office.   363
        Matters on Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification in 
          annual briefings on status of framework on 
          cybersecurity for the United States defense industrial 
          base...................................................   364
        Microelectronics for national security space.............   364
        Missile field ground support vehicles....................   364
        Missile warning and sensor integration for the Integrated 
          Tactical Warning and Attack Assessment system..........   365
        National Cyber Security University.......................   366
        Next Generation Overhead Persistent Infrared system......   366
        Nuclear Command, Control, and Communications Enterprise 
          Center.................................................   366
        Options for the future of the B83-1 gravity bomb.........   367
        Organic space capability.................................   367
        Pilot program for improving the cybersecurity of 
          disadvantaged small businesses in the defense 
          industrial base........................................   367
        Progress regarding cybersecurity framework for the 
          defense industrial base................................   368
        Qualification of the television as part of the 
          intercontinental ballistic missile weapons system......   369
        RAND study on space launch...............................   370
        Recapitalization of the National Airborne Operations 
          Center.................................................   370
        Satellite ground terminal network........................   370
        Small business cybersecurity compliance..................   371
        Space Force Training and Readiness Command...............   371
        Space technology.........................................   371
        Space testing ranges.....................................   372
        Space weather............................................   372
        Training and retention of cyber mission force personnel..   372
        Transition from Minuteman III to the Ground-Based 
          Strategic Deterrent....................................   373
        United States Space Command Headquarters.................   373
        Value of inland spaceports...............................   373
        Wide Area Surveillance Program Scorpion Sensor System....   374
DIVISION B--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AUTHORIZATIONS.................   375
        Summary and explanation of funding tables................   375
        Short title (sec. 2001)..................................   375
        Expiration of authorizations and amounts required to be 
          specified by law (sec. 2002)...........................   375
        Effective date (sec. 2003)...............................   376
TITLE XXI--ARMY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION............................   377
        Summary..................................................   377
        Authorized Army construction and land acquisition 
          projects (sec. 2101)...................................   377
        Family housing (sec. 2102)...............................   377
        Authorization of appropriations, Army (sec. 2103)........   377
        Modification of authority to carry out fiscal year 2017 
          project at Camp Walker, Korea (sec. 2104)..............   377
TITLE XXII--NAVY MILITARY CONSTRUCTION...........................   379
        Summary..................................................   379
        Authorized Navy construction and land acquisition 
          projects (sec. 2201)...................................   379
        Family housing (sec. 2202)...............................   379
        Improvements to military family housing units (sec. 2203)   379
        Authorization of appropriations, Navy (sec. 2204)........   379
TITLE XXIII--AIR FORCE MILITARY CONSTRUCTION.....................   381
        Summary..................................................   381
        Authorized Air Force construction and land acquisition 
          projects (sec. 2301)...................................   381
        Family housing (sec. 2302)...............................   381
        Improvements to military family housing units (sec. 2303)   381
        Authorization of appropriations, Air Force (sec. 2304)...   381
        Modification of authority to carry out fiscal year 2018 
          project at Royal Air Force Lakenheath (sec. 2305)......   382
        Modification of authority to carry out certain fiscal 
          year 2019 projects (sec. 2306).........................   382
        Modification of authority to carry out certain fiscal 
          year 2020 family housing projects (sec. 2307)..........   382
        Modification of authority to carry out certain fiscal 
          year 2020 projects (sec. 2308).........................   382
TITLE XXIV--DEFENSE AGENCIES MILITARY CONSTRUCTION...............   383
        Summary..................................................   383
        Authorized Defense Agencies construction and land 
          acquisition projects (sec. 2401).......................   383
        Authorized Energy Resilience and Conservation Investment 
          Program projects (sec. 2402)...........................   383
        Authorization of appropriations, Defense Agencies (sec. 
          2403)..................................................   383
TITLE XXV--INTERNATIONAL PROGRAMS................................   385
        Summary..................................................   385
    Subtitle A--North Atlantic Treaty Organization Security 
      Investment Program.........................................   385
        Authorized NATO construction and land acquisition 
          projects (sec. 2501)...................................   385
        Authorization of appropriations, NATO (sec. 2502)........   385
        Execution of projects under the North Atlantic Treaty 
          Organization Security Investment Program (Sec. 2503)...   385
        Subtitle B--Host Country In-Kind Contributions...........   386
        Republic of Korea funded construction projects (sec. 
          2511)..................................................   386
        Qatar funded construction projects (sec. 2512)...........   386
TITLE XXVI--GUARD AND RESERVE FORCES FACILITIES..................   387
        Summary..................................................   387
        Authorized Army National Guard construction and land 
          acquisition projects (sec. 2601).......................   387
        Authorized Army Reserve construction and land acquisition 
          projects (sec. 2602)...................................   387
        Authorized Navy Reserve and Marine Corps Reserve 
          construction and land acquisition projects (sec. 2603).   387
        Authorized Air National Guard construction and land 
          acquisition projects (sec. 2604).......................   388
        Authorized Air Force Reserve construction and land 
          acquisition projects (sec. 2605).......................   388
        Authorization of appropriations, National Guard and 
          Reserve (sec. 2606)....................................   388
        Modification of authority to carry out fiscal year 2020 
          project in Alabama (sec. 2607).........................   388
TITLE XXVII--BASE REALIGNMENT AND CLOSURE ACTIVITIES.............   389
        Summary and explanation of tables........................   389
        Authorization of appropriations for base realignment and 
          closure activities funded through Department of Defense 
          Base Closure Account (sec. 2701).......................   389
        Prohibition on conducting additional base realignment and 
          closure (BRAC) round (sec. 2702).......................   389
TITLE XXVIII--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION AND GENERAL PROVISIONS.......   391
    Subtitle A--Military Construction Program....................   391
        Responsibility of Navy for military construction 
          requirements for certain Fleet Readiness Centers (sec. 
          2801)..................................................   391
        Construction of ground-based strategic deterrent launch 
          facilities and launch centers for Air Force (sec. 2802)   391
    Subtitle B--Military Family Housing..........................   391
        Prohibition on substandard family housing units (sec. 
          2821)..................................................   391
        Technical corrections to privatized military housing 
          program (sec. 2822)....................................   392
        Requirement that Secretary of Defense implement 
          recommendations relating to military family housing 
          contained in report by Inspector General of Department 
          of Defense (sec. 2823).................................   392
    Subtitle C--Project Management and Oversight Reforms.........   392
        Promotion of energy resilience and energy security in 
          privatized utility systems (sec. 2841).................   392
        Consideration of energy security and energy resilience in 
          life-cycle cost for military construction (sec. 2842)..   392
    Subtitle D--Land Conveyances.................................   393
        Renewal of Fallon Range Training Complex land withdrawal 
          and reservation (sec. 2861)............................   393
        Renewal of Nevada Test and Training Range land withdrawal 
          and reservation (sec. 2862)............................   393
        Transfer of land under the administrative jurisdiction of 
          the Department of the Interior within Naval Support 
          Activity Panama City, Florida (sec. 2863)..............   393
        Land conveyance, Camp Navajo, Arizona (sec. 2864)........   393
    Subtitle E--Other Matters....................................   394
        Military family readiness considerations in basing 
          decisions (sec. 2881)..................................   394
        Prohibition on use of funds to reduce air base resiliency 
          or demolish protected aircraft shelters in the European 
          theater without creating a similar protection from 
          attack (sec. 2882).....................................   394
        Prohibitions relating to closure or returning to host 
          nation of existing bases under the European 
          Consolidation Initiative (sec. 2883)...................   394
        Enhancement of authority to accept conditional gifts of 
          real property on behalf of military museums (sec. 2884)   394
        Equal treatment of insured depository institutions and 
          credit unions operating on military installations (sec. 
          2885)..................................................   395
        Report on operational aviation units impacted by noise 
          restrictions or noise mitigation measures (sec. 2886)..   395
    Items of Special Interest....................................   395
        Army demolition prioritization...........................   395
        Army training range coordination in Hawaii...............   396
        Clarification of the use of section 2353 of title 10, 
          United States Code, authority by defense contractors...   397
        Enhancing MQ-9 and MH-139 training capabilities..........   397
        F-35 military construction at Dannelly Field.............   398
        Importance of small arms ranges..........................   398
        Improvements to the management of historic homes.........   398
        Increasing capacity at Arlington National Cemetery.......   399
        Kwajalein military construction plan and hospital........   399
        Maneuver Area Training Equipment Site (MATES)............   400
        Naval Air Station Barbers Point..........................   400
        Pacific Deterrence Initiative: Planning & Design, U.S. 
          Indo-Pacific Command...................................   401
        Strategic basing criteria briefing.......................   401
        Use of O&M for MILCON without tracking dollars...........   401
TITLE XXIX--OVERSEAS CONTINGENCY OPERATIONS MILITARY CONSTRUCTION   403
        Summary..................................................   403
        Authorized Navy construction and land acquisition 
          projects (sec. 2901)...................................   403
        Authorized Air Force construction and land acquisition 
          projects (sec. 2902)...................................   403
        Authorization of appropriations (sec. 2903)..............   403
        Replenishment of certain military construction funds 
          (sec. 2904)............................................   403
DIVISION C--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY AUTHORIZATIONS 
  AND OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS.......................................   405
TITLE XXXI--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAMS......   405
    Subtitle A--National Security Programs and Authorizations....   405
        National Nuclear Security Administration (sec. 3101).....   405
        Defense environmental cleanup (sec. 3102)................   405
        Other defense activities (sec. 3103).....................   405
        Nuclear energy (sec. 3104)...............................   405
    Subtitle B--Budget of the National Nuclear Security 
      Administration.............................................   405
        Review of adequacy of nuclear weapons budget (sec. 3111).   405
        Treatment of budget of National Nuclear Security 
          Administration (sec. 3112).............................   406
        Responsibility of Administrator for Nuclear Security for 
          ensuring National Nuclear Security Administration 
          budget satisfies nuclear weapons needs of Department of 
          Defense (sec. 3113)....................................   406
        Participation of Secretary of Defense in planning, 
          programming, budgeting, and execution process of 
          National Nuclear Security Administration (sec. 3114)...   406
        Requirement for updated planning, programming, budgeting, 
          and execution guidance for National Nuclear Security 
          Administration (sec. 3115).............................   406
        Cross-training in budget processes of Department of 
          Defense and National Nuclear Security Administration 
          (sec. 3116)............................................   407
    Subtitle C--Personnel Matters................................   407
        National Nuclear Security Administration Personnel System 
          (sec. 3121)............................................   407
        Inclusion of certain employees and contractors of 
          Department of Energy in definition of public safety 
          officer for purposes of certain death benefits (sec. 
          3122)..................................................   407
        Reimbursement for liability insurance for nuclear 
          materials couriers (sec. 3123).........................   407
        Transportation and moving expenses for immediate family 
          of deceased nuclear materials couriers (sec. 3124).....   407
        Extension of authority for appointment of certain 
          scientific, engineering, and technical personnel (sec. 
          3125)..................................................   408
    Subtitle D--Cybersecurity....................................   408
        Reporting on penetrations of networks of contractors and 
          subcontractors (sec. 3131).............................   408
        Clarification of responsibility for cybersecurity of 
          National Nuclear Security Administration facilities 
          (sec. 3132)............................................   408
    Subtitle E--Defense Environmental Cleanup....................   408
        Public statement of environmental liabilities for 
          facilities undergoing defense environmental cleanup 
          (sec. 3141)............................................   408
        Inclusion of missed milestones in future-years defense 
          environmental cleanup plan (sec. 3142).................   409
        Classification of defense environmental cleanup as 
          capital asset projects or operations activities (sec. 
          3143)..................................................   409
        Continued analysis of approaches for supplemental 
          treatment of low-activity waste at Hanford Nuclear 
          Reservation (sec. 3144)................................   409
    Subtitle F--Other Matters....................................   410
        Modifications to enhanced procurement authority to manage 
          supply chain risk (sec. 3151)..........................   410
        Laboratory- or production facility-directed research and 
          development programs (sec. 3152).......................   410
        Prohibition on use of laboratory- or production facility-
          directed research and development funds for general and 
          administrative overhead costs (sec. 3153)..............   410
        Monitoring of industrial base for nuclear weapons 
          components, subsystems, and materials (sec. 3154)......   411
        Prohibition on use of funds for advanced naval nuclear 
          fuel system based on low-enriched uranium (sec. 3155)..   411
        Authorization of appropriations for W93 nuclear warhead 
          program (sec. 3156)....................................   412
        Review of future of computing beyond exascale at the 
          National Nuclear Security Administration (sec. 3157)...   412
        Application of requirement for independent cost estimates 
          and reviews to new nuclear weapons systems (sec. 3158).   412
        Extension and expansion of limitations on importation of 
          uranium from Russian Federation (sec. 3159)............   412
        Integration of stockpile stewardship and nonproliferation 
          missions (sec. 3160)...................................   413
        Technology development and integration program (sec. 
          3161)..................................................   413
        Advanced manufacturing development program (sec. 3162)...   413
        Materials science program (sec. 3163)....................   413
        Modifications to Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and 
          High Yield program (sec. 3164).........................   413
        Earned value management program for life extension 
          programs (sec. 3165)...................................   413
        Use of high performance computing capabilities for COVID-
          19 research (sec. 3166)................................   414
        Availability of stockpile responsiveness funds for 
          projects to reduce time necessary to execute a nuclear 
          test (sec. 3167).......................................   414
    Budget Items.................................................   414
        Cleanup activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory.....   414
        Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program..........   414
    Items of Special Interest....................................   414
        Comptroller General review of uncosted balances for 
          Atomic Energy Defense Activities.......................   414
        Continued Comptroller General review of the Hanford Waste 
          Treatment Plant........................................   415
        Domestic uranium enrichment technologies.................   415
        Responsibility for Los Alamos Plutonium Facility 4 and 
          Technical Area 55......................................   416
        Review of plutonium infrastructure at the National 
          Nuclear Security Administration........................   417
TITLE XXXII--DEFENSE NUCLEAR FACILITIES SAFETY BOARD.............   419
        Authorization (sec. 3201)................................   419
        Nonpublic collaborative discussions by Defense Nuclear 
          Facilities Safety Board (sec. 3202)....................   419
        Improvements to operations of Defense Nuclear Facilities 
          Safety Board (sec. 3203)...............................   419
TITLE XXXV--MARITIME ADMINISTRATION..............................   421
        Maritime Administration (sec. 3501)......................   421
DIVISION D--FUNDING TABLES.......................................   423
        Authorization of amounts in funding tables (sec. 4001)...   423
TITLE XLI--PROCUREMENT...........................................   439
        Procurement (sec. 4101)..................................   440
        Procurement for overseas contingency operations (sec. 
          4102)..................................................   481
TITLE XLII--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION..........   493
        Research, development, test, and evaluation (sec. 4201)..   494
        Research, development, test, and evaluation for overseas 
          contingency operations (sec. 4202).....................   535
TITLE XLIII--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE...........................   539
        Operation and maintenance (sec. 4301)....................   540
        Operation and maintenance for overseas contingency 
          operations (sec. 4302).................................   564
TITLE XLIV--MILITARY PERSONNEL...................................   577
        Military personnel (sec. 4401)...........................   578
        Military personnel for overseas contingency operations 
          (sec. 4402)............................................   579
TITLE XLV--OTHER AUTHORIZATIONS..................................   581
        Other authorizations (sec. 4501).........................   582
        Other authorizations for overseas contingency operations 
          (sec. 4502)............................................   586
TITLE XLVI--MILITARY CONSTRUCTION................................   589
        Military construction (sec. 4601)........................   590
        Military construction for overseas contingency operations 
          (sec. 4602)............................................   604
TITLE XLVII--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL SECURITY PROGRAMS.....   607
        Department of Energy national security programs (sec. 
          4701)..................................................   608
LEGISLATIVE REQUIREMENTS.........................................   619
        Departmental Recommendations.............................   619
        Committee Action.........................................   619
        Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate................   622
        Regulatory Impact........................................   622
        Changes in Existing Law..................................   622



                                                       Calendar No. 483
116th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session                                                     116-236

======================================================================


     TO AUTHORIZE APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL YEAR 2021 FOR MILITARY 
ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE, FOR MILITARY CONSTRUCTION, AND 
   FOR DEFENSE ACTIVITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, TO PRESCRIBE 
   MILITARY PERSONNEL STRENGTHS FOR SUCH FISCAL YEAR, AND FOR OTHER 
                                PURPOSES

                                _______
                                

                 June 24, 2020.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

           Mr. Inhofe, from the Committee on Armed Services, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T


    The Committee on Armed Services reports favorably an 
original bill (S. 4049) to authorize appropriations for fiscal 
year 2021 for military activities of the Department of Defense, 
for military construction, and for defense activities of the 
Department of Energy, to prescribe military personnel strengths 
for such fiscal year, an for other purposes, and recommends 
that the bill does do pass.

                          PURPOSE OF THE BILL

    This bill would:
          (1) Authorize appropriations for (a) procurement, (b) 
        research, development, test and evaluation, (c) 
        operation and maintenance and the revolving and 
        management funds of the Department of Defense for 
        fiscal year 2021;
          (2) Authorize the personnel end strengths for each 
        military active duty component of the Armed Forces for 
        fiscal year 2021;
          (3) Authorize the personnel end strengths for the 
        Selected Reserve of each of the reserve components of 
        the Armed Forces for fiscal year 2021;
          (4) Impose certain reporting requirements;
          (5) Impose certain limitations with regard to 
        specific procurement and research, development, test 
        and evaluation actions and manpower strengths; provide 
        certain additional legislative authority, and make 
        certain changes to existing law;
          (6) Authorize appropriations for military 
        construction programs of the Department of Defense for 
        fiscal year 2021; and
          (7) Authorize appropriations for national security 
        programs of the Department of Energy for fiscal year 
        2021.

                           COMMITTEE OVERVIEW

    This year marks the 60th consecutive year the Senate has 
fulfilled its constitutional duty to ``provide for the Common 
Defense'' by passing the National Defense Authorization Act 
(NDAA). This annual legislation provides for funding and 
authorities for the U.S. military and other critical defense 
priorities, and ensures our troops have what they need to 
defend our nation. On June 10, 2020, the Senate Armed Services 
Committee voted in overwhelming bipartisan fashion, 25-2, to 
advance the National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 
2021 (FY21) to the Senate floor.
    Two years ago, the National Defense Strategy (NDS) outlined 
our nation's preeminent challenge: strategic competition with 
authoritarian adversaries that stand firmly against our shared 
American values of freedom, democracy, and peace--namely, China 
and Russia. These adversaries seek to shift the global order in 
their favor, at our expense. In pursuit of this goal, these 
nations have increased military and economic aggression, worked 
to develop advanced technologies, expanded their influence 
around the world, and undermined our own influence. The nature 
of warfare is changing, and America's military superiority is 
in decline or in danger of declining in many areas. Nowhere is 
this more evident than in the Indo-Pacific. At the same time, 
threats from other aggressors--rogue states like Iran and North 
Korea, which seek to destabilize and antagonize, and terrorist 
organizations, which threaten to re-emerge or expand not just 
in the Middle East but in Africa and other parts of the world--
persist. As a nation, we must rise to these challenges.
    At no time in recent memory has it been more critical to 
have the personnel, equipment, training, and organization 
needed to signal to our potential enemies, as former Secretary 
of Defense Jim Mattis put it, ``you, militarily, cannot win 
it--so don't even try.'' The FY21 NDAA rests on this simple 
foundation. A credible military deterrent, however, requires 
more than just having the most planes, ships, and tanks. It 
requires forces in the right places, at the right time, with 
the right equipment and capabilities. Posture and logistics are 
equally as important as fifth-generation aircraft and advanced 
weapons. Just as necessary to an asymmetric balance of power 
are our alliances and partnerships, which must be strengthened 
and solidified. The FY21 NDAA addresses each of these areas, 
using the National Defense Strategy Commission as a roadmap and 
building off the authorities and investments provided in both 
the FY19 and FY20 NDAA. The FY21 NDAA boldly sets policy and 
prudently aligns resources to achieve irreversible momentum in 
implementation of the NDS and ensure that America is able to 
prevent and, if necessary, win the wars not just of today, but 
tomorrow as well.
    With so much at stake, predictable, on-time, and adequate 
funding remains vital to the success of our military forces, as 
military leaders have told the Committee time and time again. 
After years of sustained conflict, underfunding, and budgetary 
uncertainty, Congress focused on rebuilding the military in the 
past two NDAAs. Progress has been made, but the work is not yet 
done. The National Defense Strategy calls for annual increases 
of three to five percent above inflation each year, which the 
Bipartisan Budget Act of 2019 did not provide for FY21. This 
year's NDAA focused heavily on prioritizing available resources 
to address the most worrying shortfalls and imminent threats.
    Using the National Defense Strategy as a linchpin, the FY21 
National Defense Authorization Act advances four priorities:

Supporting Our Troops, Their Families, and the Civilian Workforce

    The Committee's top priority is, and always has been, 
supporting the more than 2.1 million men and women who bravely 
serve our nation in our Armed Forces. They, along with military 
families and the civilian workforce, are the backbone of 
America's national security. The FY21 NDAA prioritizes their 
health and wellbeing -- ensuring our troops have the resources, 
equipment, and training needed to succeed in their missions. 
The bill recognizes that family readiness strengthens our force 
overall, and advocates for military spouses and children. It 
also ensures previous reforms to the military privatized 
housing program and to the military health system are 
implemented to rigorous standards, and reemphasizes a focus on 
training to ensure our service members can conduct their 
missions safely.

Charting a Course for the National Defense Strategy Now and Into the 
        Future

    The FY21 NDAA continues to reinforce and accelerate 
implementation of the NDS. In doing so, the bill shifts our 
focus even more to the Indo-Pacific, our priority theater. 
Critically, the bill establishes the Pacific Deterrence 
Initiative to enhance budgetary transparency and oversight, 
focus resources on capability gaps, reassure allies and 
partners, and restore the credibility of American deterrence in 
the region. The bill also emphasizes a combat-credible forward 
posture, making investments in posture, logistics, and 
intelligence capabilities, and preserves our nuclear deterrent 
by supporting our nuclear triad, command and control, and 
infrastructure. Strategic and steady support for our partners 
and allies provided for in the bill, including through security 
cooperation efforts, will strengthen the capabilities of our 
friends, and ensure the balance of power remains in our favor.

Building a Modern, Innovative, and Lethal Force

    Our national security rests on our ability to attain and 
maintain an asymmetric military advantage. Our supremacy in the 
seas, in the skies, in space, in cyberspace, and on land must 
be protected; and as we look to the future of warfare, joint 
capabilities that ensure the protection of the joint force are 
essential. The FY21 NDAA ensures the United States fields a 
force of the optimal size, structure, and strategy, capable of 
supporting the conflicts envisioned by the NDS. Unfortunately, 
in key technologies and capabilities, we've fallen behind our 
near-peer competitors. The FY21 NDAA accelerates innovation so 
we can compete effectively and regain our comparative advantage 
over China and Russia.

Reshaping Pentagon Management to Maximize Performance, Accountability, 
        and Lethality

    For too long, the Pentagon has operated as a lethargic 
bureaucracy. Since the FY15 NDAA, Congress has implemented 
numerous reforms to make the Pentagon more efficient, 
responsive, and agile. This year, the NDAA prioritizes 
accountability, with flexibility, for the Department of 
Defense--setting up management structure and processes that 
better harness innovation, operate at the speed of relevance, 
and effectively steward taxpayer dollars. The FY21 NDAA 
improves the Pentagon's budget process; adjusts hiring 
practices to recruit and retain top talent in critical fields 
like advanced technology, acquisition, health care, management, 
and more; strengthens the defense acquisition system; and 
reshapes the Defense Industrial Base as a more resilient, 
advanced National Security Innovation Base. The COVID-19 
pandemic exposed and exacerbated supply chain deficiencies 
across the government, and the FY21 NDAA takes numerous steps 
to secure the supply chain--both from overreliance on foreign 
nations and from infiltration by our adversaries.
    Achieving the aims of the NDS is a long game, and the 
Committee takes a long view. The FY21 NDAA sets us up for 
success in the long term, putting our nation on an 
irreversible, confident, and steady course to achieve a 
peaceful, free, and prosperous world--not only for us, but for 
our children and grandchildren.

                 BUDGETARY EFFECTS OF THIS ACT (SEC. 4)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
that the budgetary effects of this Act be determined in 
accordance with the procedures established in the Statutory 
Pay-As-You-Go Act of 2010 (title I of Public Law 111-139).

     SUMMARY OF DISCRETIONARY AUTHORIZATIONS AND BUDGET AUTHORITY 
                              IMPLICATION

    The administration's budget request for national defense 
discretionary programs within the jurisdiction of the Senate 
Committee on Armed Services for fiscal year 2020 was $731.3 
billion. Of this amount, $628.5 billion was requested for base 
Department of Defense (DOD) programs, $26.0 billion was 
requested for national security programs in the Department of 
Energy (DOE), and $69.0 billion was requested for Overseas 
Contingency Operations (OCO).
    The committee recommends an overall discretionary 
authorization of $731.3 billion in fiscal year 2020, including 
$628.6 billion for base DOD programs, $25.9 billion for 
national security programs in the DOE, and $69.0 billion for 
OCO.
    The two tables preceding the detailed program adjustments 
in Division D of this bill summarize the direct discretionary 
authorizations in the committee recommendation and the 
equivalent budget authority levels for fiscal year 2020 defense 
programs. The first table summarizes the committee's 
recommended discretionary authorizations by appropriation 
account for fiscal year 2020 and compares these amounts to the 
request. The table following those summary tables provides a 
consolidated display of the committee's recommended 
authorizations relating to the Pacific Deterrence Initiative, 
established in Sec. 1251 of this bill.
    The second table summarizes the total budget authority 
implication for national defense by including national defense 
funding for items that are not in the jurisdiction of the 
defense committees or are already authorized.

            DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AUTHORIZATIONS

                          TITLE I--PROCUREMENT

              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations

Authorization of appropriations (sec. 101)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for procurement activities at the levels 
identified in section 4101 of division D of this Act.

                       Subtitle B--Army Programs

Integrated Air and Missile Defense assessment (sec. 111)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Army to carry out an assessment of Integrated 
Air and Missile Defense (IAMD) capabilities and capacity to 
address existing and emerging air, missile, and other indirect 
fire threats in support of combatant command requirements. The 
provision would require a classified report of the assessment 
to be delivered to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives no later than February 
15, 2021.
    The committee notes that recent attacks on deployed U.S. 
forces, as well as advanced capabilities emerging from China 
and Russia, demonstrate the increasing sophistication and 
proliferation of threats from missiles, unmanned aircraft 
systems, and rockets. Great-power competitors have invested 
heavily in long range missiles, both in quantity and in 
advanced technologies such as hypersonics, and rockets and 
mortars remain weapons of choice against U.S. and partner 
security forces in non-conventional operations.
    The committee notes that the Army is responsible for 
``conduct[ing] air and missile defense to support joint 
campaigns,'' per Department of Defense directive 5100.01, and 
operates the majority of the ground-based air and missile 
defense capabilities in the Joint Force. Additionally, the Army 
was designated Executive Agent for Counter Small Unmanned 
Aircraft Systems (C-sUAS) in November 2019, and stood up the 
Joint C-sUAS Office in January 2020.
Report and limitation on Integrated Visual Augmentation System 
        acquisition (sec. 112)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Army to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees, no later than August 15, 2021, on the 
Integrated Visual Augmentation System (IVAS). The report would 
certify the acquisition strategy, system technology level, 
production model cost, operational suitability, and soldier 
acceptability, subsequent to completion of operational testing. 
The provision would prohibit the obligation of expenditure of 
more than 50 percent of fiscal year 2021 funds authorized for 
the procurement of IVAS until the required report is submitted.
    The committee commends the Army for the developmental 
approach that it is pursuing and its effective collaboration 
with non-traditional contractors. Furthermore, the Army has 
prioritized the use of rapid prototyping, rapid fielding, and a 
soldier-centered design approach that has facilitated the 
delivery of cutting-edge solutions necessary to ensure that the 
Army maintains its technological superiority and achieves 
overmatch in future conflicts.
    The committee is encouraged by the results of previous 
soldier touch point events and is optimistic that those 
successes will be further realized in future user evaluations. 
The committee also notes that operational testing that is 
essential to ensuring operational suitability and soldier 
acceptability in operational conditions has not yet occurred. 
Certification of the acquisition strategy subsequent to 
operational testing will validate the acquisition approach, the 
full rate production decision, and the commitment of 
substantial resources. A successful IVAS program can serve as a 
model for Army modernization efforts going forward.
Modifications to requirement for an interim cruise missile defense 
        capability (sec. 113)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Army to submit to the congressional defense 
committees the plan to operationally deploy or forward station 
in an operational theater or theaters the two batteries of 
interim cruise missile defense capability required by section 
112(b)(1)(A) of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232). 
The provision would also modify the terms of the waiver for the 
requirement for two additional batteries by September 30, 2023.
    The committee notes that the Secretary of the Army has 
exercised the waiver for the first two batteries since the Army 
will not meet the deployment deadline of September 30, 2020. 
While the committee understands the requirements for testing 
and training prior to deployment, the committee still expects 
the Secretary to meet the original intent of section 112--
forward stationing an interim cruise missile defense capability 
to protect fixed sites from cruise missile threats with 
prioritization to locations in Europe and Asia.

                       Subtitle C--Navy Programs

Contract authority for Columbia-class submarine program (sec. 121)
    The committee recommends a provision that would permit the 
Secretary of the Navy to enter into one contract for up to two 
Columbia-class submarines (SSBN-826 and SSBN-827) and 
incrementally fund such submarines.
Limitation on Navy medium and large unmanned surface vessels (sec. 122)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
that certain technical conditions be met prior to Milestone B 
approval for medium and large unmanned surface vessels.
    The committee notes that the budget request provides for 
the prototyping and testing of Medium and Large Unmanned 
Surface Vessels (MUSVs and LUSVs), including procurement of up 
to two additional LUSVs in conjunction with a Strategic 
Capabilities Office (SCO) initiative. The committee understands 
that the four LUSVs procured by the SCO beginning in fiscal 
year 2018, at a cost of more than $510 million, are sufficient 
to achieve the objectives of the SCO initiative, which is 
scheduled to be completed in the fourth quarter of fiscal year 
2021.
    The committee further notes that the budget request 
includes plans to award the LUSV Detail Design and Construction 
(DD&C) contract in fiscal year 2022 and transition LUSV to a 
program of record in fiscal year 2023.
    The committee remains concerned that the budget request's 
concurrent approach to LUSV design, technology development, and 
integration as well as a limited understanding of the LUSV 
concept of employment, requirements, and reliability for 
envisioned missions pose excessive acquisition risk for 
additional LUSV procurement in fiscal year 2021. The committee 
is also concerned by the unclear policy implications of LUSVs, 
including ill-defined international unmanned surface vessel 
standards and the legal status of armed or potentially armed 
LUSVs.
    Additionally, the committee notes that the Navy's most 
recent shipbuilding plan, ``Report to Congress on the Annual 
Long-Range Plan for Construction of Naval Vessels for Fiscal 
Year 2020,'' acknowledges similar issues: ``Unmanned and 
optionally-manned systems are not accounted for in the overall 
battle force[.] . . . The physical challenges of extended 
operations at sea across the spectrum of competition and 
conflict, the concepts of operations for these platforms, and 
the policy challenges associated with employing deadly force 
from autonomous vehicles must be well understood prior to 
replacing accountable battle force ships.''
    The committee believes that further procurement of MUSVs 
and LUSVs should occur only after the lessons learned from the 
current SCO initiative have been incorporated into the system 
specification and additional risk reduction actions are taken.
    A specific area of technical concern for the committee is 
the Navy requirement for MUSVs and LUSVs to operate 
continuously at sea for at least 30 days without preventative 
maintenance, corrective maintenance, or emergent repairs. The 
committee is unaware of any unmanned vessel of the size or 
complexity envisioned for MUSV or LUSV that has demonstrated at 
least 30 days of such operation.
    The committee understands that the SCO prototype vessels 
that are intended to provide risk reduction for this program 
have demonstrated between 2 to 3 days of continuous operation. 
The committee also understands that the SCO vessels are 
approximately 25 percent the size by tonnage of a LUSV, which 
may limit the applicability of lessons learned and risk 
reduction from the SCO vessels to the MUSV and LUSV programs. 
Among other critical subsystems, the committee views the main 
engines and electrical generators as key USV mechanical and 
electrical subsystems whose reliability is critical to ensuring 
successful operations at sea for at least 30 continuous days.
    Accordingly, this provision would require at least two main 
engines and electrical generators, including ancillary 
equipment, to be formally qualified by the Navy, including a 
successful demonstration of at least 30 days of continuous 
operation prior to the LUSV or MUSV Milestone B approval and 
would require the use of such engines and generators in future 
USVs. The provision would also require the Senior Technical 
Authority and Milestone Decision Authority to take additional 
actions related to reducing the technical risk of these 
programs prior to a Milestone B approval.
    The committee views the qualification of these critical 
subsystems as an essential prototyping step necessary to 
provide a solid technical foundation for the MUSV and LUSV 
programs. Rather than delaying these programs, the committee 
believes that qualified engines and generators will enable the 
delivery of capable, reliable, and sustainable USVs that meet 
the needs of fleet commanders faster than the plan contained in 
the budget request.

Extension of prohibition on availability of funds for Navy waterborne 
        security barriers (sec. 123)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
prohibition on availability of funds for Navy waterborne 
security barriers.

Procurement authorities for certain amphibious shipbuilding programs 
        (sec. 124)

    The committee recommends a provision that would allow the 
Secretary of the Navy to enter into one or more contracts for 
the procurement of three San Antonio-class amphibious ships and 
one America-class amphibious ship.
    The committee notes that the Assistant Secretary of the 
Navy for Research, Development, and Acquisition testified on 
March 4, 2020, that the authorities provided in this provision 
would be ``tremendously beneficial'' and added, ``[W]e will 
look forward to those authorities, should they come in the 
[National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021].''
    The committee further notes that the Navy is estimating 
savings of 8 to 12 percent, or roughly $1 billion, for the 
multiple ship procurement of these 4 ships as compared to 4 
separate ship procurement contracts.
    Accordingly, this provision would provide the necessary 
authorities for implementing such an approach.

Fighter force structure acquisition strategy (sec. 125)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Navy to align the Department's fighter force 
structure acquisition strategy with the results of the various 
independent studies required by section 1064 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91), and not later than March 1, 2021, to transmit the new 
strategy in a report to the congressional defense committees. 
The committee commends the Navy on transitioning to a strategy 
focused on the acquisition of 5th generation aircraft but 
remains concerned that the current strike fighter shortage data 
demand an increase in the annual total acquisition of fighter 
aircraft. The provision would establish a minimum number of F-
35 and Next Generation Air Dominance (NGAD) aircraft that the 
Navy and Marine Corps would be required to purchase each year 
to mitigate or manage strike fighter shortfalls. Finally, the 
provision would also prohibit the Department of the Navy's 
deviation from this strategy in its acquisition programs and 
related force structure until the Secretary of the Navy 
receives a waiver and justification from the Secretary of 
Defense and until 30 days after notifying the congressional 
defense committees of the proposed deviation.

Treatment of weapon systems added by Congress in future President's 
        budget requests (sec. 126)

    The committee recommends a provision that would preclude 
the inclusion in future annual budget requests of a procurement 
quantity of a system previously authorized and appropriated by 
the Congress that was greater than the quantity of such system 
requested in the President's budget request.
    The committee is concerned that by presenting CVN-81 as a 
ship that was procured in fiscal year 2020 (instead of as a 
ship that was procured in fiscal year 2019), LPD-31 as a ship 
requested for procurement in fiscal year 2021 (instead of as a 
ship that was procured in fiscal year 2020), and LHA-9 as a 
ship projected for procurement in fiscal year 2023 (instead of 
as a ship that was procured in fiscal year 2020), the 
Department of Defense, in its fiscal year 2021 budget 
submission, is disregarding or mischaracterizing the actions of 
Congress regarding the procurement dates of these three ships.

Report on carrier wing composition (sec. 127)

    The committee recommends a provision that would direct the 
Secretary of the Navy, in consultation with the Chief of Naval 
Operations and Commandant of the Marine Corps, to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees, not later than 
May 1, 2021, on the optimal compositions of the carrier air 
wing in 2030 and 2040 as well as alternative force design 
concepts. In conjunction with completing the report required by 
this provision, the Secretary shall provide a briefing on the 
report's findings to the congressional defense committees, not 
later than March 1, 2021.
    The committee is encouraged by the Department of Defense's 
recent decision to cease the procurement of legacy strike 
fighters but remains concerned, based on a number of 
independent analyses, that the Navy's current stated goal of a 
50-50 mix of 4th and 5th generation aircraft for the future 
carrier air wing will not be sufficient to meet the 
requirements of the National Defense Strategy. Additionally, 
the committee is concerned that the Navy lacks a strategy on 
the use of unmanned aircraft and manned-unmanned teaming.
    Therefore, the report required by this provision would 
include: (1) The analysis and justification used by the Navy to 
reach the 50-50 mix of 4th and 5th generation aircraft for 
2030; (2) Analysis and justification for the optimal mix of 
carrier aircraft for 2040; and (3) A plan for incorporating 
unmanned aerial vehicles and associated communication 
capabilities to effectively implement the future force design.

Report on strategy to use ALQ-249 Next Generation Jammer to ensure full 
        spectrum electromagnetic superiority (sec. 128)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Navy, in consultation with the Vice Chairman 
of the Joint Chiefs, to provide a report to the congressional 
defense committees, no later than July 30, 2021, defining a 
strategy to ensure full spectrum electromagnetic superiority 
using the ALQ-249 Next Generation Jammer.
    The committee notes that the ALQ-249 is the only standoff 
jamming capability in the Joint Force that is capable of 
providing electronic warfare support in a conflict envisioned 
by the National Defense Strategy (NDS). The committee is 
concerned that the current strategy and force structure of 
naval electronic warfare forces will not be sufficient to 
meeting the needs of the joint warfighting concept.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary, using 
analysis provided by the Joint Staff and in consultation with 
the Vice Chairman, to provide a report detailing: (1) The 
current procurement strategy of the ALQ-249 and an analysis of 
its capability to meet the radio frequency ranges required in a 
NDS conflict; (2) Its compatibility and ability to synchronize 
non-kinetic fires with other joint electronic warfare 
platforms; (3) A future model of an interlinked/interdependent 
electronic warfare menu of options for commanders at the 
tactical, operational, and strategic levels.

                     Subtitle D--Air Force Programs


Economic order quantity contracting authority for F-35 Joint Strike 
        Fighter program (sec. 141)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to award F-35 contracts to procure 
material and equipment in economic order quantities for fiscal 
year 2021 (Lot 15) through fiscal year 2023 (Lot 17).

Minimum aircraft levels for major mission areas (sec. 142)

    The committee recommends a provision that would establish a 
minimum number of aircraft for each major mission area in the 
United States Air Force and prohibit divestment of aircraft 
such that these minima are breached. The committee understands 
that the Air Force is divesting legacy aircraft in order to 
modernize its various fleets with modern aircraft relevant to 
the National Defense Strategy. The committee remains concerned 
that, historically, the divestment of legacy aircraft has not 
yielded additional resources to fund modernization. As such, 
the committee cautions the Air Force in taking near-term risk 
with capacity and seeks the establishment of these aircraft 
floors to mitigate its concern.

Minimum operational squadron level (sec. 143)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Air Force to seek to achieve, as soon as practicable after the 
date of the enactment of this Act and subject to the 
availability of appropriations, no fewer than 386 available 
operational squadrons, or equivalent organizational units, 
within the Air Force.

Minimum Air Force bomber aircraft level (sec. 144)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to the congressional defense 
committees, no later than 1 December, 2020, recommendations for 
a minimum number of bomber aircraft, including penetrating 
bombers in addition to B-52H aircraft to enable the Air Force 
to carry out its long-range penetrating strike mission. The 
Department should determine this floor, in part, based on what 
the Air Force can uniquely provide in future conflicts--long-
range penetrating strike capability that cannot be matched by 
other military services' standoff strike systems.
    Despite the significant increase in individual bomber 
capability, the committee remains concerned about the Nation's 
overall bomber capacity shortfall. The Air Force has a total 
inventory of 157 bombers, the smallest and oldest fleet of 
bomber aircraft in its history. Three 2019 independent studies 
of future Air Force aircraft inventory requirements, conducted 
pursuant to section 1064 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91), determined that 
increases in the size of the bomber fleet are needed to support 
the National Defense Strategy (NDS). The Air Force's own 
assessment concluded: ``We require a larger proportional 
increase for bombers,'' with a 56 percent increase in the 
number of Air Force bomber squadrons, to execute the NDS. The 
Commander of Air Force Global Strike Command has said that the 
future bomber force inventory should be greater than 225.
    Additionally, while Air Force standoff strike capabilities 
support the NDS, the committee believes that the Department of 
Defense needs to carefully assess alternatives and the cost 
effectiveness of relative numbers of such standoff systems and 
procuring a larger penetrating bomber force with its capacity 
to carry more and less costly weapons per sortie.

F-35 gun system (sec. 145)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Air Force to begin the acquisition process for 
an alternate 25mm ammunition solution that provides a true 
full-spectrum target engagement capability for the F-35A. The 
committee is aware of known deficiencies with the system as 
well as ongoing efforts to improve the accuracy and lethality 
of the gun. However, the anticipated hardware and software 
solutions do not adequately address the lethality limitation of 
the F-35A gun. Improvements are necessary in ammunition 
performance, including the ability to penetrate hard targets as 
well as the ability to achieve combined explosive, 
fragmentation, and incendiary effects. The committee further 
understands that the currently qualified 25mm ammunition 
effectively penetrates semi-hardened armor; however, the 
ammunition has limited capability against a broader range of 
target sets. Additionally, the limited carriage capacity of the 
F-35A gun system ammunition magazine strongly suggests that 
improved performance ammunition is required for mission 
success, both in air-to-ground as well as air-to-air missions. 
Consequently, the committee is concerned that the current 25mm 
ammunition is not effective enough to allow for successful 
engagement of the full spectrum of target sets anticipated on a 
typical F-35A mission.

Prohibition on funding for Close Air Support Integration Group (sec. 
        146)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the obligation or expenditure of funds for the Close Air 
Support Integration Group (CIG) or its subordinate units at 
Nellis Air Force Base, Nevada. The committee is aware that the 
CIG was an attempt to establish a center of excellence for 
close air support at a time when the A-10 was being considered 
for divestment. Given the Air Force's strategy for the long-
term retention of the A-10, the CIG's mission is unclear and 
its resources, both in manpower and aircraft currently assigned 
to the CIG and its subordinate units, are better utilized 
elsewhere.

Limitation on divestment of KC-10 and KC-135 aircraft (sec. 147)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the divestment of KC-10 and KC-135 aircraft in excess of the 
following: in fiscal year 2021, 6 KC-10s; in fiscal year 2022, 
12 KC-10s; and, in fiscal year 2023, 12 KC-10s and 14 KC-135s.

Limitation on retirement of U-2 and RQ-4 aircraft (sec. 148)

    The committee recommends a provision that would limit the 
retirement of any U-2 or RQ-4 aircraft until the Chairman of 
the Joint Requirements Oversight Council certifies to the 
congressional defense and intelligence committees that the 
operational capabilities available to the combatant commanders 
would not be affected by such a decision.

Limitation on divestment of F-15C aircraft in the European theater 
        (sec. 149)

    The committee recommends a provision that would restrict 
the divestment of F-15Cs in the European theater until the F-
15EX is integrated into the Air Force and has begun bed down 
actions in the theater. The provision would also provide a 
waiver from the limitation if the Secretary of Defense notifies 
the congressional defense committees with appropriate 
justification.

Air base defense development and acquisition strategy (sec. 150)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Chief of Staff of the Air Force (CSAF), in consultation with 
the Chief of Staff of the Army (CSA), to produce a development 
and acquisition strategy to procure a capability to protect air 
bases and prepositioned sites in the contested environments 
highlighted in the National Defense Strategy. The strategy 
should ensure a solution that is effective against current and 
emerging cruise missiles and advanced hypersonic missiles. The 
provision would require the CSAF to submit the strategy to the 
congressional defense committees no later than March 1, 2021.
    Additionally, the provision would limit the obligation or 
expenditure of fiscal year 2021 funds for operation and 
maintenance for the Office of the Secretary of the Air Force 
and the Office of the Secretary of the Army to 50 percent of 
those funds until 15 days after submission of the strategy 
required by the provision.

Required solution for KC-46 aircraft remote visual system limitations 
        (sec. 151)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Air Force to develop and implement a solution 
to the KC-46 remote visual system (RVS) operational 
limitations. The committee is aware that the manufacturer and 
the Air Force have developed a complete solution for the KC-46 
RVS issue that would remove all operational limitations for 
refueling operations of the aircraft. However, the committee is 
concerned about the duration of time that has already elapsed 
and the lack of an implementation strategy. Furthermore, the 
committee is concerned regarding the potential of implementing 
a phased approach to solving the RVS issue. This approach would 
put unnecessary delays in a final fix and delay full operation 
of the KC-46 fleet until after 2025. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Air Force to reach an agreement 
with the manufacturer for a complete, one-time solution to the 
KC-46 RVS issue, and to present an accompanying implementation 
strategy to the congressional defense committees no later than 
October 1, 2020.

Analysis of requirements and Advanced Battle Management System 
        capabilities (sec. 152)

    The committee recommends a provision regarding the 
applicability of the Advanced Battle Management System (ABMS) 
to the broader Joint All-Domain Command and Control (JADC2) 
effort. The committee is encouraged by the Air Force's effort 
to link disaggregated sensors into a network of survivable and 
persistent intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance 
capabilities. The committee also commends the Air Force for 
leading the Department of Defense in the development of an 
architecture for the broader JADC2 effort.
    However, the committee remains concerned regarding the 
progress of the ABMS effort and the speed at which the ground 
moving target indicator capability of the E-8 is being 
replaced. Therefore, the committee recommends a provision that 
would require the Secretary of the Air Force to develop an 
analysis of current ground moving target indicator requirements 
across the combatant commands and the capability that the ABMS 
will require when fielded.

Studies on measures to assess cost-per-effect for key mission areas 
        (sec. 153)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Air Force to conduct, or provide for the 
conduct of, two studies no later than January 1, 2021, to 
provide a better understanding of the cost of sustainment of 
aircraft based on combat effects.

Plan for operational test and utility evaluation of systems for Low-
        Cost Attributable Aircraft Technology program (sec. 154)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition, 
Technology, and Logistics to provide to the congressional 
defense committees an executable plan for the operational test 
and utility evaluation of the Low-Cost Attributable Aircraft 
Technology (LCAAT) systems no later than October 1, 2020, and 
to brief the committees on the plan by the same date. The 
committee intends for this provision to support the Assistant 
Secretary's intent to accelerate the LCAAT program for 
collaborative pairing with manned platforms, potentially 
including the F-35. The committee views the combined 
application of commercial technology, autonomy, and artificial 
intelligence as an innovative solution to meeting the demands 
of the National Defense Strategy.

Prohibition on retirement or divestment of A-10 aircraft (sec. 155)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the divestment of A-10 aircraft for fiscal year 2021. The 
committee is aware that there is a growing demand for low cost, 
survivable aircraft to support disaggregated operations in 
support of efforts in countering violent extremism (CVE) and to 
provide close air support and combat search and rescue 
capability in accordance with the National Defense Strategy. 
The A-10 aircraft appears to meet all the requirements set 
forth in various requests to industry. The committee 
understands the fiscal need to divest legacy aircraft as new 
aircraft are integrated into the Air Force but supports a 1-
year suspension on plans to retire or divest A-10s to ensure 
that these aircraft support ongoing CVE efforts and provide 
close air support and combat search and rescue capability.

       Subtitle E--Defense-Wide, Joint, and Multiservice Matters


Budgeting for life-cycle cost of aircraft for the Navy, Army, and Air 
        Force: annual plan and certification (sec. 171)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit an annual plan for the 
procurement of the aircraft in the Department of the Navy, the 
Department of the Army, and the Department of the Air Force in 
order to meet the requirements of the National Defense 
Strategy.

Authority to use F-35 aircraft withheld from delivery to Government of 
        Turkey (sec. 172)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Air Force to utilize, modify, and operate the 6 Turkish 
aircraft that were accepted by the Government of Turkey but 
never delivered because Turkey was suspended from the F-35 
program.

Transfer from Commander of United States Strategic Command to Chairman 
        of the Joint Chiefs of Staff of responsibilities and functions 
        relating to electromagnetic spectrum operations (sec. 173)

    The committee recommends a provision that would: (1) 
require the Secretary of Defense to transition to the Chairman 
of the Joint Chiefs of Staff (CJCS) as a Chairman's Controlled 
Activity all of the responsibilities and functions of the 
Commander of United States Strategic Command that are germane 
to electromagnetic spectrum operations; (2) define additional 
responsibilities related to EMSO for the VCJCS; and (3) require 
the combatant commanders and service chiefs to assess their 
plans and programs for consistency with the Electromagnetic 
Spectrum Superiority Strategy, the Joint Staff-developed 
concept of operations, and operational requirements.
    The committee's oversight priorities in electronic warfare 
(EW) to date have been in correcting the Department of 
Defense's governance gaps and in addressing its acquisition 
activities. The committee recognizes, however, that the 
military services and combatant commanders face operational and 
tactical challenges today that have exposed the inadequacy of 
the Department's concept of operations, tactics, techniques, 
and procedures (TTPs), and associated capabilities, forces, and 
training for electromagnetic spectrum operations (EMSO). These 
issues, highlighted in a Center for Strategic and Budgetary 
Assessment study conducted pursuant to section 255 of the John 
S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2019 (Public Law 115-232), demand the formulation of a new way 
of ``maneuvering within the electromagnetic spectrum,'' to use 
the Department's terminology--new doctrine, operational plans, 
training, capabilities, and TTPs for fighting with, against, 
and through electronic warfare capabilities. This assessment 
was amplified by the March 2019 report by the Institute for 
Defense Analysis, ``Independent Assessment of EMS Organization 
Alternatives,'' which considered a number of options to further 
the Department's focus on spectrum operations from both 
military service and joint commander perspectives. This report 
noted, ``The panel judges this crisis [in electromagnetic 
spectrum operations] to be urgent and enduring--requiring 
immediate actions from the Department's top leadership to 
address the urgent problem and a systemic institutional 
response to address the enduring competitive challenge.''
    The committee believes that the only appropriate body for 
managing this modernization is the Joint Staff and thus 
supports the Department's designation of the Vice Chairman of 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff (VCJCS) as the senior designated 
official for EW and EMSO. The VCJCS, as chairman of the Joint 
Requirements Oversight Council and as a senior advisor to the 
President and Secretary of Defense, possesses the seniority and 
vantage point to effectively provide that critical oversight 
and advocacy. In particular, the committee believes that the 
VCJCS must lead the development of EMSO concepts of operations 
and oversee their integration into the joint warfighting 
concept, the warfighting plans of the combatant commands, and 
the programs of the military services.

Cryptographic modernization schedules (sec. 174)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
each of the Secretaries of the military departments and the 
heads of relevant defense agencies and field activities to 
establish and maintain a cryptographic modernization schedule 
that specifies, for each pertinent weapon system, command and 
control system, or data link: (1) The expiration date for 
applicable cryptographic algorithms; (2) Anticipated key 
extension requests; and (3) The funding and deployment schedule 
for modernized cryptographic algorithms, keys, and equipment 
over the future years defense program. The provision would also 
require the Department of Defense (DOD) Chief Information 
Officer (CIO) to oversee the implementation of these scheduled 
investments and amend these plans, should they pose 
unacceptable risk to military operations. Finally, the 
provision would require the CIO to annually notify the 
congressional defense committees of any failures to meet these 
planned schedules.
    The committee is encouraged by the Department's recent 
focus on cryptographic modernization and, in particular, the 
priority placed on updating cryptographic equipment, keys, and 
algorithms by the CIO, the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment, and the Joint Staff. For too long, 
the National Security Agency's warnings about obsolete 
cryptography have fallen on deaf ears and the military services 
have been allowed to continuously delay much-needed 
modernization. The committee seeks to reinforce this priority 
and ensure that it does not prove to be ephemeral. This 
provision would do so by forcing the military services to 
maintain schedules for cryptographic upgrades and establishing 
DOD and congressional accountability mechanisms to deter and 
correct schedule slips.

Prohibition on purchase of armed overwatch aircraft (sec. 175)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the purchase of aircraft for the Air Force Special Operations 
Command used for the purpose of ``armed overwatch'' until such 
time as the Chief of Staff of the Air Force certifies to the 
congressional defense committees that general purpose forces of 
the Air Force have neither the skill nor the capacity to 
provide close air support and armed overwatch to U.S. forces 
deployed operationally.

Special Operations armed overwatch (sec. 176)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the acquisition of armed overwatch aircraft for the United 
States Special Operations Command (SOCOM) in fiscal year 2021. 
The provision would require the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict and the 
Commander, SOCOM, to conduct, not later than July 1, 2021, an 
analysis to define the special operations-peculiar requirements 
for armed overwatch aircraft and determine whether acquisition 
of a new special operations-peculiar platform is the most 
effective means of fulfilling such requirements.
    The committee is concerned that the acquisition strategy 
for an armed overwatch aircraft for SOCOM lacks a validated 
requirement and an appropriate analysis of the cost-
effectiveness of acquiring a new special operations-peculiar 
platform. Furthermore, the committee is concerned that the 
rapid acquisition timeline being pursued by SOCOM does not 
allow for adequate consideration of: the cost of operating and 
sustaining the aircraft; the potential negative impacts on an 
already stressed community of pilots, aircrews, and 
maintainers; and how such a costly addition fits into SOCOM's 
medium-to-long-term airborne intelligence, surveillance and 
reconnaissance capability roadmap.

Autonomic Logistics Information System redesign strategy (sec. 177)

    The committee recommends a provision that would address the 
lack of strategy for the redesign of the Autonomic Logistics 
Information System (ALIS) by requiring the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, in consultation with 
the F-35 Program Executive Officer, no later than October 1, 
2020, to: (1) Develop a program-wide process for measuring, 
collecting, and tracking information on how the ALIS is 
affecting the performance of the F-35 fleet, to include, but 
not be limited to, its effects on mission capability rates; and 
(2) Implement a strategy for the re-design of the ALIS. The 
strategy should be detailed enough to clearly identify and 
assess the goals, key risks or uncertainties, and costs of 
redesigning the system.
    The committee is encouraged at the progress that the Joint 
Program Office has made through various initiatives in 
improving and redesigning the ALIS and the transition to the 
Operational Data Integrated Network (ODIN) but is concerned 
that these initiatives and the transition to ODIN involve 
differing approaches and that technical and programmatic 
uncertainties are hindering the redesign effort.

Contract aviation services in a country or in airspace in which a 
        Special Federal Aviation Regulation applies (sec. 178)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, or a designee of the Secretary of 
Defense, to designate aircraft fulfilling urgent operational 
needs for the Department of Defense as State Aircraft if there 
exist Special Federal Aviation Regulations that would impact 
their ability to perform these missions. These aircraft are 
performing military functions, and the committee therefore 
believes that they should be afforded the status of State 
Aircraft if required to carry out their missions.

F-35 aircraft munitions (sec. 179)

    The committee recommends a provision would require the 
Secretary of the Air Force and Secretary of the Navy to qualify 
and certify, for the use by the U.S. military, additional 
munitions for the F-35 aircraft that are already qualified for 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization member F-35 partner 
aircraft.

Airborne intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance acquisition 
        roadmap for United States Special Operations Command (sec. 180)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require, 
not later than December 1, 2021, the Assistant Secretary of 
Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict (ASD 
SOLIC) and the Commander, United States Special Operations 
Command (SOCOM), to jointly submit to the congressional defense 
committees an acquisition roadmap to meet the manned and 
unmanned airborne intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance (ISR) requirements of United States Special 
Operations Forces (SOF).
    SOCOM's budget request for fiscal year 2021 and the future 
years defense program includes proposals to modify the 
composition of its airborne ISR fleet through the acquisition 
of new platforms and the divestment of platforms currently in 
its inventory. The committee is concerned that there does not 
exist an overarching strategy to guide SOCOM's airborne ISR 
acquisition efforts, particularly one that clearly: identifies 
current or anticipated special operations-peculiar capability 
gaps; describes future manned and unmanned ISR requirements, 
especially those related to the ability to operate in contested 
environments; describes the anticipated mix of manned and 
unmanned aircraft and associated manning requirements; and 
describes the extent to which service-provided manned and 
unmanned airborne ISR capabilities will be required to support 
SOF requirements.
    The committee strongly believes that clear explanation of 
the path forward is fundamental to ensuring that SOCOM's 
airborne ISR capabilities are appropriate for meeting its 
requirements over the mid- and long-term and to ensuring that 
such acquisition programs meet the intent of the National 
Defense Strategy in pursuing a more resource-efficient approach 
to countering violent extremist organizations. The committee 
believes that rigorous analysis and the submission of the 
roadmap required by this section should precede the initiation 
of any new start acquisition programs for airborne manned and 
unmanned ISR capabilities for SOCOM.

Requirement to accelerate the fielding and development of counter 
        unmanned aerial system efforts across the Joint Force (sec. 
        181)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
executive agent of the Joint Counter Small Unmanned Aerial 
Systems office to prioritize counter-unmanned aerial systems 
(CUAS) that can be fielded in fiscal year 2021 and develop a 
near-term plan to effect that fielding. As part of the 
Secretary of the Army's review of CUAS efforts, the committee 
encourages the Secretary to consider establishing a CUAS center 
of excellence for the executive agent to coordinate service 
research and development for counter-drone technologies.

Joint All-Domain Command and Control requirements (sec. 182)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Joint Requirements Oversight Council (JROC) to produce Joint 
All Domain Command and Control (JADC2) requirements no later 
than October 1, 2020. The provision would also require, 
immediately after the certification of requirements, the Chief 
of Staff of the Air Force to provide a certification to the 
congressional defense committees that the current JADC2 
efforts, including programmatic and architecture efforts, being 
led by the Air Force will meet the requirements laid out by the 
JROC. Additionally, each service chief would be required to 
certify to the congressional defense committees that his or her 
respective service efforts in multi-domain command and control 
are compatible with the Air Force-led architecture no later 
than January 1, 2021. Finally, the Secretary of Defense would 
be required to incorporate the expected costs for full 
development and implementation across the Department of Defense 
in the fiscal year 2022 budget request.
    The committee commends the Department of Defense on its 
efforts to date on JADC2. The committee recognizes that, in 
order for JADC2 to be successful, there must be leadership and 
alignment from the Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD), 
the Joint Staff, and all the military services. The committee 
is encouraged that the OSD has designated the Air Force as the 
lead for design and experimentation in order to develop an 
architecture that will meet the requirements set forth by the 
Vice Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in his role as the 
Chairman of the JROC. The committee remains concerned that the 
actual requirements are not clear and, as such, that the Air 
Force will not be able to coordinate with the other military 
services to ensure that their own multi-domain command and 
control-relevant capabilities will be compatible with the 
eventual network and architecture.

                              Budget Items


                                  Army


MQ-1

    The budget request included $0.0 in line number 2 of 
Aircraft Procurement, Army (APA), for MQ-1 procurement.
    The committee is concerned that the temporary termination 
of procurement of MQ-1s will result in significantly increased 
cost in the long run and will delay the Army's meeting of its 
stated requirements for unmanned fixed wing intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance aircraft.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $165.0 
million in line number 2 of APA for the purchase of additional 
MQ-1 aircraft.

CH-47 Cargo Helicopter Modifications

    The budget request included $15.5 million in line number 22 
of Aircraft Procurement, Army (APA), for CH-47 Cargo Helicopter 
Mods.
    The committee recognizes that installation of Improved 
Vibration Control System on the CH-47 minimizes vibration 
generated by the rotor system, improving aircraft and crew 
performance and extending component service life.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $20.0 
million in line number 22 of APA for CH-47 Cargo Helicopter 
Mods.

Procurement of PAC-3 MSE missiles

    The budget request included $779.8 million in line number 3 
of Missile Procurement, Army (MPA), for MSE Missiles, of which 
$603.2 million was included in the Army's base budget account 
and $176.6 million was included in the Overseas Contingency 
Operations account for the European Deterrence Initiative 
(EDI).
    While the committee strongly supports procurement of 
additional MSE missiles to meet the global requirement, 
activities funded through EDI should directly support 
requirements in the U.S. European Command (EUCOM) area of 
responsibility. The committee understands that the 46 MSE 
missiles requested in EDI would be subject to global allocation 
to the combatant commands at the discretion of the Secretary of 
Defense, just as the 122 missiles requested under the Army's 
base budget would be so distributed. The committee does not 
believe that procurement of globally interchangeable assets, 
like munitions, without a commitment that they would be 
prepositioned at locations in Europe or otherwise allocated to 
EUCOM upon delivery, is an appropriate use of EDI funding.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $176.6 
million, for a total of $779.8 million, in line number 3 of MPA 
in the base budget account.

Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2

    The budget request included $106.3 million in Missile 
Procurement, Army, line number 5 for Indirect Fire Protection 
Capability Increment 2 (IFPC Inc 2).
    The committee understands that a lower level of funding 
would be sufficient to execute all planned fiscal year 2021 
activities for this program.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $40.5 
million in Missile Procurement, Army, line number 5 for IFPC 
Inc 2.

Armored Multi-Purpose Vehicle

    The budget request included $193.0 million in line number 2 
of Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicles (WTCV), 
Army, for the Armored Multi-Purpose Vehicle (AMPV).
    The committee supports the AMPV program but notes 
significant projected carryover from fiscal year 2020 and a 
delayed full rate production decision.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a reduction of $20.0 
million in line number 2 of Procurement of WTCV, Army, for the 
AMPV.

Bradley Program Modifications

    The budget request included $40.0 million in line number 5 
of Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicle (WTCV), 
Army, for Bradley Program (MOD 10) Survivability Enhancements.
    The committee notes substantial prior year carryover and 
late fiscal year 2021 live fire testing for Underbelly Interim 
Solution elements of MOD 10.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a reduction of $20.0 
million in line number 5 of Procurement of WTCV, Army, for 
Bradley Program (MOD 10) Survivability Enhancements.

M88 Family of Vehicle Modification

    The budget request included $18.4 million in line number 11 
of Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicle (WTCV), 
Army, for M88 FOV Modifications.
    The committee notes an unjustified growth of government and 
contractor program support costs.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $5.0 
million in line number 11 of Procurement of WTCV, Army, for M88 
FOV Modifications.

Joint Assault Bridge

    The budget request included $72.2 million in line number 12 
of Procurement of Weapons and Tracked Combat Vehicle (WTCV), 
Army, for the Joint Assault Bridge.
    The committee notes a 1 year contract slip that will delay 
execution of fiscal year 2021 funds.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a reduction of $10.5 
million in line number 12 of Procurement of WTCV, Army, for the 
Joint Assault Bridge.

Multi-Domain Task Force Tactical Network Technology

    The budget request included $360.4 million in line number 
23 of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for Tactical Network 
Technology Mod in Svc.
    The unfunded priorities list of the Chief of Staff of the 
Army identified non-program of record procurement requirements 
to enable intelligence, cyber, electronic warfare, and space 
operations within the Multi-Domain Task Force, including $5.0 
million for scalable network node equipment.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in line number 23 of OPA for Tactical Network 
Technology Mod in Svc.

U.S. Africa Command force protection upgrades transportable tactical 
        command communications

    The budget request included $75.2 million in line number 30 
of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for Transportable Tactical 
Command Communications.
    The committee notes that U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) 
identified as an unfunded requirement the need for emergent 
force protection upgrades following the terrorist attack 
against U.S. personnel in Manda Bay, Kenya, and after a 
theater-wide review of force protection at multiple locations 
in Africa. AFRICOM identified the most immediate priorities as 
establishing and upgrading fencing, communications systems, and 
shelters to provide protection for Department of Defense 
personnel.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $1.0 
million in line number 30 of OPA for Transportable Tactical 
Command Communications.

Multi-Domain Task Force Tactical Command Communications

    The budget request included $72.5 million in line number 30 
of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for Transportable Tactical 
Command Communications.
    The unfunded priorities list of the Chief of Staff of the 
Army identified non-program of record procurement requirements 
to enable intelligence, cyber, electronic warfare, and space 
operations within the Multi-Domain Task Force, including $1.4 
million for scalable network node equipment.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $1.4 
million in line number 30 of OPA for Transportable Tactical 
Command Communications.

U.S. Africa Command force protection upgrades combat communications

    The budget request included $550.8 million in line number 
37 of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for Combat Communications 
Handheld Manpack Small Form Fit.
    The committee notes that U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) 
identified as an unfunded requirement the need for emergent 
force protection upgrades following the terrorist attack 
against U.S. personnel in Manda Bay, Kenya, and after a 
theater-wide review of force protection at multiple locations 
in Africa. AFRICOM identified the most immediate priorities as 
establishing and upgrading fencing, communications systems, and 
shelters to provide protection for Department of Defense 
personnel serving in select locations.
    The committee recommends an increase of $1.5 million in 
line number 37 of OPA for Combat Communications Handheld 
Manpack Small Form Fit.

Spider Anti-Personnel Munition

    The budget request included $14.0 million in line number 41 
of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for the Spider Family of 
Networked Munitions.
    The committee notes the Army's cancellation of the program 
subsequent to preparation and submission of the budget request.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a reduction of $14.0 
million in line number 41 of OPA for the Spider Family of 
Networked Munitions.

Multi-Domain Task Force Defensive Cyber Operations

    The budget request included $54.8 million in line number 53 
of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for Defensive Cyber 
Operations.
    The unfunded priorities list of the Chief of Staff of the 
Army identified non-program of record procurement requirements 
to enable intelligence, cyber, electronic warfare, and space 
operations within the Multi-Domain Task Force, including 
$900,000 for cyber defense and electronic warfare tools.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of 
$900,000 in line number 53 of OPA for Defensive Cyber 
Operations.

U.S. Africa Command unfunded requirement force protection upgrades long 
        haul communications

    The budget request included $29.8 million in line number 57 
of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for Long Haul Communications 
Base Support Communications.
    The committee notes that U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) 
identified as an unfunded requirement the need for emergent 
force protection upgrades following the terrorist attack 
against U.S. personnel in Manda Bay, Kenya, and after a 
theater-wide review of force protection at multiple locations 
in Africa. AFRICOM identified the most immediate priorities as 
establishing and upgrading fencing, communications systems, and 
shelters to provide protection for Department of Defense 
personnel serving in select locations.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $1.0 
million in line number 57 of OPA for Long Haul Communications 
Base Support Communications.

Multi-Domain Task Force Counterintelligence/Security Countermeasures

    The budget request included $360.4 million in line number 
81 of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for Counterintelligence/
Security Countermeasures.
    The unfunded priorities list of the Chief of Staff of the 
Army identified non-program of record procurement requirements 
to enable intelligence, cyber, electronic warfare, and space 
operations within the Multi-Domain Task Force, including $13.4 
million for advanced intelligence systems for remote 
collection.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $13.4 
million in line number 81 of OPA for Counterintelligence/
Security Countermeasures.

U.S. Africa Command force protection upgrades indirect fire protection

    The budget request included $37.0 million in line number 88 
of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for Indirect Fire Protection 
Family of Systems.
    The committee notes that U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) 
identified as an unfunded requirement the need for emergent 
force protection upgrades following the terrorist attack 
against U.S. personnel in Manda Bay, Kenya, and after a 
theater-wide review of force protection at multiple locations 
in Africa. AFRICOM identified the most immediate priorities as 
establishing and upgrading fencing, communications systems, and 
shelters to provide protection for Department of Defense 
personnel serving in select locations.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $4.0 
million in line number 88 of OPA for Indirect Fire Protection 
Family of Systems.

Multi-Domain Task Force Electronic Warfare Tools

    The budget request included $17.0 million in line number 
119 of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for BCT Emerging 
Technologies.
    The unfunded priorities list of the Chief of Staff of the 
Army identified non-program of record procurement requirements 
to enable intelligence, cyber, electronic warfare, and space 
operations within the Multi-Domain Task Force, including $3.9 
million for electronic warfare tools and cyber defense.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $3.9 
million in line number 119 of OPA for BCT Emerging 
Technologies.

WMD Civil Support Team Equipping

    The budget request included $28.5 million in line number 
123 of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for Chemical, Biological, 
Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) defense.
    The committee recognizes the critical role that Weapons of 
Mass Destruction Civil Support Teams (CSTs) play in both 
homeland defense and overseas contingency operations and the 
importance of equipping CSTs for radiological and nuclear 
hazards detection and identification.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $14.0 
million in line number 123 of OPA for CBRN defense.

U.S. Africa Command force protection upgrades physical security systems

    The budget request included $75.5 million in line number 
181 of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for Physical Security 
Systems (OPA3).
    The committee notes that U.S. Africa Command (AFRICOM) 
identified as an unfunded requirement the need for emergent 
force protection upgrades following the terrorist attack 
against U.S. personnel in Manda Bay, Kenya, and after a 
theater-wide review of force protection at multiple locations 
in Africa. AFRICOM identified the most immediate priorities as 
establishing and upgrading fencing, communications systems, and 
shelters to provide protection for Department of Defense 
personnel serving in select locations.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $12.0 
million in line number 181 of OPA for Physical Security Systems 
(OPA3).

Expeditionary Solid Waste Disposal System

    The budget request included $32.4 million in line number 
183 of Other Procurement, Army (OPA), for Other Support 
Equipment for modification of in-service equipment (OPA-3).
    The committee concurs with the Army's budget justification 
documents, which stated that the Expeditionary Solid Waste 
Disposal System (ESWDS) ``will reduce the use of burn pits by 
providing a cleaner solution for onsite disposal of 1,000 
pounds of solid waste per day. The ESWDS will also reduce 
Soldier, civilian, and local population exposure to pollutants 
from open air burn pits; reduce the amount of trash that must 
be backhauled, reducing Soldiers' exposure and attacks during 
convoy operations; reduce the waste held onsite [which] also 
deters potential vermin that could spread disease and disrupt 
mission[;] and eliminate the security risk from uncontrolled 
access to trash.'' However, despite this justification, the 
Army requested no funds for ESWDS. The committee notes that 
ESWDS could also provide a capability during pandemics to 
rapidly incinerate contaminated personal protective equipment, 
thereby decreasing exposure to servicemembers.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $15.9 
million in line number 183 of OPA for ESWDS in OPA-3.

                                  Navy


F-35C

    The budget request included $2.2 billion in line number 3 
of Aircraft Procurement, Navy (APN), for F-35C procurement.
    The committee commends the Navy and Marine Corps for 
transitioning to a greater acquisition rate of 5th generation 
aircraft with the planned purchase of 21 aircraft but still 
believes that a higher number is required to meet the needs of 
the National Defense Strategy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $200.0 
million in line number 3 of APN for the purchase of 2 
additional F-35Cs: 1 for the Navy and 1 for the Marine Corps.

F-35B

    The budget request included $1.1 billion in line number 5 
of Aircraft Procurement, Navy (APN), for F-35B procurement.
    The committee commends the Marine Corps for transitioning 
to a greater acquisition rate of 5th generation aircraft with 
the planned purchase of 10 aircraft but still believes that a 
higher number is required to meet the requirements of the 
National Defense Strategy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $125.5 
million in line number 5 of APN for the purchase of 2 
additional F-35Bs.

CH-53K

    The budget request included $813.3 million in line number 7 
of Aircraft Procurement, Navy (APN), for CH-53K procurement.
    The Marine Corps has conducted a force design review that 
includes plans to reduce the number of heavy lift squadrons by 
three, and, as such, the committee is concerned that the 
corresponding reduction in procurement will significantly 
affect the acquisition program unit cost of the CH-53K. 
Additionally, the committee is aware of potential program 
delays and restructuring decisions germane to the CH-53K. Based 
on the reduced total numbers, the committee is concerned about 
additional non-recurring engineering costs and cost growth in 
government furnished equipment.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $20.0 
million in line number 7 of APN for CH-53K.

CH-53 Advanced Procurement

    The budget request included $201.2 million in line number 8 
of Aircraft Procurement, Navy (APN), for CH-53K procurement.
    The Marine Corps has conducted a force design review that 
includes plans to reduce the number of heavy lift squadrons by 
three, and, as such, the committee is concerned that the 
corresponding reduction in procurement will significantly 
affect the acquisition program unit cost of the CH-53K. 
Additionally, the committee is aware of potential program 
delays and restructuring decisions germane to the CH-53K and 
potential acquisition reductions next year.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $10.0 
million in line number 8 of APN for CH-53K.

MQ-4

    The budget request included $813.3 million in line number 
21 of Aircraft Procurement, Navy (APN), for MQ-4 Triton 
procurement.
    The Navy plans to take pause procurement until 2023. While 
the committee is concerned with that decision, the Navy has 
articulated the risk and mitigation efforts underway. Given the 
pause, the committee believes that the current budget request 
is greater than what it required to meet program requirements.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $50.0 
million in line number 21 of APN for MQ-4 Triton.

Marine Corps aviator body armor vest

    The budget request included $40.4 million in line number 52 
of Aircraft Procurement, Navy (APN), for Aviation Life Support 
Mods.
    The committee is aware that the Marine Corps has a 
requirement to replace the aviation life support equipment 
(ALSE) vest system currently worn by MV-22 and CH-53 aircrews 
with an aviator body armor vest (ABAV) system that improves 
mobility and performance while enhancing survivability. The 
committee encourages the Marine Corps to compete both 
commercial off-the-shelf and government-owned designs of ABAV 
systems in order to identify a system that fully meets the 
Marine Corps requirement to enable and protect MV-22 and CH-53 
aircrews while minimizing development costs and delays to 
procurement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in line number 52 of APN for Aviation Life Support 
Mods.

F-35B/C Spares

    The budget request included $2.2 billion in line number 70 
of Aircraft Procurement, Navy (APN), for Spares and Repair 
Parts.
    The committee commends the Navy and Marine Corps for 
acquiring 5th generation aircraft at a higher rate with the 
planned purchase of 31 aircraft but still believes that a 
higher number is required to meet the needs of the National 
Defense Strategy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $30.0 
million in line number 70 of APN for the purchase of initial 
spares packages for the F-35B/C aircraft.

Tomahawk

    The budget request included $277.7 million in line number 3 
of Weapons Procurement, Navy (WPN), for Tomahawk missiles.
    The committee notes that additional funding could be used 
to procure additional Tomahawk missiles for the Marine Corps in 
furtherance of the National Defense Strategy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $26.0 
million in line number 3 of WPN.

LRASM

    The budget request included $168.8 million in line number 
17 of Weapons Procurement, Navy (WPN), for 48 Long Range Anti-
Ship Missiles (LRASMs).
    The committee understands that the LRASM's range, 
semiautonomous targeting capability, survivability 
enhancements, and other unique features will significantly 
improve the carrier air wing's ability to reach and defeat 
enemy surface combatants located in contested environments 
while protecting itself against enemy countermeasures. The 
LRASM capability will be relevant in multiple theaters, but it 
will be especially useful in the Indo-Pacific, which the 
Department of Defense has named its priority theater. The LRASM 
provides a near-term capability enhancement that will allow the 
carrier air wing to contribute to blunting a Chinese offensive 
earlier in conflict, thereby directly advancing the objectives 
and priorities laid out in the National Defense Strategy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $35.0 
million in line number 17 of WPN for the purchase of 10 LRASMs.

Surface ship torpedo defense

    The budget request included $5.8 million in line number 28 
of Weapons Procurement, Navy (WPN), for surface ship torpedo 
defense.
    The committee notes insufficient justification for acoustic 
device countermeasure non-recurring costs.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $2.2 
million in line number 28 of WPN.

MK-54 torpedo modifications

    The budget request included $110.3 million in line number 
31 of Weapons Procurement, Navy (WPN), for MK-54 torpedo 
modifications.
    The committee notes Mk 54 Mod 0 production delays.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $10.0 
million in line number 31 of WPN.

Submarine supplier stability

    The budget request included $1.1 billion in line number 2 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for Columbia-class 
submarine advance procurement.
    The committee believes that expanding the capabilities of 
the second- and third-tier contractors in the submarine 
industrial base should lead to greater industrial base 
stability, cost savings, and improved efficiency as production 
increases to meet the Columbia-class construction schedule.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $175.0 
million in line number 2 for Columbia-class submarine advance 
procurement.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to notify 
the congressional defense committees, in writing, within 30 
days of obligating funds provided for submarine supplier 
stability. The notification shall include: obligation date, 
contractor name or names, location, description of the 
shortfall to be addressed, actions to be undertaken, desired 
end state, usable end items to be procured, period of 
performance, dollar amount, projected associated savings, 
including business case analysis, if applicable, contract name, 
and contract number.

Virginia-class submarines

    The budget request included $2.3 billion in line number 5 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for procurement of 
Virginia-class submarines.
    The committee notes unjustified unit cost growth in plans 
($25.0 million), modular mast ($8.8 million), propulsor ($25.6 
million), and command, control, communications and information 
($15.0 million) systems.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $74.4 
million in line number 5 of SCN.

Virginia-class submarine advance procurement

    The budget request included $1.9 billion in line number 6 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for Virginia-class 
submarine advance procurement.
    The committee notes that on December 2, 2019, the Navy 
awarded a contract modification to procure 9 Virginia-class 
submarines in fiscal years 2019 through 2023, as authorized by 
section 124 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91). This contract includes an 
option for one additional submarine.
    The committee supports preserving the option to procure 10 
Virginia-class attack submarines in fiscal years 2019 through 
2023. The committee understands that construction on this 
additional submarine would not begin until March 2024, that the 
typical procurement funding profile for Virginia-class 
submarines consists of 2 years of advance procurement followed 
by 1 year of full funding procurement, and that $272.0 million 
is the minimum amount of additional advance procurement funding 
required in fiscal year 2021.
    The committee supports utilizing a typical procurement 
funding profile and believes doing so would also provide 
additional time to more fully assess previous concerns of Navy 
officials regarding the ability of the submarine industrial 
base to build 10 Virginia-class submarines, with 9 having the 
Virginia Payload Module in this time frame.
    Additionally, as noted in the Senate report accompanying S. 
1790 (S. Rept. 116-48) of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2020, the committee still has insufficient 
clarity on the Navy's intentions regarding a significant 
Virginia-class submarine design change, which could occur in 
the same time frame.
    The committee recognizes that this additional submarine was 
the Chief of Naval Operations' top unfunded priority for fiscal 
year 2021. If this level of support continues, the committee 
expects the Navy to budget accordingly in its fiscal year 2022 
future years defense program submission.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $472.0 
million in line number 6 of SCN.

Arleigh Burke-class destroyers

    The budget request included $3.0 billion in line number 10 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for procurement of 
Arleigh Burke-class destroyers.
    The committee notes the available prior year funds in this 
line number.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $30.0 
million in line number 10 of SCN.

Surface ship supplier stability

    The budget request included $29.3 million in line number 11 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for DDG-51 advance 
procurement.
    The committee believes that expanding the capabilities of 
the second- and third-tier contractors in the surface ship 
industrial base should lead to greater industrial base 
stability, cost savings, and improved efficiency as production 
increases to build greater quantities of surface combatants.
    The committee also notes that the Navy future years defense 
program includes procurement of two Arleigh Burke-class 
destroyers in fiscal year 2022, which would be procured using a 
multiyear procurement contract. The committee understands that 
advance procurement of long lead time material could reduce 
component costs and enable improved ship construction 
intervals.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $435.0 
million in line number 11 for DDG-51 advance procurement.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to notify 
the congressional defense committees, in writing, within 30 
days of obligating funds provided for surface ship supplier 
stability. The notification shall include: obligation date, 
contractor name or names, location, description of the 
shortfall to be addressed, actions to be undertaken, desired 
end state, usable end items to be procured, period of 
performance, dollar amount, projected associated savings, 
including business case analysis, if applicable, contract name, 
and contract number.

LPD Flight II

    The budget request included $1.2 billion in line number 14 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for LPD Flight II 
ships.
    The committee notes that the Navy received incremental 
funding authority in section 129 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) for 
the LPD-31, which would be fully funded in this request.
    The committee further notes that additional funding is 
required in line number 15 of SCN to maximize the benefit of 
the amphibious ship procurement authorities provided elsewhere 
in this Act through the procurement of long lead material for 
LPD-32 and LPD-33.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $250.0 
million in line number 14 of SCN. This sum is added to line 
number 15 of SCN elsewhere in this Report.

LPD Flight II advance procurement

    The budget request included no funding in line number 15 of 
Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for LPD Flight II 
advance procurement.
    The committee notes that $500.0 million is required in line 
number 15 of SCN to maximize the benefit of the amphibious ship 
procurement authorities provided elsewhere in this Act through 
the procurement of long lead material for LPD-32 and LPD-33.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $500.0 
million in line number 15 of SCN, of which $250.0 million is a 
transfer from line number 14.

LHA replacement amphibious assault ship

    The budget request included no funding in line number 17 of 
Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for the LHA 
replacement amphibious assault ship.
    The committee remains concerned with the procurement 
profile for large deck amphibious assault ships, which includes 
a span of 6 years until the next large deck amphibious assault 
ship (LHA-9) would be procured in fiscal year 2023.
    The committee notes that efficiencies could be gained by 
reducing this time span, including steadier workflow with an 
increased learning curve, material and equipment suppliers with 
more predictable delivery contracts, and a more effective 
continuous improvement schedule.
    The committee urges the Secretary of the Navy to accelerate 
the construction of LHA-9, including putting the remainder of 
the $350.0 million appropriated in fiscal year 2019 for this 
ship on contract as soon as possible, leveraging the 
incremental funding authority in section 127 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-
92) to build LHA-9 as efficiently as possible and utilizing the 
amphibious ship procurement authorities provided elsewhere in 
this Act to further increase efficiency and stability in the 
shipbuilding industrial base.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $250.0 
million in line number 17 of SCN.

Landing craft utility

    The budget request included $87.4 million in line number 23 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for the procurement 
of landing craft utility (LCU 1700) vessels.
    The committee notes insufficient justification to support 
an increase in quantities from 4 to 5 LCU 1700 vessels, as 
compared to the projection for fiscal year 2021 in the fiscal 
year 2020 future years defense program.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $17.0 
million in line number 23 of SCN.

Outfitting

    The budget request included $825.6 million in line number 
24 of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for outfitting.
    The committee notes unjustified cost growth on the Littoral 
Combat Ship ($51.8 million) and Zumwalt-class destroyer ($26.5 
million) programs.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $78.3 
million in line number 24 of SCN.

Yard patrol craft

    The budget request included $249.8 million in line number 
26 of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for service 
craft.
    In order to increase training opportunities for Surface 
Warfare Officer candidates from all accession sources, the 
committee continues to believe that the Navy should replace the 
six YP-676 class craft slated for disposal with upgraded YP-703 
class craft that incorporate modernization, training, and 
habitability improvements derived from lessons learned with 
existing YP-703 craft.
    The committee urges the Secretary of the Navy to release a 
request for proposals for the detail design and construction of 
upgraded YP-703 class craft not later than fiscal year 2021. 
The committee notes that the Navy's latest cost estimate for 
acquisition of the first upgraded YP-703 class craft is $25.5 
million.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $25.5 
million in line number 26 of SCN.

LCAC service life extension

    The budget request included $56.5 million in line number 27 
of Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy (SCN), for LCAC service 
life extensions.
    The committee notes insufficient justification to support 
an increase in funding, as compared to the projection for 
fiscal year 2021 in the fiscal year 2020 future years defense 
program.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $56.5 
million in line number 27 of SCN.

Hybrid electric drive

    The budget request included $58.5 million in line number 2 
of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for surface combatant hull, 
mechanical, and electrical equipment.
    The committee notes that the Consolidated Appropriations 
Act, 2020 (Public Law 116-93) included $35.0 million for 
``program increase--hybrid electric drive'' in this line 
number. The committee understands that the purpose of this 
funding was to provide for the installation of the five 
previously procured hybrid electric drive (HED) ship sets.
    The committee further understands that the earliest the 
Navy can execute an HED installation is in fiscal year 2023 and 
that, prior to installation, approximately $15 million is 
required to implement engineering changes and software updates 
on the 5 previously procured HED ship sets.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $20.0 
million in line number 2 of OPN.

DDG modernization

    The budget request included $547.6 million in line number 5 
of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for DDG modernization.
    The committee notes unjustified excess unit cost growth for 
installation of modernized hardware and software.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $50.0 
million in line number 5 of OPN.

LCS common mission module equipment

    The budget request included $39.70 in line number 30 of 
Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for LCS common mission module 
equipment.
    The committee notes insufficient justification for Mine 
Countermeasures containers ($13.4 million) and Mission Package 
Computing Environment sonar signal processing ($8.9 million).
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $22.3 
million in line number 30 of OPN.

LCS mine countermeasures mission modules

    The budget request included $218.8 million in line number 
31 of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for LCS mine 
countermeasures mission modules.
    The committee notes that procurement of the buried 
minehunting module and remote minehunting module would occur 
prior to operational testing, which is planned to be completed 
in fiscal year 2022. The committee seeks to avoid excess 
procurement of these systems in advance of satisfactory 
testing.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $123.5 
million in line number 31 of OPN.

LCS anti-submarine warfare mission modules

    The budget request included $61.8 million in line number 32 
of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for LCS anti-submarine 
mission modules.
    The committee notes recent variable depth sonar testing 
delays necessary to correct deficiencies and that the initial 
operational test and evaluation period for the littoral combat 
ship anti-submarine warfare mission package is scheduled for 
fiscal year 2021. The committee seeks to avoid excess 
procurement of these systems in advance of satisfactory 
testing.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $57.0 
million in line number 32 of OPN.

Small and medium unmanned underwater vehicles

    The budget request included $67.7 million in line number 35 
of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for small and medium unmanned 
underwater vehicles.
    The committee notes that the procurement of 2 Knifefish 
surface mine countermeasure unmanned undersea vehicle systems 
would occur prior to operational testing, which is planned to 
be completed in fiscal year 2022. The committee seeks to avoid 
excess procurement of these systems in advance of satisfactory 
testing.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $30.1 
million in line number 35 of OPN.

Surface electronic warfare improvement program

    The budget request included $387.2 million in line number 
45 of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for the surface electronic 
warfare improvement program.
    The committee notes that the following funding is early to 
need: installation ($5.0 million), 2 Blocks 1B3 & 2 systems 
($32.0 million), and 3 SEWIP Lite & 1B2 systems ($19.4 
million).
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $56.4 
million in line number 45 of OPN.

Cooperative engagement capability

    The budget request included $26.0 million in line number 48 
of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for procurement of 
cooperative engagement capability systems.
    The committee notes program delays with the Common Array 
Block antenna.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $7.3 
million in line number 48 of OPN.

Next generation surface search radar

    The budget request included $159.8 million in line number 
72 of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for procurement of items 
for less than $5.0 million.
    The committee notes that the next generation surface search 
radar program has available funds due to available prior year 
installation funding ($15.6 million), late production contract 
award ($33.9 million), and excess engineering change proposal 
funding ($5.3 million).
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $54.8 
million in line number 72 of OPN.

Sonobuoys

    The budget request included $237.6 million in line number 
92 of Other Procurement, Navy (OPN), for the procurement of 
sonobuoys.
    The committee notes that greater-than-expected sonobuoy 
expenditures in fiscal year 2019 resulted in the Chief of Naval 
Operations' requesting procurement of additional sonobuoys as a 
fiscal year 2021 unfunded priority.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $49.1 
million in line number 92 of OPN.

Ground-Based Anti-Ship Missile

    The budget request included $174.7 million in line number 5 
of Procurement, Marine Corps (PMC), for Artillery Weapons 
Systems.
    The committee recognizes that Naval Strike Missiles (NSMs) 
form the initial basis for the Ground-Based Anti-Ship Missile 
(GBASM) program, which will significantly enhance the Marine 
Corps' ability to perform sea denial operations. In his 
unfunded priorities list, the Commandant of the Marine Corps 
identified an unfunded requirement of $59.6 million for 
procurement of NSMs to support the GBASM program.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $59.6 
million in line number 5 of PMC for GBASM.

                               Air Force


F-35A

    The budget request included $4.6 billion in line number 1 
of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for F-35A 
procurement.
    The committee is concerned that, after repeated 
Congressional plus-ups and support for increased production, 
the Air Force still budgets for a quantity below the stated 
production objectives of the F-35 program. Further, the 
committee is concerned that the Air Force has squandered an 
opportunity to capitalize on advanced procurement 
appropriations by only budgeting for 48 aircraft this year 
instead of the 60 aircraft that were planned and that the 
advanced procurement was previously provided for by the 
Congress. The committee expects the Department to execute 
proper forecasting and propose appropriate budget requests 
rather than to continue to rely on Congressional plus-ups.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $976.7 
million in line number 1 of APAF for the purchase of 10 
additional F-35As.

MQ-9

    The budget request included $171.9 million in line number 
20 of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for MQ-9 
procurement.
    The committee is concerned about terminating procurement of 
MQ-9s without replacement. Further, the committee is worried 
that, with a reduction of MQ-9s, the Department will incur a 
significantly increased cost in the long run and the Air Force 
will be unable to meet combatant command requirements for 
unmanned fixed wing intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $50.0 
million in line number 20 of APAF and the use of the production 
shutdown funds totaling $120.6 million from Overseas 
Contingency Operations funds for the purchase of additional MQ-
9s in order to maintain the production line for another year.

B-1

    The budget request included $3.9 million in line number 22 
of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for B-1.
    The committee supports the Air Force's request to realign 
funds to support certain B-1 radio cryptographic modernization 
requirements within the associated Research, Development, Test, 
and Evaluation account rather than using procurement dollars.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $3.9 
million in line number 22 of APAF.

B-1B

    The budget request included $21.8 million in line number 24 
of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for B-1B.
    The committee supports the Air Force's request to realign 
funds to support certain B-1 radio cryptographic modernization 
requirements within the associated Research, Development, Test, 
and Evaluation account.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of 
$493,000 in line number 24 of APAF.

F-16 Radar

    The budget request included $615.8 million in line number 
30 of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for F-16 
modernization.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Air Force's 
efforts to modernize its fourth generation fighter fleet and 
equip itself with the most advanced and capable radars in 
support of the National Defense Strategy. However, the 
committee is concerned about the quantity and timing of 
procurement of advanced radars for the entire F-16 fleet.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $25.0 
million in line number 30 of APAF for the procurement of 
additional radar sets across the entire F-16 fleet.

T-38 Ejection Seat

    The budget request included $36.8 million in line number 45 
of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for T-38 upgrades.
    The committee is aware that T-38As and T-38Bs have not been 
retrofitted with modern ejection seat technology that can 
support the range of heights and weights of the current Air 
Force pilot population. The legacy seats lack modern 
capability, which creates safety concerns for pilots during 
ejection in the current operational envelope. The committee 
notes that this technology is in use in all Air Education and 
Training Command (AETC) T-38C Talons. The upgraded egress 
system would provide a significant improvement in safety 
margins for all pilots.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $7.7 
million in line number 45 of APAF to equip T-38As and T-38Bs 
with updated egress systems that provide for the safety of Air 
Force pilots.

E-4B Survivable Super High Frequency program

    The budget request included $58.8 million in line number 59 
of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for the E-4B 
National Airborne Operations Center (NAOC).
    The committee understands that the E-4B Survivable Super 
High Frequency program has been rephased to future fiscal 
years.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a reduction of $14.7 
million in line number 59 of APAF for the E-4B NAOC.

E-8 (JSTARS)

    The budget request included $11.0 million in line number 60 
of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for conducting 
various modifications of Joint Surveillance/Target Attack Radar 
System (JSTARS) aircraft.
    The committee believes in the continued relevance of the 
JSTARS platform and the immediate requirement for a low-cost 
network that can provide multiple simultaneous data links to 
and from airborne and ground-based platforms in contested 
environments.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in line number 60 of APAF for installing modifications 
in JSTARS aircraft to provide for secure information 
transmission capability.

CV-22 ABSS

    The budget request included $36.8 million in line number 70 
of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for CV-22 upgrades.
    The CV-22 Osprey is operated by Air Force Special 
Operations Command (AFSOC) to conduct special missions around 
the world. The CV-22 Advanced Ballistic Stopping System (ABSS) 
system provides protection for passengers in the aircraft cabin 
area via floor armor and sidewall cabin armor. The AFSOC 
initially procured 16 ABSS systems, but 34 aircraft remain to 
be retrofitted.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in line number 70 of APAF for CV-22 ballistic 
protection.

F-35A initial spares

    The budget request included $926.7 million in line number 
71 of Aircraft Procurement, Air Force (APAF), for Spares and 
Repair Parts.
    The committee remains concerned that the initial spares 
procurement accounts are not adequately resourced which 
continues to affect readiness, aircraft availability, and 
mission capable rates of F-35 aircraft.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $30.0 
million in line number 71 of APAF for the purchase of initial 
spares packages for the F-35 aircraft.

Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff Missile (JASSM)

    The budget request included $476.0 million in line number 4 
of Missile Procurement, Air Force (MPAF), for JASSM.
    The committee is concerned that the Air Force has not 
procured sufficient weapons to support the National Defense 
Strategy and is also concerned that the mix of Long Range Anti-
Ship Missiles (LRASMs) and Joint Air-to-Surface Standoff 
Missiles (JASSM) is too heavily weighted on JASSM to support 
National Defense Strategy-envisioned conflicts in the Indo-
Pacific region.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $75.0 
million in line number 5 of MPAF to realign weapons capability 
and purchase additional LRASMs, recommended elsewhere in this 
report.

Long Range Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM)

    The budget request included $19.8 million in line number 5 
of Missile Procurement, Air Force (MPAF), for the Long Range 
Anti-Ship Missile (LRASM).
    The committee is concerned that the Air Force has not 
procured sufficient number of weapons to support the National 
Defense Strategy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $75.0 
million in line number 5 of Missile Procurement, Air Force 
(MPAF), for procurement of additional LRASMs.

Cobra Dane service life extension

    The budget request included $96.6 million in line number 17 
of Procurement, Space Force (PSF), for Space Mods.
    The committee notes that, because of projected delays in 
fielding two homeland defense radars in the Indo-Pacific area 
of responsibility, Cobra Dane will now be required to exceed 
its originally planned life expectancy. The committee also 
notes that this project was included on the unfunded priorities 
list submitted by the Commander, U.S. Northern Command and 
North American Aerospace Defense Command.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $12.5 
million in line number 17 of PSF to accelerate the service life 
extension of the Cobra Dane radar.

PDI: Mission Partner Environment (MPE) local upgrades, U.S. Indo-
        Pacific Command

    The budget request included $9.3 million in line number 14 
of Other Procurement, Air Force (OPAF), for international 
intelligence technology and architectures.
    The unfunded priorities list submitted by the Commander, 
U.S. Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM), included additional 
funding for Mission Partner Environment (MPE) local upgrades to 
modernize the command, control, communications, and computers 
architecture in the INDOPACOM area of responsibility and 
provide local systems to support and enhance operations with 
allies and partners.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $1.5 
million in line number 14 of OPAF for MPE local upgrades within 
the INDOPACOM area of responsibility, specifically, the BICES-X 
program.

PDI: Mission Partner Environment (MPE) local upgrades, U.S. Indo-
        Pacific Command

    The budget request included $132.3 million in line number 
49 of Other Procurement, Air Force (OPAF), for base 
communications infrastructure.
    The unfunded priorities list submitted by the Commander, 
U.S. Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM), included additional 
funding for Mission Partner Environment (MPE) local upgrades to 
modernize the command, control, communications, and computers 
architecture in the INDOPACOM area of responsibility and 
provide local systems to support and enhance operations with 
allies and partners.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $14.0 
million in line number 49 of OPAF for MPE local upgrades within 
the INDOPACOM area of responsibility, specifically, the PACNET 
initiative to transform the theater communications and data 
architecture.

Energy efficient small shelters upgrades

    The budget request included $52.0 million in line number 56 
of Other Procurement, Air Force (OPAF), for Mobility Equipment.
    Solar shades provide energy efficiency and extended service 
life of small shelters.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $4.7 
million in line number 56 of OPAF for Mobility Equipment.

                              Defense Wide


Joint Regional Security Stacks SIPR funding--Procurement

    The budget request included $88.7 million in line number 19 
of Procurement, Defense-wide, for the Joint Regional Security 
Stacks (JRSS).
    The committee is aware of the operational cybersecurity 
limitations of the JRSS technology as assessed by the Director, 
Operational Test and Evaluation, the difficulty of training 
personnel to use the JRSS, and the shortage of feasible 
tactics, techniques, and procedures to make effective use of 
the JRSS. The committee believes that the deployment of JRSS on 
the Secret Internet Protocol Router Network is thus 
inappropriate, given JRSS' limited cybersecurity capability and 
the existence of alternative capabilities to execute its 
network functions.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $11.1 
million in line number 19 of Procurement, Defense-wide, due to 
the operational cybersecurity limitations of the JRSS 
technology.

Terminal High Altitude Area Defense

    The budget request included $495.4 million in line number 
31 of Procurement, Defense-Wide (PDW), for Terminal High 
Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) and did not include funding in 
line number 36 of PDW for BMDS AN/TPY-2 Radars.
    The committee notes that the Army remains below its 
validated requirement for THAAD batteries and that the 
President's budget did not include funding for the procurement 
of additional batteries. The unfunded priorities list submitted 
by the Director of the Missile Defense Agency included funding 
for an eighth THAAD battery. The committee further notes that 
procurement of this battery in early fiscal year 2021 would be 
more cost-efficient due to synchronization with an ongoing 
foreign military sales case.
    The committee also understands that the production line 
supporting the THAAD Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Trucks 
(HEMTTs) will likely close in the near future. The Director's 
unfunded priorities list also included funding for a life-of-
type buy for HEMTTs to support the existing and future force.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $106.4 
million in line number 31 of PDW for the eighth battery 
components ($76.3 million) and HEMTTs ($30.1 million) and an 
increase of $243.3 million in line number 36 of PDW for BMDS 
AN/TPY-2 Radars.

SM-3 IIA procurement

    The budget request included $218.3 million in line number 
37 of Procurement, Defense-Wide (PDW), for SM-3 Block IIA 
missiles.
    The committee believes that procuring higher quantities of 
this interceptor each year (including foreign military sales) 
is prudent, given existing requirements for Aegis Ashore and 
Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense ships, the capacity and 
efficiencies of the industrial base, and the potential for 
additional land-based SM-3 systems. The committee also notes 
that this increased procurement was included on the unfunded 
priorities list submitted by the Director of the Missile 
Defense Agency.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $128.0 
million in line number 37 of PDW for SM-3 Block IIA missiles.

Armed Overwatch

    The budget request included $101.0 million in line number 
55 of Procurement, Defense-wide, for Armed Overwatch.
    The committee is concerned that the acquisition strategy 
for an armed overwatch aircraft for U.S. Special Operations 
Command (SOCOM) lacks a validated requirement and an 
appropriate analysis of the cost-effectiveness of acquiring a 
new special operations-peculiar platform for this purpose. 
Furthermore, the committee is concerned that the rapid 
acquisition timeline being pursued by SOCOM does not allow for 
adequate consideration of: the cost of operating and sustaining 
the aircraft; the potential negative impacts on an already 
stressed community of pilots, aircrews, and maintainers; and 
how such a costly addition fits into SOCOM's medium-to-long-
term airborne intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance 
capability roadmap.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $101.0 
million in line number 55 of Procurement, Defense-wide, for 
Armed Overwatch. The committee notes that, elsewhere in this 
report, the committee recommends increases in funding to 
address unfunded requirements identified by SOCOM to address 
urgent needs, to include the replacement of combat loss 
aircraft and other equipment.

DHC-8 combat loss replacement

    The budget request included no funding in line number 56 of 
Procurement, Defense-Wide, for Manned ISR.
    The committee notes that a DHC-8 aircraft operated by U.S. 
Special Operations Command (SOCOM) was destroyed during a 
terrorist attack against forces supporting Operation Enduring 
Freedom--Horn of Africa and that SOCOM identified replacement 
of the combat loss as an unfunded requirement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $40.1 
million in line number 56 of Procurement, Defense-wide, for 
combat loss replacement of a DHC-8 aircraft.

Aircraft maintenance support combat loss replacement

    The budget request included $3.8 million in line number 62 
of Procurement, Defense-wide, for U-28.
    The committee notes that various aircraft maintenance 
spares and support equipment were destroyed during an attack on 
forces supporting Operation Inherent Resolve and that U.S. 
Special Operations Command identified replacement of these 
items as an unfunded requirement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $24.7 
million in line number 62 of Procurement, Defense-wide, for 
combat loss replacement of aircraft maintenance spares and 
support equipment.

Special Operations Tactical Communication/Next Generation Tactical 
        Communications

    The budget request included $88.7 million in line number 71 
of Procurement, Defense-wide, for Warrior Systems, SOF Tactical 
Communications.
    The committee notes that U.S. Special Operations Command 
(SOCOM) identified executability issues with the Multi-Mission 
Payload-Light (MMP-Light) program due to appropriations 
rescissions in fiscal year 2020. As a result, SOCOM requested 
the transfer of funds from the MMP-Light to the man-pack 
Capital Equipment Replacement Program for fiscal year 2021.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $13.4 
million in line number 71 of Procurement, Defense-wide, for the 
man-pack Capital Equipment Replacement Program. The decrement 
associated with this transfer is reflected elsewhere in this 
report.

Multi-Mission Payload

    The budget request included $12.2 million in line number 77 
of Procurement, Defense-wide, for Warrior Systems, Multi-
Mission Payload (MMP).
    The committee notes that U.S. Special Operations Command 
(SOCOM) identified executability issues with the MMP-Light 
program due to appropriations rescissions in fiscal year 2020. 
As a result, SOCOM requested the transfer of funds from the 
MMP-Light program to the man-pack Capital Equipment Replacement 
Program for fiscal year 2021.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a reduction of $12.2 
million in line number 77 of Procurement, Defense-wide, for 
Warrior Systems, Multi-Mission Payload (MMP). The increase 
associated with this transfer is reflected elsewhere in this 
report.

Syria exfiltration reconstitution

    The budget request included $247.0 million in line number 
81 of Procurement, Defense-wide, for Operational Enhancements.
    The committee notes that U.S. Special Operations Command 
identified the replacement of items destroyed in connection 
with the exfiltration of forces in Syria as an unfunded 
requirement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $12.5 
million in line number 81 of Procurement, Defense-wide, for 
Syria exfiltration reconstitution.

                       Items of Special Interest


A-10

    The committee is encouraged that the Air Force is executing 
a modernization strategy for the A-10 fleet to preserve this 
unique capability for CAS, FAC-A, and CSAR missions. The 
committee believes that upgrades to weapons delivery, 
management systems, and the electronic warfare and 
communications suite that keep pace with threat advancements 
and proliferation are critical to the continued success of the 
weapon system. The committee notes that these enhancements and 
the aircraft wing replacements, airframe refurbishment, and new 
mission computers will maintain the effectiveness of the A-10C 
through at least the 2030s. However, the committee is concerned 
with the assumptions being made about the required total size 
of the A-10 fleet in the future.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing no later than November 1, 2020, to 
the committee to explain the required capacity for the unique 
A-10 capability and to validate the assumptions used to 
calculate the planned future fleet size of the A-10. The 
briefing should address capacity required to sustain current 
missions, support future missions, and to deliver rotational 
forces for combatant commanders in the various mission sets of 
the A-10C.

Active Protection Systems updated plans for M2 Bradley and Stryker 
        combat vehicles

    The committee commends the successful test, integration, 
and application of an active protective system on the M1 Abrams 
tank but notes with concern that similar results have not been 
achieved for the M2 Bradley fighting vehicle or Stryker. 
Threats to combat vehicles such as the M2 Bradley and Stryker 
family of vehicles are of ever-increasing lethality and 
proliferating widely, and active protection systems are 
integral to these vehicles' survivability.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to provide a briefing, no later than August 1, 2020, on 
the Army's updated plans to integrate active protection systems 
into the M2 Bradley and Stryker family of vehicles. The 
briefing should also include an assessment of the impact of the 
recent reset of the Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle program 
on the Modular Active Protection System.

Advanced Battle Management System bridge report

    The committee is aware of the Air Force's plans to invest 
substantial funds into the Advanced Battle Management System 
(ABMS) program to achieve future warfighting objectives. 
However, the committee is concerned that there exists an 
interim requirement to achieve resilient networking using 
existing infrastructure and datalinks. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Air Force, in conjunction with the 
other military services, to submit a plan to the congressional 
defense committees, not later than January 1, 2021, for the 
allocation of resources, along with details as to how and when 
the resources will be executed, so as to either improve current 
Link 16 capabilities or create an alternative solution in terms 
of increased capacity, improved resilience, and techniques to 
reduce probability of detection. Additionally, the plan shall 
specify the path forward to improve the resiliency of Link 16 
networks using existing capabilities, to include, but not 
necessarily limited to, additional air, ground, sea, and space-
borne relay nodes to enhance resistance to interference and 
complicate potential adversaries' targeting.

Advanced combat search and rescue capability

    The committee commends the Air Force on its historical 
focus on combat search and rescue (CSAR), including the 
resourcing and training of specialized squadrons focused on 
returning isolated personnel back to friendly forces. The 
National Defense Strategy refocuses the Department of Defense's 
weight of effort to preparing for near-peer warfare and, as a 
result, CSAR has become even more important. Emerging 
technologies, such as the Agility Prime program, and 
capabilities, such as the CV-22, present new opportunities for 
the CSAR mission. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Secretary of the Air Force to conduct an analysis, and report 
to the committee, no later than February 1, 2021, on the 
benefits and capabilities of these technologies and their 
potential for use in contested environments and the scenarios 
envisioned in the National Defense Strategy.

Air Force pilot training

    The committee supports the Air Force's procurement of the 
T-7A Redhawk training aircraft, recognizing the improved 
capabilities that it will bring to undergraduate pilot 
training. The Air Force plans to transition from the T-38C to 
the T-7A at five locations: Columbus AFB, Mississippi; Laughlin 
AFB, Texas; Randolph AFB, Texas; Sheppard AFB, Texas; and Vance 
AFB, Oklahoma.
    The committee is concerned about potential impacts that 
this transition will have on the Air Force's undergraduate 
pilot training pipeline, which could further exacerbate its 
pilot shortage. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary 
of Air Force to provide a plan, no later than March 1, 2021, to 
the congressional defense committees on how it will transition 
undergraduate pilot training from the T-38C to the T-7A. This 
plan should include, at a minimum, the following: the timeline 
of deliveries of T-7A aircraft; the order of beddown locations 
at each of the planned training bases; details on the standup 
and expansion of the T-7A instructor pilot cadre; details on 
the standup of simulator operators and maintenance personnel; 
impacts of the new training syllabus; an assessment of the 
transition's overall impact to the undergraduate pilot training 
pipeline; and an assessment of the requirement for an 
additional training location if the Air Force were to determine 
that the capacity at the five planned training bases is 
insufficient.

Anti-ship missile development

    The committee is encouraged by increased attention across 
the Department of Defense to the surface warfare mission area, 
including several new anti-ship missile (ASM) programs. 
However, the committee desires greater clarity on Joint Force 
ASM requirements, development efforts, and acquisition 
strategies. The committee is interested in ensuring that 
rigorous ASM requirements exist tied to specific threats and 
operational concepts, development efforts are rationalized 
where possible, and acquisition strategies are streamlined.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Vice Chairman of the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Research and Engineering, and the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Acquisition and Sustainment, in consultation with the 
Secretaries of the military departments, to submit a report to 
the congressional defense committees not later than December 1, 
2020, on Joint Force ASM requirements, development efforts, and 
acquisition strategies.
    This report shall include the following elements: (1) A 
description of Joint Requirements Oversight Council-validated 
(JROC-validated) requirements for ASMs, including inventory 
objectives and capabilities required for each ASM, such as 
range, speed, seeker performance, and data link requirements; 
(2) A description of other Department of Defense requirements 
for ASMs that have not been validated by the JROC, including 
inventory objectives and capabilities required for each ASM, 
such as range, speed, seeker performance, and data link 
requirements; (3) A description of the development efforts 
supporting each ASM program listed under (1) and (2), such as 
prototyping subsystems, investigating use of common components, 
conducting developmental testing, conducting operational 
testing, and engaging in other forms of risk reduction; and (4) 
A description of the acquisition strategies, if applicable, for 
each ASM program listed under (1) and (2) above.

Army Radio Modernization

    The committee recognizes the challenges faced by the Army 
in testing, evaluating, and fielding radio capabilities to 
create an overarching integrated tactical network and is 
encouraged by the Army's intent to utilize a rapid acquisition 
process to separately compete each tactical radio variant for 
each aircraft being outfitted under the Army's Air to Ground 
Networking Radio program. Despite challenges in integration, by 
encouraging the platform specific head to head competition, 
rather than making a one-size-fits-all decision, the Army will 
promote competition within the industry and tailor the best 
solution for each aircraft. The committee encourages the Army 
to quickly conduct a thorough and deliberate process to ensure 
that the most effective radio is selected for each aircraft.

Assessment of Navy anti-submarine warfare training targets

    The committee understands that the Navy lacks a modern 
heavyweight anti-submarine warfare (ASW) target and that the 
current inventory of ASW training targets is deficient in 
satisfying the pre-deployment training requirements of our 
submarine, surface, and aviation ASW forces. The committee 
further understands that these ASW training targets are 
increasingly difficult to sustain, costly to repair, limited in 
capability, and have no identified replacement. The committee 
is concerned that these factors may negatively impact the ASW 
proficiency of deploying naval forces.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to submit to the congressional defense committees not later 
than February 1, 2021, an assessment on the current 
capabilities of Navy heavyweight ASW targets and a 
modernization plan for future targets and training 
capabilities. The assessment shall include, at a minimum, the 
following: (1) The current inventory of anti-submarine warfare 
targets, their capabilities, and age; (2) An evaluation as to 
how the current inventory of heavyweight ASW targets supports 
ASW training certification requirements for surface, submarine, 
and aviation ASW forces, to include the number heavyweight ASW 
targets required to generate a sufficient number of target 
presentations during training events and the degree to which 
these target presentations may be made in a manner that is 
consistent with current and projected peer and near-peer threat 
submarine capabilities; (3) An evaluation of existing training 
target availability and the Navy's plan to replace the current 
inventory of training targets with capabilities that are equal 
to or better than current Navy capabilities; (4) The benefits 
and risks of the 20-year service life extension plan currently 
in execution beyond the current expected 30-year service life 
of the MK 30 Mod 1 heavyweight ASW target; and (5) A plan to 
begin replacement of the current inventory of existing training 
targets no later than September 30, 2023.
    This assessment shall be presented as a briefing and 
submitted in unclassified form but may include a classified 
annex.

C-17 maintenance

    The committee is aware that the Air Force intends to 
achieve cost savings by moving 100 percent of its C-17 fleet 
heavy maintenance to a single depot. The Air Force has 
acknowledged that this course of action would decrease 
readiness, although not below an acceptable level, and that it 
would take 14 years to obtain a positive return on capital 
investment. The committee notes that the Air Force also found 
that such a course of action would realize billions of dollars 
of savings in C-17 life cycle costs and establish affordable 
and effective depot maintenance and commodity repair 
capability. The committee also believes that this course of 
action would improve the Air Force's implementation of section 
2464 of title 10, United States Code. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of the Air Force to submit a report, no 
later than January 31, 2021, to the congressional defense 
committees that details each course of action evaluated in the 
business case analysis of moving C-17 heavy maintenance to a 
single depot and other future product support strategies for 
the C-17 aircraft.
    Additionally, the committee directs the Director, Cost 
Assessment and Program Evaluation, to review the Secretary's 
report and submit an independent assessment to the 
congressional defense committees no later than March 1, 2021.

Comptroller General report on the Supervisor of Shipbuilding

    The committee notes that the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) concluded in a June 2018 report, Navy 
Shipbuilding: Past Performance Provides Valuable Lessons for 
Future Investments (GAO-18-238SP), that the Navy has 
experienced significant cost increases, schedule delays, and 
performance issues on its shipbuilding programs. The committee 
understands that recent quality issues on a number of Navy 
ships and submarines point to, among other issues, challenges 
in the Navy's ability to oversee quality at the private 
shipyards that build its vessels.
    The committee notes that the Navy's Supervisors of 
Shipbuilding, Conversion and Repair (SUPSHIPS) organization is 
responsible for administering contracts for new ships and 
submarines, as well as nuclear repair and modernization at 
private shipyards, including ensuring that shipbuilders provide 
the Navy with vessels that meet quality expectations. The 
committee understands that SUPSHIPS' role in this regard is 
unusual, as the Defense Contract Management Agency provides 
this type of contract oversight for most other Department of 
Defense contracts.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General to 
review the Navy's SUPSHIPS organization, including an 
assessment of: (1) The roles, responsibilities, procedures, 
capabilities, and capacity of SUPSHIPS to ensure that ship 
contracts are executed on time, at expected cost, and to 
contractual and performance requirements; (2) SUPSHIPS' role in 
overseeing suppliers for Navy ship programs; (3) The 
effectiveness of actions taken by SUPSHIPS and its higher 
chain-of-command when shipbuilders are not meeting cost, 
schedule, or performance requirements; (4) SUPSHIPS' approach 
to contract execution oversight and monitoring for shipbuilding 
programs, as compared to that of the Defense Contract 
Management Agency for other large Department of Defense 
acquisition programs; and (5) Any other related matters that 
the Comptroller General deems appropriate.
    The committee directs the Comptroller General to provide a 
briefing to the congressional defense committees on the 
findings of this review by December 1, 2020, with a report to 
follow.

Comptroller General review of Navy shipbuilding and ship maintenance

    The committee notes that the Navy is embarking on an 
ambitious, expensive undertaking to develop, design, and 
construct a number of new ships--both manned and unmanned--over 
the coming years, which would represent the biggest increase in 
fleet size in over 30 years.
    The committee understands that the Navy expects vessels to 
be constructed in quantities that sustain the industrial base 
and expand the overall size of the Navy, which requires not 
just a healthy industrial base for ship construction but also 
for all of the materials, systems, and foundry work that go 
into building a complete ship. Likewise, the Navy will have to 
expand capability in the ship repair industrial base, which 
consists of public and private shipyards that are struggling to 
execute maintenance programs to sustain the current fleet of 
approximately 300 battle force ships.
    However, the economic consequences of the first global 
pandemic in over 100 years may have significant and potentially 
long-lasting ramifications on the Navy's already limited 
industrial bases for shipbuilding and ship repair.
    Accordingly, in order to better understand and address the 
viability of future Navy ship construction and ship repair 
plans, the committee directs the Comptroller General to conduct 
a review of: (1) The Navy's current shipbuilding plan and the 
capability of the shipbuilding industrial base to support this 
plan; and (2) The ship maintenance plan and the capability of 
the ship repair industrial base to support that plan.
    As part of this review, the Comptroller General shall 
assess the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on the Navy's 
ability to build and maintain quality ships on time and on 
schedule. This review shall also address the following 
questions: (1) What plans does the Navy have in place to 
execute its current shipbuilding and ship repair plans? (2) How 
does the Navy evaluate the health of its shipbuilding and ship 
repair industrial bases? (3) To what extent are shipbuilding 
and ship repair program performance affected by COVID-related 
issues? (4) How is the Navy assessing and addressing the 
consequences of COVID-19 on the shipbuilding and ship repair 
industrial bases, including lower-tier suppliers? (5) What 
challenges related to its industrial bases will the Navy likely 
face over the next decade that could present significant risk 
to achieving its shipbuilding and ship repair plans? (6) What 
other matters does the Comptroller General deem relevant to 
highlight?
    The Comptroller General shall submit this review to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and House of 
Representatives not later than March 1, 2021.

Counter unmanned aircraft systems matters

    The low cost, ease of operation, and accelerating 
proliferation of innovative commercial-based small unmanned 
aircraft system (UAS) capabilities is rapidly expanding the 
scope and complexity of the threat to U.S. forces and 
infrastructure. The committee believes that countering small 
UASs will be an enduring requirement for the Department of 
Defense (DOD) for at least the next decade. As a result, the 
committee is encouraged by the DOD's designation of the Army as 
Executive Agent for Counter small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (C-
sUAS) in 2019, the rapid standup of the Joint C-sUAS Office 
(JCO) in 2020, and the recommendation to downselect and 
prioritize resources toward the most promising systems.
    To further the Department's C-sUAS activities, the 
committee recommends an increase in funding toward several C-
sUAS efforts, totaling approximately $73 million, noted 
elsewhere in this report. These efforts include fully funding 
the requirement to expedite activities of the JCO as captured 
in the Chief of Staff of the Army's unfunded priorities list, 
providing additional funding to the JCO to increase and improve 
test and evaluation activities, and providing additional 
funding to U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) for 
operational demonstration of C-sUAS capabilities. The committee 
encourages the JCO to work closely with SOCOM to ensure that 
the JCO's efforts appropriately incorporate special operations-
peculiar requirements that arise from the employment of small, 
disaggregated teams in remote and austere locations and to 
provide pathways to transition technologies demonstrated by 
SOCOM.
    The committee supports the Department's investment in 
advanced technologies to enhance C-sUAS capabilities and 
encourages expediting procurement and fielding of commercially 
available solutions. However, the committee believes that 
commercial C-sUAS proposals should demonstrate combat 
capability in operationally relevant environments and be 
validated by third-party entities and Department of Defense 
developmental and operational test organizations, as 
appropriate, before being considered and adopted by the 
Department. Additionally, the committee recognizes the 
leadership and innovation of multiple Federal agencies, 
especially the Department of Justice (DOJ), in the development 
and fielding of C-sUAS capability as well as the DOJ's focus on 
and investment in test and evaluation infrastructure to support 
long-term objective analytical evaluation of current and 
evolving C-sUAS capabilities over the next decade.
    Therefore, elsewhere in this report, the committee 
recommends a provision that would require the JCO to prioritize 
C-sUAS systems that can be fielded in year 2021 and would also 
encourage the Secretary of the Army, as the executive agent, to 
consider establishing a Counter-UAS center of excellence to 
coordinate research and development of counter-drone 
technologies, tactics, techniques, and procedures. 
Additionally, the committee would require development of a plan 
and investment in infrastructure to build the test and 
evaluation framework required to deepen understanding of 
countering the small, low, and slow UAS threats that the 
committee believes represent an enduring threat to U.S. troops 
and infrastructure.

DDG-51 destroyer multi-year procurement

    The committee continues to support the national policy of 
achieving at least a 355-ship fleet, as codified in the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public 
Law 115-91), which is integral to the National Defense Strategy 
and its emphasis on near-peer competition with Russia and 
China.
    The committee views DDG-51 destroyers as the backbone of 
the surface fleet, providing multi-mission flexibility and 
increasing capability with introduction of Flight III and the 
AN/SPY-6 radar. With plans for construction of a new class of 
Large Surface Combatants (LSCs) toward the end of this decade 
and the current multi-year procurement of DDG-51s ending in 
fiscal year 2022, the committee believes that it is imperative 
that the Navy award another DDG-51 multi-year contract 
beginning in fiscal year 2023. This contract is critical to 
ensuring that Flight III capability continues to be delivered 
to the fleet and the industrial base is maintained to support 
the LSC acquisition strategy.
    Accordingly, the committee urges the Secretary of Defense 
and the Secretary of the Navy to make all necessary plans to 
award another multi-year contract for DDG-51 Flight III 
destroyers in fiscal year 2023, including long lead material 
purchases in fiscal year 2022.

E-8 strategy

    The committee is encouraged by the Air Force's plans to 
modernize the E-8C Joint Surveillance and Target-Attack Radar 
System (JSTARS) weapon system to meet combatant commander 
requirements until a replacement capability is fielded. 
Additionally, the committee recognizes the Secretary of the Air 
Force's commitment to perform associated upgrades to meet 
airworthiness and operational mandates.
    The committee is concerned and disappointed, however, that 
these plans have not been followed by execution to implement 
upgrades on a reasonable schedule. The committee is concerned 
with the history of delayed execution of funds to procure and 
field modifications in a timely manner. The committee believes 
the Air Force should assess what the Air Force needs to do to 
ensure that E-8C JSTARS efforts are consistent with ensuring 
that the Air Force can effectively sustain and advance this 
weapon system's capability commensurate with combatant 
commander requirements.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to submit a report to the congressional defense 
committees by February 1, 2021, on the strategy for sustaining 
the E-8C JSTARS fleet until a suitable replacement capability 
and capacity is fielded. The strategy shall include: (1) 
Recommended changes to the E-8C program management structure to 
address funding execution shortfalls; and (2) A plan for 
modifications, including schedules and associated funding 
profiles, for achieving those modifications and ensuring that 
combatant commander requirements are met.

E-8C modernization

    The committee is encouraged by the Air Force's recognition 
of the importance of E-8C Joint Surveillance and Target Attack 
Radar System (JSTARS) aircraft and its efforts to modernize the 
avionics and communications equipment onboard to make the 
platform an integral component of the Advanced Battle 
Management System. The committee is concerned that the Air 
Force is considering a potential effort for re-engining the E-8 
Joint JSTARS aircraft at the expense of other JSTARS 
modernization programs. The committee is aware that the 
business case for JSTARS re-engining would require that the 
aircraft to fly well into the 2040s, which is beyond the 
planned in-service date, to see a positive return on the 
investment and, as such, believes that the money that might be 
used for re-engining would be better spent on other JSTARS 
modernization efforts, such as installing advanced avionics and 
upgrading communications equipment.

Electronic warfare red team

    Realistic training of blue forces in electronic warfare 
requires a red force that is trained in the tactics, 
techniques, and procedures of potential opponents, as informed 
by timely intelligence, and that fields representative 
electronic warfare equipment. The committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to brief the congressional defense 
committees, no later than March 31, 2021, on progress made and 
gaps remaining in training electronic warfare red forces based 
on intelligence as well as the Department of Defense's ability 
to field representative equipment or systems that can simulate 
representative equipment to complement the tactics, techniques, 
and procedures of red forces in order to better prepare the 
Joint Force through realistic electronic warfare training.

F-35 basing requirements

    The National Defense Strategy requires the Department of 
Defense to posture ready, combat-credible forces forward 
alongside allies and partners and, if necessary, to fight and 
win. The Department's Indo-Pacific Strategy--which describes 
the Indo-Pacific as the Department's priority theater--
emphasizes efforts to enhance Joint Force preparedness for the 
most pressing scenarios, which will occur along our 
competitors' peripheries, to include a fait accompli scenario.
    To date, the Air Force has announced the selection of 9 
operating locations for the F-35A, including locations in the 
continental United States, Alaska, and Europe. It has yet to 
announce plans for any F-35A operating locations forward in the 
Indo-Pacific region--in other words, locations sufficiently 
forward to enable immediate response in the most pressing 
scenarios envisioned in the Department's foundational strategic 
documents. At present, realizing any potential plan to 
establish an F-35A operating location forward in the Indo-
Pacific region could take nearly a decade. Put another way, 
nearly half of the Air Force's total procurement quantity of F-
35As will be delivered before the first aircraft arrives at an 
operating location forward in the Department's priority 
theater.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force, in consultation with the Commander, Indo-Pacific 
Command, not later than December 31, 2020, to provide a 
briefing to the committee on: the Air Force's current projected 
timeline to establish an F-35A operating location forward in 
the Indo-Pacific region; options to place a continuous 
rotational F-35A force utilizing only Air National Guard 
assets; options for accelerating that timeline; and an 
assessment of the merit and feasibility of those options.

Flame retardant vehicle soft armor and materiel

    The military services have established baseline 
requirements for flame resistant uniforms, but the committee 
understands that they have not developed similar requirements 
for vehicle soft armor, such as spall liners, and internal 
textile materials. Vehicle soft armor is often manufactured 
with a broad range of materials, which may include highly 
flammable plastics and glass fibers. While the primary purpose 
of soft armor is to protect against fragments, a large majority 
of enemy strikes result in flame incidents, which place 
soldiers and marines at greater risk.
    As the military services develop next generation systems 
that can counter near-peer threats, the committee encourages 
the Army and the Marine Corps to review requirements for combat 
vehicles that include flame resistant standards. Further, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Army, in coordination 
with the Secretaries of the Navy and the Air Force, to provide 
a briefing by September 30, 2020, on the feasibility and 
availability of incorporating materials inside combat vehicles 
that possess flame resistant properties.

Future Vertical Lift long-term cost and schedule assessment

    The committee is encouraged by the Army's progress on the 
Future Vertical Lift (FVL) program, including a Competitive 
Demonstration Risk Reduction (CDRR) contract award for the 
Future Long Range Assault Aircraft (FLRAA) and a Competitive 
Prototype (CP) award for the Future Attack Reconnaissance 
Aircraft (FARA). The committee supports the development and 
procurement of these critical FVL capabilities but is concerned 
about the feasibility of simultaneously procuring these 
aircraft, as well as other Army modernization priorities 
currently in development, given budget projections and the 
Army's fielding timeline.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to provide a report no later than February 15, 2021, to 
the committee assessing the current schedule, to include 
potential for sequencing procurement of the FLRAA and FARA 
programs. The report shall include 10-year cost and schedule 
projections, an assessment of operational and acquisition 
risks, and potential mitigation measures to both FLRAA and FARA 
cost and schedule profiles.

Guided missile frigate

    The committee notes that a contract for up to 10 guided 
missile frigates (FFG(X)) was awarded in April 2020 with a 
potential cumulative value of $5.6 billion. Given that this is 
a new class of ships that will have a significant role in the 
Navy battle force, the committee seeks additional information 
on the program.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Director of the 
Congressional Budget Office to submit to the congressional 
defense committees, not later than October 1, 2020, a report 
analyzing the FFG(X) program. The report shall include: (1) An 
analysis of the estimated costs of the program in the context 
of other current and past Navy shipbuilding programs; (2) An 
independent cost estimate of the FFG(X) program based on the 
specific winning ship design; and (3) Other related matters the 
Director deems appropriate.

HMMWV rollover mitigation

    The committee understands that the Army is in the process 
of performing safety modifications to the Light Tactical 
Vehicle fleet to mitigate rollover accidents. The committee 
supports the Army's fiscal year 2021 budget request to procure 
5,421 anti-lock brake system/electronic stability control 
retrofit kits that will be installed through a partnership with 
the Red River Army Depot. The committee understands that these 
kits have successfully been installed on all new High Mobility 
Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles (HMMWVs) and that the Army will 
begin the retrofit of legacy HMMWVs with these life-saving 
technologies.

Hospital ship modernization

    The committee notes that during the COVID-19 pandemic, the 
country saw a demonstration of the unique capabilities provided 
by the USNS Mercy and USNS Comfort. Both of these ships are 
nearing the end of their useful service lives. The committee 
believes that the need for medical support capability to enable 
expeditionary operations and respond to natural disasters and 
other emergencies is enduring.
    Therefore, the committee urges the Secretary of the Navy to 
modernize the capability provided by these hospital ships as 
soon as possible.

Hybrid electric drive on Arleigh Burke-class destroyers

    The committee notes that the Navy has received more than 
$175.0 million to develop, procure, and install six hybrid 
electric drive (HED) systems for Arleigh Burke-class destroyers 
but that only one such installation, on the USS Truxton, has 
occurred.
    In a January 2020 report to the Congress on HED, the Navy 
stated that it has yet to conduct sufficient testing and 
operations to determine the utility and reliability of the 
system. The committee continues to be interested in the 
potential benefits of HED systems as well as how the Navy will 
test, evaluate, and measure the at-sea performance and 
effectiveness of the HED on the USS Truxton.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy, not later than 15 days after the fiscal year 2022 budget 
request is submitted to the Congress, to provide a report to 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and House of 
Representatives on the plan for HED installation, testing, and 
operational use on Arleigh Burke-class destroyers. This report 
shall include: (1) The requirements or plan to develop 
requirements for HED on naval vessels; (2) A test plan to 
determine HED operational suitability and effectiveness that is 
approved by the Commander, Operational Test and Evaluation 
Force; (3) Details surrounding the hardware, software, or other 
upgrades required before installing existing HED systems, 
including the timeline for completing such upgrades; (5) The 
installation schedule for existing HED systems, including 
fiscal year and hull number; and (6) The HED-related funding 
requirements by fiscal year and the extent to which such 
requirements are fully funded in the future years defense 
program.

Improved Turbine Engine Program

    The Improved Turbine Engine Program (ITEP) will enhance the 
performance and operational readiness of the current Black Hawk 
and Apache helicopter fleets through the production and 
delivery of a more fuel efficient and powerful engine that is 
capable of operating in high and hot environments. In addition, 
the engine will be the government-furnished engine for the 
Future Attack Reconnaissance Aircraft (FARA) program, which is 
a key priority of the Army's Future Vertical Lift (FVL) 
program.
    The committee has supported significant Army investments in 
competitive technology development programs for turbine engines 
over the past decade. While the ITEP can enhance warfighting 
capabilities in its delivery of improved fuel efficiencies and 
mature technologies, the Army must also prioritize maintenance 
and sustainment costs to ensure the continued affordability of 
the ITEP and associated capabilities. Given the critical role 
of this program in modernizing Army aviation, the committee 
encourages the Army to pursue opportunities to accelerate the 
fielding of this engine.

Integrated air and missile defense in the U.S. Central Command area of 
        responsibility

    Recent attacks on U.S. and partner nation forces underscore 
an increase in missile, rocket, and unmanned aircraft system 
threats in the U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM) area of 
responsibility (AOR). The committee is aware that the Army and 
CENTCOM have already taken significant steps to improve the 
protection of U.S. troops in the region from these threats. 
While the committee understands that providing integrated air 
and missile defense (IAMD), counter-rocket, artillery, and 
mortar (C-RAM), and counter-unmanned aircraft systems (C-UAS) 
coverage for every facility and base where U.S. forces are 
stationed is not practical due to resource constraints, the 
committee remains concerned about IAMD and C-RAM planning, 
procedures, and coverage in the CENTCOM AOR.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, in consultation with the Commander, CENTCOM, the 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and the Chief of Staff 
of the Army, to provide a classified report to the committee no 
later than September 1, 2020, on the IAMD, C-RAM, and C-UAS 
posture in the CENTCOM AOR. The report shall include:
          (1) An explanation of current and planned IAMD and C-
        RAM capabilities and coverage in the CENTCOM AOR, 
        including allocation against the critical and defended 
        asset lists;
          (2) An accounting of partner or allied forces 
        performing IAMD and C-RAM functions in the AOR, in 
        defense of their own or coalition forces and assets, 
        and an assessment of the effectiveness of such 
        capabilities;
          (3) An assessment of the adequacy of current and 
        planned IAMD and C-RAM capabilities to meet CENTCOM 
        operational requirements;
          (4) A description of IAMD and C-RAM gaps in coverage 
        that generate substantial risk to U.S. forces or 
        mission;
    (5) An assessment of the impact on IAMD and C-RAM forces 
and personnel of additional deployments to the CENTCOM AOR, 
assessed in the context of global requirements; and
    (6) Any other matters deemed relevant by the Secretary.

Joint and service exercises

    The committee is concerned with the resourcing of joint and 
single service exercises and the potential disconnect with the 
National Defense Strategy. The committee is aware of reductions 
in joint exercise accounts based on the Defense-Wide Review 
that could significantly impact the ability of the military 
services and combatant commanders to adequately assess and 
improve joint readiness, access, basing, and overflight to set 
the conditions to be successful in a conflict.
    Therefore, no later than January 1, 2021, the Secretary of 
Defense, in coordination with each of the combatant commanders 
and service chiefs, shall report to the committee on the level 
of risk being assumed based on the level of resourcing 
requested for the Combatant Commander Exercise, Engagement and 
Training Transformation effort. The report shall specifically 
address how reductions in funding have impacted: (1) Readiness; 
(2) The ability to conduct joint operations; (3) The ability to 
develop relationships with partners and allies; and (4) Daily 
competition with adversaries to set conditions for combat 
operations and work to achieve national security objectives 
without kinetic conflict.

Joint electronic warfare training range

    The committee recognizes the requirement for the Department 
of Defense (DOD) to operate across the electromagnetic spectrum 
and prevail in electronic warfare (EW) in every operational 
domain. Development of capabilities needed to control the EW 
battlespace requires well-developed training ranges that enable 
the military services and Defense Agencies and Field Activities 
to rapidly test and field new weapon systems. Increased demand 
and spectrum encroachment at current EW training ranges mean 
that these facilities are inadequate to meet the Department's 
EW test and training needs over the next several years. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a plan for the establishment of a Joint Electronic 
Warfare Training Range that: (1) Offers sufficient space for 
spectrum isolation; (2) Provides for the ability to protect 
sensitive technologies from detection by offering access to 
large, inland space; and (3) Would be specifically dedicated to 
EW activities to avoid overcrowding. This plan shall be briefed 
to the congressional defense committees no later than December 
1, 2020.

Live-virtual-constructive and game-based training environment training

    The committee continues to recognize and support the 
important role that a secure live-virtual-constructive and 
game-based (LVC-G) training environment plays in improving 
military capabilities and readiness to meet increasing threats 
in highly contested environments.
    However, the committee is concerned that, despite repeated 
urging from the Congress, the Air Force and Navy have not 
adequately planned for or invested in a secure LVC-G advanced 
training environment to support timely development, 
acquisition, and fielding of cutting-edge air combat training 
systems.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force, in coordination with the Secretary of the Navy, to 
provide a briefing to the committee no later than February 1, 
2021, on its plan to develop and field LVC-G training 
environments that emulate real-world operational conditions. At 
a minimum, the briefing shall include: (1) The timeline and 
funding plan to develop and field LVC-G training environments; 
(2) Considerations regarding creation of a program of record 
for secure advanced training environment systems; (3) 
Recommendations for related resource allocations through the 
program objective memorandum process; and (4) Description of 
efforts to leverage efficiencies in the joint environment.

M2 Bradley Fighting Vehicle program assessment

    The recent reset of the Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle 
(OMFV) program will likely delay the fielding of the Army's 
replacement vehicle for the M2 Bradley Fighting Vehicle (BFV) 
that has been in operational service for more than 30 years. 
The OMFV program is a critical modernization effort for the 
Army, and it is one of the signature programs under the Next 
Generation Combat Vehicle (NGCV) Cross Functional Team (CFT).
    Given the change in the OMFV acquisition strategy, the 
committee wants to understand the impact of delaying the 
fielding of the OMFV on the Bradley program. Accordingly, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Army to conduct an 
assessment analyzing the impact of the delayed OMFV fielding on 
the M2 BFV program and any changes to the Bradley program that 
may be required as a result of the change in acquisition 
strategy. The Army shall brief the results of this assessment 
to the committee no later than August 1, 2020.

Marine Corps integrated air and missile defense capabilities

    The committee supports the force design efforts of the 
Commandant of the Marine Corps to better organize, equip, and 
posture the Marine Corps for great power competition in the 
Indo-Pacific region. The committee understands the need for 
integrated air and missile defense (IAMD) for the distributed 
``stand-in forces'' envisioned by the Commandant and that 
effective air and missile defense requires an integrated, 
layered approach across the Joint Force. Accordingly, the 
committee directs the Commandant to provide a report, no later 
than December 15, 2020, on the Marine Corps' plans to 
integrate, vice federate, the air and missile defense 
capabilities that it is developing as part of the joint IAMD 
architecture.

Mission command systems

    The Fiscal Year 2019 Annual Report of the Director, 
Operational Test and Evaluation (DOT&E), highlighted testing 
issues with the Command Post Computing Environment (CPCE). The 
committee is concerned by the report's findings and the 
resulting fielding limitations currently in place that 
underscore the challenges the Army faces with developmental 
mission command systems (MCS). Due to CPCE's performance during 
operational testing and the Army's challenges with 
developmental MCS, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to provide a briefing to the SASC no later than September 
30, 2020, on how the Army plans to implement DOT&E's 
recommendations in order to resolve deficiencies identified 
during testing and possible alternative commercial solutions.

Mission planning and force structure for hypersonic weapon systems

    For fiscal year 2021, the Department of Defense is 
proposing to fund hypersonic Research, Development, Test, and 
Evaluation (RDT&E) activities at $3.5 billion, an increase of 
5.9 percent over the fiscal year 2020 appropriated level of 
funding. While the RDT&E funding for weapons has received much 
visibility in response to near peer competitors, the committee 
is concerned that mission planning, the allocation of the 
weapons between combatant commands, as well as the service 
force structures to support these weapons are not adequately 
accounted for.
    The committee understands that the original proponent for 
the hypersonics requirement was the U.S. Strategic Command. At 
the time, it was proposed as an alternative to nuclear 
weapons--a long-range precision strike capability of a 
hypersonic weapon offered a non-nuclear option to hold at risk 
the same class of targets.
    However, with the success to date in demonstrating these 
weapons, the envisioned target sets have grown. Likewise, it is 
not clear what the military services' force structure for 
employing these weapons will entail. When originally conceived 
by U.S. Strategic Command, there were to be a small number of 
hypersonic weapons deployed on select platforms. That does not 
appear to be the case today.
    The committee believes that the Department of Defense 
should be assessing the other parts of a complete architecture 
needed to field such systems, including the need for mission 
planning, weapons allocation processes, and force structure 
changes.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Chairman of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff, in coordination with the combatant commanders 
and Secretaries of the military departments, to submit to the 
congressional defense committees a long-term plan, no later 
than March 30, 2021, describing: (1) The potential target sets 
for hypersonic weapons envisioned today and the required 
mission planning to support targeting by U.S. Strategic Command 
and other combatant commands; (2) How synchronization of these 
weapon systems will occur between the combatant commands; (3) 
The required force structures needed by the military services 
to support employment of these weapons against the classes of 
targets that will be held at risk; and (4) In the case of the 
Navy, whether such weapon systems should be deployed on both 
submarines and surface combatants as well as the number of such 
vessels that need to be so equipped.

Mk93 machine gun mount upgrade program

    The Army continues to invest in soldier lethality 
improvements that ensure that soldiers are equipped with the 
best technology available, including crew-served platforms such 
as the M2 .50 caliber machine gun and the Mk19 grenade machine 
gun. The Army has upgraded these weapon systems to increase 
their lethality and effectiveness with the intent of keeping 
both weapons systems in its inventory for the foreseeable 
future. However, the committee is concerned that, without 
upgrades to the Army's inventory of the Mk93 machine gun mounts 
utilized by the M2 and Mk19, investments in weapon optics, fire 
control, enablers, and ammunition may not be fully realized or 
could be undermined.
    While the Army has completed necessary developmental 
improvements to the Mk93 machine gun mount, the Army has not 
yet implemented these upgrades across the Mk93 inventory. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Army to provide a briefing 
to the SASC by September 30, 2020, on its plan to implement 
upgrades to its Mk93 machine gun mounts in order to realize the 
benefit of these investments. The briefing should include 
details on how the Army will align funding during the budget 
process to synchronize the delivery and integration of Mk93 
Improvement Kits with the Mounted Machine Gun Optic and 40mm 
High Explosive Air Burst ammunition.

Next-generation crypto key loader

    Given the increasing sophistication and proliferation of 
cyber and electronic warfare threats, the committee is 
concerned about the Army's delay in procuring and fielding the 
next-generation crypto loader and phasing out the current 
outdated device, of which 80 percent are beyond their current 
service life. Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary 
of the Army to provide a report no later than January 31, 2021, 
to the committee on the plan to field the next-generation load 
device and phase out the decades-old Simple Key Loader (SKL). 
The report shall also include the number and associated cost of 
SKLs that the Army will purchase by year until a replacement is 
fielded, and specification of opportunities to accelerate 
acquisition of the next-generation load device and the 
currently planned first-fielding in 2024.

Pacific Air Force air base resiliency

    The committee is concerned that the U.S. force posture in 
the Indo-Pacific has not sufficiently evolved to support 
implementation of the National Defense Strategy or to address 
the strategic and operational challenges posed by the People's 
Republic of China. Specifically, it is not clear that the 
Department of Defense has allocated sufficient resources to 
provide for the protection of air bases to ensure their ability 
to survive and operate while under attack from current and 
emerging cruise missiles and advanced hypersonic missiles. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Commander, Pacific Air 
Forces, and the Director of Strategic Plans, Requirements, and 
Programs, Headquarters Pacific Air Forces, to provide a 
comprehensive assessment of requirements for air base 
resiliency in the Indo-Pacific area of operations to the 
committee no later than January 1, 2021. The report should 
address the minimum amount of protection, both active and 
hardening, required for main operating bases and expeditionary 
operating bases envisioned in the adaptive basing concepts 
currently under development.

Polymer based magazines

    The committee notes that the Department of the Air Force, 
Marine Corps, Special Operations Command, and a number of 
allies are using a high-performing polymer magazine for their 
small arms that the Army has also authorized for use. The 
committee encourages the Army to integrate lessons learned from 
previous testing of high-performing polymer-based magazines and 
consider a Qualified Products List (QPL), similar to the Army's 
Protective Eyewear List, to allow units and soldiers to select 
from several approved options for magazines and include high-
performing polymer magazines.
    The committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide 
a briefing to the congressional defense committees not later 
than November 30, 2020, on the Army's plan for Next Generation 
Squad Weapons (NGSW) magazines and the feasibility of having a 
QPL for magazines. The briefing shall include the Army's 
requirements for the NGSW magazines, such as metrics, 
materials, and other characteristics (e.g., visual status 
indicators).

Preservation of Department of Defense historic aircraft and spacecraft

    The committee is concerned that the Department of Defense 
lacks clear and consistent guidelines for maintaining and 
disposing historic aircraft and spacecraft. The national 
collection of historic military aircraft and spacecraft is an 
important asset that helps honor our veterans and educates the 
public about key milestones in American history and military 
technology. However, there have been recent instances of 
historical aircraft being destroyed or sold for scrap without 
opportunity for the Department or an aviation museum to 
consider their preservation. It is in the best interest of the 
public to ensure that the Department has a clear process to 
determine disposition of historic aircraft and spacecraft given 
their historical value. The committee is also aware of the 
Navy's ``Safe For Display Inspection'' program, which could 
provide a model for the entire Department.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in consultation with the Secretaries of the military 
departments, to investigate the expansion of the ``Safe For 
Display Inspection'' program across all the military services 
and to provide to the committee a plan for the expansion of the 
program as well as an implementation timeline in a report no 
later than February 1, 2021.

Report on availability of repair for aircraft parts

    The Department of Defense, across the military services, 
continues to employ various qualification standards and 
classification processes in the determination as to whether 
pitot tubes that require replacement are classified as 
``consumable'' or ``repairable.'' The committee believes that, 
when safety, reliability, and performance of a replacement 
component are not impacted through a repair process, it is 
important that such components are reviewed for qualification 
as ``repairable'' in the interest of significant cost savings 
and, further, that the qualification processes across the 
military services are standardized in line with current 
Department of Transportation standards.
    The committee therefore directs the Secretary of Defense, 
no later than January 1, 2021, to provide a briefing to the 
committee after consulting with each of the Secretaries of the 
military departments on potential cost savings and specific 
actions being taken to ensure that the pitot tube component is 
more widely reviewed as repairable and that applicable 
classification standards and processes are updated.

Report on Unmet ISR Requirements, RC-135 Integration, and KC-135 
        Conversion

    The committee notes the continued testimony from combatant 
commanders indicating a shortfall in intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) assets and the ongoing 
lack of capacity in comparison to demand. The committee also 
notes that the Air Force has been working to research, develop, 
test, field, and implement next-generation technologies, such 
as those germane to the Joint All-Domain Command and Control 
and Advanced Battle Management System efforts, that promise to 
provide enhanced networking capability across existing and 
future Air Force assets, allowing an integrated operating 
picture of the battlespace to be developed. The committee 
highlights that the RC-135 family of aircraft is slated to be 
fielded until 2050 and provide a significant capability within 
the Air Force's ISR systems, particularly as a component of 
these linkages. The committee supports the Air Force's intent 
to incorporate these aircraft as key elements of these next 
generation sensor networks and encourages the Air Force to 
continue its baseline modernization program and to fully 
utilize these platforms in achieving its Next Generation ISR 
Dominance Flight Plan.
    The committee further notes the significant commonality 
between platforms of the C-135 inventory as well as the future 
availability of retiring KC-135 aircraft and past instances in 
which these platforms have successfully been converted to RC-
135 ISR platforms. The committee believes that such a 
conversion offers the possibility for increasing the RC-135 
inventory to meet combatant commander requirements. As such, 
the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in coordination 
with the Secretary of the Air Force, to submit to the 
congressional defense committees a report detailing an analysis 
of the cost, process, and timeline of converting retiring KC-
135 aircraft to RC-135V/W Rivet Joint ISR aircraft as well as 
an assessment of the shortfall in the current ISR inventory and 
planned integration of the RC-135 into next-generation 
networks.
    The report shall include: (1) An assessment of the overall 
ISR shortfall based on combatant commander demand, to include 
analysis of specific shortfalls and limitations imposed by the 
size of the current RC-135 fleet; (2) The number of KC-135 
aircraft anticipated to be retired and available for other uses 
as a result of the fielding of the KC-46, delineated by fiscal 
year; (3) Analysis of added efficiencies gained through growth 
in the RC-135 inventory, to include impacts on maintenance and 
sustainment, aircraft availability, and mission completion 
rates through increased fleet size; (4) A summary analysis of 
the conversion process, to include cost and estimated time for 
completion per aircraft; (5) Lessons learned through previous 
examples of KC-135 aircraft conversion, including past 
conversion to the RC-135W Airseeker for the United Kingdom's 
Royal Air Force and applicability of that process to future 
conversions within the Air Force; (6) Identification of any 
need for additional or replacement aircraft within the C-135 
fleet for which retiring KC-135 aircraft may be suited for 
conversion and for which there is a requirement, to include WC-
135 and TC-135 variants; and (7) Details on the planned 
integration of the RC-135 fleet into next generation networks 
and continued efforts to maintain modernization and 
effectiveness.
    The report shall be submitted in unclassified form, but may 
contain a classified annex if necessary, and shall be provided 
to the committees no later than February 1, 2021.

Requirements and budgeting for precisely geolocated 3D imagery

    The committee recognizes the progress that the Department 
of Defense has achieved thus far in commercial solutions for 
automated three-dimensional (3D) image processing and 
geolocation determination to support the growing demand for 
rapid targeting and other requirements for precision 
geolocation. The committee is encouraged by positive steps such 
as coordination among stakeholders, broad recognition that 
commercial solutions can meet category 1 accuracy requirements 
for targeting, and reforms of the National Geospatial-
Intelligence Agency's (NGA's) certification process. However, 
the committee does not believe that it is possible to meet the 
scale of global and near-real time requirements using current 
collection techniques. Furthermore, although the cost of 
acquiring and processing all the data needed through commercial 
sources is now dramatically reduced, the total budget required 
is substantial. Despite the pervasive need, no single 
organization has stepped forward or has been assigned to assume 
leadership responsibility and budget for the cost. Nor have 
user organizations or the NGA coalesced to provide a collective 
cost sharing solution.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Vice Chairman of the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff, the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Intelligence and Security, and the Director of Cost Assessment 
and Program Evaluation to aggregate the demand for 3D imaging 
and geolocation data, develop an equitable and practical cost-
sharing or enterprise funding solution, and recommend a course 
of action to the Secretary of Defense by January 1, 2021. The 
Secretary of Defense shall brief the congressional defense 
committees by February 1, 2021 on the results of these actions.

Self-propelled lightweight howitzers

    The committee understands that the Army is reviewing the 
need for self-propelled 105mm and 155mm howitzer solutions that 
increase survivability through rapid emplacement, firing, and 
displacement to evade enemy counterbattery fires. Since 2018, 
the Army has received operational needs statements (ONSs) from 
the 2nd Cavalry Regiment and 173rd Infantry Brigade Combat 
Team, both forward-stationed in Europe, and capability needs 
statements from I Corps and XVIII Airborne Corps, all related 
to mobile 105mm and 155mm howitzer capabilities.
    The committee understands that the Army will conduct a live 
fire evaluation in fiscal year 2021 to compare available 
foreign and domestic mobile howitzer systems that meet the 
operational requirements of the 2nd Calvary Regiment ONS. 
Further, Army Futures Command has directed the Fires Center of 
Excellence to develop a comprehensive cannon modernization 
strategy for all formations. The committee has been informed 
that, once the strategy is finalized and the mobile howitzer 
evaluation is completed, Army senior leadership will make a 
decision on the validation of mobile howitzers in the 
formations beyond the ONS requirement for the 2nd Calvary 
Regiment.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to deliver a briefing to the committee no later than March 1, 
2021, on the Army's comprehensive cannon modernization strategy 
and a status update on the mobile howitzer evaluation.

Shoulder-launched munitions procurement strategy

    The committee is concerned about the increasing weight 
carried by soldiers, to include weight from shoulder-launched 
munitions (SLM). The committee encourages the Army to consider 
employing already developed shoulder-fired weapons technology 
that can address threats in a defilade position. For that 
purpose, the committee expects the Army to assess and leverage 
other military services' and special operations components' 
requirements and solutions.

Specialization of carrier based squadrons

    The committee is concerned with the current mission make-up 
of the carrier air wing in light of the National Defense 
Strategy (NDS) and great power competition. The committee has 
received reports of carrier-based strike squadrons' decreasing 
ability to adequately train across all of the missions required 
to win against a near-peer adversary.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy, 
in consultation with the Chief of Naval Operations and the 
Commandant of the Marine Corps, to provide a report to the 
congressional defense committees, not later than February 1, 
2021, as to the optimal mission make-up for carrier-based 
strike fighter squadrons and the efficacy of specializing 
various missions sets, such as air defense, as opposed to 
strike, to better prepare for conflicts envisioned by the NDS.

Tactical Combat Training System

    The committee recognizes the success of the U.S. Navy-led 
Tactical Combat Training System-II and is encouraged that the 
Navy and the Air Force are jointly planning to use the training 
system. Any delay in fielding this capability would affect 
readiness of Navy and Air Force aircrews who need a modern, 
updated, and realistic training system for live, virtual, and 
constructive training. Additionally, the committee notes the 
Director of Operational Test and Evaluation strongly endorsed 
the Tactical Combat Training System-II, citing significant 
commonality with the Common Range Integrated Instrumentation 
System and potential cost savings of millions of dollars. The 
committee encourages the continued development and expedited 
fielding of the Tactical Combat Training System-II.

Tactical wheeled vehicle industrial base

    The committee notes with concern that the fiscal year 2021 
budget request includes a steep reduction in funding across the 
tactical wheeled vehicle (TWV) fleet. Funding decreases were 
most pronounced for the Heavy Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck 
(HEMTT) and the Family of Medium Tactical Vehicles (FMTV) 
programs, which rely on minimum sustaining rates (MSRs). 
Ensuring that heavy and medium tactical vehicles are authorized 
at or above the MSRs of production is important to maintaining 
a base of responsive vendors and suppliers in order to keep 
production lines active.
    Furthermore, the Army's Brigade Combat Teams are 
particularly reliant on the FMTV and HEMTT fleets, and overall 
readiness rates may be impacted if parts and spares become 
unavailable due to production breaks. Finally, compounding this 
problem is the decision by the Department of Defense to 
reprogram $101 million appropriated for HEMTT funding in fiscal 
year 2020 to support border wall construction.
    The committee is concerned that these actions risk 
destabilizing the supplier base, much of which is constituted 
of small businesses that require predictable funding levels. 
Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army to 
provide a briefing to the SASC no later than September 30, 
2020, assessing the minimum sustaining rates for the TWV fleet 
and the Army's plan to support those production rates. The 
briefing shall also include an evaluation of the impacts to the 
industrial base if minimum sustaining rates are not achieved 
and details as to whether the Army anticipates any production 
breaks that could negatively impact Army readiness, 
modernization, and our soldiers. Finally, the briefing should 
address how the Army encourages competition within the tactical 
wheeled vehicle industry to ensure that the industrial base 
remains robust and viable.

Tactical wheeled vehicle strategy

    The committee notes that the current tactical wheeled 
vehicle (TWV) fleet consists of nearly 250,000 vehicles and 
their associated trailers, generally categorized as light, 
medium, and heavy. Ensuring the suitability and resiliency of 
the tactical wheeled vehicle fleet is critically important to 
our national defense. Furthermore, the United States automotive 
and commercial truck industry has invested in vehicle 
technologies, to include emissions controls, autonomous 
vehicles, and electric vehicles, that could be leveraged to 
upgrade the tactical fleet, some of which is built on designs 
originated in the 1980s or earlier.
    The Army completed a Tactical Wheeled Vehicle Strategy in 
2014, but, since that time, the Department of Defense has 
reoriented to prepare itself for near-peer competition with the 
release of the National Defense Strategy in 2018. It is the 
committee's understanding that Army Futures Command (AFC) is 
currently conducting a Tactical Wheeled Vehicle study designed 
to identify the capabilities required for the TWV fleet in 
order to support future multi-domain operations. Furthermore, 
the results of this study will be used to inform the 
development of a revised TWV strategy expected to be completed 
in fiscal year 2021.
    The committee supports the Army's efforts to develop a 
revised TWV strategy that focuses on vehicle requirements and 
the capabilities necessary to ensure that the Army prevails in 
a future fight. Therefore, the committee directs the Army to 
provide a briefing to the SASC on the TWV fleet by December 31, 
2020. The briefing should include an update on the Army's 
development of a revised TWV strategy, an assessment of the 
Army's current acquisition strategy for tactical wheeled 
vehicles, the Army's plan to ensure the viability of the 
defense industrial base, and specification of further 
opportunities to encourage competition within industry.
    In addition, the committee directs the Comptroller General 
of the United States to assess the Army's tactical wheeled 
vehicle strategy and implementation efforts. The assessment 
should include an analysis of potential competitive 
opportunities and whether obstacles exist that prohibit such 
competition. The committee further directs the Comptroller 
General to submit an interim briefing not later than March 1, 
2021, on the preliminary findings of the assessment.

Taser X-26 non-lethal conducted electrical weapon upgrade

    Army personnel, across all components, require access to 
working non-lethal weapons in every environment in which the 
Army operates, from domestic bases to forward deployed 
soldiers. The committee understands that taser X-26 Conducted 
Electrical Weapons (CEWs) currently fielded across the Army are 
over 5 years past the recommended lifecycle for these weapons, 
which could increase the likelihood of failure due to age and 
deterioration. The committee is also aware that the Army's 
current inventory of the taser X-26 weapons may no longer be 
supported with software updates and, in some cases, hardware 
parts.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to submit a briefing to the SASC by September 30, 2020, on the 
status of currently fielded taser X-26 CEWs and the Army's plan 
to field future non-lethal capabilities. The briefing shall 
include details as to whether the Army intends to remove all 
non-working taser X-26 units, details as to whether the 
remaining systems should be upgraded or replaced with a newer 
generation of CEW tasers, and the funding requirements to 
support these options. In addition, the committee encourages 
the Chief of the National Guard Bureau to consider acquiring 
non-lethal taser CEWs to meet the needs of National Guard and 
Reserve personnel.

UH-60V Black Hawk conversions

    Modernization of older model UH-60 Black Hawks through 
recapitalization and upgrades to the new UH-60V models is 
crucial to ensuring the continued viability of the Black Hawk 
fleet. This modernization effort extends the service life of 
airframes and replaces outdated analog cockpits with new 
digital cockpits, ensuring that Black Hawk helicopters remain 
safe and relevant for both overseas contingency operations and 
domestic emergencies.
    The committee supports the Army's plan to field UH-60V 
Black Hawks across all components in order to maintain fleet 
and mission parity within the Army. Further, the committee is 
aware that the Army's modernization plan calls for 
recapitalizing 48 legacy aircraft each year with a goal of 
converting 760 total aircraft. The committee is concerned that 
it will take the Army more than 15 years to recapitalize these 
aircraft with production expected to continue through fiscal 
year 2037. Concurrently, the Army is pursuing multiple aviation 
modernization efforts, including the Future Long Range Assault 
Aircraft (FLRAA), which could impact the Black Hawk 
recapitalization effort given anticipated budget projections.
    Given the importance of this modernization effort, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Army to provide a 
briefing to the SASC no later than March 1, 2021, detailing how 
the Army intends to meet the goal of recapitalizing 48 aircraft 
per year and identifying opportunities to accelerate UH-60V 
Black Hawk conversions.

UH-72 Communications and Monitoring Systems

    The committee understands that the UH-72A Lakota helicopter 
provides general aviation support for aviation units in the 
Active and Reserve components. Active Army and Army National 
Guard units operate the UH-72A in a variety of missions, 
including flight training, surveillance and reconnaissance, 
medical evacuation, border security, senior leadership 
transport, and disaster response. The committee is concerned 
that the Army is not taking advantage of modern health 
monitoring systems on the UH-72A. The committee is aware that 
commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) technology is available that 
could upgrade the existing communications and health monitoring 
system with a digital, lightweight, beyond-line-of-sight, push-
to-talk radio with Voice over Internet Protocol and a real-time 
fleet health monitoring, recording, and next generation 
satellite communications system. The committee is also aware 
that these same COTS solutions could positively impact training 
on the UH-72A.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the SASC no later than September 30, 
2020, on the Army's health monitoring systems for the UH-72A 
and existing COTS solutions that could improve the 
effectiveness and lifespan of the aircraft.

Use of Navy and Marine Corps aircraft for NOBLE EAGLE

    The committee is aware of the importance of the homeland 
defense mission and the requirement to provide air defense of 
the United States at all times irrespective of potential 
conflicts in other parts of the world. It is understood that 
the preponderance of aircraft assigned to the homeland air 
defense mission are from the United States Air Force. The 
committee is concerned that the capacity of the Air Force air 
assets capable of homeland defense is becoming more and more 
limited, given operational deployments to the U.S. Central 
Command, U.S. European Command, and U.S. Indo-Pacific Command 
areas of responsibility. The committee also recognizes that 
there are Navy and Marine Corps aviation units that could 
potentially be assigned to the homeland defense mission.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
in consultation with the Commander, U.S. Northern Command, to 
provide a report to the congressional defense committees no 
later than October 1, 2020, that analyzes the current and 
potential further utilization of Navy and Marine Corps air 
units to augment the Air Force units used to provide homeland 
air defense.

USMC Aviator Body Armor Vest

    The committee is aware that the current aviation life 
support equipment (ALSE) flight vests worn by Marine Corps MV-
22 and CH-53 aircrews have excessive bulk that can impede the 
operational performance of precision mission tasks. The 
committee notes further that the Marine Corps has a requirement 
to replace the ALSE flight vests currently worn by MV-22 and 
CH-53 aircrews with an aviator body armor vest (ABAV) system 
that improves mobility and performance while enhancing 
survivability. The committee encourages the Marine Corps to 
compete both commercial off-the-shelf and government-owned 
designs of ABAV systems in order to identify a system that 
fully meets the Marine Corps requirement to enable and protect 
MV-22 and CH-53 aircrews while minimizing development costs and 
delays to procurement.

Variable depth sonar systems

    The committee believes that the Navy should increase its 
capabilities in most mission areas, particularly in the area of 
anti-submarine warfare (ASW). Given ongoing efforts by 
potential adversaries to increase the capability, lethality, 
and size of their respective submarine fleets, the committee 
believes that expanding ASW capability on DDG-51 destroyers 
would allow these ships to be more effective in conducting ASW 
missions.
    The Navy has been developing a variable depth sonar (VDS) 
system (AN/SQS-62) that will be deployed as part of ASW mission 
packages aboard Littoral Combat Ships. The committee believes 
that adding VDS systems to DDG-51 destroyers could increase the 
ASW capability of these ships, particularly considering that 
the DDG-51s are the largest component of the Navy's surface 
fleet and are central to fleet operations in peacetime and 
during hostilities.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy 
to provide a report to the congressional defense committees no 
later than December 1, 2020, on the potential benefits of 
equipping DDG-51s with VDS systems. The report shall include: 
(1) An assessment of current DDG-51 ASW performance, compared 
to the potential ASW performance of DDG-51 destroyers outfitted 
with VDS systems; (2) An assessment of current carrier strike 
group (CSG) ASW performance, compared to the potential CSG ASW 
performance if DDG-51 destroyers assigned to the CSG were 
outfitted with VDS systems; and (3) An estimate of the costs 
and manpower implications of outfitting DDG-51 destroyers with 
VDS systems.

         TITLE II--RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, TEST, AND EVALUATION

              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations

Authorization of appropriations (sec. 201)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for research, development, test, and 
evaluation activities at the levels identified in section 4201 
of division D of this Act.

    Subtitle B--Program Requirements, Restrictions, and Limitations

Designation and activities of senior officials for critical technology 
        areas supportive of the National Defense Strategy (sec. 211)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering 
(USD(R&E)) to designate a group of senior Department of Defense 
officials who would be responsible for coordinating research 
and engineering in technology areas deemed critical to the 
National Defense Strategy (NDS). Each of the designated senior 
officials would be responsible for a particular technology area 
and would continuously and iteratively build the pathways 
necessary to develop new technologies vital to the 
modernization priorities of the NDS. The officials' 
responsibilities would encompass technical, logistical, and 
financial dimensions and would include coordination with 
international, interagency, and private sector organizations. 
The provision would also require the designated senior 
officials to coordinate with the appropriate intelligence 
agencies to develop direct comparisons between the capabilities 
of the United States and the adversaries of the United States.
    The provision would also require that the USD(R&E) provide 
an annual report to the congressional defense committees 
regarding successful advances in research and engineering and 
technology transition and adoption following the implementation 
of the provision.
    The committee notes the USD(R&E) has currently assigned a 
group of senior officials that serve as Assistant Directors 
(ADs) or Technical Directors (TDs) for the NDS modernization 
priorities. The committee believes that these ADs and TDs play 
a valuable role in building roadmaps to develop critical 
technologies while simultaneously coordinating efforts across 
the military services and the Department of Defense. The 
committee further notes that the recruitment of ADs and TDs 
with deep knowledge of and expertise in their designated 
technology areas is key to ensuring the effective development 
and coordination of these technologies' development across the 
Department of Defense. The committee is encouraged by the 
impressive backgrounds of the current ADs and TDs and believes 
that these positions should be further formalized to 
institutionalize their roles and responsibilities. The 
committee believes that all DOD S&T organizations should 
coordinate appropriate S&T activities with these senior 
officials.
    The committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Research and Engineering to provide each fiscal year, not later 
than 30 days after the date on which the budget justification 
materials are submitted to Congress in support of the 
Department of Defense budget, until December 1, 2025, to the 
congressional defense committees a briefing on the technology 
roadmaps and the findings of the most recent review conducted 
of the relevant research and engineering budgets, including a 
list of projects and activities with unwarranted or inefficient 
duplication.
Governance of fifth-generation wireless networking in the Department of 
        Defense (sec. 212)
    The committee recommends a provision that would establish a 
cross-functional team (CFT) for fifth-generation wireless 
networking and designate the Chief Information Officer (CIO) of 
the Department of Defense, in carrying out the responsibilities 
established in section 142 of title 10, United States Code, to 
lead the CFT and serve as the senior designated official for 
fifth-generation wireless networking policy, oversight, 
guidance, and coordination in the Department.
    The committee commends the Department of Defense, in 
particular the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering (USD(R&E)), for its efforts over the last 2 years 
to develop a plan to determine how fifth-generation (5G) 
wireless networking can be used in military applications, how 
to gain network superiority, and how to protect 5G networks 
from adversaries seeking to compromise it. The committee is 
pleased with the USD(R&E)'s and the broader Department's rapid 
action in developing an experimentation plan to accelerate 
development of fundamental 5G dual-use technologies. The 
committee is also pleased with the Department's robust 
engagement with industry, through the National Spectrum 
Consortium, for these testing and experimentation projects.
    While the committee is impressed with the progress USD(R&E) 
has made regarding 5G experimentation and believes that 
USD(R&E) needs to continue to play a key role in 5G research 
and development, the committee realizes that a broader 
enterprise-wide approach is needed for the Department to fully 
leverage and operationalize the technology effectively across 
the Department. As the Department continues to execute this 
experimentation plan, the committee believes that a broader, 
lasting governance structure is required to advance the 
development and adoption of next generation wireless 
communication policies, technologies, capabilities, and 
applications in a coordinated manner across the entire 
Department. The committee also believes that the adoption of 
these next generation wireless capabilities will be 
transformational for the Department.
    The committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
identify and allocate the appropriate personnel necessary to 
support the 5G CFT and the additional responsibilities of the 
CIO for 5G policy, oversight, guidance, and coordination within 
the Department to ensure that this critical emerging technology 
becomes a competitive advantage to the warfighter. The 
committee is aware of the CFT model that the Department has 
employed to govern its cyber programs and policy--the 
establishment of a permanent team in the office of the 
Principal Cyber Advisor to support the rotating cyber CFT--and 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to use a similar construct 
in resourcing this implementation. The committee also expects 
that, as the leader of the CFT, the CIO will regularly report 
to and receive direction from the Secretary of Defense and 
Deputy Secretary of Defense.
Application of artificial intelligence to the defense reform pillar of 
        the National Defense Strategy (sec. 213)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish a set of no fewer than five 
use cases of artificial intelligence capabilities that support 
reform efforts consistent with the National Defense Strategy. 
The provision would also require the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Research and Engineering to pilot a technology development 
and prototyping activity that leverages commercially available 
artificial intelligence technologies and systems in the context 
of these use cases.
    The committee notes that the pilot technology development 
and prototyping activity should inform, and be broadly 
applicable to, an artificial intelligence (AI) engineering 
approach that enables the Department to share data, algorithms, 
and models to accelerate AI adoption. The committee also notes 
that these efforts should be undertaken in coordination with 
other appropriate stakeholders, including the Joint Artificial 
Intelligence Center, elements of the Office of the Secretary of 
Defense, and the military departments, to ensure that 
infrastructure, acquisition, and other enabling activities are 
in place, that high priority activities are selected for 
execution, and that effective capabilities are transitioned 
into operational use.
    The committee notes the compelling business case for near-
term application of AI at scale within the Department of 
Defense (DOD) to enhance the effectiveness and efficiency of 
DOD ``back office'' business processes and business systems. 
Already in wide and effective use in the commercial sector, as 
well as in some DOD business functions, such applications can 
have fewer technological hurdles for their transition into use 
and provide significant opportunity to drive reforms and 
savings by optimizing the business functions of the DOD. The 
committee also believes that a comprehensive DOD AI engineering 
approach would advance the analysis and use of data across the 
Department in other application areas.
    The committee notes that relatively simple applications of 
existing AI systems would greatly improve the way in which the 
Department analyzes and uses data to support management of 
enterprise acquisition, personnel, audit, and financial 
management functions.
Extension of authorities to enhance innovation at Department of Defense 
        laboratories (sec. 214)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend a 
pilot program for the enhancement of the research, development, 
test and evaluation centers of the Department of Defense, 
established under section 233 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-9 328; 
10 U.S.C. 2358 note), through September 30, 2025. The provision 
would also extend a pilot program to improve incentives for 
technology transfer from Department of Defense laboratories, 
established under section 233 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91; 10 
U.S.C. 2514 note), through September 30, 2025.
    The committee commends the military services that have been 
able to implement these pilot programs and encourages all the 
military services to look for opportunities to fully use these 
authorities. The committee notes that the Navy has indicated 
that it has aggressively implemented 18 management initiatives 
at technical warfare centers and labs under section 233 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328) that have achieved greater efficiencies and 
effectiveness by decreasing processing days for administrative 
procedures by nearly 500,000 days over 18 months.
Updates to Defense Quantum Information Science and Technology Research 
        and Development program (sec. 215)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend the 
Defense Quantum Information Science and Technology Research and 
Development Program, established in section 234 of the John S. 
McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 
(Public Law 115-232), by directing each of the Secretaries of 
the military departments to develop more robust programs for 
quantum computing capabilities.
    The provision would require the Secretaries to develop and 
annually update a list of problems for which quantum computers 
are uniquely suited or could better resolve technical and 
research challenges. The provision would also support efforts 
by private sector, government, industry, and academic 
researchers by connecting small and medium-sized businesses 
with existing quantum computing capabilities with researchers 
who can make use of existing commercial quantum computers.
    The committee notes the importance of harnessing quantum 
computing technologies to effectively compete in the rapidly-
changing global security climate outlined in the National 
Defense Strategy.
Program of part-time and term employment at Department of Defense 
        science and technology reinvention laboratories of faculty and 
        students from institutions of higher education (sec. 216)
    The committee recommends a provision that would implement a 
recommendation of the National Security Commission on 
Artificial Intelligence (AI) and authorize a pilot program to 
permit university students and faculty to take on part-time and 
term employment at Department of Defense (DOD) laboratories to 
work on critical technologies and research activities.
    The Commission noted that, when private sector companies 
hire university faculty as summer or part-time researchers, 
they ``benefit from access to a diverse group of experts that 
understands and often creates the world's most cutting-edge AI. 
In turn the companies provide resources, exposure to new 
techniques, and financial compensation to the professors, 
sometimes including funding for their university-based lab. 
When the professors return to teaching, they also expose 
promising students to the companies' work, creating student 
awareness and excitement about the available opportunities, a 
positive perception of the companies, and relationships that 
encourage student employment upon graduation.'' The Commission 
recommended that DOD replicate this proven technique and hire 
university faculty with relevant science, technology, 
engineering, and mathematics expertise to serve as part-time 
researchers in laboratories. The Commission also noted that 
faculty members could work during sabbaticals, summer breaks, 
or limited hours throughout the year.
Improvements to Technology and National Security Fellowship of 
        Department of Defense (sec. 217)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 235 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) to increase the pay range 
for participants in the Department of Defense Technology and 
National Security Fellowship, executed by the Under Secretary 
of Defense for Research and Engineering. The committee notes 
that this fellowship is intended to bring more technology 
expertise to the Department of Defense and the Congress, with a 
focus on the intersection between technology and national 
security policy challenges. The provision would also add new 
background check requirements for fellows as a prerequisite for 
participation in the program.
Department of Defense research, development, and deployment of 
        technology to support water sustainment (sec. 218)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to research, develop, and deploy advanced 
technologies that support water sustainment with technologies 
that capture ambient humidity and harvest, recycle, and reuse 
water.
Development and testing of hypersonic capabilities (sec. 219)
    The committee recommends a provision that would encourage 
the development of hypersonics capabilities as a key element of 
the National Defense Strategy. These weapons represent an area 
of intense technological competition between the United States, 
People's Republic of China, and Russian Federation. The 
committee is concerned that there is a lack of focus on air-
launched and air-breathing hypersonic capability inside the 
Department of Defense and remains concerned that more attention 
needs to be focused on the expeditious development and 
maturation of key hypersonic flight technologies. In addition 
to the need to improve ground-based test facilities such as 
wind tunnels, the Department of Defense (DOD) also needs to 
increase its flight test rate to expedite the maturation and 
fielding of hypersonic technologies. The combination of ground-
based testing and flight testing is critical to fully maturing 
the fundamental technologies needed to field a hypersonic 
flight system. High-rate hypersonic flight test programs would 
help mature six critical technology areas: (1) Thermal 
protection systems and high temperature flight structures; (2) 
Seekers and sensors for hypersonic vehicles; (3) Advanced 
navigation, guidance, and control; (4) Communications and data 
links; (5) High speed aerodynamic characterization; and (6) 
Advanced avionics and vehicle communication systems for 
hypersonic vehicles.
    Therefore, the provision would require the Under Secretary 
of Defense for Research and Engineering, in consultation with 
the Chief of Staff of the Air Force, to provide an executable 
strategy and report to the congressional defense committees, no 
later than December 30, 2020, on the plan to field air-launched 
and air-breathing hypersonic weapon capabilities within 3 
years. The strategy would include required investment in 
testing and infrastructure to address the need for both flight 
and ground testing.
Disclosure requirements for recipients of Department of Defense 
        research and development grants (sec. 220)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
chapter 139 of title 10, United States Code, by adding a new 
section on disclosure requirements for recipients of Department 
of Defense research and development grants with an effective 
date of October 1, 2021.

             Subtitle C--Plans, Reports, and Other Matters

Assessment on United States national security emerging biotechnology 
        efforts and capabilities and comparison with adversaries (sec. 
        231)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, through the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Research and Engineering and the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Intelligence and Security, to conduct an assessment of U.S. 
efforts to develop biotechnologies and biotechnology 
capabilities as compared to our adversaries' efforts and 
capabilities. The provision would also require the Secretary of 
Defense, through the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Intelligence and Security, to assess the ability of the 
intelligence community to meet the intelligence analysis needs 
of the Department of Defense with respect to emerging 
biotechnologies. The Secretary of Defense would be required to 
submit to the congressional defense committees a report on the 
assessments not later than February 1, 2021.
    The committee notes the importance of biotechnology to the 
evolving global security landscape as outlined in the National 
Defense Strategy. Therefore, the committee expects an 
assessment of the efforts to develop emerging biotechnology 
capabilities for the national security purposes of the 
Department, other federal government agencies, academia, and 
industry. Additionally, the assessment should include an 
evaluation of resourcing efforts, to include items such as 
funding, workforce capabilities and recruitment capabilities, 
facilities, test infrastructure, and the ability of the 
industrial base to support and operationalize successful 
research efforts. The assessment should also include a 
description of timelines for operational deployment of emerging 
biotechnologies for national security purposes.
    The assessments should also analyze the overall progress 
made in the field of biotechnology by the United States and our 
adversaries, including the viability, deployment, and timelines 
for operational deployment of new technologies and broader 
efforts to ensure our competitive capabilities in the global 
arena. As a nascent and dynamic emerging field of global 
competition, the committee is concerned about the ability of 
the intelligence community to provide in-depth and adequate 
analysis to support U.S. research and development activities in 
the emerging biotechnology area beyond traditional biological 
weapons. As such, the assessment should include an analysis of 
the adequacy of current defense academic and industrial 
intelligence and security apparatus (including the Defense 
Counterintelligence and Security Agency and service 
counterintelligence centers) to support Department of Defense 
investments in biotechnology. The assessment should also 
include review of the necessary supporting functions required 
for optimal intelligence community assessment of 
biotechnologies, including technology forecasting, 
bioinformatics tools, and technical solutions. Recommendations 
for improvement should include needed upgrades to intelligence 
analysis and workforce, a suggested optimal organizational 
construct for the intelligence community to support the 
Department's biotechnology enterprise, and potential 
organizational schemes for a more effective whole-of-community 
approach.
Independent comparative analysis of efforts by China and the United 
        States to recruit and retain researchers in national security-
        related fields (sec. 232)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine to 
conduct a study comparing methods for recruiting and retaining 
technology researchers, including financial incentives and 
academic opportunities, currently used by the U.S. and Chinese 
governments. The study would focus on incentives employed by 
China to bring researchers in American academic and government 
laboratories into Chinese talent programs and how these 
incentives diverge from those offered by the United States.
    The committee notes that China maintains programs such as 
China's Thousand Talents, initially formed to attract Chinese 
expatriates and other researchers to China and recently renamed 
the National High-end Foreign Experts Recruitment Plan, to 
provide funding to researchers in the United States, including 
tenured American professors and researchers at federally-funded 
laboratories. Through these talent programs, American 
researchers are encouraged to set up labs in China and conduct 
research in Chinese laboratories, granting China access to 
sensitive technologies developed in the United States.
    The committee notes China's efforts to close technology 
gaps through intellectual property theft and the relevance of 
these efforts to challenges outlined in the National Defense 
Strategy (NDS). The committee also notes both the importance of 
robust basic research in science and technology to NDS 
implementation as well as the prevalence of foreign students in 
science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education in 
the United States.
Department of Defense demonstration of virtualized radio access network 
        and massive multiple input multiple output radio arrays for 
        fifth generation wireless networking (sec. 233)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Department of Defense (DOD) to demonstrate virtualized radio 
access network (RAN) and network core technologies and massive 
multiple input multiple output (MIMO) radio array technology 
for commercial use that is globally competitive in terms of 
cost and performance. The provision would require that this 
technology demonstration be conducted at one or more of the 
sites where the DOD is deploying fifth generation (5G) network 
instances.
    The committee notes that leading global providers of 5G 
wireless networking RAN equipment and RAN radio arrays are 
foreign companies in Europe, South Korea, and China. These 
providers offer vertically integrated, specialized, and 
proprietary products that are highly coupled, which make it 
difficult for customers to mix components from multiple 
companies and results in high costs. The committee is aware 
that, as in many other information technology sectors, wireless 
networking technologies are being developed that replace 
dedicated hardware through software virtualization on commodity 
computing systems. In addition, there is an emerging set of 
open standards for the interfaces among wireless networking 
components and functions that complements this virtualization 
technology.
    The committee believes that these developments will offer 
opportunities for new entrants, including existing and new U.S. 
companies, to enter the wireless networking industry and 
compete effectively on cost and performance in the global 5G 
competition with China. The committee believes that it is 
important for the Department of Defense to demonstrate the 
maturity, cost, and performance of virtualized RAN technology, 
in coordination with the U.S. telecommunications industry, to 
ensure that this technology is a viable contender for 
commercial 5G network deployments.
    The committee notes that MIMO radio arrays, currently based 
on specialized Gallium Nitride radio-frequency electronics, 
will also be critical in developing a competitive wireless 
networking solution, particularly in terms of cost, weight, 
power, and performance. The committee believes that competing 
effectively in 5G wireless networking technology will require 
U.S. companies to bring forth significant innovation in massive 
MIMO radio array technology.

Independent technical review of Federal Communications Commission Order 
        20-48 (sec. 234)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to enter into an agreement with the 
National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine to 
conduct an independent technical review of the Order and 
Authorization adopted by the Federal Communications Commission 
(FCC) on April 19, 2020 (FCC 20-48). The independent technical 
review would include a comparison of the two different 
approaches used for evaluation of potential harmful 
interference. The provision also would require the National 
Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine to submit a 
report on the independent technical review.
    The committee is aware that extensive testing performed by 
9 federal agencies concluded that the Ligado proposal will 
cause interference for both civilian and military Global 
Positioning System (GPS) users. The committee notes that the 
Department of Defense, Department of Justice, National 
Aeronautics and Space Administration, Department of 
Transportation, Department of Commerce, Department of Homeland 
Security, Department of Energy, and Federal Aviation 
Administration all strongly oppose this proposal. The committee 
is also concerned that the mitigation conditions imposed on 
Ligado in the FCC Order are not practical and do not adequately 
protect GPS.
    The committee is aware that one of the main justifications 
in the FCC Order for approving Ligado's proposal involves the 
methods used for determining harmful interference. The 
committee believes that further technical evaluation of the 
methods is warranted and therefore recommends this independent 
study to review the two approaches (the Ligado-proposed and 
FCC-approved criteria of harmful interference to determine how 
select receivers are impacted versus the Department of 
Transportation study method of determining an allowable level 
of noise adjacent to the relevant spectrum) to determine which 
one most effectively mitigates risk and to recommend a way 
forward, including the possibility of incorporating additional 
testing.

Report on and limitation on expenditure of funds for micro nuclear 
        reactor programs (sec. 235)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to the appropriate congressional 
committees a report on the Department's micro nuclear reactor 
programs. The report would be required to cover operational, 
safety, programmatic, diplomatic, regulatory, and legal issues, 
in coordination with officials within the Department of 
Defense, Department of Energy, Department of State, and Nuclear 
Regulatory Commission. The provision would prohibit obligation 
or expenditure of funds beyond 20 percent of those authorized 
to be appropriated for such programs in fiscal year 2021 by 
this Act until submission of the report.
    The committee supports the Department's efforts to explore 
alternative operational energy sources and also supports 
innovation in reactor technology but does not believe that the 
Department has considered the unique complexities associated 
with nuclear energy in designing these programs. The committee 
is also concerned about implications for policy and programs 
outside the Department of Defense, including availability of 
unobligated enriched uranium.

Modification to Test Resource Management Center strategic plan 
        reporting cycle and contents (sec. 236)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify the 
Test Resource Management Center strategic plan reporting cycle 
and period to be covered. It is currently a 30-year strategic 
plan, re-baselined every 2 years. This provision would make the 
strategic plan cover a 15-year period, to be re-baselined at 
least every 4 fiscal years, with an annual update as needed. 
The new strategic plan would be due not later than 1 year after 
the release of the Secretary of Defense's National Defense 
Strategy (NDS).
    The committee notes that the current strategic plan 
required by section 196 of title 10, United States Code, is not 
as useful to the Congress or the Department of Defense as it 
could be, due to the nature and frequency of the updates. The 
committee believes that a more helpful strategic plan would be 
on a 4-year cycle, with yearly updates to relay any changes, 
analysis, or high visibility items determined worthy of 
reporting by the Director of the Test Resource Management 
Center.

Limitation on contract awards for certain unmanned vessels (sec. 237)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
submission of a certification by the Under Secretary of Defense 
for Research and Engineering to the congressional defense 
committees prior to the Department of Defense's contracting for 
certain vessels.
    The committee is concerned that an excessive number of 
unmanned surface and undersea vessels (USVs and UUVs) are being 
acquired prematurely using Research, Development, Test, and 
Evaluation funds and that these vessels may include subsystems 
that lack sufficient technical reliability and technological 
maturity to allow the vessels to meet threshold requirements.
    The committee seeks to avoid contracting for USVs and UUVs 
when the technical reliability and technological maturity of 
subsystems critical to propulsion and electrical distribution 
or the military purposes of the vessels are either unknown or 
known to be insufficient. For example, the committee notes the 
Navy requirement for Medium and Large USVs (MUSV and LUSV) to 
operate continuously at sea for at least 30 days without 
preventative maintenance, corrective maintenance, or emergent 
repairs. The committee is unaware of any unmanned vessel of the 
size or complexity envisioned for MUSV or LUSV that has 
demonstrated at least 30 days of such operation.
    The committee understands that the Strategic Capabilities 
Office (SCO) prototype vessels intended to provide risk 
reduction for the Navy's LUSV program have demonstrated a 
maximum of 2 to 3 days of continuous operation. The committee 
also understands that the SCO vessels are approximately 25 
percent the size by tonnage of a Navy LUSV. As a result, the 
committee is concerned that the applicability of lessons 
learned and risk reduction from the SCO vessels to the Navy 
MUSV and LUSV programs will be limited.
    The committee views prior and successful land-based 
prototyping of individual critical subsystems as essential to 
providing a solid technical foundation for USV and UUV 
programs. Rather than delaying these programs, the committee 
believes that a deliberate engineering-based subsystem 
prototyping approach will enable the delivery of capable, 
reliable, and sustainable USVs and UUVs that meet the needs of 
fleet commanders faster than the plan contained in the budget 
request, which assumes that several unproven or non-existent 
subsystems will rapidly materialize to meet the Navy's 
requirements for these vessels.

Documentation relating to Advanced Battle Management System (sec. 238)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Air Force to submit specific documentation 
germane to the Advanced Battle Management System immediately 
upon enactment of this Act.

Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery Test special purpose adjunct 
              to address computational thinking (sec. 239)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, within 1 year of enactment of this Act, 
to establish a special purpose test adjunct to the Armed 
Services Vocational Aptitude Battery test to address 
computational thinking skills relevant to military 
applications.

                              Budget Items


                                  Army


Artificial Intelligence Human Performance Optimization

    The budget request included 303.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 61102A 
for Defense Research Sciences.
    The committee notes the importance of improving special 
operations forces' individual performance optimization, 
resilience, and readiness, including recent emphasis on natural 
movement, full-range body motion, and gravity-aided non-
traditional suspension training exercises. The committee is 
also aware that an opportunity may exist to fuse these new 
health and human performance approaches with advancements in 
artificial intelligence. The committee therefore encourages 
development of the Human Development Ecosystem to improve the 
health and well-being of individual military operators. The 
committee understands that this effort will further investigate 
application of AI to the physiological, cognitive, and 
emotional needs of the warfighter.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million, in RDT&E, Army, for PE 61102A for AI Human Performance 
Optimization.

Increase in basic research, Army

    The budget request included $303.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 61102A 
Defense Research Sciences.
    The committee recognizes the increasingly complex security 
environment detailed in the National Defense Strategy and born 
from rapid technological change, challenges from adversaries in 
every operating domain, and decreased readiness derivative of 
the longest continuous stretch of armed conflict in U.S. 
history. Accordingly, it is crucial to adequately fund, 
resource, and structure the Department of Defense to conduct 
RDT&E activities for critical emerging technologies to stay 
ahead of our adversaries, most notably Russia and China. 
Resources must be devoted and responsibly spent toward research 
and development of artificial intelligence, quantum computing, 
hypersonics, directed energy, biotechnology, autonomy, cyber, 
space, 5G, microelectronics, and fully networked command, 
control, and communications technologies. As such, the 
committee encourages rapid development, prototyping, testing, 
and acquisition of these emerging technologies in order to 
remain ahead of our adversaries.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 61102A Defense Research Sciences 
to support additional basic research.

Pandemic Vaccine Response

    The budget request included $11.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62115A 
Biomedical Technology.
    Given the recent COVID-19 global pandemic, the committee 
notes the importance of protecting warfighter populations in 
the event of a global pandemic and supports expanding rapid 
response vaccine capabilities and capacity to preserve force 
readiness during an outbreak. The committee commends the 
Department of Defense for its prior efforts to pursue novel 
rapid production capabilities and encourages the Department to 
pursue late-stage multi-modal platform technologies capable of 
responding to pandemics such as influenza and COVID-19.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $4.0 
million, in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62115A for pandemic vaccine 
response research.

Hybrid additive manufacturing

    The budget request included $42.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62141A 
Lethality Technology.
    The committee notes that additive manufacturing can enable 
rapid prototyping and manufacturing of missile and smart bomb 
electronics, energetics, structural components, and warheads. 
The committee supports the development of the next generation 
of integrated hybrid additive manufacturing processes and 
equipment necessary to prototype missile, rocket, and munition 
materials, electronics, subsystems, and fully integrated 
components to demonstrate advanced designs and capabilities. 
These processes could enable the capability to combine 
materials on demand and at faster production rates and has the 
advantage of delivering a range of products without the need to 
retool manufacturing equipment.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62141A for hybrid additive 
manufacturing.

Pathfinder Air Assault

    The budget request included $30.8 million for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62142A 
Army Applied Research.
    The committee notes the importance of coupling soldier 
insights with basic research initiatives to expedite the 
delivery of new technologies to the field. The committee 
further notes that Army Futures Command (AFC) is leading the 
Army Modernization Program and that the AFC University 
Technology Development Directorate (UTDD) has improved the 
delivery of university-based applied research outcomes to the 
force through the incorporation of soldier insights. The 
committee encourages the expansion of these efforts to improve 
air assault operations and precision fires and the continued 
co-designing of technology solutions with soldiers, ensuring 
outcomes that will fulfill their needs.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million, in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62142A for Pathfinder Air 
Assault.

Harnessing Emerging Research Opportunities to Empower Soldiers Program

    The budget request included $125.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62143A 
Soldier Lethality Technology.
    The committee is aware of the work being done by the Combat 
Capabilities Development Command's Soldier Center in improving 
the protection, survivability, mobility, and combat 
effectiveness of soldiers. Among these efforts is continued 
research in areas of advanced ballistic polymers for body 
armor, fibers to make uniforms more fire-resistant, lightweight 
structures for advanced shelters--all examples of tangible 
benefits to the soldier.
    The committee recommends an increase of $2.5 million in 
RDT&E, Army, for PE 62143A for the Harnessing Emerging Research 
Opportunities to Empower Soldiers program.

Metal-based display technologies

    The budget request included $125.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62143A 
Soldier Lethality Technology.
    The committee notes the value of high efficiency and 
ruggedized computer display technology, which reduces the 
weight burden of extra batteries and displays and improves the 
warfighter's mobility and soldier lethality.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62143A for lightweight, metal-
based display technologies.

Pathfinder Airborne

    The budget request included $125.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62143A 
Soldier Lethality Technology.
    The committee notes the importance of enhancing Airborne 
Joint Forcible Entry operations in contested areas and 
fostering innovation to enable improved airborne responses to 
crisis contingencies around the world. The Pathfinder Airborne 
program pursues applied research projects to enable critical 
Army-specific airborne missions in technologies that include: 
advanced materials for soldier protection, communication, and 
sensing; next-generation additive manufacturing methods and 
materials; secure communications, smart wireless systems, and 
5G wireless networks; visualization, simulation, and analytics 
for enhanced decision-making; quantum computing, sensing, and 
communications; and enhanced soldier performance.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million, in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62143A for the Pathfinder 
Airborne program.

Ground technology advanced manufacturing, materials, and process 
        technologies

    The budget request included $28.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62144A 
Ground Technology.
    The committee notes that the Advanced Manufacturing, 
Materials, and Processes (AMMP) program located within the 
Center for Agile Materials Manufacturing Science at the Army 
Research Laboratory provides important tools and materials and 
process technologies to the rest of the Army and accelerates 
the ability of the Army to enhance its industrial base 
capabilities to meet the Army's six modernization priorities. 
The committee further notes that these innovations can reduce 
lifecycle costs and enhance capabilities for the warfighter.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million, in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62144A for ground technology 
advanced manufacturing, materials, and process initiatives.

Ground Combat Vehicle Platform Electrification

    The budget request included $217.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62145A 
Next Generation Combat Vehicle (NGCV) Technology.
    The committee recognizes that improving vehicle 
electrification technologies is essential for overmatch on the 
future battlefield and supports the Army Futures Command, 
specifically the NGCV Cross-Functional Team, as it executes 
experiments and builds prototypes.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62145A for ground combat vehicle 
platform electrification.

Immersive virtual modeling and simulation techniques

    The budget request included $217.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62145A 
Next Generation Combat Vehicle Technology.
    The committee recognizes the importance of immersive and 
virtual simulation modeling and simulation enterprise support 
for the development of autonomous vehicle technologies.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62145A for immersive virtual 
modeling and simulation techniques.

Next Generation Combat Vehicle modeling and simulation

    The budget request included $219.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62145A 
Next Generation Combat Vehicle Technology.
    The committee notes that the Next Generation Combat Vehicle 
(NGCV) cross-functional team places a high emphasis on modeling 
and simulation for analyzing and evaluating vehicle platforms 
and technologies. The committees notes that there is a need to 
quickly perform complex trade studies on requirements, sub-
system optimizations, and portfolio investments to provide 
program options in a timely fashion to decision-makers, 
including through the use of advanced software, modeling, and 
software-in-the-loop techniques.
    The committee recommends an additional $3.0 million in 
RDT&E, Army, for PE 62145A for NGCV modeling and simulation 
activities.

Backpackable communications intelligence system

    The budget request included $114.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62146A 
Network C3I Technology.
    The committee notes the importance of conducting missions 
against non-state actors and near-peer competitors in highly 
contested domains. The National Defense Strategy highlights the 
need for maintaining capability to address non-state threats, 
along with increased resources for a potential high-end 
conflict against near-peer state actors. These state actors 
employ high frequency communications as either backup or 
primary modes for command and control. The committee notes that 
backpackable communications intelligence systems are small, 
covertly operable systems capable of countering some threat 
communications capabilities in highly contest environments, 
including locating sources of adversary wireless communications 
signals.
    The committee recommends an increase of $5.0 million, in 
RDT&E, Army, for PE 62146A for backpackable communications 
intelligence systems.

Defense resiliency platform against extreme cold weather

    The budget request included $114.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62146A 
Network C3I Technology.
    The committee notes the impact of extreme cold weather on 
military infrastructure and the challenges that it poses for 
U.S. military operations. The committee notes the value of 
research in developing advanced capabilities for extreme cold 
regions in increasing the Army's ability to map remote extreme 
cold regions, ensuring the superiority of the U.S. Army in 
extreme cold regions, and reducing the deterioration of 
infrastructure due to freeze-thaw cycles. The committee further 
notes that research in developing capabilities for extreme cold 
regions should incorporate risk assessment, ground-based 
measurements, bio-inspired innovative sensors, geospatial 
mapping, and intelligent prediction capabilities.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million, in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62146A for a defense resiliency 
platform against extreme cold weather.

Multi-drone multi-sensor intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance 
        capability

    The budget request included $114.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62146A 
Network C3I Technology.
    The committee recommends an increase of $2.0 million in 
RDT&E, Army, for PE 62146A for multi-drone/multi-sensor 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance capabilities.

Quantum computing based materials optimization

    The budget request included $114.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62146A 
Network C3I Technology.
    The committee notes the importance of the construction and 
demonstration of quantum computing technologies for the design 
and development of novel advanced materials. The committee 
further notes that quantum computing-based approaches for the 
rapid design of next generation materials may result in long-
term accelerated development of military systems and may 
improve the rate of production of key defense technologies.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million, in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62146A for quantum computing-
based materials optimization.

Composite artillery tube and propulsion prototyping

    The budget request included $60.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62147A 
Long Range Precision Fires Technology.
    The committee recognizes the need for extended range, 
greater mobility, and improved maneuverability for conventional 
tube artillery. Composite tube technology will allow the use of 
powerful propellants that will achieve the desired Extended 
Range Cannon Artillery ranges while reducing weight and length 
of tube, enabling greater combat maneuverability. The committee 
notes that this will increase effectiveness and survivability 
on the multi-domain battlefield. The committee believes that 
research into this technology could enable shorter, lighter 
tubes that can use stronger propulsion to achieve required 
range, allow greater mobility, which could enable circumvention 
of enemy counter fire, and increase weapon system lethality.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $7.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62147A for research and 
development of composite tubes and propulsion prototyping.

Counter Unmanned Aerial System threat research and development

    The budget request included $56.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62150A 
Air and Missile Defense Technology.
    The committee supports the Army's investment in advanced 
technologies to mitigate threats from Unmanned Aircraft Systems 
(UAS), especially as these threats emerge and mature rapidly. 
The committee believes that it is important to leverage 
existing and proven counter-UAS technologies and to investigate 
ways to expand these technologies with automation and machine 
learning algorithms to discretely identify, detect, and 
classify emerging threat UAS systems. The committee notes that 
these technologies will enable soldiers to rapidly compress 
kill chain decision-making processes while increasing force 
protection for ground and airborne autonomous vehicles, which 
will expand soldiers' situational awareness within the battle 
space. The committee believes that it is important for the Army 
Research Lab to collaborate with academia and private industry 
to develop commercially available counter-UAS technology for 
force protection and other needs. The committee also encourages 
the Army Research Lab to help inform Army requirements and 
advise on technologies to fulfill Army Futures Command 
objectives.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in PE 62150A Air and Missile Defense Technology for 
counter-UAS threat research.

Counter unmanned aircraft systems research

    The budget request included $56.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62150A 
Air and Missile Defense Technology.
    The committee recognizes that the threat of unmanned aerial 
systems (UASs) to U.S. forces, activities, and infrastructure 
reflects a variety of UAS sizes and sophistications and is 
rapidly evolving and proliferating. Developing ever-evolving 
counter-UAS solutions requires nimble, collaborative research.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62150A for a counter-UAS 
research activity.

Coronavirus nanovaccine research

    The budget request included $95.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 62787A 
Medical Technology.
    The committee notes that the United States Army Medical 
Research and Development Command is a key part of the whole-of-
government response to COVID-19. The National Institute of 
Allergies and Infectious Diseases has identified nanovaccine 
research as potentially preventing pandemic diseases with 
vaccines that are more effective, are more durable, and can be 
produced more quickly.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 62787A to continue Department of 
Defense efforts in developing nanovaccine capabilities for 
COVID-19 and directs the Army to integrate the nanovaccine 
research with other coronavirus research efforts to the maximum 
extent practicable.

3D Advanced Manufacturing

    The budget request included $109.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63118A 
for Soldier Lethality Advanced Technology.
    The committee recommends an increase of $2.0 million in 
RDT&E, Army, for PE 63118A for 3D Advanced Manufacturing.

Cybersecurity for industrial control systems and building automation

    The budget request included $14.8 million for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63119A 
Ground Advanced Technology.
    The committee understands the importance of creating 
research programs that would enhance partnerships in developing 
cybersecurity capabilities and strategic technical workforce 
development efforts in fields critical to national security. 
The committee believes that it is important to create 
opportunities to study the cybersecurity vulnerabilities of 
industrial and facility-related control systems, such as those 
used on military installations, and to expand the scope and 
cooperation of academia's current efforts with leading Federal 
laboratories in cybersecurity training and assessment and 
advanced control system technology implementation. The 
committee encourages the Army to leverage ongoing collaboration 
with Army research organizations to accomplish these efforts.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million, in RDT&E, Army, for PE 63119A for cybersecurity for 
industrial control systems and building automation.

Graphene applications for military engineering

    The budget request included $14.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63119A 
Ground Advanced Technology.
    The committee recognizes the importance of graphene and its 
use in many applications. These include materials that provide 
lighter logistics and stronger facilities protection, augment 
concealment and cover through multispectral augmentation, 
improve sensor and detection capabilities, and allow for better 
ground and air mobility. These types of materials applications 
align well with Army Futures Command's six modernization 
priorities.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 63119A for graphene applications 
for military engineering.

High performance computing modernization

    The budget request included $188.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63461A 
Army High Performance Computing Modernization Program (HPMCP).
    The committee notes that the HPMCP supports the advanced 
computing needs of Department of Defense acquisition, 
engineering, testing, and research organizations. The committee 
notes that the President's budget request routinely underfunds 
investment in this capability, such that annual Congressional 
increases are necessary for the HPMCP to continue normal 
operations. The committee also commends the HPMCP community for 
providing technical assistance to the scientific community 
during the COVID-19 crisis and supporting a variety of research 
activities, from modeling the movement of droplets travelling 
through an aircraft to conducting virtual screenings of vaccine 
alternatives.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million, in RDT&E, Army, for PE 63461A for high performance 
computing modernization.

Carbon fiber and graphitic composites for Next Generation Combat 
        Vehicle program

    The budget request included $199.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63462A 
Next Generation Combat Vehicle Advanced Technology.
    The committee recognizes the versatility and broad 
application that carbon fiber technology provides for weight 
reduction and improving the survivability of the next 
generation of combat vehicles.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 63462A for test and development 
of carbon fiber and graphitic foam applications in the Next 
Generation Combat Vehicle program.

Cyber and connected vehicle innovation research

    The budget request included $199.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63462A 
Next Generation Combat Vehicle Advanced Technology.
    The committee recognizes the importance of identifying 
vehicle cyber vulnerabilities and adaptively securing manned 
and unmanned military vehicles. The committee further notes 
that, by leveraging partnerships in the commercial automotive, 
trucking, and defense industrial bases, the Army can bring 
together traditional and non-traditional suppliers to provide 
cost-effective cybersecurity solutions at manufacturing scale.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 63462A for cyber and connected 
vehicle research.

Small unit ground robotic capabilities

    The budget request included $27.7 million for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63462A 
Next Generation Combat Vehicle Advanced Technology.
    The committee notes that the Army's current dismounted 
infantry platoons have effective parity with those of potential 
adversaries. The committee is aware that our adversaries are 
increasingly sophisticated in the robotic arena, which in turn 
demands correspondingly capable responses to emerging threats. 
The committee also notes that there is no current organization 
or location that integrates dismounted infantry platoon-level 
robotic capabilities. These capabilities include: the Small 
Multipurpose Equipment Transport system and smaller unmanned 
ground vehicles; small unmanned aircraft systems; robotic air 
and small ground modular mission payloads; and technologies in 
autonomy, artificial intelligence, and communications. The 
committee believes that it is important that the Army extend 
air and ground robotic capabilities to smaller and lighter 
maneuver units, focusing initially on dismounted infantry 
platoons in order to provide them with substantial advantages 
over comparable potential adversary units.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $7.5 
million, in RDT&E, Army, for PE 63462A for small unit ground 
robotic capabilities.

Virtual Experimentations Enhancement

    The budget request included $199.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63462A 
Next Generation Combat Vehicle Advanced Technology.
    The committee recognizes the importance of automated 
virtual and physical prototyping to reduce the risk and cost of 
developing new technologies to support crew optimization, 
autonomy, and operations in degraded visual environments.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 63462A for Virtual 
Experimentations Enhancement.

Hyper velocity projectile extended range technologies

    The budget request included $121.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Engineering (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63464A 
Long Range Precision Fires Advanced Technology.
    The committee notes the importance of the development and 
testing of advanced guidance technology for the Hypervelocity 
Projectile--Extended Range (HVP-ER). The committee also notes 
that the HVP-ER requires a terminal sensor capability to meet 
Army's requirements to locate targets in Global Positioning 
System-degraded and -denied environments and that successful 
implementation of a terminal sensor in the HVP-ER would provide 
a necessary capability to achieve objective requirements for 
both the Extended Range Cannon Artillery Howitzer and the 
Cannon-Delivered Area Effects Munition programs.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million, in RDT&E, Army, for PE 63464A for extended range hyper 
velocity projectile technologies.

Electromagnetic effects research to support long range precision fires 
        and air and missile defense cross functional teams

    The budget request included $58.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63466A 
Air and Missile Defense Advanced Technology.
    The committee notes the importance of: reducing the time 
required for development and testing associated with the Long 
Range Precision Fires (LRPF) and Air and Missile Defense (AMD) 
cross-functional teams, the ability to assess specific 
electromagnetic effects associated with radar and other 
electronic warfare programs, and expedited RDT&E activities in 
support of the LRPF and AMD cross-functional teams.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 63466A to establish 
electromagnetic effects research capabilities to directly 
support the LRPF and AMD cross-functional teams.

Development and fielding of high energy laser capabilities--Army

    The budget request included $58.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63466A 
Air and Missile Defense Advanced Technology.
    The committee recommends an increase of $10.5 million in 
RDT&E, Army, for PE 63466A for support for the high energy 
laser system characterization lab for the development and 
fielding of high energy laser capabilities.

Hypersonic hot air tunnel test environment

    The budget request included $11.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63305A 
Army Missile Defense Systems Integration.
    The committee notes the importance of support facilities 
and propulsion methods that will demonstrate and test high 
speed and hypersonic technologies. The committee also notes 
that the Director of the Test Resource Management Center 
identified a need for increased capacity for and capability in 
ground testing of thermal protection systems to support 
hypersonic programs. The committee notes that a test 
environment that delivers high temperature testing available 
over a full hypersonic mission profile would support the 
aggressive set of hypersonics programs, prototypes, and 
deployment schedules envisioned in the National Defense 
Strategy and associated implementation plans.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 63305A for hypersonic hot air 
tunnel test environment development.

Future Long Range Assault Aircraft (FLRAA)

    The budget request included $327.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 63801A 
Aviation--Advance Development.
    The committee supports the development and procurement of 
the Future Long Range Assault Aircraft (FLRAA), which is a 
critical Army modernization priority. The committee understands 
that additional funding could enable the integration of key 
technologies onto the platform in order to mitigate program 
risk.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 63801A to support integration 
activities for the Future Long Range Assault Aircraft program.

Operational Fires program reduction, Army

    The budget request included $156.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 64115A 
Technology Maturation Initiatives.
    The committee recognizes the importance of coordinating 
various service and agency hypersonics activities and is 
concerned with the lack of a transition pathway for the Defense 
Advanced Research Projects Agency's Operational Fires effort 
into a funded Army acquisition or development activity.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $10.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 64115A for an Operational Fires 
program reduction.

Hypersonic program reduction, Army

    The budget request included $801.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 64182A 
Hypersonics.
    The committee recognizes the importance of hypersonic 
research and development, especially in light of the National 
Defense Strategy and the advancing threats that it describes. 
However, the committee is concerned that there has been a lack 
of adequate coordination on hypersonic prototyping efforts 
among the various stakeholders and service components.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 64182A.

Joint Counter Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems Office

    The budget request included $18.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 64741A 
Project FG5 Counter Unmanned Aerial Systems.
    The committee is encouraged by the Department of Defense 
designation of the Army as Executive Agent for Counter small 
Unmanned Aircraft Systems (C-sUAS) in 2019, the rapid standup 
of the Joint C-sUAS Office in 2020, and the recommendation to 
downselect and prioritize resources toward the most promising 
systems. The Chief of Staff of the Army identified in his 
unfunded priorities list a requirement of $17.5 million to: 
address gaps in currently fielded C-sUAS systems, increase 
capability against Group 3 unmanned aircraft systems threats, 
and expand interoperability.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $17.5 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 64741A Project FG5 for Counter 
Unmanned Aerial Systems.

Counter Unmanned Aerial Systems for Special Operations Forces

    The budget request included $18.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 64741A 
Project FG5 Counter Unmanned Aerial Systems.
    The committee notes that deployed military personnel, 
especially special operations forces (SOF) deployed to austere 
locations, face an increasing threat from weaponized unmanned 
aerial systems (UASs). The committee believes that counter-UAS 
systems utilizing artificial intelligence, open-architecture 
systems, and the ability to integrate multiple sensors to 
detect, engage, and defeat threats could decrease the workload 
associated with existing counter-UAS solutions and more 
effectively protect small SOF teams and fixed locations. The 
committee understands that U.S. Special Operations Command 
(SOCOM), in partnership with the Defense Innovation Unit and 
the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, successfully demonstrated 
such capabilities in both a test environment and during an 
overseas operational assessment. The committee is encouraged by 
SOCOM's plans to conduct additional overseas operational 
assessments in fiscal year 2020 and notes that, elsewhere in 
this Act, the committee authorizes additional funds through the 
Joint Counter-Small UAS Office and for SOCOM to support 
continued advancement of these technologies.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $7.5 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 64741A for counter-unmanned 
aircraft systems.

Counter small unmanned aircraft systems operational demonstrations

    The budget request included $18.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 64741A 
Project FG5 Counter Unmanned Aerial Systems.
    The committee is encouraged by the Department of Defense's 
designation of the Army as Executive Agent for Counter small 
Unmanned Aircraft Systems (C-sUAS) in 2019, the rapid standup 
of the Joint C-sUAS Office in 2020, and the recommendation to 
downselect and prioritize resources toward the most promising 
systems. The committee expects the JCO to work closely with the 
United States Special Operations Command (SOCOM) on its 
developmental efforts to support expeditionary, mounted, and 
dismounted C-sUAS capabilities for deployed special operations 
forces. The committee understands that SOCOM is conducting 
operational demonstrations of C-sUAS capabilities in the United 
States and overseas and believes that these efforts are 
important for developing and acquiring capabilities to address 
emerging unmanned aircraft system threats and filling critical 
capability gaps identified by combatant commanders.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $15.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 64741A Project FG5 Counter 
Unmanned Aerial Systems.

Next Generation Squad Weapon

    The budget request included $265.8 million in RDT&E, Army, 
for PE 64802A for Weapons and Munitions Engineering 
Development, of which $30.6 million was for Small Caliber Ammo 
for Next Gen Squad Weapons.
    The committee understands that the Next Generation Squad 
Weapon (NGSW) is a top Army modernization priority urgently 
needed to increase the lethality of soldiers, marines, and 
special operators in close-combat formations. The NGSW program 
includes the NGSW rifle, the NGSW automatic rifle, the NGSW 
fire control optic, and a common 6.8 millimeter ammunition 
cartridge designed to address emerging threat capabilities and 
provide overmatch against threats at ranges beyond the current 
weapon systems.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $0.8 
million, for a total of $265.6 million, for PE 64802A for 
Weapons and Munitions in order to increase funding for NGSW 
small caliber ammunition to incorporate more soldiers, marines, 
and special operators in providing user assessment of the NGSW 
system.
    The committee urges the Army to keep the committee fully 
apprised of progress relating to the fielding of the NGSW and 
how the Army will utilize user feedback and acceptance in 
determining key acquisition decisions in the program.

Bradley and Stryker Active Protection Systems

    The budget request included no funding in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 64852A 
Project XU9 for the suite of Survivability Enhancements 
Systems.
    The committee understands that additional funds would 
enable completion of Urgent Materiel Release (UMR) testing for 
the Bradley Iron Fist Light De-coupled (IFLD) and limited 
characterization activities in support of Stryker and other 
ground combat platform active protection systems.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $47.0 
million in Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), 
Army, for PE 64852A in order to complete both the follow-on 
limited characterization effort ($14.0 million) and the IFLD 
UMR Phase II testing ($33.0 million).

Integrated Data Software Pilot Program

    The budget request included $142.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 65013A 
Information Technology Development.
    The committee notes that new commercial software solutions 
can be used to improve the military services' supply, 
logistics, and spare parts management, increasing their combat 
readiness while reducing costs. The committee is aware of the 
challenges that the Army has faced in synchronizing information 
management and data to maintain a digital connection between 
the product data and parts information. The committee 
recommends that the Army make efforts to prioritize this 
integration and analysis activity and encourages its adoption 
throughout the Army's logistics enterprise to increase 
readiness and reduce costs.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 65013A for an integrated data 
software pilot program.

Army cyber situational understanding capability

    The budget request included $28.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 65041A 
Defensive Cyber Tool Development.
    The committee understands that the Army intends for the 
Cyber Situational Understanding tool to provide tactical 
commanders with a better understanding of their and adversary 
forces' activity, maneuver, and exposure in the cyber, 
electromagnetic, and broader information domains. The Defense 
Advanced Research Projects Agency's PlanX capability, now 
transitioned to the Strategic Capabilities Office's Project IKE 
program and to United States Cyber Command, was initially 
developed to provide such a capability for tactical commanders. 
While PlanX has been adapted through further development to 
meet the specific needs of Cyber Command's planning and 
operational elements and is being used today by Army cyber 
protection teams, at least portions of the codebase remain 
well-suited for providing the tactical-level situational 
awareness that the Army seeks for its brigade- and division-
level commanders. In fact, the committee understands that the 
PlanX capability is being used in such tactical applications 
outside of the cyber domain today. The PlanX codebase is also 
owned entirely by the government and would provide 
interoperability between the Cyber Mission Forces and Army 
maneuver units, making it an attractive baseline for further 
development projects. This line of reasoning is also applicable 
to similar Navy and Air Force initiatives to provide cyber 
situational awareness to tactical commanders.
    The committee therefore directs the Secretary of the Army 
to assess: (1) The PlanX/Project IKE capability's ability to 
meet, with further development, the Cyber Situational 
Understanding tool requirements; (2) The cost-efficiency of 
using the PlanX/Project IKE capability as the baseline for the 
Cyber Situational Awareness tool; (3) The training and 
interoperability benefits that result from acquisition and 
employment of situational understanding tools with a common 
baseline across the Cyber Mission Forces and tactical cyber 
units; and (4) Whether or not the Cyber Situational 
Understanding program should be reoriented to utilize and build 
off of the PlanX/Project IKE capability. The Secretary of the 
Army shall deliver a briefing to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and House of Representatives, detailing 
the findings of the assessment and a proposed path forward, no 
later than January 30, 2021.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $12.0 
million for PE 65041A for the Cyber Situational Understanding 
program to avoid duplication. The committee directs that the 
remaining funds for this initiative be used for tailoring the 
Joint Cyber Command and Control (JCC2) baseline to the Army's 
specific brigade combat team application. The committee urges 
the Departments of the Navy and Air Force to undertake similar 
efforts to adapt the JCC2 solution to tactical-level echelons.

Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2

    The budget request included $235.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 65052A 
Indirect Fire Protection Capability Increment 2 (IFPC Inc 2).
    The committee understands that a lower level of funding 
would be sufficient to execute all planned fiscal year 2021 
activities for this program.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $47.8 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 65052A for IFPC Inc 2.

Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle

    The budget request included $327.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 65625A 
Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle (OMFV).
    The committee supports the Army's efforts to replace the 
Bradley Fighting Vehicle, which has been in service for over 30 
years, but notes the OMFV program reset that occurred in 
January 2020. The committee understands that the Army 
terminated physical prototyping by multiple vendors planned and 
budgeted for fiscal years 2020 and 2021 in favor of digital 
prototyping prior to proceeding to physical prototypes.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $80.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 65625A.

Directed energy test and evaluation capabilities

    The budget request included $350.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 65601A 
Test Ranges and Facilities.
    The committee notes that directed energy systems are a 
priority within the modernization efforts to support the 
National Defense Strategy. The committee further notes that the 
``FY 2018-FY 2028 Strategic Plan for DOD T&E Resources''' 
report indicated that the demand for directed energy test 
capabilities will soon expand from ``demand for testing to 
address specific objectives of laboratory demonstrations'' to 
``demand for testing to address requirements for validating a 
weapon system for operational use.''
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $15.0 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 65601A Test Ranges and 
Facilities to fund directed energy test capabilities.

Precision Strike Missile

    The budget request included $122.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 67134A 
Long Range Precision Fires.
    The committee is supportive of the Precision Strike Missile 
(PrSM) program, including efforts to significantly increase 
range and versatility of the missile, but notes that the 
program is proceeding with a single vendor instead of two as 
originally planned and programmed.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $7.5 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 67134A for PrSM.

Guided Multiple-Launch Rocket System

    The budget request included no funds in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, to qualify a 
second source for solid rocket motors (SRMs) for the Guided 
Multiple-Launch Rocket System, Extended Range (GMRLRS-ER).
    The committee is concerned that, as the Army transitions to 
the GMLRS-ER, a sole supplier of SRMs may not have the capacity 
to meet future production needs or provide a surge capacity, 
thus exposing the Army to the risk of disruption via a single 
point of failure.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $17.5 
million in RDT&E, Army, for PE 25778A to qualify a second 
source of solid rocket motors for GMLRS-ER.

Advanced manufacturing technologies

    The budget request included $61.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Army, for PE 78045A 
End Item Industrial Preparedness Activities under the 
Manufacturing Technology Program.
    The committee notes that the 2019 Army Modernization 
Strategy states that the Army is attempting to `` fundamentally 
change the way [it] develop[s] materiel capability. Advanced 
manufacturing methods and materials will be incorporated into 
system design, development, production, and sustainment.''
    Therefore, the committee recommends the following increases 
in RDT&E, Army, for PE 78045A to support the advanced 
manufacturing of weapons and systems consistent with Army 
modernization priorities: $7.5 million for functional fabrics 
manufacturing; $5.0 million for tungsten manufacturing for 
armaments; and $5.0 million for nanoscale materials 
manufacturing.

                                  Navy


Defense University Research and Instrumentation Program

    The budget request included $116.8 million for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 61103N 
University Research Initiatives.
    The committee notes the importance of the competitive grant 
process managed by the Office of Naval Research (ONR), through 
which the Defense University Research Instrumentation Program 
(DURIP) funds the academic institutions' purchase and 
development of the research equipment and infrastructure 
necessary for high-quality Navy-relevant science. This 
instrumentation plays a vital role in allowing Department of 
Defense-critical research projects to acquire technical 
resources specifically engineered to meet their requirements 
and is critical in accelerating the development of operational 
capabilities for the warfighter. The technologies developed and 
acquired through the DURIP process ensure that the next 
generation of scientists and engineers are trained with and 
have access to cutting-edge equipment and infrastructure, 
including in the execution of research aboard Navy-supported 
academic research vessels.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 61103N for the Defense 
University Research and Instrumentation Program.

Increase in basic research, Navy

    The budget request included $467.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 61153N 
Defense Research Sciences.
    The committee recognizes the ``increasingly complex 
security environment'' detailed in the National Defense 
Strategy and born from rapid technological change, challenges 
from adversaries in every operating domain, and decreased 
readiness derivative of the longest continuous stretch of armed 
conflict in U.S. history. Accordingly, it is crucial to 
adequately fund, resource, and structure the Department of 
Defense to conduct RDT&E activities for critical emerging 
technologies to stay ahead of our adversaries, most notably 
Russia and China. Resources must be devoted and responsibly 
spent toward research and development of artificial 
intelligence, quantum computing, hypersonics, directed energy, 
biotechnology, autonomy, cyber, space, 5G, microelectronics, 
and fully networked command, control, and communications 
technologies. As such, the committee encourages rapid 
development, prototyping, testing, and acquisition of these 
emerging technologies in order to remain ahead of our 
adversaries.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 61153N Defense Research Sciences 
to support additional basic research.

Predictive modeling for undersea vehicles

    The budget request included $467.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 61153N 
Defense Research Sciences.
    The committee notes that the designs of Naval undersea 
systems are increasing in complexity, scope, and 
sophistication. This, along with complex operating 
environments, makes advanced predictive modeling and 
computational tools for such systems difficult to develop. 
Without validated modeling tools, underwater vehicle and 
platform development relies heavily on experimentation, which 
can significantly lengthen the design phase, result in costly 
system-level rework, and restrict innovation.
    The committee recommends an increase of $3.0 million in 
RDT&E, Navy, for PE 61153N for predictive modeling for undersea 
vehicles.

Direct air capture and blue carbon removal technology program

    The budget request included $21.4 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which 
$122.2 million was for PE 62123N Force Protection Applied 
Research.
    The committee notes that the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) required the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of 
Homeland Security, the Secretary of Energy, and the heads of 
such other Federal agencies as the Secretary of Defense 
considers appropriate, to carry out a program on research, 
development, testing, evaluation, study, and demonstration of 
technologies related to blue carbon capture and direct air 
capture.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $8.0 
million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 62123N for electric propulsion 
research for carbon capture.

Electric propulsion for military craft and advanced planning hulls

    The budget request included $122.3 million for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 62123N 
Force Protection Applied Research.
    The committee notes the ongoing, yet increasing, 
operational tempo of naval special warfare maritime units such 
as the Special Warfare Combatant Craft and Coastal Riverine 
Force squadrons. The committee is aware that U.S. Special 
Operations Command has identified mission critical capability 
objectives for hybrid propulsion technologies and low signature 
management that, in the face of increasingly technologically 
advanced adversaries, are of substantial importance and should 
be supported.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 62123N for electric propulsion 
for military craft and advanced planning hulls.

Expeditionary unmanned systems launch and recovery

    The budget request included $122.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 62123N 
Force Protection Applied Research.
    The committee supports the Navy's investment in advanced 
fixed wing unmanned aerial vehicles and notes that, in order to 
support persistent operations in austere environments, 
additional investment in expeditionary launch and recovery 
capabilities is warranted. The committee believes that it is 
important to conduct research and development related to the 
launch and recovery of expeditionary unmanned systems that 
enable high-efficiency, high-payload drones to take off and 
land on land and at-sea.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 62123N to support expeditionary 
unmanned systems launch and recovery.

Testbed for autonomous ship systems

    The budget request included $122.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 62123N 
Force Protection Applied Research.
    The committee notes that a key technology gap for long-
duration autonomous ship operation lies in the robustness and 
resiliency of the hull and machinery plant. The committee also 
notes that autonomous ships will be expected to operate for 
months between human-assisted maintenance and that autonomous 
machinery must be robust and resilient in order to avoid 
failure, repair damage, or redirect platforms as needed. The 
committee notes the development of digital-twin technologies 
that allow for predictive or automated maintenance and improved 
operations and logistics and help fill a critical gap that has 
been identified in autonomous systems.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 62123N for the development of a 
testbed for autonomous ship systems.

Interdisciplinary Cybersecurity Research

    The budget request included $50.6 million for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 62131M 
Marine Corps Landing Force Technology.
    The committee notes the current research efforts to 
understand expeditionary cyber challenges and commends the 
interdisciplinary approach to developing solutions for cyber 
systems and considering the role of human behavior in the 
tactical cyber environment. The committee supports continued 
multidisciplinary research in the areas of dynamic cyber 
defense, tactical cyberspace operations and signals 
intelligence, sensing, computation, and mobile communications.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 62131M for interdisciplinary 
cybersecurity research.

Humanoid robotics research

    The budget request included $67.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 62236N 
Warfighter Sustainment Applied Research.
    The committee recognizes the promise of autonomous humanoid 
robotics for dangerous and repetitive jobs on ships designed 
primarily for use by human sailors. In particular, the Navy has 
identified shipboard firefighting and a number of shipboard 
maintenance tasks as ideal candidates for integrating the use 
of humanoid robots.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $4.0 
million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 62236N for humanoid robotics 
research.

Social networks and computational social science

    The budget request included $67.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 62236N 
Warfighter Sustainment Applied Research.
    The committee supports the Navy's research efforts to: 
develop algorithms, methods, and tools for analysis of social 
hysteria propagation and group polarization; improve methods of 
information environment assessment and strategic communication; 
and refine detection of adversarial information maneuvers 
across social media platforms.
    The committee recommends an additional $3.0 million in 
RDT&E, Navy, for PE 62236N for social networks and 
computational social science research.

Naval academic undersea vehicle research partnerships

    The budget request included $56.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 62747N 
Undersea Warfare Applied Research.
    The committee notes that partnerships among academia, 
government, and industry are instrumental in translating 
technological advances to emerging Navy undersea vehicles and 
systems in cost-effective ways, training a highly skilled 
workforce, and supporting increased and sustained submarine 
production capacity. Undersea dominance is an enduring 
capability that is a key foundation of our national defense and 
a core element of strategic overmatch in an era of great power 
competition.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $7.5 
million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 62747N for Navy and academia 
submarine partnerships.

Thermoplastic materials

    The budget request included $160.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 62792N 
for Innovative Naval Prototypes Applied Research.
    The committee recommends an increase of $7.3 million in 
RDT&E, Navy, for PE 62792N for continued development of 
technology to fabricate composite aircraft and ship parts from 
highly formable thermoplastic materials.

Mission planning advanced technology demonstration

    The budget request included $219.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 63640M 
United States Marine Corps Advanced Technology Demonstration.
    The committee supports the Department of Defense Unmanned 
Systems Integrated Roadmap and notes the importance of a robust 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) platform 
for forward deployed operations in contested environments. The 
committee encourages the development of a Mission Support 
Station that allows mission plans to be created and then 
dynamically updated based on available data from numerous 
sources, including weather, satellite imagery, sensor feeds, 
and other ISR from unmanned systems.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 63640M for the mission planning 
advanced technology demonstration.

Unmanned surface vessel development

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which 
$464.0 million was for PE 63178N Medium and Large Unmanned 
Surface Vehicles and $38.4 million was for PE 63573N Advanced 
Surface Machinery Systems.
    The committee notes that the budget request provides for 
the prototyping and testing of Medium and Large Unmanned 
Surface Vessels (MUSVs and LUSVs), including procurement of up 
to two additional LUSVs in conjunction with a Strategic 
Capabilities Office (SCO) initiative. The committee understands 
that the 4 LUSVs procured by the SCO beginning in fiscal year 
2018, at a cost of more than $510 million, are sufficient to 
achieve the objectives of the SCO initiative, which is 
scheduled to be completed in the fourth quarter of fiscal year 
2021.
    The committee believes that further procurement of MUSVs 
and LUSVs should occur only after the lessons learned from the 
current SCO initiative have been incorporated into the system 
specification and additional risk reduction actions are taken.
    A specific area of technical concern for the committee is 
the Navy requirement for MUSVs and LUSVs to operate 
continuously at sea for at least 30 days without preventative 
maintenance, corrective maintenance, or emergent repairs. The 
committee is unaware of any unmanned vessel of the size or 
complexity envisioned for MUSV or LUSV that has demonstrated at 
least 30 days of such operation.
    The committee understands that the SCO prototype vessels 
that are intended to provide risk reduction for these programs 
have demonstrated between 2 to 3 days of continuous operation. 
The committee also understands that the SCO vessels are 
approximately 25 percent the size by tonnage of a LUSV, which 
may limit the applicability of lessons learned and risk 
reduction from the SCO vessels to the MUSV and LUSV programs. 
Among other critical subsystems, the committee views the main 
engines and electrical generators in particular as key USV 
mechanical and electrical subsystems whose reliability is 
critical to ensuring successful operations at sea for at least 
30 continuous days.
    The committee also notes that additional funding is 
necessary to accelerate completion of the Integrated Power and 
Energy Systems test facility (ITF) to achieve full test 
capability in fiscal year 2023, consistent with section 131 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 
(Public Law 116-92), as well as the qualification of silicon 
carbide power modules.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $464.0 
million, for a total of $0, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 63178N, and 
an increase of $200.0 million, for a total of $238.4 million in 
RDT&E, Navy, for PE 63573N.
    The committee's intent is that the increased funding in PE 
63178N be used for: the USV main engine and electrical 
generator qualification testing directed elsewhere in this Act 
($70.0 million); USV autonomy development, which may include 
conversion of existing vessels ($45.0 million); accelerating 
ITF testing ($75.0 million); and accelerating the qualification 
of silicon carbide power modules ($10.0 million).

Advanced combat systems technology

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $70.2 
million was for PE 63382N advanced combat systems technology.
    The committee notes that project 3416 (HIJENKS) had 
insufficient schedule justification ($7.0 million) and project 
3422 (SHARC) would procure excess platforms ahead of 
satisfactory testing ($7.1 million).
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $14.1 
million, for a total of $56.1 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
63382N.

Surface and shallow water mine countermeasures

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $52.4 
million was for PE 63502N surface and shallow water mine 
countermeasures.
    The committee notes Barracuda (project 2989) schedule 
delays, including a 2-year delay in the critical design review 
and developmental testing to fiscal years 2022 and 2024 
respectively. The committee is also concerned that operational 
testing was removed from the program schedule and directs the 
Secretary of the Navy to restore such testing.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $28.2 
million, for a total of $24.2 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
63502N.

Advanced submarine system development

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which 
$185.4 million was for PE 63561N advanced submarine system 
development.
    The committee notes that engineering development models are 
early to need in project 9710.
    The committee also notes that additional funding ($20.0 
million) could be used to complete procurement qualification of 
out-of-autoclave bow dome technology and demonstrate other 
components that utilize this technology for future use on 
Virginia-class and other classes of submarines.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a net increase of 
$10.0 million, for a total of $195.4 million, in RDT&E, Navy, 
for PE 63561N.

Ship concept advanced design

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which 
$126.4 million was for PE 63563N ship concept advanced design.
    The committee lacks sufficient clarity on the capability 
requirements to support the following ship design efforts: 
Future Surface Combatant (project 2196, $19.1 million), next 
generation medium amphibious ship (project 4044, $30.0 
million), and next generation medium logistics ship (project 
4045, $30.0 million).
    The committee supports the Conditions Based Maintenance + 
(CBM+) initiative, which improves the cost, schedule, and 
performance outcomes in ship maintenance availabilities using 
analytic tools. The committee understands that additional funds 
($16.0 million) could accelerate the implementation of the CBM+ 
initiative.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $63.1 
million, for a total of $63.3 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
63563N.

Large Surface Combatant preliminary design

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $70.2 
million was for PE 63564N ship preliminary design and 
feasibility studies.
    The committee lacks sufficient clarity on the Large Surface 
Combatant (LSC) capability requirements and the program's 
compliance with section 131 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) to 
support the start of preliminary design for the LSC program or 
completion of the Capabilities Development Document (project 
0411).
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $41.3 
million, for a total of $29.0 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
63564N.
    Additionally, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to submit a report with Navy's fiscal year 2022 budget 
request that details the plan to comply with the requirements 
of section 131 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020.

Littoral Combat Ship

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $32.2 
million was for PE 63581N Littoral Combat Ship.
    The committee notes available prior year funds in project 
3096.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $5.0 
million, for a total of $27.2 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
63581N.

LCS mission modules

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $67.9 
million was for PE 63596N LCS mission modules.
    The committee notes that the Littoral Combat Ship mine 
countermeasures mission package has an outdated integrated 
master schedule and test and evaluation master plan (project 
2550). The committee also notes available prior year funds due 
to testing delays (project 2551).
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $35.0 
million, for a total of $32.9 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
63596N.

Conventional munitions

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $9.9 
million was for PE 63609N conventional munitions.
    The committee notes insufficient justification to support 
insensitive weapons development (project 0363).
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $7.8 
million, for a total of $2.1 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
63609N.

Surface Navy Laser Weapon System

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which 
$128.8 million was for PE 63925N directed energy and electric 
weapon systems.
    The committee notes excess engineering and sustainment 
support costs for the Surface Navy Laser Weapon System (project 
3402).
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $15.0 
million, for a total of $113.8 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
63925N.

Large unmanned undersea vehicles

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $78.1 
million was for PE 64031N large unmanned undersea vehicles.
    The committee notes excess procurement ahead of Snakehead 
phase 1 testing, which is scheduled for fiscal year 2022. The 
committee seeks to avoid excess procurement of these systems in 
advance of satisfactory testing.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $36.0 
million, for a total of $42.1 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
64031N.

Advanced undersea prototyping

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which 
$115.9 million was for PE 64536N advanced undersea prototyping.
    The committee notes that the Snakehead and Orca test 
strategies require updates to enable certification by the 
Director of Operational Test and Evaluation in accordance with 
the Senate report accompanying the Department of Defense 
Appropriations Bill, 2020, incorporated into the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2020 (S. Rept. 116-103). Additionally, the 
committee is aware of Orca testing delays.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $20.0 
million, for a total of $95.9 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
64536N.

Hypersonic program reduction, Navy

    The budget request included $1.1 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 64659N 
Precision Strike Weapons Development Program.
    The committee recognizes the importance of hypersonics 
research and development, especially in light of the National 
Defense Strategy and the advancing threats posed by 
adversaries. However, the committee is concerned that there has 
been a lack of adequate coordination on hypersonics prototyping 
efforts among the various stakeholders and service components.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 64659N Precision Strike Weapons 
Development Program.

Conventional prompt strike

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $1.1 
billion was for PE 64659N precision strike weapons development 
program.
    The committee notes that the budget request included 
modification and installation costs for conventional prompt 
strike weapons integration on two Virginia-class submarines but 
included funds for the procurement of only one Virginia-class 
submarine. Therefore, modification and installation costs are 
early to need for one Virginia-class submarine.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $52.0 
million, for a total of $1.1 billion, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
64659N.
    The committee supports conventional prompt strike weapons 
development and the associated submarine integration. However, 
the committee lacks clarity on the requirement, including the 
inventory objective, for submarines capable of employing these 
weapons and notes that projected funding through fiscal year 
2025 will total more than $900.0 million for submarine design, 
modification, and installation costs for such weapons.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Chief of Naval 
Operations to submit to the congressional defense committees 
not later than March 30, 2021, approved requirements, including 
the inventory objective by ship class, for submarines capable 
of employing conventional prompt strike weapons. The Chief of 
Naval Operations shall coordinate this response with a related 
report from the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff on 
mission planning and force structure for hypersonic weapon 
systems, which is required elsewhere in this Report and due on 
the same date.
    Additionally, the committee directs the Secretary of Navy 
to request funding required for new construction submarine 
modification and installation costs associated with 
conventional prompt strike weapons as part of the end cost of 
each such submarine in the Shipbuilding and Conversion, Navy 
account in future budget submissions.

Submarine tactical warfare systems

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $63.9 
million was for PE 64562N submarine tactical warfare systems.
    The committee notes AN/BYG-1 APB17 and APB19 testing 
delays.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $5.0 
million, for a total of $58.9 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
64562N.

Advanced degaussing

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $51.9 
million was for PE 64567N ship contract design.
    The committee understands that, since legacy degaussing 
systems for surface combatants were developed, alternative 
methods for performing this function have proven to be more 
capable and cost-effective.
    The committee believes that conducting an installation and 
demonstration of advanced degaussing capability on an existing 
Arleigh Burke-class destroyer is warranted to evaluate the 
utility of such a capability for further forward-fit and back-
fit on naval vessels.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $14.9 
million, for a total of $66.8 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
64567N.

Lightweight torpedo development

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which 
$146.0 million was for PE 64610N lightweight torpedo 
development.
    The committee notes High Altitude Anti-Submarine Warfare 
Weapon operational testing delays (project 1412) and Mk 54 Mod 
2 torpedo contract delays (project 3418).
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $30.0 
million, for a total of $116.0 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
64610N.

Submarine acoustic warfare development

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $69.2 
million was for PE 11226N submarine acoustic warfare 
development.
    The committee notes that the Compact Rapid Attack Weapon 
engineering design model (TI-2) is early to need.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $8.0 
million, for a total of $61.2 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
11226N.

Integrated surveillance system

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which 
$103.0 million was for PE 24311N integrated surveillance 
system.
    The committee notes that, since fiscal year 2015, the Navy 
has utilized Transformational Reliable Acoustic Path Systems 
(TRAPS) in anti-submarine warfare missions. The committee 
understands that these deployable systems have performed 
satisfactorily and comprise a critical element of the Navy's 
overall integrated undersea surveillance system. The committee 
is concerned that capability or capacity gaps may result if 
additional spiral 1 TRAPS units are not procured in fiscal year 
2021.
    In addition, the committee understands that additional 
funding in project 0766 could accelerate the development, 
configuration, and integration of advanced sensors and 
associated signal processing into representative system sensor 
packages for developmental and operational testing.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $50.0 
million, for a total of $153.0 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
24311N.

LCAC composite component development

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $1.7 
million was for PE 24413N amphibious tactical support units.
    The committee understands that additional investment in 
advanced composites manufacturing for air cushion vehicle 
components, including propeller blades and composite deck house 
modules, could reduce the overall acquisition and life cycle 
costs of the Navy's air cushioned landing crafts.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million, for a total of $6.7 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
24413N.

G/ATOR demonstration

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $22.2 
million was for PE 24460M Ground/Air Task Oriented Radar.
    The committee believes that the Joint Force, particularly 
the Marine Corps, could derive significant warfighting benefits 
in the integrated air and missile defense mission area from 
integrating the AN/TPS-80 Ground/Air Task-Oriented Radar (G/
ATOR) with Standard Missile-6 (SM-6) and the Cooperative 
Engagement Capability (CEC) network.
    The committee understands that a proof-of-concept 
demonstration using a G/ATOR to conduct an SM-6 engagement 
would require $73.6 million, which includes the procurement of 
a G/ATOR that would remain a dedicated test asset.
    The committee further understands that the G/ATOR is 
capable of providing tracks, via the USMC Composite Tracking 
Network (CTN), to the CEC network. However, changes to the CTN 
are required to enable completion of an Engage On Remote 
capability between Navy surface combatants and a G/ATOR.
    The committee further understands it would cost 
approximately $10.0 million to analyze the feasibility of a 
stand-alone G/ATOR and SM-6 engagement.
    The committee notes that the Marine Corps is supportive of 
conducting such a demonstration and analysis, which would 
consist of two tracking events and a live fire shoot, 
coordinated with the Navy, in fiscal year 2022.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $83.6 
million, for a total of $105.8 million, in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 
24460M.

Attack and utility replacement aircraft vehicle

    The budget request included $21.5 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, of which $18.1 
million was for PE 64212N, Other Helo Development, including 
$11.3 million for development of an attack and utility 
replacement aircraft (AURA) vehicle.
    The Navy AURA program has been has been following the 
Army's development of the Future Long Range Assault Aircraft 
(FLRAA), applying lessons learned from the Army program, and 
assessing subsystem commonality with the Army development 
efforts.
    The committee supports such cooperation, urges the Navy and 
Army to expand these efforts, and recommends an increase of 
$5.0 million in PE 64212N for that purpose.

Cyber tool development

    The budget request included $35.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Navy, for PE 35251N 
Cyber Space Operations Forces and Force Support.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Navy Cyber 
Warfare Development Group (NCWDG), which benefits enormously 
from its unique intelligence, prototyping, and acquisition 
authorities and nesting within U.S. Fleet Cyber Command. The 
committee encourages the Army and Air Force to evaluate the 
authorities available to and organizational alignment of the 
NCWDG and the feasibility of modeling their tool development 
organizations and activities after the NCWDG. The committee 
also understands that the funding for development and 
acquisition of operational tools across the Navy and Army is 
insufficient for the development and acquisition of 
foundational tool suits, a critical component of the Joint 
Cyber Warfighting Architecture.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in RDT&E, Navy, for PE 35251N Cyber Space Operations 
Forces and Force Support for cyber tool development.

                               Air Force


Increase in basic research, Air Force

    The budget request included $315.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
61102F Defense Research Sciences.
    The committee recognizes the ``increasingly complex 
security environment'' detailed in the National Defense 
Strategy and born from rapid technological change, challenges 
from adversaries in every operating domain, and decreased 
readiness derivative of the longest continuous stretch of armed 
conflict in U.S. history. Accordingly, it is crucial to 
adequately fund, resource, and structure the Department of 
Defense to conduct RDT&E activities for critical emerging 
technologies to stay ahead of our adversaries, most notably 
Russia and China. Resources must be devoted and responsibly 
spent toward research and development of artificial 
intelligence, quantum computing, hypersonics, directed energy, 
biotechnology, autonomy, cyber, space, 5G, microelectronics, 
and fully networked command, control, and communications 
technologies. As such, the committee encourages rapid 
development, prototyping, testing, and acquisition of these 
emerging technologies in order to remain ahead of our 
adversaries.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 61102F Defense Research 
Sciences to support additional basic research.

High Energy Synchrotron X-Ray program

    The budget request included $140.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
62102F Materials.
    The committee notes the value of continued funding for 
high-energy X-ray beamlines optimized for Air Force research 
needs. This research capability enables Air Force Research 
Laboratory researchers, collaborators, and original equipment 
manufacturers to employ real-time, three-dimensional x-ray 
characterization methods to test a broad range of mission-
critical structural and functional materials. The committee 
notes the value of this research to high performance materials 
for tactical aircraft, the understanding of metal fatigue, 
processes for additive manufacturing technologies, and 
scientific workforce development.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 62102F for the High Energy 
Synchrotron X-Ray research program.

Materials maturation for high mach systems

    The budget request included $140.8 million for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
62102F Materials.
    The committee notes the importance of advanced thermal 
protection systems (TPSs) research to enable efficient 
operation of high-speed vehicles for military and commercial 
aerospace needs. The committee further notes that much 
scientific and technical work remains in the exploration of the 
capabilities of the high temperature materials and associated 
coatings, identification of non-destructive inspection 
techniques, study of initiation and progression of material 
damage in severe flight environments, and transition of the 
technology into advanced load-bearing TPSs.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million, in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 62102F for materials 
maturation for high mach systems.

Metals Affordability Initiative

    The budget request included $140.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
62102F Materials.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Metals 
Affordability Initiative as an innovative public-private 
partnership that makes metals for warfighter needs lighter, 
stronger, and more affordable. Since the program's inception in 
1999, the MAI has saved taxpayers over $2 billion, and has a 
10:1 return on taxpayer investment, by increasing yields, 
decreasing maintenance costs, and minimizing time and expense 
for metals manufacturing for Air Force needs.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in PE 62102F Materials to support the Metals 
Affordability Initiative.

Qualification of additive manufacturing processes

    The budget request included $140.8 million for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
62102F Materials.
    The committee notes that Executive Order 13806, ``Assessing 
and Strengthening the Manufacturing and Defense Industrial Base 
and Supply Chain Resilience of the United States,'' points to 
``gaps in the national-security-related domestic manufacturing 
capabilities, including non-existent, extinct, threatened and 
single-point-of-failure capabilities.'' The committee also 
notes that a great deal of additive manufacturing research and 
development is conducted openly on commercially available 
systems, allowing adversaries access to substantial innovation. 
The committee supports further development of additive 
manufacturing processes that leverage unclassified innovations 
for sensitive and classified weapon systems.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million, in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 62102F for qualification 
of additive manufacturing processes.

Technologies to repair fasteners

    The budget request included $103.3 million for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
63030F Air Force Foundational Development/Demos.
    The committee notes that the galvanic corrosion of fastener 
holes in carbon-composite and aluminum alloy airframes is a 
significant maintenance burden and a source of aircraft 
downtime. The committee believes that the development of 
inexpensive and reliable technologies that can repair fastener 
holes could reduce maintenance costs and extend the useful 
lifetime of the F-22 and F-35.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.5 
million, in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 63030F for technologies to 
repair fasteners.

Hypersonic materials

    The budget request included $349.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF), for PE 
62201F Aerospace Vehicle Technologies.
    The committee supports the Air Force's efforts to design 
and test materials capable of withstanding the hypersonic 
environment.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in RDAF for PE 62201F.

Golden Horde Vanguard program reductions

    The budget request included $157.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
63032F Future AF Integrated Technology Demos.
    The committee recognizes the importance of programs that 
support the transition of promising innovative science and 
technology programs into formal acquisition or operational use. 
The committee notes that these efforts are more appropriately 
funded outside of the limited funding available for science and 
technology efforts themselves.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $50.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 63032F Future AF Integrated 
Technology Demos for Golden Horde Vanguard program reductions. 
The committee report reallocates this funding to high priority 
science and technology activities in support of the National 
Defense Strategy.

Fixed-wing improvements

    The budget request included $199.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
63033F Next Gen Platform Dev/Demo.
    The committee notes that Air Force efforts to improve B-52 
flight operations resulted in a 6.6 percent performance gain, 
saving 4.2 million gallons of fuel per year, and a positive 
return on investment in less than 1 year. Flight data analysis 
also showed that not pursuing efficiencies resulted in 
increased fuel burn and costs, 350 additional maintenance hours 
per year, and 41 days of non-mission capable status for landing 
gear maintenance. Analysis for KC-135 aft body drag reduction 
devices show savings of $7.5 million per year.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends the following 
increases: $3.0 million for B-52 pylon fairings, $3.0 million 
for C-130 finlets, and $3.0 million for KC-135 aft body drag, 
in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 63033F Next Gen Platform Dev/Demo.

AETP/NGAP

    The budget request included $636.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF), for PE 
64004F Advanced Engine Development.
    The committee supports the Air Force's efforts to develop 
state of the art engine technology that has the potential to 
provide expanded flight envelopes with increases in thermal and 
power production at the same time. The committee encourages the 
Air Force to accelerate this revolutionary technology to 
achieve the increase in combat capability.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $50.0 
million in RDAF for PE 64004F.

Directed energy counter-Unmanned Aerial Systems (CUAS)

    The budget request included $21.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
64032F Directed Energy Prototyping.
    Unmanned aerial systems (UASs) pose a growing threat to 
U.S. forces. The development of directed energy capabilities to 
counter UASs and cruise missiles is critical, as employment of 
such defensive capabilities would impose substantial costs on 
adversaries.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 64032F.

Advanced Hypersonic Air-breathing Weapon

    The budget request included $381.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF), for PE 
64033F Hypersonic Prototyping.
    The committee supports the Air Force's efforts in 
developing air-breathing hypersonic missiles but is concerned 
that the Air Force has not provided sufficient resources to 
successfully transition the Hypersonic Air Breathing Weapon 
being developed by the Defense Advanced Research Projects 
Agency (DARPA), in partnership with the Air Force, based on the 
recent successes and acceleration of the DARPA program.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $65.0 
million in RDAF for PE 64033F.

KC-135 operational energy increases

    The budget request included $219.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
64858F Tech Transition Program.
    The committee notes that roughly 60 percent of operational 
energy use occurs in the Air Force at a cost of over $5.4 
billion per year. One of the greatest consumers of fuel in the 
Air Force is the KC-135. Just switching from horizontal to 
vertical wiper blades with a $2 million investment can save 
almost $10 million each year. Using low-cost flight planning 
software instead of traditional practices can decrease the 
workload for flight planners by roughly 300 hours per month. In 
the air, the same planning software has been shown to improve 
flight efficiency by at least 10 percent, which saves $75.0 
million per year.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends the following 
increases: $4.5 million for agile software development and 
operations, $10.0 million for KC-135 winglets, and $2.0 million 
for KC-135 vertical wipers in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 64855F 
Tech Transition Program.

Polar communications

    The budget request included $219.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Space Force, for PE 
64858F Tech Transition.
    The committee understands that strategic satellite 
communication is vital to national security and that there 
exists a potential 7-year gap in resilient capability coverage. 
Additionally, the Commander, U.S. Northern Command, has warned 
about a lack of basic and reliable communications in the 
northern most latitudes, communications that the Department of 
Defense will need to help respond to great power competition. 
The committee is aware of recent developments in low- and 
medium-earth orbit communications that could support additional 
satellite capability to begin to establish more robust 
communications at these northern latitudes.
    Therefore, the committee recommends and increase of $46.0 
million in RDT&E, Space Force, for PE 64858F for strategic 
satellite communications capability.

Low-Cost Attritable Aircraft Technology

    The budget request included $219.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
64858F Tech Transition Program.
    The committee supports the Assistant Secretary of the Air 
Force for Acquisition, Technology, and Logistics' intent to 
accelerate the Air Force Research Laboratory's Low-Cost 
Attributable Aircraft Technology XQ-58 program for 
collaborative pairing with manned platforms, potentially 
including the F-35. The committee views the combined 
application of commercial technology, autonomy, and artificial 
intelligence as an innovative solution to meeting the demands 
of the National Defense Strategy.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $128.0 
million, in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 0604858F for the purchase 
of additional XQ-58 aircraft and operationally relevant 
testing.

Long Endurance UAS

    The budget request included $219.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF), for PE 
64858F Tech Transition Program.
    The committee supports the Air Force's effort to provide an 
alternative to traditional space assets by using unmanned 
vehicles to provide persistent over the horizon surveillance, 
targeting, and tactical communications capability.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $33.5 
million in RDAF for PE 64858F for long endurance unmanned 
aircraft systems.

Rapid repair of high performance materials

    The budget request included $219.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
64858F Tech Transition Program.
    The committee recognizes the importance of further 
advancement of systems that can be used to repair high 
performance materials for the Department of Defense. The 
committee highly encourages further integration of portable 
deployable systems.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $6.0 
million, in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 64858F for development of 
technologies to enable the rapid repair of high performance 
materials.

Small satellites

    The budget request included $219.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
64858F Technology Transition Program.
    The committee is encouraged by the Department of Defense's 
focus on small satellite capabilities and supports the growth 
and expansion of the space industry capabilities in this 
critical technology area.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $6.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 64858F for small 
satellites.

Air Force Open Systems Integration

    The budget request included no funding in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF), for PE 
0604429F Airborne Electronic Attack.
    The committee supports the Air Force's initiative to 
transition the Systems of Systems Technology Integration Tool 
Chain for Heterogeneous Electronic Systems (STITCHES) 
capability to the 850th Electronic Warfare Group. This open 
systems integration solution provides critical capability 
across the Department of Defense. The committee was 
disappointed to learn that the transition was authorized but 
failed to capture the required funding.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $30.0 
million in RDAF for PE 0604429F for STITCHES transition 
activities.

SLATE/VR Training

    The budget request included $248.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF), for PE 
0605223F Advanced Pilot Training.
    The committee supports the effort to accelerate the 
fielding of commercially developed airborne augmented reality 
for: (1) In-flight learning; (2) Operational training; (3) 
Advancing learning and performance assessment science and 
practice by integrating and testing advanced airborne augmented 
reality prototypes in Air Force training aircraft; and (4) 
Active Air Force fighters through initial integration 
activities for the F-16.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $6.0 
million in RDAF for PE 0605223F.

Gulf Test Range modernization

    The budget request included $208.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
64759F Major T&E Investment.
    The committee notes its support for the next phase in the 
Gulf Test Range telemetric modernization process.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $15.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 64759F for Gulf Test Range 
modernization.

Enterprise Resource Planning Common Services

    The budget request included $9.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
38602F Enterprise Information Services.
    The committee remains concerned about the Air Force's 
development of Enterprise Resource Planning Common Services 
with respect to implementing best practices for the frequency 
of capability delivery to end users and notes that the 
acquisition strategy for this program is inconsistent with the 
Air Force's digital modernization strategy.
    The committee recommends a reduction of $7.5 million in 
RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 38602F.

Advanced Air to Air capability

    The budget request included $15.8 billion in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF), for PE 
9999999 Classified Programs.
    The committee supports the Air Force's efforts in 
developing advanced air-to-air weapons to enable air 
superiority, which is fundamental to achieving victory in any 
conflict.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $62.0 
million in RDAF for PE 999999.

Air Force Integrated Personnel and Pay System

    The budget request included $27.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
65018F Air Force Integrated Personnel and Pay System (AF-IPPS).
    The committee notes its continuing concern with AF-IPPS 
implementation of best practices for frequency of capability 
delivery to end users and that the acquisition strategy for 
this program is inconsistent with the Air Force's digital 
modernization strategy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $20.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 65018F.

B-1B Squadrons

    The budget request included $15.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Air Force (RDAF), for PE 
11126F B-1B Squadrons.
    The committee supports the Air Force's request to realign 
funds to support certain B-1 radio cryptographic modernization 
requirements within this account.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $10.8 
million in RDAF for PE 11126F for cryptographic modernization 
activities.

PDI: Mission Partner Environment (MPE) local upgrades, U.S. Indo-
        Pacific Command

    The budget request included $13.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
35600F International Intelligence Technology and Architectures.
    The unfunded priorities list submitted by the Commander, 
U.S. Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM), included additional 
funding for Mission Partner Environment (MPE) local upgrades to 
modernize the command, control, communications, and computers 
architecture in the INDOPACOM area of responsibility and 
provide local systems to support and enhance operations with 
allies and partners.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.7 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 35600F, specifically for 
the BICES-X program.

C-17 microvanes

    The budget request included $9.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
41130F C-17 Aircraft (IF).
    The committee supports efforts to increase efficiency and 
to reduce costs associated with fuel burn. The committee notes 
that the Air Force estimates savings of approximately $10.0 
million per year, with less than a 4-month positive return on 
investment, through the use of C-17 microvanes, which have been 
shown to streamline airflow and reduce drag.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 41130F for the fielding of 
C-17 microvanes.

Logistics Information Technology

    The budget request included $35.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Air Force, for PE 
78610F Logistics Information Technology (LOGIT).
    The committee notes its concern with the progress of the 
Item Master effort with respect to implementation of best 
practices for frequency of capability delivery to end users and 
that the acquisition strategy for this program is inconsistent 
with the Air Force's digital modernization strategy.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $20.0 
million in RDT&E, Air Force, for PE 78610F.

Small satellite mission operations center

    The budget request included $139.9 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Space Force, for PE 
1206601SF Space Technology Applied Research.
    The committee believes that there is significant potential 
in small satellite missions and that a central operations 
center would provide synergy to the ongoing Department of 
Defense efforts.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDT&E, Space Force, for PE 1206601SF for a small 
satellite mission operations center.

GPS User Equipment

    The budget request included $390.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Space Force, for PE 
1203164SF NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (User Equipment) 
(SPACE).
    The committee understands that the modernized Global 
Positioning System user equipment program for the Space Force 
has slipped by over a year and that more delays are possible.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $20.0 
million in RDT&E, Space Force, for PE 1203164SF.

National Security Space Launch technology development

    The budget request included $561.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Space Force, for PE 
1206853SF National Security Space Launch Program (SPACE)--EMD.
    Elsewhere in this Act, the committee recommends a provision 
that would require the Secretary of the Air Force to establish 
a program to develop technologies and systems to enhance phase 
three National Security Space Launch requirements and enable 
further advances in launch capability associated with the 
insertion of national security payloads into relevant classes 
of orbits.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $30.0 
million in RDT&E, Space Force, for PE 1206853SF. This increase 
would resource this important program.

Cobra Dane service life extension

    The budget request included $28.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Space Force (RDSF), for PE 
1203873SF Ballistic Missile Defense Radars.
    The committee notes that, because of projected delays in 
fielding two homeland defense radars in the Indo-Pacific area 
of responsibility, Cobra Dane will now be required to exceed 
its originally planned life expectancy. The committee also 
notes that this project was included on the unfunded priorities 
list submitted by the Commander, U.S. Northern Command and 
North American Aerospace Defense Command.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $18.5 
million in RDSF for PE 120387SF to accelerate the service life 
extension of the Cobra Dane radar.

Commercial space domain awareness

    The budget request included $86.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Space Force, for PE 
1203940SF Space Situation Awareness Operations.
    The committee believes that, in an increasingly crowded 
environment, the space situational awareness (SSA) mission is 
essential to U.S. Government and commercial space operations. 
The committee views the use of commercial data for this mission 
as an important part of an integrated approach to achieving 
SSA.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $7.0 
million in RDT&E, Space Force, for PE 1203940SF for commercial 
procurement of SSA data.

Global Positioning System III--Operational Control Segment

    The budget request included $482.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Space Force, for PE 
1206423SF Global Positioning System III--Operational Control 
Segment.
    The committee believes that Global Positioning System 
modernization is a critical milestone for achieving the lethal 
force envisioned in the National Defense Strategy but sees this 
request as excess to need.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $65.0 
million in RDT&E, Space Force, for PE 1206423SF.

                              Defense Wide


Defense Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research

    The budget request included $35.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
61110D8Z Basic Research Initiatives.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Defense 
Established Program to Stimulate Competitive Research 
(DEPSCoR). The program helps increase the number of university 
researchers and improve the capabilities of institutions of 
higher education in eligible jurisdictions to perform 
competitive research relevant to the Department of Defense.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $20.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 61110D8Z for DEPSCoR.

Minerva Research Initiative

    The budget request included $35.6 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
61110D8Z Basic Research Initiatives.
    The committee is concerned by the proposed divestment in 
social science research programs within the Office of the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering and the 
Army's withdrawal from Minerva Research Initiative in recent 
years. At a time when peer and near-peer adversaries are 
increasingly employing strategies of malign influence and 
disinformation, maintaining the Nation's technological 
superiority in the face of these threats requires not only 
investing in physical sciences but also the integration of 
cross-disciplinary research that explores the social, cultural, 
behavioral, political, historical, and religious drivers of 
today's increasingly complex global security environment.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $17.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 61110D8Z Basic Research 
Initiatives for the Minerva research initiative.
    The committee further notes that the National Academies of 
Science, Engineering, and Medicine's 2020 review of Minerva's 
accomplishments found that, despite facing challenges with 
establishing a stable, well-functioning organizational 
structure as well as resource limitations, the program has made 
important contributions. The study found that the program has 
had a positive impact on the amount of dialogue between the 
Department of Defense and the social science community, the 
number of social science researchers with an interest in 
research relevant to national security, and the amount of 
collaboration among researchers working on topics relevant to 
national security. The committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Research and Engineering to review the findings of 
this report and brief the congressional defense committees on 
planned responses to the report's recommendations, no later 
than March 1, 2021.

Traumatic brain injury medical research

    The budget request included $53.7 million for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
61117E Basic Operational Medical Research Science.
    The committee notes the importance of continued medical 
research conducted by the Army Futures Command and Army 
Research Laboratory to advance the prevention, detection, and 
treatment of acute traumatic brain injury (TBI). The committee 
notes that TBIs are associated with a variety of long-term 
effects and are prevalent in military and civilian settings. 
The committee supports this funding increase to help the Army 
to prevent TBI incidence and ultimately develop prevention, 
detection, and treatment methodologies that could be used to 
protect the entire Joint Force as well as civilian populations.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 61117E for traumatic 
brain injury medical research.

Aerospace, education, research, and innovation activities

    The budget request included $31.0 million for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
61228D8Z Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority 
Institutions.
    The committee notes the importance of fundamental research 
and the pipeline of highly qualified technical talent in 
support of long-term national security needs. The committee 
supports increased funding for aerospace education and research 
activities at Historically Black Colleges and Universities/
Minority Institutions to promote the expansion of the future 
aerospace technical workforce, especially among U.S. citizens, 
and to enhance research in areas such as fatigue damage 
tolerance, experimental aerodynamics, and the performance of 
materials and components under extreme environmental 
conditions.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 61228D8Z Historically 
Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions for 
aerospace education, research, and innovation activities.

Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority Institutions

    The budget request included $31.0 million for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
61228D8Z Historically Black Colleges and Universities/Minority 
Institutions.
    The committee notes the importance of increasing the 
Department of Defense's (DOD) partnerships with Historically 
Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs). These HBCU 
institutions can support the Department of Defense's needs for 
high quality research as well as serve as a source for United 
States citizens with science, technology, engineering, and 
mathematics training who can support national security 
technology missions.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million, in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 61228D8Z.

Emerging biotech research

    The budget request included $250.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
62715E Materials and Biological Technology.
    The committee recognizes the importance of protecting 
warfighter populations stationed domestically and abroad in the 
event of a pandemic. The committee supports expanding rapid 
response vaccine capabilities and capacity that can meet the 
needs of this population in the event of an outbreak. The 
committee commends the Department of Defense for its prior 
efforts, conducted by the Defense Advanced Research Projects 
Agency, to pursue novel rapid production capabilities and 
directs the Department to pursue late-stage multi-modal 
platform technologies capable of responding to pandemics such 
as influenza, COVID-19, and future infectious diseases.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $40.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 62715E for an increase 
in emerging biotechnology research.

Operational Fires program reduction, Defense-wide

    The budget request included $231.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
63286E Advanced Aerospace Systems.
    The committee recognizes the importance of coordinating 
various service and agency hypersonics activities and is 
concerned with the lack of a transition pathway for the Defense 
Advanced Research Projects Agency's Operational Fires effort 
into a funded Army acquisition or development activity.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $20.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 63286E for a reduction 
in the Operational Fires program.

Hypersonic program reduction

    The budget request included $102.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
64331D8Z Rapid Prototyping Program.
    The committee recognizes the importance of hypersonic 
research and development, especially in light of the National 
Defense Strategy and the advancing threats that it describes. 
However, the committee is concerned that there has been a lack 
of adequate coordination on hypersonic prototyping efforts 
among the various stakeholders and service components.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $20.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 64331D8Z for hypersonic 
program reduction.

Stratospheric balloon research

    The budget request included $133.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
63338D8Z Defense Modernization and Prototyping.
    The committee recognizes the increasing importance of 
stratospheric balloons in command, control, communications, 
computers, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance 
(C4ISR) and missile defense missions. The committee is 
concerned that, as projects move from the Office of Secretary 
of Defense's Missile Defeat Project to elsewhere in the 
Department, transition of prior research will be insufficient. 
Specifically, the committee is concerned that the Trippwire 
high altitude demonstration program, previously funded under 
the Missile Defeat Project, lacks specific budgetary 
continuity. The committee understands that the Trippwire 
technologies still require testing and evaluation activities 
before they can transition to the military services as a 
program of record.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $13.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 63338D8Z for 
stratospheric balloon research.

Rapid prototyping using digital manufacturing

    The budget request included $93.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
63680D8Z Manufacturing Technology.
    The committee notes that high performance computing, when 
combined with additive manufacturing, has the potential to 
significantly support the ability for forward deployed forces 
and the defense industrial base to make optimal use of the 
additive manufacturing capabilities. High performance computing 
assets can be used to optimize design processes, support real 
time monitoring of manufacturing processes and product quality, 
and support detailed data analyses of critical parts. The 
Department of Defense has indicated that the use of high 
performance computing addresses a critical capability required 
in implementation of additive manufacturing.
    The committee recommends an increase of $5.0 million in 
RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 63680D8Z Manufacturing Technology 
for rapid prototyping using digital manufacturing.

Defense supply chain technologies

    The budget request included $40.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
63680S Manufacturing Technology Program.
    The committee recognizes the potential of academic 
partnership programs to increase the adoption of additive 
manufacturing, automation, and robotics metal-casting 
technologies among small-to-medium businesses in the defense 
industrial base.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 63680S for defense 
supply chain technologies.

Steel Performance Initiative

    The budget request included $40.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
63680S Manufacturing Technology Program.
    The committee notes that failure to invest in steel 
technology for advanced weapon systems threatens leadership in 
commercial steel technology and in defense equipment 
performance. The committee understands that steel is a critical 
and enabling material for the performance of defense equipment. 
Investment is needed in steel alloy development and 
manufacturing technology to maintain warfighter preparedness 
and a strong industrial base.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million for RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 63680S.

Network-Centric Warfare Technology program reduction

    The budget request included $661.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
63766E Network-Centric Warfare Technology.
    The committee is concerned with the coordination of service 
and Strategic Capabilities Office programs and activities as 
well as the absence of transition plans for some of the 
proposed and ongoing research efforts.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $10.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 63766E Network-Centric 
Warfare Technology.

Operational Energy Capability Improvements

    The budget request included $0.0 in Research, Development, 
Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 64055D8Z 
Operational Energy Capability Improvement.
    The committee notes that, since its creation in 2012, the 
Operational Energy Capability Improvement Fund (OECIF) has 
served as ``seed money'' to start or consolidate promising 
innovations and to demonstrate technological feasibility with 
the goal of transitioning science and technology investments 
into Department of Defense programs. The committee further 
notes that OECIF investments are directly focused on the 
capability needs expressed in the National Defense Strategy and 
that OECIF's efforts have complemented, not replaced or 
duplicated, investments made by the military services. The 
committee is concerned that the budget request did not include 
funding for the OECIF and notes its support for the program as 
the Department works to rapidly address new and critical issues 
arising from emerging threats to our ability to supply the 
Joint Force.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $65.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 64055D8Z Operational 
Energy Capability Improvement.

Funding for long-duration demonstration initiative and joint program

    The budget request included $61.3 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
63851D8Z Environmental Security Technical Certification 
Program.
    The committee recommends an increase of $15.0 million in 
RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 63851D8Z to fund a pilot program on 
long-duration energy storage established elsewhere in this Act.

Advanced technologies

    The budget request included $730.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW), for PE 
64250D8Z Advanced Innovative Technologies.
    The committee is supportive of advanced innovation but is 
concerned that some of the projects planned to be undertaken in 
fiscal year 2021 are outside of the charter of the Strategic 
Capabilities Office--namely, the use of mature technology to 
produce game-changing capability. The committee is encouraged 
by the continued work on the hypervelocity gun weapon system 
(HGWS) and its continued development to provide a low cost 
integrated air and missile defense interceptor. The committee 
encourages the continued development of the HGWS program.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $100.0 
million in RDDW for PE 64250D8Z.

Defense Modernization and Prototyping program reduction

    The budget request included $133.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
64331D8Z Defense Modernization and Prototyping.
    The committee recognizes the importance of hypersonic 
research and development, especially in light of the National 
Defense Strategy and the advancing threats that it describes. 
However, the committee is concerned that there has been a lack 
of adequate coordination on hypersonic prototyping efforts 
among the various stakeholders and service components.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $20.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 64331D8Z.

Homeland Defense Radar-Hawaii

    The budget request did not contain funding in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-Wide (RDDW), for PE 
64672C Homeland Defense Radar-Hawaii (HDR-H).
    The committee is aware of the challenges related to site 
selection for HDR-H but understands that the Missile Defense 
Agency has a viable path forward if provided sufficient 
funding. The committee believes that a persistent sensing 
capability in this area of responsibility is critical for 
homeland defense and also notes that this program was included 
in the unfunded priorities list submitted by the Commander, 
Indo-Pacific Command.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $162.0 
million in RDDW for PE 64672C.

Next Generation Interceptor

    The budget request included $664.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW), for PE 
64874C Improved Homeland Defense (IHLD) Interceptors.
    The committee fully supports the effort to modernize the 
Ground-Based Interceptor fleet but also notes that delays in 
releasing the request for proposals for the Next Generation 
Interceptor (NGI) have led to a projected contract award date 
that is almost 1 year later than initially planned for by the 
Missile Defense Agency (MDA). These delays have also prevented 
the MDA from obligating or expending the fiscal year 2020 
funding that was appropriated for the two initial contract 
awards.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $310.0 
million in RDDW for PE 64874C for the NGI program.

PDI: Guam Defense System

    The budget request did not include funding in Research, 
Defense, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
64880C Land-Based SM-3 for a Guam Defense System (GDS).
    The committee notes that this project was included on the 
unfunded priorities list submitted by the Commander, U.S. Indo-
Pacific Command, who stated that Guam is both the western-most 
territory of the U.S. homeland and a critical location for 
posture and operations in the Indo-Pacific area of 
responsibility. The committee agrees with the Commander that 
protection of U.S. assets and personnel on Guam is critical for 
effective operations in the region.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $76.8 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 64880C Land-Based SM-3 
for GDS.
    In addition, the committee expects the Missile Defense 
Agency (MDA), along with U.S. Strategic Command (STRATCOM) and 
U.S. Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM), to continue to analyze 
and refine the plan for a defense architecture against the 
range of missile threats to Guam while also beginning the work 
described above.
    Accordingly, not later than January 31, 2021, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the 
Director of the MDA and the Commanders, STRATCOM and INDOPACOM, 
to submit to the congressional defense committees an assessment 
of the architecture required for the defense of Guam from air 
and missile threats, including ballistic, hypersonic, and 
cruise missiles. The assessment shall include the following 
elements:
          (1) An analysis of existing and projected air and 
        missile threats to U.S. forces, assets, and 
        infrastructure located on Guam;
          (2) An analysis of impacts to the ability of U.S. 
        forces to conduct operations in the INDOPACOM area of 
        operations if systems and assets on Guam are vulnerable 
        to air and missile threats;
          (3) An analysis of systems currently available for 
        procurement or deployment that could contribute to the 
        defense of Guam from these threats not later than the 
        end of 2025;
          (4) An analysis of new systems currently in 
        development, or modifications to existing systems, that 
        could enhance or substitute for existing options in 
        contributing to this mission;
          (5) Estimated cost and schedule for the various 
        options studied; and
          (6) Anything else the Secretary deems relevant.

Hypersonic and Ballistic Tracking and Custody Layer

    The budget request included $216.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW), for PE 
1206410SDA Space Technology Development and Prototyping.
    The committee understands that the Space Development Agency 
(SDA) is responsible for the development of the hypersonic and 
ballistic space-based tracking and custody layer. In addition 
the committee has been informed that the SDA is transferring 
funds to have the Missile Defense Agency continue development 
of the Hypersonic and Ballistic Tracking Space Sensor as a 
potential sensor for the tracking layer.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $20.0 
million in RDDW for PE 1206410SDA.

Hybrid space

    The budget request included $216.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW), for PE 
1206410SDA Space Technology Development and Prototyping.
    The committee understands that the Commander, U.S. Indo-
Pacific Command, Commander, U.S. European Command, and other 
combatant commanders have identified the need for persistent 
space-based radars in their unfunded priorities lists for 
fiscal year 2021. A constellation of low earth orbit, space-
based radars, with rapid revisit rates and the capability to 
maintain situational awareness of adversary activities and 
providing low latency target custody, would meet the 
requirements of the combatant commanders.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $130.0 
million in RDDW for PE 1206410SDA.

Hypersonic and Ballistic Tracking Space Sensor

    The budget request did not include funding in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-Wide (RDDW), for PE 
1206895C BMDS Space Programs for a Hypersonic and Ballistic 
Tracking Space Sensor (HBTSS).
    The committee is aware that some funding for this 
capability was included in the budget request for the Space 
Development Agency (SDA). The committee notes, however, that 
section 1683 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) required the Secretary of 
Defense to assign primary responsibility for the development 
and deployment of an HBTSS payload to the Missile Defense 
Agency. Further, the amount of funding contained in the 
requested SDA budget for this program is far less than what is 
required to keep the HBTSS program on track, according to 
fiscal year 2020 budget documentation.
    The committee notes that the Commander, U.S. Strategic 
Command, and Commander, U.S. Northern Command, among other 
senior military and civilian officials, have stated repeatedly 
that space-based sensors are the most effective path to 
improving both homeland and theater missile defenses against a 
wide range of missile threats. The committee is disappointed 
that the Department of Defense has once again neglected to 
request meaningful funding for this program.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $120.0 
million in RDDW in PE 1206895C for HBTSS.

Stryker Nuclear Biological Chemical Reconnaissance Vehicle Sensor Suite 
        Upgrade

    The budget request included $320.0 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation, Defense-wide (RDDW), for PE 
64384BP Chemical and Biological Defense Program--EMD, of which 
$128.9 million was for Contamination Avoidance programs, 
including the Stryker Nuclear Biological Chemical 
Reconnaissance Vehicle Sensor Suite Upgrade (NBCRV SSU).
    The committee understands that platform-mounted 
reconnaissance of nuclear and radiological hazards is a key 
capability for ground forces and supports the Department of 
Defense's efforts to develop stand-off technology that would 
protect soldiers and equipment from radiation exposure. The 
committee believes that this capability would be useful on a 
broader variety of platforms.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in RDDW for PE 64384BP for Contamination Avoidance 
programs to accelerate integration activities for the Stryker 
NBCRV SSU and to investigate platform-agnostic variants of the 
sensor package.

Infrastructure to assess counter-small UAS commercial solutions

    The budget request included $422.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
64940D8Z Central Test and Evaluation Investment Program 
(CTEIP).
    The committee notes the expansion of small Unmanned 
Aircraft System (sUAS) threats as fueled by the proliferation 
of industry-driven sUAS capabilities highlighted elsewhere in 
this Act. The committee believes that the scope and complexity 
of this threat will only increase over the next decade.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $15.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 64940D8Z to build the 
necessary test and evaluation infrastructure to assess Counter-
sUAS (C-sUAS) capabilities.
    To ensure the best use of this additional funding, the 
committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Research 
and Engineering (USD R&E) to provide a plan for the development 
of the test and evaluation infrastructure required to 
appropriately assess C-sUAS solutions so as to systematically 
address the long-term threat to U.S. troops and critical 
infrastructure.
    The committee expects future funding to be used to build 
the appropriate test and evaluation infrastructure, but it will 
be contingent on the efficacy of the briefed plan. The 
committee recommends that the USD R&E consult with the 
Department of Justice on its efforts to systematically address 
C-sUAS threats using a comprehensive test and evaluation plan.
    The plan shall be briefed to the congressional defense 
committees no later than February 1, 2021, and shall address 
the capability to: (1) Provide full time, space, and position 
information on low, slow, and small targets that are either 
under operator control or autonomous and that may be executing 
terrain-following maneuvers; (2) Enable cyber analyses of 
defeat mechanisms for autonomous and automated systems; (3) 
Enable end-to-end analysis of the proposed C-sUAS kill chain 
from sensor to defeat mechanism to impact on UAS functionality; 
and (4) Such other matters as the USD R&E determines to be 
appropriate.

Telemetry range extension wave glider relay

    The budget request included $422.5 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
64940D8Z Central Test and Evaluation Investment Development.
    The committee notes the need for investments in test ranges 
in support of the capabilities called for in the National 
Defense Strategy. Range extension enables range safety and 
Department of Defense over-water test events of long-range 
hypersonic weapons, aircraft, and sea surface platforms.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $15.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 64940D8Z.

National Academies study on comparison of talent programs

    The budget request included $5.8 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
65151D8Z Studies and Analysis Support--OSD.
    The committee recommends a provision elsewhere in this 
Report to require the National Academies of Science, 
Engineering, and Medicine to conduct a study comparing methods 
for recruiting and retaining researchers used by the U.S. and 
Chinese governments. The committee notes that the People's 
Republic of China maintains various well-funded talent programs 
through which American researchers are encouraged to set up 
labs in China and conduct research in Chinese laboratories, 
providing the country access to sensitive technologies 
developed in the United States.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 65151D8Z for the 
National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine study 
on comparison of talent programs.

Defense Technical Information Center

    The budget request included $59.4 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
65801KA Defense Technical Information Center (DTIC).
    The committee notes the challenges that the DTIC faces in 
efficiently and effectively performing its mission to 
facilitate sharing, maintain open repositories, and develop 
analytics of data across the research and engineering 
enterprise. The committee notes that the role of the DTIC needs 
to be re-examined given the emphasis that the Department of 
Defense is placing on the use of modern data collection, 
distribution, and analysis techniques and technologies to 
support both management and combat missions.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $50.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 65801KA.
    The committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Research and Engineering, in coordination with the Chief Data 
Officer and other appropriate officials, to brief the 
congressional defense committees on a plan for the 
modernization and revitalization of DTIC missions, 
capabilities, and roles to support the National Defense 
Strategy no later than December 31, 2021.

Advanced machine tool research

    The budget request included $9.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
67210D8Z Industrial Base Analysis and Sustainment Support.
    The committee notes that Executive Order 13806 (Assessing 
and Strengthening the Manufacturing and Defense Industrial Base 
and Supply Chain Resiliency of the United States) and the 
follow-on Department of Defense report both called for 
strengthening American manufacturing capabilities. The use of 
non-U.S.-origin machine tools could provide openings for both 
industrial and national espionage and yield degradation in 
product quality and functionality. U.S. machine tool makers are 
largely buying, rather than building, the tools necessary to 
manufacture cutting edge machine tools.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $20.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 67210D8Z for research in 
advanced machine tooling.

Cold spray manufacturing technologies

    The budget request included $9.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
67210D8Z Industrial Base Analysis and Sustainment Support.
    The committee notes that a January 2020 Government 
Accountability Office report, titled ``Military Depots: DOD Can 
Benefit from Further Sharing of Best Practices and Lessons 
Learned'' (GAO-20-116), cited the potential benefits of the 
application of cold spray manufacturing technologies in 
sustainment activities across the Department of Defense.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 67210D8Z for cold spray 
manufacturing technologies.

Domestic organic light emitting diode manufacturing

    The budget request included $9.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
67210D8Z Industrial Base Analysis and Sustainment Support.
    The committee recognizes the importance of organic light 
emitting diode (OLED) microdisplays as critical components in 
major military aviation and ground combat programs of record. 
However, the committee is concerned that the domestic OLED 
manufacturing industrial base is fragile. Spare parts are very 
limited, often resulting in substantial time and production 
capacity loss. A single-point-of-failure for any one of these 
tools can result in a complete production line halt that can 
span weeks or even months.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 67210D8Z for support for 
domestic OLED manufacturing.

Implementation of radar supplier resiliency plan

    The budget request included $9.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
67210D8Z Industrial Base Analysis and Sustainment Support.
    The committee acknowledges the Department of Defense's 
preparation of a Radar Supplier Resiliency Plan.
    To support implementation of this plan, the committee 
recommends an increase of $5.0 million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, 
for PE 67210D8Z. Accordingly, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to report to the congressional defense 
committees by April 15, 2021, on the critical deliverables that 
will have a direct and measurable impact on the radar 
industrial base during the first year of implementation.

Manufacturing for reuse of NdFeB magnets

    The budget request included $9.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
67210D8Z Industrial Base Analysis and Sustainment Support.
    The committee notes that the Department of Defense depends 
on high-performance magnets, including rare earth neodymium-
iron-boron (NdFeB), for the functioning of sophisticated weapon 
systems. Section 2533c of title 10, United States Code, 
requires the Department to stop using magnets from China. The 
committee is also concerned about the reliability of other 
sources of these magnets and the global dependence on raw 
materials supplied by China.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $6.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 67210D8Z to expand 
domestic manufacturing capacity for these magnets.

Submarine Construction Workforce Training Pipeline

    The budget request included $9.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
67210D8Z Industrial Base Analysis and Sustainment Support.
    The committee notes that, over the next decade, the 
submarine shipbuilding industry must hire at least 18,000 new 
skilled workers to support the production of the Columbia-class 
ballistic missile submarine and the continued construction of 
the Virginia-class submarine. The submarine industry has worked 
closely with State and local governments, community colleges, 
high schools, and community-based non-profits for the past 
several years to establish new training pipelines to support 
these increased hiring needs. Thus far, such pipeline training 
programs have placed nearly 2,500 people in submarine industry 
jobs. The committee notes that additional funding will increase 
the throughput of these pipelines and expand them into 
additional States to more adequately respond to the hiring 
demand.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $20.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 67210D8Z for increasing 
the submarine construction workforce training pipeline.

Workforce transformation cyber initiative pilot program

    The budget request included $46.5 million for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
33140D8Z Information Systems Security Program.
    The committee supports the National Security Agency (NSA) 
National Cryptologic School pilot program to enable workforce 
transformation certificate-based courses on cybersecurity and 
artificial intelligence that are offered by Center of Academic 
Excellence (CAE) universities. The committee understand that 
this pilot program will develop courses and curricula with 
technology partners and also provide funding for select NSA CAE 
universities to offer these courses and receive tuition 
reimbursement for participation in the courses.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $20.0 
million, in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 33140D8Z for the 
workforce transformation cyber initiative pilot program.

Cyber orchestration pilot

    The budget request included $8.9 million for Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
33140K Information Systems Security Program.
    Elsewhere in this report, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to sponsor a demonstration of commercial 
technologies and techniques for enabling interoperability among 
cybersecurity systems and tools and for machine-to-machine 
communications and automated workflow orchestration. This 
demonstration should include comply-to-connect products, the 
Assured Compliance Assessment Solution, the Automated 
Continuous Endpoint Monitoring program, the Sharkseer perimeter 
defense system, and other Department of Defense cybersecurity 
systems. The committee urges the Secretary to coordinate this 
demonstration with the speed metrics pilot and the 
demonstration of the Systems of Systems Technology Integration 
Tool Chain for Heterogeneous Electronic Systems 
interoperability technology recommended elsewhere in this 
report.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million, in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 33140K for the cyber 
orchestration pilot program.

Joint Regional Security Stacks SIPR funding--RDT&E

    The budget request included $9.7 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
33228K Joint Regional Security Stacks (JRSS).
    The committee is aware of the operational cybersecurity 
limitations of the JRSS technology as assessed by the Director, 
Operational Test and Evaluation, the difficulty of training 
personnel to use the JRSS, and the shortage of feasible 
tactics, techniques, and procedures to make effective use of 
the JRSS. The committee believes that the deployment of JRSS on 
the Secret Internet Protocol Router Network is thus 
inappropriate, given JRSS' limited cybersecurity capability and 
the existence of alternative capabilities to execute its 
network functions.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $486,000 
in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 33228K due to the operational 
cybersecurity limitations of the JRSS technology.

Multi-Mission Payload

    The budget request included $1.2 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Special Operations 
Command, for PE 1160431BB Warrior Systems for Multi Mission 
Payload (MMP).
    The committee notes that United States Special Operations 
Command (SOCOM) identified executability issues with the MMP-
Light program due to appropriations rescissions in fiscal year 
2020. As a result, SOCOM requested the transfer of funds from 
the MMP-Light to the man-pack Capital Equipment Replacement 
Program for fiscal year 2021.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a reduction of $1.2 
million in RDT&E, Special Operations Command, for PE 1160431BB. 
The increase associated with this transfer is reflected 
elsewhere in this report.

Advanced satellite navigation receiver

    The budget request included $39.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
65814OTE Operational Test Activities and Analyses.
    The committee notes the need for test and evaluation 
activities for development of countermeasures and counter-
countermeasure capabilities. Currently, full characterization 
of existing threats is limited due to the technical limitations 
of current flight data systems to support high speed and 
dynamic flight testing requirements.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 65814OTE to improve 
threat characterization in high dynamic flight testing.

Joint Test and Evaluation Program

    The budget request included $39.1 million in Research, 
Development, Test, and Evaluation (RDT&E), Defense-wide, for PE 
65814OTE Operational Test Activities and Analyses.
    The committee notes that the Joint Test and Evaluation 
program focuses on joint (cross-service and cross-combatant 
command) warfighter needs and rapid delivery of non-materiel 
solutions, such as: joint tactics, techniques, and procedures; 
concepts of operations; improved and new training packages; and 
new test tools and methodologies. Over the past decade, the 
program has completed 40 joint tests and 96 quick reaction 
tests, sponsored primarily by the combatant commands. The 
committee believes that this important work should continue.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $22.0 
million in RDT&E, Defense-wide, for PE 65814OTE to restore the 
Department's proposed cut to the program under the Defense-Wide 
Review.

                       Items of Special Interest


Advanced powertrain demonstrator

    The committee supports the efforts of the Army in 
developing and integrating modern powertrain technology to 
provide leap-ahead capabilities for ground combat vehicles. The 
committee notes that the Advanced Powertrain Demonstrator 
initiative has successfully demonstrated improved power 
density, which can provide opportunities to add capabilities to 
existing ground combat vehicles, such as additional crew 
members or weapons, and has provided a wider array of options 
for next-generation platforms.
    The committee encourages the Army to continue to progress 
the Advanced Powertrain Demonstrator to higher Technology 
Readiness Levels and to consider resourcing follow-on efforts, 
including the Advanced Mobility Experimental Prototype, in 
collaboration with the Program Executive Office for Ground 
Combat Systems. In addition, the Army should continue to 
leverage private sector investment in powertrain technologies 
to achieve leap-ahead breakthroughs in powertrain efficiency.

Anti-corrosion and nano technologies

    The committee remains concerned about the high cost of 
corrosion within the Department of Defense. The military 
services, particularly the Navy, face complex threats in the 
Indo-Pacific region that require our military equipment and 
infrastructure to be resilient and have maximum operational 
availability. The committee urges the Office of Naval Research 
to pursue lightweight, nanotechnology-based capabilities that 
provide high corrosion resistance and other performance 
properties to decrease the cost of corrosion and increase the 
operational availability of military equipment and 
infrastructure that enhances the ability of the Joint Force, 
particularly the Navy, to operate in the Indo-Pacific area of 
responsibility.

Artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies and systems

    The committee recognizes that the Department of Defense 
(DOD) is deploying artificial intelligence (AI) and machine 
learning (ML) to increase warfighter capability, decrease 
operational costs, and increase civilian safety. AI/ML can 
realize these benefits by enabling machines to perform tasks 
that have traditionally required labor-intensive human 
intelligence--for example, to analyze data, image, video, and 
audio files, potentially increasing capabilities to track 
threats and monitor global developments.
    The committee notes that the interim report from the 
National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence 
identifies an outstanding need for distributed and 
decentralized data processing capabilities, down to the 
distributed team, squad, and platoon levels, where units often 
cannot rely on high-bandwidth networks or heavy-duty data 
processing resources. The committee notes that there may be an 
opportunity to deploy AI to this distributed tactical edge 
environment to enhance decision-making and to support 
activities such as mapping, sensing, and mission planning. The 
committee encourages the Department to develop, adopt, and 
deploy such technologies, when appropriate, to gain significant 
tactical and strategic advantages.
    Further, the committee notes the potential use of AI/ML 
technology to address a broad spectrum of DOD missions. The 
committee directs the Director of the Joint Artificial 
Intelligence Center (JAIC) to provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees, no later than March 1, 2021, 
that identifies military occupational specialties and 
capabilities across the military services and Defense Agencies 
and Field Activities that can better leverage AI to maximize 
effectiveness, mission goals, and cost savings to the Federal 
Government. The committee directs that this briefing include an 
identification of business processes and business information 
technology systems that would directly benefit from the 
immediate application of commercial AI/ML capabilities to DOD 
``back office'' activities, such as financial management, 
acquisition, personnel management, and the Department's audit.
    The committee also notes the unique cybersecurity 
vulnerabilities of AI/ML-based systems. The committee notes 
that the Department's efforts to develop and deploy secure 
hardware and software do not yet have a clear thrust to 
mitigate threats that are unique to AI/ML-enabled capabilities. 
The committee directs the Department to leverage 
multidisciplinary teams, compromised of U.S. Government, 
industry, and research university representatives, to urgently 
develop required capabilities and infrastructure to secure the 
algorithms, data, and execution of AI/ML-enabled systems. 
Further, the committee encourages the Department to partner 
with research universities to develop undergraduate and 
graduate curricula and research fellowship opportunities 
focused on threat identification and mitigation for AI/ML-
enabled systems.
    The committee also encourages the JAIC to work closely with 
the White House Artificial Intelligence Task Force, as well as 
the National Institute for Standards and Technology, to develop 
standards for the use of AI across the U.S. Government and best 
practices for the Federal Government's engagement of the 
private sector. The committee also urges the Secretary of 
Defense to continuously review and refine a detailed code of 
ethics associated with its use of AI to ensure that any future 
uses respect civil rights, including privacy, and to ensure 
that human decision-makers remain central to all operational 
activities involving AI/ML and AI/ML-enabled capabilities.
    Finally, the committee recommends that the Department 
consider establishing joint U.S.-allied partner ventures, as 
well as joint DOD ventures with state-level AI-based economic 
development activities, that address shared needs in AI/ML-
enabled capabilities.

Carbon fiber and graphitic foam for Special Operations Forces tactical 
        vehicles

    The committee recognizes recent efforts made by United 
States Special Operations Command (SOCOM) to develop low-cost, 
wider application carbon fiber and graphitic foam components in 
support of the Special Operations Forces (SOF) tactical vehicle 
program. The committee notes that carbon fiber components may 
reduce vehicle weight, reduce fuel consumption, increase 
payload capacity, and could extend service life for SOF 
tactical vehicles. Additionally, graphitic carbon foam may also 
reduce vehicle heat signatures and improve heat dissipation 
from the engine and electronics compartments and could provide 
protection against blast energy, directed energy weapons, and 
electromagnetic pulse threats.
    The committee notes that the Defense Logistics Agency has 
designated graphite/carbon fiber as a strategic material. The 
committee acknowledges that the U.S. Army and SOCOM have 
identified low cost mesophase pitch as a United States-based 
source of graphite that can be used to produce carbon fiber, 
graphitic carbon foam, and battery technologies. The committee 
recognizes the versatility and broad application that carbon 
fiber technology may provide for the Armed Forces by reducing 
the weight of parts as compared to traditional steel 
components.
    Therefore, the committee encourages SOCOM continue its 
efforts to test, develop, and field low cost carbon fiber and 
graphitic carbon foam in support of its tactical vehicle 
program and other programs, as appropriate.

Carbon fiber wheels and graphitic foam for Next Generation Combat 
        Vehicle

    The committee commends the U.S. Army Ground Vehicle Systems 
Center's (GVSC's) decision to transition into lower cost, wider 
application carbon fiber composite wheels and graphitic carbon 
foam research in support of the Next Generation Combat Vehicle 
(NGCV). Carbon fiber wheels may reduce vehicle weight, reduce 
fuel consumption, increase payload capacity, and extend service 
life for the NGCV. Graphitic carbon foam may dramatically 
reduce vehicle heat signatures and improve heat dissipation 
from engine and electronics compartments while also protecting 
against blast energy, directed energy weapons, and 
electromagnetic pulse threats. Finally, these products lend 
themselves to being produced at remote locations with additive 
manufacturing processes in support of NGCV operation and 
maintenance.
    The Defense Logistics Agency has designated graphite/carbon 
fiber as a strategic material. The committee notes favorably 
that the U.S. Army GVSC has identified low cost mesophase pitch 
as a United States-based source of graphite that can be used to 
produce carbon fiber, graphitic carbon foam, and battery 
technologies for the NGCV. The committee recognizes the 
versatility and broad application that carbon fiber technology 
provide for the Armed Forces by reducing the weight of parts by 
over 50 percent, as compared to traditional steel components, 
while improving survivability and performance.
    The committee encourages the U.S. Army GVSC to continue to 
test, develop, and field low cost mesophase pitch carbon fiber 
and graphitic carbon foam components that may reduce vehicle 
weight, reduce fuel consumption, increase payload capacity, 
extend service life, reduce vehicle signatures, improve 
survivability, and utilize additive manufacturing technology to 
reduce cost and weight in the NGCV program.

Close Combat Lethality Task Force

    In March 2018, the Close Combat Lethality Task Force 
(CCLTF) was established by former Secretary of Defense James 
Mattis, as a direct report to the Secretary, and chartered with 
dramatically improving the effectiveness and survivability of 
close combat formations through a combination of materiel and 
non-materiel means, including innovations in recruitment, 
retention, training, concepts of operation, tactics, 
techniques, and procedures, and equipment. The committee agreed 
with Secretary Mattis' rationale for creating the CCLTF, 
specifically that close combat formations should be manned, 
trained, and equipped as an elite force capable of combat 
``overmatch,'' and with its designation as a Cross Functional 
Team (CFT) under section 911 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114328), 
leveraging the critical enabling authorities of that law.
    In a memorandum dated March 27, 2020, Secretary of Defense 
Mark Esper transferred the CCLTF to the Secretary of the Army 
with a tasking to determine alignment of the CCLTF within the 
Army hierarchy. This decision effectively ended the CCLTF's 
designation as a CFT under section 911. As a result, the CCLTF 
will no longer be accorded the priority of a CFT sponsored by, 
and reporting directly to, the Secretary of Defense, nor will 
it exercise the authorities available under section 911 and 
those assigned by the Secretary of Defense.
    The committee is concerned about the potential consequences 
of these decisions on the close combat mission of the 
Department of Defense. The Secretary of the Army has been 
directed to report back to the Secretary of Defense on the 
authorities, responsibilities, policy, and procedures that the 
Secretary of the Army will provide for the continued operation 
of the CCLTF. While the Army's senior leaders have indicated 
that they remain committed to the vision and success of the 
CCLTF, it is unclear whether the Army intends to pursue the 
non-material initiatives that are central to dramatically 
improving close combat effectiveness and survivability. In 
addition, the committee notes that the Marine Corps also has 
considerable equities in the CCLTF, and they are critical to 
the success of this joint effort.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to provide a briefing to the SASC, not later than September 30, 
2020, on the Army's plan to provide enduring support for the 
materiel and non-materiel initiatives to improve close combat 
lethality and survivability. The briefing shall also provide 
details on the CCLTF's alignment within the Army, how the Army 
will partner with the Marine Corps and Special Operations 
Command on the CCLTF's initiatives, and whether the CCLTF will 
continue to be organized and operated as a cross-functional 
team reporting directly to a senior leader. Furthermore, the 
briefing shall address the status of the lines of effort 
assigned by Secretary Mattis and any changes to recruitment, 
retention, training, and personnel turnover in close combat 
units. Finally, the briefing shall also address whether 
personnel from the Cost Analysis and Program Evaluation office, 
the Offices of the Under Secretaries of Defense for Research 
and Engineering, Acquisition and Sustainment, and Personnel and 
Readiness, the Joint Staff, and U.S. Special Operations Command 
will continue to participate in the CCLTF as outside experts.

Collaboration on research to counter foreign malign influence 
        operations

    The committee notes that section 228 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-
92) authorizes the Department of Defense to carry out a 
research program on foreign malign influence operations as part 
of the university research program.
    The committee believes that countering foreign malign 
influence should be a priority in the effective implementation 
of the National Defense Strategy, and the committee urges the 
Department to utilize this authority to the greatest extent 
possible and increase its collaboration with academia, 
nongovernmental organizations, and other relevant entities to 
maintain an edge in identifying and countering adversarial 
foreign malign influence.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives on how the 
Department will implement section 228 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020. The briefing shall 
include, at a minimum: (1) Details on how the program will 
enhance understanding of foreign malign influence; (2) An 
identification of organizations that are collaborating on such 
research as well as a description of steps being taken to 
ensure appropriate inclusion of the military services' research 
and cyber centers; and (3) A description of how the program 
will work with universities, nongovernmental organizations, and 
other relevant entities to enhance the understanding of and 
development of appropriate responses to foreign malign 
influence through collaborative research and the exchange of 
information.

Comptroller General review of Artificial Intelligence Activities of the 
        Department of Defense

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense (DOD) is 
investing significantly in developing and acquiring artificial 
intelligence (AI) tools and systems in order to develop and 
deploy AI-enabled capabilities to support DOD missions. For 
example, the DOD has established a Joint Artificial 
Intelligence Center (JAIC) to coordinate Department-wide AI 
activities, increased science and technology investments in AI, 
and attempted to employ more AI experts in a variety of roles. 
The DOD has historically had challenges developing modern 
capabilities in a timely manner as well as coordinating 
disparate activities across the Department. Given the growing 
significance of AI to DOD's acquisition goals, the committee 
directs the Comptroller General of the United States to 
continuously monitor and report on: (1) DOD's AI-related 
efforts, including science and technology, research and 
development, and formal acquisition programs; (2) The status of 
these efforts, including types of technologies and technology 
transition strategies being used; (3) Efforts to build 
expertise and infrastructure, including accessible data sets 
and computational capabilities, both within the DOD and across 
the Federal Government, to support DOD missions. The committee 
directs the Comptroller General to provide a briefing on the 
status of the effort to the committee by September 1, 2020, and 
provide a report to the committee by February 1, 2021.

Cyber Operations for Base Resilient Architecture

    The committee understands that the U.S. is committed to a 
holistic cyber mission assurance program through investments in 
defensive cyberspace operations, weapon system cyber resiliency 
efforts, the Cyber Resiliency Office for Weapon Systems, and 
Mission Defense Teams.
    Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary of Air 
Force to continue funding and to expand the Cyber Operations 
for Base Resilient Architecture pilot program in the U.S. Indo-
Pacific Command area of responsibility as part of the overall 
mission assurance strategy.

Emerging biotechnology for national security

    The committee notes the importance that emerging 
biotechnologies will have in national security missions, 
including medical response to threats, biological defense, and 
bio-based manufacturing and computation.
    The committee believes that the Department of Defense 
should consider developing more formal organizations with 
specific responsibility for maintaining critical technical 
expertise in these emerging areas and facilitating adoption and 
availability of these technologies for Department of Defense 
missions. The committee notes that the optimal construct for 
such an organization might be a network of linked 
organizations, or a virtual consortium of independent 
organizations, to include both public and private sector 
entities. Activities of such an organization should range from 
basic research to prototyping of new concepts to support for 
manufacturing and production to providing technical expertise 
to the Department as required.
    The committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Research and Engineering to develop plans for the establishment 
of and support for potential organizational options to advance 
emerging biotechnology research, analyses, prototyping, and 
manufacturing activities for national security missions. The 
plan developed should address the following issues: development 
and continuous modernization of fundamental tools and 
technologies to advance knowledge in engineering biology; 
options for governance structures, level of investment 
required, a list of types of participants, intellectual 
property strategies, and other considerations required to stand 
up the entity or entities, including required physical and 
digital infrastructure; and possible metrics to measure 
progress or success.
    The committee directs that the plan include a focus on 
strengthening the current organization, structure, and funding 
of emerging biotechnologies research and development across the 
Department to allow for stronger coordination across the 
military services and Defense Agencies and Field Activities and 
to develop, mature, and transition biotechnology activities, 
including the identification of duties of designated officials 
and additional authorities required. The plan should also 
address coordination with appropriate interagency and 
international activities.
    Not later than March 1, 2021, the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Research and Engineering shall provide a briefing 
to the congressional defense committees on the plans, policy 
recommendations, and implementation plan, strategy, and 
associated funding requirements.

Ground Vehicle Systems Center modeling and simulation

    The U.S. Army Combat Capabilities Development Command 
(CCDC) Ground Vehicle Systems Center (GVSC) is developing a 
robust modeling and simulation capability. The committee notes 
that such a capability could assist the Next Generation Combat 
Vehicle Cross Functional Team, particularly as the Army focuses 
on a digital design approach to the Optionally Manned Fighting 
Vehicle. This approach could leverage modern practices of the 
commercial automotive industry and foster development of 
important next generation capabilities. The committee supports 
modeling and simulation capability development by GVSC and, 
elsewhere in this report, has authorized funds to support Next 
Generation Combat Vehicle technologies. The committee directs 
the Director, Army Combat Capabilities Development Command, to 
coordinate with the Director, Test Resource Management Center, 
to ensure that relevant modeling and simulation capabilities 
are available for wider use across the Department of Defense's 
test and evaluation enterprise.

High-energy laser weapons systems

    The committee recognizes that advancements in stabilized 
gimbal systems have provided improvements in target detection, 
identification, and designation on high-energy laser (HEL) 
weapon systems. The committee notes that these systems can 
enhance long-range tracking performance, thereby improving 
success rates and enhancing the safety of servicemembers on the 
battlefield. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a briefing to the congressional defense 
committees no later than December 31, 2020, on current actions 
being taken to improve advanced tracking and targeting 
capability on HEL weapon systems.

Implement National Academics of Science Army Information Science report 
        recommendations

    The committee notes that the 2019 National Academies of 
Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Assessment of the 
Information Sciences Directorate at the Army Research Office 
found that the Army is producing work of high scientific 
quality with well qualified program managers and that funded 
projects are of high caliber and in areas relevant to the 
Army's science and technology mission with examples of 
transitions of the research to the Army and to the Department 
of Defense (DOD) more broadly. The study made a number of 
recommendations to improve the quality of these programs, 
related to: program assessment metrics and program management 
expertise; management of researchers and research portfolios; 
coordination of activities with other similar DOD and 
interagency activities; and broadening of the researcher base. 
The committee also notes that the Department of Defense's 
Office of Basic Science issued a 2019 study on ``Future 
Directions at the Intersection of Management Science and 
Information Science'' which highlighted a number of 
opportunities in these fields where research could be conducted 
to improve the way that the Army and the Department as a whole 
could manage business processes within technology development 
organizations. The committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to review these two studies and provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees on how the Army will address 
the findings and recommendations of these two reports, no later 
than January 1, 2022. This briefing shall be provided in 
publicly releasable format, with a classified annex as 
necessary.

Joint Artificial Intelligence Center reporting structure

    The committee is aware of the recommendations made by the 
National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence in its 
March 2020 report and appreciates its efforts to highlight a 
number of areas where the Department of Defense (DOD) can 
strengthen its efforts in adopting artificial intelligence 
(AI). The committee is also aware that, over the past 24 
months, the Joint AI Center (JAIC) has grown from a nascent 
organization into the focal point of the DOD AI Strategy. Many 
of the JAIC's initial AI capability development efforts have 
transitioned into operational end use by the military services, 
combatant commands, and several DOD components. The JAIC is now 
working with organizations across the DOD to develop dozens of 
new AI-enabled product lines and share lessons learned that 
will support independent efforts.
    The committee believes that successful AI adoption depends 
on enabling capabilities across modern digital infrastructure, 
data management practices, and information technology 
operations. In recognition of the critical relationship between 
successful digital transformation and adopting AI, the 
committee understands that the Department positioned the JAIC 
within the DOD CIO organization. This structure has enabled the 
JAIC's success and that of the CIO organization and benefited 
the DOD enterprise. However, moving forward, the committee also 
understands that the JAIC's reporting directly to the Secretary 
of Defense would afford to the JAIC the high visibility that 
Secretary direct reports enjoy as well as high priority in the 
budget request process and the ability to grant waivers from 
any bureaucratic process requirements not grounded in law. The 
committee encourages the Department to continue to evaluate 
this balance to ensure that the JAIC appreciates from an 
appropriate balance of responsibilities, authorities, and 
oversight. The committee directs the Secretary to brief the 
congressional defense committees no later than March 31, 2021, 
on the future plans for the JAIC's alignment and reporting 
structure.

Nanotechnology research

    The committee notes the great advances in nanotechnology 
made through Department of Defense investments in nanomaterials 
and electronics in partnership with the National Nanotechnology 
Initiative. Currently, nanotechnology is fielded in numerous 
defense systems, including electronics, sensors, medical 
technologies, coatings, and uniforms. The committee believes 
that continued investment in this field is important to 
supporting a variety of modernization activities consistent 
with the National Defense Strategy. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering to provide a briefing, in publicly releasable 
format, with a classified annex as necessary, on Department 
activities in the research, development, and use of 
nanotechnology. The briefing shall describe: applications or 
proposed applications for nanotechnology in defense systems; 
specific materials being evaluated; research organizations in 
the U.S. Government and private sector engaged in such 
research; identified funding for such activities to date; and a 
description of the military services' and Defense Advanced 
Research Projects Agency's assessments on and plans for the use 
of nanotechnology to support future defense needs and 
requirements. The committee directs that this briefing be 
provided to the congressional defense committees no later than 
December 31, 2021.

National Guard research, development, test and evaluation activities

    The committee notes that National Guard and reserve 
components consist of personnel that have private sector 
experience that is directly relevant to National Defense 
Strategy modernization priorities. For example, these personnel 
may have relevant experience in medical fields, software, 
robotics, cybersecurity, and other critical technical 
disciplines. In other cases, National Guard equipment and 
installations are commonly used in technological development 
and experimentation activities. For example, the committee is 
aware that the Army has taken advantage of facilities at Fort 
Pickett to conduct critical operational testing and 
experimentation for the Integrated Visual Augmentation System. 
In order to leverage these capabilities further, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to review and analyze the 
benefits and feasibility of authorizing National Guard and 
Reserve members', equipment's, and facilities' participation on 
a reimbursable basis in research, development, test and 
evaluation (RDT&E) projects in which their involvement furthers 
the work because of a member's or unit's availability, 
qualifications, experience, education, or facilities and 
equipment. In this review, the Secretary should consider 
requesting authority to provide reimbursement for these 
activities from RDT&E accounts, subject to the availability of 
appropriations. The committee directs the Secretary to brief 
the congressional defense committees on a recommendation for 
this proposed policy action no later than February 1, 2021.

National Security Innovation Network

    The committee recognizes that the nature of security 
threats are changing and notes that innovation and 
entrepreneurial methodologies can generate new solutions to 
national security problems. The committee notes that, while 
certain programs in the Department of Defense have allowed for 
more rapid acquisition, the challenge of implementing rapid 
change in the Department persists. The committee further 
understands that the acquisition of new talent to support the 
national security workforce will be critical to achieving the 
aims of the National Defense Strategy and that recruitment from 
innovative sectors of the economy that have traditionally been 
less engaged in the defense enterprise will be critical for 
continued competitiveness.
    The committee highlights the effectiveness of the National 
Security Innovation Network in building a network of alliances 
between the defense, academia, and venture communities whose 
innovation, collaboration, and adaptability can be of crucial 
service to national security. The committee expresses its 
support for the program and in particular notes the ongoing 
expansion of activities at universities through academic 
accelerator programs and technology and national security 
fellowships as an example of ways the Department of Defense can 
provide new pipelines for young talent to consider in support 
of the Nation's national security.

Open Systems Architecture for the Army's Future Vertical Lift programs

    The committee recognizes the benefits of a Modular Open 
Systems Architecture (MOSA) systems engineering approach, as 
indicated by subchapter I of title 10, United States Code, 
which requires its use. The committee therefore appreciates 
that the Army has used it in the Future Vertical Lift Future 
Attack Reconnaissance Aircraft and Future Long-Range Assault 
Aircraft programs and also notes the importance of agile 
contracting in a time of great power competition.
    In order to capture the benefits of a MOSA, the committee 
directs the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, 
Logistics, and Technology to summarize lessons learned from 
using MOSA approaches, to include recommendations to update 
existing Department of Defense policy and guidance on MOSA 
approaches, no later than December 31, 2021, and to brief the 
congressional defense committees on this summary and these 
recommendations. This briefing shall be conducted at the 
classified level, as required. Should the Assistant Secretary 
also have views for the Congress to consider regarding updates 
to subchapter I of title 10, United States Code, the committee 
directs that the Assistant Secretary provide them.

Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle requirements and acquisition 
        strategy

    The Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle (OMFV) is a priority 
Army modernization program critically needed to replace the M2 
Bradley fighting vehicle that has been in operational service 
for more than 30 years. Earlier this year the Army cancelled 
the initial OMFV solicitation and decided to revise the 
acquisition strategy. It is the committee's understanding that 
a reset of the program was necessary in order to establish 
technologically-achievable and affordable requirements as well 
as to facilitate competition.
    The committee encourages the Army to complete a thorough 
re-evaluation of requirements for the OMFV and to pursue a 
competitive acquisition approach that will provide best quality 
and price. Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of 
the Army to provide a classified briefing to the SASC no later 
than August 1, 2020, on OMFV requirements and the revised 
acquisition strategy. The briefing shall include the threat-
basis and operational rationale for the OMFV requirements and 
the plan to integrate active protection systems.

Pandemic resilience technologies

    COVID-19 has exposed vulnerabilities and challenges for the 
Navy's operations and logistics and maintenance enterprises. 
The committee is concerned about the Navy's ability to prepare 
for and respond to future pandemics. Critical gaps remain in 
our understanding of how COVID-19 spreads through personnel and 
platforms in Navy-specific environments and the effectiveness 
of various disease identification, mitigation, and eradication 
approaches under consideration.
    To ensure warfighter health and ship operational 
availability into the future, the committee supports a 
significant applied research and development effort, in 
partnership with industry and universities, into pandemic 
resilience technologies and related operational protocols 
tailored to the unique, contained close-quarters and secure 
environments on Navy ships and shore facilities.
    Accordingly, the committee encourages the Navy to develop 
and adopt technologies and protocols that have the potential to 
prevent the spread and mitigate the impact of future pandemics 
on Navy personnel and operations, including: (1) Artificial 
intelligence and data-driven infectious disease modeling and 
interventions; (2) Shipboard airflow management and 
disinfectant technologies; (3) Personal protective equipment, 
sensors, and diagnostic systems; and (4) Reduced-manning and 
unmanned operation, such as resilient unmanned logistics, to 
reduce human contact.

Predictive maintenance algorithm

    The committee recognizes and commends the efforts of the 
160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment in becoming one of 
the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center's (JAIC's) first two 
National Mission Initiatives through development of an 
algorithm to conduct predictive maintenance (PMx), rather than 
forensic or preventative maintenance, on rotary wing aircraft 
engines.
    The committee encourages continued study of this algorithm 
and its scalability enterprise-wide and continued support of 
unique partnerships between Department of Defense elements, the 
JAIC, and outside stakeholders. Not later than November 30, 
2020, the Secretary of Defense shall provide a briefing to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives. The briefing shall include details of the 
following: (1) Positive lessons learned through this 
partnership and program; (2) Barriers to these partnerships or 
to scalability, including data availability; and (3) A detailed 
description of any plans for future adaption of the PMx 
algorithm for other applications.

Reimbursable work at Army Combat Capabilities Development Command 
        laboratories and engineering centers

    The committee notes that the technical workforce and 
facilities of the Army labs and engineering centers are at the 
forefront of innovation and prototype development for the Army 
and a number of other Federal agencies. The committee is aware 
that recent restrictions on these organizations' ability to 
perform reimbursable work have limited the ability for small 
businesses and other companies to leverage the workforce, 
equipment, and research infrastructure investments at these 
labs and centers. These limitations have also limited the 
ability of the Army's technical organizations to work more 
closely with leaders in the private sector to adapt new 
technological capabilities for Army missions.
    The committee believes that the capabilities of Department 
of Defense (DOD) science and technology infrastructure should 
be available to Federal and industry customers, with those 
partnerships managed to prioritize defense core activities and 
missions. Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to promulgate policy to fully implement the ``manage to 
budget'' flexibilities of subsection (e) of section 2358a of 
title 10, United States Code, to allow lab and center directors 
to manage and optimize their reimbursable workloads and 
customers without regard for funding organization or Tables of 
Distribution and Allowances limitations. The committee notes 
that some of the workload can be handled with technically 
expert term civilian employees, using the authorities 
established in section 1109 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92).

Review of barriers to innovation

    The committee is aware of the report titled ``Barriers to 
Innovation in Research and Engineering Activities of the 
Department of Defense,'' required by section 232 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public 
Law 115-91). The committee believes that it is important to 
address the barriers discussed in the report. The committee 
encourages the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering (USD (R&E)) to examine the feasibility of 
recommendations pertaining to: broadening hiring authorities at 
Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratories; adjusting 
reprogramming thresholds to increase the USD (R&E)'s 
flexibility to shift funds within the science and technology 
(S&T) budgeting activities; extending the appropriation life of 
Congressional budget additions; and continued support for 
authorities that encourage a competitive funding process to 
help address the challenges of aging infrastructure, that 
encourage acquisition at the speed of relevance, and that 
encourage a culture of innovation.
    Additionally, the committee directs the USD(R&E), not later 
than December 31, 2021, to survey laboratories and other S&T 
organization to identify existing barriers to innovation in the 
research and engineering enterprise and to brief the 
congressional defense committees on: (1) Any required updates 
to the Department of Defense report developed in response to 
section 232 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 and proposed recommendations to address 
relevant findings; (2) Proposed changes in directives, rules, 
regulations, and other policies that will enhance the ability 
of the innovation, research, and engineering enterprise of the 
Department to execute its designated missions, including a 
description of how proposed changes have been coordinated with 
the Secretaries of the military departments and the appropriate 
heads of the Defense Agencies and Field Activities; (3) A 
schedule, plan, and identification of responsible organizations 
for addressing barriers identified in the review; and (4) 
Actions taken to address specific issues identified in the 
Department of Defense report developed in response to section 
232 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2018.

Soldier Enhancement Program

    Established by the Congress in 1990, the Soldier 
Enhancement Program (SEP) allows the Army to quickly provide to 
soldiers the necessary equipment and clothing for success on 
the battlefield. It supports accelerated integration and 
modernization of critical kit, including more lethal weapons, 
lighter load-bearing equipment, field gear, survivability 
items, communications equipment, and navigational aids. The 
committee understands that, during the Army's budget 
deliberations, senior Army leadership determined that funding 
for the SEP should be reallocated for higher Army priorities. 
Furthermore, the committee has been informed that the Army is 
reviewing how to retain SEP functions with a recommendation 
pending from Army Futures Command expected later this year. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army to 
provide a briefing to the SASC by September 30, 2020, on the 
Army's plans to fulfill the critical evaluation and acquisition 
role performed by the SEP.

Strategic Capabilities Office activities

    The committee notes that section 233 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-
92) mandated that the Strategic Capabilities Office (SCO) 
report directly to the Deputy Secretary of Defense and 
established two cross-functional teams to improve the technical 
quality of SCO prototyping projects and to support the 
transition of those projects into the military services or 
Defense Agency and Department of Defense Field Activity 
acquisition activities or operational use. Consistent with the 
National Defense Strategy and challenges posed by Russia and 
China, the committee feels that the SCO should play a key role 
in responding in a timely fashion to fill the capability gaps 
and operational needs identified by combatant commands by using 
proven technology to produce game-changing capabilities with 
responsive new systems and technologies. The committee directs 
the Deputy Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees no later than March 1, 2021, 
on the Strategic Capabilities Office's activities to respond to 
combatant command identified capability gaps, including an 
identification of activities to improve the speed at which new 
capabilities can be delivered and an assessment of the role 
that military service acquisition activities play in 
efficiently transitioning appropriate SCO programs into 
operational capabilities.

Ultra-compact hyperspectral imagery

    Technology that can discriminate mobility hazards and 
targets in the three dimensional battle space may enable 
soldiers to make quicker decisions to effectively neutralize 
adversary weapon systems. The committee is aware that Ultra-
Compact Hyperspectral Imagery (UCHSI) may provide a compact and 
affordable real-time imaging sensor that enables the warfighter 
to detect, identify, track, and prioritize targets of interest. 
Therefore, the committee encourages the Army to consider this 
technology for possible applications that support Army 
modernization priorities such as the Next Generation Combat 
Vehicle, Long Range Precision Fires, Soldier Lethality, and 
Future Vertical Lift.

Unmanned Aerial Systems in Great Power Competition

    The committee recognizes the important role that manned and 
unmanned aerial systems (UASs) serve in great power 
competition. The committee further appreciates that manned and 
satellite ISR platforms are costly and limited to episodic 
coverage and understands that the Department of Defense needs 
to develop new concepts of operations to effectively employ 
platforms not inherently designed for operating in contested 
environments, such as non-stealthy UASs. Therefore, the 
committee directs the Secretary of the Air Force to submit a 
report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives, no later than November 30, 2020, 
detailing the strengths and vulnerabilities of UASs in a 
National Defense Strategy-envisioned environment and the 
tactics, techniques, and procedures that would allow for the 
survivability of UASs in scenarios pitting the United States 
against near-peer adversaries.

                  TITLE III--OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

              Subtitle A--Authorization of Appropriations

Authorization of appropriations (sec. 301)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for operation and maintenance activities at 
the levels identified in section 4301 of division D of this 
Act.

                   Subtitle B--Energy and Environment

Modifications and technical corrections to ensure restoration of 
        contamination by perfluorooctane sulfonate and 
        perfluorooctanoic acid (sec. 311)
    The committee recommends a provision that would modify the 
authority for environmental restoration projects of the 
National Guard and provide technical corrections and conforming 
amendments to the statute governing the Defense Environmental 
Restoration Program.
Readiness and Environmental Protection Integration Program technical 
        edits and clarification (sec. 312)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2684a of title 10, United States Code, to provide a 
technical correction to the definition of an eligible entity.
    Furthermore, this provision would allow funds obligated to 
agreements under section 2684a of title 10, United States Code, 
to be made available for use at the time of obligation and for 
any subsequent amendment to the agreement.
Survey and market research of technologies for phase out by Department 
        of Defense of use of fluorinated aqueous film-forming foam 
        (sec. 313)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to conduct a survey and market research of 
available firefighting technologies or substances available to 
be adapted for use by the Department of Defense to facilitate 
the phase-out of fluorinated aqueous film-forming foam. The 
Secretary would be required to brief the congressional defense 
committees on the results of the survey and market research 
within 180 days of the enactment of this Act.
    The committee is encouraged by recent research studies that 
identify remediation technologies that can destroy per- and 
polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) in water that meet or exceed 
Federal guidelines with only inert byproducts remaining. This 
is an attractive alternative to treatment technologies that 
transfer the contamination to adsorption media that then 
require additional transport, disposal, or incineration. The 
committee strongly encourages the Department, in cooperation 
with other Federal agencies where appropriate, to explore the 
use of destruction technologies at PFAS-contaminated sites. The 
committee notes that PFAS destruction will reduce PFAS exposure 
pathways, reduce long term operation and maintenance costs, and 
eliminate concerns over disposal procedures.

Modification of authority to carry out military installation resilience 
        projects (sec. 314)

    The committee recommends a provision that would make 
clarifying amendments to sections 2815 and 2684a of title 10, 
United States Code, to ensure that military installation 
resilience projects can be executed to maintain, improve, or 
rapidly reestablish mission assurance and prevent commercial 
and residential encroachment around military installations.

Native American Indian lands environmental mitigation program (sec. 
        315)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 160 of title 10, United States Code, to authorize the 
Secretary of Defense to participate in a program to mitigate 
the environmental effects of Department of Defense activities 
on Indian lands and culturally connected locations.

Energy resilience and energy security measures on military 
        installations (sec. 316)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
subchapter I of chapter 173 of title 10, United States Code, by 
adding a section on energy resilience and energy security 
measures on military installations.

Modification to availability of energy cost savings for Department of 
        Defense (sec. 317)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2912(a) of title 10, United States Code, to include 
operational energy savings.

Long-duration demonstration initiative and joint program (sec. 318)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Director of the Environmental Security Technology Certification 
Program of the Department of Defense to establish a 
demonstration initiative comprised of demonstration projects 
focused on the development of long-duration energy storage 
technologies not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act.

Pilot program on alternative fuel vehicle purchasing (sec. 319)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to carry out a pilot program on 
alternative fuel vehicle purchasing.

                 Subtitle C--Logistics and Sustainment


Repeal of statutory requirement for notification to Director of Defense 
        Logistics Agency three years prior to implementing changes to 
        any uniform or uniform component (sec. 331)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 356 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232; 10 
U.S.C. 771) by repealing the requirement that a Secretary of a 
military department notify the Director of the Defense 
Logistics Agency at least 3 years prior to implementing changes 
to any uniform or uniform component and making a technical 
correction.
    The committee notes that, per section 352 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328), it is still the policy of the United States that the 
Secretary of Defense shall eliminate the development and 
fielding of armed force-specific combat and camouflage utility 
uniforms and families of uniforms in order to adopt and field a 
common combat and camouflage utility uniform or family of 
uniforms for specific combat environments to be used by all 
members of the Armed Forces.
    Clarification of limitation on length of overseas forward 
deployment of currently deployed naval vessels (sec. 332)
    The committee recommends a provision that would make a 
clarifying amendment to section 323(b) of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232).

                          Subtitle D--Reports


Report on impact of permafrost thaw on infrastructure, facilities, and 
        operations of the Department of Defense (sec. 351)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees on the impact of changes in permafrost on 
the infrastructure, facilities, assets, and operations of the 
Department of Defense within 180 days of the enactment of this 
Act.

Plans and reports on emergency response training for military 
        installations (sec. 352)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a report due 180 days after the 
date of the enactment of this Act to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives that 
includes a review of each Department of Defense installation's 
training protocols for coordination with local law enforcement 
for active shooter training.

Report on implementation by Department of Defense of requirements 
        relating to renewable fuel pumps (sec. 353)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report on renewable fuel pumps 
to the Congress not later than 90 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act.

Report on effects of extreme weather on Department of Defense (sec. 
        354)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to the congressional defense 
committees a report, not later than 180 days after the date of 
the enactment of this Act, on vulnerabilities to military 
installations and combatant commander requirements resulting 
from extreme weather.

                       Subtitle E--Other Matters


Prohibition on divestiture of manned intelligence, surveillance, and 
        reconnaissance aircraft operated by United States Special 
        Operations Command (sec. 371)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the use of any funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act 
to divest any manned intelligence, surveillance, and 
reconnaissance (ISR) aircraft operated by the United States 
Special Operations Command (SOCOM) and prohibits the Department 
of Defense from divesting any manned ISR aircraft operated by 
SOCOM in fiscal year 2021.
    The committee notes that elsewhere in this Act is a 
provision that would require the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict and the 
Commander of SOCOM to jointly submit to the congressional 
defense committees an acquisition roadmap to meet the manned 
and unmanned airborne ISR requirements of United States Special 
Operations Forces (SOF). The committee is concerned that there 
does not exist an overarching strategy to guide SOCOM's 
airborne ISR acquisition efforts that, among other things, 
clearly identifies current or anticipated special operations-
peculiar capability gaps and describes future manned and 
unmanned ISR requirements of SOF over the near-, mid-, and 
long-term. Given longstanding shortfalls in the Department of 
Defense's ability to fulfill geographic combatant command ISR 
requirements, the committee believes that the submission of 
this roadmap should precede congressional consideration of any 
proposal that would result in the divestiture of ISR 
capabilities or otherwise change the current composition of 
SOCOM's airborne ISR fleet.

Information on overseas construction projects in support of contingency 
        operations using funds for operation and maintenance (sec. 372)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2805(c) of title 10, United States Code, by requiring 
the Secretaries of the military departments, the Directors of 
the Defense Agencies, and the heads of any other relevant 
components of the Department of Defense to track and report to 
the Under Secretary of Defense (Comptroller) relevant data 
regarding all overseas construction projects funded with 
amounts appropriated or otherwise made available for operation 
and maintenance in support of contingency operations. 
Additionally, the provision would require that the Secretary of 
Defense prepare, for inclusion in the annual budget submission 
by the President under section 1105 of title 31, a consolidated 
budget justification display, in classified and unclassified 
forms, that identifies all overseas construction projects 
funded with amounts appropriated or otherwise made available 
for operation and maintenance in support of contingency 
operations.
    The committee is concerned about the attendant risks of 
routinely using operation and maintenance (O&M) funding locally 
to more quickly meet contingency construction requirements due 
to perceptions that the Department of Defense (DOD) process for 
executing construction projects using military construction 
(MILCON) funding is too lengthy. In its September 8, 2016, 
report titled Defense Infrastructure: Actions Needed to Enhance 
Oversight of Construction Projects Supporting Military 
Contingency Operations'' (GAO-16-406), the Government 
Accountability Office (GAO) concluded the practice of using O&M 
funding for contingency construction projects creates 
financial, operational, and duplication risks to DOD. For 
instance, the GAO found that, in 2015, officials at a base in 
the CENTCOM area of responsibility used O&M funding for 
temporary facilities for a squadron while in the same year 
requesting MILCON funding for a permanent facility for the same 
squadron, which could result in providing the same service to 
the same beneficiaries.
    The committee believes that the extent of this risk is not 
fully known because the DOD does not track the universe and 
cost of all contingency construction projects funded with O&M 
appropriations. Nonetheless, the amount of O&M funds used 
appears significant given that the GAO identified almost $1 
billion in O&M-funded construction costs for fiscal years 2009-
12 for projects in Afghanistan alone, costs that are 
significant compared with the $3.9 billion that the DOD 
reported as enacted for MILCON-funded projects there in the 
same period.
    While the committee supports actions that the DOD has taken 
to address issues raised in GAO's report--such as working to 
revise authorities for construction agents in joint operational 
areas--the committee believes that more action is needed.

Provision of protection to the National Museum of the Marine Corps, the 
        National Museum of the United States Army, the National Museum 
        of the United States Navy, and the National Museum of the 
        United States Air Force (sec. 373)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2465(b) of title 10, United States Code, by adding a 
contract for the performance of on-site security guard 
functions at the: Marine Corps Heritage Center at the Marine 
Corps Base Quantico, Virginia, including the National Museum of 
the Marine Corps; Heritage Center for the National Museum of 
the United States Army at Fort Belvoir, Virginia; Heritage 
Center for the National Museum of the United States Navy at 
Washington, District of Columbia; and the Heritage Center for 
the National Museum of the United States Air Force at Wright-
Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio.

Inapplicability of congressional notification and dollar limitation 
        requirements for advanced billings for certain background 
        investigations (sec. 374)

    The committee recommends a provision that would exempt the 
Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency from the $1 
billion Department of Defense-wide limitation on advance 
billings in working capital funds.
    The committee understands that the Defense 
Counterintelligence and Security Agency will be processing its 
requests for background investigations through advance billing 
for maximum efficiency. The security clearance investigation 
mission did not exist at the Department of Defense when the $1 
billion limitation on advance billings was instituted. Without 
an exempting this mission from the cap, DOD would suffer from 
an inability to employ advance billings in the traditional 
areas of usage, such as disaster relief.

Repeal of sunset for minimum annual purchase amount for carriers 
        participating in the Civil Reserve Air Fleet (sec. 375)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 9515 of title 10, United States Code, by striking 
subsection (k), which would make the minimum annual purchase 
amount for carriers participating in the Civil Reserve Air 
Fleet (CRAF) a permanent authority.
    The committee notes that the original intent of section 
9515 was to protect smaller carriers amid the economic downturn 
in 2008, which represented a substantial threat to the 
Department of Defense. The committee further notes that, 
according to the U.S. Transportation Command (TRANSCOM), the 
loss of significant capacity in these small carriers would not 
only have reduced the overall capacity in the CRAF program but 
also would have resulted in CRAF activation occurring sooner in 
the event of a crisis.
    The committee understands that, given the economic downturn 
brought on by COVID-19, along with the fact that section 9515 
was set to sunset in December 2020, being able to guarantee 
assured levels of business will help carriers make a business 
case for keeping aircraft that they might otherwise dispose of 
in the event of another downturn in business. In addition, this 
authority would allow TRANSCOM to offer carriers a reasonable 
business alternative to entering into long-term contracts with 
delivery companies that effectively prohibit pledging aircraft 
to the CRAF program. This authority would assist in ensuring 
that the CRAF program is able to maintain sufficient capacity 
in the future.

Improvement of the Operational Energy Capability Improvement Fund of 
        the Department of Defense (sec. 376)

    The committee recommends a provision that would realign the 
Operational Energy Capability Improvement Fund (OECIF) of the 
Department of Defense under the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
for Sustainment.
    The committee notes that, despite the pressing requirements 
of fuel and logistical vulnerabilities identified in the 
National Defense Strategy, the current OECIF authority 
requested no funds for the OECIF, which has been increased 
elsewhere in this Act. The committee believes that realignment 
of this account will allow those charged with logistics and 
sustainment to invest in operational energy innovations that 
have a proven positive return on investment through cost 
savings, making improvements to combat capabilities, and 
increased readiness, thus reflecting the new reality of the 
contested logistics environment.

Commission on the naming of items of the Department of Defense that 
        commemorate the Confederate States of America or any person who 
        served voluntarily with the Confederate States of America. 
        (sec. 377)

    The committee recommends a provision that would establish a 
commission regarding the removal and renaming of certain assets 
of the Department of Defense that commemorate the Confederate 
States of America or any person who served voluntarily with the 
Confederate States of America.

Modifications to review of proposed actions by Military Aviation and 
        Installation Assurance Clearinghouse (sec. 378)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 183a(c) of title 10, United States Code, to modify the 
review of proposed actions by the Military Aviation and 
Installation Assurance Clearinghouse.

Adjustment in availability of appropriations for unusual cost overruns 
        and for changes in scope of work (sec. 379)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify the 
treatment of amounts appropriated to the Secretary of the Navy 
for changes within the scope of work for a contract for ship 
overhaul.

Requirement that Secretary of Defense implement security and emergency 
        response recommendations relating to active shooter or 
        terrorist attacks on installations of Department of Defense 
        (sec. 380)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to implement not that later than 90 days 
after the date of the enactment of this Act the recommendations 
germane to active shooter or terrorist attacks on installations 
of the Department of Defense made in a series of previously 
published reports.

Clarification of food ingredient requirements for food or beverages 
        provided by the Department of Defense (sec. 381)

    The committee notes that the Defense Logistics Agency 
declared the prohibition of certain ingredients from food it 
purchases but did not engage other departments and agencies 
with nutrition expertise, such as the Department of Agriculture 
and the Food and Drug Administration, in development of this 
policy. Therefore, the committee recommends a provision that 
would require the Department to seek comments from the public 
and subject matter experts within the food supply chain before 
making a final determination about food ingredients.

                              Budget Items


Joint Counter-Unmanned Aerial Systems initial operating capability 
        acceleration

    The budget request included $40.3 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), of which $1.1 billion was for SAG 115 
Land Forces Operations Support.
    The committee notes that the Secretary of Defense recently 
designated the Department of the Army as the executive agent of 
the Joint Counter-Unmanned Aerial Systems Office (JCO). The 
committee further notes that the Secretary of Defense also 
provided guidance to accelerate the initial operational 
capability (IOC) for the JCO. The committee finally notes that, 
as part of his unfunded requirements list, the Chief of Staff 
of the Army requested additional funds to fund the 
establishment of the JCO, hire JCO personnel, and begin to 
execute its mission, which includes the development of rapid 
response capability.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $10.3 
million in OMA for SAG 115 for JCO IOC acceleration.

Child Development Center playground equipment and furniture increases

    The budget request included $40.3 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), of which $8.2 billion was for SAG 131 
Base Operations Support.
    The committee notes that, as part of his unfunded 
requirements list, the Chief of Staff of the Army requested 
additional funds to replace child development center (CDC) 
playground equipment to address safety issues and for CDC 
Furniture, Fixtures, and Equipment (FF&E).
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $79.0 
million in OMA for SAG 131 for CDC playground equipment and 
furniture.

Child Youth Service improvements

    The budget request included $40.3 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), of which $8.2 billion was for SAG 131 
Base Operations Support.
    The committee notes that, as part of his unfunded 
requirements list, the Chief of Staff of the Army requested 
additional funds to provide for six key Child Youth Service 
(CYS) program improvements across multiple installations, 
namely to: (1) Provide for further CYS classroom management 
training and improved care-provider responses, intended to 
reduce inappropriate care-provider incidents, for $5.0 million; 
(2) Provide for updated and expanded employee training to 
improve care-provider skills, certifications, and 
accreditation, encouraging professional development and 
employee retention for $2.5 million; (3) Provide for improved 
CYS information technology and cloud service and maintenance to 
improve data management and reporting performance for $5.0 
million; (4) Recover unobtainable CYS reform savings, which 
includes Army fee assistance to community partners for military 
children not able to be accommodated on installations and 
parent services that enable centralized registration, for $26.0 
million; (5) Provide for additional CYS transportation (buses) 
for children enrolled in before/after-school programs, 
specifically to reduce transportation challenges sometimes 
experienced by single/dual military member families, for $5.0 
million; (6) Provide for youth computer lab life-cycle 
replacement of computers and peripherals for school age and 
youth programs that encourage youth participation in order to 
divert from at-risk behavior for $3.5 million.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $47.0 
million in OMA for SAG 131 for CYS improvements.

Army Facilities, Sustainment, Restoration, and Modernization increase

    The budget request included $40.3 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), of which $3.5 billion was for SAG 132 
Facilities Sustainment, Restoration, and Modernization, $2.9 
billion in Operation and Maintenance, Army Reserve (OMAR), of 
which $327.1 million was for SAG 132 Facilities Sustainment, 
Restoration, and Modernization, and $7.4 billion in Operation 
and Maintenance, Army Reserve National Guard (OMARNG), of which 
$876.0 million was for SAG 132 Facilities Sustainment, 
Restoration, and Modernization.
    The committee notes that, as part of his unfunded 
requirements list, the Chief of Staff of the Army requested 
additional funds for Facilities Sustainment, Restoration, and 
Modernization (FSRM), which would bring Army funding up to 90 
percent of its requirement.The committee understands that these 
funds would alleviate current challenges in maintaining 
facilities to better support existing readiness levels while 
increased sustainment funding would also prevent 
disproportionate restoration and modernization backlog growth.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends the following 
increases: $62.4 million in OMA for SAG 132, $5.3 million in 
OMAR for SAG 132, and $11.2 million in OMARNG for SAG 132.

EUCOM and INDOPACOM Multi-Domain Task Force increases

    The budget request included $40.3 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), of which $3.5 billion was for SAG 132 
Facilities Sustainment, Restoration, and Modernization.
    The committee notes that, as part of his unfunded 
requirements list, the Chief of Staff of the Army requested 
additional funds for sustainment, restoration, and 
modernization requirements for building renovations and Base 
Operating Support expenditures to adequately house personnel 
and headquarters for the Multi-Domain Task Force (MDTF) 
elements in the Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM) and European 
Command (EUCOM) theaters.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $126.8 
million in OMA for SAG 132, specifically for MDTF for INDOPACOM 
and EUCOM.

Revitalization of Army deployment infrastructure

    The budget request included $40.3 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), of which $3.5 billion was for SAG 132 
Facilities Sustainment, Restoration, and Modernization.
    The committee notes that, as part of his unfunded 
requirements list, the Chief of Staff of the Army requested 
additional funds to assist in the revitalization of Army 
deployment infrastructure, including the: (1) Airfield control 
group complex and rail load complex at Joint Base Lewis-
McChord, Washington; (2) Commercial truck load complex and 
deployment support facility at Fort Bragg, North Carolina; (3) 
Commercial truck load complex at Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri; 
(4) Rail load complex, hangar repair, deployment support 
facility, and aerial port of embarkation support at Fort Hood, 
Texas; (5) Taxiway repair at Fort Huachuca, Arizona; and (6) 
Ramps repair at Fort Campbell, Kentucky.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $45.3 
million in OMA for SAG 132 for the above projects to support 
power projection restoration and modernization.

U.S. Africa Command force protection upgrades personnel recovery/
        casualty evacuation

    The budget request included $239.4 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), for SAG 141 U.S. Africa Command 
(AFRICOM).
    The committee notes that AFRICOM identified as an unfunded 
requirement the need for emergent force protection upgrades 
following the terrorist attack against U.S. personnel in Manda 
Bay, Kenya, and after a theater-wide review of force protection 
at multiple locations in Africa. AFRICOM identified the most 
immediate priorities as establishing and upgrading fencing, 
communications systems, and shelters to provide protection for 
Department of Defense personnel serving in select locations.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.5 
million in OMA for SAG 141 for personnel recovery/casualty 
evacuation.

U.S. Africa Command intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance

    The budget request included $239.4 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), for SAG 141 U.S. Africa Command 
(AFRICOM).
    The committee notes that AFRICOM is currently able to meet 
30 percent of its Joint Staff-validated intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) requirements in its area 
of responsibility and has identified the need to sustain this 
level of ISR support in fiscal year 2021 as an unfunded 
requirement.
    The committee recommends an increase of $64.0 million in 
OMA for SAG 141 for ISR support.

United States Africa Command personnel recovery, casualty evacuation, 
        and trauma care

    The budget request included $239.4 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), for SAG 141 U.S. Africa Command 
(AFRICOM).
    The committee notes that AFRICOM has identified shortfalls 
in its ability to provide timely personnel recovery, casualty 
evacuation, and trauma care to U.S. personnel operating in the 
AFRICOM area of responsibility. The committee notes that 
AFRICOM identified the need to address gaps in these critical 
capabilities as an unfunded requirement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $36.0 
million in OMA for SAG 141 for personnel recovery, casualty 
evacuation, and trauma care support for AFRICOM.

United States Cyber Command Access and operations

    The budget request included $314.5 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force (OMAF), for SAG 15E Cyber Command 
(CYBERCOM) and $430.1 million in Operation and Maintenance, 
Army (OMA), for SAG 151 Cyberspace Operations.
    The committee recognizes the importance of the Cyber 
Mission Forces (CMF) and the increased operational demands 
placed on them.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $25.0 
million in OMAF for SAG 15E and an increase of $5.0 million in 
OMA for SAG 151 in order to provide to the CMF more resources 
to access, operate, and train as required to meet operational 
demands as described in the unfunded priorities list of the 
Commander, U.S. Cyber Command.

Service-wide transportation

    The budget request included $491.9 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), for SAG 421.
    The committee recommends a decrease of $25.0 million in OMA 
for SAG 421 to reflect historical underexecution.

Other personnel support

    The budget request included $701.1 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), for SAG 434 for other personnel 
support.
    The committee recommends a decrease of $4.0 million in OMA 
for SAG 434 for historical underexecution.

Servicewomen's commemorative partnerships

    The budget request included $701.1 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army (OMA), for SAG 434 Other Personnel Support, 
of which no funds were for programs at military service 
memorials and museums that highlight the role of women in the 
military.
    The committee notes that section 2834 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-
92) authorized the transfer of administrative jurisdiction of 
an approximately 16.0 acre parcel of land in Arlington, 
Virginia, from the Secretary of the Interior to the Secretary 
of the Army. The Secretary of the Army was directed to enter 
into a memorandum of understanding to define roles and 
responsibilities for the shared responsibility and resources 
for operation and maintenance of the Women in Military Service 
for America (WIMSA) Memorial and surrounding grounds.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in OMA for SAG 434 for WIMSA.

Pilot program on the remote provision by the National Guard for 
        cybersecurity

    The budget request included $7.4 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Army National Guard (OMARNG), of which $7.9 
million was for SAG 151 Cyberspace Activities--Cyberspace 
Operations. The budget request also included $6.8 billion in 
Operation and Maintenance, Air National Guard (OMANG), of which 
$16.3 million was for SAG 012D Cyberspace Activities.
    Elsewhere in this report, the committee recommends pilot 
programs on the National Guard's remote provision to State 
governments and National Guards in other States of 
cybersecurity technical assistance in training for, preparation 
for, and response to cyber incidents.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in OMARNG for SAG 151 and an increase of $3.0 million 
in OMANG for SAG 012D to conduct these National Guard 
cybersecurity pilot programs.

PDI: Asia Pacific Regional Initiative, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command

    The budget request include $61.5 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy (OMN), for SAG 1CCH Combatant Commander Core 
Operations, including $9.4 million for the Asia Pacific 
Regional Initiative (APRI).
    The committee notes that, last year, APRI funds helped to 
facilitate the deployment of a Royal Thai Army infantry 
battalion to the Joint Readiness Training Center at Fort Polk, 
Louisiana, for a month-long training exercise alongside U.S. 
Army soldiers. The committee commends this unique combined 
training event as a tangible step forward for the U.S.-Thai 
alliance. To the extent that the Royal Thai Army continues its 
modernization on the basis of U.S. formations and equipment, 
the committee encourages further opportunities for U.S.-Thai 
combined training, including in the United States. Moreover, in 
general, the committee encourages U.S. Indo-Pacific Command to 
facilitate, as appropriate, additional training opportunities 
for allies and partners in the United States.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in OMN for SAG 1CCH for the Asia Pacific Regional 
Initiative.

PDI: Joint Task Force Indo-Pacific, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command

    The budget request included $102.3 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy (OMN), for SAG 1CCM Combatant Commander 
Direct Mission Support.
    The unfunded priorities list submitted by the Commander, 
U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, included additional funding for 
Joint Task Force INDOPACOM (JTF-IP). The committee agrees with 
the assessment of the National Defense Strategy (NDS) that U.S. 
competitors and adversaries are ``using other areas of 
competition short of open warfare to achieve their ends,'' 
including information warfare, and that ``these trends, if 
unaddressed, will challenge our ability to deter aggression.'' 
The committee believes that increased resources for information 
operations in the Indo-Pacific are important for addressing the 
challenges described by the NDS.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $6.3 
million in OMN for SAG 1CCM for Special Operations Pacific's 
Joint Task Force Indo-Pacific information operations in support 
of U.S. Indo-Pacific Command.

PDI: Counterterrorism Information Facility in Singapore, U.S. Indo-
        Pacific Command

    The budget request included $102.3 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy (OMN), for SAG 1CCM Combatant Commander 
Direct Mission Support.
    The unfunded priorities list submitted by the Commander, 
U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, included additional funding to 
assist the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) in 
establishing the Counterterrorism Information Facility in 
Singapore.
    The committee recommends an increase of $2.0 million in OMN 
for SAG 1CCM for support to the establishment of the 
Counterterrorism Information Facility in Singapore.

PDI: Countering Chinese malign influence, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command

    The budget request included $8.8 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy (OMN), for SAG 1CCS Military Information 
Support Operations (MISO).
    The National Defense Strategy warns that competitors and 
adversaries of the United States are using areas of competition 
short of open warfare, including information warfare, to 
achieve their ends. If unaddressed, this trend will undermine 
the ability of the United States to deter aggression. In 
particular, the committee notes the urgent need for intensified 
efforts to counter Chinese malign influence the Indo-Pacific 
region, including through disinformation and propaganda. These 
efforts will require expanded and deeper collaboration between 
the Department of Defense and other Federal departments and 
agencies.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $17.7 
million in OMN for SAG 1CCS for WebOps, force presence related 
to MISO, support for Radio Free Asia, and other campaign 
support activities. The committee does not recommend additional 
funding for the Indo-Pacific Defense Forum.

USNS Mercy MTF improvements

    The budget request included $49.7 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Navy (OMN), of which $99.4 million was for SAG 
2C1H Expeditionary Health Services Systems.
    The committee notes that, as part of his unfunded 
requirements list, the Chief of Naval Operations requested 
additional funds to support optimization of the military 
treatment facility (MTF) in conjunction with the USNS Mercy's 
service-life extension program to improve the hospital ship's 
ability to maintain Role 3 MTF capabilities.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $11.6 
million in OMN for SAG 2C1H for USNS Mercy MTF improvements.

Energy Security Programs Office

    The budget request included $49.6 billion in the Operation 
and Maintenance, Navy (OMN), of which $519.7 million was for 
SAG 4B2N Planning, Engineering, and Program Support.
    The committee continues to strongly support the Department 
of the Navy's Energy Security Programs Office (ESPO), which has 
successfully executed over 49 energy resilience projects 
leveraging non-Department of Defense funding in Texas, 
Tennessee, Mississippi, Florida, North Carolina, Virginia, 
Georgia, South Carolina, Arizona, Nevada, California, Maryland, 
New Jersey, New York, Connecticut, Rhode Island, Washington, 
Hawaii, Italy, and Japan. These projects range from microgrids 
to efforts to improve mission assurance. However, the Navy has 
made funding choices insufficient to support the ESPO for 
fiscal year 2021, and projects may not occur in Georgia, North 
Carolina, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Maryland, 
California, Hawaii, Washington, Guam, Bahrain, and Japan.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $5.0 
million in OMN for SAG 4B2N for the ESPO office to ensure that 
fiscal year 2021 projects are executed.

A-10 Aircraft

    The budget request included $34.8 billion in Operation & 
Maintenance, Air Force (OMAF), including $731.5 million for SAG 
011A Primary Combat Forces, of which $1.4 billion was for SAG 
011D Air Operations Training (OJT, Maintain Skills), $0.0 was 
for SAG 011M Depot Purchase Equipment Maintenance, and $4.4 
billion was for SAG 011Y Flying Hour Program.
    The budget request assumed a reduction of A-10 aircraft and 
squadrons in fiscal year 2021. The committee believes that this 
reduction is premature and as such recommends restoring such 
funding.
    Therefore, the committee recommends the following increases 
in OMAF: $1.7 million to SAG 011A Primary Combat Forces, $12.4 
million to SAG 011D Air Operations Training (OJT, Maintain 
Skills), $3.4 million to SAG 011M Depot Purchase Equipment 
Maintenance, and $52.9 million to SAG 011Y Flying Hour Program.

Air Force Facilities Sustainment, Restoration, and Modernization 
        increases

    The budget request included $34.8 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force (OMAF), of which $3.2 billion was for 
SAG 011R Facilities Sustainment, Restoration, and 
Modernization, $3.4 billion in Operation and Maintenance, Air 
Force Reserve (OMAFR), of which $103.4 million was for SAG 011R 
Facilities Sustainment, Restoration, and Modernization, and 
$6.8 billion in Operation and Maintenance, Air National Guard 
(OMANG), of which $323.6 million was for SAG 011R Facilities 
Sustainment, Restoration, and Modernization.
    The committee notes that, as part of his required unfunded 
requirements list, the Chief of Staff of the Air Force 
requested additional funds for facility maintenance and repair 
investment to achieve 1.85 percent of plant replacement value 
(PRV), accelerating the ramp-up to meet the Department of the 
Air Force Infrastructure Investment Strategy goal of 2 percent 
PRV.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends the following 
increases: $101.8 million in OMAF to SAG 011R, $4.2 million in 
OMAFR to SAG 011R, and $8.9 million in OMANG to SAG 011R.

Transfer to OCO

    The budget request included $1.5 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force, SAG 011W for Contractor Logistics 
Support and System Support.
    The committee recommends a decrease of $30.5 million to 
transfer such funding to Operation and Maintenance, Air Force, 
Overseas Contingency Operations, SAG 011W for Contractor 
Logistics Support and System Support. The committee notes a 
corresponding increase in that account.

Slowing Air Force KC-135 and KC-10 tanker fleet divestment

    The budget request included $34.8 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force (OMAF), of which no funds were for SAG 
011M Depot Purchase Equipment Maintenance and $4.4 billion was 
for SAG 011Y Flying Hour Program.
    The committee notes that the National Defense Strategy of 
2018 specifically calls for ``Resilient and Agile Logistics.'' 
The committee further notes that program delays for the KC-46 
tanker have exacerbated a growing tanker capacity problem and 
yet the Air Force chose to divest of crucial KC-10 and KC-135 
resources. The committee notes that, according to the United 
States Transportation Command (TRANSCOM), this proposed 
divestment would cause significant negative impacts to 
TRANSCOM's posture during wartime and daily competition and 
negatively impact senior leader decision space for mobilization 
if confronted with a crisis. The committee believes that the 
Air Force should be planning for contested logistics while 
accounting for delays in the KC-46 and other future programs.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends the following 
increases for the KC-135 tanker fleet: $3.4 million in OMAF to 
SAG 011M Depot Purchase Equipment Maintenance and $36.6 million 
in OMAF to SAG 011Y Flying Hour Program. Additionally, the 
committee recommends the following increases for the KC-10 
tanker fleet: $48.4 million in OMAF to SAG 011M Depot Purchase 
Equipment Maintenance and $16.2 million in OMAF to SAG 011Y 
Flying Hour Program.

PDI: Mission Partner Environment (MPE) local upgrades, U.S. Indo-
        Pacific Command

    The budget request included $34.8 billion for Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force, of which $849.8 million was for SAG 12A 
Global C3I & Early Warning.
    The unfunded priorities list submitted by the Commander, 
U.S. Indo-Pacific Command (INDOPACOM), included additional 
funding for Mission Partner Environment (MPE) local upgrades to 
modernize the command, control, communications, and computers 
architecture in the INDOPACOM area of responsibility and 
provide local systems to support and enhance operations with 
allies and partners.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $30.8 
million for SAG 12A for MPE local upgrades within the INDOPACOM 
area of responsibility.

Hunt Forward missions

    The budget request included $314.5 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force (OMAF), for SAG 15E Cyber Command 
(CYBERCOM).
    The committee recognizes the importance of CYBERCOM's cyber 
hunt forward missions as an integral component of the 
Department's persistent engagement strategy. The committee also 
notes the need for a framework to enhance consistency across 
these missions, as described elsewhere in this report.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $13.8 
million in OMAF for SAG 15E in order to provide to the Cyber 
National Mission Force the capabilities it needs to implement 
systems and strategies as it seeks to deter, disrupt, and 
defeat cyber adversaries as reflected in the unfunded 
priorities list of the Commander, U.S. Cyber Command.

Securing the Department of Defense Information Network

    The budget request included $314.5 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force (OMAF), for SAG 15E Cyber Command 
(CYBERCOM) and $1.9 billion in Operation and Maintenance, 
Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 280 Defense Information System 
Agency (DISA).
    The committee recognizes the importance of CYBERCOM and 
DISA's missions in securing the Department of Defense 
Information Network (DODIN). The committee is encouraged by the 
recent efforts of the Department to develop enterprise-wide 
common security product integration frameworks to enable 
interoperability and coordinated orchestration among 
cybersecurity services, devices, appliances, agents, 
applications, tools, command and control centers, and the 
network. The committee understands that additional funding 
would allow the Department to support improvements in the 
situational understanding, monitoring, analytics, training, and 
inspections needed to enhance cyber resiliency and readiness.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.9 
million in OMAF for SAG 15E and an increase of $40.0 million in 
OMDW for SAG 280 in order to enhance the Department's ability 
to secure, operate, and defend mission areas of the DODIN as 
described in the unfunded priorities list of the Commander, 
U.S. Cyber Command.

Air Force marketing reduction

    The budget request included $34.8 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force (OMAF), of which $155.1 million was for 
SAG 033A Recruiting and Advertising. The budget request also 
included $3.4 billion in Operation and Maintenance, Air Force 
Reserve (OMAFR), of which $23.1 million was for SAG 042J 
Recruiting and Advertising. Finally, the budget request 
included $6.8 billion in Operation and Maintenance, Air 
National Guard (OMANG), of which $48.6 million was for SAG 042J 
Recruiting and Advertising.
    The committee notes that the Air Force Audit Agency 
recently completed its review of Air Force advertising and 
recruiting programs. The audit found that ``Air Force personnel 
in all three components did not effectively manage marketing 
and recruiting programs.'' The audit further notes that Air 
Force personnel ``did not display fiscal responsibility'' and 
were unable to demonstrate that the Air Force received ``fair 
and reasonable pricing for over $130 million (88 percent) of 
$149 million in sample contract actions reviewed.'' 
Additionally, the audit details numerous violations of the 
basic rules of government contracting and financial management. 
The committee is disappointed by such disregard for taxpayer 
dollars.
    While the Air Force deserves credit for taking immediate 
action to correct some of the audit findings, the committee 
believes that the Air Force advertising and recruiting 
organization requires major reform. In response to similar 
audit findings, the Army completely revamped its entire 
advertising organization. The committee expects the Air Force 
to dedicate similar effort in restoring the Congress' trust 
that advertising dollars are being spent efficiently and 
effectively.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends the following 
decreases: $20.0 million in OMAF to SAG 033A Recruiting and 
Advertising, $5.0 million in OMAFR to SAG 042J Recruiting and 
Advertising, and $15.0 million in OMANG to SAG 042J Recruiting 
and Advertising.

COVID-related throughput decrease

    The budget request included $34.8 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Air Force (OMAF).
    The committee notes that the Air Force will likely 
experience COVID-19-related throughput issues, thereby 
decreasing the need for depot carryover balances funded through 
the Air Force Working Capital Fund.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $75.8 
million in OMAF to reflect COVID-related throughput issues.

Syria exfiltration reconstitution

    The budget request included $898.0 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 1PL6 Special 
Operations Command Combat Development Activities.
    The committee notes that U.S. Special Operations Command 
identified the replacement of items destroyed in connection 
with the exfiltration of forces in Syria as an unfunded 
requirement.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 1PL6 for Syria exfiltration 
reconstitution.

Contractor logistics support

    The budget request included $685.1 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide, for SAG 1PL7 Special Operations 
Command Maintenance.
    The committees notes that the availability of intelligence, 
surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) capabilities remains a 
perennial shortfall across the geographic combatant commands. 
The committee notes that, despite this, the budget request for 
fiscal year 2021 cuts the contractor logistics support 
necessary for the deployment of manned ISR aircraft operated by 
U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) without identifying a 
follow-on ISR solution to mitigate the loss in capability in 
fiscal year 2021.
    Additionally, the committee notes that the budget request 
for fiscal year 2021 and the future years defense program 
includes proposals to modify the composition of SOCOM's 
airborne ISR fleet through the acquisition of new platforms and 
the divestment of platforms currently in its inventory. The 
committee is concerned that there does not exist an overarching 
strategy to guide SOCOM's airborne ISR acquisition efforts, 
particularly one that clearly identifies current or anticipated 
special operations-peculiar capability gaps and describes 
future manned and unmanned ISR requirements. The committee 
believes that it is not prudent to divest of important ISR 
capabilities without a clearly articulated strategy for how 
critical ISR requirements will be satisfied in the near-, mid-, 
and long-term. The committee notes that elsewhere in this Act, 
there is a provision that would require the Assistant Secretary 
of Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict 
and the Commander, SOCOM, to jointly submit to the 
congressional defense committees an acquisition roadmap to meet 
the manned and unmanned airborne ISR requirements of United 
States Special Operations Forces.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $22.0 
million in Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide, for SAG 
1PL7 for contractor logistics support for manned ISR aircraft.

U.S. Special Operations Command flying hours

    The budget request included $2.6 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide, for SAG 1PLR Special Operations 
Command Theater Forces.
    The committee notes that, elsewhere in this Act, there is a 
provision that would prohibit the divestiture of manned 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) aircraft 
operated by U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) in fiscal 
year 2021 due to the lack of a plan to mitigate the loss of ISR 
capability in fiscal year 2021 as well as an overarching ISR 
acquisition roadmap for SOCOM's airborne ISR capabilities to 
meet its requirements over the near-, mid-, and long-term. The 
committee believes that the submission of the required roadmap 
should precede congressional consideration of any plan of SOCOM 
to change the composition of its airborne ISR capabilities.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $1.3 
million in Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide, for SAG 
1PLR for flying hours.

Innovative Readiness Training increase

    The budget request included $40.3 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $147.9 million was 
for SAG 4GT3 Civil Military Programs.
    The committee notes that the $13.1 million of the request 
for Civil Military Programs was for the Innovative Readiness 
Training (IRT). The committee is aware that the military 
services continue to face readiness challenges due to budgetary 
constraints. The committee continues to recognize the value of 
the IRT, which affords to the military services realistic joint 
training opportunities for National Guard, Reserve, and Active-
duty servicemembers.
    The committee understands that the IRT offers complex and 
challenging training opportunities for domestic and 
international crises. The committee is also aware that Alaska, 
Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Indiana, 
Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Minnesota, Missouri, Montana, 
Nebraska, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, 
North Dakota, South Dakota, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, and 
Wyoming all use the IRT.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $16.9 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GT3 Civil Military Programs.

Starbase

    The budget request included $44.6 billion for Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $148.0 million was 
for SAG 4GT3 Civil Military Programs.
    The committee notes that the Science and Technology 
Academies Reinforcing Basic Aviation and Space Exploration 
(STARBASE) program is an effective program that improves the 
knowledge and skills of students in kindergarten through 12th 
grade in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $15.0 
million for SAG 4GT3 Civil Military Programs for the STARBASE 
program.

Defense Contract Management Agency

    The budget request included $1.4 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTO Defense Contract 
Management Agency (DCMA).
    The committee notes that the Congress has previously 
directed that the Department of Defense centrally conduct 
commercial item determinations to ensure consistency in the 
application of professional judgment, as is now required under 
section 2380 of Title 10 United States code. Thus, the 
delegation and transfer of this function would violate the law. 
The DCMA has developed the requisite subject matter expertise 
to perform this function and should maintain such expertise. 
The committee also notes the importance of certain contract 
administration functions that the DCMA performs, including the 
recovery of cancelling funds and contract closeout.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $56.4 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTO to restore proposed reductions 
resulting from the Defense-Wide Review.

DWR restore: Congressional oversight

    The budget request included $1.5 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide, for SAG 4GTN Office of the Secretary 
of Defense.
    The committee records its remarks about the Defense-Wide 
Review (DWR) 1.0 elsewhere in this report. In particular, the 
oversight materials produced, as well as the proposal to 
transfer the burden of payment for background investigations to 
the U.S. Congress, did not meet or reflect the stated goals of 
the DWR.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $3.0 
million in Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide, for SAG 
4GTN for the Office of the Secretary of the Defense.

Joint Regional Security Stacks SIPR funding--O&M

    The budget request included $582.6 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GU9 Defense 
Information Systems Agency--CYBER.
    The committee is aware of the operational cybersecurity 
limitations of the Joint Regional Security Stacks (JRSS) 
technology as assessed by the Director, Operational Test and 
Evaluation, the difficulty of training personnel to use the 
JRSS, and the shortage of feasible tactics, techniques, and 
procedures to make effective use of the JRSS. The committee 
believes that the deployment of JRSS on the Secret Internet 
Protocol Router Network is thus inappropriate, given JRSS' 
limited cybersecurity capability and the existence of 
alternative capabilities to execute its network functions.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $4.7 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GU9 for JRSS, due to the operational 
cybersecurity limitations of the JRSS technology.

DWR restore: blankets for homeless program

    The budget requested included $382.1 million for Operation 
and Maintenance, Defense-wide, for SAG 4GTB Defense Logistics 
Agency.
    The Defense-Wide Review eliminated funding for the Defense 
Logistics Agency's (DLA's) Blankets for Homeless Program. The 
Stewart B. McKinley Homeless Assistance Act of 1987 (Public Law 
100-77) enables the DLA to provide blankets to qualified U.S. 
501(c)3 organizations working with the homeless, many of whom 
are veterans. Homeless shelters request blankets, which are 
issued on a first-come first-served basis up to the amount of 
funding.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $3.6 
million for Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide, for SAG 
4GTB for the Defense Logistics Agency to continue this program.

Defense Institute of International Legal Studies

    The budget request included $2.7 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), SAG 4GTD, Defense Security 
Cooperation Agency for the Defense Institute of International 
Legal Studies.
    The committee notes that the reforms to the Department of 
Defense's security cooperation enterprise contained in the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328) emphasized institutional capacity building as a 
critical component of the Department's security cooperation 
efforts. The committee notes that the Defense Institute of 
International Legal Studies plays an important role in building 
partner nation legal capacity, which strengthens accountability 
within the security and justice sectors, civilian control of 
the military, enhanced compliance with human rights standards 
and international humanitarian law, democracy, and democratic 
rule of law.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million in Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide, for SAG 
4GTD, Defense Security Cooperation Agency for the Defense 
Institute of International Legal Studies to increase its 
capacity to conduct its expanding mission of legal 
institutional capacity building as a significant component of 
the Department's security cooperation efforts. The committee 
notes that, elsewhere in this report, the committee recommends 
a correlated decrease in funding for the Institute for Security 
Governance.

Institute for Security Governance

    The budget request included $58.8 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), SAG 4GTD, Defense Security 
Cooperation Agency, for the Institute for Security Governance.
    The committee notes that the reforms to the Department of 
Defense's security cooperation enterprise contained in the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public 
Law 114-328) emphasized institutional capacity building as a 
critical component of the Department's security cooperation 
efforts. The committee notes that the Department has made 
progress in integrating institutional capacity building as a 
core element of its security cooperation activities and expects 
the Department to continue to expand these efforts. The 
committee also notes the importance of legal institutional 
capacity building, a key mission of the Defense Institute of 
International Legal Studies, to the long-term sustainability of 
these programs. The budget request of $58.8 million for the 
Institute for Security Governance would represent a more than 
57 percent increase over fiscal year 2020 funding levels.
    In line with the committee's support for legal 
institutional capacity building, the committee recommends a 
decrease of $2.0 million in Operation and Maintenance, Defense-
wide, SAG 4GTD, Defense Security Cooperation Agency, for the 
Institute for Security Governance. The committee notes that, 
elsewhere in this report, the committee recommends a correlated 
increase for the Defense Institute of International Legal 
Studies.

PDI: Indo-Pacific Maritime Security Initiative

    The budget request included $410.7 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide, for SAG 4GTD Defense Security 
Cooperation Agency for the National Defense Strategy 
Implementation account.
    The committee notes that the budget request for the 
National Defense Strategy Implementation account included 
amounts intended for building partner capacity (BPC) activities 
in the Indo-Pacific Command area of responsibility, utilizing 
authorities provided in section 333 of title 10, United States 
Code, and section 1263 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92). The committee 
continues to support the Indo-Pacific Maritime Security 
Initiative (MSI) as a standalone and signature security 
cooperation initiative for strengthening partnerships in the 
Department of Defense's priority theater, the Indo-Pacific. The 
initiative's flexibility with regard to multinational projects 
offers unique opportunities for increasing regional cooperation 
and deepening regional interoperability. Furthermore, the 
initiative is a tangible and recognizable symbol of the 
enduring American commitment to the Indo-Pacific region at a 
time when our strategic competitors are seeking to sow doubt 
about the value of our alliances and partnerships. For these 
reasons, the committee believes that the funding requested in 
the National Defense Strategy Implementation account for 
maritime-focused BPC activities in the Indo-Pacific Command 
area of responsibility is most appropriately executed pursuant 
to the MSI authority.
    Therefore, the committee directs that, of the amount 
requested for BPC activities in the Indo-Pacific Command area 
of responsibility in Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide, 
for SAG 4GTD for the National Defense Strategy Implementation 
account, not less than $200.0 million be used pursuant to 
section 1263 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92). This amount shall only 
come from those amounts requested by the Department of Defense 
for security cooperation activities in the Indo-Pacific Command 
area of responsibility.

PDI: Indo-Pacific Maritime Security Initiative

    The budget request included $627.8 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide, Overseas Contingency Operations, for 
SAG 4GTD Defense Security Cooperation Agency for the National 
Defense Strategy Implementation account.
    The committee notes that the budget request for the 
National Defense Strategy Implementation account included 
amounts intended for building partner capacity (BPC) activities 
in the Indo-Pacific Command area of responsibility, utilizing 
authorities provided in section 333 of title 10, United States 
Code, and section 1263 of the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92). The committee 
continues to support the Indo-Pacific Maritime Security 
Initiative (MSI) as a standalone and signature security 
cooperation initiative for strengthening partnerships in the 
Department of Defense's priority theater, the Indo-Pacific. The 
initiative's flexibility with regard to multinational projects 
offers unique opportunities for increasing regional cooperation 
and deepening regional interoperability. Furthermore, the 
initiative is a tangible and recognizable symbol of the 
enduring American commitment to the Indo-Pacific region at a 
time when our strategic competitors are seeking to sow doubt 
about the value of our alliances and partnerships. For these 
reasons, the committee believes that the funding requested in 
the National Defense Strategy Implementation account for 
maritime-focused BPC activities in the Indo-Pacific Command 
area of responsibility is most appropriately executed pursuant 
to the MSI authority.
    Therefore, the committee directs that, of the amount 
requested for BPC activities in the Indo-Pacific Command area 
of responsibility in Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide, 
for SAG 4GTD for the National Defense Strategy Implementation 
account, not less than $200.0 million be used pursuant to 
section 1263 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92). This amount shall only 
come from those amounts requested by the Department of Defense 
for security cooperation activities in the Indo-Pacific Command 
area of responsibility.

Staffing of Department of Defense Education Activity schools

    The budget request included $44.6 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $2.9 billion was for 
SAG 4GTJ Department of Defense Education Activity (DODEA). The 
amount authorized to be appropriated for OMDW includes the 
following change from the budget request. The provision 
underlying this change in funding levels is discussed in 
greater detail in title V of this committee report.

                     [Changes in millions of dollars]
 
 
 
Maintenance of student-teacher ratios in DODEA schools              +1.5
                                                       -----------------
    Total.............................................              +1.5
 

Impact aid

    The budget request included $44.6 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $2.9 billion was for 
SAG 4GTJ Department of Defense Education Activity. The amount 
authorized to be appropriated for OMDW includes the following 
changes from the budget request. The provisions underlying 
these changes in funding levels are discussed in greater detail 
in title V of this committee report.

                     [Changes in millions of dollars]
 
 
 
Impact aid for schools with military dependent                     +50.0
 students.............................................
Impact aid for children with severe disabilities......             +20.0
                                                       -----------------
    Total.............................................             +70.0
 

Defense Community Infrastructure Program

    The budget request included $40.3 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), of which $40.2 million was 
for SAG 4GTM Office of Economic Adjustment.
    The committee notes that section 2861 of the John S. McCain 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public 
Law 115-232) established a pilot for the Defense Community 
Infrastructure Program. The committee continues to recognize 
the importance of the military services' establishing and 
strengthening their relationships with local communities and 
looks forward to reviewing the results of the pilot program 
upon its completion.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $50.0 
million in OMDW to SAG 4GTM Office of Economic Adjustment.

National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence

    The budget request included $1.5 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide, for SAG 4GTN Office of the Secretary 
of Defense.
    The committee recognizes the important work that the 
National Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence (NSCAI) 
has put forth in its interim reports and is aware of the first 
quarter recommendations of the Commission. Additionally, the 
committee is aware that additional funds are needed to cover 
additional Freedom of Information Act request expenses. The 
committee is supportive of the NSCAI and looks forward to its 
final report and recommendations.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.5 
million in Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide, for SAG 
4GTN for the NSCAI.

Bien Hoa dioxin cleanup

    The budget request included $1.5 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTN Office of the 
Secretary of Defense, of which no funds were proposed for Bien 
Hoa dioxin cleanup in Vietnam.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $15.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN for Bien Hoa dioxin cleanup.

Energy Resilience Readiness Exercises

    The budget request included $1.5 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTN Office of the 
Secretary of Defense, of which no funds were for Energy 
Resilience Readiness Exercises (ERREs).
    The committee continues to support the significant success 
of ``black start'' ERREs performed by the military services and 
overseen by the Department of Defense (DOD). The committee 
believes that low-cost ERREs, which each cost roughly $500,000, 
provide a real-world opportunity to ``pull the plug'' on 
military installations and truly test how each would respond in 
the event of a cyberattack or natural disaster. The committee 
believes that this is a small but warranted investment for 
Department of Defense installation readiness. Unfortunately, 
the Department elected not to program for any ERREs in fiscal 
year 2021.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN for ERREs.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention nation-wide human health 
        assessment

    The budget request included $1.5 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTN Office of the 
Secretary of Defense, of which no funds were proposed for the 
ongoing Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 
Nation-wide human health assessment related to contaminated 
sources of drinking water from per- and poly-fluoroalkyl 
substances.
    The committee continues to support the ongoing human health 
assessment. Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase 
of $10.0 million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN for the ongoing CDC 
assessment.

Funding for commission relating to Confederate symbols

    The budget request included $1.5 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 490 Office of the 
Secretary of Defense.
    The committee recommends an increase of $2.0 million in 
OMDW for SAG 490 to provide adequate resources for the 
commission on Confederate symbols established elsewhere in this 
Act.

Cooperative program for Vietnam personnel MIA

    The budget request included $1.5 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 490 Office of the 
Secretary of Defense.
    The committee recommends an increase of $2.0 million in 
OMDW for SAG 490 to provide adequate resources to a cooperative 
program with the Ministry of Defense of Vietnam to account for 
Vietnamese missing in action, a program which is authorized 
elsewhere in this Act.

DWR restore: Congressional background investigations

    The budget request included $949.0 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide, for SAG 5GTE Defense 
Counterintelligence and Security Agency.
    The Defense-Wide Review proposed transferring the burden 
for processing security clearance background investigations for 
congressional staff from the Department of Defense to the 
congressional defense committees.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide, for SAG 
4GTE for the Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency to 
continue processing congressional background investigations. 
The committee notes a corresponding decrease elsewhere in this 
report.

Energy performance contracts

    The budget request included $1.5 billion in the Operation 
and Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTN Office of 
the Secretary of Defense, of which no funds were for energy 
performance contracts.
    The committee supports efforts by the Department of Defense 
and the military services to include energy resilience and 
cybersecurity in all energy performance contract projects. 
However, in too many instances, the upfront costs of resilience 
do not pencil out despite providing a direct mission benefit 
and capability. To facilitate inclusion of mission-critical 
resilience and cybersecurity across the Department, the 
committee recommends adding $10.0 million to leverage 
performance contracting efforts. These funds should be used 
only to leverage resilience and cybersecurity into a 
performance contract when those measures cannot be effectively 
paid for with a performance contract and leverage at least $10 
of private capital for every dollar of Department funds.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $10.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN for energy performance contract 
funding.

Personnel in the Office of Assistant Secretary of Defense Sustainment 
        and Environment, Safety, and Occupational Health

    The budget request included $1.5 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTN Office of the 
Secretary of Defense, of which no funds were for sufficient 
numbers of personnel in the Office of the Assistant Secretary 
of Defense for Sustainment in Environment, Safety, and 
Occupational Health (ESOH).
    The committee recognizes the challenges facing the 
Department of Defense in the Office's remit, ranging from per- 
and polyfluoroalkyl substances to the Military Housing 
Privatization Initiative.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $2.0 
million in OMDW for ESOH personnel in the Office of the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Sustainment.

Improvement of occupational license portability for military spouses 
        through interstate compacts

    The budget request included $1.5 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTN Office of the 
Secretary of Defense.
    The committee remains concerned about the lack of 
portability of employment licenses and credentials across State 
lines, which hinders military spouse employment. Due to the 
delays and expense involved in re-licensure and re-
credentialing, many military spouses decide not to practice 
their professions. This becomes a financial and career choice 
issue for military families, impacting servicemembers' desire 
to stay in the military.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $4.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN, for the activities outlined in 
section 575 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92), which required the 
Secretary of Defense to enter into a cooperative agreement with 
the Council of State Governments to assist with the funding and 
development of interstate compacts on licensed occupations.

National Cyber Director independent study funding

    The budget request included $1.5 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTN Office of the 
Secretary of Defense.
    Elsewhere in this report, the committee recommends a 
independent study on the establishment of a National Cyber 
Director.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $2.5 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN for conducting an independent 
study on the establishment of a National Cyber Director.

Readiness and Environmental Protection Initiative

    The budget request included $1.5 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 4GTN Office of the 
Secretary of Defense, of which $75.0 million was for the 
Readiness and Environmental Protection Initiative (REPI).
    The committee continues to support the mission of the REPI 
and believes that the program has proven to be highly effective 
in addressing encroachment. However, the committee is concerned 
that the Department of Defense continues to underfund the REPI 
despite its success to date and the cost-efficiency of 
Department investments, born from substantial partner 
contributions. The Department has expressed concerns about the 
growing need to protect key installations, ranges, and airspace 
but has failed to match those concerns with adequate resources.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $25.0 
million in OMDW for SAG 4GTN for the REPI and strongly 
encourages the Department to reflect in future REPI budget 
requests the urgency of the problem of encroachment and the 
success that the REPI has achieved in addressing this problem.

DWR restore: support to commissions

    The budget request included $340.3 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide, for SAG 4GTQ Washington Headquarters 
Services.
    The Defense-Wide Review 1.0 proposed ending support for 
commissions and transferring the burden onto other components.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $3.0 
million in Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide, for SAG 
4GTQ for the Washington Headquarters Services to continue to 
provide support for commissions.

Biological Threat Reduction Program

    The budget request included $238.5 million in Miscellaneous 
Appropriations for SAG 1PL3 Cooperative Threat Reduction.
    The committee believes that the Biological Threat Reduction 
Program (BTRP) has provided valuable assistance in the 
prevention and detection of emergent biological threats.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends an increase of $50.0 
million in Miscellaneous Appropriations for SAG 1PL3 for the 
BTRP.

Acquisition Workforce Development Account

    The budget request included $58.2 million in Operation and 
Maintenance, Defense-wide (OMDW), for SAG 012 Acquisition 
Workforce Development Account (DAWDA).
    The committee notes that the budget request included a 
$199.0 million reduction for the DAWDA based on the Defense-
Wide Review. The committee notes that this account was 
originally authorized due to the Department's inability to 
adequately invest in the training and education of its 
professional acquisition workforce. The committee is concerned 
that, at a reduced funding level, the Department will face 
challenges in building the acquisition workforce it needs to 
support the National Defense Strategy. The acquisition 
workforce is currently demonstrating its critical role as the 
Department works to meet the national security and economic 
challenges resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic. The committee 
believes that DAWDA is critical to meeting the Department's 
need to streamline procurement, work with Silicon Valley 
innovators, support research on and development of new 
acquisition tools and innovative acquisition policies, and 
develop a workforce to implement modern acquisition reforms and 
practices.
    Therefore, the committee recommends an increase of $98.5 
million in OMDW for SAG 012 to increase funding for the 
Acquisition Workforce Development Account.

Operation and maintenance adjustments

    The budget request included $253.9 billion in Operation and 
Maintenance funding.
    The committee notes that the onset of COVID-19 has forced 
the delay or cancellation of numerous training and exercise 
events, as well as slowed operations. The committee expects 
that COVID-19 will continue to affect such activities in an 
unpredictable and non-linear fashion.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a decrease of $550.0 
million across the Operation and Maintenance accounts to 
account for the impacts of COVID-19 on training and operations.

Bulk fuel adjustment

    The budget request included $7.7 billion across the 
Operation and Maintenance accounts, both base and Overseas 
Contingency Operations, for the purchase of bulk fuel.
    Analysis conducted by the Government Accountability Office 
(GAO) using the most recent data indicates that the Department 
of Defense will underexecute its bulk fuel purchases by $1.5 
billion in fiscal year 2021 owing to the rapid decrease in bulk 
fuel prices. The committee commends GAO for its forward-leaning 
work in analyzing bulk fuel prices to assist Congress in 
decision-making given the unique uncertainty of the current 
fuel markets.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease in the 
Operation and Maintenance accounts of $1.5 billion to account 
for likely underexecution in bulk fuel purchases.

Foreign currency adjustment

    The budget request included $5.4 billion in the Operation 
and Maintenance and Military Personnel accounts for activities 
requiring conversion of U.S. dollars to foreign currencies.
    The committee notes that the Government Accountability 
Office has repeatedly issued recommendations for the Department 
of Defense to analyze its Foreign Currency Fluctuations, 
Defense account balance given historical trends and managerial 
usage of the account.
    Accordingly, the committee recommends a decrease of $450.0 
million across the Operation and Maintenance and Military 
Personnel accounts.

                       Items of Special Interest


Adversary air

    The committee is aware of the ongoing and growing 
requirements for near-peer representative air-to-air training 
using aggressor aircraft with capability similar to that of the 
advanced adversaries that these aircraft are designed to 
replicate. Additionally, it is becoming clear that this 
requirement will not be met in the near-term with solely 
organic service assets.
    Therefore the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force and the Secretary of the Navy, no later than February 1, 
2021, to submit to the congressional defense committees a 
report that sets forth a plan to develop and implement an Air 
Aggressor Enterprise that incorporates advanced organic and 
contract services to maintain full-spectrum readiness for Air 
Force and Navy 4th and 5th generation aircraft.
    The report shall include: (1) A description of the current 
Air Aggressor Enterprise for the Air Force and Navy; (2) A 
description of the needs, resources, and requirements that the 
Air Force and Navy require to maintain full-spectrum readiness 
for all required joint and single service exercises as well as 
daily, home station, in-garrison training requirements; (3) A 
description and identification of any tactical, operational, or 
strategic risk that is incurred by maintaining, retiring, or 
modernizing the current Air Aggressor Enterprise; (4) A 
description of the basic requirements for an aircraft that can 
replicate a modern ``2030'' adversary in the air domain; and 
(5) An assessment of the costs and benefits of organic versus 
contract-supplied adversary air.

Air Force aerospace ground equipment

    As the Air Force implements its ``Base of the Future'' 
concept, the committee encourages the use of new technologies 
and alternatives to the current method of powering aircraft on 
the flight-line through diesel generators and aerospace ground 
equipment (AGE). Existing AGE lack efficiency and can be costly 
for operations and repairs. Electrical Ground Power Units 
(eGPUs) can use automotive propulsion batteries to power an 
electronics package and be integrated onto a self-propelled 
cart, providing near silent operation while eliminating 
emissions. The committee understands that eGPUs could also 
increase overall system efficiency by nearly 75 percent and 
provide the additional function of having a one-solution power 
system to support a variety of loads. Furthermore, the 
elimination of mechanical moving parts and diesel fuel could 
decrease the ongoing need for periodic maintenance, which could 
reduce the total ownership costs of the units to the Air Force. 
By leveraging the economies of scale provided by using proven 
commercial automotive batteries to power aircraft on the 
flight-line, the Air Force could see a reduction in 
development, procurement, and lifecycle costs.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Air 
Force to brief the committee not later than October 1, 2020, on 
the following: (1) Readiness status of the current AGE fleet; 
(2) Sustainment and operation and maintenance costs of the 
current AGE fleet; (3) Identification of alternate types of AGE 
that can provide flight-line power to aircraft; and (4) An 
assessment of total life cycle cost savings of replacing 
current diesel-powered flight-line AGE with eGPUs.

Air Force Reserve runway infrastructure

    The committee believes that the Air Force's physical runway 
infrastructure is an essential component of the readiness of 
U.S. operational and strategic forces, including the crucial 
reserve component forces that support the National Defense 
Strategy. The committee believes that the maintenance and 
extension of such assets is critical to launching aircraft 
quickly and effectively across a variety of mission areas. The 
committee is concerned by multiple examples where the Air Force 
Reserve has yet to or is not addressing these requirements with 
urgency.
    In particular, the committee notes that the continued 
operation at Gila Bend Air Force Auxiliary Field, home of the 
56th Fighter Wing, is crucial to emergency operations for both 
Luke Air Force Base and Davis-Monthan Air Force Base. The 
committee understands that the current end-of-runway turnaround 
does not meet current requirements, thus requiring the 56th 
Fighter Wing to operate under a waiver. The committee further 
understands that Gila Bend accounted for 18,000 sorties in 2018 
alone and will continue to increase as the 56th Fighter Wing 
fields additional F-35As. Additionally, the committee notes 
that the Niagara Falls Air Reserve Station's existing runway is 
not long enough to allow KC-135 aircraft to take off or land at 
high gross weights under all weather conditions. The committee 
further understands that the current taxi pattern does not 
allow for the use of the full runway without back taxi, which 
is not an option during the free-flow launch of aircraft 
required to support certain critical missions. The committee 
notes that both examples, if not addressed, increase risk to 
aircraft and crew safety during inclement weather or other 
emergency situations.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to conduct an assessment and provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees, no later than November 1, 
2020, detailing the operational requirements for Air Force 
Reserve and Air Guard airfields in addition to the state of 
airfields where runway degradation currently poses a threat to 
operations. Additionally, the assessment shall include a list 
of all runways currently utilizing a waiver authority of 
current requirements and the cost associated for improving said 
runways to meet current requirements. The briefing shall 
include the operational requirement for airfields, an 
assessment of the impact to operations, cost to repair, cost to 
replace, remaining useful life, and narrative on the required 
daily maintenance to ensure that the runway is acceptable for 
full operations at the installation as well as any challenges 
with infrastructure acquisition methods and processes.
    If required, a classified annex may accompany the 
unclassified briefing.

Air Force Special Operations Command total force utilization

    The committee believes that the Air Force Special 
Operations Command (AFSOC) should make every effort to fully 
utilize the total force to meet aircrew training and 
operational requirements in platforms like the AC-130J, CV-22, 
MC-12W, and A-29 in order to meet the requirements of the 
National Defense Strategy (NDS). The committee notes that 
AFSOC's 2020 Strategic Guidance document indicated the need to 
``appropriately structure and resource its training enterprise 
to ensure full-spectrum readiness across the total force.'' 
Additionally, the committee believes that AFSOC should fully 
utilize infrastructure and personnel across the total force, to 
include those of the Air National Guard. Such assets include 
hanger space, taxiway, and parking space at available 
installations. Furthermore, the committee believes that AFSOC 
should fully utilize Active/National Guard associated 
installations with access to bombing ranges and large-scale 
military operating areas, low-level training routes, and 
advanced training environments.
    Therefore, the committee encourages AFSOC to work with the 
National Guard Bureau to fully utilize the total force in 
support of AFSOC's strategic objectives and in furtherance of 
the NDS.

Assessment of potential transfer of real property, equipment and 
        facilities in the Assembled Chemical Weapons Alternative 
        Program

    The Assembled Chemical Weapons Alternative Program carries 
out the destruction of chemical weapons produced by the United 
States as required under the Chemical Weapons Convention, which 
entered into force on April 29, 1997. The Department of Defense 
is responsible for the construction of facilities with 
specialized equipment to perform such destruction where the 
stockpile of chemical weapons is located. Given the highly 
toxic nature of this process, much of the equipment and 
facilities cannot be re-utilized, except for a small number of 
limited cases where re-use by local communities would be 
beneficial. The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
report to the congressional defense committees, no later than 
February 28, 2021, on the ability of the Assembled Chemical 
Weapons Alternatives Program to transfer for follow on use by 
the military or to local communities real property, equipment, 
and facilities, safe to use for additional duties at minimal 
cost to the U.S. Government and consistent with section 
1521(d)(2) of title 50, United States Code, including necessary 
legislative changes if so required. The committee directs the 
Department of Defense to engage with relevant local 
communities, as appropriate, in preparation of the required 
report as well as planning related to any such transfers.

Backup power technology

    The committee is concerned that the critical 
telecommunications and cybersecurity networks on our military 
installations throughout the United States and abroad are 
increasingly susceptible to power outages caused by attacks 
from our adversaries or by natural disasters. Loss of power to 
communications equipment contradicts mission readiness and 
assurance and must be mitigated.
    The committee strongly encourages the Department of Defense 
to ensure that all military installations across the military 
services have backup power technology that adheres to master 
energy plans as well mission critical resilience and 
cybersecurity measures, meets performance standards set by the 
Environmental Protection Agency, and provides power for no less 
than 48 hours without refueling. The committee also strongly 
encourages the Department to pursue technologies with low noise 
while ensuring cost-effectiveness.

Briefing on contested logistics in support of the National Defense 
        Strategy

    The committee strongly supports the National Defense 
Strategy (NDS) and the Department of Defense's focus in 
preparing both the individual military services and the 
combatant commands for great power competition. The committee 
notes that, in the event of a large scale conflict, the 
Department will be required to maneuver in a contested 
environment, which will require logistics planning for 
manpower, liquid energy, munitions, sustainment, and many other 
facets of projecting a forward presence. The committee believes 
that the individual military service components' working 
together with the United States Transportation Command 
(TRANSCOM) will be essential to ensuring that the Department is 
ready and resourced to project and sustain U.S. forces.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense, in coordination with Commander, TRANSCOM, to brief the 
committee no later than October 15, 2020, on how the Department 
creates and sustains long-term logistics plans to inform the 
NDS to meet the requirements of great power competition. The 
briefing should address but not be limited to: (1) How 
logistics-centric war games inform future warplans; (2) How the 
Department shares best practices across the military services 
to improve potential outcomes for issues like operational 
energy; (3) The current logistics-focused documents used to 
support the NDS; and (4) The Department's view on whether a 
separate logistics-focused strategy document as an addendum to 
the NDS would bolster current plans. This briefing should also 
consider the unique geographic constraints, security risks, and 
potential for operations under a contested environment and any 
other issues the Department deems appropriate.
    If required, the briefing may include a classified annex.

Briefing on microturbine technology for military applications

    The committee notes the importance of installation and 
operational energy in support of both basing and contested 
logistics, which directly support the National Defense 
Strategy. The committee is aware of advances in microturbine 
and mobile substation technology that now enables rapid 
deployments of resilient power units that could maximize 
operational flexibility by using multiple fuel types, including 
natural gas and diesel, as well as alternative fuels such as 
propane, hydrogen, ethanol, biogas, and landfill gas, depending 
on fuel availability in the theater of operations. The 
committee understands that these units are compact, that they 
can be transported via air, sea, rail, or road, and that they 
can be operational in a matter of hours. The committee further 
understands that microturbines not only produce potential fuel 
savings but can also connect to existing power assets using a 
micro-grid controller to ensure that all assets are used in the 
most efficient manner. The committee notes that this power 
generation should allow for lower overall fuel usage and fewer 
fuel convoys on the road, which are vulnerable to potential 
enemy action.
    The committee encourages the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretary of the Army, who serves as the 
executive agent for Joint Force Logistics, to review this 
technology and study its military applications. The committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing to the 
committee on the potential applicability and effectiveness of 
microturbines for both installation and operational energy 
needs no later than November 1, 2020. If deemed viable, the 
briefing should also include a cost estimate and schedule for 
conducting a proof of concept demonstration.

Cold spray applications for Department of Defense sustainment and 
        medical activities

    The committee recognizes the importance of further 
advancement, procurement, and deployment of high pressure cold 
spray systems that can be used to repair high performance 
materials for the Department of Defense. The committee highly 
encourages further integration of portable deployable high 
pressure cold spray systems. Such systems will potentially 
enable improved performance, readiness, and sustainability of 
deployed joint forces. Examples may include ships underway, 
deployed ground forces, and expeditionary aviation units.
    The committee encourages the Department to explore 
additional cold spray applications during original manufacture 
of new weapon systems as well as for the application of 
antimicrobial copper surfaces. The committee recognizes that 
copper surfaces have proven effective at reducing or 
eliminating bacteria and viruses on touch surfaces and that 
cold spray technology is an efficient and cost-effective method 
of coating touch surfaces with antimicrobial copper. These 
applications may provide means of preventing the spread of 
harmful pathogens and reducing hospital-acquired infections.

Consideration for local broadcasting and traditional media for 
        Department of Defense advertising

    The committee encourages the service chiefs, in 
coordination with their respective recruiting commands, to give 
all due consideration toward the use of local broadcasting and 
traditional media sources when advertising for the Department 
of Defense.

Consideration of variable refrigerant flow systems

    The committee acknowledges that variable refrigerant flow 
systems already deployed at United States Army, Air Force, and 
Navy installations, as well as on ships, play an important role 
in assisting the Department of Defense in achieving energy 
efficiency requirements. Further, the committee recognizes that 
variable refrigerant flow systems provide the Department with a 
number of benefits, including precise individual control and 
inverter technology to minimize energy consumption and optimize 
energy savings, adaptable designs suitable for both retrofits 
and new builds, large allowances for piping length and level 
difference to provide a flexible layout, and individualized 
climate control settings to maximize comfort.
    Accordingly, the committee encourages the Department, in 
selecting equipment for heating, ventilation, and air 
conditioning, to consider life-cycle costs, energy efficiency, 
design flexibility, and individualized comfort. Additionally, 
when considering modifications to the Unified Facilities 
Criteria regarding the use of variable refrigerant flow systems 
at Department facilities, the committee encourages the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Sustainment to work 
collaboratively with industry to mitigate technical concerns, 
optimize equipment performance, minimize energy consumption, 
and maximize energy savings.

Defense Personal Property Program

    The committee appreciates the work the United States 
Transportation Command (TRANSCOM) has undertaken to address 
shortfalls with the Defense Personal Property Program (DP3) 
through a single contractor known as the Global Household Goods 
Contract (GHC). The committee appreciates TRANSCOM's 
responsiveness to congressional inquiries regarding this topic 
and looks forward to continued transparency from TRANSCOM.
    The committee remains concerned, however, of GHC's 
implementation as it relates to remote and isolated 
installations. The committee is aware that locations, such as 
Alaska and Hawaii, generally have fewer shipping companies to 
assist in boosting capacity and much higher transit costs due 
to the time, space, and distance required for such moves. The 
committee notes that these unique challenges are often not 
considered in the planning and execution of Nation-wide 
government programs, leading to poor customer experiences, 
which could reflect poorly on the newly established GHC 
program.
    Accordingly, as TRANSCOM begins its transition from DP3 to 
GHC, the committee encourages the use of small businesses to 
ensure that capacity and quality of service are maintained 
across all installation locations, especially in areas with 
remote, isolated, and insular installations.

Defense Personal Property Program

    The committee is aware of the continued frustrations of 
servicemembers and their families with the quality and 
efficiency of the Defense Personal Property Program (DP3), 
provided by U.S. Transportation Command (TRANSCOM). The 
committee notes that DP3 arranges for the movement and storage 
of about 400,000 personal property shipments of servicemembers 
and their families annually--40 percent of them during peak 
moving season. The committee understands that TRANSCOM has 
identified problems meeting peak moving season demand and 
addressing longstanding quality issues.
    The committee notes that TRANSCOM announced that, no 
earlier than April 30, 2020, it would award a Global Household 
Goods Contract to a single commercial move manager to oversee 
DP3 activities that relate to the movement and storage-in-
transit of household goods. While the committee is encouraged 
by TRANSCOM's desire to improve the program's delivery of 
services to servicemembers, the committee believes that the 
Department of Defense should maintain certain services for 
servicemembers. The committee expects that servicemembers and 
their families will continue to have the option to utilize or 
reject any vendor to assist in their Personally Procured Move 
(PPM) relocation. Further, military exchanges should continue 
to enter into contracts and arrange marketing programs with PPM 
relocation vendors, as they deem appropriate, and market PPM 
relocation vendors to servicemembers who select the PPM 
relocation option.
    Additionally, as the Department moves forward to implement 
the Global Household Goods Contract, the committee remains 
concerned about the recommendations described by the Government 
Accountability Office in a report titled ``Movement of 
Household Goods: DOD Should Take Additional Steps to Assess 
Progress toward Achieving Program Goals'' (GAO-20-295). The 
committee strongly encourages the Commander, TRANSCOM, to 
develop a process for tracking data during the first 3 years of 
the Global Household Goods Contract to inform the planned 
manpower study during the third year of the contract. The 
committee also encourages the development of performance 
metrics for those DP3 activities that will still be performed 
by the military services, such as servicemember counseling and 
claims resolution. The committee believes that servicemembers 
and their families deserve a process that relies on quality 
data and include performance metrics to ensure accountability.

Defense Readiness Reporting Reform briefing

    The committee recognizes that the Defense Readiness Report 
System must evolve to meet the demands of irregular warfare 
environments and capture whether force elements are able to 
compete and win in a high-intensity near-peer scenario. The 
committee is encouraged by the Department of Defense's ongoing 
efforts in readiness reporting reform, guided by the findings 
and milestones established in the Department's recent 
assessment of the current readiness reporting system, Defense 
Readiness Reporting Systems Reform (D-C613F67), and applauds 
the Department for its assessment of how readiness reporting 
can be improved using new analytical technologies.
    The committee believes that the Department can benefit 
greatly from improving its readiness reporting, as implementing 
the National Defense Strategy depends on a more lethal and 
ready force. The committee notes that the report outlined 
specific measures the Department could take to successfully 
measure readiness of components and therefore enable a more 
effective warfighting force. The committee further notes that 
this report identifies threat-based reporting, improved 
information technology systems, interoperability, and agility 
as some of the elements required of the future data 
architecture. For example, the Department found that effective 
data modeling requires artificial intelligence-enabled 
technologies and that commercial-off-the-shelf products would 
benefit a future analytics workbench. The committee agrees that 
leveraging artificial intelligence-enabled technologies would 
allow the Department to better understand system data and make 
actionable decisions in near-real time.
    Accordingly, the committee encourages the Department to 
consider inclusion of artificial intelligence as it develops 
guidance for the Defense Readiness Reporting System and expects 
the Department to implement the recommendations from its 
report, D-C613F67.
    Additionally, the committee directs the Secretary of 
Defense to provide a briefing on Department of Defense 
Instruction 7730.66, Guidance for the Defense Readiness 
Reporting System, and Department of Defense Directive 7730.65, 
Department of Defense Readiness Reporting System, as well as an 
update on implementing the aforementioned recommendations no 
later than February 1, 2021.

Diverse training for special operations forces

    The committee notes that training of special operations 
forces (SOF) requires access to diverse venues and locations to 
enable realistic military training. In particular, training in 
austere, remote, and rough terrain supports the development of 
operational tactics, techniques, and procedures and testing of 
special operations-peculiar equipment. The committee believes 
that former surface mine sites may provide SOF with training 
opportunities for accomplishing SOF-unique tasks and encourages 
U.S. Special Operations Command to evaluate the use of such 
locations for future training opportunities.

Eastern Gulf Test and Training Range (EGTTR)

    The committee notes that the Air Force Development Test 
Center's mission is to plan, conduct, and evaluate testing of 
U.S. and allied non-nuclear munitions, electronic combat, 
target acquisition, weapon delivery, base intrusion protection, 
and supporting systems. That mission is executed at Eglin Air 
Force Base in Florida, whose land test areas encompass 463,000 
acres and water test areas, including the Eastern Gulf Test and 
Training Range (EGTTR), which cover 86,500 square miles in the 
Gulf of Mexico, making it the Department of Defense's (DOD) 
largest test and training area in the world.
    The committee notes that the DOD uses the EGGTR to develop 
and maintain the readiness of our combat forces and that the 
EGGTR is critical to achieving the objectives contained in the 
National Defense Strategy. The EGTTR connects test and training 
ranges and capabilities across the Eastern Gulf of Mexico 
extending from Key West to NW Florida. The test and training 
areas contain multiple live-fire bombing ranges, including 
Pinecastle Range, Avon Park Air Force Range, and the Eglin 
Bombing Range, supporting simultaneous maritime, air, and land 
training exercises.
    Due to its capabilities, the EGTTR complex is an integral 
part of DOD's Major Range and Test Facilities Base and the 
Training Resources Strategy. Additionally, the EGTTR supports 
multiple users, which include all military services within the 
DOD, other government agencies, foreign countries, and private 
companies. The Air Force currently expends annually in the 
EGTTR approximately 550 bombs, 580 missiles, 1,218,000 rounds 
of ammunition, and 637,000 countermeasures.
    All the military services, plus other government agencies, 
allied nations, and commercial entities, use the EGTTR to test 
the newest weapons and to ensure that legacy inventory weapons 
still work as intended.
    The committee understands that emerging technologies such 
as hypersonics, autonomous systems, and advanced sub-surface 
systems could require enlarged testing and training footprints.
    Therefore, the committee recognizes the importance of the 
EGTTR to the national security of the United States.

Electronic component failures

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense has 
found that electronics maintenance is a leading driver of 
weapon systems non-availability, accounting for over $10 
billion in fiscal year 2018 sustainment costs. This has 
exacerbated electronics availability issues and resulted in 
over 278,000 days of end-item system nonavailability and 
approximately $3 billion in non-value-added sustainment costs 
annually.
    To address these issues, the committee directs the 
Secretary of Defense to provide a report to the congressional 
defense committees, no later than December 31, 2020, that 
analyzes this persistent maintenance issue. The report should: 
recommend best practices to be used by the Department of 
Defense to address electronics component failures due to 
intermittent faults; identify responsible organizations in the 
military services and the Defense Agencies and Department of 
Defense Field Activities to address these issues; and include 
strategic plans and a roadmap to field intermittent fault 
detection and isolation capabilities.

Emerging viral threats

    The committee believes that emerging viral threats such as 
the 2019 novel coronavirus highlight the need for innovative 
and real-time forecasting and modeling techniques to ensure 
that the U.S. military and civilians are best positioned to 
respond, as appropriate, to emerging public health and national 
security threats. The committee encourages the Department of 
Defense (DOD) to leverage emerging infectious disease 
forecasting and modeling methods and data developed by 
university and private partners to the extent practicable. The 
committee also encourages the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, 
in collaboration with other agencies such as the Department of 
Health and Human Services, to examine the zoonotic features of 
emerging viruses, such as COVID-19 and Ebola, with the goal of 
understanding how such pathogens cause disease in humans and 
the potential impact on U.S. national security interests.

Engine optimization initiatives at Tinker Air Force Base

    The committee notes that the National Defense Strategy 
(NDS) requires a lethal and ready force and, to support that 
force, aviation platforms will have a key role in strategic 
airlift. Jet engine ingestion of debris and contaminants during 
operations erodes engine compressor blades, decreasing engine 
efficiency and power, increasing fuel burn and exhaust gas 
temperature, and causing higher maintenance costs and decreased 
aircraft availability.
    The committee understands that the Air Force Office of 
Operational Energy, in conjunction with the Advanced Power 
Technology Office, Air Force Research Laboratory, Naval Air 
Systems, commercial airlines, industry, and the Air Force Life 
Cycle Management Center Propulsion Directorate at Tinker Air 
Force Base, is exploring blade coating certifications for the 
F-117 engine, blade scanning testing for the F-108 engine 
program, and an engine foam wash. The committee further 
understands that the Air Force is currently validating return 
on investment data and will have an implementation report of 
any proven concepts later this year.
    The committee notes that coating high pressure compressor 
blades with erosion/corrosion-resistant finish preserves 
structures and increases time between repairs. Laser and 
infrared scanning of high pressure compressor blades can be 
used to determine physical characteristics of the airfoils and 
group them to ``tune'' the engine and improve efficiency. 
Finally, washing engines on wing with atomized water to remove 
debris from the compressor blade airfoil surfaces can be used 
to maintain optimal efficiency and deliver a cooler running 
engine.
    The committee agrees with the Air Force's assessment that, 
if the return on investment can be demonstrated through testing 
and certification, these optimization initiatives can reduce 
fuel consumption of the largest USAF consumers and lead to 
second and third order benefits, including improved performance 
and increased readiness. The committee understands that 
industry is already realizing fuel savings of up to 3 percent 
using this technology. A roughly 2 percent fuel savings for the 
KC-135, for example, is $17.0 million (2018 fuel expenditures).
    The committee is encouraged by these potential savings as 
there are secondary and tertiary benefits in readiness and in 
the performance of contested logistics missions and looks 
forward to the final implementation report.

Improving depot best practice sharing

    The committee notes that the Government Accountability 
Office (GAO) has issued several reports on the challenges 
experienced at the organic maintenance depots, including 
challenges pertaining to deteriorating equipment and facility 
condition, filling critical personnel skill gaps, meeting 
service repair needs, and excesses in carryover of workload. 
These problems can lead to delays in the maintenance of weapon 
systems that ultimately affect readiness by impeding the 
military services' ability to conduct training and provide 
forces to perform missions around the world. Despite these 
challenges, it is not clear the extent to which the Department 
of Defense (DOD) is assessing and mitigating the risk of 
maintenance delays when identifying its depot workload 
requirements.
    The committee notes that the GAO's most recent report on 
the subject, ``DOD Can Benefit from Further Sharing of Best 
Practices and Lessons Learned'' (GAO-20-116), outlined specific 
areas where the DOD can improve both its information sharing 
practices as well as implementation of said practices between 
the military services. For example, the GAO found that while 
the DOD has more than 60 working groups, the Office of the 
Secretary of Defense does not maintain a centralized list of 
working groups nor points of contact. Additionally, the GAO 
found that differing military service priorities and strategies 
were also a barrier to successful best practice sharing. The 
committee agrees with GAO's assessment that the inability to 
locate these working groups combined with competing service 
priorities can impede the sharing of best practices.
    The committee notes the benefits of cross-service sharing 
of best practices. The committee was encouraged, for example, 
to learn that the Navy Fleet Readiness Center Southwest 
implemented an intermittent fault detection system from Ogden 
Air Logistics Complex, an Air Force organization, reducing 
repair time from 90 days to 30 days while quadrupling the 
generators' time between failures. The committee further notes, 
however, that according to the GAO, the Army stated that, while 
it established lessons learned for sharing maintenance best 
practices and lessons learned, it did not maintain them due to 
organizational restructuring and resource constraints.
    The committee notes that the GAO provided two 
recommendations, both of which the Department of Defense 
concurred with: 1) The Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment should ensure that the Deputy 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Materiel Readiness create, 
share, and maintain a comprehensive and up-to-date list of all 
DOD sharing venues, including points of contact, related to 
depot maintenance; and 2) The Secretary of the Army should 
ensure that Army Materiel Command reestablishes and maintains 
organizations dedicated to sharing materiel best practices and 
lessons learned, as required by Army regulations.
    Accordingly, the committee expects the Secretary of Defense 
to implement the recommendations of GAO-20-116.

Informing War Plans Through Accurate War Gaming

    The committee notes the 2018 National Defense Strategy 
calls for resilient and agile logistics in the era of great 
power competition. The committee believes that the delivery of 
liquid energy, including, but not limited to JP5, JP8, Jet A1, 
and F76, is crucial to achieving that success.
    The committee notes that the Air Force Office of 
Operational Energy has developed modeling and simulation tools 
to analyze fuel consumption and installation supply during 
wargames. The committee believes that these tools can better 
inform wargame outcomes and must be designed to reflect the new 
reality of the contested logistics environment that 
characterizes the operating environment to improve future 
warplans.
    The committee encourages the Joint Staff to work in 
coordination with the Air Force Office of Operational Energy to 
produce energy-informed warplans through wargaming, campaign 
analysis, and modeling and simulation.

Infrared uniform management

    The committee notes that the National Defense Strategy 
cites growing threats from China and Russia, whose forces are 
equipped with thermal detection sensors. The committee believes 
that, to counter this threat, it is important that 
servicemembers are equipped with uniforms that are effective in 
concealing servicemembers from enemy infrared (IR) and thermal 
sensors and durable enough to withstand wear and tear from 
combat operations. The committee further believes that, as 
advanced IR and thermal detection technology becomes 
increasingly available to the Nation's military competitors, 
effective and durable personal signature management becomes 
critical to force protection and mission execution.
    The committee notes that the military services have 
previously established baseline standards for flame resistant 
uniforms for servicemembers deployed in hostile areas, which 
include a laundering durability requirement to ensure that 
servicemembers have an enduring protective capability that 
extends well into the predicted service life of the uniform. 
However, the committee understands that the military services 
do not currently maintain a similar durability requirement for 
uniforms with IR signature management capability. The committee 
understands that recent technical developments in flame 
resistant garments have begun to reduce costs while offering 
options that include a durable IR management capability. The 
committee notes that these emerging technological developments 
could provide the military services with ways to protect their 
forces, regardless of the environment, without imposing undue 
burden on already strained budgets.
    As such, the committee encourages the military services to 
explore these technologies further and to incorporate durable 
IR signature management capabilities designed to fully protect 
our men and women in uniform.

Installation energy

    The committee recognizes that the energy consumption of 
large, energy-intensive systems, such as heating, ventilation, 
and air conditioning (HVAC) systems of the Department of 
Defense (DOD), are monitored and managed by industrial control 
systems (ICS) to maximize their efficiency and cost savings. 
Unfortunately, computers, printers, and other smaller items 
plugged into an electrical system are not. While the More 
Situational Awareness for Industrial Control Systems (MOSAICS) 
program is focused on the cybersecurity of ICS platforms, it is 
not aimed at providing energy cost savings. Recent technologies 
have emerged on the market to provide comprehensive plug-load 
energy savings with cybersecurity protection.
    Therefore, to further a DOD priority to leverage building 
control systems to achieve substantial energy savings in a 
highly secure architecture, the committee authorizes and 
encourages the Secretary of Defense to establish a pilot 
program that incorporates technologies relating to energy 
management on an installation that is not reliant on a single 
telecommunications provider or energy provider. This approach 
will assure that, if successful, the technology suite and 
architecture will be easily implemented across the DOD and will 
be able to generate the maximum level of energy savings in a 
secure environment.
    The pilot should: (1) Include at least three installations; 
(2) Incorporate energy efficiency technology for an entire 
plug-load (large and small systems); (3) Incorporate 
comprehensive cybersecurity technology; (4) Integrate with 
current and future architectures; (5) Allow scalability and 
flexibility; and (6) Avoid single points of failure. The pilot 
program shall sunset on September 30, 2023. Within 90 days of 
completion of the pilot, the DOD shall brief the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House Representatives on 
the results of the pilot, whether or not it should be expanded 
as appropriate, and explanation as to the outcome of that 
decision.

Installation Utility and Energy Authority Integration

    The committee supports the Department of Defense's (DOD's) 
efforts to improve installation utility resilience. The 
committee recognizes that the DOD has a variety of statutory 
authorities that can be used to fulfill the Department's 
installation utility needs, including third-party financing, 
utilities privatization, and capital investment using 
appropriated dollars.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to brief the congressional defense committees, not later than 
April 1, 2021, on initiatives that leverage and integrate 
existing utility and energy authorities to support installation 
resiliency projects that improve utilities efficiency, upgrade 
infrastructure, and strengthen mission assurance.

Joint Military Information Support Operations WebOps Center

    The committee notes that U.S. Special Operations Command 
(SOCOM) is designated as the coordinating authority for web-
based military information support operations. The committee 
supports the establishment of the Joint Military Information 
Support Operations WebOps Center (JMWC) at SOCOM to enable 
global coordination of web-based MISO, counter transregional 
misinformation challenges, share best practices, and leverage 
efficiencies whenever possible.
    However, the committee is concerned that the overall 
resource requirements to support the JMWC, in both funding and 
personnel, are not well understood and should be better refined 
as the JMWC seeks to achieve initial operating capacity later 
this year. Additionally, the committee believes that projected 
personnel requirements for some combatant commands are 
excessive and not aligned with the priorities outlined in the 
National Defense Strategy. The committee also believes that 
SOCOM should prioritize the development of rigorous standards 
and assessments to appropriately characterize the success or 
failure of web-based messaging efforts and make recommendations 
for re-directing resources when appropriate.

Military Munitions Response Program

    The committee recognizes and supports the ongoing and 
costly efforts by the Department of Defense to address the 
significant challenges of cleaning up military installations 
contaminated by per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances. 
Additionally, the Department must weigh the pressing priority 
of executing the Military Munitions Response Program (MMRP) in 
a manner consistent with its budget request. The committee is 
also concerned about public safety at the over 5,000 MMRP sites 
across the country that potentially contain unexploded 
ordnance. The committee understands that tough choices must be 
made by the Department and the military services when balancing 
the priorities of environmental contamination and unexploded 
ordnance in executing the MMRP. The committee strongly 
encourages the Department and the military services to execute 
and obligate funds for the MMRP within the environmental 
restoration accounts in accordance with their budget requests 
as best as possible, given the competing priorities of MMRP and 
the need to clean up installations contaminated by per- and 
polyfluoroalkyl substances.

Military working dogs Comptroller General review

    The committee recognizes the importance of working dogs, 
who serve honorably alongside servicemembers and support 
agencies across the Federal Government. However, the committee 
is concerned by the September 2019 State Department Office of 
the Inspector General report on the ``Evaluation of the Anti-
terrorism Assistance Explosive Detection Canine Program--Health 
and Welfare,'' which documented serious animal welfare concerns 
for working dogs.
    Given that the committee recognizes the importance of 
welfare protections for humane treatment, the committee directs 
the Comptroller General of the United States to submit to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives a report no later than February 1, 2021, that 
reviews the use of working dogs across the Federal Government 
and evaluates whether welfare standards for working dogs are 
upheld. This report should include the total number of working 
dogs at each Federal entity and a summary of their support 
roles.
    Additionally, the Comptroller General should summarize any 
Federal policies related to the protection or health and 
welfare of working dogs and evaluate whether Federal entities 
with working dogs implement and adhere to these policies. 
Finally, the Comptroller General should provide recommendations 
to strengthen oversight and protection of working dogs, 
including suggestions to standardize contracts relating to the 
use of working dogs by foreign countries or Federal 
contractors. These written agreements should ensure a mutual 
understanding regarding the health, welfare, and retirement of 
working dogs, require that any foreign partner or contractor 
provide welfare evaluations and healthcare for canines, and 
stipulate that medical needs after deployment or service are 
met.

National all-domain warfighting center

    The committee recognizes the critical need for the National 
Guard, as an essential component of the Joint Force, to conduct 
all-domain training and exercises in support of the National 
Defense Strategy (NDS).
    The committee notes the Joint Staff's development of an 
all-domain warfighting concept to support the NDS. It also 
notes that the National Guard Bureau has successfully sponsored 
exercise Northern Strike as a Joint National Training 
Capability accredited exercise to provide readiness-building 
opportunities for all the military services through joint 
combined arms training. This exercise occurs at Camp Grayling 
Joint Maneuver Training Center and the Alpena Combat Readiness 
Training Center, installations which have already provided 
opportunities for units from any service, allies, and partners 
to achieve or sustain proficiency in conducting joint command 
and control, air, maritime, and ground maneuver integration, 
and the synchronization of lethal and non-lethal (cyber) fires 
in a joint, multinational major combat operations environment 
that is scalable across unit resources levels. It also has 
multi-modal capabilities to train and exercise joint logistics 
and sustainment at operationally relevant distances. This 
training environment addresses training gaps and builds 
readiness at multiple echelons with the scope and scale 
required to address emerging challenges of near-peer 
competitors.
    The committee encourages the Secretary of the Army and the 
Secretary of the Air Force to appropriately resource training 
and exercise opportunities for the Army and Air National Guards 
to maintain readiness in an all-domain training environment to 
the maximum extent feasible.

Naval expeditionary sustainment and repair

    The committee supports investments that align mature 
technology-based solutions with expeditionary shipboard 
sustainment and repair concepts of operations to improve 
warship resiliency, lethality, and availability.

Navy Converged Enterprise Resource Planning

    The committee supports Navy efforts to modernize financial 
management and logistics systems using best-in-class commercial 
enterprise resource planning solutions and notes strong initial 
progress in this area. The committee urges the Navy to adopt a 
flexible staffing model to scale progress across the Navy 
enterprise, ensure cost-effective staffing, keep pace with 
innovation, and leverage the value of cloud computing-enabled 
platforms. To achieve this, the committee believes that the 
Navy should avoid excessive on-site place of performance 
requirements, restrictive experience level requirements 
inconsistent with commercial practices, and other policies that 
restrict available workforce, increase costs, and reduce the 
scalability needed to achieve audit readiness and logistics 
modernization goals. The committee notes that the recent 
challenges in response to the COVID-19 crisis highlighted the 
need for flexible policies with respect to place of performance 
of appropriate Department of Defense missions.

Navy shipyard infrastructure optimization

    The committee notes that the Department of the Navy 
operates and maintains four public shipyards in the United 
States: Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Virginia; Portsmouth Naval 
Shipyard, Maine; Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Washington; and 
Pearl Harbor Naval Shipyard, Hawaii. The committee recognizes 
the vital role these shipyards play in generating readiness, 
supporting the Navy's surface and submarine fleet by performing 
depot- and intermediate-level maintenance, modernization work, 
emergent repairs, and in-activations.
    In recognizing the importance of maintaining these public 
shipyards, in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91), the committee directed the 
Secretary of the Navy to provide a report to the congressional 
defense committees to address shortfalls in the public shipyard 
enterprise. The committee notes that the Navy created the 
Shipyard Infrastructure Optimization Plan (SIOP) within the 
Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) to recapitalize and 
modernize the infrastructure at all four public shipyards. The 
committee understands that subsequently the Navy established a 
program office, PMS-555, to help coordinate the various Navy 
stakeholders as they optimized the SIOP and began 
implementation of the plan.
    The committee believes the infrastructure improvements 
needed at the Navy's public shipyards must be consistent and 
keep pace with the anticipated growth of Navy force structure, 
consistent with the 30-year shipbuilding plan, required 
annually pursuant to section 231 of title 10, United States 
Code. The committee is concerned that necessary SIOP 
infrastructure investments have seen little military 
construction or facilities, sustainment, restoration and 
modernization (FSRM) funding programmed to date. These 
investments are critical to ensuring the readiness of the Navy 
and for maintaining the fleet. The committee appreciates that 
the Navy is trying to optimize the program but remains 
concerned that further delays will add cost and complicate 
fulfillment of fleet maintenance needs.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Navy to provide a briefing to the congressional defense 
committees every 6 months, beginning on September 1, 2020, on 
the status of the SIOP. Specifically, the briefing should 
include updates on the following plans: (1) Personnel Roadmap; 
(2) Infrastructure Development Plan; (3) Metrics Assessment 
Plan; (4) Workload Management Plan; and (5) Funding and 
Authorities Plan.
    Additionally, the briefing shall include a listing of 
equipment from Federal Supply Class 3411 (Boring Machines), 
3416 (Lathes), and 3441 (Bending and Forming Machines) that has 
been unserviceable for over 30 consecutive days. The listing 
shall include, for each such piece of equipment: (1) The reason 
for the delayed repair; (2) The availability of technical 
representatives from the manufacturer to provide assistance in 
diagnosing and repairing the discrepancy; and (3) The estimated 
time to repair.
    Lastly, the committee directs the Secretary of the Navy to 
provide to the congressional defense committees a report with 
the annual budget request for each of fiscal years 2022 through 
2027. This report shall include details surrounding the 
anticipated investment in the public shipyards contained in the 
future years defense program, including military construction 
and FSRM-funded projects. These investments shall be broken out 
by project, public shipyard, and fiscal year.

Partnerships with industrial base for hypersonic and directed energy 
        programs

    The committee recognizes the strategic importance of the 
defense industrial base. The committee also recognizes that 
hypersonic and directed energy programs are developing crucial 
platforms in support of the National Defense Strategy. The 
committee believes that, in order to efficiently utilize the 
combined capabilities of the organic and non-organic industrial 
bases, the Department of Defense should pursue partnerships and 
joint ventures between non-organic and established Centers of 
Excellence within the organic industrial base for any contract 
actions pertaining to enduring research and development, 
design, prototyping, testing, production, and sustainment, 
including for hypersonic and directed energy programs.

Preservation of the Force and Families program

    The committee recognizes the near- and long-term physical, 
mental, and emotional effects of nearly two decades of 
continuous operations in high-stress environments experienced 
by our special operations forces (SOF). One of the top 
priorities of U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM) is to 
take care of its people, and, in responding to the demand 
signal from SOF components, SOCOM created the Preservation of 
the Force and Families (POTFF) program. The committee strongly 
supports all aspects of the POTFF initiative, especially the 
nesting of human, psychological, spiritual, and social 
performance support programs within an integrated care model, 
intended to maximize access and minimize stigma.
    The committee also recognizes the stress caused by high 
operational tempo and unexpected deployment and training 
schedules on the families of SOF personnel and strongly 
supports the POTFF programs that provide families with the 
tools to deal with these unique challenges. The committee 
encourages SOCOM across all echelons to continue to prioritize 
the POTFF program and to utilize all tools at its disposal to 
drive forward the POTFF's continuous innovation and evolution 
to meet the needs of the SOF force and family.

Readiness and Environmental Protection Integration program

    The committee recognizes the important role that the 
Department of Defense plays as a Federal partner in multi-state 
watershed restoration projects and the importance of the 
Readiness and Environmental Protection Integration (REPI) 
program in advancing a critical military goal: limiting 
encroachment and land use conflicts on and near military 
installations.
    The committee strongly encourages the Department to support 
REPI projects that leverage other Federal and non-Federal 
funding sources to deploy best management practices on lands 
conserved through the REPI program to enhance resilience and 
improve water quality in watersheds where the Department has 
restoration partnership obligations and where land subsidence 
compounds the threat of sea level fluctuation and associated 
flooding.

Red Hill

    The committee encourages the Navy and the Defense Logistics 
Agency (DLA) to prioritize engagement with local community 
stakeholders as well as the Environmental Protection Agency and 
the State of Hawaii as they continue efforts to carry out 
requirements established in the Administrative Order of Consent 
(AOC). The purpose of the AOC is to ensure that the drinking 
water supply is protected while allowing the Red Hill Bulk Fuel 
Storage Facility adjacent to Joint Base Pearl Harbor Hickam, 
Hawaii, to remain in use as a vital resource for our national 
defense. The committee also encourages the Navy to continue to 
hold quarterly informational updates on the Red Hill Bulk Fuel 
Storage Facility, as per the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92), that are open to the 
public.
    Additionally, the committee supports the Navy's continuing 
effort to improve the integrity of its bulk fuel storage 
systems, including its plan to acquire and implement a 
secondary containment solution for Red Hill where 27,000 
gallons of fuel leaked in January 2014. The committee strongly 
encourages the Secretary of the Navy to appoint a senior 
executive solely responsible for overseeing and executing the 
Navy's obligations related to Red Hill, including those 
detailed in its October 2019 Tank Upgrade Alternative report. 
This individual should be given decision authority related to 
research and development, procurement, resourcing requirements, 
and community engagement, while continuing to rely on expert 
advice concerning engineering matters that affect the integrity 
of the bulk fuel storage facility.

Report on Department of Defense small arms training system capabilities

    The committee notes that the past four National Defense 
Authorization Acts have called on the Department of Defense to 
transition to advanced small arms synthetic training systems to 
improve Active Duty, Reserve, and National Guard lethality and 
combat readiness training. The committee further notes that 
this directive aligns with the Department of Defense's National 
Defense Strategy objective to achieve a more lethal force and 
to accelerate ongoing reforms to ensure that the military 
services are making the most of the resources that the Congress 
provides and to focus on processes that free up time, money, 
and manpower to further readiness recovery. The committee is 
concerned that the military services have not yet achieved a 
consistent standard of verifying that all small arms synthetic 
training systems are leveraging advanced technology to achieve 
these objectives.
    Despite years of program acquisition efforts by each of the 
military services coupled with reports from the Department 
confirming the importance of transitioning to next generation 
small arms training systems, the committee remains concerned 
that there is a lack of substantial financial investments in 
the improvement of legacy small arms simulation systems and 
programs of record, currently capable of only rudimentary 
training and data collection capabilities and lacking the 
requirement to integrate and validate key biometrics, human 
performance, and cognitive data that enable tracking and 
verification of trainee performance and skills enhancement.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Comptroller General 
of the United States to conduct an audit of each military 
service's existing and planned small arms simulation training 
systems. The report shall include, but not be limited to, a 
detailed description and assessment of each system's 
effectiveness in delivering: advanced human performance and 
cognitive training techniques; integrated biometric systems; 
advanced software-based data processing and collection 
capabilities beyond basic fundamentals of marksmanship; the 
ability to establish cognitive and physical baselines at the 
individual level; and the ability to track and report detailed 
trainee results without requiring man-in-the-loop logging and 
aggregation. In addition, the audit shall report: the type of 
data collected; how the data are retained and tracked to 
validate system effectiveness, lethality requirements, and 
measurable live fire qualification improvements at the 
individual, small unit, and collective levels; and how the data 
are being used to inform determinations for training and 
readiness resourcing of small arms trainers.
    The committee directs that the Comptroller General provide 
a report on its findings no later than February 1, 2021.

Software to automate manufacturing

    Noting that the National Defense Strategy cites the 
importance of maintaining the Department of Defense's domestic 
technological advantage, which requires changes across the 
National Security Innovation Base, the committee understands 
that automotive manufacturers, aerospace companies, medical 
technology companies, industrial automation companies, and 
consumer packaged goods manufacturers leverage software that 
further automates manufacturing through the use of computer 
aided design (CAD), computer aided manufacturing (CAM), 
computerized numerically controlled (CNC) machining, and 
similar manufacturing technologies. These can optimize 
manufacturing, even at very low minimum order quantities.
    The committee believes that, as the Department of Defense 
aims to balance near term readiness recovery with investments 
in long term combat capability and faces challenges with 
mission-critical repair part obsolesce and shortages across the 
organic industrial base, the use of such technologies could 
help address these challenges.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, 
through the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and 
Sustainment and the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering, in consultation with each Service Acquisition 
Executive, to: (1) Assess how using automated technologies 
related to CAD, CAM, and CNC machining at arsenals, depots, and 
fleet readiness centers could address spare part obsolescence 
issues; (2) Evaluate which service components would implement 
such digital manufacturing approaches and which current 
domestic industrial base entities could support these 
technologies; and (3) Submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees on (1) and (2) no later than October 1, 
2021.

Utilities privatization

    The committee continues to support the successful utilities 
privatization (UP) effort that has been underway for the past 2 
decades. The UP program has succeeded for many years due to 
robust oversight from the military departments. This committee 
has repeatedly expressed its support for UP, both in 
legislative text and in accompanying report language. In the 
Senate report accompanying S. 1790 (S. Rept. 116-48) of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020, this 
committee reiterated its support for UP and specifically 
praised the Army for its successful privatization of the storm 
water system at Fort Knox. Existing legal authority, including 
the authority to privatize storm water systems under the 
current text of section 2688 of title 10, United States Code, 
allows the Department of Defense (DOD) to leverage private-
sector expertise to enhance installation resiliency and to 
improve water, wastewater, storm water, and electrical services 
for tenant commands and residents in a cost-effective manner.
    The committee strongly encourages the DOD to take 
additional action to use UP capabilities to the fullest extent 
possible, consistent with the intent of the original 
authorization. Thus, the committee encourages the Under 
Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to issue 
additional guidance to the military departments, building on 
the February 7, 2019, memorandum issued by the Under Secretary, 
authorizing the military departments to competitively seek 
proposals for storm water system privatization, consistent with 
section 2688 of title 10, United States Code. The committee 
encourages the Assistant Secretaries of the military 
departments with responsibility for energy, installations, and 
environment, in turn, to engage with installation leaders to 
consider options for using the UP model for storm water 
infrastructure on the installations that they oversee under 
those authorities.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, in coordination with 
the Assistant Secretaries of the military departments with 
responsibility for energy, installations, and environment, to 
provide a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives no later than March 1, 
2021, on any updated guidance released by the DOD on UP and a 
list of any cases where the military departments have declined 
to privatize the storm water infrastructure of a base or 
installation that has already privatized water and wastewater 
systems, to include a detailed explanation for each such 
decision.

Water and energy infrastructure

    The committee notes that the definition of military 
installation resilience, codified in section 101(e)(8) of title 
10, United States Code, includes water and energy 
infrastructure improvement projects, as well as the protection 
of water sources, under ``necessary resources on or outside of 
the military installation.'' For example, the committee 
understands that El Paso Water provides approximately 30 
percent of the water and 100 percent of the wastewater service 
for Fort Bliss. The committee strongly encourages the Army to 
maintain this relationship and these specific ratios as they 
relate to water and wastewater, which are crucial to the 
installation's mission.
    The committee also notes that an April 2019 report by the 
Department of Defense found that ``water shortages can 
significantly impact military readiness through reduced 
training opportunities and limited operational capacity.'' As 
such, the Department and the military services should be doing 
everything they can to ensure sustainable access to water for 
each installation, especially at locations that ``may benefit 
[from] using additional water conservation measures to avoid 
potential water shortages or increased costs associated with 
water scarcity'' like Fort Hunter Liggett, Fort Stewart, 
Mountain Home Air Force Base, Naval Air Station Lemoore, and 
Naval Air Weapons Station China Lake.
    Given that water shortages pose a risk to the long-term 
viability of military bases, the committee directs the Army to 
brief the committee no later than October 1, 2020, on lessons 
learned from its Net Zero Initiative Pilot Program. Lastly, the 
committee encourages the Department and the military services 
to increase its focus on and maximize efforts in leak detection 
and repair, which the Department found is the ``most promising 
water conservation strategy that DOD can apply.''

              TITLE IV--MILITARY PERSONNEL AUTHORIZATIONS

                       Subtitle A--Active Forces

End strengths for active forces (sec. 401)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
Active-Duty end strengths for fiscal year 2021, as shown below:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     FY 2021                  Change from
                                                  FY 2020  -----------------------------------------------------
                    Service                     Authorized                              FY 2021       FY 2020
                                                             Request   Recommendation   Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army..........................................     480,000    485,900         485,000       -900          +5,000
Navy..........................................     340,500    347,800         346,730     -1,070          +6,230
Marine Corps..................................     186,200    184,100         180,000     -4,100          -6,200
Air Force.....................................     332,800    333,700         333,475       -225            +675
                                               -----------------------------------------------------------------
    DOD Total.................................   1,339,500  1,351,500       1,345,205     -6,295          +5,705
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    As COVID-19 continues to wreak havoc on the nation, the 
committee has monitored closely the military's ability meet its 
recruiting and retention mission. Due to social distancing, 
school closures, and other virus mitigation measures, military 
recruiting has shifted to an online activity. It is too early 
to know whether this virtual approach will prove successful. 
Meanwhile, the military departments were forced to reduce basic 
training capacity to approximately 50 percent of normal 
operations. While each service believes it will be able to 
return to normal basic training throughput by early summer, 
this is not guaranteed. Based on these factors, the military's 
ability to achieve authorized end strength in fiscal year 2020 
is uncertain.
    Many of the assumptions utilized in determining the 
military's fiscal year 2021 end strength request are no longer 
accurate. Each military department may begin the fiscal year 
with fewer personnel than anticipated due to COVID-19. 
Recruiters may still be unable to access potential recruits in 
schools and in their homes, which could exacerbate recruiting 
challenges. Reduced basic training capacity could continue, 
limiting the military's ability to process new recruits.
    Therefore, the committee has taken a cautious approach to 
the end strength authorization for active forces. This 
provision would authorize end strength levels within existing 
variance authority for the Army, Navy, and Air Force. Based on 
detailed modelling conducted by the Marine Corps, the committee 
would further reduce Marine Corps end strength by 4,100 
compared to the budget request.
    The committee emphasizes that this provision does not 
signal a lack of support for the military's end strength goals. 
If conditions improve throughout the summer and fall of 2020, 
the committee would support restoring end strength to the 
requested level.
End strength level matters (sec. 402)
    The committee recommends a provision that would repeal 
section 691 of title 10, United States Code, which would 
consolidate Active-Duty end strength management legal 
requirements into one statute. The provision would also amend 
section 115 of title 10, United States Code, to authorize the 
Secretary concerned to vary Active-Duty end strength levels as 
previously authorized by section 691.
    The committee notes that the military departments are 
required to adhere to statutory end strength levels as 
specified in section 115 of title 10, United States Code. The 
amendments made by this provision would remove a mostly 
redundant requirement, which complicates the ability of the 
Secretary of Defense to manage the military.

                       Subtitle B--Reserve Forces

End strengths for Selected Reserve (sec. 411)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
Selected Reserve end strengths for fiscal year 2021, as shown 
below:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                FY 2021 Authorized            Change from
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
                    Service                       FY 2020                               FY 2021       FY 2020
                                                             Request   Recommendation   Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................    336,000    336,500         336,500          0            +500
Army Reserve...................................    189,500    189,800         189,800          0            +300
Navy Reserve...................................     59,000     58,800          58,800          0            -200
Marine Corps Reserve...........................     38,500     38,500          38,500          0               0
Air National Guard.............................    107,700    108,100         108,100          0             400
Air Force Reserve..............................     70,100     70,300          70,300          0             200
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
    DOD Total..................................    800,800    802,000         802,000          0          +1,200
Coast Guard Reserve............................      7,000      7,000           7,000          0               0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

End strengths for Reserves on active duty in support of the reserves 
        (sec. 412)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
full-time support end strengths for fiscal year 2021, as shown 
below:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                FY 2021 Authorized            Change from
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
                    Service                       FY 2020                               FY 2021       FY 2020
                                                             Request   Recommendation   Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................     30,595     30,595          30,595          0               0
Army Reserve...................................     16,511     16,511          16,511          0               0
Navy Reserve...................................     10,155     10,215          10,215          0              60
Marine Corps Reserve...........................      2,386      2,386           2,386          0               0
Air National Guard.............................     22,637     25,333          25,333          0           2,696
Air Force Reserve..............................      4,431      5,256           5,256          0             825
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
    DOD Total..................................     86,715     90,296          90,296          0           3,581
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

End strengths for military technicians (dual status) (sec. 413)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
military technicians (dual status) for the reserve components 
of the Army and Air Force for fiscal year 2021, as shown below:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                FY 2021 Authorized            Change from
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
                    Service                       FY 2020                               FY 2021       FY 2020
                                                             Request   Recommendation   Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................     22,294     22,294          22,294          0               0
Army Reserve...................................      6,492      6,492           6,492          0               0
Air National Guard.............................     13,569     10,994          10,994          0          -2,575
Air Force Reserve..............................      8,938      7,947           7,947          0            -991
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
DOD Total......................................     51,293     47,727          47,727          0          -3,566
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The provision would also prohibit under any circumstances 
the coercion of a military technician (dual status) by a State 
into accepting an offer of realignment or conversion to any 
other military status, including as a member of the Active, 
Guard, and Reserve program of a reserve component. The 
provision would further specify that if a technician declines 
to participate in such a realignment or conversion, no further 
action may be taken against the individual or the individual's 
position.
Maximum number of reserve personnel authorized to be on active duty for 
        operational support (sec. 414)
    The committee recommends a provision that would establish 
limits on the number of reserve personnel authorized to be on 
Active Duty for operational support under section 115(b) of 
title 10, United States Code, as of September 30, 2021, as 
shown below:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                FY 2021 Authorized            Change from
                                                           -----------------------------------------------------
                    Service                       FY 2020                               FY 2021       FY 2020
                                                             Request   Recommendation   Request     Authorized
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Army National Guard............................     17,000     17,000          17,000          0               0
Army Reserve...................................     13,000     13,000          13,000          0               0
Navy Reserve...................................      6,200      6,200           6,200          0               0
Marine Corps Reserve...........................      3,000      3,000           3,000          0               0
Air National Guard.............................     16,000     16,000          16,000          0               0
Air Force Reserve..............................     14,000     14,000          14,000          0               0
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
    DOD Total..................................     69,200     69,200          69,200          0               0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Separate authorization by Congress of minimum end strengths for non-
        temporary military technicians (dual status) and maximum end 
        strengths for temporary military technicians (dual status) 
        (sec. 415)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 115 of title 10, United States Code, to require the 
separate authorization of minimum end strengths for non-
temporary dual status military technicians and maximum end 
strengths for temporary dual status military technicians for 
each fiscal year by the Congress. The provision would also 
require the Department of Defense to include, as part of the 
President's annual budget request, a request for end strength 
authorizations for non-temporary and temporary dual status 
military technicians.
    The use of temporary dual status military technicians is 
largely not subject to congressional oversight. While the 
committee authorizes annually the minimum number of permanent 
dual status technician positions, temporary technician 
positions are not subject to any similar limitation. The 
committee has learned that each reserve component likely 
utilizes thousands of temporary technician positions every year 
but that the actual number is difficult to determine and each 
reserve component struggles to explain the purpose for the 
temporary technician workforce. A new end strength 
authorization for temporary military technicians would enable 
the Department of Defense and the Congress to understand the 
size and role of this population.

              Subtitle C--Authorization of Appropriations

Military personnel (sec. 421)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the appropriations for military personnel activities at the 
levels identified in section 4401 of division D of this Act.

                              Budget Items

Military personnel funding changes
    The amount authorized to be appropriated for military 
personnel programs includes the following changes from the 
budget request:

                    [Changes in millions of dollars]
 
 
 
Military personnel underexecution.....................         -1,611.69
End strength reduction................................            -755.0
    Total.............................................         -2,366.69
 

    The committee recommends a total reduction in the Military 
Personnel (MILPERS) appropriation of $2,366.69 million. This 
amount includes: (1) A reduction of $1,611.69 million to 
reflect the Government Accountability Office's most recent 
assessment of annual MILPERS under-execution; and (2) A 
decrease of $755.0 million to reflect active component end 
strength reductions from the President's Budget request.

                   TITLE V--MILITARY PERSONNEL POLICY

                  Subtitle A--Officer Personnel Policy

Repeal of codified specification of authorized strengths of certain 
        commissioned officers on active duty (sec. 501)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 523 of title 10, United States Code, to require that 
the number of officers serving on Active Duty in the grades of 
major, lieutenant colonel, and colonel in the Army, Air Force, 
and Marine Corps or lieutenant commander, commander, and 
captain in the Navy in a given fiscal year be specifically 
authorized by the Congress.
    The committee notes that the officer strength table was 
originally included as a fundamental feature of the Defense 
Officer Personnel Management Act (DOPMA) (Public Law 96-513). 
The strength table was designed to serve as an effective 
limitation on the number of mid-grade officers within each 
military service. The House report accompanying the legislation 
(H. Rept. 96-1462) explained that the table would be adjusted 
over time to align with emerging officer manpower requirements. 
However, in practice, the authorized strength table is rarely 
updated, and it is no longer linked to strategy or actual 
officer requirements.
    The committee authorizes annual end strength levels for the 
overall active and reserve components and numerous other 
subsets of total force manpower. This allows end strength to 
fluctuate to meet strategic and budgetary necessities. 
Similarly, this provision would require each military service 
to annually justify required mid-grade officer manpower needs 
to support an annual authorization from the Congress. This 
provision would provide greater flexibility to the military 
while also ensuring that the Congress continues to perform its 
vital oversight role in ensuring that the officer corps is 
effectively managed.
Temporary expansion of availability of enhanced constructive service 
        credit in a particular career field upon original appointment 
        as a commissioned officer (sec. 502)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
sections 533 and 12207 of title 10, United States Code, to 
provide temporary authority for the Secretaries of the military 
departments to award constructive service credit upon original 
appointment in particular officer career fields for advanced 
education.
    Section 502 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) 
enacted authority to permit additional credit for ``special 
training or experience in a particular officer career field as 
designated by the Secretary concerned, if such training or 
experience is directly related to the operational needs of the 
armed force concerned.'' No authority was provided to award 
additional credit for ``advanced education,'' however. This 
provision would afford the Secretaries of the military 
departments greater flexibility to award credit for not only 
special training or experience but also advanced education in 
designated career fields such as those related to cyberspace or 
specialized skillsets.
    The provision would also require each of the Secretaries of 
the military departments to submit a report detailing the use 
and benefits of enhanced constructive credit authority in 
meeting the operational needs of the Armed Forces.
Requirement for promotion selection board recommendation of higher 
        placement on promotion list of officers of particular merit 
        (sec. 503)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 616 of title 10, United States Code, to clarify that 
the secretary of the military department concerned shall 
prescribe guidelines and procedures for placing officers higher 
on a promotion selection list based on an officer's merit.
Special selection review boards for review of promotion of officers 
        subject to adverse information identified after recommendation 
        for promotion and related matters (sec. 504)
    The committee recommends a provision that would delay until 
January 1, 2021, the applicability of the amendments made by 
section 502 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92), germane to the manner in 
which adverse information about a regular officer would be 
furnished to a promotion selection board convened under section 
611(a) of title 10, United States Code, to consider such an 
officer for promotion to a grade below brigadier general in the 
Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps, rear admiral (lower half) in 
the Navy, or the equivalent grade in the Space Force.
    The provision would also modify section 14107 of title 10, 
United States Code, to extend prescriptions for furnishing 
adverse information to promotion selection boards convened 
pursuant to section 14101(a) of title 10, United States Code, 
to consider a reserve officer for promotion to a grade above 
lieutenant colonel in the Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps, 
commander in the Navy, or the equivalent grade in the Space 
Force.
    Finally, the provision would codify in two new sections of 
law the authority of the Secretary of the military department 
concerned to convene a special selection review board--pursuant 
to section 628a of title 10, United States Code, for regular 
officers and pursuant to section 14502a of title 10, United 
States Code, for reserve officers--upon determining that an 
officer recommended for promotion to a grade at or below major 
general in the Army, Air Force, and Marine Corps, rear admiral 
in the Navy, or the equivalent grade in the Space Force is the 
subject of adverse information that was not furnished to a 
promotion selection board that recommended the officer for 
promotion, as required by sections 615 or 14107 of title 10, 
United States Code.
    Any special selection review board convened--whether for a 
regular or reserve officer--would, to the greatest extent 
practicable, apply the same standards used by the promotion 
selection board that originally recommended the officer for 
promotion and would consider the record of the officer as 
presented to the original promotion board, together with the 
adverse information regarding the officer. The special 
selection review board would be conducted so as not to indicate 
or disclose the officer or officers for whom the board was 
convened and the members of the board would apply a competitive 
process to determine whether or not to sustain the 
recommendation of the officer or officers at issue for 
promotion. An officer whose promotion is recommended for 
sustainment by a special selection review board and approved by 
the President would be appointed to the next higher grade as 
soon as practicable and, upon appointment, would have the same 
date of rank as the officer would have had pursuant to the 
recommendation of the original promotion board. If a special 
selection review board did not sustain a recommendation for 
promotion of an officer, that officer would be considered to 
have failed selection for promotion.
    The amendments to section 14107 and the codification of 
sections 628a and 14502a of title 10, United States Code, would 
take effect on the date of the enactment of this Act.
Number of opportunities for consideration for promotion under 
        alternative promotion authority (sec. 505)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 649c of title 10, United States Code, to make a 
technical correction related to the definition of the term 
``promotion zone'' in the alternative promotion authority 
provided by section 507 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232).
    Section 645 of title 10, United States Code, defines the 
term ``promotion zone'' in part as officers who have not 
``failed of selection for promotion to the next higher grade.'' 
Though appropriate for traditional promotion policy, this 
portion of the definition inhibits the full implementation of 
the alternative promotion authority.
Mandatory retirement for age (sec. 506)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1251 of title 10, United States Code, to include the 
Space Force and expand the authority of the Secretaries of the 
military departments to permit an officer to defer retirement 
until the officer reaches age 68. The provision would also 
clarify benefit eligibility for officers who reach mandatory 
retirement age.
Clarifying and improving restatement of rules on the retired grade of 
        commissioned officers (sec. 507)
    The committee recommends a provision that would clarify the 
rules governing the retired grades of commissioned officers. 
The codification of rules pertaining to regular officers would 
be restated in section 1370 of title 10, United States Code, 
and the rules applicable to non-regular officers--including 
guidance to address certain unique circumstances particular to 
a non-regular career path--set forth in new section 1370a of 
title 10, United States Code.
    Both sections 1370 and 1370a would address the principles 
underpinning determinations of satisfactory service, the effect 
of misconduct in a lower grade on such determinations, service-
in-grade requirements and waivers and reductions thereto, and 
requirements for notice to the Congress.
    As a general rule, the restatement would reserve to the 
Secretary of the military department concerned the authority to 
make grade determinations with regard to officers--regular and 
non-regular--to be retired at or below major general, rear 
admiral, or the equivalent grade, but without the power of 
delegation. The restatement would reserve to the Secretary of 
Defense most actions related to officers proposed for 
retirement in a grade above major general, rear admiral, or the 
equivalent.
    The restatement would promulgate enhanced guidelines for 
the assignment of a conditional retired grade to officers under 
investigation for misconduct or pending adverse personnel 
action and the determination of an officer's final retired 
grade and adjustment of retired pay on the resolution of such 
matters.
    Finally, the restatement would clarify the conditions 
pursuant to which an administratively final retirement grade 
could be reopened, and the manner by which a proposed change to 
a reopened grade would be effectuated and the officer's retired 
pay recalculated. Although the committee has undertaken to 
clarify section 509 of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92), it remains strongly 
committed to the principle that a determination to increase an 
officer's retired grade to O-9 or O-10 after reopening an 
administratively final determination may be effectuated only by 
the President, by and with the advice and consent of the 
Senate. Although the committee ultimately declined to take this 
step, it considered returning to the long-held practice--of 
requiring that all O-9 and O-10 retirements, of both active and 
reserve officers, be made by the President, by and with the 
advice and consent of the Senate. The current practice, enacted 
by section 502 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
1996 (Public Law 104-106)--pursuant to which the Secretary of 
Defense certifies to Congress the highest grade in which such 
officers have served satisfactorily and should be retired, is a 
creature of statute, derived from Congress' authority under 
Article I, Section 8, of the U.S. Constitution to raise, 
support, and regulate the armed forces. Prior to 1996, an 
officer could be retired in the grade of O-9 or O-10 only by 
the President, by and with the advice and consent of the 
Senate. The committee expects that any reopening of an 
administratively final determination of retired grade that 
results in the proposal to increase an officer's retired grade 
to O-9 or O-10, be submitted by the President to the Senate 
under provisions of section 509 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020, as amended by the 
instant provision.

Repeal of authority for original appointment of regular Navy officers 
        designated for engineering duty, aeronautical engineering duty, 
        and special duty (sec. 508)

    The committee recommends a provision that would repeal 
section 8137 of title 10, United States Code, which authorizes 
the Secretary of the Navy to appoint regular officers who are 
designated for engineering, aeronautical engineering, and 
special duty.
    Repealing this section of law will provide additional 
flexibility to the Navy to assign commanders and manage 
officers according to emerging needs. The committee notes that 
under current law the Navy needs to request a legislative 
change for every new category of unrestricted line officers, 
which delays the Navy's ability to adjust its officer corps to 
reflect current priorities. The other military departments 
already possess the flexibility that would be provided by this 
provision.

                Subtitle B--Reserve Component Management


Exclusion of certain reserve general and flag officers on active duty 
        from limitations on authorized strengths (sec. 511)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 526a of title 10, United States Code, to authorize the 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff to allocate 15 general 
and flag officer positions in the combatant commands and 3 
general and flag officer positions on the Joint Staff to be 
exclusively filled by reserve component officers. The provision 
would also create an exclusion from general and flag officer 
strength limitations for a Reserve general or flag officer who 
is on Active Duty for training or who is on Active Duty under a 
call or order specifying a period of less than 180 days.

                Subtitle C--General Service Authorities


Increased access to potential recruits (sec. 516)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
sections 503 and 983 of title 10, United States Code, to add e-
mail addresses and mobile telephone numbers to the list of 
information required to be provided to recruiters by 
institutions of higher education and secondary schools. The 
provision would also require secondary schools to provide 
student information within 60 days of a request from a military 
recruiter. Additionally, this provision would require colleges 
and universities to provide student directory information 
within 60 days of the start of a school year or 60 days of the 
date of a recruiter's request as well as to provide lists of 
those students who do not return to the institution from the 
previous semester.
    Current law only allows for the collection of outdated 
communication information, such as address and telephone 
listings. Further, no response time is mandated, so many 
schools do not provide this information until it is too late 
for military recruiters to make the best use of it by providing 
students with pertinent information enabling them to explore 
their options.
    The committee emphasizes that parents continue to have the 
right to opt out of releasing their child's information under 
the same terms and conditions as are available under current 
law.
    Studies show that half of today's youth admit that they 
know little of the military. This provision would allow 
recruiters to collect better information for contacting today's 
students, improving the military's ability to inform students 
and parents about the opportunities provided by military 
service.

Temporary authority to order retired members to active duty in high-
        demand, low-density assignments during war or national 
        emergency (sec. 517)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 688a of title 10, United States Code, to make certain 
constraints on the Secretary of a military department's 
authority to order to Active Duty a retired member who agrees 
to serve on Active Duty inapplicable during a time of declared 
war or national emergency.

Certificate of release or discharge from Active Duty (DD Form 214) 
        matters (sec. 518)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Department of Defense Form DD 214 to be redesignated as the 
Certificate of Military Service. The provision would also amend 
section 569 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) to require the Certificate 
of Military Service to be a standard total force record of 
military service for all members of the Armed Forces that 
summarizes the record of service for each member and to require 
that the Certificate of Military Service be provided to members 
of the reserve components of the Armed Forces at appropriate 
times throughout a servicemember's career. Lastly, the 
provision would repeal section 570 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020.

Evaluation of barriers to minority participation in certain units of 
        the Armed Forces (sec. 519)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require not 
later than 30 days after the date of the enactment of this Act 
the Secretary of Defense, acting through the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Personnel and Readiness, to seek to enter into an 
agreement with a federally funded research and development 
center to conduct a study on reducing barriers to minority 
participation in elite units in the Armed Services.

            Subtitle D--Military Justice and Related Matters


 Part I--Investigation, Prosecution, and Defense of Sexual Assault and 
                            Related Matters


Modification of time required for expedited decisions in connection 
        with applications for change of station or unit transfer of 
        members who are victims of sexual assault or related offenses 
        (sec. 521)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 673 of title 10, United States Code, to extend the 
approval or disapproval time of an expedited transfer request 
from 72 hours to 5 calendar days.
    This proposed change would allow commanders to have access 
to sexual assault victims' complete career information before 
counseling victims on their options. By providing more time for 
commanders to gather information, a victim of sexual assault 
requesting an expedited transfer will be able to make a fully 
informed decision.

Defense Advisory Committee for the Prevention of Sexual Misconduct 
        (sec. 522)

    The committee recommends a provision that would include the 
United States Coast Guard (USCG) Academy in the Defense 
Committee for the Prevention of Sexual Assault (DAC-PSA) 
established by section 550B of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92).
    Additionally, this provision would require the DAC-PSA to 
advise the Secretary of the Department under which the USCG is 
operating on policies, programs, and practices of the USCG 
Academy.

Report on ability of Sexual Assault Response Coordinators and Sexual 
        Assault Prevention and Response Victim Advocates to perform 
        duties (sec. 523)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to conduct a survey of sexual assault 
response coordinators and sexual assault prevention and 
response victim advocates on their experiences in assisting 
victims of sexual assault by June 30, 2021.
    The provision would require the Secretary to submit a 
report on the results of the survey, including any actions to 
be taken based on the results, to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives.

Briefing on Special Victims' Counsel program (sec. 524)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Judge Advocates General of the Army, the Navy, the Air Force, 
and the Coast Guard and the Staff Judge Advocate to the 
Commandant of the Marine Corps to brief the congressional 
defense committees on the status of the Special Victims' 
Counsel program of the Armed Force concerned.

Accountability of leadership of the Department of Defense for 
        discharging the sexual harassment policies and programs of the 
        Department (sec. 525)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to develop and implement a strategy on 
holding leadership accountable for discharging the sexual 
harassment policies and programs of the Department of Defense.

Safe-to-report policy applicable across the Armed Forces (sec. 526)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Department of Defense to prescribe in regulations a safe-to-
report policy regarding the handling of minor collateral 
misconduct involving a member of the Armed Forces who is the 
alleged victim of sexual assault that applies to all members of 
the Armed Forces and cadets and midshipmen at the military 
service academies.

Additional bases for provision of advice by the Defense Advisory 
        Committee for the Prevention of Sexual Misconduct (sec. 527)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 550B of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) to include additional 
items for the Defense Advisory Committee for the Prevention of 
Sexual Misconduct to review.

Additional matters for reports of the Defense Advisory Committee for 
        the Prevention of Sexual Misconduct (sec. 528)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 550B of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) to include additional 
matters for reports provided by the Defense Advisory Committee 
for the Prevention of Sexual Misconduct.

Policy on separation of victim and accused at military service 
        academies and degree-granting military educational institutions 
        (sec. 529)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to promulgate regulations for the military 
academies and degree-granting military educational institutions 
to minimize the association between an alleged victim of sexual 
assault and the accused until both complete their courses of 
study.

Briefing on placement of members of the Armed Forces in academic status 
        who are victims of sexual assault onto Non-Rated Periods (sec. 
        530)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to brief the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives on the 
feasibility and advisability of granting requests from members 
of the Armed Forces who are in academic status and who are 
victims of sexual assault to be placed on a non-rated period 
for their performance report.

                Part II--Other Military Justice Matters


Right to notice of victims of offenses under the Uniform Code of 
        Military Justice regarding certain post-trial motions, filings, 
        and hearings (sec. 531)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
Article 6b(a)(2) of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 
U.S.C. 802b(a)(2)), to provide that victims of offenses under 
the Uniform Code of Military Justice have the right to 
reasonable, accurate, and timely notice of a post-trial motion, 
filing, or hearing that may address the finding or sentence of 
a court-martial with respect to the accused, unseal privileged 
or private information of the victim, or result in the release 
of the accused.

Consideration of the evidence by Courts of Criminal Appeals (sec. 532)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
Article 66 of the Uniform Code of Military Justice (10 U.S.C. 
866) to authorize the Court of Criminal Appeals, when 
considering appeals of court-martial convictions, to consider 
the weight of the evidence only upon a specific showing by the 
accused of deficiencies of proof. Under the provision, the 
Court could set aside and dismiss a finding if clearly 
convinced that the finding was against the weight of the 
evidence.
    Further, the provision would require a minimum of twelve 
years of experience in military justice assignments to qualify 
as a military judge on the Court of Criminal Appeals, with a 
waiver. The provision would also require the entire Court of 
Criminal Appeals review a determination by a panel of the Court 
that a finding of guilty was clearly against the weight of the 
evidence.

Preservation of records of the military justice system (sec. 533)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Department of Defense to retain records of the military justice 
system for a minimum of 15 years.

Comptroller General of the United States report on implementation by 
        the Armed Forces of recent GAO recommendations and statutory 
        requirements on assessment of racial, ethnic, and gender 
        disparities in the military justice system (sec. 534)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Comptroller General of the United States to study and submit to 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and House of 
Representatives a report on the implementation of the 
recommendations in the May 2019 report of the Government 
Accountability Office titled ``Military Justice: DOD and the 
Coast Guard Need to Improve Their Capabilities to Assess Racial 
and Gender Disparities''' (GAO-19-344) and the requirements in 
section 540I(b) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92).

Briefing on mental health support for vicarious trauma for certain 
        personnel in the military justice system (sec. 535)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Judge Advocates General of the Army, the Navy, and the Air 
Force and the Staff Judge Advocate to the Commandant of the 
Marine Corps to brief the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives on the mental health 
support for vicarious trauma provided to certain personnel in 
the military justice system no later than 180 days after the 
date of the enactment of this Act.

Guardian ad litem program for minor dependents of members of the Armed 
        Forces (sec. 536)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 540L of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) by adding an element to 
the report on the establishment of a guardian ad litem program 
for certain military dependents who are victims or witnesses of 
offenses under the Uniform Code of Military Justice involving 
abuse or exploitation.

   Subtitle E--Member Education, Training, Transition, and Resilience


Training on religious accommodation for members of the Armed Forces 
        (sec. 541)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to develop and implement training 
regarding religious liberty and accommodation for members of 
the Armed Forces in consultation with the Chief of Chaplains of 
each service. Recipients of this training shall include 
commanders, chaplains, judge advocates, and others as 
recognized by the Secretary.

Additional elements with 2021 certifications on the Ready, Relevant 
        Learning initiative of the Navy (sec. 542)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the Navy to submit a life cycle sustainment plan 
and report on the use of readiness assessment teams with the 
2021 Ready Relevant Learning certifications required by section 
545 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2018 (Public Law 115-91).

Report on standardization and potential merger of law enforcement 
        training for military and civilian personnel across the 
        Department of Defense (sec. 543)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report on the standardization 
and potential merger of law enforcement training for military 
and civilian personnel across the Department of Defense to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives no later than June 8, 2021.

Quarterly Report on Implementation of the Comprehensive Review of 
        Special Operations Forces Culture and Ethics (sec. 544)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
quarterly reports on the implementation of the Comprehensive 
Review of Special Operations Forces Culture and Ethics.
    The committee strongly supports efforts by the United 
States Special Operations Command (SOCOM) to address the root 
causes of ethical lapses and misconduct by Special Operations 
Forces (SOF) identified by the Comprehensive Review of Special 
Operations Forces Culture and Ethics completed in January 2020. 
The committee notes that the Comprehensive Review found that 
``selective implementation'' of recommendations from four 
previous reviews related to SOF culture and ethics since 2011, 
including two mandated by the Congress, have resulted in 
continued challenges related to the assessment and selection of 
SOF, leader development, force structure, and employment.
    The committee also notes that, while the Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity 
Conflict (ASD SOLIC) is the ``service secretary-like'' civilian 
responsible for oversight of and advocacy for SOF, the ASD 
SOLIC played a relatively minor role in the comprehensive 
review. The committee believes that the ASD SOLIC must play a 
direct and active role in overseeing implementation of the 
actions recommended by the comprehensive review if such reforms 
are to be successful.
    Therefore, the committee recommends a provision that would 
require the ASD SOLIC, in coordination with the Commander, 
SOCOM, to provide the congressional defense committees with 
quarterly updates on progress in implementing the 16 actions 
recommended by the Comprehensive Review.

Information on nominations and applications for military service 
        academies (sec. 545)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require, no 
later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act, 
the Secretary of the Defense, in consultation with the 
Superintendents of the military service academies, to submit a 
report to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives on the feasibility and 
advisability of creating a uniform online portal for all 
congressional nominations to the military service academies.
    The provision would also require the Secretary of Defense, 
in consultation with the Superintendents of the military 
service academies, to establish standard classifications that 
cadets, midshipmen, and applicants to the academies may use to 
self-identify gender, race, and ethnicity.

Pilot programs in connection with Senior Reserve Officers' Training 
        Corps units at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and 
        minority institutions (sec. 546)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to carry out pilot programs to reduce 
barriers to participation in the Senior Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps (SROTC) through partnerships with nearby 
military installations and to assess the feasibility and 
advisability of providing financial assistance to members of 
SROTC who participate in flight training. Historically black 
colleges and universities and minority institutions would be 
given preference for participation in the pilot programs that 
would be authorized by this provision.

Expansion of Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps program (sec. 547)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2031(a)(2) of title 10, United States Code, to insert 
language expanding the purpose of the Junior Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps (JROTC) to include an introduction to service 
opportunities in military, national, and public service. The 
provision would also require the Secretary of Defense to 
develop and implement a plan to establish and support not fewer 
than 6,000 JROTC units by September 30, 2031.

Department of Defense STARBASE program (sec. 548)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2193b(h) of title 10, United States Code, to include 
the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands and American 
Samoa in the Department of Defense STARBASE program.

                   Subtitle F--Decorations and Awards


Award or presentation of decorations favorably recommended following 
        determination on merits of proposals for decorations not 
        previously submitted in a timely fashion (sec. 551)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1130 of title 10, United States Code, to authorize a 
Secretary of a military department to present an award or 
decoration, following the favorable review of a request of a 
Member of Congress, after a 60-day period for congressional 
review. This provision would eliminate the requirement for 
legislation to waive the statute of limitation for award of 
that medal or decoration.

Honorary promotion matters (sec. 552)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
chapter 80 of title 10, United States Code, by authorizing the 
Secretary of Defense to make honorary promotions, whether or 
not posthumous, of a former member or retired member of the 
Armed Forces to any grade not exceeding the grade of major 
general, rear admiral (upper half), or an equivalent grade in 
the Space Force. At least 60 days prior to making an honorary 
promotion, the Secretary would provide notification to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives and the requesting Member of Congress, if 
applicable, including a detailed discussion of the rationale 
supporting the determination.
    In addition, the provision would amend section 1563 of 
title 10, United States Code, to require that all promotions 
made using this authority would be honorary, whether or not 
posthumous, with no effect on pay, retired pay, or other 
benefits.

Subtitle G--Defense Dependents' Education and Military Family Readiness 
                                Matters


             Part I--Defense Dependents' Education Matters


Continuation of authority to assist local educational agencies that 
        benefit dependents of members of the Armed Forces and 
        Department of Defense civilian employees (sec. 561)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
$50.0 million in Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide, for 
continuation of the Department of Defense (DOD) assistance 
program to local educational agencies impacted by enrollment of 
dependent children of military members and DOD civilian 
employees. The committee increased the funding amount for 
fiscal year 2021 to provide additional assistance to local 
educational agencies that may experience unforeseen expenses 
related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Impact aid for children with severe disabilities (sec. 562)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
$10.0 million in Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide, for 
impact aid payments for children with disabilities (as enacted 
by Public Law 106-398; 114 Stat. 1654A-77; 20 U.S.C. 7703a), 
using the formula set forth in section 363 of the Floyd D. 
Spence National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001 
(Public Law 106-398), for continuation of Department of Defense 
assistance to local educational agencies that benefit eligible 
dependents with severe disabilities. Subsection (b) of the 
provision would authorize the Secretary of Defense to use an 
additional $10.0 million for payments to local educational 
agencies determined by the Secretary to have higher 
concentrations of military children with severe disabilities. 
Subsection (c) of the provision would establish a one-time 
requirement for the Secretary to brief the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives by 
March 1, 2021, on the Department's evaluation of each local 
educational agency with higher concentrations of military 
children with severe disabilities and its subsequent 
determination of the amounts of impact aid each such agency 
should receive. The committee increased the funding amount for 
fiscal year 2021 to provide additional assistance to local 
educational agencies that may experience unforeseen expenses 
related to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Staffing of Department of Defense Education Activity schools to 
        maintain maximum student-to-teacher ratios (sec. 563)

    The committee recommends a provision that would establish 
maximum student-to-teacher ratios for Department of Defense 
Education Activity (DODEA) schools through the 2023-2024 school 
year.
    The committee remains concerned about the Department of 
Defense's plans to reduce staffing in grades K-3 as part of the 
Defense-Wide Review, which seeks to move funding from lower 
priority to higher priority programs. The committee believes 
that the education of children in the DODEA system should 
remain among the Department's highest priorities. Nevertheless, 
since the Department seeks to harvest savings from DODEA's 
budget, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
review DODEA's above-school staffing and funding as of the date 
of this committee report and to brief the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives by 
December 1, 2020, on the results of this review. This review 
shall include: (1) An analysis of the number of employees, 
full-time and part-time, employed by the DODEA who are not 
assigned to a school; (2) The number of contractors so employed 
and the amount of contract payments made to such individuals; 
and (3) The amount of headquarters funding associated with the 
DODEA, along with a comparison to headquarters or overhead 
spending in domestic school districts in the continental United 
States.

Matters in connection with free appropriate public education for 
        dependents of members of the Armed Forces with special needs 
        (sec. 564)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
each of the Secretaries of the military departments to collect 
and maintain information on special education disputes filed by 
servicemembers and the outcomes of such disputes, based on 
information from Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) 
personnel, installation or other military leadership, and any 
other sources that the Secretary concerned considers 
appropriate.
    Additionally, the provision would require the Comptroller 
General of the United States to conduct a study and brief the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives, no later than March 31, 2021, on: (1) The 
consequences for a State or local educational agency of a 
finding of failure to provide free, appropriate public 
education to a military dependent; (2) The manner in which 
local educational agencies with military families utilize 
impact aid funds; (3) The efficacy of attorney and other legal 
support for military families in special education disputes; 
(4) The standardization of policies and guidance for school 
liaison officers between the Office of Special Needs of the 
Department of Defense (DOD) and the military departments and 
the efficacy of such policies and guidance; and (5) The 
improvements of family support programs of the Office of 
Special Needs, and of each military department, in light of the 
recommendations of the Comptroller General in the report titled 
``DOD Should Improve Its Oversight of the Exceptional Family 
Member Program'' (GAO-18-348).

Pilot program on expanded eligibility for Department of Defense 
        Education Activity Virtual High School program (sec. 565)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to carry out a 4-year pilot program that 
would permit certain dependents of Active-Duty servicemembers 
to enroll in the Department of Defense Education Activity 
Virtual High School (DVHS) program. The provision would 
prescribe the selection of DVHS participants and limitations on 
the program. Additionally, the provision would require the 
Secretary to submit an interim report on the pilot program no 
more than 2 years after the date of the enactment of this Act 
to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives and a final report to the same committees no 
more than 180 days after completion of the program.

Pilot program on expansion of eligibility for enrollment at domestic 
        dependent elementary and secondary schools (sec. 566)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, beginning not later than 180 days after 
the date of the enactment of this Act, to carry out a pilot 
program to authorize a dependent of a full-time Active-Duty 
servicemember, without regard to whether the member resides on 
a military installation, to enroll in a domestic Department of 
Defense Education Activity school on a space-available basis.

Comptroller General of the United States report on the structural 
        condition of Department of Defense Education Activity schools 
        (sec. 567)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Comptroller General of the United States to submit a report to 
the congressional defense committees, within 1 year of the date 
of the enactment of this Act, on the structural condition of 
all Department of Defense Education Activity schools, including 
the infrastructure or other means to support the virtual 
education of students attending such schools with no physical 
structure.

               Part II--Military Family Readiness Matters


Responsibility for allocation of certain funds for military child 
        development programs (sec. 571)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1791 of title 10, United States Code, to require the 
Secretary of Defense to be responsible for the allocation of 
Office of the Secretary of Defense-level funds for military 
child development programs for children from birth through 12 
years of age. The provision would disallow delegation of the 
Secretary's responsibility to the military departments.
    The committee remains concerned about the Department of 
Defense's plans to transfer funds to the military services to 
provide childcare fee assistance as part of the Defense-Wide 
Review. The committee believes that military family childcare 
should remain among the Department's highest priorities and 
transferring resources to the military services would degrade 
standardization of the program and hinder oversight 
capabilities of the Office of the Secretary of Defense.
    Currently, the military services administer two separate 
contracts with different fee assistance benefits for military 
families, one more generous to military families than the 
other. The committee understands that there are ongoing 
discussions within the Department about creating a single 
contract for the childcare fee assistance program across the 
Department. Since the Army's childcare fee assistance contract 
provides the greatest benefit to military families, the 
committee encourages the Department to model any Department-
wide contract after that currently used by the Army.

Improvements to Exceptional Family Member Program (sec. 572)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1781c of title 10, United States Code, to standardize 
and improve the Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP). The 
provision would: (1) Require the Secretary of Defense to 
implement certain performance metrics; (2) Create additional 
protections and options for servicemembers and their families 
enrolled in EFMP; and (3) Require the Office of Special Needs 
to create policies and procedures to confirm that each military 
service has the right staffing to ensure effective and 
efficient operation of the program so that military families 
receive the required support.

Procedures of the Office of Special Needs for the development of 
        individualized services plans for military families with 
        special needs (sec. 573)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1781c(d)(4) of title 10, United States Code, to require 
that the policy of the Department of Defense Office of Special 
Needs must include requirements for the development and 
continuous updating by an appropriate office of an 
individualized services plan--whether medical, educational, or 
both--for each military family with special needs and 
procedures for the development of an individualized services 
plan for military family members with special needs who have 
requested family support services and have completed family 
needs assessments.

Restatement and clarification of authority to reimburse members for 
        spouse relicensing costs pursuant to a permanent change of 
        station (sec. 574)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 453 of title 37, United States Code, to authorize the 
Secretaries of the military departments to reimburse a 
servicemember of the Armed Forces for the qualified relicensing 
or credentialing costs of his or her spouse. The provision 
would repeal the expiring authority in section 476(p) of title 
37, United States Code.
    The committee notes that the provision would clarify the 
existing statutory language to ensure that servicemembers and 
their spouses can request reimbursement for qualified 
relicensing or credentialing costs when undergoing a permanent 
change of station from an overseas duty location to a duty 
location in the continental United States. Additionally, the 
provision would clarify the requirement for a military spouse 
to have been previously credentialed or certified, regardless 
of location or professional engagement.

Improvements to Department of Defense tracking of and response to 
        incidents of child abuse involving military dependents on 
        military installations (sec. 575)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, consistent with the recommendations of 
the Comptroller General of the United States in the Government 
Accountability Office report titled ``Child Welfare: Increased 
Guidance and Collaboration Needed to Improve DOD's Tracking and 
Response to Child Abuse'' (GAO-20-110), to improve the efforts 
of the Department of Defense to track and respond to incidents 
of child abuse involving dependents of members of the Armed 
Forces that occur on military installations.

Military childcare and child development center matters (sec. 576)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1793 of title 10, United States Code, to require: (1) 
The liberal issuance of hardship waivers for childcare fees; 
(2) A family discount to be offered in child development 
centers (CDCs), charging any child after the first child an 
amount equal to 85 percent of the fee otherwise chargeable; (3) 
Secretaries of the military departments to carry out a fee 
assistance program modeled after the Army Fee Assistance 
program; (4) Additional actions to allow for the hiring of 
qualified employees for CDCs; and (5) Reports on installations 
with imbalances between demand and availability for childcare.

Expansion of financial assistance under My Career Advancement Account 
        program (sec. 577)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 453 of title 37, United States Code, to allow the 
reimbursement to a servicemember of the cost that his or her 
spouse incurs for the maintenance of professional licenses and 
credentials and continuing education courses associated with a 
permanent change of station. Additionally, the provision would 
expand the My Career Advancement Account Program to include 
expenses relating to continuing education courses and national 
testing.

                       Subtitle H--Other Matters


Removal of personally identifying and other information of certain 
        persons from investigative reports, the Department of Defense 
        Central Index of Investigations, and other records and 
        databases (sec. 586)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
that, not later than October 1, 2021, the Secretary of Defense 
establish and implement a policy and process through which a 
person's name, personally identifying information, and other 
pertinent information could be expunged or otherwise removed 
from: (1) The subject or title block of a Department of Defense 
(DOD) law enforcement or criminal investigative report; (2) The 
Department of Defense Central Index of Investigations (DCII); 
and (3) Any other record maintained by the DOD in connection 
with such a report or DCII entry, under circumstances in which 
probable cause did not or does not exist to determine that the 
offense for which the person was titled occurred or that the 
titled person actually committed the offense.
    Further, the provision would require the Department to 
establish a mechanism to assist a person whose information is 
expunged or removed from DOD records in correcting or expunging 
the person's information from records and databases maintained 
by organizations or entities external to the DOD, based on 
information previously provided by the Department.
    Finally, the provision would require the Secretary of 
Defense to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than 
October 1, 2021, detailing actions taken to implement these 
requirements.

National emergency exception for timing requirements with respect to 
        certain surveys of members of the Armed Forces (sec. 587)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
sections 481, 481a, 7461, 8480, and 9461 of title 10, United 
States Code, to authorize the Secretary of Defense to postpone 
the conduct of the following surveys when conducting these 
surveys is not practicable due to a war or national emergency 
declared by the President or the Congress: (1) Armed Forces 
Workplace and Gender Relations Surveys; (2) Armed Forces 
Workplace and Equal Opportunity Surveys; (3) Assessments of 
sexual harassment and sexual violence at the military service 
academies; and (4) The workplace and gender relations survey of 
Department of Defense civilian employees.
    The committee expects that the Secretary would exercise 
this authority to postpone these surveys and assessments only 
when conditions are such that the survey cannot be conducted 
or, if conducted, the results of the survey would not be 
meaningful. The committee also expects that any survey 
postponed under this authority would be conducted as soon as 
practicable and appropriate.

Sunset and transfer of functions of the Physical Disability Board of 
        Review (sec. 588)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1554a of title 10, United States Code, to authorize the 
Secretary of Defense to sunset the Physical Disability Board of 
Review (PDBR) on or after October 1, 2020. The provision would 
require the Secretary to transfer any remaining requests 
pending the Board's review at that time and to assign them to a 
board for the correction of military records operated by the 
Secretary of the military department concerned.

Extension of reporting deadline for the annual report on the assessment 
        of the effectiveness of activities of the federal voting 
        assistance program (sec. 589)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 105A(b) of the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens Absentee 
Voting Act (52 U.S.C. 20308(b)) to change the deadline to 
submit the annual report on the effectiveness of activities of 
the Federal Voting Assistance Program from March 31 of every 
year to September 30 of odd-numbered years. The provision also 
would clarify that the information submitted in the report 
should cover the previous calendar year to align with regularly 
scheduled elections for Federal office.

Pilot programs on remote provision by National Guard to State 
        governments and National Guards in other States of 
        cybersecurity technical assistance in training, preparation, 
        and response to cyber incidents (sec. 590)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of the Army and the Secretary of the Air Force to 
each conduct a pilot program to develop and use a capability 
within the National Guard through which a National Guard of a 
State would remotely provide State governments and National 
Guard units of other States with cybersecurity technical 
assistance. The provision would establish the development and 
exercise activities to be assessed and executed as part of the 
program, should it be carried out.
    The committee is supportive of programs to facilitate 
National Guard cyber assistance to State and local entities. In 
future contingencies, such assistance will need to be provided 
rapidly if it is to be efficacious, meaning that physical 
transportation and access to compromised systems are likely 
unaffordable luxuries for the National Guard and other cyber 
forces. The committee sees merit in such a program in preparing 
the National Guard for remote provision of cybersecurity 
assistance, a likely demand of governors and Federal 
authorities in the wake of cyberattacks of significant 
consequence.
    The committee encourages the Secretary of the Army and the 
Secretary of the Air Force, if they opt to carry out such a 
program, to coordinate with the Commander, U.S. Cyber Command. 
The committee understands that Cyber Command has made concerted 
efforts to reduce its physical deployment of cyber protection 
teams and has developed capabilities and tactics, techniques, 
and procedures (TTPs) to enable remote provision of 
cybersecurity capability. The committee sees merit in the 
development of common architectures, toolsuites, and TTPs 
across the National Guard and Cyber Mission Forces for use in 
missions such as hunt forward operations, securing the 
Department of Defense Information Network, and the provision of 
assistance to critical infrastructure companies.

Plan on performance of funeral honors details by members of other Armed 
        Forces when members of the Armed Force of the deceased are 
        unavailable (sec. 591)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, within 180 days of the date of the 
enactment of this Act, to provide a briefing to the Committees 
on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives on a plan for the performance of funeral honors 
functions at the funeral of a deceased member of the Armed 
Forces by one or more members of the Armed Force of the 
deceased or by such other servicemembers or organizations as 
described in the provision. The provision would amend section 
1491(b)(2) of title 10, United States Code, to repeal the 
requirement that one member of the Armed Force of the deceased 
be a member of the funeral detail.

Limitation on implementation of Army Combat Fitness Test (sec. 592)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the Secretary of the Army from implementing the Army Combat 
Fitness Test until the Secretary receives the results of a 
study from an independent entity on the extent that the test: 
(1) Would adversely impact Army members stationed or deployed 
to climates or areas with conditions that would prevent outdoor 
physical training on a frequent or sustained basis; and (2) 
Would affect recruitment and retention in critical support 
military occupational specialties of the Army, such as medical 
personnel.

                       Items of Special Interest


Air Force Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps Flight Academy

    As the United States confronts a shortage of pilots and 
aviation professionals, both the military and the private 
sector must look to increase awareness and enthusiasm for 
aviation-related careers among today's youth. The committee 
supports the Air Force's attempts to boost interest in aviation 
professions through its Air Force Junior Reserve Officers' 
Training Corps (ROTC) Flight Academy program. The first 2 
years' results of the program are promising. More than 40 
percent of participants have come from historically 
underrepresented groups in the aviation community, and at least 
80 percent of all participants have earned their private pilot 
certificates. 5 2018 participants earned U.S. Air Force Academy 
appointments, and 20 2019 participants earned service academy 
appointments. In addition, 62 2019 participants earned ROTC 
scholarships. In 2020, the program received 2,594 applications 
for 200 scholarships, compared with 621 applications for 120 
scholarships in 2018, and the number of university partners has 
grown from 6 to 17, demonstrating clear success in 
accomplishing the program's goals of increasing awareness and 
enthusiasm for opportunities in aviation. The committee 
encourages the Air Force to continue and expand this important 
program.

Air Ground Operations Wings

    The committee supports the Air Force's continued focus on 
ensuring that it has highly trained battlefield airmen who are 
ready to deploy at a moment's notice to provide commanders with 
combat-ready tactical air control party personnel, battlefield 
weather, and force protection assets. However, due to these 
units' high operational tempo, the committee is concerned about 
sustaining their long-term combat readiness and effectiveness.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives no later than 
March 1, 2021, that assesses the long-term sustainment of Air 
Force's Air Ground Operations Wings (AGOW). This briefing 
should include the following components: (1) A description of 
the organisational structure of the Air Force's Air Ground 
Operations Wings; (2) An evaluation of AGOW equipment, manning, 
and training; (3) The status of AGOW base infrastructure and 
support; (4) An evaluation of AGOW training capability; and (5) 
Recommendations on improving the overall readiness of AGOWs and 
their associated personnel.

Ban on unsafe products at Department of Defense Child Development 
        Centers

    The Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act of 2008 (Public 
Law 110-314) prohibits the sale of recalled consumer products. 
While this Act has helped clear store shelves of dangerous 
products, it fails to ensure that they are removed from 
childcare facilities, potentially leaving children across the 
country at risk. While some states have banned the use of 
recalled products at childcare facilities, there remains no 
Federal requirement that childcare facilities, including on 
military installations, prohibit the use of these dangerous 
products. The committee is concerned about military children 
encountering recalled consumer products in Department of 
Defense (DOD) Child Development Centers (CDCs) and strongly 
encourages the Department to develop policy identifying and 
removing such products from DOD CDCs.

Briefing on current efforts to reduce non-essential training

    The committee commends the Department of Defense and each 
of the military departments on recent efforts to reduce 
administrative, ancillary, and computer-based training 
requirements in order to give warfighters additional time to 
focus on combat lethality. These steps, when combined with a 
focus on empowering local commanders to manage training 
requirements, should significantly improve the quality of life 
and quality of service for all servicemembers.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Personnel and Readiness to provide a briefing to 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives on the effect of these non-essential training 
reductions on the morale and readiness of military personnel by 
November 1, 2020. The briefing shall include the Department's 
definition of non-essential training, as well as an update on 
any ongoing efforts to identify and reduce non-essential 
training. Additionally, the briefing shall highlight any non-
essential training mandated by law that, in the Department's 
view, should be curtailed or eliminated.

Comptroller General report on the dual status military technician 
        workforce

    Over the last several years, the military technician 
workforce has been subject to several major transformation and 
realignment initiatives. For example, recent National Defense 
Authorization Acts reduced and eventually eliminated entirely 
non-dual status military technician position authorizations. 
Additionally, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) required the Department of 
Defense to convert a significant number of dual status military 
technician positions into full-time Federal civilian positions. 
Meanwhile, the committee is monitoring current efforts in the 
Air National Guard to convert large numbers of dual status 
military technicians into Active Guard Reserve positions.
    An additional confusing aspect of the military technician 
workforce is the use and prevalence of temporary military 
technician positions, which are meant to fill in for vacancies 
in permanent positions that occur when an employee deploys or 
is on another long-term military duty. This ``temporary'' 
workforce is not subject to any congressional oversight, so its 
size, structure, and purpose are largely unknown outside of the 
Department of Defense.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to provide to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives, not 
later than March 31, 2021, a report on the military technician 
workforce, with an emphasis on determining how temporary 
positions align with law, rules, and procedures governing the 
permanent technician workforce. The report should include the 
following components:
          (1) The number of temporary technicians utilized by 
        each reserve component in recent fiscal years;
          (2) The justification for utilizing temporary dual 
        status technicians;
          (3) A thorough description of the type of work 
        performed by temporary dual status technicians;
          (4) An explanation of the approval process and any 
        other management controls related to temporary dual 
        status technicians;
          (5) A summary of benefits and employment protections 
        for temporary dual status technicians;
          (6) An assessment of the degree to which the civilian 
        duties of these temporary technicians align with 
        military duties;
          (7) An analysis of the average Federal civilian 
        experience of individuals employed as temporary 
        technicians;
          (8) An analysis of the average Federal civilian 
        experience of individuals employed as dual-status 
        technicians who were converted to Active Guard Reserve 
        positions in the Air National Guard in fiscal year 
        2019; and
          (9) An assessment of the effect on unit and personnel 
        readiness resulting from the use of temporary positions 
        compared to permanent dual status technicians.

Comptroller General review on Department of Defense's accreditation of 
        confinement and other detention facilities

    The committee is aware that the Department of Defense has 
contracted with the American Correctional Association for the 
accreditation of confinement and other detention facilities in 
the United States, South Korea, Germany, and Okinawa. The 
committee recognizes the importance of maintaining military 
facilities at home and abroad that meet basic health and safety 
standards, including the risks posed to members of the military 
services and the military's credibility by the maintenance of 
facilities that do not meet these standards.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of 
the United States to provide to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives a 
briefing on preliminary observations by February 27, 2021, 
followed by a report to be delivered on a mutually agreeable 
date, on the Department of Defense's accreditation of 
confinement and other detention facilities. This report shall 
include: (1) Information, including cost information, related 
to the contracts awarded by the Office of the Secretary of 
Defense and the military services for accreditation of these 
facilities over the past 3 years; (2) An assessment of DOD's 
process for ensuring that its accredited facilities meet 
established health and safety standards; and (3) An assessment 
of possible alternatives to the current use of contractors, 
such as creation of an independent unit, internal to the 
Department of Defense, responsible for oversight, auditing, and 
accreditation of these facilities.

Grade of Director of the Joint Artificial Intelligence Center

    The committee notes that the Joint Artificial Intelligence 
Center (JAIC) has become the central organization for the 
adoption and incorporation of artificial intelligence 
capabilities throughout the Department of Defense. The 
committee recognizes the recommendation made by the National 
Security Commission on Artificial Intelligence with respect to 
the benefits of having a senior military official direct the 
JAIC. Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretary of 
Defense to ensure that the Director of the JAIC has the grade 
of lieutenant general in the Army, Air Force, or Marine Corps, 
or vice admiral in the Navy. The committee further encourages 
the Secretary of Defense to ensure that the JAIC Director has 
operational experience in artificial intelligence, machine 
learning, or relevant career fields.

Interagency cooperation impacting recruiting

    The committee remains concerned by studies that have found 
that up to 71 percent of young people in the United States may 
be ineligible for military service due to medical disqualifying 
factors, a lack of educational attainment, or a record of crime 
or substance abuse. The committee understands that these are 
deeper issues, outside the purview of the Department of 
Defense, but they have a direct impact on the military's 
ability to recruit new servicemembers.
    The committee notes that barriers to recruitment cause a 
monetary cost to the Department of Defense by necessitating the 
use of enhanced recruiting tactics to meet mission. There are 
also risks associated with providing waivers to potential 
recruits who are otherwise ineligible to serve.
    The committee recommends that the Secretary of Defense 
collaborate with the Secretaries and Administrators of relevant 
Federal departments and agencies, including the Departments of 
Agriculture, Education, Health and Human Services, and Justice, 
with the purpose of taking a holistic approach to addressing 
issues that ultimately impact the ability of the military 
services to recruit new servicemembers.

Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps computer science and 
        cybersecurity education

    The committee recognizes that the United States in general, 
and the military in particular, currently struggles to find and 
produce a sufficient number of Americans trained to succeed in 
computer science and cybersecurity careers. The Junior Reserve 
Officers' Training Corps (JROTC) can serve as a catalyst to 
overcoming these systemic shortages by providing an 
extracurricular experience to this public service-oriented, 
highly diverse population of young Americans who demonstrate a 
penchant for computer science and related subjects. The 
committee encourages the Secretary of the Air Force to partner 
with Federal, State, and industry leaders to continue pilot 
programs that provide evidence-based computer science and 
cybersecurity education at schools serving JROTC youth.

Mental health discrimination during accession

    During the military accession process, recruits with 
potentially disqualifying medical conditions are reviewed on a 
case-by-case basis to determine whether a given applicant is a 
candidate to receive a medical waiver. Although the committee 
recognizes that the physical, mental, and emotional strain 
associated with military service necessitates rigorous medical 
standards to protect servicemembers, the committee is concerned 
that existing medical waiver policies related to mental health 
conditions in pre-adolescent or early adolescent years could 
deter aspiring recruits from seeking mental healthcare. Given 
the propensity for military dependents to serve and the 
stresses of military family life, these policies could 
disproportionately impact military children. The committee 
encourages the military services to review the medical waiver 
request process as it pertains to mental health conditions, 
particularly in instances of temporary or adolescent diagnoses 
with demonstrable clinical improvement.

Military Family Readiness and Command Climate Surveys

    The committee believes that commanders and other 
individuals, both military and civilian, with military family 
readiness responsibilities must be adequately trained so that 
they are equipped to encourage, support, and increase military 
family readiness among the personnel within the unit or 
installation under such individual's command or purview, 
including by providing servicemembers and their families with a 
fuller understanding of the resources available locally within 
such units or installations. Further, the committee believes 
that leaders with these responsibilities must be evaluated on 
how well they encourage, support, and increase military family 
readiness, including through incorporation of these matters 
into command assessments and other surveys as appropriate to 
ensure that leaders at all levels pay the necessary attention 
to these matters.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to provide a 
briefing to the committee by no later than December 1, 2020, on 
the feasibility and advisability of incorporating military 
family readiness matters into command climate surveys or other 
appropriate mechanisms to assess the adequacy of command and 
unit efforts: (1) To welcome new military families to the 
installation concerned and to ensure that such families are 
immediately connected with any resources necessary to 
acclimatize to such installation; (2) To provide support for 
military families experiencing challenges with military family 
housing, including privatized military housing; (3) To inform 
military spouses of employment opportunities; (4) To provide 
support for military families seeking childcare opportunities, 
including for children with special needs; (5) To provide 
support for military families during deployment and training 
exercises of the unit concerned; (6) To provide support for 
military spouses during pregnancy and after childbirth; (7) To 
provide support for military families preparing to transition 
into civilian life; (8) To provide support for military 
families seeking healthcare or mental health resources; and (9) 
To provide support for military families experiencing food 
insecurity or seeking nutrition assistance program support.

Plan for enhancement of recruitment for the Armed Forces among rural, 
        isolated, and native populations

    The committee notes that recent Office of Personnel 
Management data show that people who come from native or 
isolated populations comprise less than 0.1 percent of the 
military. As the Department of Defense seeks to improve 
recruiting practices to improve performance among 
underrepresented groups, the native and isolated populations of 
the country can be a vital source of quality military 
personnel.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives by December 1, 2020, 
detailing current military recruiting efforts among populations 
in rural areas, isolated areas, socially disadvantaged areas, 
and among native populations.
    The report should include the following elements:
          (1) A summary of current and planned recruiting 
        efforts in rural, isolated, and socially disadvantaged 
        areas, as well as among native populations;
          (2) A discussion of challenges germane to access to 
        rural and isolated populations;
          (3) An analysis of cultural challenges involved with 
        recruiting rural, isolated, and native populations; and
          (4) An assessment of any funding shortfalls related 
        to rural, isolated, and native population recruiting.

Senior officer accountability and use of ``proximate cause'' standard

    The committee has recently become aware of a troubling 
practice within the military services of finding that, because 
the actions or inactions of senior military officials are not 
the ``proximate cause'' of events on the battlefield, such 
officials bear no responsibility for their leadership failures, 
even in cases in which a properly conducted investigation found 
that such officers should bear responsibility for their 
conduct.
    Black's Law Dictionary defines proximate cause as ``the 
result of a direct action . . . that sets in motion a chain of 
events that is unbroken and causes damage, injury, and 
destruction with no other interference.'' Would-be proximate 
cause is overcome by intervening causes. In the context of 
military action on a battlefield, those closest to the action 
and most in harm's way, enlisted service members and junior 
officers, will almost always provide intervening cause that 
under this standard could absolve senior commanders from ever 
being responsible for anything that happens under their 
command. In short, the committee believes that application of 
the legal principle of proximate cause is inappropriate in 
determining a military commander's responsibility for the 
actions of subordinate units. A commander's responsibility for 
the actions of subordinates goes hand-in-hand with the 
commander's authority. The committee strongly urges the 
military services to ensure that senior military officials are 
held accountable, to the extent appropriate, under traditional 
military norms of command responsibility that have served the 
United States military well for over 200 years.

Status of Remotely Piloted Aircraft Culture and Process Improvement 
        Program

    In 2016, the Air Force launched the Culture and Process 
Improvement Program (CPIP) for the Remotely Piloted Aircraft 
(RPA) community. At the time, the Air Force described the CPIP 
as providing focus to build a sustainable RPA enterprise for 
the long term. Based on numerous focus groups and other 
feedback, the CPIP cataloged over 170 recommendations to 
improve the health of the RPA workforce. Four years later, 
however, the Air Force struggles to explain how many of the 
CPIP recommendations have been, or are planned to be, 
implemented.
    The RPA workforce continues to face challenges not 
experienced by any other community in the Air Force. RPA crews 
are highly recruited to fly for government contractors who fly 
the same RPAs as the Air Force on ``government owned-contractor 
operated'' combat lines. Essentially, the government has 
established a dynamic in which it pays contractors to poach Air 
Force talent. Other well-known problems related to shift work, 
dwell time, and austere base locations continue to dampen 
morale among the RPA workforce. The CPIP identified these and 
other problems years ago, yet the Air Force seems to have made 
little progress in addressing them. From the perspective of the 
workforce, the time and effort spent on the CPIP amounted to 
little actual improvement.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Air 
Force to provide a report to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives by March 1, 
2021, containing a detailed update on the status of each 
recommendation made by the Remotely Piloted Aircraft Culture 
and Process Improvement Program. The update shall include an 
explanation of each recommendation and, for each 
recommendation, a statement as to whether the Air Force has 
already implemented or intends to implement it. If a 
recommendation has already been, or is intended to be, 
implemented, the report shall include an actual or planned 
implementation date, designate a responsible official for the 
recommendation, and note whether additional resources are 
required for implementation. If the Air Force does not intend 
to implement a recommendation, the report shall include an 
explanation of the factors that led the Air Force to reach that 
decision.

Supporting innovations for 21st century servicemember and family 
        readiness and resiliency

    The committee is concerned that the Department of Defense 
lacks a modern, software-driven approach to support 
servicemember and military family population health, readiness, 
and resiliency, and it believes that the Department must 
implement transformative innovations that deliver 21st century 
servicemember and family readiness and resiliency.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed Services of 
the Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than 90 
days after the date of the enactment of this Act, on the 
Department's plan to develop partnership-driven innovation 
efforts featuring multi-domain, software-driven solutions that 
actively assist servicemembers and military families with 
implementation of the eight categories of total force fitness 
across their daily lives.
    The report shall include the following elements: (1) A 
proposal and timeline describing how the Department will change 
its approach to total force fitness by better aligning its 
efforts across all operational elements of the military 
departments to support implementation of software-driven, 
systemic approaches to address total force fitness; (2) An 
overview of the Department's current activities to accelerate 
partnerships for total force fitness innovation; and (3) A 
description as to how the Department can use existing 
authorities in combination with public-private partnerships to 
support pilot/prototype projects for the development of 
scalable, modern software-as-a-platform approaches that are 
agile and comprehensive in breadth and capability.

The Veterans Metrics Initiative Study

    Every year, over 200,000 servicemembers transition out of 
the military to civilian life. The Departments of Defense and 
Veterans Affairs, along with over 40,000 public and private 
organizations, offer a vast array of services to assist 
servicemembers during their military-to-civilian transitions: 
helping them find fulfilling employment or educational 
opportunities; meeting physical and mental healthcare needs; 
retaining secure housing; and successfully re-integrating them 
with civilian society. The committee is concerned, however, by 
the lack of evidence-based methods to determine the value of 
these many transition programs to veterans' long-term well-
being.
    The committee applauds The Veterans Metrics Initiative 
study, a public-private research partnership that evaluated 
programs currently being used by transitioning veterans. The 
study examined veteran well-being across four key areas--mental 
and physical health; vocation; finances; and social 
relationships--to identify factors associated with well-being 
over a 3-year period following separation from military 
service. The study also identified characteristics that can be 
tracked to predict which veteran populations will have 
increased difficulty in adjusting to civilian life, and which 
types of programs may be of greatest use to them, by 
identifying and characterizing program components that led to 
positive well-being.
    Therefore, the committee encourages the Secretaries of 
Defense and Veterans Affairs to work with The Veterans Metrics 
Initiative study coordinator to collaborate on the use of these 
data to refine the Transition Assistance Program. Adjustments 
to the program could address those areas of greatest risk to 
the well-being of servicemembers as they transition to civilian 
life and provide enhanced programs for the populations 
predicted to have greater challenges in transition.

          TITLE VI--COMPENSATION AND OTHER PERSONNEL BENEFITS

                     Subtitle A--Pay and Allowances

Reorganization of certain allowances other than travel and 
        transportation allowances (sec. 601)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
chapter 7 of title 37, United States Code, to authorize the 
Department of Defense to continue making payments beyond fiscal 
year 2022 for per diem while on duty outside the continental 
United States and for funeral honors duties.
Hazardous duty pay for members of the Armed Forces performing duty in 
        response to the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (sec. 602)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of the military department concerned to pay hazardous 
duty pay in the amount of $150 per month to members of the 
Armed Forces who perform duty in response to the coronavirus 
disease 2019 (COVID-19). Hazardous duty pay for COVID-19 would 
not be prorated.
Subtitle B--Bonuses and Special and Incentive Pays
One-year extension of certain expiring bonus and special pay 
        authorities (sec. 611)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend, 
through December 31, 2021, various expiring bonus and special 
pay authorities for military personnel. The provision would 
extend special pay and bonus authority for reserve personnel, 
military heathcare professionals, and nuclear officers and 
consolidated pay authorities for officer and enlisted 
personnel. The provision would also extend the authority to 
provide a temporary increase in the rate of Basic Allowance for 
Housing in certain circumstances.
Increase in special and incentive pays for officers in health 
        professions (sec. 612)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
subparagraphs (A) through (E) of section 335(e)(1) of title 37, 
United States Code, to increase the maximum amounts of special 
and incentive pays for military health professions officers.
    A recent report by the Comptroller General of the United 
States (GAO-20-165) ``found that for 21 of the 27 physician and 
dentist specialties, the maximum cash compensation was less 
than the private sector civilian median within four officer pay 
grades (O-3 to O-6).'' Additionally, the report stated that 
``the maximum military cash compensation for 16 of 21 physician 
and 5 of 6 dental specialties was less than the civilian median 
for all pay grades.'' Furthermore, a previous Comptroller 
General report (GAO-18-77) highlighted significant gaps in the 
military departments for numerous Active-Duty physician 
specialties, including those considered critical for combat 
casualty care. As a result of the information provided in these 
reports, the committee believes that it should enhance the cash 
compensation of military health professions officers to ensure 
that the Department of Defense can recruit and retain such 
officers, especially those serving in critical wartime medical 
and dental specialties.

     Subtitle C--Disability Pay, Retired Pay, and Survivor Benefits

Inclusion of drill or training foregone due to emergency travel or duty 
        restrictions in computations of entitlement to and amounts of 
        retired pay for non-regular service (sec. 621)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
sections 12732 and 12733 of title 10, United States Code, to 
authorize the Secretary of Defense, or the Secretary of 
Homeland Security with respect to the Coast Guard, to provide 
points for Reserve retirement purposes if a Reserve 
servicemember is prevented from participating in required 
drills or training during the emergency period beginning on 
March 1, 2020, which coincides with the COVID-19 pandemic.
Modernization and clarification of payment of certain Reserves while on 
        duty (sec. 622)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 12316 of title 10, United States Code, to modify the 
existing priority of payments so that a Reservist, who is 
entitled to retired or retainer pay and who performs paid 
reserve duty, would receive compensation for the reserve duty 
unless the Reservist elects to waive that compensation to 
receive the retired or retainer pay.

                       Subtitle D--Other Matters

Permanent authority for and enhancement of the Government lodging 
        program (sec. 631)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 914 of the Carl Levin and Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (Public 
Law 113-291) to permanently authorize a government lodging 
program for employees of the Department of Defense and members 
of the uniformed services under the jurisdiction of the 
Secretary of Defense. The provision would also require the 
Secretary concerned to exclude from the lodging program 
Department of Defense civilian employees who are traveling for 
the performance of mission functions of a public shipyard of 
the Department of Defense, if the purpose or mission of such 
travel would be adversely affected by the requirements of the 
Government lodging program.
Approval of certain activities by retired and reserve members of the 
        uniformed services (sec. 632)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 908 of title 37, United States Code, to authorize 
retired members of the uniformed services, members of a reserve 
component of the Armed Forces not on Active Duty for more than 
30 days, and members of the Commissioned Reserve Corps of the 
Public Health Service to accept payment for speeches, travel, 
meals, lodging, or registration fees, if approved by the 
Secretary concerned. The provision would also require that 
annual reports on approvals for employment or compensation of 
retired general and flag officers include the following 
elements: (1) The foreign government involved; (2) The duties 
to be performed; and (3) The compensation or payment to be 
provided.

                       Items of Special Interest

Commissary and Exchange loyalty programs
    Military commissaries offer many benefits to their patrons 
through the Commissary Rewards Program, such as digital coupon 
offers, digital receipts, and at-cashier discounts. To improve 
sales and revenues at commissaries and military exchanges, the 
committee encourages the Military Exchange Service to adopt a 
loyalty program using lessons learned from the Defense 
Commissary Agency. The committee believes that both retail 
venues would benefit from cross-linking loyalty programs, which 
would further incentivize commissary customers to patronize 
both commissaries and exchanges. Similar loyalty programs in 
the private retail industry have proven to be highly successful 
in expanding sales.
Comptroller General report on the impact of reforms in the defense 
        commissary system
    The Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) operates about 240 
commissaries worldwide that sell groceries and household goods 
at reduced prices to eligible customers, including uniformed 
servicemembers, their families, and retirees. To pay for 
operating costs that exceed sales revenue, the Congress has 
appropriated approximately $1.3 billion annually from amounts 
appropriated to the Defense Working Capital Fund for commissary 
use from fiscal years 2015 through 2019. Additionally, sales at 
the commissaries have fallen from $5.5 billion in fiscal year 
2015 to $4.5 billion in fiscal year 2019. To help the DeCA 
improve its business operations without diminishing customer 
savings, the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) authorized certain 
reforms for the commissary system. For example, the NDAA 
authorized the DeCA to set commissary prices in response to 
market conditions and customer demand (i.e., variable pricing), 
and it authorized the Secretary of Defense to convert the 
commissary system to a non-appropriated fund entity or 
instrumentality, subject to certain conditions.
    The committee seeks to understand the extent to which the 
DeCA has used these authorities and/or implemented other 
reforms (e.g., the sale of private label goods) to improve its 
operations and to reduce its need for appropriated funds. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Comptroller General of the 
United States to conduct a review and to provide a briefing to 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives no later than March 1, 2021, with a report to 
follow, that includes the following: (1) What reforms the DeCA 
has implemented within the past 5 years to improve its business 
operations; (2) What effect those reforms have had on DeCA's 
sales, expenses, need for appropriated funds, and/or customer 
savings and satisfaction; (3) What challenges the DeCA faces in 
providing reduced-price groceries and household goods, and what 
steps the DeCA is taking to address those challenges; and (4) 
Any other issues that the Comptroller General determines are 
applicable to DeCA's operations and reform efforts.
Operation of commissaries during government shutdowns
    Military commissaries provide a reliable source of high 
quality food and subsistence for military servicemembers and 
their families. During government shutdowns prompted by an 
expiration of congressional appropriations, commissary closures 
deprive families of this vital subsistence source. Due to the 
critical importance of commissaries to military families, the 
committee believes that the Department of Defense should 
designate commissary operations as excepted programs during 
government shutdowns.
Special operations special and incentive pay
    The committee directs the Assistant Secretary of Defense 
for Special Operations and Low Intensity Conflict (ASD SOLIC), 
in coordination with the Commander, United States Special 
Operations Command (SOCOM), the Secretary of the Army, and the 
Chief of Staff of the Army, to study the effect on steady-state 
retention of offering a Critical Skills Retention Bonus to Army 
Special Operations Forces (SOF) commissioned officers. 
Specifically, the ASD SOLIC shall evaluate the Navy's Special 
Warfare Officer Continuation Pay program and make a 
recommendation on whether such a program should be emulated by 
the other military departments. Not later than October 1, 2020, 
the ASD SOLIC shall provide a briefing to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
on its findings and recommendations for SOF special and 
incentive pay. Lastly, the committee encourages the ASD SOLIC 
and SOCOM to develop a dynamic modeling system to assess how 
adjustments in other special and incentive pay policy could 
increase retention within Army Special Operations Forces.

                   TITLE VII--HEALTH CARE PROVISIONS

           Subtitle A--Tricare and Other Health Care Benefits

Authority for Secretary of Defense to manage provider type referral and 
        supervision requirements under TRICARE program (sec. 701)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1079(a)(12) of title 10, United States Code, to provide 
the Department of Defense with greater flexibility in 
determining which provider types under the TRICARE program may 
diagnose or assess a mental or physical illness, injury, or 
bodily malfunction and, by extension, the extent to which 
referrals and supervision may be required for these provider 
types.
Removal of Christian Science providers as authorized providers under 
        the TRICARE Program (sec. 702)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
subsection (a) of section 1079 of title 10, United States Code, 
by striking paragraph (4) to remove Christian Science providers 
as authorized providers under the TRICARE program.
    The Congress originally enacted the authorization of 
Christian Science providers and the associated statutory 
exemption of Christian Science services from TRICARE's medical 
necessity requirement because the Church of Christ, Scientist 
instructed its members to seek the care of Christian Science 
practitioners in lieu of other clinicians, including 
physicians. The Church has changed its position, however, and 
it no longer prohibits members from seeking traditional medical 
care, making this statutory exemption unnecessary.
Waiver of fees charged to certain civilians for emergency medical 
        treatment provided at military medical treatment facilities 
        (sec. 703)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1079b of title 10, United States Code, to require the 
Secretary of Defense to implement procedures that would 
authorize military treatment facilities (MTFs) to waive fees 
for medical care provided to civilians at MTFs if, after any 
insurance payments, the civilian is unable to pay for the care 
provided and that care enhanced the medical readiness of the 
health care providers who furnished the care.
Mental health resources for members of the Armed Forces and their 
        dependents during the COVID-19 pandemic (sec. 704)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to develop a plan, within 180 days of the 
date of the enactment of this Act, to protect and promote the 
mental health and well-being of servicemembers and their 
dependents during the current pandemic. The provision would 
require the Secretary to conduct outreach to the military 
community to identify resources and healthcare services, 
including mental healthcare services, available under the 
TRICARE program to support servicemembers and their dependents.
Transitional health benefits for certain members of the National Guard 
        serving under orders in response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) 
        (sec. 705)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to provide to a National Guard (NG) member 
separating from active service after serving on full-time duty 
pursuant to section 502(f) of title 32, United States Code, the 
health benefits authorized under section 1145 of title 10, 
United States Code, for a member of a reserve component 
separating from Active Duty, if the active service from which 
the NG member is separating was in support of the whole of 
government response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Extramedical maternal health providers demonstration project (sec. 706)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, within 1 year of the date of the 
enactment of this Act, to conduct a 5-year demonstration 
project designed to evaluate the cost, quality of care, and 
impact on maternal and fetal outcomes of using certain extra-
medical maternal health providers (doulas and lactation 
consultants) under the TRICARE program to determine whether to 
make coverage of the services of such providers permanent under 
TRICARE.

Pilot program on receipt of non-generic prescription maintenance 
        medications under TRICARE pharmacy benefits program (sec. 707)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to conduct a 3-year pilot program whereby 
covered TRICARE beneficiaries may elect to receive certain non-
generic prescription maintenance medications either through 
military treatment facility pharmacies, the TRICARE mail order 
pharmacy program, or retail network pharmacies. The provision 
would prescribe certain conditions of the pilot program and 
would require the Secretary to provide a briefing to the 
congressional defense committees, within 90 days of the date of 
the enactment of this Act, on implementation of the pilot 
program. Subsequently, the Secretary would provide an interim 
report to the same committees within 18 months after the 
commencement of the pilot program. Finally, the Comptroller 
General of the United States would submit a report on the 
program to the same committees by March 1, 2024.

                 Subtitle B--Health Care Administration


Modifications to transfer of Army Medical Research and Development 
        Command and public health commands to Defense Health Agency 
        (sec. 721)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1073c(e) of title 10, United States Code, and section 
737 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2020 (Public Law 116-92) to delay the transfer of the Army 
Medical Research and Development Command (and such other 
medical research organizations of the Armed Forces, as 
appropriate) and the public health commands or programs of the 
military services to the Defense Health Agency from September 
30, 2022, to September 30, 2024, and correcting the name of the 
Army Medical Research and Development Command.

Delay of applicability of administration of TRICARE dental plans 
        through Federal Employees Dental and Vision Insurance Program 
        (sec. 722)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 713(c) of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) to 
delay the transition of the administration of TRICARE dental 
plans for Active-Duty family members, non-activated National 
Guard/Reserve members, family members of National Guard/Reserve 
members, and certain survivors to the Federal Employees Dental 
and Vision Insurance Program until January 1, 2023.

Authority of Secretary of Defense to waive requirements during national 
        emergencies for purposes of provision of health care (sec. 723)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
chapter 55 of title 10, United States Code, to authorize the 
Secretary of Defense to waive or modify the requirements of 
such chapter, or any regulation prescribed under such chapter, 
for a period of 60 days for services furnished by a health care 
provider (or class of providers) in an emergency area (or 
portion of such area) during an emergency period (or portion of 
such period). The provision would authorize the Secretary to 
renew any such waiver or modification for subsequent 60-day 
periods during an applicable emergency declaration. 
Additionally, the provision would require the Secretary to 
submit to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives, at least 2 days before exercising 
a waiver or modification, a certification and advance written 
notice that describes the impact and duration of the waiver or 
modification. Finally, the provision would require the 
Secretary to submit a report to the same committees on the use 
of this authority within 1 year of the end of an emergency 
period during which the Secretary exercised this authority.

                 Subtitle C--Reports and Other Matters


Extension of authority for Joint Department of Defense-Department of 
        Veterans Affairs Medical Facility Demonstration Fund (sec. 741)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1704(e) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-84) to extend the authority 
for the Joint Department of Defense-Department of Veterans 
Affairs Demonstration Fund from September 30, 2021, to 
September 30, 2022.

Membership of Board of Regents of Uniformed Services University of the 
        Health Sciences (sec. 742)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2113a(b) of title 10, United States Code, to designate 
the Director of the Defense Health Agency as an ex officio 
member of the Board of Regents of the Uniformed Services 
University of the Health Sciences.

Military health system Clinical Quality Management Program (sec. 743)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to implement a comprehensive clinical 
quality management program within the military health system. 
The provision would prescribe the elements of the program and 
include clinical quality management of healthcare delivery 
outside military medical treatment facilities, on ships, 
planes, in deployed settings, and in the purchased care 
component of the military health system.
    The committee is aware of several recent incidents in which 
a military service waited years until a substantial claim was 
paid under the Federal Tort Claims Act before initiating a 
review to determine whether any involved healthcare provider 
met National Practitioner Data Bank (NPDB) reporting criteria. 
This delay in conducting a review of substandard medical care 
allowed providers who failed to meet medical practice standards 
to continue treating TRICARE beneficiaries. This provision 
would require initiation of the review as soon as possible 
after an event to expedite reports to the NPDB and other 
accountability measures in appropriate cases.

Modifications to pilot program on civilian and military partnerships to 
        enhance interoperability and medical surge capability and 
        capacity of National Disaster Medical System (sec. 744)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 740 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) to require the Secretary 
of Defense to implement the pilot program on civilian and 
military partnerships to enhance interoperability and medical 
surge capability and capacity of the National Disaster Medical 
System not later than September 30, 2021. The provision would: 
(1) Designate the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health 
Affairs as the lead official for design and implementation of 
the program; (2) Describe the requirements for a phased 
selection of pilot program sites at not fewer than five sites; 
and (3) Describe the conditions for consideration and 
prioritization of such sites. The provision would authorize the 
appropriation of $5.0 million to the Secretary to establish and 
implement the pilot program.
    The committee recognizes the importance of developing 
strong military-civilian partnerships to enhance and expand the 
capabilities and capacities of the National Disaster Medical 
System. These partnerships would: (1) Provide additional 
training platforms to improve the clinical readiness skills of 
military medical providers; (2) Expand the Nation's capacity to 
redistribute mass casualties of war to civilian medical 
centers; and (3) Establish an enduring framework for a well-
coordinated Federal response to pandemics, such as COVID-19, or 
to nuclear, radiological, biological, and chemical threats.

Study on force mix options and service models to enhance readiness of 
        medical force of the Armed Forces to provide combat casualty 
        care (sec. 745)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, within 30 days of the date of the 
enactment of this Act, to seek to enter into an agreement with 
a federally funded research and development center or other 
independent entity to conduct a study on force mix options and 
service models to optimize readiness of the medical force to 
deliver combat casualty care. The Secretary would submit a 
report on the findings of the study to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives within 
15 months of the date of the enactment of this Act.
    The committee remains concerned that existing force mix 
options and service models do not meet the total combat 
casualty care requirements of the combatant commanders in their 
areas of responsibility. Therefore, the committee expects this 
study to consider, examine, and explore: (1) A design for an 
optimal scalable model for embedding critically skilled Active-
Duty medical providers in civilian trauma centers; (2) The 
potential impact of expanding the current model of Reservists' 
serving in civilian trauma centers; and (3) Any options for 
alternative Reservists models, including various accession and 
training models.

Comptroller General study on delivery of mental health services to 
        members of the reserve components of the Armed Forces (sec. 
        746)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Comptroller General of the United States to conduct a study on 
the delivery of Federal, State, and private mental health 
services to members of the reserve components. The provision 
would require the Comptroller General to submit to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives a report on the study not later than 1 year 
after the date of the enactment of this Act.

Review and report on prevention of suicide among members of the Armed 
        Forces stationed at remote installations outside the contiguous 
        United States (sec. 747)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Comptroller General of the United States to conduct a review of 
efforts by the Department of Defense to prevent suicide among 
servicemembers stationed at remote installations outside the 
contiguous United States. The provision would prescribe the 
elements of such review and require the Comptroller General to 
brief the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the 
House of Representatives, not later than October 1, 2021, on 
preliminary observations relating to the review. The 
Comptroller General would then submit a report containing the 
results of the review to the same committees not later than 
March 1, 2022.

Audit of medical conditions of tenants in privatized military housing 
        (sec. 748)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Inspector General of the Department of Defense (DODIG) to 
conduct an audit of the medical conditions of servicemembers 
and their families who have resided in unsafe or unhealthy 
privatized military housing. One of the objectives of the audit 
is to determine the association between the exposure to 
specified hazards and the occurrence of a medical condition. 
Not later than 1 year after commencement of the audit, the 
DODIG would be required to submit to the Secretary of Defense 
and the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the 
House of Representatives a report on the results of the audit 
and to publish the audit on a publicly available internet 
website of the Department of Defense.

Comptroller General study on prenatal and postpartum mental health 
        conditions among members of the Armed Forces and their 
        dependents (sec. 749)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Comptroller General of the United States to conduct a study on 
prenatal and postpartum mental health conditions among members 
of the Armed Forces and their dependents. The Comptroller 
General would submit a report on the study's findings to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives within 1 year of the date of the enactment of 
this Act.

Plan for evaluation of flexible spending account options for members of 
        the uniformed services and their families (sec. 750)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit, by March 1, 2021, to the 
congressional defense committees a plan to evaluate flexible 
spending account options that allow pre-tax payment of health 
and dental insurance premiums, out-of-pocket health care 
expenses, and dependent care expenses for members of the 
uniformed services.

Assessment of receipt by civilians of emergency medical treatment at 
        military medical treatment facilities (sec. 751)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Comptroller General of the United States, within 1 year of the 
date of the enactment of this Act, to complete an assessment of 
the provision of emergency medical treatment by the Department 
of Defense to non-covered civilian patients at military medical 
treatment facilities during the period from October 1, 2015, to 
September 30, 2020. The Comptroller General would provide a 
report containing the results of the assessment to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives within 180 days after completion of such 
assessment.

                       Items of Special Interest


Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis research of the Department of Defense

    The committee encourages the Department of Defense to 
expand funding for research related to amyotrophic lateral 
sclerosis (ALS), an insidious, non-curable neurodegenerative 
disease, in the annual core medical research budget of the 
Department of Defense. Evidence from scientific research 
suggests a mutually inclusive relationship between military 
service and ALS with a higher incidence in the veteran 
population without known reasons. The committee directs the 
Department to brief, not later than September 30, 2020, the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives on the initiatives and funding for ALS research 
of the Department during the 5-year period preceding the date 
of the briefing. The briefing shall include a description of 
any existing or promising breakthroughs in the diagnosis and 
treatment of ALS resulting from such research.

Clinical performance management system

    The committee is aware of web-enabled software that can 
empower health system administrators and frontline clinicians 
to transform healthcare delivery and reduce costs through a 
unique clinical performance management system. The software 
allows comparison of clinical effectiveness across key 
variables, including patient demographics, individual 
clinicians, procedures, medications, and facilities. With such 
available software, the Defense Health Agency and military 
treatment facility clinicians could perform rapid analyses of 
clinical data using actionable, accurate statistical process 
control charts to improve health outcomes, reduce variability, 
and improve performance throughout the military health system. 
The committee encourages the Defense Health Agency to explore 
this opportunity to improve the quality of care delivered in 
military treatment facilities.

Diagnostic medical devices for traumatic brain injury

    The Department of Defense continues to seek ways to 
evaluate troops rapidly for suspected traumatic brain injury. 
Still, the committee remains concerned by the Department's 
failure to field certain diagnostic tools already approved by 
the Food and Drug Administration. The committee believes that 
such tools could have more rapidly diagnosed servicemembers' 
mild TBI (mTBI) following the January 8, 2020, missile attack 
on Al Asad Air Base, Iraq. Although the Al Asad incident is a 
troubling example, the committee understands that most mTBIs 
occur in training, sports, and off-duty events at home station. 
More than ever, the committee believes that FDA-approved mTBI 
screening devices should be available for use in troop clinics 
where service personnel with no apparent symptoms are too often 
returned to duty without further medical evaluation. Therefore, 
the committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to deploy 
mTBI/concussion multi-modal diagnostic devices to the lowest 
possible echelon of medical care to help medical personnel and 
commanders better understand when injured troops must receive 
more specialized medical evaluation and treatment for mTBI.

Ensure eating disorder treatment for servicemembers and dependents

    The committee is aware of studies indicating that there is 
a higher prevalence of eating disorders among members of the 
Armed Forces and veterans than among the general population and 
that research has found a significant relationship between 
eating disorders and these individuals with a history of post-
traumatic stress and trauma. The committee recognizes that 
family members of the Armed Forces have a higher prevalence of 
eating disorders than the general population, with 20 percent 
of children of members of the Armed Forces found at risk of 
developing an eating disorder. The committee also recognizes 
that female members have a particularly high risk for an eating 
disorder, as studies have found that 16 percent of such members 
have an eating disorder and 34 percent of such members are at 
risk of developing an eating disorder.
    Therefore, the committee encourages the Department of 
Defense and the Defense Health Agency to identify eating 
disorders as a health condition to be treated and to: (1) 
Ensure that facilities are available to treat these disorders 
for all servicemembers; (2) Provide eating disorder treatment 
under TRICARE to a dependent without regard to the age of the 
dependent; and (3) Require commanders and supervisory personnel 
to undertake mental health early identification training, 
including on the warning signs and symptoms of eating 
disorders.

Improve academic collaboration and streamline traumatic brain injury 
        funding streams

    The committee understands that the Department of Defense 
has identified traumatic brain injury (TBI) as a top medical 
priority for combat casualties and commends the significant 
investments in identifying and treating TBI and related pain. 
Additionally, the committee acknowledges that there are 
multiple federal funding streams available for research into 
identifying and treating TBI and that the Department 
collaborates with a wide variety of research institutions to 
develop improved identification and treatment tools.
    The committee is concerned, however, that a lack of 
collaboration and information sharing between civilian 
researchers in these areas has slowed progress in developing 
diagnostic and treatment tools and that there appears to be 
only limited progress in deploying a diagnostic tool for TBI. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, the 
Secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services, and 
the heads of other Federal agencies as deemed appropriate by 
the Secretary of Defense, to coordinate available streams of 
federal funding for research in these critical areas. The 
Department should seek partnerships with civilian researchers 
and encourage collaboration and information sharing between 
such researchers receiving federal funds. Finally, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to streamline the 
approval process for research funding, particularly those 
studies relating to TBI, to the greatest extent possible to 
accelerate the development of identification and treatment 
tools.

Improvements to the TRICARE Extended Care Health Option program

    The Exceptional Family Member Program (EFMP) provides 
comprehensive, coordinated community support, housing, 
educational, medical, and personnel services worldwide to U.S. 
military families with children with special needs. The 
committee is aware that many families participating in the EFMP 
are not provided with consistent opportunities and services 
throughout each Permanent Change of Station move. Such moves 
disrupt family members as the unique services provided to 
special needs children can differ between States. As a 
component of EFMP, the TRICARE Extended Care Health Option 
(ECHO) program serves as an alternative to States' Home and 
Community-Based Services 1915(c) waiver programs for families 
of Active-Duty servicemembers. State waiver programs often 
operate under existing enrollment caps, which create lengthy 
waiting lists for services, making them inaccessible to many 
military family members. The committee is concerned that the 
current ECHO program may not provide comparable services to 
programs in States where military families reside, and, as 
such, the Department of Defense should consider program changes 
to provide more equitable access to services that States offer 
more widely.

Military health clinical readiness

    Ensuring a ready medical force can only be accomplished 
when Active-Duty clinicians receive the necessary volume and 
diversity of clinical cases or surgeries in a peacetime setting 
sufficient to prepare them for the types of injuries they will 
treat in the combat theater. The committee supports the Defense 
Health Agency's (DHA) adoption of a knowledge, skills, and 
abilities (KSA) clinician readiness framework. Furthermore, the 
committee believes that a joint KSA center of excellence, 
leveraging the input of the combatant commands (through the 
Joint Staff Surgeon) and the military services' medical 
departments, will help sustain, integrate, and standardize the 
methodology across the military health system. Specifically, a 
joint KSA center of excellence will incorporate industry best 
practices, integrate clinical readiness metrics into DHA's 
performance planning process, track National Guard and 
Reservist clinician KSAs, and help inform future service and 
joint medical training platforms. Accordingly, the committee 
recommends that the Secretary of Defense establish a joint KSA 
center of excellence.

Modification of Post Deployment Health Assessment (DD Form 2796) to 
        increase reporting of exposure to burn pit smoke

    The committee is aware that many servicemembers returning 
from deployment in support of a contingency operation do not 
report that they have experienced exposure to airborne 
contaminants from burn pits. As a result, they are not 
evaluated for the effects of such exposure, and there is no 
documentation in the member's health record. The DD Form 2796 
contains a general question asking servicemembers if they are 
worried about their health because they believe they were 
exposed to something in the environment while deployed. Many 
servicemembers respond ``no'' if they are not experiencing 
health issues. To address underreporting of exposures, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to modify DD Form 
2796 to ask explicitly whether a servicemember was exposed to 
an open burn pit in an operational environment.

Musculoskeletal injury prevention

    The committee is aware that musculoskeletal disorders 
account for almost 25 percent of all military injuries. 
Musculoskeletal injuries among Active-Duty servicemembers 
result in over 10 million limited duty days each year and 
account for over 70 percent of the medically non-deployable 
population. Servicemembers experience anterior cruciate 
ligament (ACL) injuries at 10 times the rate of the general 
population. Investing in injury prevention education and human 
performance programming can greatly reduce the number of 
musculoskeletal injuries, resulting in both improved 
servicemember health and improved combat force readiness.
    The committee encourages the Secretary of Defense, in 
coordination with the Army Holistic Health and Fitness Program, 
to carry out a program on musculoskeletal injury prevention 
research to identify risk factors for musculoskeletal injuries 
among members of the Armed Forces and to create a better 
understanding for adaptive musculoskeletal and bone formation 
during initial entry military training. Additionally, the 
committee supports partnerships between the Department of 
Defense and institutions of higher education to expand current 
injury prevention and human performance education programs. 
These partnerships could support on-site medical coverage, 
musculoskeletal recovery, and physical performance improvement 
capabilities to improve unit readiness.

Rare cancer research and treatment

    The Department of Defense has begun to address 
environmental exposure risks which may correlate with certain 
cancers. The committee remains concerned, however, with 
servicemembers' receipt of medical care following a rare cancer 
diagnosis. Over 60 cancers may disproportionately impact 
servicemembers, and many are rare cancers affecting fewer than 
6 per 100,000 Americans annually. Some targeted therapies for 
such cancers have been developed, but more work must be done. 
Understanding specific molecular drivers for each patient's 
cancer and then sharing those data are key to providing the 
most effective therapies and to advancing research that will 
lead to new treatments. Therefore, the committee directs the 
Department to provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives, not 
later than March 1, 2021, that: (1) Describes the specific 
types of molecular diagnostic tests that are available to 
cancer patients within the military health system; (2) Provides 
recommendations on expansion of molecular diagnostic testing 
for servicemembers with cancer; and (3) Outlines data-sharing 
practices with the Department of Veterans Affairs, the National 
Institutes of Health, and the external research community.

Remote health capabilities in the tactical environment

    Rapidly evolving telehealth capabilities--hardware with 
advanced remote vital signs monitoring, software facilitating 
medical records documentation and reach-back consultation in 
real time, and cloud storage of documentation--can 
significantly improve warfighter survival on the battlefield. 
In the critical moments after a combat injury, direct, two-way 
physician/combat medic interaction in the tactical environment 
at very low bandwidths can bridge communications gaps among 
medics, forward surgical hospital teams, and echelon III 
medical centers. The Army's Medical Communications for Combat 
Casualty Care (MC4) initiative demonstrates how the development 
of medical information management and information technology 
infrastructure facilitates point-of-injury care for combat 
casualties and ultimately saves lives. The committee encourages 
the Department of Defense to consider implementation of MC4 as 
a joint battlefield medical solution across the military 
services.

Status of pilot program to treat post-traumatic stress disorder 
        resulting from sexual trauma

    Section 702 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) 
authorized a 3-year pilot program to assess the feasibility and 
advisability of using intensive outpatient programs to treat 
servicemembers suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder 
resulting from sexual trauma. The legislation required the 
pilot program to be carried out through partnerships with 
public, private, and non-profit health care organizations, 
universities, and institutions.
    The committee is concerned that, nearly 2 years after the 
enactment of this provision, the Department of Defense has not 
yet selected civilian partners to participate in this pilot 
program. The committee urges the Department to expedite 
required policy and TRICARE manual changes needed to reach 
agreements with civilian partners to facilitate testing of new 
models of care that will be evidence-based and measurable. The 
committee further directs the Secretary of Defense to provide 
the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives with a briefing on the status of this pilot 
program not later than July 31, 2020.

Substance abuse prevention

    The committee recognizes the ongoing work of the Department 
of Defense to reduce substance abuse among servicemembers. 
Certain studies from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health 
Administration conclude that a large percentage of suicide 
victims suffer from depression, substance use disorders, or 
both. The committee recognizes the importance of programs that 
teach harm reduction techniques and offer confidential 
educational information that can help reduce substance use and 
potential relapse. Therefore, the committee recommends that the 
Department initiate a pilot program to test an evidence-based, 
confidential, internet-based substance abuse education, peer 
coaching, and case management program.

TBI medical research

    The Department of Defense continues to seek methods for 
expeditiously evaluating servicemembers for acute traumatic 
brain injury (TBI). The committee recognizes that over 320,000 
servicemembers were diagnosed with a TBI within the last 15 
years and that these injuries are associated with a variety of 
long-term effects, including cognitive impairment, psychiatric 
disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, and chronic traumatic 
encephalopathy. The committee further recognizes that the early 
diagnosis of a TBI, while it is still in its acute phase and 
especially prior to the display of symptoms, significantly 
improves military medical professionals' ability to treat this 
injury and to prevent or mitigate those long-term effects. The 
committee therefore encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
support the basic research required to develop and field acute 
TBI diagnostic capabilities as quickly as possible, to include 
multi-modal research models focused on medical imaging, 
molecular biomarkers, and biophysical sensors, among other 
diagnostic capabilities.

Telehealth and virtual health technology implementation

    Section 718 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) required the military 
health system (MHS) to incorporate telehealth services 
throughout its direct and purchased care components. The 
Department of Defense's (DOD) slow implementation of telehealth 
and virtual health technologies, however, has hindered 
transformation of the MHS into a modern healthcare delivery 
platform. A rapid expansion of DOD's virtual health 
technologies over the last few years would have given 
beneficiaries more options to access certain healthcare 
services while practicing physical distancing at their homes 
during the COVID-19 pandemic.
    The committee remains interested in the continued, expanded 
use of both telehealth and virtual health technologies 
throughout the MHS and recommends an approach that implements 
those technologies using a flexible, evolutionary acquisition 
process that encourages healthy competition, enables 
incremental improvements to provider workflows, improves access 
and care for beneficiaries, and potentially lowers overall 
costs to the MHS.

Traumatic brain injury treatment

    The committee is encouraged by the recent successful 
clinical trial involving non-implanted neurostimulation devices 
and physical therapy for preventing headaches and improving 
balance for patients with mild-to-moderate traumatic brain 
injury (mmTBI). The committee supports continuing research into 
mmTBI treatments for the hundreds of thousands of 
servicemembers diagnosed with this illness. Therefore, the 
committee encourages the Department of Defense to pursue 
additional clinical trials with non-implanted neurostimulation 
devices to treat mmTBI.

TRICARE managed care support contract structure

    The committee is aware that the Defense Health Agency (DHA) 
has been working to draft requirements for the fifth generation 
of TRICARE managed care support contracts, known as ``T-5.'' 
The DHA held two industry day events in 2019 to conduct market 
research and to present T-5 concepts to potential offerors, but 
the contracting plans presented by the DHA at each of these 
meetings differed drastically. At one event, the DHA presented 
the concept of potentially awarding multiple TRICARE contracts 
via an indefinite delivery indefinite quantity (IDIQ) contract 
structure. At a subsequent meeting, the DHA announced that it 
had shifted away from the IDIQ and/or multiple region concept 
and pivoted back to considering a two-region structure for 
TRICARE Prime contracts, similar to that of the existing 
TRICARE managed care support contracts.
    The current TRICARE contract structure does not support 
innovation, beneficiary choice, increased competition, or 
market-based management strategies. Continuing the current 
contract structure limits the DHA and does not comport with the 
reforms directed by this committee. Specifically, maintaining a 
two-region structure will neither provide the DHA with options 
to swiftly address contractor performance issues or shortfalls 
nor will it incentivize contractors to comport with the most 
high quality, innovative, and cost-effective industry best 
practices to improve quality of care for TRICARE beneficiaries 
and to maximize returns on DHA investment. Furthermore, a DHA 
choice to continue to limit TRICARE managed care support 
contracts to two large regions stifles competition because the 
incumbents have a significant advantage. Additionally, very few 
private sector health care delivery companies have both the 
significant financial resources as well as the relevant past 
performance required to compete for such large scale, widely-
scoped contracts.
    In defense of maintaining the status quo, the DHA has 
informed the committee that there exists a legal barrier to the 
DHA's contracting for multiple TRICARE networks, either via an 
increased number of smaller regions, by medical markets, or by 
means of a multiple award IDIQ contract vehicle. The committee 
notes, however, that to date the DHA has been unable to provide 
a citation to any such legal barrier. Moreover, an examination 
of relevant statutory (chapter 55 of title 10, United States 
Code) and regulatory (title 32, Code of Federal Regulations, 
part 199) language confirms that no such legal barrier exists. 
To the contrary, the statutory and regulatory language 
contemplates multiple contracts as well as multiple provider 
networks.
    The committee believes that shifting the next iteration of 
TRICARE managed care support contracts to a multiple region 
construct will allow private sector support plans to better 
serve beneficiaries by more closely matching local beneficiary 
needs with innovative service and care capabilities, improve 
integration with military treatment facility leadership, and 
facilitate a more agile, cost-effective approach for the 
Department. The committee therefore urges the Secretary to 
ensure that the contract structure for T-5 departs from the 
current two-region design.
    The committee directs the Secretary to review the 
legislative reforms enacted over the past several years and 
report to the committee on how the acquisition strategy for the 
next set of TRICARE managed care support contracts incorporates 
those reforms in a manner that increases competition and 
beneficiary choice. This report should be provided to the 
committee prior to the release of any T-5 Request for Proposal.

  TITLE VIII--ACQUISITION POLICY, ACQUISITION MANAGEMENT, AND RELATED 
                                MATTERS

                  Subtitle A--Industrial Base Matters


Policy recommendations for implementation of Executive Order 13806 
        (Assessing and Strengthening the Manufacturing and Defense 
        Industrial Base and Supply Chain Resiliency) (sec. 801)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to 
submit a series of recommendations surrounding United States 
industrial policies to the Secretary of Defense, who would 
subsequently be required to submit these recommendations to the 
President, the Office of Management and Budget, the National 
Security Council, the National Economic Council, and the 
congressional defense committees.
    The committee commends the Department of Defense for its 
leadership in implementing the July 21, 2017, Presidential 
Executive Order on Assessing and Strengthening the 
Manufacturing and Defense Industrial Base and Supply Chain 
Resiliency of the United States. The challenges and shortfalls 
highlighted in the report authored in response to the executive 
order are of such scale that the committee believes that only a 
national approach can effectively address these deficits. 
Therefore, the committee expects the Department to exercise its 
leadership position, analytical capabilities, and policy 
expertise in developing recommendations for the industrial 
policies that the United States ought to pursue.

Assessment of national security innovation base (sec. 802)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Deputy Secretary of Defense to conduct an assessment of how 
economic forces and structures are shaping the capacity of the 
national security innovation base. The provision would require 
the Deputy Secretary to submit an assessment along with any 
policy recommendations proceeding from it to the Secretary of 
Defense no later than 540 days after the date of the enactment 
of this Act and the Secretary of Defense to submit such 
assessment and recommendations, no later than 30 days after 
receipt, to the President, the Office of Management and Budget, 
the National Security Council, the National Economic Council, 
and the congressional defense committees.
    The committee recognizes the Department of Defense's 
substantial efforts to ensure that the industrial base is 
innovative, robust, and expansive and remains concerned that 
the wider U.S. economy has a significant impact on the 
industrial base. The committee believes that ensuring domestic 
production and supply of critical national security 
technologies and source materials may extend beyond the 
activities, industrial policies, and scope of the Department of 
Defense and require serious interagency and private sector 
cooperation. Developing a strategy to address this issue should 
be an inclusive, whole-of-government deliberative process that 
involves the Department of Defense, other relevant government 
agencies, and relevant stakeholders. The committee also 
recognizes that Department of Defense appropriations are 
downstream of economic health and Federal budgets. This 
provision would therefore allow the Department to identify 
critical economic features, propose policies to guarantee that 
its development, industrial, and budgetary needs are 
recognized, and ensure that broader economic policy decisions 
are fully informed.

Improving implementation of policy pertaining to the national 
        technology and industrial base (sec. 803)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in executing the activities required 
under sections 2501, 2502, and 2505 of title 10, United States 
Code, to also identify critical National Technology and 
Industrial Base (NTIB) member country development and 
manufacturing activities and capabilities. The provision would 
also: modify section 2502 of title 10, United States Code, to 
require the establishment of a regulatory council comprised of 
the member countries; modify section 2350a of title 10, United 
States Code, to allow for the consummation of cooperative 
research and development agreements among the NTIB member 
countries; and require the Secretary of Defense to establish a 
process for considering additional NTIB member countries, 
conduct an assessment on certain countries, and report on that 
assessment within 540 days of the date of the enactment of this 
Act.

Modification of framework for modernizing acquisition processes to 
        ensure integrity of industrial base (sec. 804)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2509 of title 10, United States Code, to add references 
to matters of existing law, regulation, policy, and associated 
activities and that would make a technical change related to 
optical transmission components. The committee appreciates the 
Department of Defense's continued attention to challenges that 
it faces in modernizing acquisition processes to ensure the 
integrity of the defense industrial base.
    In carrying out the assessment required by section 2509 of 
title 10, United States Code, due March 15, 2022, the 
Comptroller General of the United States shall incorporate the 
following additional objectives: (1) The use by the Defense 
Logistics Agency and the Defense Health Agency of contracts for 
the purchase of drugs and medical devices; (2) The effect that 
increasing domestic manufacturing may have on the price and 
quality of drugs and medical devices used by the Department of 
Defense; and (3) The opportunities for investment in domestic 
advanced manufacturing capabilities for drugs and medical 
devices to reduce supply chain dependence risks to members of 
the Armed Forces and civilians.

Assessments of industrial base capabilities and capacity (sec. 805)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish a process for assessing 
foreign industrial bases, to integrate that process with other 
industrial base analysis activities, and to report to the 
congressional defense committees on that approach by March 15, 
2021.
    The Department of Defense's September 2018 report on 
Assessing and Strengthening the Manufacturing and Defense 
Industrial Base and Supply Chain Resiliency identifies 
industrial policies of competitor nations as one of the five 
macro forces driving risk into the United States industrial 
base, noting ``the erosion of parts of our industrial base[] 
is, in part, attributable to the industrial policies of major 
trading partners that have created an unfair and non-reciprocal 
trade environment.'' The report goes on to cite China's 
behavior in particular, to include Chinese economic aggression, 
as a contributing factor. The committee remains concerned not 
only about the United States' overreliance on China for key 
components of national security capabilities but also about how 
China's own industrial policy has facilitated this.
    The committee notes the respective roles for the Director, 
Defense Counterintelligence and Security Agency (DCSA), and the 
Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Industrial Policy 
outlined in section 2509 of title 10, United States Code, as 
part of a framework for modernizing acquisition processes to 
ensure the integrity of the industrial base. The committee 
acknowledges the increased demands levied on the DCSA, and the 
committee believes that cooperation between these two 
organizations on this activity will help to anchor a strategic 
vision for expeditiously identifying and countering evolving 
threats to the defense industrial base.

Analyses of certain materials and technology sectors for action to 
        address sourcing and industrial capacity (sec. 806)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to conduct a series of assessments of 
certain materials and technology sectors, such as 
microelectronics and pharmaceutical ingredients, to determine 
what action to take with respect to sourcing or investment to 
increase domestic industrial capacity and explore ways to 
entice critical technology industries to move production to the 
United States for the purposes of national security. The 
committee notes that, in 2018, the Department of Defense 
published a study titled ``Assessing and Strengthening the 
Manufacturing and Defense Industrial Base and Supply Chain 
Resiliency of the United States.'' The study identified several 
risks to the industrial base, including foreign dependency. 
China, Japan, and Germany were all identified as sole suppliers 
for critical technologies used by the United States military. 
Additionally, the U.S.-China Economic and Security Review 
Commission's 2019 annual report identified a ``growing 
reliance'' on products critical to the manufacturing of active 
pharmaceutical ingredients.
    The committee notes that significant supply chain 
vulnerability has been demonstrated by the recent coronavirus 
pandemic. This represents a critical vulnerability, especially 
when some supply chains are under the direct control or 
influence of the Government of the People's Republic of China 
or are potentially unreliable during an actual conflict. The 
committee remains concerned about overreliance on non-domestic 
sources of supply for certain technologies and products that 
are critical to the national defense, including 
microelectronics and pharmaceutical ingredients. The committee 
believes that the Department must increase resiliency by 
expanding our domestic industrial base as well as fostering 
industrial cooperation with trusted allies and partners, who 
may offer additional capability and capacity in certain areas. 
The committee notes that a variety of mechanisms to balance 
these objectives are available to the Department and enshrined 
in title 10, United States Code, to include the Berry amendment 
and the National Technology and Industrial Base, and elsewhere 
in section 55 of title 50, United States Code, pertaining to 
the Defense Production Act. The committee notes that, in some 
cases, these authorities have been used to support and maintain 
trusted and assured sources of critical goods from domestic or 
friendly nation sources and may be used beneficially to address 
other materials and goods. In establishing an assessment 
process for considering all available mechanisms, the committee 
intends to increase defense industrial base resiliency while 
also reducing espionage vulnerabilities and limiting the 
potential for foreign sabotage or disruption of U.S. access to 
supply.
    The committee notes that the assessments required by this 
provision are intended neither to lead to the removal of 
covered items as identified in section 2533a(b) of title 10, 
United States Code, nor to remove the Department's ability to 
make a determination of non-availability of domestic sources 
under section 2533a(c) of title 10, United States Code, to meet 
critical needs. The committee notes that the provision is 
intended to initiate analyses of items where such a 
determination has been made, to determine whether and what 
actions to take to develop additional domestic capacity, and to 
thereby increase supply chain security.

Microelectronics manufacturing strategy (sec. 807)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Deputy Secretary of Defense to develop a Department of Defense-
wide (DOD-wide) strategy by January 1, 2021, to manufacture 
state-of-the-art integrated circuits in the United States 
within a period of 3-5 years that includes a plan to explore 
and evaluate options for re-establishing foundry services and 
the industrial capabilities associated with such services. The 
provision would require the Secretary of Defense to submit the 
strategy, together with any views and recommendations that the 
Secretary may have, to the President, the National Security 
Council, and the National Economic Council by January 15, 2021, 
followed by a briefing, not later than February 1, 2021, to the 
congressional defense committees. The committee expects the 
Deputy Secretary of Defense, in implementing this provision, to 
consult with the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and 
Sustainment and the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
Engineering and to integrate the results of ongoing studies 
sponsored by those officials.
    Section 224 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) required the Department of 
Defense to develop tiered standards for the security of supply 
chains for microelectronics and to procure products that comply 
with such standards. The committee intended this provision to 
stimulate government and industry action to reduce the United 
States' current near-total dependence on overseas foundries for 
the manufacture and assembly of state-of-the-art 
microelectronics.
    Over the last few decades, Taiwan, South Korea, and the 
People's Republic of China have implemented large-scale 
national industrial policies to build microelectronics 
manufacturing facilities. In contrast, there are no longer any 
large-scale state-of-the-art microelectronics manufacturing 
foundries in the United States. There are facilities in the 
United States to manufacture advanced integrated circuits but 
they either do not offer manufacturing services for other 
companies' designs, they lack scale, or both.
    The committee is aware that the DOD is developing 
technology that potentially could secure otherwise untrusted 
microelectronics components, but the committee is concerned 
that these technologies cannot protect against supply chain 
disruptions due to geopolitical shifts or military 
confrontation in a volatile region overseas. The committee is 
also aware that the Department is developing a strategy to 
enable the domestic production of state-of-the-art integrated 
circuits in low volumes to meet DOD needs. The committee is 
concerned that this approach will not scale to satisfy larger 
national security and economic requirements for an assured and 
trusted supply of state-of-the-art microelectronics. The 
committee believes that the U.S. Government needs to develop a 
comprehensive microelectronics strategy to foster a sustainable 
domestic electronics manufacturing capability that is globally 
and commercially competitive in both cost and performance.
    The committee notes with concern that microelectronics 
supply chain problems are not limited to state-of-the-art 
devices. The production of printed circuit boards, servers, and 
other essential computing and networking equipment is also 
dominated by foreign suppliers in at-risk locations.

Additional requirements pertaining to printed circuit boards (sec. 808)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Department of Defense to take steps to reduce and mitigate the 
risks of reliance on certain sources of supply and 
manufacturing for printed circuit boards.

Statement of policy with respect to supply of strategic minerals and 
        metals for Department of Defense purposes (sec. 809)

    The committee recommends a provision that would state the 
policy of the United States regarding the supply of strategic 
minerals and metals for the purposes of the Department of 
Defense.

Report on strategic and critical minerals and metals (sec. 810)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report on strategic and 
critical minerals and metals and vulnerabilities in the supply 
chains of such minerals and metals to the Committees on Armed 
Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives not 
later than June 30, 2021.

Stabilization of shipbuilding industrial base workforce (sec. 811)

    The committee recommends a provision that would establish a 
shipbuilding industrial base working group.

Miscellaneous limitations on the procurement of goods other than United 
        States goods (sec. 812)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2534 of title 10, United States Code, related to 
miscellaneous limitations on the procurement of goods.

Use of domestically sourced star trackers in national security 
        satellites (sec. 813)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require, 
beginning October 1, 2021, any acquisition executive of the 
Department of Defense who approves a contract to require any 
star tracker system included in the design of such national 
security satellite to be domestically sourced, unless: (1) 
There was no available domestically sourced star tracker system 
to meet the national security satellite system's needs; (2) The 
cost of the available domestically sourced star tracker system 
was unreasonably priced based on market conditions; or (3) An 
urgent and compelling national security need exists.
    According to a 2011 Department of Defense report, heavily 
subsidized foreign suppliers have invested significantly in 
developing state-of-the-art star tracking systems, effectively 
cornering the international market, including the U.S. 
government satellite market, for models with moderate accuracy. 
Recognizing the critical nature of these star tracking systems 
to the proper operation of U.S. Government satellites, the 
Department of Defense leveraged Title III of the Defense 
Production Act to invest over $22 million in producing a 
competitively-bid, domestically sourced moderate accuracy star 
tracking system, which will be commercially available in 2021. 
Once in production, U.S.-made star trackers will be available 
to meet the range of needs of U.S. national security 
satellites.
    The committee recognizes that star trackers have direct 
access to satellite attitude control systems, making their data 
integrity and processing capabilities integral to the 
satellite's safe navigation while also enabling accurate 
geolocation of terrestrial objects. The committee believes that 
the availability of domestically-sourced star trackers is vital 
to the safe and effective operation of U.S. national security 
satellites.

Modification to small purchase threshold exception to sourcing 
        requirements for certain articles (sec. 814)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify the 
small purchases exception included in section 2533a of title 
10, United States Code, also known as the Berry Amendment. The 
threshold for the small purchases exception in the Berry 
Amendment is based on the simplified acquisition threshold. The 
committee notes that section 805 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) 
modified the simplified acquisition threshold, increasing it 
from $150,000 to $250,000. This provision would return the 
threshold for the small purchases exception in the Berry 
Amendment to $150,000.

             Subtitle B--Acquisition Policy and Management


Report on acquisition risk assessment and mitigation as part of 
        Adaptive Acquisition Framework implementation (sec. 831)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Service Acquisition Executives to identify how they are 
assessing certain risks in acquisition programs under the new 
Adaptive Acquisition Framework.
    The committee continues to appreciate the careful 
consideration paid by the Department of Defense to its Adaptive 
Acquisition Framework, which implements the acquisition reforms 
legislated over the last 5 years. The committee believes that 
the Service Acquisition Executives play important roles as 
portfolio managers and in executing programs delegated by the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment. The 
committee believes that the Department of Defense can no longer 
afford to use cost, schedule, and performance thresholds as 
simple proxies for risk when determining the path that an 
acquisition program travels through the Defense Acquisition 
System and in organizing how programs are managed and overseen. 
Exclusive attention to cost, schedule, and performance of major 
defense acquisition programs and other development programs 
obscures myriad other risks in programs, large and small, any 
one of which could be single points of failure for successful 
acquisitions. Given the role that the Service Acquisition 
Executives play in portfolio and program management, the 
committee believes their insights to be valuable in shaping 
overall acquisition policy.
    The committee believes that another area of opportunity is 
the optimization of the Department's requirements generation 
processes, as established under Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff Instruction 5123.01H, pertaining to the Joint 
Capabilities Integration and Development System, and the 
associated manual. The committee notes that the Department's 
challenges are well-described in the MITRE Corporation's March 
2020 report, titled ``Modernizing DOD Requirements Enabling 
Speed, Agility, and Innovation,'' in particular the additional 
time it takes to produce validated requirements for an 
acquisition program. The committee notes the report's 
recommendations accord with the idea underpinning the 
Department's Adaptive Acquisition Framework. Notwithstanding 
the committee's direction elsewhere in this Act regarding the 
Department's incorporation of certain elements in finalizing 
its interim Software Acquisition Pathway, the committee directs 
the Secretary of Defense to consider the recommendations of the 
MITRE Corporation's report and to provide views to the 
congressional defense committees, along with rationales for why 
such recommendations could not be implemented if they are 
determined to be inapposite, not later than July 15, 2021.

Comptroller General report on implementation of software acquisition 
        reforms (sec. 832)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Comptroller General of the United States to assess the extent 
to which the Department of Defense has implemented various 
reforms related to the acquisition of software for weapon 
systems, business systems, and other activities that are part 
of the defense acquisition system. The committee notes that the 
Defense Science Board and Defense Innovation Board have 
produced substantial studies with significant recommendations 
for reform and that the committee has itself produced numerous 
provisions in prior National Defense Authorization Acts related 
to the reform of software acquisition. The committee further 
notes the Department's commitment to implementing these 
reforms.
    The Comptroller General would brief the committee by March 
15, 2021, and scope follow-on work accordingly.
    The provision would also make certain modifications to the 
Comptroller General's annual assessment of selected acquisition 
programs and initiatives.

Subtitle C--Amendments to General Contracting Authorities, Procedures, 
                            and Limitations


Authority to acquire innovative commercial products and services using 
        general solicitation competitive procedures (sec. 841)

    The committee recommends a provision that would permanently 
authorize the Department of Defense to use what are commonly 
known as Commercial Solutions Openings to solicit and acquire 
innovative commercial items, technologies, or services.
    The committee notes that this authority was originally 
established in section 879 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) and 
that it has been successfully used by the Department to 
establish agreements with small businesses in technology areas 
relevant to supporting the National Defense Strategy.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to collect 
and develop best practices for the use of this authority and to 
share those practices with relevant acquisition organizations 
as well as to include it with appropriate educational and 
training activities of the Department's acquisition workforce.

Truth in Negotiations Act threshold for Department of Defense contracts 
        (sec. 842)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 2306a of title 10, United States Code, by establishing 
a standard $2.0 million threshold for application of the 
requirements of the Truth in Negotiations Act.

Revision of proof required when using an evaluation factor for defense 
        contractors employing or subcontracting with members of the 
        selected reserve of the reserve components of the Armed Forces 
        (sec. 843)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 819 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2006 (Public Law 109-163) to remove a documentation 
requirement that is duplicative of solicitation requirements 
established under subpart 15.203 of the Federal Acquisition 
Regulation. The committee appreciates the Department of 
Defense's continued attention to regulatory reform efforts and 
notes that this change is based on a recommendation from the 
Department's Regulatory Reform Task Force.

Contract authority for advanced development of initial or additional 
        prototype units (sec. 844)

    The committee recommends a provision that would enhance an 
authority previously provided to the Department of Defense to 
streamline the process for moving technologies from science and 
technology into production by permitting activities to be 
performed under the same contract as the technology is matured. 
The committee notes that this proposal would help to implement 
the National Defense Strategy as a reform effort to enable 
greater performance and affordability, capability delivery at 
the speed of relevance, and rapid, iterative approaches from 
development to fielding.

Definition of business system deficiencies for contractor business 
        systems (sec. 845)

    The committee recommends a provision that would replace the 
term ``significant deficiency'' and its definition in section 
893 of the Ike Skelton National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2011 (Public Law 111-383) with the term ``material 
weakness'' and its definition, as established by Generally 
Accepted Auditing Standards. The committee notes that the 
Section 809 Panel's ``Report of the Advisory Panel on 
Streamlining and Codifying Acquisition Regulations'' 
recommended this terminology change to ensure consistency 
between the National Defense Authorization Act, the Defense 
Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement, and Generally 
Accepted Auditing Standards.
    In implementing this change in the Defense Federal 
Acquisition Regulation Supplement, the Department of Defense 
should ensure that the definitions for associated terms are 
also updated or incorporated as appropriate, including: 
``significant deficiency,'' ``other deficiency,'' ``material 
noncompliance,'' ``misstatement,'' and ``acceptable contractor 
business system.''

Repeal of pilot program on payment of costs for denied Government 
        Accountability Office bid protests (sec. 846)

    The committee recommends a provision that would repeal 
section 827 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91), which required the 
Secretary of Defense to carry out a pilot program to determine 
the effectiveness of requiring contractors to reimburse the 
Department of Defense (DOD) for costs incurred in processing 
covered protests. The committee finds that the pilot program is 
unlikely to result in improvements to the bid protest process 
given the small number of bid protests captured by the pilot 
criteria and lack of cost data.
    The committee continues to support efforts to improve the 
handling of bid protests. In support of such efforts, the 
committee directs the Secretary of Defense to undertake a study 
of the processes for agency-level bid protests. The study 
should evaluate the following for agency-level bid protests: 
prevalence, timeliness, outcomes, availability, and reliability 
of data on protest activities; consistency of protest processes 
among the military services; and any other challenges that 
affect the expediency of such protest processes. In doing so, 
the study should review existing law, the Federal Acquisition 
Regulation, and agency policies and procedures and solicit 
input from across the DOD and industry stakeholders. The study 
should also include recommendations to improve the expediency, 
timeliness, transparency, and consistency of agency-level bid 
protests.
    Not later than September 1, 2021, the Secretary of Defense 
shall provide the congressional defense committees with a 
report detailing the results and recommendations of the study, 
together with such comments as the Secretary determines 
appropriate.

 Subtitle D--Provisions Relating to Major Defense Acquisition Programs


Implementation of Modular Open Systems Architecture requirements (sec. 
        861)

    The committee recommends a provision that would facilitate 
and establish requirements for the open systems architecture 
for Joint All-Domain Command and Control to ensure 
compatibility across new and legacy systems in the Department 
of Defense.

Sustainment reviews (sec. 862)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
military services to submit certain information, already 
required in section 2441 of title 10, United States Code, to 
the Congress regarding operating and support costs of the 
largest and most expensive acquisition programs. The 
information would also be required to be available on a public 
website maintained by the Director of the Cost Assessment and 
Program Evaluation. Additionally, the section would require the 
Comptroller General of the United States to assess the steps 
the military departments are taking to quantify and address 
operating and support cost growth.

Recommendations for future direct selections (sec. 863)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
each military department to nominate to the congressional 
defense committees at least one acquisition program for which 
it would be appropriate and advantageous to use large numbers 
of users to provide direct assessment of the outcome of a 
competitive contract award.

Disclosures for certain shipbuilding major defense acquisition program 
        offers (sec. 864)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
disclosures for certain shipbuilding major defense acquisition 
program offers.
    The disclosures would require a description of the extent 
to which the offeror's planned contract performance will 
include foreign government subsidized performance, financing, 
financial guarantees, or tax concessions.
    The committee's intent is to increase transparency in 
shipbuilding major defense acquisition programs.

                   Subtitle E--Small Business Matters


Prompt payment of contractors (sec. 871)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
contract financing law to strengthen the requirement that the 
Department of Defense establish a goal to pay small business 
contractors within 15 days of receipt of an invoice. The 
committee notes that the Defense Logistics Agency decision in 
November 2019 to move from 15-day payment terms to 30-day terms 
may have a detrimental effect on small businesses' ability to 
continue to do business for the U.S. Government, especially 
during economic downturns. The committee further notes that 
modern invoicing and payment systems should be able to support 
expedited review and payment of invoices and support Department 
efforts to continue to leverage existing commercial systems in 
support of those processes.

Extension of pilot program for streamlined awards for innovative 
        technology programs (sec. 872)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend by 3 
years the authorization of a pilot program to streamline 
contracting and auditing processes for certain innovative 
technology projects carried out by small businesses. Originally 
authorized in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92), this authority has the potential 
to accelerate the awards of Small Business Innovation Research 
contracts and other contracts to innovative non-traditional 
defense contractors by alleviating requirements for small 
businesses to submit certified cost and pricing data and 
requirements for certain types of audit and records 
examination.

     Subtitle F--Provisions Related to Software-Driven Capabilities


Inclusion of software in government performance of acquisition 
        functions (sec. 881)

    The committee recommends a provision that would add 
software to the list of government performance of acquisition 
functions to ensure that each acquisition program has a 
software program lead position that is performed by a properly 
qualified member of the Armed Forces or a full-time employee of 
the Department of Defense. Additionally, the provision would 
remove the statutory reference to the categories of Major 
Automated Information System and Major Defense Acquisition 
Program so that software expertise is required for all 
acquisition programs, as needed.
    As noted in the February 2018 Defense Science Board report 
titled ``Design and Acquisition of Software for Defense 
Systems,'' software is a crucial and growing part of weapon 
systems and the Department needs to be able to sustain software 
indefinitely. In the administration proposal on this provision, 
the Department noted that it ``lacks modern software 
development expertise in its program offices or the broader 
functional acquisition workforce'' and that the Department 
``needs to ensure software management and expertise is 
developed and established as core to major programs.'' As part 
of implementing the Department's high priority of improving 
software acquisition, the Department must ensure that properly 
qualified professionals occupy key leadership positions 
responsible for software.

Balancing security and innovation in software development and 
        acquisition (sec. 882)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to 
incorporate certain considerations while finalizing the interim 
software policy for a software acquisition pathway as part of 
the Department of Defense's (DOD's) new Adaptive Acquisition 
Framework.
    The committee recognizes the growing importance of assuring 
the security of software and determining the provenance of code 
and the risks posed by reliance--whether known or inadvertent--
on code produced by or within adversary nations.
    The committee is also concerned about DOD's non-compliance 
with section 875 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91), which required the 
Department to implement an Office of Management and Budget 
pilot relating to open source software due to significant 
potential benefits to the Department, to include improved 
performance. The committee notes that the Department has cited 
security concerns in connection with openly publishing certain 
code. The committee further notes that there is no 
comprehensive Department-wide process for conducting security 
reviews of code or parts of code and that the National Security 
Agency, which should have similar security concerns to the 
Department as a whole, has such a process for the purpose of 
maximizing appropriate public release.
    The committee encourages the Department to pursue the 
appropriate balance of innovation and security in developing, 
acquiring, and maintaining software.
    The committee further directs the Under Secretary and the 
Department of Defense Chief Information Officer to develop a 
roadmap with milestones that will enable the Department to 
require and effectively manage the submission by contractors of 
a software bill of materials.
    Finally, the committee reminds the Department that section 
800 of the National Defense Authorization for Fiscal Year 2020 
(Public Law 116-92) required that the Department's software 
policy provide for delivery of capability to end-users no later 
than 1 year after funds are obligated and that other 
government-wide policy and best practices call for updates no 
less frequently than once every 6 months.

Comptroller General report on intellectual property acquisition and 
        licensing (sec. 883)

    The committee recommends a provision that would direct the 
Comptroller General of the United States to report on the 
implementation of the Department of Defense's instruction for 
intellectual property acquisition and licensing. The committee 
notes that the Department established this instruction in 
response to section 2322 of title 10, United States Code, which 
required the Department to develop a policy for intellectual 
property acquisition and licensing and to create a cadre of 
intellectual property experts.
    The report should assess the following: (1) Whether the 
Department is achieving the instruction's core principles; (2) 
The extent to which key offices are fulfilling their 
responsibilities; (3) The Department's progress in creating a 
cadre of intellectual property experts; (4) How the Department 
is assessing and demonstrating implementation; and (5) Changes 
to acquisition programs, among other things. The Comptroller 
General should submit the report to the congressional defense 
committees no later than October 1, 2021.

                       Subtitle G--Other Matters


Safeguarding defense-sensitive United States intellectual property, 
        technology, and other data and information (sec. 891)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish, enforce, and track actions 
being taken to protect defense-sensitive United States 
intellectual property, technology, and other data and 
information, including hardware and software, from acquisition 
by China. Additionally, the provision would require the 
Secretary to generate a list of critical national security 
technology and provide for mechanisms to restrict employees or 
former employees of the defense industrial base from working 
directly for companies wholly owned by, or under the direction 
of, the government of the People's Republic of China.
    The National Defense Strategy establishes that long-term 
strategic competition with near-peer adversaries is one of the 
two ``principal priorities'' of the Department of Defense. The 
committee recognizes that the protection of defense-sensitive 
United States intellectual property, technology, and other data 
and information from acquisition by China or other potential 
adversaries is vital to the national security of the United 
States. It also recognizes that the Government of the People's 
Republic of China maintains, as a national priority, an 
unequalled global program of theft and other misappropriation 
of intellectual property and technology and unacceptable 
requirements for transfer of intellectual property, technology, 
and other data and information, with particular attention to 
items and matters of national security and economic importance.

Domestic comparative testing activities (sec. 892)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 2350a of title 10, United States Code, to allow for 
domestic comparative test. The committee believes that the 
Department of Defense's new Adaptive Acquisition Framework is a 
very important step toward ensuring additional avenues for new 
entrants to the defense industrial base. The committee 
emphasizes the Federal Acquisition Regulation preference for 
commercial solutions and believes that this is especially 
important in technical areas where commercial development 
outpaces the Department. The ability of companies with 
innovative commercial solutions to conduct comparative tests 
with one or more programs of record against program 
requirements is foundational to enabling the Department's 
benefiting from commercial innovation.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment and the Under Secretary 
of Defense for Research and Engineering to jointly define the 
points along each of the acquisition pathways where market 
research should be refreshed and establish entry points for 
such testing.

Repeal of apprenticeship program (sec. 893)

    The committee recommends a provision that would repeal 
section 2870 of title 10, United States Code, as added by 
section 865 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92), which requires the 
Secretary of Defense to revise the Defense Supplement to the 
Federal Acquisition Regulation to require that a system be used 
to monitor or record contractor past performance related to 
efforts to meet or exceed an apprenticeship employment goal of 
20 percent.

                       Items of Special Interest


Army Combat Fitness Test equipment

    The committee is aware that United States Army Forces 
Command (FORSCOM) trains, mobilizes, deploys, sustains, 
transforms, and reconstitutes assigned conventional forces and 
that United States Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) 
recruits, trains, and educates soldiers for all initial entry 
training. The Army Combat Fitness Test (ACFT) with its Holistic 
Health Fitness (H2F) approach is scheduled to replace the Army 
Physical Fitness Test in October 2020. The committee 
understands that there are domestic companies interested in 
supplying and sustaining this equipment. However, the committee 
is concerned that FORSCOM has procured containerized gym 
equipment sourced from China and other non-domestic sources 
using a reverse auction contract vehicle without any technical 
evaluation ahead of ACFT implementation. The committee is most 
concerned that FORSCOM does not have a sustainment plan for 
these container gyms and will face increased operation and 
maintenance costs in maintaining lower quality equipment 
sustained in the field over time.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of the 
Army to provide a briefing to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives by October 1, 
2020, on: (1) The results of an assessment as to whether its 
reverse auction acquisitions were appropriate for ACFT gym 
equipment and whether it has the appropriate sustainment plan 
in place for its gym equipment; and (2) A plan to transfer 
procurement and sustainment of ACFT supporting gym equipment 
from FORSCOM to TRADOC.

Comptroller General review on the impact of small business Federal 
        contracting programs

    The committee directs the Comptroller General of the United 
States to conduct a review of Department of Defense contracts 
with certain small business concerns and assess the effect that 
Federal contract set asides have had on small business concerns 
in the defense industrial base. The committee notes that 
Federal contracting programs have been established to assist 
small business concerns with the intent of stimulating economic 
development and creating a level playing field. This has 
generally been accomplished by setting aside certain 
percentages of Federal contracts for different categories of 
small business concerns, including small business concerns 
owned and controlled by socially and economically disadvantaged 
individuals, as defined in section 8(d)(3)(C) of the Small 
Business Act (15 U.S.C. 637(d)(3)(C)), small business concerns 
owned and controlled by women, as defined in section 3 of such 
Act (15 U.S.C. 632), and qualified HUBZone small business 
concerns, as defined in section 31(b) of such Act (15 U.S.C. 
657a(b)). However, beyond these percentages, the committee 
would like to understand how the Department measures the 
success of its efforts under these small business programs and, 
in turn, determines the health of this critical element of the 
defense industrial base.
    Therefore, the Comptroller General review shall assess: (1) 
Whether the Department's efforts carried out under these 
Federal contracting programs have achieved their intended 
effect of stimulating economic development and creating a level 
playing field for small business concerns in the defense 
industrial base; (2) How the Department measures the short- and 
long-term effects of these contracting programs on small 
business concerns in the defense industrial base, (3) The 
Department's progress in implementing the small business plan 
required under section 851 of the John S. McCain National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-
232); and (4) Other matters that the Comptroller General 
determines appropriate. The Comptroller General shall submit a 
report detailing the findings of the review to the 
congressional defense committees and congressional small 
business committees by August 31, 2021.

Contracting for non-traditional defense contractors

    The committee recognizes that certain categories of non-
traditional businesses face barriers to working with the 
Department of Defense. These businesses include, but are not 
limited to, veteran-owned, disabled-veteran-owned, and 
minority-owned businesses. The committee further recognizes 
that other categories of non-traditional businesses face 
obstacles to contracting with the Department, including 
entities that are owned entirely by employee stock ownership 
plans (ESOPs). The committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the congressional defense committees 
by December 31, 2020, on the advantages of working with ESOPs 
and the barriers ESOPs face in contracting with the Department. 
For the purposes of this briefing, an ESOP shall mean an entity 
that is owned entirely by an employee stock ownership plan (as 
defined in section 4975(e)(7) of the Internal Revenue Code of 
1986 (title 26 of United States Code)).

Development of domestic unmanned aircraft systems industry

    The committee notes the prohibition on the operation and 
procurement of foreign-made unmanned aircraft systems (UASs) in 
section 848 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92). As such, the committee 
encourages the Department of Defense to take additional steps 
to promote the further development of the domestic UAS 
industry, including making it easier for small UAS providers to 
work with the Department by reducing burdensome requirements 
for participation in Department programs.
    The committee also encourages the Department to use 
available rapid acquisition authorities to contract for proven 
commercial off-the-shelf technologies and recommends that the 
Department expand the use of capabilities from small, 
innovative, domestic UAS companies to provide the greatest 
opportunity to successfully meet performance objectives, 
program cost objectives, and schedules.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to brief the 
congressional defense committees no later than January 31, 
2021, on the Department's plans to support domestic 
manufacturing of small unmanned aircraft systems, perhaps 
including use of the Defense Production Act or other 
mechanisms, to enhance the domestic production capacity.

Domestic procurement of military working dogs

    The committee notes the critical role played by military 
working dogs in military operations around the world, and the 
committee is concerned by increased competition in procuring 
military working dogs. According to the Air Force, which serves 
as the Executive Agent for the Military Working Dog Program in 
Department of Defense Directive 5200.31E, nearly all military 
working dogs procured by the Department are whelped in Europe 
and trained domestically. Due to the finite number of breeders 
overseas, as well as rising market demand, the cost for the Air 
Force and other agencies to procure whelped military working 
dogs from Europe is skyrocketing. The Air Force recognizes that 
the United States does not have enough established breeders 
with the expertise, genetic quality, and potential capacity to 
meet increasing demands for military working dogs for the 
Department of Defense and other executive agencies. The 
committee supports initiatives of the Air Force to meet this 
challenge, including the forthcoming proposed Capabilities 
Based Assessment on the military working dog program that will 
include a review of procurement. This year-long assessment 
enables the Department to identify requirements necessary to 
execute the aforementioned program successfully and to breed 
military working dogs domestically in order to sustain a 
stable, secure supply and to minimize costs.
    Additionally, the committee recognizes that the 
Department's Military Working Dog programs, carried out by the 
Air Force as executive agent, are in need of a dedicated line 
of accounting and therefore supports Department efforts to 
establish one. A dedicated line of accounting will more 
accurately capture the facility and resource requirements 
necessary to successfully and efficiently provide military 
working dogs to all the military services.

Domestic sources for corrosion control chemicals

    The committee recognizes that the impact of corrosion on 
the Department of Defense (DOD) is nearly $20.0 billion per 
year as it accounts for as much as 20 percent of maintenance 
costs and impacts military readiness. The committee notes that 
many of the current chemicals used to treat, mitigate, and 
control corrosion are produced in China and can be dangerous 
for workers and harmful to the environment. The committee 
believes that DOD should not be reliant on chemicals from China 
to maintain vital weapon systems and other military equipment. 
The committee understands that there are now bio-based 
solutions that are produced domestically that are safer, better 
performing, and more cost-effective than traditional solutions. 
The committee believes that the DOD should review whether these 
bio-based chemicals, which are already used in other domestic 
sections such as the oil and gas industry, could offer a better 
performing domestic corrosion control solution.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Assistant Secretary 
of Defense for Sustainment to review commercially-available, 
domestically-manufactured bio-based corrosion control and 
mitigation solutions used in other commercial sectors and to 
provide to the committee no later than November 1, 2020, a 
briefing that should include the Department's findings and 
potential military applications.

Improving information available to contracting officials regarding 
        contractor workplace safety violations

    The committee is concerned that companies with serious 
workplace safety violations continue to receive Department of 
Defense (DOD) contracts. The committee notes recent legislation 
directing attention to DOD contractor workplace safety, 
including establishing section 2509 of title 10, United States 
Code, to streamline and digitize processes for identifying and 
mitigating risks to the defense industrial base across the 
acquisition process. The committee notes that a February 2019 
Government Accountability Office (GAO) report, titled ``Defense 
Contracting: Enhanced Information Needed on Contractor 
Workplace Safety'' (GAO-19-235), mandated by the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91) identified several challenges the DOD faces in addressing 
violations. The report found that, among 192 companies 
performing manufacturing or construction contracts for the DOD, 
83 had previously been cited for health and safety violations 
and 52 of those had at least one ``serious'' violation, meaning 
that there was a ``substantial probability that death or 
serious physical harm could result, and the company knew or 
would have known with the exercise of reasonable diligence.''
    The GAO noted the absence of information on Occupational 
Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) violations to inform 
DOD decisions related to contract award and administration and 
recommended that the Assistant Secretary of Labor for OSHA 
address data limitations that prevent the DOD from reliably 
identifying contractors with violations. The GAO also 
recommended that the DOD make better use of the OSHA website 
and consider establishing a safety performance rating for DOD 
contracts in industries with high rates of occupational 
injuries. The DOD agreed with the recommendations, but it is 
unclear whether it has taken steps to implement them. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide to the Senate Armed Services Committee a briefing on 
the steps taken to implement the GAO recommendations by March 
1, 2021.

Procurement Technical Assistance Program and COVID-19

    The committee recognizes that, in order to address the 
economic damage caused by the COVID-19 pandemic, the Congress 
passed legislation that provided economic support to certain 
businesses.
    The Procurement Technical Assistance Program supports the 
work of Procurement Technical Assistance Centers (PTACs) to 
provide support to businesses to pursue and perform contracts 
with the Department of Defense, other Federal, State, and local 
government entities, and with government prime contractors--
often at no cost to the supported business.
    The committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
identify opportunities for PTACs to provide their client 
businesses with relevant information related to recently 
created opportunities for economic support.

Report on battery supply chain security

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense relies 
on reliable, durable, and high performance batteries for nearly 
all weapon systems and other military equipment such as backup, 
energy storage, and uninterrupted power supply. The committee 
notes that the United States is heavily reliant on China and 
foreign sources for mining and refining of lithium to create 
lithium ion batteries necessary for today's modern weapon 
systems.
    The committee also notes that the last primary lead smelter 
in the United States closed in 2013 and that, in order to 
produce new lead batteries needed for military and other 
systems, spent lead acid batteries must be recycled. The 
committee is concerned about the recent rise of unregulated, 
unreported, or mislabeled exports of spent lead acid batteries, 
as U.S.-based secondary lead recyclers are encountering a 
shortage of batteries to recycle for use in military and 
civilian supply chains.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Under Secretary of 
Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment, in coordination with 
the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Industrial 
Policy, to deliver a report to the congressional defense 
committees no later than February 1, 2021, on the threats to 
the supply chain and reliance on foreign sources for lithium 
and the impact of unregulated, unreported, or mislabeled export 
of spent lead acid batteries affecting the domestic lead supply 
chain. In completing this report, the Department should consult 
with any other Federal agencies it deems appropriate.

Report on satellite power sourcing

    The committee is aware that high-efficiency solar cells and 
panels are essential for powering civil and national security 
satellites. U.S. technological leadership and secure and 
reliable sources of solar cells and panels are critical aspects 
of wartime and peacetime satellite operations. A 2019 report by 
Air Force Research Laboratory and the Defense Innovation Unit 
found that China has a national strategy to become a global 
space power and aims to ``penetrate foreign space companies to 
provide access to space-enabled global infrastructure . . . and 
use[s] predatory pricing and unfair trade practices to dominate 
key market segments.''
    One of the recommendations in the report is for the United 
States to ``include reforms in government contracting and 
direct government investment as needed to compensate for U.S. 
adversaries'' anti-competitive behavior, and establish the 
long-term technological and logistical space infrastructure 
needed to ensure long-term, U.S. dominance in space.''
    The committee understands that the U.S. domestic supply of 
satellite solar power products is limited and believes that a 
whole-of-government approach is needed to enable a stable 
domestic industrial base for solar cell and panel 
manufacturing. The committee also believes that foreign 
competition within the solar cell industry is often subsidized 
in order to undercut U.S. domestic suppliers. The committee 
therefore directs the Secretary of Defense, in consultation 
with other agencies as required, to submit a report to the 
congressional defense and intelligence committees by December 
31, 2020, outlining the vulnerabilities and risks associated 
with foreign sources of satellite solar power technology and 
provide a set of recommended investments, policy changes, or 
other steps deemed appropriate to support this segment of the 
national security space industrial base.

Risks associated with contractor ownership

    The committee has a longstanding concern regarding the 
risks arising from insufficient transparency of contractor 
ownership structures, as reflected in section 845 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public 
Law 116-92) on modernization of acquisition processes to ensure 
integrity of the defense industrial base and section 847 of the 
same law on mitigating risks related to foreign ownership, 
control, or influence of Department of Defense (DOD) 
contractors or subcontractors.
    The committee notes that a November 2019 report by the 
Government Accountability Office (GAO), titled ``Defense 
Procurement: Ongoing DOD Fraud Risk Assessment Efforts Should 
Include Contractor Ownership'' (GAO-20-106), found that the DOD 
faces ``financial and nonfinancial fraud and national security 
risks posed by contractors with opaque ownership.'' The report 
noted that contractors can use opaque ownership structures for 
illicit financial gain through a variety of methods, including 
price inflation, fraudulent subcontracting, and subverting 
competitive processes. The DOD concurred with GAO's 
recommendation that the DOD Comptroller ``should include an 
assessment of risks related to contractor ownership as part of 
its ongoing efforts to plan and conduct a department-wide fraud 
risk assessment.'' However, it is unclear what steps have been 
taken to implement it.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to brief the committee, not later than October 30, 2020, on the 
status of implementing this recommendation. The briefing should 
also identify resources that the DOD is dedicating to 
mitigating the risks associated with contractor ownership, 
identify the entity or entities within the Department dedicated 
to addressing contractor ownership risks, evaluate whether 
existing control activities are sufficient to respond to these 
risks, and recommend any changes to law that would support 
efforts to identify and mitigate these risks.

Secure sources of supply for rare earth elements

    The committee is aware of and supports the Department's 
focus on identifying and acquiring secure sources of supply for 
rare earth elements (REE). The committee recognizes that the 
extraction of REE is becoming more prevalent across the United 
States and that there is further research being conducted to 
determine innovative techniques to improve such extraction of 
REE. For example, substantial progress has been made in the 
extraction of REE from coal acid mine drainage waste. The 
Department is encouraged to team with other agencies to take 
this proven extraction method from the laboratory to a 
practical, viable, steady-state process that produces REE for 
the Department's warfighting needs. With the increase in 
extraction, the committee understands the importance for the 
Department of determining how to best store extracted REE and 
to maintain secure sources of supply. The committee strongly 
encourages the Department to continue to stockpile extracted 
REE in their appropriate forms, as it is critical for the 
Department to maintain adequate amounts of REE to source 
warfighter equipment and munitions in support of the National 
Defense Strategy.
    The committee also strongly supports the five Presidential 
Determinations authorizing the use of Defense Production Act 
(DPA) Title III authorities to strengthen the domestic 
industrial base and supply chain for REE. Two Funding 
Opportunity Announcements (FOAs) focused on magnets and process 
capabilities have been issued. The committee urges the 
Department to also use DPA Title III authorities to invest in 
the production of nontraditional sources of REE feedstock, 
including the extraction of REE from coal ash. Coal ash 
deposits containing economically significant fractions of REE 
have been stockpiled in the U.S. for much of the last century 
from coal-burning power plants. They represent a supplemental 
resource to conventional ore-mining. Both industry and Federal 
Government investments have matured processes to extract REE 
from coal ash, and the committee encourages investment in a 
production scale plant to help address the national defense 
market for REE.
    Accordingly, the Secretary of Defense shall brief the 
committee no later than February 1, 2021, and assess the 
viability and necessity of using or developing new technologies 
to maintain secure sources of supply of REE. The briefing shall 
cover or include the following elements: (1) Traditional 
extraction of REE; (2) Nontraditional corrosive extraction and 
refining of such elements from ore and coal; (3) Nontraditional 
noncorrosive extraction and refining of such elements from ore 
and coal; (4) An assessment of the economic importance of REE, 
including Indium, Gallium, Germanium, and Tin; (5) An 
assessment of the domestic supply chain and availability of 
rare earth metals, including Indium, Gallium, Germanium, and 
Tin; and (6) An evaluation of the need to stockpile REE, 
including Indium, Gallium, Germanium, and Tin. The briefing 
shall be provided at the appropriate level of classification.

Shipbuilding industrial base

    The committee notes that the ``Report to Congress on the 
Annual Long-Range Plan for Construction of Naval Vessels for 
Fiscal Year 2019'' stated, ``An efficient and supported 
industrial base is a fundamental requirement to achieving and 
sustaining the Navy's baseline acquisition profiles. Our 
shipbuilding industrial base and supporting vendor base 
constitute a national security imperative that is unique and 
that must be properly managed and protected. Over the previous 
five decades 14 defense-related new construction shipyards have 
closed, 3 have left the defense industry, and one new shipyard 
has opened. Today, the Navy contracts primarily with 7 private 
new-construction shipyards to build our future Battle Force, 
representing significantly less capacity than our principal 
competitors. If faced with the demands of a major conflict it 
may be possible to engage other industries to assist, but the 
cost of such assistance is currently unquantifiable.''
    Consequently, the committee urges the Secretary of the Navy 
to properly manage and protect the domestic Navy shipbuilding 
industrial base and supporting vendor base.

Sustainment of munitions

    Joint Munitions Command (JMC) provides the Army and the 
Joint Force with ready, reliable, and lethal munitions to 
sustain global operations. Since 2002, JMC and the Army have 
taken significant steps to address critical readiness concerns 
identified in the munitions readiness report; however, 
additional steps should be taken to ensure that life cycle 
needs for ammunition are met. In addition, the committee is 
aware of the interagency report, ``Assessing and Strengthening 
the Manufacturing and Defense Industrial Base and Supply Chain 
Resiliency of the United States,'' published in response to 
Executive Order 13806. The report highlights myriad challenges, 
especially for the organic industrial base, for securing the 
supply chain for a wide range of systems, including munitions.
    As such, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army to 
provide a briefing, not later than December 31, 2020, to the 
committee on the feasibility and suitability of establishing a 
pilot program at JMC for the sustainment of munitions as part 
of the overall life-cycle management of munitions programs. The 
briefing should address the recommendations included in the 
interagency report to help ``diversify away from complete 
dependency on source of supply'' as well as ``modernize the 
organic industrial base.'' The briefing should also include 
cost savings and operational efficiencies that could be gained 
by centralizing the sustainment of munitions. Finally, the 
briefing should address whether an automated process would help 
determine critical required levels and the required sources 
needed to fulfill them.

      TITLE IX--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT

   Subtitle A--Office of the Secretary of Defense and Related Matters

Assistant Secretary of Defense for Special Operations and Low-Intensity 
        Conflict and related matters (sec. 901)
    The committee recommends a provision that would clarify the 
responsibilities of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
Special Operations and Low-Intensity Conflict (ASD SOLIC) for 
providing ``service secretary-like'' civilian oversight and 
advocacy for special operations forces (SOF). Specifically, the 
provision would modify section 138(b)(2) of title 10, United 
States Code, to clarify the administrative chain of command for 
the ASD SOLIC in exercising authority, direction, and control 
with respect to the special operations-peculiar administration 
and support of U.S. Special Operations Command (SOCOM). The 
provision would also codify the Secretariat for Special 
Operations, which currently exists within the Office of the ASD 
SOLIC, in section 139 of title 10, United States Code. Lastly, 
the provision would require the Secretary of Defense, not later 
than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, to 
publish a Department of Defense directive establishing policy 
and procedures related to the exercise of authority, direction, 
and control of all matters relating to the organization, 
training, and equipping of SOF by the ASD SOLIC as specified by 
section 138(b)(2)(A) of title 10, United States Code.
    The committee remains concerned with the lack of progress 
on implementation of section 922 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act (NDAA) for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-
328), which enhanced the role of ASD SOLIC as the ``service 
secretary-like'' individual responsible for providing civilian 
oversight and advocacy of SOF. The committee notes that a May 
2019 report published by the Government Accountability Office 
(GAO) found that the majority of the remaining tasks identified 
by the Department as necessary for implementing section 922 do 
not have clear timeframes for completion. Furthermore, the GAO 
found that ``outdated'' departmental guidance is hindering the 
ASD SOLIC's ability to serve as the ``service secretary-like'' 
civilian responsible for the oversight and advocacy of SOF, as 
required by section 138(b)(2)(A) of title 10, United States 
Code. Further, the committee is concerned by the lack of 
progress in staffing the Secretariat for Special Operations 
that was created to facilitate the ASD SOLIC's ``service 
secretary-like'' responsibilities despite efforts by the 
committee in recent NDAAs to provide additional flexibility to 
the Department to bring on additional personnel to support the 
activities of the Secretariat.
    The committee strongly believes that an empowered and 
appropriately resourced ASD SOLIC is critical to the effective 
civilian oversight and advocacy of SOF and to ensuring that 
this force is appropriately aligned with the objectives of the 
National Defense Strategy.
Redesignation and codification in law of Office of Economic Adjustment 
        (sec. 902)
    The committee recommends a provision that would codify the 
Office of Economic Adjustment and redesignate it as the 
``Office of Local Defense Community Cooperation,'' falling 
under the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Acquisition and Sustainment.
Modernization of process used by the Department of Defense to identify, 
        task, and manage Congressional reporting requirements (sec. 
        903)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Assistant Secretary of Defense for Legislative Affairs to 
conduct business process reengineering analysis and assess 
commercially available analytics tools, technologies, and 
services in order to modernize the process by which the 
Department of Defense identifies reporting requirements from 
the text of the National Defense Authorization Act, tasks the 
reports within the Department, and manages their completion and 
delivery to Congress. The analysis shall be conducted with the 
assistance of the Chief Data Officer of the Department of 
Defense and the Director, Defense Digital Service. A briefing 
to the congressional defense committees, due November 15, 2020, 
shall include key takeaways of the business process analysis 
and concrete steps taken to optimize the process, as well as 
any necessary congressional support.
    The committee believes that the current process for 
tasking, assigning, generating, and distributing congressional 
required reports does not serve anyone involved, as most of the 
process involves manual data entry on both the departmental and 
congressional sides. This generates unnecessary workload for 
both sides and significantly impedes Congressional oversight. 
Section 874 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) 
required the Department of Defense to diagnose the obstacles to 
achieving a modernized process for tracking congressionally 
required reports. The Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives have worked with the 
Department to standardize all data elements involved for the 
rapid transmission of data and define the necessary 
functionality of a modernized process. The committee expects 
the Department to aggressively pursue the next step of this 
modernization effort, which is replacing its software systems 
and collaborating with the committee to enable its access to 
such systems in a timely fashion.
Inclusion of Vice Chief of the National Guard Bureau as an advisor to 
        the Joint Requirements Oversight Council (sec. 904)
    The committee recommends a provision that would include the 
Vice Chief of the National Guard Bureau as an advisor to the 
Joint Requirements Oversight Council under certain 
circumstances.
Assignment of Responsibility for the Arctic region within the Office of 
        the Secretary of Defense (sec. 905)
    The committee recommends a provision that would assign 
responsibility for the Arctic region to the Deputy Assistant 
Secretary of Defense for the Western Hemisphere or any other 
Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense the Secretary of Defense 
considers appropriate. The committee recommends that the 
Secretary of Defense consider adding `Arctic Region' to the 
title of the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense designated 
to cover Arctic issues as a way of highlighting the importance 
of the portfolio.

          Subtitle B--Department of Defense Management Reform

Termination of position of Chief Management Officer of the Department 
        of Defense (sec. 911)
    The committee recommends a provision that would 
disestablish the position of the Chief Management Officer of 
the Department of Defense on a date to be determined by the 
Secretary of Defense but in no case later than September 30, 
2022.
Report on assignment of responsibilities, duties, and authorities of 
        Chief Management Officer to other officers or employees of the 
        Department of Defense (sec. 912)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
that, not later than 45 days before the date on which the 
Secretary of Defense determines that the position of the Chief 
Management Officer (CMO) of the Department of Defense (DOD) 
should be disestablished, the Secretary submit to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of 
Representatives a report setting forth: (1) The position and 
title of each officer or employee of the DOD in whom the 
Secretary would vest responsibility for performing the various 
duties of the CMO on the disestablishment of that position; (2) 
Any duties of the CMO that the Secretary would recommend be 
discontinued or modified; (3) A description of the process and 
timeline for transferring the responsibilities and resources of 
the CMO to the appropriate persons and organizations; (4) The 
Secretary's recommendations for additional authorities and 
resources that may be required to ensure effective exercise by 
the appropriate officers or employees of the responsibilities 
to be transferred to them from the CMO; and (5) Such other 
matters as the Secretary deems appropriate.
    The report would be required to reflect that the Secretary 
of Defense: (1) Vested in the Deputy Secretary of Defense 
responsibility to perform such duties of the CMO as are 
properly assigned to the Deputy in the role of Chief Operating 
Officer of the Department under provisions of section 1123 of 
title 31, United States Code; and (2) Assigned to the 
Performance Improvement Officer of the Department of Defense 
the functions enumerated in section 1124 of title 31, United 
States Code.
Performance Improvement Officer of the Department of Defense (sec. 913)
    The committee recommends a provision that would codify in 
section 142a of title 10, United States Code, the position of 
Performance Improvement Officer (PIO) of the Department of 
Defense (DOD), to be appointed consistent with and perform the 
duties and functions enumerated in section 1124 of title 31, 
United States Code, together with such other duties and 
responsibilities prescribed by the Secretary or Deputy 
Secretary of Defense.
    The DOD PIO would report directly to the Deputy Secretary 
of Defense in the Deputy's role as the Chief Operating Officer 
of the Department of Defense, as set forth in section 1123 of 
title 31. The PIO would be authorized to communicate views on 
matters under the PIO's purview directly to the Deputy 
Secretary, without obtaining the approval or concurrence of any 
other officer or employee of the Department.
Assignment of certain responsibilities and duties to particular 
        officers of the Department of Defense (sec. 914)
    The committee recommends a provision that would affirm the 
designation of the Deputy Secretary of Defense as the Chief 
Operating Officer of the Department of Defense in accordance 
with section 1123 of title 31, United States Code, and the 
Deputy's responsibility for supervision of the Performance 
Improvement Officer of the Department. Further, consistent with 
the disestablishment of the position of the Chief Management 
Officer of the Department of Defense, the provision would 
reassign certain responsibilities and duties to particular 
officers of the Department, including: (1) To the Deputy 
Secretary of Defense or such other officer or official of the 
Department as the Secretary of Defense or Deputy may designate, 
the authority to designate a priority defense business system, 
consistent with section 2222 of title 10, United States Code; 
(2) To the Secretary of Defense, the Deputy Secretary of 
Defense, or an officer or official designated by either, the 
responsibility to conduct periodic reviews of the efficiency 
and effectiveness of each Defense Agency and Department of 
Defense Field Activity, as set forth in section 192 of title 
10, United States Code; (3) To the Under Secretary of Defense 
(Comptroller), together with any such officers and employees of 
the Department of Defense as the Secretary or Deputy Secretary 
of Defense may designate, the maintenance of the ``Financial 
Improvement and Audit Remediation Plan'' in accordance with 
section 240b of title 10, United States Code; and (4) To the 
Performance Improvement Officer of the Department of Defense, 
designation as a member of the Defense Business Council and 
access authorization to all common enterprise data of the 
Department of Defense as set forth in section 2222 of title 10, 
United States Code.
Assignment of responsibilities and duties of Chief Management Officer 
        to officers or employees of the Department of Defense to be 
        designated (sec. 915)
    The committee recommends a provision that, consistent with 
the disestablishment of the position of the Chief Management 
Officer of the Department of Defense, would reassign certain 
duties and responsibilities established in law to those 
officers or employees of the Department so designated by the 
Secretary or Deputy Secretary of Defense.
Definition of enterprise business operations for title 10, United 
        States Code (sec. 916)
    The committee recommends a provision that would codify in 
section 101 of title 10, United States Code, the definition of 
the term ``enterprise business operations.''
Annual report on enterprise business operations of the Department of 
        Defense (sec. 917)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to the Congress an annual report 
on the enterprise business operations of the Department of 
Defense. The report would include: a review of the proposed 
budget for the enterprise business operations of each of the 
Defense Agencies and Department of Defense Field Activities for 
the fiscal year beginning in the year in which the report is 
submitted; the identification of each such proposed budget that 
does not achieve required levels of efficiency and 
effectiveness for enterprise business operations; and a 
discussion of the actions proposed to address any such 
deficiency.
Conforming amendments (sec. 918)
    The committee recommends a provision that would would 
provide conforming amendments to title 10, United States Code, 
to reflect the disestablishment of the position of Chief 
Management Officer of the Department of Defense and the 
establishment of the position of Performance Improvement 
Officer of the Department of Defense.

                    Subtitle C--Space Force Matters

        Part I--Amendments to Integrate the Space Force Into Law

Clarification of Space Force and Chief of Space Operations authorities 
        (sec. 931)
    The committee recommends a provision that would provide 
technical and conforming amendments to clarify in existing law 
the authorities of the United States Space Force and the Chief 
of Space Operations.
Amendments to Department of the Air Force provisions in title 10, 
        United States Code (sec. 932)
    The committee recommends a provision that would provide 
technical and conforming amendments to incorporate the United 
States Space Force in Department of the Air Force provisions in 
title 10, United States Code.
Amendments to other provisions of title 10, United States Code (sec. 
        933)
    The committee recommends a provision that would provide 
technical and conforming amendments to incorporate the United 
States Space Force in certain provisions of title 10, United 
States Code.
Amendments to provisions of law relating to pay and allowances (sec. 
        934)
    The committee recommends a provision that would provide 
technical and conforming amendments to incorporate the United 
States Space Force in certain provisions of law pertaining to 
military pay and allowances.
Amendments relating to provisions of law on veterans' benefits (sec. 
        935)
    The committee recommends a provision that would provide 
technical and conforming amendments to incorporate the United 
States Space Force in certain provisions of law relating to 
veterans' benefits.
Amendments to other provisions of the United States Code (sec. 936)
    The committee recommends a provision that would provide 
technical and conforming amendments to incorporate the United 
States Space Force in certain other provisions of the United 
States Code.
Applicability to other provisions of law (sec. 937)
    The committee recommends a provision that would define the 
authority of the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of the 
Air Force with regard to members of the United States Space 
Force and the benefits for which members of the United States 
Space Force would be eligible with regard to any provision of 
law not addressed by the technical and conforming amendments 
enacted in this Act.

                         Part II--Other Matters

Matters relating to reserve components for the Space Force (sec. 941)
    The committee recommends a provision that would explicitly 
authorize a reserve component of the United States Space Force 
(USSF) but delay the establishment of a Space National Guard 
until the completion of the Assistant Secretary of the Air 
Force for Manpower and Reserve Affairs-led reserve component 
study and until the Secretary of Defense certifies that a Space 
National Guard organization would effectively execute its 
assigned missions, which would also be described in that 
certification.
    Additionally, the committee is aware that there are current 
Air National Guard units with space missions. These units play 
important roles in space operations. The committee directs the 
Air National Guard to assign these units as USSF-gained units 
upon mobilization until such time as there is a Space National 
Guard.

Transfers of military and civilian personnel to the Space Force (sec. 
        942)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the involuntary transfer of military or civilian personnel into 
the United States Space Force (USSF). The committee is fully 
supportive of the force structure and mission requirements of 
the United States Space Force but remains concerned that the 
involuntary transfer of military or civilian personnel into the 
USSF is counterproductive to its successful deployment.

Limitation on transfer of military installations to the jurisdiction of 
        the Space Force (sec. 943)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the transfer of a military installation to the responsibility 
or command of the U.S. Space Force until the Secretary of the 
Air Force conducts a business case analysis of the cost and 
efficacy of such transfer and briefs the congressional defense 
committees on the outcome of such analysis. Under the 
provision, the Secretary would be required to brief the 
congressional defense committees on the outcome of any such 
analysis within 15 days of its conclusion.

Subtitle D--Organization and Management of Other Department of Defense 
                          Offices and Elements


Annual report on establishment of field operating agencies (sec. 951)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees, not later than January 31 of each year, 
identifying any field operating agency established by the 
Department of Defense or a component thereof during the 
preceding calendar year. The report would list: (1) The name of 
such field operating agency; (2) The agency's location; (3) The 
title and grade of the head of the agency; (4) The chain of 
command, supervision, or authority by which the agency head 
reports to the Office of the Secretary of Defense or the 
military department concerned; (5) The agency's mission; (6) 
The number of personnel authorized and assigned to the agency; 
(7) The purpose underlying the agency's establishment; and (8) 
Any cost savings or other efficiencies expected to accrue to 
the Department in connection with the establishment and 
operation of the agency.
    The committee intends this provision to substitute for a 
long-recurring provision of defense appropriations acts, last 
enacted in section 8041 of the Department of Defense 
Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-93).

                      TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS

                     Subtitle A--Financial Matters

General transfer authority (sec. 1001)
    The committee recommends a provision that would allow the 
Secretary of Defense to transfer up to $4.0 billion of fiscal 
year 2021 funds authorized in division A of this Act to 
unforeseen higher priority needs in accordance with normal 
reprogramming procedures. Transfers of funds between military 
personnel authorizations would not be counted toward the dollar 
limitation in this provision.
Application of Financial Improvement and Audit Remediation Plan to 
        fiscal years following fiscal year 2020 (sec. 1002)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require 
that the Department of Defense Financial Improvement and Audit 
Remediation Plan ensure that an annual audit of the 
Department's financial statements for each fiscal year after 
fiscal year 2020 occurs by not later than March 31 following 
that fiscal year.

                   Subtitle B--Counterdrug Activities

Codification of authority for joint task forces of the Department of 
        Defense to support law enforcement agencies conducting 
        counterterrorism or counter-transnational organized crime 
        activities (sec. 1011)
    The committee recommends a provision that would establish a 
new section 285 in title 10, United States Code, to codify 
section 1022 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2004 (Public Law 108-136), as most recently amended 
by section 1022 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92), which authorizes the 
expenditure of funds from the drug interdiction and counter-
drug activities account to enable joint task forces that 
support law enforcement agencies conducting counter-drug 
activities to also provide support to law enforcement agencies 
conducting counterterrorism or counter-transnational organized 
crime activities. The provision would also eliminate the 
geographic limitations on the use of the authority to better 
reflect the global nature of the threat.

                Subtitle C--Naval Vessels and Shipyards

Modification of authority to purchase used vessels with funds in the 
        National Defense Sealift Fund (sec. 1021)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2218 of title 10, United States Code, to permit the 
Secretary of Defense to purchase 7 used, foreign-built sealift 
ships without the accompanying requirement to procure 10 new 
sealift vessels from U.S. shipyards.
Waiver during war or threat to national security of restrictions on 
        overhaul, repair, or maintenance of vessels in foreign 
        shipyards (sec. 1022)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 8680 of title 10, United States Code, to allow the 
Secretary of the Navy to waive restrictions on the overhaul, 
repair, or maintenance of vessels in foreign shipyards during a 
time of war or for the duration of a period of a threat to 
national security (as determined by the Secretary of Defense).
Modification of waiver authority on prohibition on use of funds for 
        retirement of certain legacy maritime mine countermeasure 
        platforms (sec. 1023)
    The committee recommends a provision that would modify the 
waiver authority germane to the prohibition on the use of funds 
for retirement of certain legacy maritime mine countermeasure 
platforms contained in section 1046 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) to 
include concurrence by the Director of Operational Test and 
Evaluation.
Extension of authority for reimbursement of expenses for certain Navy 
        mess operations afloat (sec. 1024)
    The committee recommends a provision that would further 
amend section 1014(b) of the Duncan Hunter National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 (Public Law 110-417), as 
most recently amended by section 1023(a) of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 (Public Law 114-
92), by striking September 30, 2020, and inserting September 
30, 2025, thereby extending the Secretary of Defense's 
authority to fund the cost of meals on United States naval and 
naval auxiliary vessels for non-military personnel.
Sense of Congress on actions necessary to achieve a 355-ship Navy (sec. 
        1025)
    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of Congress on actions necessary to implement the 
national policy of the United States to have available, as soon 
as practicable, not fewer than 355 battle force ships.

                      Subtitle D--Counterterrorism

Extension of prohibition on use of funds for transfer or release of 
        individuals detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
        Bay, Cuba, to the United States (sec. 1031)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
through December 31, 2021, the prohibition on the use of funds 
provided to the Department of Defense to transfer or release 
individuals detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
Bay, Cuba, to the United States.
Extension of prohibition on use of funds to close or relinquish control 
        of United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (sec. 
        1032)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
through the end of fiscal year 2021, the prohibition on the use 
of funds provided to the Department of Defense: (1) To close or 
abandon United States Naval Station, Guantanamo; (2) To 
relinquish control of Guantanamo Bay to the Republic of Cuba; 
or (3) To implement a material modification to the Treaty 
between the United States of America and Cuba signed at 
Washington, D.C., on May 29, 1934, which modification would 
constructively close United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
Bay.

Extension of prohibition on use of funds for transfer or release of 
        individuals detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
        Bay, Cuba, to certain countries (sec. 1033)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
through December 31, 2021, the prohibition on the use of funds 
provided to the Department of Defense to transfer or release 
individuals detained at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo 
Bay, Cuba, to Libya, Somalia, Syria, and Yemen.

Extension of prohibition on use of funds to construct or modify 
        facilities in the United States to house detainees transferred 
        from United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba (sec. 
        1034)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
until December 31, 2021, the prohibition on the use of funds 
provided to the Department of Defense to construct or modify 
facilities in the United States to house detainees transferred 
from United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

         Subtitle E--Miscellaneous Authorities and Limitations


Inclusion of disaster-related emergency preparedness activities among 
        law enforcement activities authorities for sale or donation of 
        excess personal property of the Department of Defense (sec. 
        1041)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 2576a of title 10, United States Code, to permit the 
transfer of excess property, to include high-water vehicles, 
for use in disaster-related emergency preparedness activities. 
High-water vehicles include the Family of Medium Tactical 
Vehicles, Light Medium Tactical Vehicles, Low Signature Armored 
Cab vehicles, Mine-Resistant Ambush Protected tactical 
vehicles, M939 series trucks, M809 series trucks, M35 series 
trucks, Medium Tactical Vehicle Replacement vehicles, the Heavy 
Expanded Mobility Tactical Truck, Palletized Load System 
trucks, Logistics Vehicle Systems, and any vehicle requested 
for high water response for disaster-related emergency 
preparedness.

Expenditure of funds for Department of Defense clandestine activities 
        that support operational preparation of the environment (sec. 
        1042)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to expend up to $15.0 million in any 
fiscal year for clandestine activities for any purpose the 
Secretary determines to be proper for preparation of the 
environment for operations of a confidential nature. The 
committee notes that the Department of Defense previously 
utilized section 127 of title 10, United States Code, otherwise 
known as ``emergency and extraordinary expenses'' (EEE) for 
clandestine operational preparation of the environment 
activities. However, the committee has previously expressed 
concerns with the Department's use of the EEE authority for 
non-emergent and recurring expenses. Therefore, the committee 
believes that this authority will allow for the continuation of 
clandestine operational preparation of the environment 
activities while enhancing congressional oversight.

Clarification of authority of military commissions under chapter 47A of 
        title 10, United States Code, to punish contempt (sec. 1043)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
subchapter IV of chapter 47A of title 10, United States Code, 
to permit a judge of the United States Court of Military 
Commission Review or a military judge detailed to a military 
commission to punish contempt. The provision would also provide 
that the punishment for contempt may not exceed confinement for 
30 days, a fine of $1,000, or both and would establish the 
conditions under which punishment for contempt is reviewable.
    The committee perceives the availability of the contempt 
power as essential to the orderly progression of military 
commission proceedings and notes that vesting contempt power in 
a military judge detailed to a military commission would align 
with the authority vested in both a military judge presiding 
over a court-martial and in a civilian judge presiding in a 
court established pursuant to Article III of the U.S. 
Constitution. The committee expects that a military judge 
detailed to a military commission would exercise contempt power 
in accord with the judicial tenets of fairness and 
impartiality.

Prohibition on actions to infringe upon First Amendment rights of 
        peaceable assembly and petition for redress of grievances (sec. 
        1044)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
the use of amounts authorized to be appropriated by this Act 
for a program, project, or activity, or for the use of 
personnel, to conduct actions against United States citizens 
that infringe on their rights under the First Amendment to the 
Constitution peaceably to assemble or to petition the 
government for a redress of grievances.

Arctic planning, research, and development (sec. 1045)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense and the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff to begin planning and implementing changes that may be 
necessary for requirements, training, equipment, doctrine, and 
capability development of the Armed Forces should an expanded 
role of the Armed Forces in the Arctic be determined to be in 
the national security interests of the United States.

Consideration of security risks in certain telecommunications 
        architecture for future overseas basing decisions of the 
        Department of Defense (sec. 1046)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to take security risks posed by at-risk 
vendors such as Huawei and ZTE into account when making 
overseas stationing decisions.

Foreign military training programs (sec. 1047)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to establish specified vetting procedures 
and monitoring requirements for certain military training on 
Department of Defense installations and facilities within the 
United States.

Reporting of adverse events relating to consumer products on military 
        installations (sec. 1048)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to ensure that any adverse event that 
occurs on a military installation relating to consumer products 
is reported on saferproducts.gov.

Inclusion of United States Naval Sea Cadet Corps among youth and 
        charitable organizations authorized to receive assistance from 
        the National Guard (sec. 1049)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 508 of title 32, United States Code, to add the United 
States Navy Sea Cadet Corps to the list of organizations 
authorized to receive assistance from the National Guard.

Department of Defense policy for the regulation of dangerous dogs (sec. 
        1050)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Veterinary Service Activity of the Department of Defense to 
establish a standardized policy applicable across all military 
communities for the regulation of dangerous dogs within 90 days 
of the date of the enactment of this Act.

Sense of Congress on basing of KC-46A aircraft outside the contiguous 
        United States (sec. 1051)

    The committee recommends a provision that would articulate 
the sense of Congress on what the Secretary of the Air Force 
should consider during the strategic basing process for the KC-
46A aircraft outside the continental United States.

                    Subtitle F--Studies and Reports


Report on potential improvements to certain military educational 
        institutions of the Department of Defense (sec. 1061)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the Committees on 
Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
no later than December 1, 2021, setting forth the results of a 
review and assessment of potential improvements to certain 
educational institutions of the Department of Defense. The 
review would be conducted by an outside organization with 
expertise in analyzing matters in connection with higher 
education.

Reports on status and modernization of the North Warning System (sec. 
        1062)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit to the congressional defense 
committees two reports: one on the current status of the North 
Warning System and another containing a plan for modernizing 
the capabilities provided by that system, including cost, 
schedule, and technological advancements required.

Studies on the force structure for Marine Corps aviation (sec. 1063)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to commission three studies on the future 
of the U.S. Marine Corps aviation enterprise.
    The committee commends the Marine Corps on its efforts to 
organize, train, and equip the force to better meet the needs 
outlined in the National Defense Strategy, in particular, the 
need for forward-postured, combat-credible forces to serve as 
the ``contact'' and ``blunt'' layers in both competition and 
conflict, particularly in the Indo-Pacific theater. While the 
committee supports the goals of the Marine Corps in a time of 
sustained world-wide deployments, it remains concerned about 
the planned aviation divestment. The committee requires more 
analysis to determine if reducing the number of F-35B squadrons 
contradicts the significant fifth-generation fighter capability 
requirements of the future force. Furthermore, the committee is 
concerned that reducing medium and heavy lift helicopter 
squadrons may not meet operational capacity requirements given 
the focus of Force Design 2030 on the Indo-Pacific and the 
logistics demands created by Expeditionary Advanced Base 
Operations, particularly in a contested environment.

                       Subtitle G--Other Matters


Department of Defense strategic Arctic ports (sec. 1081)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees on the updated assessment of the estimated 
cost of constructing, maintaining, and operating a strategic 
port in the Arctic at each potential site evaluated pursuant to 
section 1752(b) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92). The report should also 
include, for each potential site at which construction of such 
a port could be completed by 2030, an estimate of the number of 
days per year that such port would be usable by vessels of the 
Navy and the Coast Guard. The provision would further permit 
the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with others, to 
designate one or more ports identified in the report as 
Department of Defense Strategic Arctic Ports.

Personal protective equipment matters (sec. 1082)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require: 
(1) Briefings from the Secretaries of the military departments, 
no later than January 31, 2021, on the fielding of the newest 
generations of personal protective equipment (PPE) by the 
military services in the jurisdiction of each Secretary; (2) 
The Director of the Defense Health Agency to develop and 
maintain a system for tracking data on injuries among members 
of the Armed Forces when servicemembers are utilizing the 
newest generation of PPE and to brief Congress no later than 
January 21, 2025, on the prevalence of preventable injuries 
attributable to ill-fitting or malfunctioning PPE; and (3) The 
annual Periodic Health Assessment of servicemembers and post-
deployment health assessments of servicemembers to include 
questions on whether a servicemember incurred an injury in 
connection with ill-fitting or malfunctioning PPE and, in the 
case of a servicemember's having incurred such an injury, 
questions on one or more elements of self-evaluation of the 
injury.

Estimate of damages from Federal Communications Commission Order 20-48 
        (sec. 1083)

    The committee recommends a provision that would prohibit 
any funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act for fiscal 
year 2021 from being used by the Secretary of Defense to comply 
with the Order and Authorization adopted by the Federal 
Communications Commission (FCC 20-48) until the Secretary 
submits to the Congress an estimate of the covered costs and 
eligible reimbursable costs associated with interference with 
the Global Positioning System (GPS) resulting from the Order. 
The provision would require that the Secretary certify that the 
estimate is accurate with a high degree of certainty.
    The committee is concerned that the Federal Communications 
Commission approved Ligado's proposal despite extensive testing 
performed by 9 Federal agencies that concluded that the Ligado 
proposal will cause interference for both civilian and military 
GPS users. The committee is concerned that the conditions 
imposed on Ligado in FCC 20-48 are not practical and do not 
adequately protect GPS. Specifically, the committee is 
concerned that the requirement for Ligado to repair or replace 
any potentially affected Federal GPS receiver would only cover 
the cost of the GPS receiver and not any of the associated 
development and fielding costs to repair or replace the device, 
placing a large cost burden on the Department of Defense.

Modernization effort (sec. 1084)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Communications and 
Information, in consultation with the Policy and Plans Steering 
Group, to establish goals and a plan for modernization of 
spectrum management infrastructure. The provision also includes 
assorted reporting requirements and requires Government 
Accountability Office oversight of those reports and 
activities.

                       Items of Special Interest


21st Century Integrated Digital Experience Act implementation

    The committee supports the goals of the 21st Century 
Integrated Digital Experience Act (IDEA) (Public Law 115-336) 
and believes that embracing the requirements of the 21st 
Century IDEA would have a significant positive impact on the 
Department of Defense's mission delivery and improving customer 
service to employees, Active-Duty personnel, family members, 
and others who interact with the Department and the military 
services through intranets, websites, and forms.
    Therefore, to assess the progress of the implementation of 
the 21st Century IDEA across the Department, the committee 
directs the Chief Information Officer (CIO) of the Department 
of Defense to prepare and issue a report on its implementation. 
This assessment should include the status of any Department-
wide guidance and initiatives and consultation with the CIOs of 
the Army, Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps, as well as the 
Washington Headquarters Service and any other relevant 
departments. The Department shall provide the report to the 
congressional defense committees within 90 days of the 
enactment of this Act.

American Red Cross

    The American Red Cross is a congressionally chartered 
Federal instrumentality that provides independently verified 
emergency communication messages for military members seeking 
emergency leave due to medical emergencies of loved ones, 
supports deployed locations in conflict zones, and mobilizes 
clinical and non-clinical volunteers for service in military 
medical treatment facilities. Since 9/11, the Red Cross has 
served more than 1 million military families by providing 
critical services on military installations and in military 
hospitals around the world, supporting military families during 
deployments and emergencies, and continuing to serve veterans 
after completion of their military service. To provide these 
services, Red Cross staff and volunteers require support from 
the Department of Defense, including access to facilities and 
information technology. The committee encourages the Secretary 
of Defense to review and update agreements with the American 
Red Cross and the Department's directives to ensure appropriate 
support to the Red Cross as a Federal instrumentality.

Comptroller General assessment of Defense Logistics Agency disposal of 
        surplus equipment

    The committee is concerned that the Department of Defense 
may not be disposing of surplus equipment in accordance with 
Departmental guidance, particularly with respect to military 
vehicles. The committee therefore directs the Comptroller 
General of the United States to conduct a review of: (1) The 
Department's process for assigning demilitarization codes; (2) 
How the demilitarization codes inform the disposal process, 
including, in the case of property with controlled components, 
the degree to which the Department is authorized to make 
reasonable, cost-effective modifications in order to make them 
available for public use; (3) The extent to which the Defense 
Logistics Agency and the military services adhere to 
demilitarization coding and disposal policies, consistent with 
Department of Defense requirements; and (4) In the case of 
property with controlled components, the process used to 
determine whether or not to modify such property in order to 
make it available for public use. The Comptroller General shall 
submit a report detailing the findings of the review to the 
congressional defense committees by June 30, 2021.

COVID-19 and security forces relationships

    The committee acknowledges that the COVID-19 pandemic will 
pose a unique challenge to security forces relationships by 
complicating planned exercises, reducing the possibility of in-
person meetings and exchanges, and creating myriad scheduling 
and logistical challenges. However, the committee believes that 
building and maintaining security forces relationships has 
become even more important in the wake of the pandemic and 
feels that it is incumbent upon the regional combatant commands 
to adapt to changing circumstances.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide, not later than September 30, 2020, the 
congressional defense committees with a briefing on the 
following subjects: (1) How the combatant commands, military 
services, and Defense Agencies and Department of Defense Field 
Activities have altered their plans to continue to build 
security forces relationships in light of COVID-19; (2) The 
types of exercises, key leader engagements, trainings, 
education, workshops, and other activities complicated by 
COVID-19; (3) The policies and procedures used to overcome 
these issues; (4) New policies, procedures, and activities--
especially virtual alternatives--being employed to build 
relationships in light of COVID-19; and (5) The ways in which 
the pandemic has altered the goals and focus of various 
security forces relationships, especially related to how the 
pandemic has changed the perspective, plans, and needs of our 
key allies and partners.

Demonstration of current Department of Defense budget and program data 
        visualization (sec.)

    The committee is concerned that Department of Defense (DOD) 
senior leadership is not availing itself of modern data 
visualization tools to provide adequate visibility of choices 
and facilitate decision-making in the Planning, Programming, 
Budgeting, and Execution process. The scope and complexity of 
the data associated with the defense enterprise are vast and 
can act as a significant tax on the efficiency of all levels of 
the national security enterprise.
    The committee commends the Office of the Under Secretary of 
Defense (Comptroller) for developing an internal data 
visualization solution for the DOD-wide audit to help senior 
leaders understand data quickly, diagnose problems, and focus 
decision-making and resources.
    The committee believes that both DOD leadership as well as 
the congressional defense committees would benefit from the use 
of modern data visualization tools, which could enable 
decision-makers to rapidly and more easily understand budgetary 
and programmatic data and trends.

Enabling congressional oversight of defense-wide agency spending (sec. 
        )

    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense to deliver a 
report with the submission of the budget request for fiscal 
year 2022 detailing the changes to the budgets of agencies not 
under the control of a military department, including programs 
affected by a Defense-Wide Review 2.0. The report shall 
identify the action taken under such review as either an 
expansion or acceleration, a cancellation, reduction in scope, 
deferral or delay, or a transfer to another component or 
agency. The report should include basic relevant budget data, 
including identifying information such as program element, sub-
activity group, or line number, and the projected 5-year budget 
plan for each program.
    The committee commends the Department of Defense for 
undertaking the Defense-Wide Review for the first time in the 
fiscal year 2021 budget process. The Defense-wide budget 
contains myriad and largely unconnected activities, from the 
Defense Health Program to the Missile Defense Agency, and 
comprises about 15 percent of the Department of Defense's 
overall budget. Establishment of a rigorous process for annual 
review by the Secretary of Defense of the Defense-wide budget 
is valuable. As the Defense-Wide Review 1.0 demonstrated, the 
relevant agencies conducted risk-based prioritization of their 
programs and activities, resulting in delays or reduction of 
programs for justified reasons. Unfortunately, in other cases, 
the Review simply acted as a catalyst to cut or eliminate 
programs based on little to no justification to meet savings 
targets.
    The committee notes that the information provided by the 
Department to enable the committee to carry out its 
constitutional duty of oversight fell woefully short of 
expectations. Despite months of congressional requests for 
information, the Department hosted only one engagement on the 
Defense-Wide Review, and it failed to update its supplemental 
justification documents. While the Defense-Wide Review was 
conducted on a short timeline, the committee believes that the 
Congress must receive far more robust explanatory materials not 
only to fulfill its duties but also to ensure that the overall 
Defense-Wide Review process aligns the Department with the 
National Defense Strategy. The committee further notes that the 
data and justification material necessary to enable 
congressional oversight of the Defense-Wide Review already 
exist. Therefore, the committee encourages the Department to 
work with the congressional defense committees to establish 
expectations for Defense-Wide Review 2.0 justification 
materials well in advance of the submission of the budget 
request for fiscal year 2022.

Enhancing security cooperation

    The committee notes that security cooperation is a 
fundamental element of the National Defense Strategy and that 
engagement, development, training, and education with partner 
military forces is crucial to successfully strengthening 
alliances and attracting new partners. The committee further 
notes that reforms made in the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) and subsequent 
Department of Defense Instruction 5132.14, ``Assessment, 
Monitoring, and Evaluation Policy for the Security Cooperation 
Enterprise,'' dated January 12, 2017, have resulted in 
important improvements to security cooperation and that the 
framework for the assessment, monitoring, and evaluation (AM&E) 
has enhanced the Department's transparency, effectiveness, and 
performance management of these partner engagements.
    The committee expresses its support for the ongoing 
implementation of the AM&E framework and highlights its added 
importance in light of increasing global power competition. The 
committee also encourages further investment in security 
cooperation and engagement and continued support within the 
Department for these efforts.

Incentives to promote Department of Defense audit activities

    The committee notes that the Department of Defense (DOD) 
has begun to undertake focused and coordinated activities to 
try to meet the mandate of the Chief Financial Officers Act of 
1990 (Public Law 101-576), which requires annual audits of 
financial statements for Federal agencies. The committee also 
notes that, although the DOD has significantly more resources 
and access to expertise than most Federal agencies, after 30 
years of effort, the DOD remains the only agency yet to obtain 
a ``clean'' audit opinion on its financial statements.
    The committee believes that DOD's progress toward achieving 
this clean audit opinion will continue to be hampered by a lack 
of internal organizational incentives to invest the resources 
and leadership attention required to change the systems, 
processes, and culture that define the currently unauditable 
DOD enterprise.
    The committee notes that the establishment of internal 
organizational budgetary incentives, such as the ability for 
the military services and agencies to recoup and reapply the 
savings derived from correcting issues uncovered by audit 
activities to agency priorities or to activities that could 
help achieve and maintain clean audit status, would be 
beneficial to the overall audit effort.
    The committee therefore directs the Deputy Secretary of 
Defense to consider and develop incentives, including budgetary 
incentives, that would encourage the military services and 
agencies to increase efforts to achieve a clean financial audit 
status and to develop the capabilities, expertise, and 
practices to maintain that clean status over time.

Intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance support

    The committee understands that resource limitations may 
impact the ability of the Department of Defense to conduct 
intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) activities 
in support of global counternarcotics and counter-illicit 
trafficking operations. The committee further understands that 
there may be opportunities to enhance ISR capabilities in 
support of these missions through modifications to and 
increased maintenance of currently fielded systems, including 
land-based radar and communications intercept technology, or 
through the leasing of such systems. The committee encourages 
the Department to explore opportunities in this area in order 
to provide increased area coverage and capabilities for 
counternarcotics, counter-illicit trafficking, and other 
missions, as appropriate.

Inventory of systems integral to the Planning, Programming, Budgeting, 
        and Execution process (sec. )

    The committee directs the Under Secretary of Defense 
(Comptroller), in consultation with the Chief Information 
Officer, the Chief Data Officer, and such other officers and 
employees of the Department of Defense as the Secretary of 
Defense may designate, to deliver a report to the congressional 
defense committees, not later than October 1, 2020, on the 
information systems integral to managing and sharing data 
related to the Planning, Programming, Budgeting, and Execution 
(PPBE) process.
    The report should include a compilation of discrete 
information technology systems used to manage and share 
programming and budgetary data throughout the Department of 
Defense, with information identifying each system's deployment 
by component and the phases of the PPBE process to which each 
system contributes. Accompanying information may include the 
initial operational capability dates, modernization efforts to 
date, and future modernization plans for such systems.
    The committee is concerned that the systems undergirding 
the Department of Defense PPBE process do not enable the 
standardization of relevant budgetary and programmatic data 
across the Department. While the internal sharing of such 
information has improved in recent years, the custom data 
elements created by various components act as a significant 
barrier to further collaboration and efficiency. Improved data 
standardization across the Department will decrease repetitive 
work, enable new types of data visualization, and improve the 
ability of senior leadership to access information in a timely 
fashion.

Mission-based budgeting (sec. )

    The committee notes that identifying or categorizing 
program elements by specific mission or combatant command could 
provide immense value to both the Department of Defense and the 
Congress in considering changes to the defense budget. The 
Major Force Programs provide little analytical value as 
currently constructed. Program elements, the building blocks of 
the budget, are dispersed among several accounts and sub-
activity groups, making the aggregation of relevant 
activities--from hypersonic strike weapons to artificial 
intelligence programs, for example--to understand mission 
capabilities and gaps extremely time-consuming and difficult.
    The committee understands that certain components have 
expanded their use of mission-based budgeting, such as the 
Chief Information Officer's work in identifying cyber-related 
program elements. However, the potential for expanding this 
practice remains great, particularly for joint capability 
portfolios such as integrated air and missile defense, counter-
unmanned aerial systems, long-range precision strike, and 
emerging technologies.
    The committee believes that the expanded use of mission-
based budgeting could substantially improve the visibility of 
certain areas of the Department's budget without any change to 
the underlying structure of the budget itself.

Presentation of defense budget materials by military services

    The committee is concerned that the Department of Defense 
may be making decisions regarding the budget requests of each 
military service without adequate consideration of mission-
specific funding requirements. The committee notes that the 
division of the defense budget between the military services 
should be primarily based on strategic considerations. The 
committee believes that more accurate presentation of service 
budgets would help the Secretary of Defense analyze the budget 
proposals prepared by each of the military departments and 
adjudicate the amounts of funding recommended for each of the 
services based on factors such as relevance to implementation 
of the National Defense Strategy, opportunities for 
technological breakthroughs, efficiency and accountability for 
previous years' funding, and similar objective criteria.
    To facilitate the extent to which the Office of the 
Secretary of Defense follows this direction, the committee 
directs that the Secretary of Defense shall include in any 
budget overview documents provided to Congress with the fiscal 
year 2022 budget, and all subsequent budgets, a description of 
the amounts and shares of the defense budget recommended to 
each of the military services or departments, the defense-wide 
accounts, and any other or miscellaneous recipients of 
Department of Defense budget requests.
    The committee additionally directs that the amounts and 
shares for each military service or department reported 
pursuant to this direction shall not include amounts that are 
not directly related to the budgets of each service or 
department, such as funding that is subsequently redirected to 
general defense-wide needs or for other national security 
purposes.
    Further, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
provide a briefing on the implementation of revised budget 
overview documents to the congressional defense and 
intelligence committees. This briefing should be delivered no 
later than November 1, 2020.
    Finally, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense to 
consult with the appropriate counterintelligence officials in 
preparation of these exhibits.

Reciprocity of security clearances

    The committee is concerned that issues remain concerning 
extended delays or impediments in the transfer of security 
clearances between agencies and departments of the U.S. 
Government.
    The committee understands that organizations ``receiving'' 
a request to accept clearances and provide access have the 
authority to reject automatic approval and to conduct their own 
adjudication if the individual in question has what is called a 
``condition'' or ``exception'' code in his or her security file 
or if ``new information'' relating to one or more of the 
standard adjudicative guidelines has emerged since the 
individual was last approved for access. A condition or 
exception code indicates that the individual is not in 
compliance with one or more adjudicative standards but has 
received a waiver. The receiving or ``gaining'' organization, 
in such cases, has the right to review the specific issue and 
how it was handled and resolved by the agency or department 
currently holding the clearance and providing access to 
classified information.
    The committee understands that these conditions or 
exception codes are not standardized and vary across government 
organizations and, in some circumstances, individuals may not 
be aware that they have such codes in their files.
    Therefore, the committee directs that the Security 
Executive Agent and the Under Secretary of Defense for 
Intelligence and Security shall conduct a review that includes 
the following actions: (1) Compile statistics based on a 
representative sample on the prevalence of condition codes that 
result in above average durations for approval of clearance and 
access transfer requests and in outright rejections of 
requested transfers; (2) Assess the degree of consistency and 
rigor across agencies and departments in the use of these 
condition codes; (3) Develop and evaluate the merits of options 
to mitigate or even eliminate this limitation on reciprocity, 
including improved documentation of and the sharing of 
information about the circumstances or context for activating a 
condition code; and (4) Produce recommendations for reforms. 
The results of this review shall be provided to the 
congressional defense and intelligence committees no later than 
February 1, 2021.

Civilian casualties

    The committee notes that civilian casualties are a tragic 
and unavoidable part of war and recognizes that the Department 
of Defense endeavors to conduct all military operations in 
compliance with the international law of armed conflict and the 
laws of the United States, including the principles of 
distinction, proportionality, and the requirement to take 
feasible precautions in planning and conducting operations to 
reduce the risk of harm to civilians and civilian objects.
    The committee believes that protection of civilians and 
civilian objects during military operations is a moral and 
ethical imperative and commends the Department of Defense for 
the measures it has implemented and is currently implementing 
to prevent, mitigate, track, investigate, learn from, respond 
to, and report civilian casualties resulting from United States 
military operations. The committee notes that the Department 
has submitted to the Congress three successive annual reports 
on civilian casualties resulting from United States military 
operations for calendar years 2017, 2018, and 2019 and has 
updated reports as appropriate. Additionally, the committee 
commends the United States Africa Command for announcing on 
March 31, 2020, that the command would be issuing a new 
quarterly report on the status of ongoing civilian casualty 
allegations and assessments. Collectively, these efforts 
increase public transparency regarding civilian casualty 
allegations that are reported to the command and demonstrate 
the constant commitment of the United States Armed Forces to 
minimizing civilian harm in the conduct of military operations.
    In support of its broader efforts to prevent and respond to 
allegations of civilian casualties, the committee encourages 
the Department to redouble efforts to:
          (1) Establish and implement the policy of the 
        Department relating to civilian casualties resulting 
        from United States military operations, as required by 
        section 936 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
        Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-
        232);
          (2) Issue regulations for the implementation of 
        section 1213 of the National Defense Authorization for 
        Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) for ex gratia 
        payments for damage, personal injury, or death that is 
        incident to the use of force by the United States Armed 
        Forces, a coalition that includes the United States, a 
        military organization supporting the United States, or 
        a military organization supporting the United States or 
        such coalition;
          (3) Ensure that the geographic combatant commands 
        have the requisite personnel and resources to 
        appropriately integrate the observance of human rights 
        and the protection of civilians and civilian objects in 
        all activities be the commands;
          (4) Promote the observance of human rights and the 
        protection of civilians and civilian objects through 
        engagements with foreign partner forces, including in 
        connection with train and equip programs; advise, 
        assist, accompany, and enable missions; and executing 
        fully combined and coalition operations; and
          (5) Increase coordination with the Department of 
        State in any country in which the United States Armed 
        Forces are conducting military operations in order to 
        assist in the response to reports of civilian 
        casualties resulting from such military operations.

United States Army High Containment Facility at Fort Detrick

    The committee notes that Fort Detrick currently houses the 
military's primary High Containment Bio Safety Level Four (BSL 
4) Facility, which is nearing its end-of-life. These unique 
facilities serve to conduct research on pathogenic agents that 
pose extreme health risks to the military and homeland, such as 
COVID-19. Recently, the facility has been shut down by the 
Centers for Disease Control over concern about its ability to 
safely handle waste streams from the aging facility. The waste 
handling facility is separate from the main facility, and it 
too is aging and has broken down several times.
    Over the past 10 years, the Army has been constructing a 
modern 30,000 square foot High Containment Facility next to the 
existing one in order to replace it. This new facility, which 
has several unique handling features and wings, is being built 
at a cost of over $1 billion. However, the construction and 
final operations have been delayed several times, first by a 
fire from welding during construction and more recently because 
of dependence on the aging waste handling facility that the 
current High Containment Facility relies upon and which has 
been unreliable. The U.S. Army's Future Command is now 
responsible for operating the High Containment Facilities, both 
the current one and that under construction.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Secretary of the Army 
to report to the congressional defense committees, no later 
than February 28, 2021, on: (1) The expected lifetime and 
annual cost of operating the current High Containment Facility; 
(2) Actions, cost, and timelines to remedy the aging waste 
handling facility next to it; (3) The amount expended to date 
on the High Containment Facility under construction; (4) A plan 
of action for waste handling at the High Containment Facility 
under construction, including cost, timelines, and impacts if 
additional delays are incurred; and (5) The expected date to 
certify full operations of the High Containment Facility under 
construction, taking into account the current inability to 
handle waste generated from operations.
    The committee notes the unique role that the U.S. Army has 
had in research of and handling these extremely dangerous 
pathogens and the importance of this unique responsibility to 
the Department of Defense and our Nation and encourages swift 
action to resolve any outstanding issues that have delayed 
transitioning operations to the High Containment Facility under 
construction.

Update to Digital Modernization Strategy and investments to improve 
        resiliency in sustaining mission-essential functions

    The committee believes that the Department of Defense's 
need to work remotely as part of the response to the COVID-19 
pandemic exposed a decade or more of underinvestment in 
critical enterprise-wide information technology infrastructure, 
to include end user devices, network capacity and stability, 
cloud services, and classified capabilities. The committee 
acknowledges that the Department of Defense Chief Information 
Officer formed a task force and acted quickly to mobilize 
contracting instruments to mitigate near-term gaps, requested 
appropriate funding from the Congress, and at present seems to 
have been able to minimize the degradation of continuity of the 
Department's mission-essential functions. However, the 
committee is concerned about significant degradation of certain 
functions--especially those requiring access to classified 
information--that have not been fully mitigated. Furthermore, 
the committee believes that, in order to sustain improvements 
in capacity and resiliency, the Department needs to reexamine 
its requirements. The committee directs the Chief Information 
Officer to update the Department's Digital Modernization 
Strategy and supporting policies and procedures and to submit a 
report to the congressional defense committees on these actions 
and specific investments needed to achieve this resiliency with 
the budget request for fiscal year 2022.

State Partnership Program foreign travel expenses

    The committee is aware that a January 14, 2020, report 
published by the United States Property and Fiscal Office for 
Hawaii (report no. 19-002) found that, when the Financial 
Management Regulation Chapter 18 of Volume 12 was repealed by 
the Department of Defense, it may have resulted in the removal 
of a positive legal authority for the National Guard State 
Partnership Program to fund travel and allowances for members 
of foreign countries under the State Partnership Program. 
Therefore, the committee directs the Department to coordinate 
with the National Guard Bureau to review the issue and provide 
a report to the committee no later than December 30, 2020, 
identifying any potential discrepancies discovered and 
specifying the resolution.

Strategic evaluation of the State Partnership Program

    The committee notes that security cooperation is a 
fundamental element of the National Defense Strategy and that 
engagement, development, training, and education with partner 
military forces is crucial to successfully strengthening 
alliances and attracting new partners. In particular, the 
committee highlights the effectiveness of the State Partnership 
Program in cultivating positive relationships with partner 
forces and enhancing long-term interoperability and notes the 
efforts made by the Department to improve security cooperation. 
The committee believes that global power competition 
necessitates an effort to expand the competitive space and 
encourages the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the 
National Guard Bureau, in consultation with the Department of 
State, combatant commanders, and adjutants general, to 
prioritize expansion of partnerships in regions that offer new 
opportunities for U.S. engagement where it may traditionally 
have been less present, in alignment with the goals of the 
National Defense Strategy. The committee is also aware that a 
strategic evaluation of the State Partnership Program is being 
conducted by the Department of Defense and expresses its 
support for an objective analysis with the aim of improving, 
expanding, and enhancing the program. The committee expresses 
its support for the effort and encourages the Department to 
fully share the results with the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives and to 
collaborate with these committees to implement applicable 
policy recommendations that result from the study.

                  TITLE XI--CIVILIAN PERSONNEL MATTERS

               Subtitle A--Department of Defense Matters

Enhanced pay authority for certain acquisition and technology positions 
        in the Department of Defense (sec. 1101)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
subchapter I of chapter 87 of title 10, United States Code, to 
permanently authorize an enhanced pay authority for acquisition 
and technology positions in the Department of Defense. The 
provision would authorize up to 20 total positions within the 
Office of the Secretary of Defense and the military departments 
that may have a maximum pay rate set at 150 percent of level 1 
of the Executive Schedule.
Enhanced pay authority for certain research and technology positions in 
        the science and technology reinvention laboratories of the 
        Department of Defense (sec. 1102)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
chapter 139 of title 10, United States Code, to permanently 
authorize an enhanced pay authority for research and technology 
positions in the Department of Defense. The provision would 
authorize up to 15 total positions within the military 
departments that may have a maximum pay rate set at 150 percent 
of level 1 of the Executive Schedule.
Extension of enhanced appointment and compensation authority for 
        civilian personnel for care and treatment of wounded and 
        injured members of the Armed Forces (sec. 1103)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1599c(b) of title 10, United States Code, to extend the 
enhanced appointment and compensation authority for civilian 
personnel for the care and treatment of wounded and injured 
members of the Armed Forces through December 31, 2025.
Extension of overtime rate authority for Department of the Navy 
        employees performing work aboard or dockside in support of the 
        nuclear-powered aircraft carrier forward deployed in Japan 
        (sec. 1104)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 5542 of title 5, United States Code, to extend until 
September 30, 2023, the authority of the Secretary of the Navy 
to pay overtime rates to civilian employees performing 
temporary duty in Japan in support of the forward deployed 
nuclear aircraft carrier.
Expansion of direct hire authority for certain Department of Defense 
        personnel to include installation military housing office 
        positions supervising privatized military housing (sec. 1105)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 9905 of title 5, United States Code, to authorize 
direct hire authority for installation military housing office 
positions responsible for supervising privatized military 
housing projects.
Extension of sunset of inapplicability of certification of executive 
        qualifications by qualification certification review board of 
        Office of Personnel Management for initial appointments to 
        Senior Executive Service positions in Department of Defense 
        (sec. 1106)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1109 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232), to 
extend by 3 years the sunset date of the Department of 
Defense's temporary exemption from Office of Personnel 
Management qualification certification review boards for 
individuals appointed to senior executive service positions 
within the Department.
    During the first year of this temporary authority, 15 
qualified individuals were appointed to Department of Defense 
senior executive service positions in financial management, 
human resources, mathematics, and acquisition organizations. 
Average time-to-hire was reduced by nearly 140 days. This 
authority allowed the Department to utilize a high quality 
selection process, coupled with a streamlined application 
process, to reduce hiring timelines, all while continuing to 
ensure that candidates demonstrate a mastery of the 
competencies most valued and attributed to successful 
executives.
Pilot program on enhanced pay authority for certain high-level 
        management positions in the Department of Defense (sec. 1107)
    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Department of Defense to establish a pilot program to offer 
higher compensation than normally allowed by the executive 
schedule for limited numbers of positions requiring extremely 
high levels of experience managing complex organizations.

Pilot program on expanded authority for appointment of recently-retired 
        members of the Armed Forces to positions in the Department of 
        Defense (sec. 1108)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to initiate a 3-year pilot program to 
hire retired servicemembers within 180 days of retirement into 
positions at a pay grade no higher than GS-13 of the general 
schedule. The provision would also require positions utilizing 
the pilot authority to have direct hire authority and a 
certification of a potential lack of qualified applicants for 
the vacant position before a recently retired servicemember can 
be hired. The provision would require the Secretary of Defense 
to submit a report to the congressional defense committees on 
the use of the pilot authority 2 years after the commencement 
of a pilot program.
    The committee envisions that this provision would be used 
broadly by the military departments to alleviate hiring 
challenges due to a variety of circumstances. The Secretary 
concerned may certify that a position, or set of positions, 
lacks sufficient numbers of potential applicants based on 
geography, unique job requirements, security clearance 
restrictions, or any other factor. In addition, the committee 
emphasizes that the authority to make the required 
certification may be delegated to a local military or civilian 
official with a pay grade equal to or above O-6.

Direct hire authority and relocation incentives for positions at remote 
        locations (sec. 1109)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
chapter 81 of title 10, United States Code, to provide a 
temporary direct hire authority to positions in the competitive 
service in geographically remote locations and locations with 
extreme climate conditions. The provision would also provide a 
relocation incentive to positions covered by the direct hire 
authority.

Modification of direct hire authority for certain personnel involved 
        with Department of Defense maintenance activities (sec. 1110)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 9905 of title 5, United States Code, to provide direct 
hire authority for positions that perform support functions for 
depot-level maintenance and repair.

Fire Fighters Alternative Work Schedule demonstration project for the 
        Navy Region Mid-Atlantic Fire and Emergency Services (sec. 
        1110A)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Commander of Navy Region Mid-Atlantic to establish and carry 
out a 5-year fire fighter alternative work schedule 
demonstration project. The demonstration project would require 
tours of duty to be scheduled at least 2 weeks in advance and 
that tours of duty use a regularly recurring pattern of 48-hour 
shifts followed by 48 or 72 consecutive non-work hours. The 
provision would also require the Commander of Navy Region Mid-
Atlantic to submit to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
Senate and the House of Representatives a report on effects of 
the demonstration project no later than 180 days after the 
demonstration project is terminated.

                  Subtitle B--Government-Wide Matters


One-year extension of temporary authority to grant allowances, 
        benefits, and gratuities to civilian personnel on official duty 
        in a combat zone (sec. 1111)

    The committee recommends a provision that would extend by 1 
year the discretionary authority of the head of a Federal 
agency to provide allowances, benefits, and gratuities 
comparable to those provided to members of the Foreign Service 
to the agency's civilian employees on official duty in a combat 
zone.

One-year extension of authority to waive annual limitation on premium 
        pay and aggregate limitation on pay for Federal civilian 
        employees working overseas (sec. 1112)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1101 of the Duncan Hunter National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2009 (Public Law 110-417), as 
most recently amended by section 1105 of National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92), to 
extend through 2021 the authority of heads of executive 
agencies to waive the limitation on the aggregate of basic and 
premium pay of employees who perform work in an overseas 
location that is in the area of responsibility of the 
Commander, U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM), or in a location 
that was formerly in CENTCOM but has been moved to the area of 
responsibility of the Commander, U.S. Africa Command, in 
support of a military operation or an operation in response to 
a declared emergency.

Technical amendments to authority for reimbursement of Federal, State, 
        and local income taxes incurred during travel, transportation, 
        and relocation (sec. 1113)

    The Committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 5724b of title 5, United States Code, to make a 
technical correction to authority provided by section 1114 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 
(Public Law 116-92) relative to the reimbursement of Federal, 
State, and local income tax expenses incurred by Federal 
civilian employees incident to government-directed travel, 
transportation, and relocations.

                       Items of Special Interest


Classified ready workforce

    The committee is aware of the challenges the Department of 
Defense (DOD) faces when recruiting and retaining a diverse, 
high-skilled science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) 
workforce. The committee further recognizes that the Department 
can increase efforts to recruit its STEM workforce from 
universities with minority-majority and historically under-
served student populations. Therefore, the committee directs 
the Secretary of Defense to provide a briefing, by December 31, 
2020, to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the 
House of Representatives on how the Department of Defense can 
partner with Hispanic-serving land-grant institutions to create 
a talent development program that provides experiential 
learning through internship and co-op programs within the 
military departments and other DOD components. The briefing 
shall include information on how such programs can include 
pathways for security clearances that would serve both the DOD 
and students upon entry into the workforce.

Report prior to transfer of Defense Finance and Accounting Service 
        functions

    The committee believes the Defense Finance and Accounting 
Service (DFAS) performs a critical function in service to 
military members, their families, and survivors. Continuity in 
the delivery of these services is important as military 
families, retirees, and survivors depend on timely delivery of 
pay and benefits.
    The committee directs the Secretary of Defense, prior to a 
decision under any applicable provision of law, to transfer any 
function currently performed by DFAS to a commercial provider 
of finance, accounting, or similar services, to submit a report 
to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House 
of Representatives setting forth the quantitative and business 
case for the transfer, including the extent such transfer would 
yield cost savings or improved service to the DFAS customer 
base.

             TITLE XII--MATTERS RELATING TO FOREIGN NATIONS

                  Subtitle A--Assistance and Training

Authority to build capacity for additional operations (sec. 1201)
    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 333 of title 10, United States Code, relating to the 
authority of the Secretary of Defense to conduct or support 
programs to provide training and equipment to the national 
security forces of one or more foreign countries by adding 
cyberspace operations to the list of authorized functional 
areas in which such support may be provided.
    The committee notes that the Secretary has previously used 
the authority under section 333 to conduct cyber-related 
activities to build partner capacity (BPC) but notes that these 
activities were couched within the span of other enumerated 
operations under section 333. The committee believes that, 
while this support was appropriate, the lack of an explicit 
authority for cyber-related BPC complicated congressional 
oversight as well as inhibits the ability of the Department of 
Defense to conduct the deliberate planning necessary for the 
long-term effectiveness of these activities.
Authority to build capacity for air sovereignty operations (sec. 1202)
    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 333 of title 10, United States Code, relating to the 
authority of the Secretary of Defense to conduct or support 
programs to provide training and equipment to the national 
security forces of one or more foreign countries by adding air 
sovereignty operations to the list of authorized functional 
areas in which such support may be provided.
    The committee notes that, in Department of Defense Joint 
Publication 1-02, as of April 12, 2001, air sovereignty is 
defined as ``a nation's inherent right to exercise absolute 
control and authority over the airspace above its territory.'' 
The committee believes that the addition of air sovereignty 
operations to the list of support authorized under section 333 
is appropriate and consistent with the objectives outlined in 
the National Defense Strategy. The committee notes, however, 
that the amounts available for activities under section 333 are 
limited and therefore expects the Department to exercise 
discretion when considering proposals under the expanded 
authority, particularly any proposals that may involve high-
cost, complex weapons systems.
Modification to the Inter-European Air Forces Academy (sec. 1203)
    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 350(b) of title 10, United States Code, to authorize 
the Secretary of the Air Force to expand military education and 
training at the Inter-European Air Forces Academy to military 
personnel of countries that are both within the United States 
Africa Command area of responsibility and eligible for 
assistance under chapter 5 of part II of the Foreign Assistance 
Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2347 et seq.). The provision would 
expand eligibility beyond countries that are members of the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization or signatories to the 
Partnership for Peace Framework Documents.
Modification to support of special operations for irregular warfare 
        (sec. 1204)
    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 1202 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91; 131 Stat. 1639), as most 
recently amended by section 1207 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92), by 
raising the annual funding limitation to $15.0 million.
Extension and modification of authority to support border security 
        operations of certain foreign countries (sec. 1205)
    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 1226 of the National Defense Authorization for Fiscal 
Year 2016 (Public Law 114-92), as most recently amended by 
section 1213 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232), to 
extend the authority to support border security operations of 
certain foreign countries through December 31, 2023. The 
provision would also clarify the source of funds available for 
support pursuant to this authority in order to improve 
oversight of such expenditures.
Modification of authority for participation in multinational centers of 
        excellence (sec. 1206)
    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 344 of title 10, United States Code, by modifying the 
authority for participation in multinational centers of 
excellence.
Implementation of the Women, Peace, and Security Act of 2017 (sec. 
        1207)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to undertake specified activities 
consistent with the Women, Peace, and Security Act of 2017 
(Public Law 115-68) and to provide an annual report to Congress 
on the progress made in implementation.
Ted Stevens Center for Arctic Security Studies (sec. 1208)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of 
State, to submit a plan, not later than 90 days after the date 
of the enactment of this Act, to establish a Department of 
Defense Regional Center for Security Studies for the Arctic. 
Further, not earlier than 30 days after the submission of the 
required plan and subject to the availability of 
appropriations, the provision would provide discretionary 
authority to the Secretary to establish and administer such a 
center.
Functional Center for Security Studies in Irregular Warfare (sec. 1209)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of 
State, to submit a report not later than 90 days after the date 
of the enactment of this Act that assesses the merits and 
feasibility of establishing and administering a Department of 
Defense Functional Center for Security Studies in Irregular 
Warfare. Further, not earlier than 30 days after the submission 
of the required plan and subject to the availability of 
appropriations, the provision would provide discretionary 
authority to the Secretary to establish and administer such a 
center.

        Subtitle B--Matters Relating to Afghanistan and Pakistan

Extension and modification of authority for reimbursement of certain 
        coalition nations for support provided to United States 
        military operations (sec. 1211)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authority for reimbursement of certain coalition nations for 
support provided to United States military operations through 
December 31, 2021.
Extension and modification of Commanders' Emergency Response Program 
        (sec. 1212)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authorization for the Commanders' Emergency Response Program in 
Afghanistan through December 31, 2021, and would authorize $2.0 
million for that program for use during calendar year 2021.
Extension and modification of support for reconciliation activities led 
        by the Government of Afghanistan (sec. 1213)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authorization for the Department of Defense to provide support 
for bottom-up, Government of Afghanistan-led reconciliation 
activities. The provision would modify the existing authority 
to ensure that covered support can only be provided for 
reconciliation activities that include the participation of the 
Government of Afghanistan and do not restrict the participation 
of women. The provision would also prohibit Taliban members' 
receipt of reimbursement for travel or lodging expenses and 
stipends or per diem payments. Finally, the provision would 
prohibit the Department from providing covered support until it 
provides the implementation framework required by section 1218 
of the National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 2020 
(Public Law 116-92), due to the Congress on March 19, 2020.
Sense of Senate on special immigrant visa program for Afghan allies 
        (sec. 1214)
    The committee recommends a provision that would express 
support for the special immigrant visa program for Afghan 
allies. The committee views this program as vital to the United 
States mission in Afghanistan. Afghans routinely risk their 
lives to assist United States military and diplomatic personnel 
and further U.S. interests. The committee urges the United 
States Government to clear the backlog in processing special 
immigrant visa applications and notes that, under the Afghan 
Allies Protection Act of 2009 (8 U.S.C. 1101 note), 
applications for special immigrant status should be processed 
within 270 days.
Sense of Senate and report on United States presence in Afghanistan 
        (sec. 1215)
    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate on the United States' presence in 
Afghanistan and would require the Secretary of Defense to 
submit a report on the external threat posed by extremist 
groups in Afghanistan to the homeland, and other matters, by 
September 1, 2020.

         Subtitle C--Matters Relating to Syria, Iraq, and Iran

Extension of authority and limitation on use of funds to provide 
        assistance to counter the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (sec. 
        1221)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authority to provide assistance to Iraq to counter the Islamic 
State of Iraq and Syria through December 31, 2021. The 
provision would authorize the use of not more than $322.5 
million in Operation & Maintenance, Defense-wide, Overseas 
Contingency Operations funds for such purposes. The provision 
would also limit the obligation or expenditure of 75 percent of 
the authorized funding until the Secretary of Defense provides 
a plan to the congressional defense committees for fully 
transitioning security assistance for the Iraqi Security Forces 
from the Counter-Islamic State of Iraq and Syria Train and 
Equip Fund to standing security assistance authorities managed 
by the Defense Security Cooperation Agency and State Department 
by the end of fiscal year 2022.
    The committee supports continued assistance to the Iraqi 
Security Forces, including the Counter Terrorism Service (CTS) 
and the Ministry of Peshmerga. However, the committee believes 
that traditional capacity-building activities are more 
appropriately funded through standing security assistance 
authorities found in titles 10 and 22 of United States Code. 
The committee notes that, elsewhere in this report, the 
committee recommends a transfer of $322.5 million to the 
Defense Security Cooperation Agency for such purposes.
Extension and modification of authority to provide assistance to vetted 
        Syrian groups and individuals (sec. 1222)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authority to provide assistance to vetted Syrian groups through 
2021 under section 1209 of the Carl Levin and Howard P. 
``Buck'' McKeon National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 2015 (Public Law 113-291), as amended. The provision would 
also consolidate reporting elements into the standing 
requirement for quarterly reports on the use of the authority.
    The committee supports continued cooperation with the 
Syrian Democratic Forces (SDF) to maintain the gains made 
against the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) in 
northeastern Syria and appreciates the sacrifices that the SDF 
has made in defeating the so-called territorial caliphate. The 
committee believes that the safe, humane detention of ISIS 
foreign terrorist fighters and repatriation of such fighters to 
their countries of origin should remain a top priority for the 
United States and international community, and the committee 
continues to support the use of authorized funding for such 
purposes.
Extension and modification of authority to support operations and 
        activities of the Office of Security Cooperation in Iraq (sec. 
        1223)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend the 
authorization for the Office of Security Cooperation in Iraq 
through fiscal year 2021. The provision would reduce the funds 
available for this authority from $30.0 million to $15.0 
million. The committee expects the Office of Security 
Cooperation in Iraq to continue its transition to a normalized 
security cooperation office and directs the Department of 
Defense to report on its progress in implementing this 
transition.

   Subtitle D--Matters Relating to Europe and the Russian Federation

Extension of limitation on military cooperation between the United 
        States and the Russian Federation (sec. 1231)
    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 1232(a) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328) to extend through fiscal 
year 2021 the limitation on military cooperation between the 
United States and the Russian Federation.
Prohibition on availability of funds relating to sovereignty of the 
        Russian Federation over Crimea (sec. 1232)
    The committee recommends a provision that would state that 
none of the funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act for 
fiscal year 2021 for the Department of Defense may be obligated 
or expended to, and that the Department may not, implement any 
activity that recognizes the sovereignty of the Russian 
Federation over Crimea.
Modification and extension of Ukraine Security Assistance Initiative 
        (sec. 1233)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
through December 31, 2024, the authority under section 1250 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2016 
(Public Law 114-92), as amended by section 1244 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-
92), for the Secretary of Defense, with the concurrence of the 
Secretary of State, to provide security assistance, including 
defensive lethal assistance, and intelligence support to 
military and other security forces of the Government of 
Ukraine. The provision would authorize up to $250.0 million in 
fiscal year 2021 to provide security assistance to Ukraine, of 
which $125.0 million would be available only for lethal 
assistance.
    The committee continues to believe that defense 
institutional reforms are critical to sustaining capabilities 
developed using security assistance provided under this and 
other authorities. Moreover, defense institutional reforms will 
ultimately enable a more effective defense of Ukraine's 
sovereignty and territorial integrity and allow Ukraine to 
achieve its full potential as a strategic partner of the United 
States. Therefore, the provision would prohibit the obligation 
or expenditure of 50 percent of the funds authorized to be 
appropriated in fiscal year 2021 under this authority until the 
Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of 
State, certifies that Ukraine has taken substantial action to 
make defense institutional reforms. The provision would also 
include additional areas of reform to be considered with 
respect to such a certification, including: transformation of 
command and control structures and roles in line with North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization principles and improvement of 
human resources management, including to support career 
management reforms, enhanced social support to military 
personnel and their families, and professional military 
education systems.
Report on capability and capacity requirements of military forces of 
        Ukraine and resource plan for security assistance (sec. 1234)
    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of State, not later than 
180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, to 
jointly submit to certain committees of Congress a report on 
the capability and capacity requirements of the military forces 
of Ukraine. The provision would specify a number of elements to 
be addressed in the report.
    The provision would also require the Secretary of Defense 
and the Secretary of State, not later than February 15, 2022, 
to jointly submit to certain committees of Congress a resource 
plan for United States security assistance with respect to 
Ukraine in fiscal year 2023 and the 4 succeeding fiscal years.
Sense of Senate on North Atlantic Treaty Organization enhanced 
        opportunities partner status for Ukraine (sec. 1235)
    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate that the United States should support the 
designation of Ukraine as an enhanced opportunities partner as 
part of the Partnership Interoperability Initiative of the 
North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
Extension of authority for training for Eastern European national 
        security forces in the course of multilateral exercises (sec. 
        1236)
    The committee recommends a provision that would extend 
through December 31, 2023, the authority provided in section 
1251 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
2016 (Public Law 114-92), as amended by section 1247 of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public 
Law 116-92), for the Secretary of Defense, with the concurrence 
of the Secretary of State, to provide multilateral or regional 
training, and pay the incremental expenses of participating in 
such training, for countries in Eastern Europe that are 
signatories to the Partnership for Peace Framework Documents 
but not members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
(NATO) or that became NATO members after January 1, 1999.
Sense of Senate on Kosovo and the role of the Kosovo Force of the North 
        Atlantic Treaty Organization (sec. 1237)
    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate on matters relating to Kosovo and the role 
of the Kosovo Force (KFOR) of the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization (NATO).
    The committee believes that the United States should 
continue to support the diplomatic efforts of Kosovo and Serbia 
to reach a historic agreement to normalize relations with 
mutual recognition as a central element. Such an agreement is 
in the interest of both countries and would enhance security 
and stability in the western Balkans.
    The committee recognizes that the KFOR continues to play an 
indispensable role in maintaining the security and stability 
that are the essential predicates for the success of Kosovo's 
and Serbia's diplomatic efforts to achieve normalization of 
relations. While the participation of the United States Armed 
Forces in the KFOR is foundational to the credibility and 
success of KFOR's mission, the KFOR also represents a positive 
example of burden-sharing. NATO allies and other European 
partners contribute over 80 percent of the troops for the 
mission. Therefore, together with our allies and partners, the 
United States should maintain its commitment to the KFOR and 
take all appropriate steps to ensure that the KFOR has the 
necessary personnel, capabilities, and resources to perform its 
critical mission.
    Additionally, the committee believes that the United States 
should continue to support the Kosovo Security Force's gradual 
transition to a multi-ethnic army for the Republic of Kosovo 
that is interoperable with NATO members through an inclusive 
and transparent process that respects the rights and concerns 
of all of Kosovo's citizens, promotes regional security and 
stability, and supports Kosovo's aspirations for eventual full 
membership in the NATO.

Sense of the Senate on strategic competition with the Russian 
        Federation and related activities of the Department of Defense 
        (sec. 1238)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of the Senate that long-term strategic competition with 
the Russian Federation is a principal priority for the 
Department of Defense that requires sustained investment due to 
the magnitude of the threat posed to United States security, 
prosperity, and alliances and partnerships. The provision would 
further express the sense of the Senate concerning steps that 
the Department of Defense should take to enhance deterrence 
against Russian aggression and counter Russian activities short 
of armed conflict.

Report on Russian Federation support of racially and ethnically 
        motivated violent extremists (sec. 1239)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the head of any 
other relevant Federal department or agency, to submit a report 
to the appropriate congressional committees on Russian support 
to racially- and ethnically-motivated violent extremist groups 
and networks in Europe and the United States. The groups or 
networks to be covered in the report include groups or 
networks: (1) Targeted or recruited by the Russian intelligence 
services; (2) That have received support, including training, 
messaging support on social media platforms, and financial or 
other support from Russia, its agents, or other Russian 
entities acting at the direction of or for the benefit of the 
Russian Government; and (3) That have leadership or bases of 
operations located within Russia and that operate or maintain 
chapters or a network of groups in Europe or the United States. 
The report would also require the Secretary to provide any 
recommendations for mitigating the security threat posed by 
these groups or networks and countering Russian support for 
such groups or networks.
    The committee is concerned about the growing national 
security threat arising from Russia's support, both directly 
and indirectly, for racially- and ethnically-motivated violent 
extremist groups in Europe and the United States. Russia's 
continued support of such groups or networks, whether through 
direct support, information warfare operations to amplify and 
inflame ethnic and religious tensions, and tolerating their 
operations on Russian soil, poses a significant risk to 
societal stability and democratic institutions in Europe and 
the United States.

Participation in European program on multilateral exchange of surface 
        transportation services (sec. 1240)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to participate in a Surface Exchange 
of Services program of the Movement Coordination Center Europe.

Participation in programs relating to coordination or exchange of air 
        refueling and air transportation services (sec. 1241)

    The committee recommends a provision that would codify 
permanently the authority of the Secretary of Defense to 
participate in programs relating to coordination or exchange of 
air refueling and air transportation services.

        Subtitle E--Matters Relating to the Indo-Pacific Region


Pacific Deterrence Initiative (sec. 1251)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to carry out the Pacific Deterrence 
Initiative (PDI) to ensure the effective implementation of the 
National Defense Strategy with respect to the Indo-Pacific 
region. The provision would describe the activities to be 
carried out under the PDI: (1) Activities to increase the 
lethality of the Joint Force in the Indo-Pacific region; (2) 
Activities to enhance the design and posture of the Joint Force 
in the Indo-Pacific region; (3) Activities to strengthen 
alliances and partnerships; and (4) Activities to carry out a 
program of exercises, experimentation, and innovation for the 
Joint Force in the Indo-Pacific region. The provision would 
authorize $1.4 billion to be appropriated for the Secretary to 
carry out PDI in fiscal year 2021, as specified in the funding 
table in section 4502.
    The provision would also authorize $5.5 billion to be 
appropriated for the Secretary to carry out the PDI in fiscal 
year 2022. Not later than February 15, 2021, the provision 
would require the Secretary, in consultation with the 
Commander, U.S. Indo-Pacific Command, to submit to the 
congressional defense committees a plan to expend not less than 
the amounts authorized to be appropriated for the Secretary to 
carry out the PDI in fiscal year 2022.
    The provision would repeal section 1251 of the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-
91), as most recently amended by section 1253 of the John S. 
McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 
(Public Law 115-232), which established an authority for an 
``Indo-Pacific Stability Initiative.''
    The committee notes that the provision would emphasize that 
specific activities to be carried out under the PDI, 
particularly those related to the lethality of the Joint Force 
and the design and posture of the Joint Force, should be 
focused in and with respect to locations west of the 
International Date Line. In this way, the committee believes 
that the PDI will bolster the ``contact'' and ``blunt'' layers 
described by the Global Operating Model of the National Defense 
Strategy to maintain the credibility of American deterrence 
against adversarial aggression in the Indo-Pacific region.
    The committee encourages the Secretary of Defense to 
consider whether a named operation in the Indo-Pacific would 
improve the execution of the PDI, including through more 
predictable and sustainable funding, improved joint planning 
and coordination of training and exercise activities, and 
increased support for deployments of rotational forces.
    The committee notes that the PDI is designed to further the 
strategic and policy objectives articulated by Congress in the 
Asia Reassurance Initiative Act (Public Law 115-409) and by the 
executive branch in the National Security Strategy, the ``Free 
and Open Indo-Pacific'' strategy of the Department of State, 
the National Defense Strategy, and the Indo-Pacific strategy 
report of the Department of Defense.
    The committee notes that the provision would require the 
Department of Defense to submit detailed budgetary display 
information associated with the PDI in future budget requests. 
The committee believes that the availability of budgetary data 
organized according to regional missions and the priorities of 
the combatant commands is critical for the ability of the 
Department and the Congress to assess the implementation of the 
National Defense Strategy. Furthermore, a budgetary display is 
included elsewhere in this Act that captures spending related 
to the PDI. The committee encourages the Department of Defense 
to continue working with the Congress to improve budgetary 
transparency in support of its oversight responsibilities.

Sense of Senate on the United States-Vietnam defense relationship (sec. 
        1252)

    The committee recommends a provision that would commemorate 
the 25th anniversary of the normalization of diplomatic 
relations between the United States and Vietnam and express 
support for deepening defense cooperation between the United 
States and Vietnam, including with respect to maritime 
security, cybersecurity, counterterrorism, information sharing, 
humanitarian assistance and disaster relief, military medicine, 
peacekeeping operations, defense trade, and other areas.

Authority to transfer funds for Bien Hoa dioxin cleanup (sec. 1253)

    The committee recommends a provision that would allow the 
Secretary of Defense to transfer not more than $15.0 million in 
fiscal year 2021 to the Secretary of State, to be used by the 
United States Agency for International Development for the Bien 
Hoa dioxin cleanup in Vietnam.

Cooperative program with Vietnam to account for Vietnamese personnel 
        missing in action (sec. 1254)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense to carry out a cooperative program 
with the Ministry of Defense of Vietnam to assist in accounting 
for Vietnamese personnel missing in action.

Provision of goods and services at Kwajalein Atoll, Republic of the 
        Marshall Islands (sec. 1255)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of the Army to provide goods and services, 
including inter-atoll transportation, at Kwajalein Atoll, 
Republic of the Marshall Islands (RMI), to the RMI government 
and other eligible patrons. The provision would also require 
the Secretary of the Army to provide a briefing on the use of 
the authority under section 7596(a) of title 10, United States 
Code, as would be added by the provision, in fiscal year 2021, 
including a written summary describing the goods and services 
provided on a reimbursable basis and the goods and services 
provided on a non-reimbursable basis.

Authority to establish a Movement Coordination Center Pacific in the 
        Indo-Pacific region and participate in an Air Transport and 
        Air-to-Air Refueling and other Exchanges of Services program 
        (sec. 1256)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense, with the concurrence of the Secretary 
of State, to establish a Movement Coordination Center Pacific 
and enable the participation of the Department of Defense in an 
Air Transport and Air-to-Air Refueling and other Exchanges of 
Services (ATARES) program of the Center.

Training of ally and partner air forces in Guam (sec. 1257)

    The committee recommends a provision that would commend the 
memorandum of understanding agreed to by the United States and 
the Republic of Singapore on December 6, 2019, to establish a 
fighter jet training detachment in Guam. The provision would 
require that, not later than 1 year after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense submit to the 
congressional defense committees a report assessing the merit 
and feasibility of entering into agreements similar to the 
aforementioned memorandum of understanding with other United 
States allies and partners in the Indo-Pacific region, to 
include Japan, Australia, and India.

Statement of policy and sense of Senate on the Taiwan Relations Act 
        (sec. 1258)

    The committee recommends a provision that would state the 
policy of the United States with respect to upholding its 
obligations under the Taiwan Relations Act (Public Law 96-8).
    Among other things, the provision would emphasize that the 
Taiwan Relations Act and the ``Six Assurances'' continue to 
provide the foundation of United States-Taiwan relations.
    The provision would reiterate the commitment of the United 
States under the Taiwan Relations Act to maintain the capacity 
``to resist any resort to force or other forms of coercion that 
would jeopardize the security, or the social or economic 
system, of the people on Taiwan,'' including the capacity of 
the United States Armed Forces to deny an operation by the 
People's Republic of China to rapidly seize control of Taiwan 
and present the United States with a ``fait accompli.''
    The provision would state that it is the policy of the 
United States to deepen, to the fullest extent short of 
establishing diplomatic relations the extensive, close, and 
friendly relations of the United States with Taiwan, including 
defense relations.
    Finally, the provision would express the sense of the 
Senate that the Secretary of Defense should ensure that policy 
guidance to the Department of Defense related to United States-
Taiwan defense relations is fully consistent with the statement 
of policy contained in the provision and issue new policy 
guidance required to carry out such policy.

Sense of Congress on port calls in Taiwan with the USNS Comfort and 
        USNS Mercy (sec. 1259)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of Congress that the Department of Defense should conduct 
port calls in Taiwan with the USNS Comfort and USNS Mercy.

Limitation on use of funds to reduce total number of members of the 
        Armed Forces serving on active duty who are deployed to the 
        Republic of Korea (sec. 1260)

    The committee recommends a provision that would, among 
other things, prohibit funds authorized to be appropriated by 
this Act to be obligated or expended to reduce the total number 
of members of the Armed Forces serving on Active Duty and 
deployed to the Republic of Korea to fewer than 28,500.

Sense of Congress on co-development with Japan of a long-range ground-
        based anti-ship cruise missile system (sec. 1261)

    The committee recommends a provision that would express the 
sense of Congress that the Department of Defense should 
prioritize consultations with the Ministry of Defense of Japan 
to determine whether a ground-based, long-range anti-ship 
cruise missile system would meet shared defense requirements of 
the United States and Japan and, if so, that the United States 
and Japan should consider co-development of such a system.

                          Subtitle F--Reports


Review of and report on overdue acquisition and cross-servicing 
        agreement transactions (sec. 1271)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to produce a report on all unreimbursed 
and overdue Acquisition and Cross-Servicing (ACSA) transactions 
valued at $1.0 million or more. The provision would also 
require a plan for securing reimbursement from the relevant 
foreign partner and a summary of actions taken by the 
Department to improve record-keeping related to ACSA 
transactions.

Report on burden sharing contributions by designated countries (sec. 
        1272)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 2350j of title 10, United States Code, by requiring an 
annual report on burden sharing contributions received from 
designated countries under this authority and the purposes for 
which such contributions were used.
    The committee notes that section 2350j of title 10, United 
States Code, authorizes the Secretary of Defense, after 
consultation with the Secretary of State, to accept cash 
contributions from any country or regional organization 
designated for specified purposes. The committee lacks 
sufficient visibility into reimbursements made pursuant to this 
authority and believes that the report required by this 
provision will better enable the committee to conduct 
appropriate oversight.

Report on risk to personnel, equipment, and operations due to Huawei 5G 
        architecture in host countries (sec. 1273)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense, not later than 1 year after the date of 
the enactment of this Act, to submit to the congressional 
defense committees a report that contains an assessment of: (1) 
The risk to personnel, equipment, and operations of the 
Department of Defense in host countries posed by the current or 
intended use by such countries of a 5G telecommunications 
architecture provided by Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd.; and (2) 
Measures required to mitigate this risk, including the merit 
and feasibility of the relocation of certain personnel or 
equipment of the Department of Defense to another location 
without the presence of a 5G telecommunications architecture 
provided by Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd.

                       Subtitle G--Other Matters


Reciprocal patient movement agreements (sec. 1281)

    The committee recommends a provision that would authorize 
the Secretary of Defense, with the concurrence of the Secretary 
of State, to enter into a bilateral or multilateral memorandum 
of understanding or other formal agreement with one or more 
governments of certain partner countries concerning reciprocity 
with respect to patient movement personnel, services, and 
equipment. The provision would require the Secretary of 
Defense, before entering into a memorandum of understanding or 
other formal agreement, to certify in writing that the 
professional credentials, certifications, licenses, and 
approvals for patient movement personnel and patient movement 
equipment of the partner country meet or exceed the equivalent 
standards of the United States for similar personnel and 
equipment and will provide for a level of care comparable to, 
or better than, the level of care provided by the Department of 
Defense. The provision would require that such a certification 
be submitted to the appropriate congressional committees not 
later than 15 days after the date on which the Secretary of 
Defense makes the certification and be reviewed and recertified 
by the Secretary of Defense not less frequently than annually.

Extension of authorization of non-conventional assisted recovery 
        capabilities (sec. 1282)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 943(g) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2009 (Public Law 110-417), as most recently amended 
by section 1282(a) of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328), by extending for 3 
years the authority of the Department of Defense to engage in 
Non-Conventional Assisted Recovery activities.

Extension of Department of Defense support for stabilization activities 
        in national security interest of the United States (sec. 1283)

    The committee recommends a provision that would modify 
section 1210A(h) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) by extending the authority 
for the Department of Defense to provide specified support for 
stabilization activities in the national security interest of 
the United States through December 31, 2021.

Notification with respect to withdrawal of members of the Armed Forces 
        participating in the Multinational Force and Observers in Egypt 
        (sec. 1284)

    The committee recommends a provision that would require the 
Secretary of Defense to submit a report to the congressional 
defense committees and the Committee on Foreign Relations of 
the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of 
Representatives 30 days prior to a reduction in the total 
number of members of the Armed Forces deployed to the 
Multinational Force and Observers (MFO) in Egypt to fewer than 
430 members. The report would include: a detailed accounting of 
the number of members of the Armed Forces to be withdrawn from 
the MFO in Egypt and the capabilities that such members of the 
Armed Forces provide in support of the mission; an explanation 
of national security interests of the United States served by 
such a reduction and an assessment of the effect, if any, such 
a reduction is expected to have on the security of United 
States partners in the region; a description of consultations 
performed by the Secretary with the other countries that 
contribute military forces to the MFO; an assessment of whether 
other countries, including the countries that contribute 
military forces to the MFO, will increase their contributions 
of military forces to compensate for the capabilities withdrawn 
by the United States; and an explanation of any anticipated 
negative impact of such a reduction on the ability of the MFO 
in Egypt to fulfill its mission of supervising the 
implementation of the security provisions of the 1979 Treaty of 
Peace between Egypt and Israel and employing best efforts to 
prevent any violation of the terms of such treaty and the 
manner in which any such negative impact will be mitigated.
    The committee strongly supports maintaining U.S. military 
support to the MFO. The 1979 Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty 
represents an anchor of stability in an unpredictable region. 
The MFO has been essential to supervising the implementation of 
the treaty's security provisions and employing best efforts to 
prevent violations of its terms. The committee believes that 
American leadership of the MFO, including adequate U.S. force 
contributions, is essential to the MFO's credibility with Egypt 
and Israel and is also vital to encouraging 12 other partners 
to contribute troops to the force. The committee is concerned 
that a significant drawdown from the MFO would create new 
challenges in the implementation of the peace treaty, resulting 
in a less stable Middle East and making it more difficult to 
implement the National Defense Strategy.

Modification to initiative to support protection of national security 
        academic researchers from undue influence and other security 
        threats (sec. 1285)

    The committee recommends a provision that would amend 
section 1286 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232) to 
include requirements for briefings to appropriate senior 
officials of institutes of higher education on the espionage 
risks posed by near-peer strategic competitors.

Establishment of United States-Israel Operations-Technology Working 
        Group (sec. 1286)

    The committee recommends a provision that would direct the 
Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Minister of 
Defense of Israel, to establish, not later than 1 year after 
the date of the enactment of this Act, a United States-Israel 
Operations-Technology Working Group.

                       Items of Special Interest


Barriers to security cooperation

    The committee acknowledges that, while the Department of 
Defense (DOD) maintains strong bi- and multilateral security 
cooperation programs with key partners and allies involved in 
the Indo-Pacific region, these capacity building efforts could 
be enhanced through more proactive planning and cooperation 
with allies and partners that capitalize on each country's 
comparative strengths. Improved coordination among the security 
cooperation activities of allies and partners in the Indo-
Pacific region would allow each partner to maximize its 
contributions to regional security and interoperability with 
U.S. forces while more efficiently distributing limited 
resources. Medium- and long-range planning to meet shared 
operational requirements and security cooperation planning 
stand out as areas in which early coordination with partners, 
such as Japan, Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom, 
could pay significant dividends.
    Therefore, not later than October 1, 2020, the committee 
directs the DOD to commission a study conducted by a Federally 
Funded Research and Development Corporation to examine: (1) Key 
allies' and partners' comparative strengths in meeting shared 
operational requirements and security cooperation objectives 
with other partner nations; (2) The ways the DOD can draw on 
partner nations' comparative strengths to meet shared security 
objectives; (3) An assessment of the U.S. operational and 
policy barriers that inhibit more expansive cooperation; and 
(4) Recommendations for how to alter U.S. policies, guidance, 
and procedures, including security cooperation planning 
processes, to better capitalize on partners' comparative 
strengths.

Defense cooperation with Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania

    The committee commends Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania for 
meeting their commitments as North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
(NATO) allies to spend at least 2 percent of gross domestic 
product on defense, focusing their investments on the 
capabilities necessary to deter and resist Russian aggression, 
and improving coordination on defense requirements and 
procurement. However, despite these efforts, the committee 
recognizes that each nation has unmet defense requirements that 
are unlikely to be met solely through their individual national 
defense budgets. That is why, among other steps, the Congress, 
in section 1246 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-120), required the Secretary 
of Defense and the Secretary of State to jointly conduct a 
comprehensive, multilateral assessment of the military 
requirements of Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia to deter and 
resist aggression by the Russian Federation and to report to 
the Congress on the results of that assessment. The committee 
underscores the importance of this assessment, which is 
intended to provide a substantive foundation for expanded 
defense cooperation between the United States and Estonia, 
Latvia, and Lithuania, including in such areas as maritime 
situational awareness, ammunition, Command, Control, 
Communications, Computers, Intelligence, Surveillance, and 
Reconnaissance, and special forces. Therefore, the committee 
directs the Secretary of Defense to provide, not later than 
August 15, 2020, a briefing on the status of the assessment and 
report required by section 1246 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-120), 
including any interim recommendations of the Secretary.

Destabilizing activities of the Russian Federation

    The committee remains concerned about activities of the 
Russian Federation that could have a destabilizing impact on 
the political and security environment in the U.S. European 
Command area of responsibility.
    The committee notes that the Russian Federation has played 
a destabilizing role in the relationship between Kosovo and 
Serbia, undermined the sovereignty of Bosnia and Herzegovina, 
provided support to transnational extremist groups, and 
consistently worked to undermine the North Atlantic Treaty 
Organization alliance and European Union. In the western 
Balkans, in particular, this has included the Russian 
Federation's supporting a coup attempt in Montenegro and 
promoting discord in North Macedonia as each country was 
preparing to join the NATO alliance.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Secretary of Defense 
to provide a briefing to the committee, no later than October 
30, 2020, on efforts by U.S. European Command to promote U.S. 
security cooperation with countries in the western Balkans and 
to reduce their dependence on Russian weapon systems.

Forward deployed naval forces in Europe

    The committee continues to support additional forward-
basing of United States Navy destroyers in Rota, Spain. The 
ships currently stationed in Spain are among the most 
dynamically-employed assets of U.S. global maritime presence--
performing ballistic missile defense missions, carrying out 
strikes in Syria, boosting U.S. presence across the European 
theater in support of allies and partners, and monitoring 
increasing Russian naval activities. At the same time, these 
ships have maintained some of the highest readiness rates of 
ships in the Navy, in part due to rigorous maintenance 
practices.
    The committee is concerned that increasing Russian naval 
activity in the European theater, which is at its highest level 
since the Cold War, presents a significant challenge to the 
implementation of the National Defense Strategy in the European 
theater. The committee is also aware of the significant 
advances in Russian naval capability, especially undersea.
    Due in part to these developments, the Commander, U.S. 
European Command, testified to the committee in February 2020 
that he supports increasing from four to six the number of 
destroyers based in Rota, Spain. The Commander said that, based 
on the European Deterrence Initiative investments, Rota, Spain, 
facilities could support two more destroyers immediately. He 
also said that the two ships would ``improve our ability to get 
indications and warnings in the potential battle space and also 
dramatically improve our ability to better command and 
control.'' In March 2020, the Chief of Naval Operations also 
endorsed the additional naval presence before the committee. 
The committee finds the arguments of senior defense leadership 
to increase naval presence in Europe, and the mission 
flexibility it would provide, compelling.
    Therefore, the committee directs the Chief of Naval 
Operations and the Commander, U.S. European Command, not later 
than 15 days after the fiscal year 2022 budget request is 
submitted to the Congress, to provide a briefing to the 
Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and House of 
Representatives on the plan to base two additional destroyers 
at Rota, Spain. This brief shall include a detailed 
explanation, by fiscal year, of actions and the associated 
funding that will lead to the forward stationing of six 
destroyers based in Rota as soon as practicable.

GAO briefing of the USMC distributed laydown

    Section 1260K of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 2020 (Public Law 116-92) directed the Department of 
Defense to submit a report on the implementation of the planned 
distributed lay-down of members of the United States Marine 
Corps in Okinawa, Guam, Hawaii, Australia, and other locations. 
The committee is aware that the estimated cost of the 
distributed lay-down continues to increase and that the 
projected completion date continues to be delayed. The 
committee seeks to ensure the proper alignment of the 
Department's plans concerning Marine Corps resources, 
capabilities, and posture to adequately prepare these forces 
for possible contingencies in the Indo-Pacific region. The 
committee also recognizes the significant implications of the 
Commandant's Planning Guidance issued in July 2019 and the 
subsequent Force Design 2030 report issued in March 2020 with 
respect to force design, operational concepts, and posture.
    Accordingly, the committee directs the Comptroller General 
of the United States to review the report required above and 
submit to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and 
the House of Representatives an assessment of the matters 
contained in the report, including an assessment of: (1) The 
extent to which DOD's report addressed the mandated reporting 
elements; (2) The status of DOD's implementation for the 
planned distributed laydown; and (3) Any other matters the 
Comptroller General determines are relevant.
    The committee further directs the Comptroller General to 
provide an interim briefing to the Committees on Armed Services 
of the Senate and the House of Representatives, not later than 
90 days after the date on which the DOD submits its repor