[Congressional Record Volume 167, Number 208 (Thursday, December 2, 2021)]
[House]
[Pages H6872-H6891]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




                FURTHER EXTENDING GOVERNMENT FUNDING ACT

  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, pursuant to House Resolution 829, I call 
up the bill (H.R. 6119) making further continuing appropriations for 
the fiscal year ending September 30, 2022, and for other purposes, and 
ask for its immediate consideration in the House.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 829, the bill 
is considered read.
  The text of the bill is as follows:

                               H.R. 6119

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``Further Extending Government 
     Funding Act''.

     SEC. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS.

       The table of contents of this Act is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short Title.
Sec. 2. Table of Contents.
Sec. 3. References.

        DIVISION A--FURTHER CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2022

  DIVISION B--ADDITIONAL AFGHANISTAN SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 
                                  2022

                         DIVISION C--EXTENSIONS

Title I--Extensions
Title II--Budgetary Effects

     SEC. 3. REFERENCES.

       Except as expressly provided otherwise, any reference to 
     ``this Act'' contained in any division of this Act shall be 
     treated as referring only to the provisions of that division.

        DIVISION A--FURTHER CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2022

       Sec. 101.  The Continuing Appropriations Act, 2022 
     (division A of Public Law 117-43) is amended--
       (1) by striking the date specified in section 106(3) and 
     inserting ``February 18, 2022'';
       (2) in section 118, by striking ``first quarter'' and 
     inserting ``first and second quarters'';
       (3) in section 137, by striking ``$22,080,000'' and 
     inserting ``$44,838,000'' and by striking ``$2,261,000'' and 
     inserting ``$4,547,000''; and
       (4) by adding after section 157 the following new sections:
       ``Sec. 158.  Section 9(i)(2) of the Food and Nutrition Act 
     of 2008 (7 U.S.C. 2018(i)(2)) shall be applied by 
     substituting the date specified in section 106(3) of this Act 
     for `December 31, 2021'.
       ``Sec. 159.  Section 533 of title V of division B of Public 
     Law 116-260 is repealed.
       ``Sec. 160. (a) Notwithstanding section 101, section 748 of 
     title VII of division E of Public Law 116-260 shall be 
     applied during the period covered by this Act by--
       ``(1) substituting `2023' for `2022';
       ``(2) substituting `2022' for `2021' each place it appears;
       ``(3) substituting `2021' for `2020' each place it appears; 
     and
       ``(4) substituting `section 748 of division E of Public Law 
     116-260, as in effect on September 30, 2021' for `section 749 
     of division C of Public Law 116-93' each place it appears.
       ``(b) Subsection (a) shall not take effect until the first 
     day of the first applicable pay period beginning on or after 
     January 1, 2022.
       ``Sec. 161.  Section 302 of the Universal Service 
     Antideficiency Temporary Suspension Act shall be applied by 
     substituting the date specified in section 106(3) of this Act 
     for `December 31, 2021' each place it appears.
       ``Sec. 162.  In addition to amounts otherwise provided by 
     this Act, there is appropriated $1,600,000,000, for an 
     additional amount for fiscal year 2022, to remain available 
     until September 30, 2024, for the account specified and for 
     the activities specified, in section 141 of this Act.
       ``Sec. 163.  During the period covered by this Act, section 
     506(a)(1) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 
     2318) shall be applied by substituting `$200,000,000' for 
     `$100,000,000'.''.
        This division may be cited as the ``Further Continuing 
     Appropriations Act, 2022''.

  DIVISION B--ADDITIONAL AFGHANISTAN SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 
                                  2022

        The following sums are appropriated, out of any money in 
     the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the fiscal year 
     ending September 30, 2022, and for other purposes, namely:

                                TITLE I

                         DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

                           MILITARY PERSONNEL

                        Military Personnel, Army

       For an additional amount for ``Military Personnel, Army'', 
     $128,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2022, 
     for support of Operation Allies Welcome by the Department of 
     Defense.

                        Military Personnel, Navy

       For an additional amount for ``Military Personnel, Navy'', 
     $7,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2022, for 
     support of Operation Allies Welcome by the Department of 
     Defense.

                    Military Personnel, Marine Corps

       For an additional amount for ``Military Personnel, Marine 
     Corps'', $32,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 
     2022, for support of Operation Allies Welcome by the 
     Department of Defense.

                     Military Personnel, Air Force

       For an additional amount for ``Military Personnel, Air 
     Force'', $145,000,000, to remain available until September 
     30, 2022, for support of Operation Allies Welcome by the 
     Department of Defense.

                       OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE

             Overseas Humanitarian, Disaster, and Civic Aid

       For an additional amount for ``Overseas Humanitarian, 
     Disaster, and Civic Aid'', $4,000,000,000, to remain 
     available until September 30, 2023, for support of Operation 
     Allies Welcome by the Department of Defense.

                     GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS TITLE

       Sec. 1101.  Not later than 30 days after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, and every 30 days thereafter through 
     fiscal year 2022, the Secretary of Defense shall provide a 
     written report to the congressional defense committees 
     describing the execution of funds provided in this title, 
     including the amounts obligated and expended, in total and 
     since the previous report; the nature of the costs incurred 
     or services provided by such funds; and any reimbursements or 
     funds transferred by another Federal agency to the Department 
     of Defense which relates to the purpose of the funds provided 
     by this title.
       Sec. 1102.  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
     funds provided by this title

[[Page H6873]]

     shall only be for the purposes specified, and shall not be 
     subject to any transfer authority provided by law.

                                TITLE II

                    DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

    DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT, OPERATIONS, INTELLIGENCE, AND OVERSIGHT

            Office of the Secretary and Executive Management

                         operations and support

       For an additional amount for ``Operations and Support'', 
     $147,456,000, to remain available until September 30, 2022, 
     for necessary expenses in support of Operation Allies 
     Welcome, including the provision of staffing and support 
     services for Safe Havens:  Provided, That amounts provided 
     under this heading in this Act may be transferred by the 
     Secretary of Homeland Security to other appropriations in the 
     Department of Homeland Security only for necessary expenses 
     of Operation Allies Welcome and not for any other purpose:  
     Provided further, That amounts made available under this 
     heading in this Act shall be available in addition to any 
     other appropriations available for the same purpose, 
     including appropriations available pursuant to the authority 
     of section 506(a)(2) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961:  
     Provided further, That, beginning not later than January 31, 
     2022, the Office of the Secretary shall report monthly to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and the House of 
     Representatives on the use of transfer authority provided 
     under this heading in this Act.

                               TITLE III

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

               Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

                cdc-wide activities and program support

       For an additional amount for ``CDC-Wide Activities and 
     Program Support'', $8,000,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2022, for support of Operation Allies Welcome 
     for medical support, screening, and other related public 
     health activities related to Afghan arrivals and refugees.

                Administration for Children and Families

                     refugee and entrant assistance

       For an additional amount for ``Refugee and Entrant 
     Assistance'', $1,263,728,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2023, for support of Operation Allies Welcome 
     for carrying out refugee and entrant assistance activities in 
     support of citizens or nationals of Afghanistan paroled into 
     the United States under section 212(d)(5) of the Immigration 
     and Nationality Act and citizens or nationals of Afghanistan 
     for whom such refugee and entrant assistance activities are 
     authorized:  Provided, That amounts made available under this 
     heading in this Act may be used for grants or contracts with 
     qualified nonprofit organizations to provide culturally and 
     linguistically appropriate services, including wrap-around 
     services during temporary housing and after resettlement, 
     housing assistance, medical assistance, legal assistance, 
     education services, and case management assistance:  Provided 
     further, That the Director of the Office of Refugee 
     Resettlement, in carrying out section 412(c)(1)(A) of the 
     Immigration and Nationality Act with amounts made available 
     under this heading in this Act, may allocate such amounts 
     among the States in a manner that accounts for the most 
     current data available.

                                TITLE IV

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

                   Administration of Foreign Affairs

                          diplomatic programs

       For an additional amount for ``Diplomatic Programs'', 
     $44,300,000, to remain available until expended, for support 
     for Operation Allies Welcome and related efforts by the 
     Department of State, including additional relocations of 
     individuals at risk as a result of the situation in 
     Afghanistan and related expenses, and to reimburse the 
     account under this heading in prior Acts making 
     appropriations for the Department of State, foreign 
     operations, and related programs for obligations previously 
     incurred.

           emergencies in the diplomatic and consular service

       For an additional amount for ``Emergencies in the 
     Diplomatic and Consular Service'', $36,000,000, to remain 
     available until expended, for support for Operation Allies 
     Welcome and related efforts by the Department of State, 
     including additional relocations of individuals at risk as a 
     result of the situation in Afghanistan and related expenses, 
     and to reimburse the account under this heading in prior Acts 
     making appropriations for the Department of State, foreign 
     operations, and related programs for obligations previously 
     incurred.

                     BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

                          Department of State

     united states emergency refugee and migration assistance fund

       For an additional amount for ``United States Emergency 
     Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund'', $1,200,000,000, to 
     remain available until expended, notwithstanding section 
     2(c)(2) of the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 
     (22 U.S.C. 2601(c)(2)), for support for Operation Allies 
     Welcome and related efforts by the Department of State, 
     including additional relocations of individuals at risk as a 
     result of the situation in Afghanistan and related expenses.

                     GENERAL PROVISION--THIS TITLE

       Sec. 1401.  The Secretary of State shall include in the 
     reports required by section 2402 of title IV of the 
     Afghanistan Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2022 (division C 
     of Public Law 117-43) the proposed uses of funds appropriated 
     under this title.

                                TITLE V

                      GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS ACT

       Sec. 1501.  Each amount appropriated or made available by 
     this Act is in addition to amounts otherwise appropriated for 
     the fiscal year involved.
       Sec. 1502.  No part of any appropriation contained in this 
     Act shall remain available for obligation beyond the current 
     fiscal year unless expressly so provided herein.
       Sec. 1503.  Unless otherwise provided for by this Act, the 
     additional amounts appropriated by this Act to appropriations 
     accounts shall be available under the authorities and 
     conditions applicable to such appropriations accounts for 
     fiscal year 2022.
       Sec. 1504.  Each amount provided by this division is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 4001(a)(1) and section 
     4001(b) of S. Con. Res. 14 (117th Congress), the concurrent 
     resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2022.
       Sec. 1505.  Not later than January 15, 2022, the Director 
     of the Office of Management and Budget shall provide to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
     and the Senate a written report on Operation Allies Welcome:  
     Provided, That such report shall describe the strategy and 
     transition plan leading to the conclusion of Operation Allies 
     Welcome; a plan, including timeline, for relocating all 
     Afghans currently residing at Department of Defense 
     facilities to longer-term housing; the activities and 
     responsibilities assigned to each Federal agency involved in 
     such strategy and transition plan; and an estimate of the 
     costs from each such agency for carrying out such strategy 
     and transition plan.
        This division may be cited as the ``Additional Afghanistan 
     Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2022''.

                         DIVISION C--EXTENSIONS

                          TITLE I--EXTENSIONS

     SEC. 2101. EXTENSION OF AUTHORITY TO MAKE CERTAIN 
                   APPOINTMENTS FOR NATIONAL DISASTER MEDICAL 
                   SYSTEM.

       Section 2812(c)(4)(B) of the Public Health Service Act (42 
     U.S.C. 300hh-11(c)(4)(B)) is amended by striking ``December 
     3, 2021'' and inserting ``February 18, 2022''.

     SEC. 2102. EXTENSION OF ADDITIONAL SPECIAL ASSESSMENT.

       Section 3014(a) of title 18, United States Code, is amended 
     by striking ``December 31, 2021'' and inserting ``February 
     18, 2022''.

     SEC. 2103. EXTENSION OF TEMPORARY ORDER FOR FENTANYL-RELATED 
                   SUBSTANCES.

       Effective as if included in the enactment of the Temporary 
     Reauthorization and Study of the Emergency Scheduling of 
     Fentanyl Analogues Act (Public Law 116-114), section 2 of 
     such Act (as amended by Public Law 117-43) is amended by 
     striking ``January 28, 2022'' and inserting ``February 18, 
     2022''.

     SEC. 2104. EXTENDING INCREASED FMAP FOR CERTAIN TERRITORIES.

       (a) In General.--Section 1905(ff)(3) of the Social Security 
     Act (42 U.S.C. 1396d(ff)(3)) is amended by striking 
     ``December 3, 2021'' and inserting ``February 18, 2022''.
       (b) Reduction of Medicare Improvement Fund.--Section 
     1898(b)(1) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 
     1395iii(b)(1)) is amended by striking ``$69,000,000'' and 
     inserting ``$56,000,000''.

                      TITLE II--BUDGETARY EFFECTS

     SEC. 2201. BUDGETARY EFFECTS.

       (a) Statutory PAYGO Scorecards.--The budgetary effects of 
     this division shall not be entered on either PAYGO scorecard 
     maintained pursuant to section 4(d) of the Statutory Pay-As-
     You-Go Act of 2010.
       (b) Senate PAYGO Scorecards.--The budgetary effects of this 
     division shall not be entered on any PAYGO scorecard 
     maintained for purposes of section 4106 of H. Con. Res. 71 
     (115th Congress).
       (c) Classification of Budgetary Effects.--Notwithstanding 
     Rule 3 of the Budget Scorekeeping Guidelines set forth in the 
     joint explanatory statement of the committee of conference 
     accompanying Conference Report 105-217 and section 250(c)(8) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985, the budgetary effects of this division shall not be 
     estimated--
       (1) for purposes of section 251 of such Act;
       (2) for purposes of an allocation to the Committee on 
     Appropriations pursuant to section 302(a) of the 
     Congressional Budget Act of 1974; and
       (3) for purposes of paragraph (4)(C) of section 3 of the 
     Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act of 2010 as being included in an 
     appropriation Act.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The bill shall be debatable for 1 hour, 
equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member 
of the Committee on Appropriations or their respective designees.
  The gentlewoman from Connecticut (Ms. DeLauro) and the gentlewoman 
from Texas (Ms. Granger) each will control 30 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Connecticut.


                             General Leave

  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members 
have 5 legislative days to revise

[[Page H6874]]

and extend their remarks and include extraneous material on the measure 
under consideration.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentlewoman from Connecticut?
  There was no objection.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Madam Speaker, before I go any further, I would first like to take a 
moment to mourn the loss of Congresswoman Carrie Meek. She was an 
extraordinary force in the Congress and a pioneer who was never 
deterred by any challenge that came her way. I like to say that though 
she was unassuming and soft-spoken, she carried a big stick. That is 
evident in her enduring legacy today. I had the honor of serving 
together with Congresswoman Meek on the Appropriations Committee years 
ago, and I feel immensely privileged to have worked with her to help 
expand opportunity for all Americans. We all mourn her loss.
  Madam Speaker, I will be frank. Instead of being here today 
discussing another continuing resolution, I wish that we were here to 
present a bipartisan, bicameral appropriations agreement. Continuing 
resolutions are not the way to govern. They are a short-term patch that 
leaves the American people behind. But we are here today because my 
colleagues across the aisle have refused time and time again to begin 
negotiations or even offer a proposal of their own for government 
funding that delivers for the American people.
  House and Senate Democrats have put forward their proposals, but 
Republicans have not presented an offer of their own. There is not one 
piece of paper describing what Republicans want. It has been 30 days 
since I brought together a bipartisan, bicameral four-corners meeting 
on November 2, and to date we have not heard one word from them--not 
one word.
  But now my Republican counterparts want more time--something that 
they have had since we came to this floor to pass the last funding 
extension 62 days ago, which means we now have no choice but to pursue 
a short-term extension. Make no mistake, Madam Speaker, a vote against 
this continuing resolution is a vote to shut the government down.
  The legislation before us, the Further Extending Government Funding 
Act, continues government funding at current levels through February 
18. It makes minimal changes to address the most urgent of needs during 
the period of the continuing resolution and provides $7 billion to 
continue supporting Afghanistan evacuees after the end of 20 years of 
war.
  While I wish the February 18 end date were earlier--and I pursued 
earlier dates--I believe this agreement allows the appropriations 
process to move forward toward a final funding agreement that addresses 
the needs of the American people.
  Let me be clear, working families, small businesses, veterans, and 
our military need the certainty that comes with passing omnibus funding 
legislation instead of short-term funding patches. Republicans must 
join us for bipartisan, bicameral negotiations to resolve our 
differences and keep government working for us all.
  For our communities, we need an omnibus to create and sustain good-
paying jobs, support small businesses, prevent future pandemics, and 
advance lifesaving medical research. We need an omnibus to strengthen 
public schools, protect our air and water, combat the opioid epidemic, 
and support core services such as food safety and consumer product 
inspections. Without an omnibus, investments in all these areas will be 
denied.
  For our veterans, we need an omnibus to provide sufficient funding 
for veterans' benefits, reduce backlogs for veterans and their 
families, and meet the needs of the VA's healthcare system. Without an 
omnibus there will be a shortfall that will cause veterans not to 
receive their benefits in full.
  For our national security, we need an omnibus to support defense 
readiness and modernization, secure our cyber infrastructure, and 
strengthen American leadership abroad. Without an omnibus, a pay raise 
for troops will not be funded while funds will be misdirected to a war 
we are no longer fighting.
  As I said before, I wanted to be here today passing a bipartisan, 
bicameral appropriations agreement. Sadly, we are not. But as 
Republicans take the next 2\1/2\ months, Democrats remain ready, 
willing, and able to move this process forward. We are ready to go, but 
we need willing partners to put the American people first.
  With a new deadline of February 18, it is long past time for our 
Republican colleagues to offer constructive proposals to address the 
critical issues facing the country by funding the Federal Government's 
important work. As the American people put their faith and trust in us, 
they deserve no less.
  Madam Speaker, I urge a ``yes'' vote on this legislation, and I 
reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Madam Speaker, today I rise to speak on H.R. 6119, a short-term 
continuing resolution through February 18. I must admit that I am 
disappointed to be on the floor of the House today to speak about a 
continuing resolution rather than full-year appropriations bills. But 
earlier this year, my colleagues on the other side of the aisle crafted 
fiscal year 2022 bills with little input from Republicans, and we have 
not been able to find a path forward.
  During markups this summer, our Members made it clear we would not 
support partisan bills that include irresponsible spending increases 
and extreme policies. Unfortunately, that is exactly where we find 
ourselves.

  The House and Senate bills were drafted to top-line spending levels 
that do not reflect a bipartisan consensus. The majority party also 
focused funding on their own priorities with nondefense spending 
increasing at a much higher rate than defense spending. And last, but 
certainly not least, the policies in the bills are the most extreme 
that I have seen since I became a member of the Appropriations 
Committee.
  During 2019 and 2020, there were also strong differences of opinions, 
but we had an agreement in place that allowed us to negotiate final 
bills quickly. The terms were rather simple. The party leaders and the 
White House reached early agreement on the spending framework. Everyone 
agreed to drop controversial language and restore longstanding 
provisions unless all sides agreed to changes. I am concerned that we 
cannot have meaningful discussions on full-year appropriations without 
a similar understanding before we start.
  I wish we would have focused on funding the essential elements of 
government long before now. Instead, too much time has been spent 
focusing on extremely partisan and costly bills being sent to the 
President's desk, and there could be another bill on the way before the 
end of the year.
  It is unrealistic for Republicans to negotiate on appropriations 
bills while this massive reconciliation package is still under 
discussion. Our constituents are demanding that we take a comprehensive 
look at all of the spending this year. With our debt skyrocketing and 
inflation at the highest levels in 30 years, we cannot afford to think 
about appropriations bills in isolation. However, I do hope that we can 
make progress getting our bills finalized once we move into the new 
year; otherwise, we will be having the same conversation in February 
about another continuing resolution.
  Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentlewoman 
from Ohio (Ms. Kaptur), who is the chairwoman of the Appropriations 
Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development, and Related Agencies.
  Ms. KAPTUR. Madam Speaker, I thank the chairwoman for yielding.
  Madam Speaker, I rise to address this latest short-term budget fix 
before us. We have a bipartisan responsibility to pass a full-year 
appropriations package. Democrats have worked in good faith to find 
common ground that will allow us to meet our national obligations to 
the American people and deliver essential services that they expect.
  Unfortunately, Republicans have decided that engaging in partisan 
politics and throwing up needless speed bumps in delays and roadblocks 
is more important than doing their job.
  The people harmed most by this obstruction are the hardworking 
families,

[[Page H6875]]

seniors, and veterans I represent. In fact, our Great Lakes region 
deserves so much better, and Americans deserve better. Let's govern our 
Nation. No more stalls.
  Our bipartisan Energy and Water Development, and Related Agencies 
Subcommittee worked diligently to craft a forward-thinking bill. It 
invests new resources to meet America's needs and create good jobs in 
clean energy and water technologies allowing us to secure our Nation's 
energy independence, create good-paying jobs, and confront the climate 
crisis that is impacting every coast in every region and, frankly, 
continent.
  A full-year bill will ensure our water resource agencies are able to 
meet the needs of the American people and solidify our waterway and 
port infrastructure driving our economy forward, meeting the backlogs 
that are there, and creating good jobs from coast to coast.
  The people's business must be conducted, and for the sake of our 
Nation, Republicans should work in a constructive manner, not 
destructive.
  We look forward to passing these bills and investing in the American 
people. For now, I urge my colleagues to support this bridge to the 
future and move our Nation forward again.

                              {time}  1530

  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume. I rise in reluctant opposition to the continuing resolution.
  But first, I want to recognize our good friend, Carrie Meek, from 
Florida. I share the gentlewoman's sadness over her passing. She was a 
good friend. She was a great Member, and we will miss her, and I extend 
my condolences to her family.
  For months, my friends on the other side of the aisle spent their 
time crafting their big tax and spend social welfare bill. In the end, 
they passed a bill that will most likely fail in the Senate because it 
represents the most radical change to the American social contract in 
history, creating generations of dependency on the backs of the 
American middle class. While they went back and forth, going further 
left with each version, the clock on funding our government ran out.
  The most basic responsibility of this Congress is to fund the 
government, to ensure seniors and veterans receive their earned 
benefits on time. Yet, the majority pushed aside that basic duty in the 
name of radical social change. The CR before us represents their 
failure to govern.
  As the ranking Republican on the Defense Appropriations Subcommittee, 
our committee has heard firsthand about the threats that face our 
country and our allies.
  Right now, at this very moment, the Russians have amassed forces 
along the Ukrainian border, weeks after they purposely demonstrated 
their ability to destroy a satellite in high orbit. It is unbelievable.
  A record number of Chinese military airplanes have flown that Taiwan 
airspace, and their naval forces continue to threaten freedom of 
navigation in the South China Sea.
  President Biden's abject failure in Afghanistan, which freed an 
estimated 7,000 hardened terrorists, has created more uncertainty for 
both us and our allies. And threats such as North Korea, Iran, and 
other nonstate actors remain as well.
  We cannot continue to cripple our national security apparatus with 
CRs year after year. It is not only wasteful--this CR is going to cost 
the Department of Defense about $1.7 billion per month for nothing--but 
it allows our adversaries to continue gaining while we remain stagnant.
  Now more than ever, we must give them the funding and tools they need 
to counter threats to the United States.
  It is time that the majority focus on their most basic task: Do the 
work the American people expect of our government.
  Our U.S. servicemembers, veterans, seniors, and the most vulnerable 
among us deserve better. I urge my colleagues to vote ``no,'' and I 
reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, once again, the Republicans refuse to 
come to the table to negotiate, thereby jeopardizing benefits for our 
veterans and our national security. We can move if they come to the 
table.
  I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman from North Carolina (Mr. 
Price), the chairman of the Appropriations Subcommittee on 
Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and Related 
Agencies.
  Mr. PRICE of North Carolina. Madam Speaker, I rise in support of this 
continuing resolution. But I want to make clear: This is a stopgap 
measure, necessitated by Republican refusal to work with Democrats on a 
bicameral, bipartisan basis to find a path forward for the balance of 
the fiscal year.
  Specifically, I can attest to the need for a full-year transportation 
T-HUD bill to update our aging transportation infrastructure, to remedy 
inequities in housing and transportation, prevent evictions, and make 
our infrastructure more resilient to natural disasters and climate 
change.
  We need to fortify safety as the primary function of the Federal 
Aviation Administration, providing full-year funding to strengthen 
certification activities, modernize air traffic control, and hire 
highly qualified personnel.
  We need to fully renew all Section 8 and other housing vouchers for 
nearly 5 million low-income and working families to ensure that they 
can remain stably housed. We also need to keep pace with the cost of 
upgrading our Nation's public housing, which houses more than 2 million 
low-income residents.
  We also spent months vetting over 1,000 Community Project Funding 
requests in a bipartisan manner for well-designed housing, 
transportation, and economic development projects that produce direct 
community benefits throughout the country. Without completing the 
annual appropriations process, none of these investments will be 
possible.

  Madam Speaker, I urge adoption of this CR today but I also urge my 
Republican colleagues to meet Congress' most basic constitutional 
responsibility of funding our government and directing investments for 
the future by coming to the table. Come to the table. Let's find a 
constructive path forward.
  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Roy).
  Mr. ROY. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  There is a lot of noise in this town right now about government 
shutdowns, and the fact is, the issue isn't about shutdowns. It is 
about whether or not Members of this body will continue to use money we 
don't have to fund mandates, indoctrination, and the use of force 
against our citizens:
  $73.5 billion for the Department of Education that subsidizes the 
indoctrination of our children with critical race theory and woke 
gender ideologies;
  $10 billion for an FBI that was just used by the Attorney General of 
the United States to target parents;
  $50 billion for a Department of Homeland Security that leaves our 
borders wide open, empowering cartels because Secretary Mayorkas fails 
to execute the laws of the United States;
  $6 billion for the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious 
Diseases run by Dr. Fauci.
  Need I say more?
  $592 million for OSHA, which has imposed an unconstitutional vaccine 
mandate on 84 million Americans.
  I offered an amendment to strip any funding from this bill that would 
fund Federal vaccine mandates, and it wasn't even able to see the light 
of day.
  This is about a Congress that is supposed to use the power of the 
purse, our Article I authority, rather than hiding behind the judges in 
Article III, to check the executive branch. We have a moral obligation 
to give voice and representation to the people who elected us whose 
liberty and livelihoods are being attacked.
  My friend who battles MS is looking at being terminated from the 
university she teaches at because of the unlawful Federal contractor 
mandate.
  The medical hero in Texas who is 9 months pregnant is facing 
termination under the unlawful CMS mandate.
  Military personnel, including the 13-year Army veteran in my district 
who is concerned about myocarditis, are facing being discharged from 
service to our country.
  These are our neighbors, our relatives, our friends--maybe not for 
some of you who go home to double-masked, vaccine passport cities. But

[[Page H6876]]

these are real Americans that this government wants to go after.
  I urge my colleagues to stop empowering executive branch tyranny over 
Americans, and I urge my Republican colleagues to not just vote ``no'' 
and give a speech, but go stand with Mike Lee. Go stand with others in 
the Senate trying to defend these Americans. We should not fund tyranny 
over American citizens.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, antiscience fearmongering about vaccines 
is wrong. Fears about government requirements for vaccines are flat-out 
silly. And the Republicans are prepared to shut down the government 
based on this. Incredible.
  I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentlewoman from California (Ms. 
Roybal-Allard), the chair of the Appropriations Subcommittee on 
Homeland Security.
  Ms. ROYBAL-ALLARD. Madam Speaker, each year, the first and most 
important responsibility Congress has is to determine how taxpayer 
dollars will be spent on behalf of our constituents. The continuing 
resolution before the House will prevent a government shutdown and give 
us sufficient time to complete the full-year funding bills if the 
minority will finally come to the negotiating table.
  Some friends on the other side of the aisle have suggested simply 
enacting a yearlong CR, which would effectively wash our hands of our 
constitutional duty. My subcommittee is responsible for drafting the 
funding bill for the Department of Homeland Security. If, as my 
Republican colleagues have suggested, we were to pass a full-year CR, 
DHS would lose critical increases in the House bill that are imperative 
to the security of the United States. This includes a historic 20 
percent increase for the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security 
Agency; funding to increase FEMA's capacity to respond to the growing 
frequency of disasters linked to climate change; a quadrupling of 
funding for trade facilitation and security at our ports of entry; a 6 
percent increase for Homeland Security Investigations; and an 8 percent 
increase for critical Coast Guard operations.
  Let's quickly approve this short-term CR and then roll up our sleeves 
and work together to fulfill our constitutional duty by negotiating 
full-year bills.
  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman 
from Georgia (Mr. Bishop), the chairman of the Appropriations 
Subcommittee on Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug 
Administration, and Related Agencies.
  Mr. BISHOP of Georgia. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentlewoman for 
yielding.

  This year, House Democrats worked hard and passed government funding 
bills which support vital programs that create jobs, grow our economy, 
and ensure our national security.
  As chairman of the House Appropriations Committee's Subcommittee on 
Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and 
Related Agencies, I want to stress that the programs in our bill touch 
the lives of every single American every day.
  It would ensure that USDA can continue to feed America and the world, 
to help expand economic opportunity, to create jobs in rural areas, and 
to fully meet the demand for farm ownership loans.
  It would increase funding to address the opioid crisis and rare 
cancers and resume unannounced, in-person inspections in the two 
largest foreign drug manufacturing countries in the world, China and 
India.
  Simply put, it would provide resources to ensure that we have the 
most abundant, wholesome, and safest food and medicine in the world.
  It will help families that may struggle to put food on the table 
through programs like SNAP and WIC.
  Sadly, the bill cannot move forward because, in the past few months, 
House and Senate Republicans have refused to negotiate with Democrats 
on government funding.
  Today, we are passing this short-term bill just to keep the 
government open. In doing so, Democrats are making sure our government 
continues serving the American people. We are also offering another 
chance for our Republican colleagues to come to the table with 
constructive proposals.
  I urge my colleagues to support this bill and, more importantly, to 
come together with us to provide peace of mind and certainty to our 
fellow Americans by passing a full fiscal year '22 funding bill 
package.
  Madam Speaker, I include in the Record letters in support of the bill 
from the Aerospace Industries Association, the Coalition on Human 
Needs, the Coalition for Health Funding, and the National Defense 
Industrial Association.


                             Aerospace Industries Association,

                                  Arlington, VA, November 2, 2021.
      Hon. Chuck Schumer,
     Majority Leader, U.S. Senate,
     Washington, DC.
      Hon. Mitch McConnell,
     Minority Leader, U.S. Senate,
     Washington, DC.
      Hon. Nancy Pelosi,
     Speaker, House of Representatives,
     Washington, DC.
     Hon. Kevin McCarthy,
     Minority Leader, House of Representatives,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Majority Leader Schumer, Speaker Pelosi, Ranking 
     Member McConnell, and Ranking Member McCarthy: The United 
     States aerospace and defense industries are an essential 
     partner with the federal government in an array of efforts 
     vital to our economy and our national security. Each fall, 
     that partnership is tested when those programs are slowed 
     down or deferred by the use of multiple continuing 
     resolutions (CR) to keep the government running. On behalf of 
     our vital industries and our more than two million employees, 
     the Aerospace Industries Association (AIA) strongly urges you 
     to reach a near-term agreement on fiscal year 2022 funding to 
     avoid further CRs beyond December 3, 2021.
       Government watchdogs continue to document the waste and 
     unnecessary disruption that CRs cause to federal programs. 
     Multiple agencies advised the Government Accountability 
     Office (GAO) in a 2021 report that longer CRs ``contributed 
     to distortions in agencies' spending, adding to the rush to 
     obligate funds late in the year before they expire.'' The GAO 
     determined that contracting officers working under a CR must 
     continuously align the period of performance under their 
     contracts to the specific timeframe of a given CR, resulting 
     in many unnecessary contract modifications during the year. 
     Hiring of new civilian staff is also delayed, making it 
     harder for agencies to meet their goals. The GAO notes that 
     agencies apply creative workarounds in the first quarter of 
     each fiscal year, because they assume that appropriations 
     bills will not be in place by the beginning of the fiscal 
     year. However, these effects become far more serious, and 
     agency staff have fewer options, when CRs continue into the 
     second quarter and beyond.
       The Department of Defense (DOD) is uniquely harmed under 
     CRs because these bills typically prohibit DOD from starting 
     new programs or activities or increasing any program's 
     production rate beyond that of the current fiscal year. Both 
     `new starts' and rate increases are critical for our national 
     defense because our defense posture and threats are always 
     evolving. As CRs extend to longer periods during the year, 
     this is an increasing problem for which DOD seldom gets 
     relief. DOD reported to the GAO that between FY10 and FY20, 
     they had requested exceptions to CR language (called 
     ``anomalies'') 1,258 times and had only been granted three 
     percent of those requests. Most of these requested relief 
     from the prohibition on new starts and rate increases. We 
     strongly believe that, should Congress produce CRs extending 
     into the second quarter of FY22, it should eliminate the 
     prohibition on new starts and production rate increases.
       FY22 is the first year in a decade when discretionary 
     spending levels have not been fixed in statute by the Budget 
     Control Act. AIA has long argued that statutory caps are not 
     needed because Congress and the administration are able to 
     assess and address the needs of the nation more effectively, 
     and with greater oversight, through the annual appropriations 
     process. Last year, Congress enacted all 12 full-year 
     appropriations bills by December 27. If Congress fails to 
     once again enact full-year appropriations bills, or continues 
     running the government into 2022 under continuing 
     resolutions, it will send the wrong signal to the 
     government's partners, like those in our industry. We count 
     on stable, reliable and adequate funding to support the 
     critical capabilities that we provide for all Americans.
       Like other industries, COVID-19 took a serious toll on our 
     workforce and the thousands of small- and medium-sized 
     businesses along the supply chain that are at the heart of 
     the aerospace and defense industries. More than ever, 
     businesses across all industries need predictability and 
     consistency.
       We again ask that you ensure that all government programs 
     receive full Fiscal Year 2022 funding on or before December 
     3, 2021.
           Sincerely,

                                                 Eric Fanning,

                                                President and CEO,
                                 Aerospace Industries Association.

[[Page H6877]]

                                     Coalition on Human Needs,

                                Washington, DC, November 15, 2021.
     Hon. Rosa DeLauro,
     Chairwoman, House Committee on Appropriations, Washington, 
         DC.
       Dear Chairwoman DeLauro: On behalf of the Coalition on 
     Human Needs, I am writing to strongly urge you to do 
     everything in your power to enact omnibus FY 2022 
     appropriations legislation including all 12 subcommittee 
     bills. Our nation badly needs the increased funding provided 
     in the House Appropriations Committee bills. We face many 
     increased needs, a great many exacerbated by the pandemic and 
     its economic dislocations. For more than a decade, funding 
     levels for vital human needs programs have shrunk, especially 
     taking inflation into account. If Congress fails to enact 
     omnibus appropriations legislation and instead defaults to a 
     long-term continuing resolution (CR) with flat funding, we 
     will seriously damage our capacity to respond to the multiple 
     public health and economic crises we face. As a member of the 
     House Committee on Appropriations, you have a key role to 
     play in working for enactment of an omnibus, not a long-term 
     CR.
       Members of the Coalition on Human Needs, including human 
     service provider organizations, faith groups, labor, civil 
     rights, policy experts and other advocates concerned with 
     meeting the needs of people with low incomes, 
     enthusiastically welcomed the funding levels provided in the 
     Biden FY 2022 budget and the House and Senate Appropriations 
     Committees. We have tracked nearly 200 human needs programs 
     over the past decade. Between FYs 2010 and 2020, we found 
     that two-thirds of these programs, covering health care, 
     housing, nutrition, social services, education, training, and 
     more, had lost ground, taking inflation into account. In the 
     past year, we have begun to rebuild. But the needs are also 
     growing.
       We now face rising prices affecting necessities including 
     utilities, food, and rent. Flat funding from a prolonged CR 
     would fail our people by not providing needed increases in 
     programs such as the Low Income Home Energy Assistance 
     Program (LIHEAP). The House increases LIHEAP by $125 million; 
     the Senate bill increases funding by $175 million. Both these 
     increases are too modest when taking into account that 
     natural gas heating costs are projected to rise by 30 percent 
     this winter and heating oil is expected to rise by 43 
     percent. Nutrition programs will also need funding increases 
     because of rising food prices. The House has provided $1.4 
     billion for Senior Nutrition programs, an increase of $436 
     million above the FY 2021 enacted level. Responding to the 
     acute shortage of affordable housing, the House bill would 
     expand rental assistance to 125,000 additional households. 
     These increases are vitally needed. Flat funding in all these 
     areas would be simply unacceptable.
       We have for some time faced a substance use crisis, and are 
     projected to reach 100,000 deaths from opioid overdoses by 
     the end of this year, up from about 93,000 in 2020. The House 
     funding level for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health 
     Services Administration (SAMHSA) is $9.16 billion, $3 billion 
     more than current year funding. Without those additional 
     funds, we will not be able to cope with the continuing 
     increases in opioid addiction.
       The pandemic has increased mental health problems. The 
     proposed SAMHSA funding levels allow us to respond more 
     adequately. In particular, House funding for various 
     children's mental health programs increase by $118.5 million 
     over current year levels. This is a vital turn-around after 
     years of erosion. From FYs 2010 to 2020, Children's Mental 
     Health Services declined by 14 percent, including inflation. 
     We must not return to flat funding when the pandemic has 
     adversely affected the mental health of millions of children 
     and adults.
       Over the past decade, we allowed our public health capacity 
     to diminish, and as a consequence we were not ready to cope 
     with COVID-19. The House Labor-HHS-Education appropriations 
     bill increases the Centers for Disease Control about $2.7 
     billion over the current year, allowing for the agency to 
     rebuild so that it can more effectively respond to COVID-19 
     and future health threats.
       We know our economy is hampered by a mismatch between jobs 
     available and people with the skills to fill those positions. 
     FY 2022 appropriations proposals include increases in 
     Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act programs (WIOA), 
     YouthBuild, Registered Apprenticeships, and Reintegration of 
     Ex-Offender programs, as well as expansion of community 
     college training programs. These will lead to jobs with 
     higher pay and broadly shared economic growth. These 
     increases are needed to overcome a ten-year 17 percent 
     reduction in WIOA programs and to move us forward.
       There are too many important programs to list here. But we 
     do wish to underscore that children have experienced many 
     hardships during the pandemic, including unprecedented losses 
     in education. The historic increases proposed in Title I K-12 
     education for students with low incomes and in special 
     education funding are urgently needed to help children 
     overcome the educational setbacks they have experienced. 
     Title I spending rises by at least $16.6 billion over FY 
     2021, and there will be $341 more per student for more than 
     7.6 million students with disabilities. The FY 2022 
     appropriations bills include many important funding increases 
     to help families care for their children. In addition to the 
     mental health, housing, and education funding already 
     mentioned here, there are badly needed increases in child 
     care, Head Start, early learning programs, and child abuse 
     prevention and treatment programs. There are also urgently 
     needed increases in funds to care for unaccompanied immigrant 
     children.
       The nation's recovery depends on strengthening a host of 
     domestic programs that have been allowed to shrink for years, 
     not just to get to where they had been before, but to respond 
     to needs far greater because of the pandemic and its global 
     economic dislocations. A long-term continuing resolution 
     would be a severe failure to address these needs. We strongly 
     urge you to enact omnibus appropriations legislation 
     including all twelve bills as soon as possible.
           Sincerely,
                                                Deborah Weinstein,
     Executive Director.
                                  ____

                                                November 19, 2021.
     Hon. Rosa DeLauro,
     Chair, Committee on Appropriations,
     House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
     Hon. Kay Granger,
     Ranking Member, Committee on Appropriations,
     House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
     Hon. Patrick Leahy,
     Chairman, Committee on Appropriations,
     U.S. Senate, Washington, DC.
     Hon. Richard Shelby,
     Vice Chairman, Committee on Appropriations,
     U.S. Senate, Washington, DC.
       Dear Chair DeLauro, Chairman Leahy, Ranking Member Granger, 
     and Vice Chairman Shelby: On behalf of the Campaign to invest 
     in American's Workforce, the Coalition for Health Funding, 
     the Coalition on Human Needs, and the Committee for Education 
     Funding and our members, we urge you to pass the fiscal year 
     (FY) 2022 Labor-HHS-Education appropriations bill as soon as 
     possible. The bill passed by the House this summer and the 
     bill proposed by the Senate Appropriations Committee this 
     fall provide vital increased funding for the programs and 
     services that have a profound impact on health and well-
     being, child development, educational and skills attainment, 
     employment, and productivity. Failing to enact the FY 2022 
     bill and relying on continuing resolutions (CRs) would be a 
     grave missed opportunity to improve the lives of all 
     Americans.
       The use of extended CRs creates disruption and dysfunction, 
     and injects fiscal uncertainty into an already uncertain 
     environment for the agencies that support the nation's public 
     health, education, job training, social services, and much 
     more. The reliance on CRs that extend far into the new fiscal 
     year that has become commonplace in recent years limits 
     Congress's ability to exercise its oversight authority and 
     make necessary adjustments to funding levels to meet new 
     demands.
       While short-term CRs are challenging enough, the 
     possibility of a year-long CR could be catastrophic as our 
     nation continues to struggle to return to normalcy amidst the 
     COVID-19 pandemic. Below are some examples highlighting the 
     challenges that a year-long continuing resolution poses to 
     critical programs funded by the Labor-HHS-Education 
     appropriations bill:
       Last year, the nation's overdose rate increased by a 
     staggering 30 percent with 90,000 deaths nationwide--a rate 
     of increase not seen in three decades and it is now reported 
     that drug overdose deaths reached 100,000 between April 2020 
     and April 2021, a grim record. In FY 2022, states are slated 
     to receive billions of dollars to assist with prevention, 
     treatment, and recovery services--these dollars will be lost 
     with a full year CR.
       CRs make it difficult for state and local health 
     departments, as well as school districts, to plan activities 
     and hire staff as they rely on predictable funding from 
     federal agencies to carry out their work. Funding delays will 
     hold up essential programmatic work in communities across the 
     country.
       CRs force grant-funding agencies like the National 
     Institutes of Health to adopt conservative funding policies, 
     holding back on investments in new areas of life-saving 
     research and damaging existing ongoing research efforts. 
     Unreliable and unpredictable funding streams hurt the 
     nation's scientific enterprise, and damage America's 
     competitiveness globally.
       After a decade of almost frozen funding for education, the 
     House and Senate Labor-HHS-Education bills provided needed 
     investments for FY 2022, starting to address long-standing 
     needs along the education continuum. Freezing funding at last 
     year's levels would leave funding for the Department of 
     Education below the level of a decade ago in inflation-
     adjusted dollars.
       The pandemic continues to have profound impacts on teaching 
     and learning, and while the COVID-relief already enacted 
     supports short-term costs associated with the pandemic, there 
     will be new, ongoing needs that the FY 2022 appropriations 
     bill begins to address for students, educators, and 
     institutions.
       During the pandemic, the costs of child care at a center 
     rose an estimated 47 percent, while family day care increased 
     by 70 percent; many child care centers were forced to close. 
     Lack of child care is keeping many women from rejoining the 
     labor force. The House bill increases child care by $1.5 
     billion and Head Start by $1.4 billion; flat-funding child 
     care would make it impossible to rebuild capacity.
       More than 11.8 million people are unemployed or 
     underemployed and women, people of color and people without 
     an education

[[Page H6878]]

     past high school comprise a disproportionate amount of these 
     workers. A CR would deny additional investments to an already 
     historically underfunded workforce system at a time of great 
     need.
       As the Administration works to implement the historic 
     investments to our nation's infrastructure included in the 
     Bipartisan Infrastructure Bill, the demand for skilled 
     workers in industries including construction, manufacturing, 
     energy and related industries will continue to grow. At the 
     same time, workers who lost their jobs in retail, hospitality 
     and other sectors hardest hit by the pandemic are looking for 
     opportunities to build new skills for available job 
     opportunities. A CR denies critical investments in training 
     programs necessary to mitigate the current skills mismatch 
     and allow workers to access the jobs for which businesses are 
     hiring.
       The cost to heat a home with natural gas is projected to 
     rise by 30 percent this winter; heating oil costs are 
     expected to rise by 43 percent. Flat-funding for the Low 
     Income Home Energy Assistance Program would lead to dramatic 
     reductions in the number of households served and the amount 
     of help they get from LIHEAP.
       The undersigned organizations call on Congress to pass a FY 
     2022 appropriations bill in a timely manner to avoid the 
     damaging trend of long-term CRs and provide needed services 
     for the American public. Thank you for your consideration. If 
     you have questions about this letter, please contact:
       Erin Will Morton, Coalition for Health Funding
       Sarah Abernathy, Committee for Education Funding
       Katie Spiker, Campaign to Invest in America's Workforce or
       Deborah Weinstein, Coalition on Human Needs
           Sincerely,
     Erin Will Morton,
       Executive Director, Coalition for Health Funding.
     Katie Spiker,
       Managing Director of Government Affairs, National Skills 
     Coalition, Campaign to Invest in America's Workforce.
     Sarah Abernathy,
       Executive Director, Committee for Education Funding.
     Deborah Weinstein,
       Executive Director, Coalition on Human Needs.
                                  ____



                                                         NDIA,

                                  Arlington, VA, November 1, 2021.
     Hon. Patrick Leahy,
     Chairman, Appropriations Committee, U.S. Senate.
     Hon. Rosa DeLauro,
     Chairwoman, Appropriations Committee, House of 
         Representatives.
     Hon. Richard Shelby,
     Ranking Member, Appropriations Committee, U.S. Senate.
     Hon. Kay Granger,
     Ranking Member, Appropriations Committee, House of 
         Representatives.
       Dear Chairman Leahy, Chairwoman DeLauro and Ranking Members 
     Shelby and Granger: On behalf of the thousands of companies 
     represented by the National Defense Industrial Association 
     (NDIA) and across the defense industrial base, we write to 
     request the expedited completion of the defense appropriation 
     bill. While we applaud the bipartisan effort to pass a 
     continuing resolution (CR) and avoid a government shutdown, 
     it is a poor stand-in for the full-year appropriations 
     desperately needed by our warfighters and those who provide 
     them with the equipment and services that enable their 
     mission.
       We cannot stress enough the importance of the defense 
     appropriations bill to our national security and to a healthy 
     defense industrial base. The limbo caused under CRs wastes 
     precious time and money our nation cannot recover. Delayed 
     new starts and initiatives place a strain on companies and 
     their workforce, particularly as they recalibrate operations 
     to a post-pandemic normal. Our nation's competitors face no 
     similar challenges putting us at a competitive disadvantage, 
     particularly with emerging technologies, and place our supply 
     chains at increasing risk, something we cannot afford after 
     the nearly two years of pandemic impacts.
       Doing business with the Federal Government is already hard. 
     The tomes of regulations, burdensome business requirements, 
     sometimes Kafkaesque contracting and oversight procedures, 
     and compressed margins have combined to drive businesses out 
     of the defense sector with a net outflow of well over 10,000 
     companies since 2011 and, as noted in our annual Vital Signs 
     report, a halving of new entrants to the sector between 
     fiscal 2019 and fiscal 2020 alone. Add to that the 
     uncertainty of ``if and when'' a full-year defense 
     appropriations gets signed into law, more companies will 
     reassess their participation in the defense industrial base. 
     The ultimate price of this is paid by our warfighters who 
     will lose out on innovations and new capabilities not 
     delivered.
       The inefficiencies caused by beginning 12 of the last 13 
     fiscal years without full-year funding have cost the military 
     services billions lost in inefficient expenditures and 
     program delays. Also, delayed contract starts challenge 
     larger contractors while threaten the existence of smaller 
     prime contractors and small businesses down the supply chain. 
     The effect of that has a human face and a long-term impact. 
     To execute a new-start contract, a company must recruit, 
     hire, and train a workforce despite a tight labor market and 
     a shortage of workers with the required security clearance. 
     Faced with a delayed start, that company must now choose 
     between two bad options, either pay that workforce to stand 
     idle or let those workers go--both of which could lead to 
     contract or business failure and undelivered capabilities to 
     our service members.
       With no full-year funding, we cannot afford to go too long 
     without hampering readiness recovery efforts, delaying 
     capabilities to our warfighters, and postponing investments 
     in advanced technologies while allowing our defense 
     industrial base to erode. NOIA supports a bipartisan 
     agreement on domestic and national security spending and 
     encourages the adoption of a two-year budget to prevent 
     another year of budget instability and to provide the needed 
     support to the Department of Defense for their critical 
     missions.
       We appreciate your attention to this critical issue and 
     look forward to working with your Committees moving forward.
           Very respectfully,
     Herbert J. Carlisle,
       General, USAF (Ret), President and CEO, National Defense 
     Industrial Association.
     Arnold L. Punaro,
       MajGen, USMC (Ret), Chairman of the Board, National Defense 
     Industrial Association.

  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentlewoman 
from California (Ms. Lee), the chairwoman of the Appropriations 
Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs.
  Ms. LEE of California. Madam Speaker, let me first thank our chair, 
Congresswoman DeLauro, for yielding and for her tremendous leadership 
throughout this overall process because, I tell you, this continuing 
resolution, it really should not be necessary.
  We have had ample time under the previous CR to complete bicameral, 
bipartisan negotiations to complete our full-year funding 
responsibilities, but not all parties have agreed to even come to the 
table.
  But Democrats are determined to keep our government open, so I urge 
everyone to support this continuing resolution.
  There are immense needs, though, and challenges outside our borders. 
We must complete our work on a full-year appropriations bill that 
provides the much-needed investments in diplomacy and development to 
meet those challenges.
  For far too long, we have had an imbalance between defense, 
diplomacy, and development. So I am very proud that the House passed 
the State-Foreign Operations bill, increasing funding for global health 
and pandemic response efforts, humanitarian assistance, and our 
commitment to key allies and partners. We must provide our 
international agencies the resources they need to defeat the global 
COVID-19 pandemic and ensure that we are taking the proper steps to 
protect ourselves in the future.
  The House bill also has a tripling of environmental funding from the 
prior year, which are critical investments to address climate change 
and accelerate the progress in adaptation of clean energy.
  Our bill prioritizes the protection and advancement of women, 
including for family planning, which has not received an increase in 
funding in over a decade.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I yield an additional 30 seconds to the 
gentlewoman from California.

                              {time}  1545

  Ms. LEE of California. Madam Speaker, these investments, along with 
other important investments in housing, jobs, and community investment, 
are on hold until we complete our work for fiscal year 2022 
appropriations bills. So we must not shrink from our global 
responsibility but instead work to pass our budget, an omnibus bill, as 
soon as possible. Lives and livelihoods depend on this.
  Madam Speaker, again I thank Chairwoman DeLauro for making sure we 
keep the government open.
  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

[[Page H6879]]

  

  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentlewoman 
from Minnesota (Ms. McCollum), the chair of the Appropriations 
Subcommittee on Defense.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Madam Speaker, we are here today to prevent the 
Republicans from shutting down the Federal Government tomorrow.
  Republicans in the U.S. Senate are holding the FY 2022 appropriations 
process hostage by refusing to do any work, let alone negotiate with 
Democrats.
  Rather than doing their job of funding the Federal Government, Senate 
Republicans want to kick the can down the road, wasting the first 4\1/
2\ months of the fiscal year.
  As chair of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Defense, it is clear 
that Republicans are undermining our national security. They are 
increasing waste and inefficiency, they are weakening our military 
readiness, and they are sending a signal to our troops and the millions 
of workers in the defense industry that they are not a priority.
  The American people should be sick and tired of hearing Republicans 
in Congress talk about how we need a stronger national defense while 
doing everything in their power to weaken our national defense.
  This is a time of instability in the world. Russia is knocking on the 
doorstep of Ukraine. China is at the doorstep of Taiwan. There are 
serious national security threats in the world.
  When our adversaries look at Congress, they see Republicans playing 
political games rather than investing in research and modernization. 
What kind of message does that send to our adversaries? What kind of 
message does that send to the men and women of our military, who we ask 
to do the toughest jobs while putting their lives on the line?
  I am voting for this continuing resolution to prevent a Republican 
shutdown. But I must say, while this CR is necessary, I find it to be 
unacceptable as an outcome.
  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Arrington).
  Mr. ARRINGTON. Madam Speaker, these CRs, these fits and starts of 
prioritizing the Nation's resources and allocating these resources so 
we can run the people's government, are inefficient at best, they are 
dysfunctional, it is disgraceful, it is pervasive, and it is a 
structural issue that both Republicans and Democrats have to solve 
ultimately. I am trying to be fair about this, because I have seen this 
happen when Republicans have been in charge, in all fairness.
  I think the difference this time in the life of our country is that 
my Democrat colleagues have been distracted while trying to pass a 
massive tax-and-spend bill. It is the largest expansion of government 
and the largest tax hike. It is the biggest transfer of wealth. It is a 
lot of things, and they ain't good.
  Meanwhile, we are just totally punting on managing our budget. Three 
years in a row, my colleagues have not put forth a budget.
  What I would like to see us do, to fix this for both sides, is to 
consider when we are talking about CRs and the debt ceiling and we are 
putting on display for the entire world how dysfunctional we are with 
respect to budget and appropriations, is that we would actually put 
forward bipartisan reforms like enforceable spending caps. Those are 
gone after this year. How about paygos and CutGos that are actually 
enforceable so that we force Congress to do what everyone else in the 
country does, which is live within their means.
  There is a whole list here. Debt targets; no budget, no recess. How 
about we stay here and celebrate Christmas together and the holidays 
until we get a dadgum budget passed?
  There are lots of bipartisan measures that I implore my colleagues to 
talk to their leadership about while I am talking to mine, so we can do 
something about it and not just keep this dysfunction going infinitum.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, once again, it has been the Republicans' 
refusal to come to the table to negotiate that has stopped the process 
and forced us to do a short-term stopgap measure. We shouldn't be doing 
it, but Republicans need to come to the table.
  Madam Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. 
Ryan), the chairman of the Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch.
  Mr. RYAN. Madam Speaker, what you are seeing here before the United 
States Congress is two clear, different visions of America and where we 
want to go and what we want to do.
  We know that China is running circles around us. We know they are 
building islands in the South China Sea. We know Russia is on the 
border. We know the middle class has been eroded. And we know the 
Republican philosophy has been cut taxes for the top 1 percent and hope 
the crumbs fall down to places like Youngstown, Ohio.
  But what we are trying to do is three things. We want to build the 
United States, we want to rebuild the middle class, and we want to beat 
China.
  But we can't do that if we don't have our greatest weapon. And our 
greatest weapon during the Cold War and our greatest weapon over the 
last 50 years has been a strong middle class. That has been our 
greatest weapon, our greatest strength. We reinvested into the United 
States, we reinvested into our communities, we invested in the 
technology, and we dominated the industry: steel, glass, and aerospace.
  Now, we are hearing from the other side: Shut government down. Don't 
do anything. We don't want to be an honest broker.
  Tyranny? What are you people talking about? We are talking about 
universal preschool, and they have it as a communist indoctrination of 
the American student. It is insane.
  We need to pass this appropriations bill. We need to pass the CHIPS 
Act, because we have got to close the technology gap.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I yield an additional 30 seconds to the 
gentleman from Ohio.
  Mr. RYAN. Madam Speaker, we see all of these cargo ships out in 
California. They are not coming from Kansas. They are coming from 
China. If we don't reinvest and bring these supply chains back here, we 
are going to continue to lose. That is what is happening.
  China is out-manufacturing us in semiconductors, communications 
equipment, electric vehicles, and batteries. We have to rebuild our 
country, or this whole thing isn't going to work.
  We have got to make sure our kids are healthy and educated and 
skilled so they can thrive and outcompete China. That is what this bill 
is about. It is not about tyranny. It is not about communist 
indoctrination. It is about rebuilding the United States.
  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  I just want to make a point. The Republicans on the Appropriations 
Committee want to increase our defense spending. We don't want to cut 
defense spending. Both the Republicans and the Democrats on the 
authorizing committee don't want to cut the defense spending. And both 
the Republicans and Democrats in the United States Senate don't want to 
cut defense spending.
  We have a national defense strategy that was laid down by General 
Mattis, which I think we should follow, which asked for a net increase 
of a minimum of 3 to 5 percent net of inflation. That is just to 
maintain some credible deterrent against China and a resurgent Russia. 
Until we get to those numbers, we will continue to be operating on a 
continuing resolution.
  Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, if the Republicans wanted to do something 
about our defense and our security in the military, they would move to 
work with us to pass the defense appropriations bill and the omnibus.
  Madam Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentlewoman from Florida 
(Ms. Wasserman Schultz), the chair of the Subcommittee on Military 
Construction and Veterans' Affairs.
  Ms. WASSERMAN SCHULTZ. Madam Speaker, the Republicans' refusal to 
negotiate bipartisan spending bills has us standing on another shutdown 
cliff and, once more, relying on another Band-Aid funding bill. It is 
the same place we were 2 months ago when Congress voted to provide 2 
more months for earnest negotiations. Since then, House and Senate 
Democrats put forth proposals, and Republicans put nothing on the 
table.

[[Page H6880]]

  As anyone who figures out their household bills every week knows, a 
table full of nothing doesn't keep the lights on, doesn't put groceries 
on the table. Nothing isn't going to put food in the refrigerator, and 
it certainly doesn't pay the phone bill or buy anyone's prescriptions. 
But that is what Republicans came up with in the last 2 months: 
absolutely nothing.
  It looks a lot like the solutions Republicans put forward to solve 
all of the problems American families face: nothing. They have no plan.
  So as responsible stewards, Democrats on the Appropriations Committee 
crafted yet another extension to maintain funding levels through 
February and ensure that our most urgent needs can be met.
  But working families, small businesses, and veterans can't live on 
temporary patches. They need the certainty that comes with passing a 
full appropriations package to create jobs, prevent future pandemics, 
and keep schools safe. We need an omnibus budget to safeguard our air, 
our food, and our water.
  As chair of the Subcommittee on Military Construction and Veterans' 
Affairs, I know veterans need an omnibus to get their earned benefits, 
to slash the claims backlogs they face, and to fully meet their VA 
healthcare needs.
  I urge a ``yes'' vote on this continuing resolution because it will 
keep the government open and extend funding for critical education, 
health, housing, and public safety programs. These are programs and 
services that every community, red or blue, relies on every day.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I yield an additional 30 seconds to the 
gentlewoman from Florida.
  Ms. WASSERMAN SCHULTZ. Madam Speaker, Republicans' refusal to put the 
American people first and faithfully negotiate leaves every parent and 
mom-and-pop shop less secure.
  Let's get serious about governing.
  I say to my Republican colleagues: It is time to show up for work and 
stop worshipping at the altar of Donald Trump for 5 minutes, long 
enough to do your job.
  Let's stop this legislative brinksmanship and immediately begin to 
negotiate the FY 2022 bills so we can meet our country's needs.
  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  I think everybody knows, Madam Speaker, what the conditions are that 
have been pretty much publicized. National defense spending must go up 
and the balance of the appropriations has to come down; the legacy 
riders must come back in, and the poison pills have to go away. It is 
pretty simple, as far as I am concerned.
  Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I want to remind my colleague on the 
other side of the aisle that a continuing resolution is a cut to 
defense. If you come to the table, we will discuss it, then we can move 
forward on the defense of this Nation.
  Madam Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentlewoman from Maine 
(Ms. Pingree), the chair of the Appropriations Subcommittee on 
Interior, Environment, and Related Agencies.
  Ms. PINGREE. Madam Speaker, I rise to support the continuing 
resolution, which extends government funding at current levels until we 
pass a full appropriations package for the next fiscal year.
  It is my strong hope that this short-term extension will be the last 
one and that my colleagues across the aisle will acknowledge our solemn 
duty to exercise the power of the purse.
  A continuing resolution that lasts a full year does not serve the 
American people. As the chair of the Subcommittee on Interior, 
Environment, and Related Agencies, I can attest that the investments in 
the House interior bill would benefit all of our constituents, for 
those of us on both sides of the aisle.
  The bill makes long-overdue investments to protect human health, to 
fight the climate emergency, and to meet our trust obligations to 
Tribal nations. It provides critical resources to rebuild the Federal 
workforce so that these agencies can meet their missions and better 
serve the public.
  Failing to complete a full-year bill means no additional investments 
in the EPA to research and develop standards for harmful pollutants 
like PFAS, no further investments in domestic renewable energy, and 
insufficient resources for the healthcare of nearly 2.2 million 
American Indians and Alaska Natives.
  Regardless of whether we pass a full-year bill, we can be certain 
that millions of Americans will be exposed to pollution, that 
healthcare costs will rise, and that our window for mitigating climate 
change will shrink.
  To ignore these threats is not in the Nation's best interest, nor any 
of ours. We were sent to Congress to improve the lives and livelihoods 
of our constituents.
  Madam Speaker, I encourage my colleagues to support this bill, but I 
encourage my colleagues on the other side of the aisle to finish the 
bill.
  Madam Speaker, I include in the Record a letter from The Ad Hoc Group 
for Medical Research.
                                                  The Ad Hoc Group


                                         for Medical Research,

                                                November 15, 2021.
     Hon. Rosa DeLauro,
     Chair, Committee on Appropriations,
     House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
     Hon. Kay Granger,
     Ranking Member, Committee on Appropriations,
     House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
     Hon. Patrick Leahy,
     Chair, Committee on Appropriations,
     U.S. Senate, Washington, DC.
     Hon. Richard Shelby,
     Vice Chair, Committee on Appropriations,
     U.S. Senate, Washington, DC.
       Dear Chairwoman DeLauro, Chairman Leahy, Ranking Member 
     Granger, and Vice Chairman Shelby: Thank you for your past 
     leadership in championing sustained, real growth in medical 
     research funding. As Congress begins to draft a final fiscal 
     year (FY) 2022 spending package, the 314 undersigned members 
     of the Ad Hoc Group for Medical Research urge you to invest 
     robustly in agencies and programs to improve the nation's 
     health and well-being, including base funding for the 
     National Institutes of Health (NIH), as a key national 
     priority and to finalize the appropriations process as 
     expeditiously as possible. The Ad Hoc Group for Medical 
     Research is a coalition of patient and voluntary health 
     groups, medical and scientific societies, academic and 
     research organizations, and industry, dedicated to enhancing 
     the federal investment in biomedical, behavioral, social, and 
     population-based research supported by the NIH.
       We greatly appreciate that both the House-passed (H.R. 
     4502) and Senate draft Labor-HHS-Education spending bills 
     include strong increases for the NIH base in FY 2022, which 
     would provide greater hope and opportunity for every patient 
     awaiting a cure, every researcher working toward the next 
     breakthrough, and every aspiring scientist considering a 
     career in the lab. To maximize the potential of medical 
     research to make rapid progress toward these goals, we urge 
     you to provide at least $46.4 billion for NIH's base, as 
     included in the House-passed bill. Continuing the momentum of 
     the prior six years of bipartisan support for meaningful 
     funding growth in the NIH's existing institutes and centers 
     is key to ensuring that the nation can continue to accelerate 
     the development of life-changing cures, pioneering treatments 
     and diagnostics, and innovative preventive strategies.
       Additionally, we appreciate that both bills ensure that the 
     new investment for the proposed Advanced Research Projects 
     Agency for Health (ARPA-H) supplements, rather than 
     supplants, the NIH's base. While complementary, NIH and ARPA-
     H have distinct and important missions. As such, investment 
     in ARPA-H must not come at the expense of the NIH base. 
     Instead, to fully realize the benefits of the envisioned new 
     entity while simultaneously allowing NIH to keep pace with 
     discovery, an FY 2022 appropriation of at least $46.4 billion 
     for NIH's base budget is needed. Prioritizing strong 
     investments for foundational research discoveries funded by 
     the NIH will be critical to the success of the visionary new 
     research initiative, particularly as it builds its 
     operational capacity in its inaugural year and beyond. 
     Likewise, avoiding further delays in finalizing funding 
     determinations will enable both ARPA-Hand NIH's planned and 
     existing programs to be maximally efficient and strategic in 
     their work in FY 2022.
       To that end, our organizations strongly support an approach 
     to the final FY 2022 spending package that avoids additional 
     CRs past December. Aside from the budget implications, CRs 
     create inefficiencies and add uncertainty to a system that is 
     already

[[Page H6881]]

     under stress with the continued reverberations of the ongoing 
     COVID-19 pandemic. We strongly urge you to work swiftly in 
     securing bipartisan, bicameral agreement on topline 
     discretionary spending allocations and to ensure any final 
     budget agreement reflects a strong commitment to the nation's 
     health.
       Once again, we commend you for continuing to recognize the 
     incomparable value of the federal investment in the NIH, and 
     we look forward to working with you to secure $46.4 billion 
     for the agency's base in FY 2022, in addition to funding you 
     provide for ARPA-H.
       Sincerely,


                314 Signatories as of November 15, 2021

       Academic Consortium for Integrative Medicine & Health, 
     Academic Pediatric Association, Academy for Eating Disorders, 
     Academy for Professionalism in Health Care, Academy for 
     Radiology & Biomedical Imaging Research, ACT for NIH, 
     AdventHealth, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Alliance 
     for Academic Internal Medicine (AAIM), Alliance for Aging 
     Research, ALS Association, Alzheimer's Association and 
     Alzheimer's Impact Movement, Alzheimer's Foundation of 
     America, American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP), 
     American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, American 
     Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, American Academy 
     of Neurology, American Academy of Pediatrics, American 
     Academy of Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation.
       American Academy of Sleep Medicine, American Association 
     for Anatomy, American Association for Cancer Research, 
     American Association for Dental, Oral, and Craniofacial 
     Research, American Association for the Advancement of 
     Science, American Association for the Study of Liver 
     Diseases, American Association of Chairs of Departments of 
     Psychiatry, American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 
     American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine, 
     American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, American 
     Association of Directors of Psychiatry Residency Training, 
     American Association of Immunologists, American Association 
     of Neurological Surgeons, American Association of 
     Neuromuscular & Electrodiagnostic Medicine, American 
     Association of Physicists in Medicine, American Association 
     of Veterinary Medical Colleges, American Brain Coalition, 
     American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network, American 
     College of Academic Addiction Medicine (ACAAM), American 
     College of Cardiology.
       American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 
     American College of Physicians, American College of 
     Radiology, American College of Surgeons, American Council on 
     Education, American Gastroenterological Association American 
     Geriatrics Society, American Headache Society, American 
     Institute for Cancer Research, American Institute for Medical 
     & Biomedical Engineering, American Institute of Ultrasound in 
     Medicine, American Liver Foundation, American Lung 
     Association, American Massage Therapy Association, American 
     Pediatric Society, American Physiological Society, American 
     Psychiatric Association, American Psychological Association, 
     American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 
     American Society for Investigative Pathology.
       American Society for Microbiology, American Society for 
     Nutrition, American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental 
     Therapeutics, American Society for Reproductive Medicine 
     (ASRM), American Society for Virology, American Society of 
     Anesthesiologists, American Society of Hematology, American 
     Society of Human Genetics, American Society of Nephrology, 
     American Society of Neuroradiology, American Society of 
     Pediatric Nephrology, American Society of Radiologic 
     Technologists, American Surgical Association, American 
     Thoracic Society, American Urogynecologic Society, American 
     Urological Association, Anxiety and Depression Association of 
     America, Associated Medical Schools of New York.
       Association for Anatomy, Cell Biology and Neurobiology 
     Chairs (AACBNC), Association for Clinical and Translational 
     Science, Association for Clinical Oncology, Association for 
     Prevention Teaching and Research, Association for 
     Psychological Science, Association for Research in Vision and 
     Ophthalmology (ARVO), Association of Academic Health Centers 
     (AAHC), Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries, 
     Association of Academic Physiatrists.
       Association of American Cancer Institutes, Association of 
     American Medical Colleges, Association of American 
     Universities, Association of Bioethics Program Directors, 
     Association of Chairs of Departments of Physiology, 
     Association of Independent Research Institutes, Association 
     of Medical and Graduate Departments of Biochemistry (AMGDB), 
     Association of Medical School Pediatric Department Chairs, 
     Association of Minority Health Professions Schools, 
     Association of Pathology Chairs, Association of Population 
     Centers, Association of Psychologists in Academic Health 
     Centers, Association of Public and Land-grant Universities, 
     Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO), 
     Association of Schools and Programs of Public Health, 
     Association of University Professors of Neurology, 
     Association of University Professors of Ophthalmology, 
     Association of University Radiologists, Atrium Health, Autism 
     Speaks.
       AVAC (AIDS Vaccine Advocacy Coalition), Barnes-Jewish 
     Hospital, Bassett Healthcare Network, Biophysical Society, 
     BJC HealthCare, Boston Medical Center, Boston University, 
     Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Brown 
     University, Carle Illinois College of Medicine, Case Western 
     Reserve University, CDH International, Cedars-Sinai, Child 
     Neurology Foundation, Children's Healthcare of Atlanta, 
     Children's Hospital Los Angeles, Children's Hospital of 
     Philadelphia, Children's Mercy Kansas City, 
     Cholangiocarcinoma Foundation, ChristianaCare.
       Christopher & Dana Reeve Foundation, Clinical Research 
     Forum, Coalition for Clinical and Translational Science, 
     Coalition for the Life Sciences, College on Problems of Drug 
     Dependence, Columbia University, COMBINEDBrain, Conference of 
     Boston Teaching Hospitals, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, 
     Consortium of Social Science Associations, Cooley's Anemia 
     Foundation, Coriell Institute for Medical Research, Cornell 
     University, Council of University Directors of Clinical 
     Psychology, Council on Social Work Education, Crohn's & 
     Colitis Foundation, CURE Epilepsy, Cystic Fibrosis 
     Foundation, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Dartmouth-Hitchcock 
     Health.
       Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance, Digestive Disease 
     National Coalition, Dravet Syndrome Foundation, Drexel 
     University, Duke Health, Duke University, Dystonia Medical 
     Research Foundation, East Carolina University, ECAN 
     Esophageal Cancer Action Network, Emory University, Endocrine 
     Society, Epilepsy Foundation, Federation of American 
     Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB), Federation of 
     Associations in Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Fight 
     Colorectal Cancer, Foundation for Sarcoidosis Research, Fox 
     Chase Cancer Center, Friends of the National Institute on 
     Drug Abuse, GBSICIDP Foundation International, Global Health 
     Technologies Coalition.
       Global Liver Institute, Harvard University, HealthyWomen, 
     Henry Ford Health System, HIV Medicine Association, Hope For 
     Stomach Cancer, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, 
     Indiana University, Indiana University Health, Infectious 
     Diseases Society of America, Initiative to End Alzheimer's 
     Disease Board of Visitors, International Foundation for 
     Gastrointestinal Disorders, International Society for Stem 
     Cell Research (ISSCR), Interstitial Cystitis Association, 
     JDRF, Jeffrey Modell Foundation, John & Amy Mewhiney Cancer 
     Foundation, Johns Hopkins University and Medicine, Joslin 
     Diabetes Center, KidneyCAN.
       Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, Lewy 
     Body Dementia Association, LGS Foundation, Lupus Foundation 
     of America, Lymphatic Education & Research Network, Magee-
     Womens Research Institute and Foundation, March of Dimes, 
     Mass General Brigham, Medical College of Wisconsin, Medical 
     Image Perception Society, Medical Library Association, 
     Memorial Sloan Kettering, MemorialCare Health System, 
     Mesothelioma Applied Research Foundation, METAvivor, 
     Michelson Center for Public Policy, Michelson Medical 
     Research Foundation, Michigan State University, Moffitt 
     Cancer Center, National Alliance for Eye and Vision Research.
       National Alopecia Areata Foundation, National Association 
     for Biomedical Research, National Eczema Association, 
     National Fragile X Foundation, National Kidney Foundation, 
     National Pancreas Foundation, NephCure Kidney International, 
     New York Medical College, New York University, North American 
     Vascular Biology Organization, Northeastern University, 
     Nutrition & Medical Foods Coalition, NYU Langone Health, 
     Oakland University, Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation, 
     Pancreatic Cancer Action Network, Patient Services, Inc., 
     Pediatric Policy Council, Penn State University, Personalized 
     Medicine Coalition.
       Population Association of America, Project Sleep, Prostate 
     Cancer Foundation, Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, Pulmonary 
     Hypertension Association, Radiological Society of North 
     America (RSNA), Recurrent Pregnancy Loss Association, 
     Research!America, RESOLVE: The National Infertility 
     Association, Restless Legs Syndrome Foundation, Rosalind 
     Franklin University of Medicine and Science, RTI 
     International, Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 
     Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, 
     Scleroderma Foundation, Sjogren's Foundation, Sleep Research 
     Society, Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM), 
     Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine.
       Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine, Society for 
     Neuroscience, Society for Pediatric Radiology, Society for 
     Pediatric Research, Society for Reproductive Endocrinology 
     and Infertility, Society for Reproductive Investigation, 
     Society for Women's Health Research, Society of Academic 
     Associations of Anesthesiology and Perioperative Medicine 
     (SAAAPM), Society of Behavioral Medicine, Society of General 
     Internal Medicine, Society of Gynecologic Oncology, Society 
     of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Society of 
     Skeletal Radiology, Society of Surgical Chairs, Society of 
     Toxicology (SOT), Society of University Surgeons, St. Louis 
     Children's Hospital, Stanford University, Stony Brook 
     University, Syngap1 Foundation.
       Temple University, Texas A&M Health, The American College 
     of Rheumatology, The American Society for Transplantation and 
     Cellular Therapy, The Gerontological Society of America, The 
     Jackson Laboratory, The Maya's Wings Foundation, The Michael 
     J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson's Research, The Ohio State 
     University Wexner Medical Center, The State University of New 
     York,

[[Page H6882]]

     The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, The 
     University of North Carolina System, The University of Texas, 
     Southwestern Medical Center, Triage Cancer, TSC Alliance, 
     Tulane University School of Medicine, UC San Diego, UCLA, UNC 
     Health and UNC School of Medicine, University of Arkansas for 
     Medical Sciences.
       University of California, Irvine, University of Chicago 
     Medical Center, University of Cincinnati, University of 
     Colorado System, University of Connecticut, University of 
     Hawai'i System, University of Illinois College of Medicine, 
     University of Iowa, University of Maryland, Baltimore, 
     University of Massachusetts Chan Medical School, University 
     of Michigan, University of Nebraska Medical Center, 
     University of Pennsylvania, University of Pittsburgh, 
     University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences, University of 
     Rochester, University of South Carolina, University of 
     Southern California, University of Washington, US Hereditary 
     Angioedema Association (HAEA).
       USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, UVA Health, 
     Vanderbilt University, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 
     Virginia Commonwealth University, Washington State 
     University, Washington University in St. Louis, West Virginia 
     University, Yale University.

                              {time}  1600

  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania (Mr. Perry).
  Mr. PERRY. Madam Speaker, in the name of science, congressional 
Democrats are continuing their unconstitutional, unlawful march to 
force Americans to get the jab.
  Think about it. Democrats are already on the path to ruin Christmas, 
destroying the supply chain. They are just going to keep going, right? 
Destroying industry after industry.
  For a party who praised America's healthcare workers when there 
wasn't a jab available, who were out there on the front lines, now if 
they don't get it, it is okay to fire them, and not a word.
  Finally, mandates for defense contractors and intelligence workers 
who have to make a choice between defending their country and putting 
their own life in peril, and no discussion about natural immunity, none 
whatsoever. You could have had COVID already. Not good enough. You have 
got to get the jab or lose your job.
  Vote against this.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I just want to remind the gentleman that 
antiscience fearmongering about vaccines is wrong. Science is on our 
side, and history is on our side. Vaccines work.
  I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Quigley), 
the chairman of the Appropriations Subcommittee on Financial Services 
and General Government.
  Mr. QUIGLEY. Madam Speaker, I rise today in disappointed support of a 
second continuing resolution, but let's remember, every continuing 
resolution reflects a failure to govern.
  House Democrats did our job and passed government funding bills, all 
of them, to create good-paying jobs to support the hardworking middle 
class and protect our national security.
  In September, we voted on a bipartisan basis to extend government 
funding through December 3 to allow negotiations to finalize 
legislation. Since then, my colleagues across the aisle have refused to 
seriously negotiate with us on funding.
  That leads us to where we are now, considering another new short-term 
CR right before the holiday break, when we should have already 
completed our work.
  The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over 
again and expecting a different result. Sure enough, here we are again, 
having to pass another short-term CR because we can't pass funding 
bills in a regular manner.
  There is more than enough time in a year to come to an agreement and 
pass funding bills. America's friends and enemies around the world are 
watching us to see if our country can continue to function in a 
changing world. We must show them we can, but this effort requires 
compromise, as it always has.
  I ask them to join us for a bipartisan, bicameral negotiation to 
resolve our differences and keep government working for the people.
  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman 
from Pennsylvania (Mr. Cartwright), the chairman of the Appropriations 
Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies.
  Mr. CARTWRIGHT. Madam Speaker, I rise in support of the continuing 
resolution. At the same time, I join my colleagues in calling on the 
other side of the aisle to join in helping enact a year-long 
appropriations act, the way we are supposed to do, rather than relying 
on this kind of stop-and-go government funding or a full-year 
continuing resolution, as has also been threatened.
  Look, a full-year continuing resolution would be disastrous to our 
country in so many ways. It would greatly limit or reduce essential 
investments in our Nation's future.
  As for the Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies 
appropriations bill, as reported out of committee earlier this year, it 
provides funding increases aimed at creating jobs in distressed 
communities, enforcing our trade laws, fighting crime and supporting 
community involvement with law enforcement, ensuring civil rights, 
advancing American scientific research, fighting the opioid epidemic, 
confronting the climate crisis, among so many other critical public 
investments. These funding increases are only possible with an 
appropriations agreement.
  I urge support, both for the short-term CR, and to quickly finalize a 
full-year appropriations agreement.
  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee).
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Madam Speaker, I thank the Chairwoman and all of the 
very important people on the Appropriations Committee for their work on 
this bill.
  I ask the question, what side do you want to be on? Do you want to be 
on the side that provides our hardworking military pay raises for the 
troops, to be able to get money away from a misdirected war?
  Do you want to be on the side that provides for working families?
  Do you want to be on the side that stops those who can't pay for 
daycare to have that?
  Do you want to be on the side of those who say, ``I am a Federal 
employee, and I have been shut out of my job''?
  What side do you want to be on? I want to be on the side of 
negotiating an omnibus that works for the American people. I want my 
Republican friends to know that we have tried to negotiate, but we are 
adults and we are not going to let this government shut down.
  What we are going to do is recognize these are dangerous times. We 
know that there is now an omicron variant. We are not going to play the 
antivaxxer game, we are not going to say that it is about vaccine 
mandates because we know that most of the Federal Government has been 
vaccinated; but what we are going to do is extend this resolution to 
keep the government open because the side that Democrats are on is the 
side of the American people and our government workers who go out and 
work every day and the families who go out and work every day.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Ms. Scanlon). The time of the gentlewoman 
has expired.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I yield the gentlewoman an additional 30 
seconds.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. I thank the gentlewoman for yielding. A shutdown 
would induce furloughs that could hit 62 percent of the U.S. Centers 
for Disease Control, right in the middle of COVID-19.
  In addition, families would be desperate as well.
  I want you to understand that veterans would suffer. During the 
Thanksgiving holiday, I went to the veterans hospital. I can tell you, 
it is not empty. Veterans are there every day, and when they are there, 
they are getting services. Do you want to be part of a government 
shutdown where veterans hospitals are closed and veterans are standing 
outside with their hand asking what is happening?
  I want to be on the side of those who understand the value of working 
for the American families and doing what Democrats have done, passing 
bills, passing laws that serve the American people.
  Vote for the CR and vote for the omnibus so that we can get the job 
done. I thank the gentlewoman for her courtesies.

[[Page H6883]]

  Madam Speaker, as a senior member of the Committees on the Judiciary, 
on Homeland Security, and on the Budget, I rise in support of H.R. 
6119, the ``Further Extending Government Funding Act,'' which provides 
funding to continue the operations of the federal government through 
February 18, 2022, and avoids a wasteful and irresponsible shutdown, 
and also the underlying bill.
  House Democrats passed government funding bills to create good paying 
jobs, support the hard-working middle class, and protect our national 
security; Senate Democrats have also released all their appropriations 
bills.
  Without an omnibus, there will be a shortfall that will cause 
veterans not to receive their benefits in full.
  For our national security, we need an omnibus to support defense 
readiness and modernization, sustain good-paying American jobs, secure 
our cyber infrastructure, and strengthen American leadership abroad.
  Without an omnibus, a pay raise for troops will not be funded while 
funds will be misdirected to a war we are no longer fighting.
  With a new deadline of February 18, we need Republicans to offer 
constructive proposals to address the critical issues facing the 
country by funding the federal government's important work for the 
American people.
  Madam Speaker, I need not remind my colleagues that we are at a 
critical point in the fight against this pandemic--less than 24 hours 
ago, it was reported that the first case of the Omicron variant was 
confirmed in the United States.
  Our response in the following days and weeks will be crucial.
  Yet some of my colleagues on the other side of the aisle in the House 
and the Senate have indicated that they intend to block the passage of 
this stopgap spending bill in order to trigger a shutdown of the 
Federal government unless a bill is passed that undoes President 
Biden's initiatives to vaccinate and test employees at large companies.
  Simply put, this is irresponsible and dangerous at a time when we 
have a new threat on our soil in the form of the Omicron variant.
  A government shutdown would induce furloughs that could hit 62 
percent of employees at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control.
  It would be nothing other than reckless to hamstring the agency at 
the center of America's fight against the COVID-19 pandemic at this 
time--we need all hands on deck.
  In September, Congress voted on a bipartisan basis to extend 
government funding through December 3 to allow time for bicameral, 
bipartisan negotiations to complete omnibus government funding 
legislation.
  Since then, House and Senate Republicans have refused to negotiate 
with Democrats on government funding.
  In fact, while House and Senate Democrats have put forward their 
proposals, Republicans have not presented an offer of their own.
  Therefore, the Appropriations Committee introduced H.R. 6119, the 
Further Extending Government Funding Act, which continues government 
funding at current levels through February 18.
  It makes minimal changes to address the most urgent of needs during 
the period of the Continuing Resolution.
  Although this bill is necessary, working families, small businesses, 
veterans, and our military need the certainty that comes with passing 
an omnibus as opposed to short-term funding patches.
  Republicans must join us for bipartisan, bicameral negotiations to 
resolve our differences and keep government working for the people.
  For our communities, we need an omnibus to create jobs by supporting 
small businesses, bolster our public health infrastructure to prevent 
future pandemics and medical research to save lives, strengthen public 
schools with a focus on those serving students with the highest need, 
protect our air and water through environmental protection and 
enforcement efforts, combat the opioid epidemic on the ground in our 
communities, and support core services such as food safety and consumer 
product inspections.
  Without an omnibus, investments in all these areas will be denied.
  For our veterans, we need an omnibus to provide sufficient funding 
for veterans' benefits, reduce backlogs for veterans and their families 
seeking assistance, and meet the needs of the VA's health care system.
  Throughout the 117th Congress, House Democrats have worked to deliver 
results for the American people, passing legislation to address each 
pillar of the ``For The People'' agenda: lower health care costs, 
higher wages by rebuilding America, and cleaning up corruption and 
strengthening our Democracy.
  And under the leadership of Speaker Pelosi, the House has passed 
hundreds of bills, including legislation to crush the COVID-19 
pandemic, build our economy back better, lower health care and 
prescription drug prices, raise wages, advance economic and retirement 
security, end gun violence, act on the climate crisis, protect 
Dreamers, and strengthen voting rights.
  For example, in this Congress the House has passed and sent to the 
President the following legislation that has been signed into law:
  H.R. 1799, Paycheck Protection Program Extension Act:
  This legislation extended the Paycheck Protection Program application 
deadline for two months through May 31, 2021 to help struggling 
businesses keep workers employed during COVID-19.
  H.R. 1276, SAVE LIVES Act:
  This law ensured that more veterans, their families, and caregivers 
got access to COVID-19 vaccines in a timely manner.
  S. 937, COVID-19 Hate Crimes Act:
  This law addresses the dramatic increase in hate crimes targeting the 
AAPI community since the start of the pandemic. This law designates a 
point person at the Department of Justice to review hate crimes related 
to the COVID-19 pandemic, bolsters state and local governments to 
improve their reporting of hate crimes and ensures that hate crime 
information is more accessible to Asian-American communities.
  S. 475, Juneteenth National Independence Day Act:
  This law established the first federal holiday in 38 years to 
formally recognize Juneteenth National Independence Day and commemorate 
the end of slavery in the United States.
  House Democrats have also worked to advance critical pieces of 
legislation, which await action in the Senate:
  H.R. 1, For The People Act:
  This comprehensive legislation would promote government transparency, 
strengthen access to the ballot box and make it easier for Americans to 
exercise their right to vote, secure election infrastructure, and curb 
the influence of dark money in politics.
  H.R. 5, Equality Act:
  The Equality Act would codify consistent anti-discrimination legal 
protections for LGBTQ Americans by amending several existing civil 
rights laws to include explicit non-discrimination protections in key 
areas of life.
  H.R. 6, Dream and Promise Act:
  The Dream and Promise Act would protect Dreamers, Temporary Protected 
Status (TPS), and Deferred Enforced Departure (DED) status holders from 
deportation and provide an opportunity to obtain permanent legal status 
that would enable these groups to work legally within the United States 
and continue to contribute to their local communities and economy.
  H.R. 7, Paycheck Fairness Act:
  This bill would strengthen labor protections around equal pay by 
prohibiting the use of salary history to set compensation, provide more 
transparent options for joining class-action lawsuits challenging 
systemic discrimination, and require employers to show that gender pay 
gaps are job-related and consistent with business need.
  H.R. 8, Bipartisan Background Checks Act and H.R. 1446, the Enhanced 
Background Checks Act:
  These bills would modernize federal laws around gun sales. The former 
would close current loopholes that allow buyers to purchase guns 
without a background check in certain venues, while the latter would 
prevent gun sales from going through before background checks are 
completed.
  H.R. 1280, the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act:
  This bill, which House Democrats also passed in the 116th Congress 30 
days after the murder of George Floyd, will address racial bias in 
policing, ensure accountability for police brutality and misconduct, 
and work to change the culture of law enforcement to promote better 
relationships with the communities they serve.
  H.R. 842, Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act:
  This bill aims to strengthen labor protections for union workers 
through overriding Republican-led ``right to work'' laws, promoting 
free and fair union elections, and holding companies that attempt to 
restrict union activity accountable.
  H.J. Res. 17, Removing the Deadline for Ratification of the Equal 
Rights Amendment:
  This resolution would remove the deadline for ratifying the Equal 
Rights Amendment in order to enshrine women's equality in the 
Constitution.
  H.R. 1620, Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act:
  This long-overdue legislation to reauthorize the Violence Against 
Women Act passed the House with bipartisan support. It would 
reauthorize funding to vital grant programs that help prevent sexual 
assault, domestic violence, and improve access to resources for victims 
and survivors.
  H.R. 3237, the Emergency Security Supplemental to Respond to 1/6 
Appropriations Act:
  This bill provides $1.9 billion in funding to secure the U.S. Capitol 
Complex and ensure the brave men and women of the U.S. Capitol Police 
have the resources they need to do

[[Page H6884]]

their jobs. The legislation responds to the direct costs incurred by 
the National Guard and DC police on January 6, provides funding to 
improve the security of windows and doors in the Capitol complex, and 
secures funds to improve Capitol Police training and equipment.
  H.R. 3005, Legislation to #RemoveHate from the Capitol Building:
  This bill would remove statues of those who perpetuated and supported 
slavery and segregation in this country, along with statues or busts of 
those who served voluntarily in the Confederate States of America, from 
public display in the U.S. Capitol.
   H.R. 1603, the Farm Workforce Modernization Act:
  This bipartisan bill would stabilize the agriculture industry's labor 
supply by reforming the H-2A guest worker program and creating a 
pathway to citizenship for agricultural workers, many of whom worked 
through the pandemic.
  H.R. 51, the Washington, DC Admission Act:
  This bill would admit Washington, DC as the 51st state in the Union 
and end the injustice in denying nearly 700,000 citizens the right to 
be represented fully in Congress. It would also end the unjust practice 
of treating District of Columbia residents differently when allocating 
government resources or relief.
  H.R. 3985, ALLIES Act:
  This bill would increase the visa cap and expedite the visa process 
for Afghan allies who worked alongside American military personnel, 
diplomats, development professionals, and partner forces, to help 
ensure they make it safely out of harm's way.
  H.R. 803, Protecting America's Wildness and Public Lands Act:
  This comprehensive bill would conserve and protect natural landscapes 
across America, designating over 1.5 million acres of public land as 
protected wilderness and withdrawing significant amount of public land 
from drilling and mining activities to promote a healthier environment.
  H.R. 2467, the PFAS Action Act:
  This bipartisan bill would improve the safety of Americans' drinking 
water by requiring the EPA to set a drinking water standard, prevent 
the future release of PFAS chemicals into our bodies of water, and 
start the process of cleaning up affected communities.
  H.R. 256, Repeal of the 2002 AUMF Against Iraq:
  This bill, which passed with bipartisan support, would repeal the 
2002 Authorization of Military Force Against Iraq.
  H.R. 1230, the Protecting Older Workers Against Discrimination Act:
  The bipartisan Protecting Older Workers Against Discrimination Act 
restores protections for older workers that were weakened in a 2009 
Supreme Court ruling that made it harder for older workers to prove age 
based discrimination in the workplace.
  H.R. 2662, the Inspectors-General Independence and Empowerment Act:
  This bill seeks to promote government transparency and accountability 
by ensuring the independence of federal inspectors-general, allowing 
government watchdogs to act freely without fear of political pressure 
or threats. It would also protect whistleblowers from threats of 
retaliation by making it a violation of House rules for Members to 
reveal their identities.
  In addition, three Congressional Review Act resolutions have been 
signed into law, overturning dangerous rules put in place by the Trump 
Administration:
  S.J. Res 13, a CRA overturning an EEOC rule to address discrimination 
in the workplace;
  S.J. Res. 14, a CRA addressing dangerous methane emissions; and
  S.J. Res. 15, a CRA to protect against predatory lenders.
  These along with many, many others are among the bills awaiting 
Senate action.
  Madam Speaker, let me briefly list several of the programs vital to 
Americans that are protected or extended by H.R. 6119. The bill:
  Provides waiver language for certain intelligence programs as well as 
agencies that operate under the State Department Basic Authorities Act 
and Foreign Relations Authorization Act;
  Allows the Food and Nutrition Service to spend at a higher rate 
during the period covered by the legislation to provide supplemental 
USDA foods to low-income seniors (age 60 and over) and to some low-
income women, infants and children up to age six.
  Allows a higher spending rate for the White House to support 
continuing COVID-19 operations.
  Allows the Small Business Administration flexibility to spend at the 
rate necessary to accommodate potential demand increases for 
commitments for business loans through the 7(a) and 504 business loans, 
for the Secondary Market Guarantee Program, and for the Small Business 
Investment Company (SBIC) program.

  Allows District of Columbia voucher schools an additional year to be 
accredited and therefore remain in the program. The accrediting process 
requires in-school visits, which are not happening during the 
coronavirus.
  Allows the District of Columbia to spend FY 2021 funds received from 
local tax revenues and other non-Federal sources in the amount and for 
the programs and activities provided in DC's FY 2021 Budget Act.
  Extends the term of certain bankruptcy judgeships.
  Allows the Federal Emergency Management Agency to access the entire 
DRF appropriation for fiscal year 2021 under the continuing resolution 
as necessary to respond to declared disasters.
  Continues the authorization for the NFIP.
  Extends funding for the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families 
program and the Child Care Entitlement to States program during the 
period of the continuing resolution. The extension will allow HHS to 
make first-quarter payments to States.
  Extends the availability of funding for multiyear research grants 
supported by the National Institutes of Health that were interrupted in 
fiscal year 2020 by COVID-19 and would have expired at the end of the 
fiscal year.
  Madam Speaker, our colleagues across the aisle have in both chambers 
have been obstructive, dilatory, petulantly uncooperative throughout 
the first session of the 117th Congress.
  Nowhere was this more apparent than the refusal of the majority of J 
Republican members in the House voted 175-35 against H.R. 3233, 
legislation modeled after the 9/11 Commission establishing a National 
Commission to Investigate the January 6 Attack on the United States 
Capitol Complex Act.
  Madam Speaker, American families do not get to choose which bills to 
pay and which ones to ignore; neither can the United States Congress 
without putting the nation into default for the first time in its 
history.
  Long ago, in 1789, Alexander Hamilton, the nation's first and 
greatest Treasury Secretary, understood that the path to American 
prosperity and greatness lay in its creditworthiness which provided the 
affordable access to capital needed to fund internal improvements and 
economic growth.
  The nation's creditworthiness was one of its most important national 
assets and according to Hamilton: ``the proper funding of the present 
debt, will render it a national blessing.''
  But to maintain this blessing, or to ``render public credit 
immortal,'' Hamilton understood that it was necessary that: ``the 
creation of debt should always be accompanied with the means of 
extinguishment.''
  In other words, to retain and enjoy the prosperity that flows from 
good credit, it is necessary for a nation to pay its bills.
  To preserve the sanctity of the full faith and credit of the United 
States, protect American jobs and businesses of all sizes, and ensure 
the continued growth of the economy, I strongly support the provision 
in the bill before extending the public debt limit to December 16, 
2021.
  Madam Speaker, I would also like to discuss an important topic that 
is closely related to this bill and that this House must address very 
soon--raising the debt ceiling.
  Preserving the full faith and credit of the United States by raising 
to the debt limit to ensure that America pays the bills for past 
expenditures when they come due is not a partisan exercise but an act 
of patriotism, a recognition and embrace of the solemn obligation to 
preserve the unrivaled advantages that flow from the ability provided 
in the Article I, Section 8, clause 2 of the Constitution to ``borrow 
money on the credit of the United States.''
  Long ago, in 1789, Alexander Hamilton, the nation's first and 
greatest Treasury Secretary, understood that the path to American 
prosperity and greatness lay in its creditworthiness which provided the 
affordable access to capital needed to fund internal improvements and 
economic growth.
  It is because of the existence and wise use of the Borrowing Power 
that the nation was able to expand its reaches, resources, and riches 
by financing the Louisiana Purchase, the purchase of Alaska from 
Russia, to fund the investments to end the Great Depression, to finance 
the mobilization of resources needed in World War II to defeat fascism 
and save freedom in the nation and the world, to revive the economy 
after the catastrophic Great Recession of 2008, and most recently, to 
protect the public health and safety and restore the economy during the 
COVID-19 pandemic.
  This is why the ability to borrow money on the credit of the United 
States to finance its growth and protect its people and interests is 
essential to the national security and led Hamilton to proclaim that 
``the proper funding of the present debt, will render it a national 
blessing.''
  But to maintain this blessing, or to ``render public credit 
immortal,'' Hamilton understood that it was necessary that: ``the 
creation of debt should always be accompanied with the means of 
extinguishment.''
  In other words, to retain and enjoy the prosperity that flows from 
good credit, it is necessary for a nation to pay its bills.

[[Page H6885]]

  The United States has never defaulted on the payment of any debt 
incurred, and because of the size and strength of its economic and 
unmatched creditworthiness, is able to borrow on the lowest and most 
favorable terms of any nation or entity in the history of the world.
  So secure and reliable is a bond issues by the Department of Treasury 
that the Unites States is the preferred haven for investments of 
foreign governments, corporations, and sovereign wealth funds.
  The interest rate charged the federal government of the United States 
is the base for which every rate, from the prime rate charged the 
richest corporation to rates charged small business on purchases to the 
mortgages rates and students loans taken out by consumers.
  If you raise the cost of borrowing for the government of the United 
States, you set off a chain reaction of increased interest rates for 
every other borrower in the United States and around the world.
  This is why leading public finance experts and agencies, like Moody's 
Chief Economist Mark Zandi, have said it would be ``cataclysmic'' for 
the United States to default on its loan obligations.
  Republicans know the debt ceiling needs to be raised; in 2019 during 
the Trump Administration, the Republican Senate Majority Leader 
marshalled Senate Republicans to vote to raise the debt ceiling, 
saying: ``We raised the debt ceiling because America can't default[,] 
that would be a disaster.''
  Madam Speaker, this debate over extending the debt limit is not about 
restraining future spending, it is about paying the bills piled up 
already under both Republican and Democratic administrations.
  The question of raising the national debt limit does not depend on 
how one feels about the Build Back Better agenda, as wildly popular as 
it is among all Americans, Democrats, Independents, and Republicans 
included.
  It is instead about preserving the singular asset of the United 
States, its enviable and unrivaled creditworthiness, to finance future 
investments beneficial to the national interest, like the provision of 
free college for two years, or $2 billion investment to reduce violence 
in communities approved by the Committee on the Judiciary, or 
investments to preserve and strengthen Medicaid expansion programs, or 
extend broadband to underserved rural and urban areas, an action that 
will be as life-changing as the rural electrification program was in 
the 1930s.
  Madam Speaker, if our friends across the aisle really want to shrink 
the deficit, reduce the national debt, practice fiscal responsibility, 
and bring about sustained economic growth and prosperity, there is a 
much better, easier, and more certain way to achieve these goals than 
by tampering with the U.S. Constitution.
  The easier and better way is for the American people to keep a 
Democrat in the White House and place Democratic majorities in the 
House and Senate.
  In the 1990s under the leadership of President Clinton the budget was 
balanced for four consecutive years, the national debt was paid down, 
the national debt, 23 million new jobs were created, and projected 
surpluses exceeded $5 trillion.
  Under President Obama the financial crisis and economic meltdown 
inherited from his Republican predecessor was ended, the annual deficit 
was reduced by 67 percent, the auto industry was saved from collapse, 
and 15 million jobs were created.
  In contrast, under every Republican administration since President 
Reagan the size of the deficit bequeathed to his successor was 
substantially larger than the deficit he inherited, a major economic 
recession occurred, and economic growth was lower than it was at the 
beginning of his administration.
  To preserve the sanctity of the full faith and credit of the United 
States, protect American jobs and businesses of all sizes, and ensure 
the continued growth of the economy, raised.
  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I am kind of a little confused. Last I 
looked, the Democratic Party controls the House, they control the 
Senate, and they control the White House. If they want to pass an 
omnibus bill, pass it.
  Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman 
from Rhode Island (Mr. Cicilline).
  Mr. CICILLINE. Madam Speaker, I first want to say thank you to the 
Appropriations chair and to the members of the Appropriations Committee 
for their extraordinary work.
  Let's be clear about one thing. A continuing resolution is not a way 
to proceed, but it is the only way we can proceed in the face of 
Republican obstruction, and when you vote ``no'' on the continuing 
resolution, you are voting to defund the government and shut it down.
  That means veterans can't access healthcare at the VA.
  It means Native American Tribes can't have access to healthcare and 
schools.
  It means our troops won't get the pay they deserve.
  You are voting to shut the government down, and at the same time you 
are unwilling to be part of a process to pass appropriations bills for 
an entire year. You are here to govern. You have a responsibility to 
make sure this appropriation process works. And I am grateful for the 
service of the members of the Appropriations Committee that have worked 
on this in a painstaking way.
  We have Republicans in the Senate who are obstructing this process, 
but I am glad that I am part of the process that makes sure government 
remains open, that we take care of our responsibilities, that we ensure 
that the economic recovery that is underway is not hampered. I thank 
the chair of the Appropriations Committee for the hard work in bringing 
us to this moment.
  I urge everyone to support the continuing resolution. Be responsible.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Members are reminded to direct their remarks 
to the Chair.
  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Let me just say to you that we have heard from a number of advocacy 
groups urging the Congress to move on taking up a full-year omnibus. 
Let me just tell you the groups that have written to us.
  We are looking at the National Defense Industrial Association: On 
behalf of thousands of companies represented by the National Defense 
Industrial Association, we write to request the expedited completion of 
the defense appropriation bill.
  We talk about the Association of American Universities: Urge you to 
reach a bipartisan agreement to complete the FY22 appropriations 
process before the end of the year.
  The Aerospace Industries Association: Our essential partners are 
urging us to avoid a further CR beyond December 3, wanting us to come 
to the table in order to be able to have a full-year appropriations 
bill.
  The Coalition for Health Funding, the same message to all of us: 
Relying on continuing resolutions would be a grave, missed opportunity 
to improve the lives of all Americans. A full-year appropriations bill.
  The Ad Hoc Group for Medical Research telling us the very, very same 
thing: To maximize the potential of medical research, we need to move 
forward with a full-year bill.
  The veterans organizations saying the same thing: Do not shortchange 
veterans and their benefits by holding back on a full-year 
appropriations bill.
  Madam Speaker, I include in the Record statements in support of the 
bill from a broad coalition of groups urging negotiations now, as well 
as letters from veterans' organizations and America's leading research 
universities.

           Broad Coalition of Groups Urging Negotiations Now

       A broad coalition of groups have joined Chair DeLauro and 
     Democratic Appropriators urging negotiations and agreement on 
     fiscal year 2022 appropriations bills. These organizations 
     include:


                   Ad Hoc Group for Medical Research

       Our organizations strongly support an approach to the final 
     FY 2022 spending package that avoids additional CRs past 
     December. Aside from the budget implications, CRs create 
     inefficiencies and add uncertainty to a system that is 
     already under stress with the continued reverberations of the 
     ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. We strongly urge you to work 
     swiftly in securing bipartisan, bicameral agreement on 
     topline discretionary spending allocations and to ensure any 
     final budget agreement reflects a strong commitment to the 
     nation's health.


                    Aerospace Industries Association

       The United States aerospace and defense industries are an 
     essential partner with the federal government in an array of 
     efforts vital to our economy and our national security. Each 
     fall, that partnership is tested when those programs are 
     slowed down or deferred by the use of multiple continuing 
     resolutions (CR) to keep the government running . . . If 
     Congress fails to once again enact full-year appropriations 
     bills, or continues running the government into 2022 under 
     continuing resolutions, it will send the wrong signal to the 
     government's partners, like those in our industry. We count 
     on stable, reliable and adequate funding to support

[[Page H6886]]

     the critical capabilities that we provide for all Americans.


                American Association for Cancer Research

       As the nation continues to combat the COVID-19 pandemic, 
     cancer has not stopped, and remains the second leading cause 
     of death in the United States. To better prevent, detect, and 
     treat cancers, Congress must act swiftly to increase 
     investments in cancer research and prevention. A full-year 
     continuing resolution or funding lapse would threaten our 
     nation's research enterprise and stall medical breakthroughs 
     that could benefit the lives of millions of patients with 
     cancer and survivors. The AACR urges congressional 
     negotiators to come to the table and agree to Fiscal Year 
     2022 allocations that would support robust and sustained 
     funding for cancer research and prevention.


                  Association of American Universities

       Higher education, research, and innovation play integral 
     roles in our nation's competitiveness, security, health, and 
     ability to combat and overcome the pandemic. Our nation 
     cannot afford continued inaction on FY22 appropriations. In 
     the absence of final appropriations, federal agencies 
     postpone research award decisions and prepare for potential 
     lapses in funding. Continuing resolutions (CRs) slow the pace 
     of scientific innovation and create funding uncertainty for 
     researchers and students. It is vital that Congress complete 
     appropriations this year and avoid serial stop-gap measures 
     and a yearlong CR.


                        Coalition on Human Needs

       The nation's recovery depends on strengthening a host of 
     domestic programs that have been allowed to shrink for years, 
     not just to get to where they had been before, but to respond 
     to needs far greater because of the pandemic and its global 
     economic dislocations. A long-term continuing resolution 
     would be a severe failure to address these needs. We strongly 
     urge you to enact omnibus appropriations legislation 
     including all twelve bills as soon as possible.


Joint Coalition of the Campaign to Invest in American's Workforce, the 
  Coalition for Health Funding, the Coalition on Human Needs, and the 
                    Committee for Education Funding

       The bill passed by the House this summer and the bill 
     proposed by the Senate Appropriations Committee this fall 
     provide vital increased funding for the programs and services 
     that have a profound impact on health and well-being, child 
     development, educational and skills attainment, employment, 
     and productivity. Failing to enact the FY 2022 bill and 
     relying on continuing resolutions (CRs) would be a grave 
     missed opportunity to improve the lives of all Americans.


                National Defense Industrial Association

       We cannot stress enough the importance of the defense 
     appropriations bill to our national security and to a healthy 
     defense industrial base. The limbo caused under CRs wastes 
     precious time and money our nation cannot recover. Delayed 
     new starts and initiatives place a strain on companies and 
     their workforce, particularly as they recalibrate operations 
     to a post-pandemic normal. Our nation's competitors face no 
     similar challenges putting us at a competitive disadvantage, 
     particularly with emerging technologies, and place our supply 
     chains at increasing risk, something we cannot afford after 
     the nearly two years of pandemic impacts.


 Veterans Service Organizations, including the American Legion and the 
                        Veterans of Foreign Wars

       A full-year continuing resolution could result in an 
     estimated $7 billion shortfall in funding for mandatory 
     compensation and pension benefits, in large part due to an 
     increased number of benefit claims resulting from 
     congressional approval of new diseases related to Agent 
     Orange exposure for Vietnam veterans . . . we call on you to 
     reject consideration of a full-year continuing resolution 
     that would reduce veterans' funding below what has already 
     been approved in an overwhelming bipartisan vote.
                                  ____

                                                November 10, 2021.
     Hon. Charles E. Schumer,
     Majority Leader, U.S. Senate,
     Washington, DC.
     Hon. Mitch McConnell,
     Minority Leader, U.S. Senate,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Majority Leader Schumer and Minority Leader McConnell: 
     On behalf of the millions of veterans our organizations 
     represent, we write to express serious concerns about reports 
     that the Senate is considering approving a full-year 
     continuing resolution to fund the federal government for the 
     remainder of fiscal year 2022, which would have significant 
     negative consequences for veterans, their families, 
     caregivers and survivors. Therefore, we are asking that you 
     work together to ensure that veterans programs, benefits and 
     medical services receive the full level of funding for fiscal 
     year 2022 that was approved with strong bipartisan support 
     (25 to 5) by the Senate Appropriations Committee in August.
       As you know, Congress approved and the President signed a 
     short-term continuing resolution (Public Law 117-43) on 
     September 30th to fund the federal government through 
     December 3, 2021, extending funding at the levels previously 
     enacted in fiscal year 2021 appropriations legislation. 
     Funding for Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical care 
     and benefit payments for fiscal year 2022 was previously 
     approved in December 2020 as advance appropriations in 
     Division J (Military Construction and Veterans Affairs) of 
     the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2021, Public Law 116-
     260. However, the advance appropriations process only works 
     properly if funding levels are adjusted to address increased 
     demand for benefits and services as part of the following 
     year's regular appropriations process, as is necessary for 
     fiscal year 2022. Further, if Congress passes a full-year 
     continuing resolution, all other programs, services and 
     benefits would remain funded at fiscal year 2021 levels, 
     which would fall short of the anticipated needs.
       For example, a full-year continuing resolution could result 
     in an estimated $7 billion shortfall in funding for mandatory 
     compensation and pension benefits, in large part due to an 
     increased number of benefit claims resulting from 
     congressional approval of new diseases related to Agent 
     Orange exposure for Vietnam veterans.
       In addition, the time it takes to process these and other 
     claims for benefits would be significantly increased without 
     the $300 million increase for the Veterans Benefits 
     Administration approved by the Senate Appropriations 
     Committee. Similarly, reductions from the Committee-approved 
     levels for the Board of Veterans' Appeals and the National 
     Cemetery Administration would negatively impact veterans and 
     their survivors seeking their services and benefits.
       Enacting a full-year continuing resolution would also 
     negatively hamper veterans' ability to receive timely medical 
     care absent the $3.3 billion increase for Veterans Medical 
     Community Care approved by the Senate Committee. VA's 
     critical Medical and Prosthetic Research programs would be 
     cut by $67 million and funding to support VA's health care 
     infrastructure would be cut $450 million below the levels 
     approved by the Committee if Congress passes a full-year 
     continuing resolution.
       As leaders of the Senate, we call on you to reject 
     consideration of a full-year continuing resolution that would 
     reduce veterans' funding below what has already been approved 
     in an overwhelming bipartisan vote of the Senate 
     Appropriations Committee. Instead, we ask that you use your 
     influence to ensure that the Senate completes consideration 
     of the fiscal year 2022 appropriations so that veterans, 
     their families, caregivers and survivors have timely access 
     to all the benefits, services and medical care they have 
     earned.
           Respectfully,
     Lawrence W. Montreuil,
       National Legislative Director, The American Legion.
     Tom Porter,
       Executive Vice President, Government Affairs, Iraq and 
     Afghanistan Veterans of America.
     Heather Ansley, Esq., MSW,
       Associate Executive Director of Government Relations, 
     Paralyzed Veterans of America.
     Patrick Murray,
       Director, National Legislative Service, Veterans of Foreign 
     Wars.
     Joy J. Ilem,
       National Legislative Director, DAV (Disabled American 
     Veterans).
     Dan Merry,
       Colonel, USAF (Ret), Vice President for Government 
     Relations, Military Officers Association of America.
     Sharon Hodge,
       Director for Policy and Government Affairs, Vietnam 
     Veterans of America.
     Brian Dempsey,
       Government Affairs Director, Wounded Warrior Project.
                                  ____



                         Association of American Universities,

                                                November 18, 2021.
     Hon. Nancy Pelosi,
     Speaker, House of Representatives,
     Washington, DC.
     Hon. Kevin McCarthy,
     Minority Leader, House of Representatives,
     Washington, DC.
     Hon. Charles Schumer,
     Majority Leader, U.S. Senate,
     Washington, DC.
     Hon. Mitch McConnell,
     Minority Leader, U.S. Senate,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Speaker Pelosi and Leaders Schumer, McCarthy, and 
     McConnell: I write on behalf of America's leading research 
     universities to urge you to reach a bipartisan agreement to 
     complete the FY22 appropriations process before the end of 
     the year.
       Recent suggestions that final FY22 appropriations could be 
     delayed until March 2022 are distressing. Higher education, 
     research, and innovation play integral roles in our nation's 
     competitiveness, security, health, and ability to combat and 
     overcome the pandemic. Our nation cannot afford continued

[[Page H6887]]

     inaction on FY22 appropriations. In the absence of final 
     appropriations, federal agencies postpone research award 
     decisions and prepare for potential lapses in funding. 
     Continuing resolutions (CRs) slow the pace of scientific 
     innovation and create funding uncertainty for researchers and 
     students. It is vital that Congress complete appropriations 
     this year and avoid serial stop-gap measures and a year-long 
     CR.
       Congress has made good progress in determining FY22 funding 
     levels, and now it is time to finish the job. Both the House 
     and Senate bills include important increases to federal 
     investments in student aid and research that would help 
     bolster our nation's economic competitiveness and standing as 
     the global innovation leader. For example, the bills propose 
     a $400 increase to the Pell Grant maximum award and increased 
     funding for other student aid programs, the National 
     Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the 
     Department of Energy's Office of Science, and other critical 
     research agencies. AAU supports the proposed increases, and 
     we stand ready to reinforce efforts to ensure final passage.
       We urge you to complete FY22 appropriations before the end 
     of the year and to approve the highest levels of funding 
     proposed for student aid and research programs in the House 
     and Senate bills. Thank you for considering our views.
           Sincerely,
                                                Barbara R. Snyder,
                                                        President.

  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Maryland (Mr. Hoyer), the majority leader of the House of 
Representatives.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman from Connecticut has 30 
seconds remaining.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
Maryland (Mr. Hoyer).
  Mr. HOYER. Madam Speaker, I thank the chair of the Appropriations 
Committee for yielding me 1 minute.
  I rise to say, of course, everybody is going to vote for this bill. I 
wish I believed that.
  Madam Speaker, this bill is a demonstration of the failure of 535 
adults elected by their fellow citizens to act responsibly. Obviously, 
of those 535, a number have acted responsibly, have worked to get the 
job done.
  There are really only 12 bills that need to pass the Congress. There 
are many other bills that are important bills and should pass the 
Congress that I voted for and make life better for America.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. HOYER. How is that?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman from Connecticut had 30 
seconds remaining.
  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Maryland (Mr. Hoyer).
  Mr. HOYER. I thank the gentleman, who is my friend, and I thank him 
for that.
  As I was saying, this is a failure. We knew that these 12 bills have 
to pass. Why? Because if they do not, government shuts down. It stops 
serving the American people. It stops maintaining security and health 
and welfare of our people. So we know these bills have to pass.
  But notwithstanding that, year after year after year, we come to this 
point where we are adopting a CR. It is really a CI, congressional 
irresponsibility.
  Now let me say that I generally speak of the Congress, but very 
frankly, Madam Speaker, we have exercised our responsibility in this 
House. We passed 9 of the 12 appropriation bills and sent them to the 
Senate.

                              {time}  1615

  The Senate, Madam Speaker, has not sent a single bill to the House, 
not passed a single appropriations bill through the United States 
Senate. They have passed through some in committee.
  I heard my friend   Tom Cole speaking earlier on the rule. He is my 
friend, and he is a Member I respect. He is a member of the 
Appropriations Committee and the Rules Committee. He is a Member who 
respects this institution. But I disagree with him very much about why 
we are at a CR. We passed overwhelmingly 75 percent of the 
appropriation bills before August 1 and sent them to the Senate. They 
have neither acted on those bills nor have they acted on their own 
bills and asked to go to conference.
  So we find ourselves at the 11th hour, as we did on September 30--
although we passed the CR a little before September 30--without having 
funded the government.
  The gentleman referred to the fact that we control both Houses. 
Frankly, nobody controls the United States Senate. We are in the 
majority by one. But, unfortunately, in the United States Senate, you 
need not a majority; you need a supermajority. So the minority can 
defeat the majority.
  The minority can defeat the majority in the United States Senate. 
That is an appalling place for our democracy to be. I have written an 
op-ed in Time magazine on that issue, and it has been distributed to 
many Members.
  Mr. Cole made an assessment about why the CR is coming to the floor 
today with just hours to go before it expires. His assessment was not 
correct. The reason we have not gotten, as the gentlewoman has pointed 
out, to even the opportunity to discuss a resolution of the differences 
between the House and the Senate on spending levels and the objects of 
that spending is because Senate Republicans have refused to negotiate 
and made as a condition precedent--as we lawyers say, something that 
has to happen before you do something else--that we resolve all the 
riders.
  Now, for any of us who have been involved in the appropriation 
process for any period of time, the riders are almost always the last 
items to be resolved, invariably. I served as an active member of the 
Appropriations Committee for 23 years, and for the last 16 years, I 
have been very much involved in working with the Appropriations 
Committee to get these bills passed.
  Because of the refusal to even sit down and determine how much money 
we will spend overall, which is called in our jargon 302(a) numbers, 
the chairman has been unable to get to a discussion of the differences 
so that they could be resolved. If you can't discuss, you can't 
resolve.
  So for Mr. Cole, frankly, to have intimated that somehow it was the 
Democrats that couldn't do it, it takes two to tango, and frankly, one 
of the partners in the Senate doesn't want to tango until something 
happens that almost always happens at the end.
  The timing for the consideration of this CR resulted not from the 
majority's focus on passing critical legislation to help the American 
people get ahead, the Build Back Better Act, the infrastructure bill 
which, by the way, only 13 Republicans voted for, but my speculation is 
at least half of them are going to take credit for what was done in 
that bill, maybe all of them. It is as a result, this failure, of the 
minority's determination to slow down the work of Congress so that such 
legislation is delayed.
  As a matter of fact, the minority leader of the United States Senate 
said exactly that. He said that he would not consider negotiating on 
the CR until Build Back Better was done, which means he is prepared to 
shut down the government. I think that is probably not true. I don't 
think he wants to shut down the government. I hope he doesn't want to 
shut down the government.
  He wants to gum up the works on Build Back Better. I get that. He is 
opposed to it. He doesn't like it. He thinks it is the wrong 
priorities. That is an honest position to take. I think it is 
incorrect, but it is honest. But don't do it by playing games with the 
appropriation process.
  In my view, the Senate treats the appropriation process as a back-
burner issue. When we get to it, we will get to it, but we have a lot 
of other things we want to do first. For the last 10, 11 months, that 
is what the case has been.
  To dissemble and derail the legislative process using every tool 
available to them to prohibit Congress from doing exactly what the 
American people are looking for us to do is not responsible. How sad. 
How shameful that reality is.
  I agree that it is unfortunate that we have to take up another 
stopgap measure this week to keep this government operating. If it were 
based upon whether this is the right thing to do in terms of substance, 
I would vote ``no.'' But it absolutely is the right thing to do in 
terms of process.
  But the chair is absolutely right; we need to pass an omnibus. I 
would hope that every Republican after, hopefully, passing this piece 
of legislation today

[[Page H6888]]

or tomorrow will then address how we are going to have an omnibus, how 
we are going to deal with the problems, how we are going to give the 
government agencies that which they need to meet new challenges that 
were not available to us a year ago and so they could not be addressed.
  It is extremely disappointing that Senate Republicans are blocking 
progress toward full-year appropriations that will enable our 
government to serve the American people. I happen to believe that the 
ranking member, Senator Shelby, wants to see an omnibus passed. I 
believe that. But I believe the tactics of the Republican leadership in 
the Senate are not to do so until they get what they want.
  That is dangerous for our country, and it is extraordinarily 
inefficient for the 2 million people who are waiting to see what we are 
doing. That is what they are focused on, not the job, not the 
priorities, not the dangers, but what is happening: Is the government 
going to fund us on Saturday? On Saturday, are we going to be able to 
operate?
  There are few certainties in Washington, Madam Speaker, but one of 
them has now become that Congress will not complete the appropriation 
process by the start of the fiscal year. I have tried to make that 
happen every year that I have been majority leader. The chair of this 
committee, Rosa DeLauro, did everything she could to pass 12 
appropriation bills by the August 1 deadline. If we had had any help on 
the Republican side, we would have done it--any help.
  Now, we have only a four-vote margin over here, so on some of the 
bills that were more controversial for one reason or another, we needed 
some help. I will remind my friend--and I dearly thank him for yielding 
me the time. He knew it was going to be a somewhat extended discussion, 
but I thank him for that. It reflects back to how this institution used 
to operate, frankly, and I appreciate it. But he knows that when the 
Republican side was in the majority, and they could not get the 
majority of votes on fiscal issues, they looked to this side of the 
aisle. We always helped and made it happen; maybe not 100 percent of 
us, but a large enough amount so that the important fiscal issues would 
be dealt with and passed.
  Only six times over the past 20 years has Congress come within 3 
months of this deadline, the end of the fiscal year.
  Now, I could go on for some period of time talking about Mr. Cole. He 
said the majority wasn't serious. We are very serious. We have been the 
ones that opened up government after it was shut down for some 35 days 
when we took over from the Republican leadership two Congresses ago. We 
can do better.
  For Mr. Cole to say that we were spending time pandering to the 
American people by passing the Build Back Better Act or passing the 
bipartisan infrastructure act, I hope he reflects upon that statement 
and says, no, that was wrong. Yes, we focused on Build Back Better 
because we think it is important for the American people, but we had 
already passed the appropriation bills. They were already in the Senate 
ready to be acted upon, and we were ready to act in response.
  Madam Speaker, this is the result of the inability of the Congress to 
work. The House worked. Republicans and Democrats, this House can work. 
Maybe sometimes I don't agree with what it does, and maybe sometimes my 
colleagues on the other side of the aisle don't agree with what it 
does, but it works. It can pass legislation.
  The Senate is not working, and it is hurting our country.
  We should all resolve, however we vote on this CR, we should all 
resolve, hopefully, all of us--and I am a good friend of the ranking 
member, Ms. Granger. I think she wants to get this bill done. By ``this 
bill,'' I am talking about omnibus, all 12 appropriation bills. I think 
she wants to get that done. But I am not sure that she has been 
empowered by her leadership to do so.
  We can have differences, and we have a way of resolving those 
differences. Ultimately, we vote. But if we keep putting it off, 
putting it off, putting it off, it undermines the credibility of the 
United States, the confidence that people have in our country, the 
confidence that our workers have in our stewardship of the leadership 
of this country, and the people's confidence. So we ought to resolve 
that we stop this.
  The Republicans, through Mr. Cole, have talked about a motion to 
recommit. It mirrors the unserious nature of their opposition. Why do I 
say that? Because their motion to recommit has nothing to do with the 
funding of government. It has nothing to do with our responsibility to 
ensure that government continues to work on behalf of the American 
people. Rather, it would send this bill back to committee and would not 
possibly be able to act in a timely fashion that some 30 hours from 
now, I guess 31\1/2\ hours from now, government would shut down.
  I would have understood perhaps a motion that would have said we are 
going to fund government at this level, or we are going to fund this 
objective and not that objective, but that is not what it did, totally 
irrelevant to the appropriations process bill. They may think it is an 
important issue. I get that. But it doesn't have anything to do with 
this issue.
  Very frankly, that is exactly what the Senate has been doing on the 
Republican side, irrelevant issues, not the appropriations process. So 
we find ourselves now at a time when we must pass this CR.
  I am not in love with this CR, but in a world of alternatives, there 
should be none for any of us. All of us should have the courage to be 
responsible. Madam Speaker, all of us should have the courage to say 
there is no alternative, and after we pass this bill and the Senate 
passes this bill, get down to the work between now and February 18.
  I would hope we could pass an omnibus appropriation bill including 
the work of the gentleman from California, the gentlewoman from 
Connecticut, and all the rest of us on the priorities that we want to 
pursue as an American people and the investments that we want to make 
in achieving those objectives. I hope we do that.

                              {time}  1630

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume. I would like to remind my friends in the majority, we don't 
run the House, we don't run the White House, and God only knows who 
runs the Senate.
  But I do know this, that the gentleman that the majority leader 
referred to, the ranking minority member in the United States Senate 
certainly wants an appropriation bill, but I think he has made it quite 
clear, and I think we have made it quite clear--the gentleman referred 
to Mr. Cole--I think he has made it quite clear that the legacy riders, 
which need to come back in, the poison pills have got to go out, the 
dollars, by the way, which we have not agreed to in defense spending 
because, as you know, the Committee on Appropriations did not agree to 
a number that passed in the United States House of Representatives. It 
did pass by the authorization committee at a higher number, and in the 
Senate by a higher number, both Republicans and Democrats.
  So I think we recognize that defense number has to go up and 
something else has to come down. If those things happen, I think we can 
have a serious negotiation. Until then, I am afraid we are going to be 
continuing to operate on a continuing resolution.
  Madam Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentlewoman from Georgia 
(Mrs. Greene).
  Mrs. GREENE of Georgia. Madam Speaker, I rise in opposition to the 
CR. The American people are $29 trillion in debt, thanks to Congress. 
And this Congress wants to borrow more money and more time to figure 
out how to run the government and how to pay for it. That is an outrage 
to the American people.
  You want to talk about courage and responsibility? Do you know what 
courage and responsibility is?
  It is learning how to manage the people's money. The people work hard 
every single day. They have to pay the taxes. And then they have to 
trust this House, this body, and the Senate to create a budget, but 
every single time, it is the budget that puts them further and further 
in debt.
  It is the audacity of Congress to borrow more money and not be able 
to come up with a budget that makes sense and that we can pay for.

[[Page H6889]]

  What an outrage. What an irresponsibility. That isn't courage. That 
is not responsibility. That is out-of-control behavior that this 
Congress needs to rein in. This government should be shut down. You 
want to know why it should be shut down? Because the people in here 
cannot control themselves. The people in here do not understand how to 
balance a checkbook. And the people in here do not deserve the 
responsibility on how to spend the American people's money.
  Madam Speaker, $29 trillion. Shut it down. Do not pass the CR. Shut 
it down.
  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I yield myself the balance of my time.
  Madam Speaker, as I said before, the fiscal year 2022 bills were 
drafted with little input from Republicans. And since then, we have not 
been able to find a path forward.
  In years past, we have had an agreement in place that allowed us to 
negotiate final bills quickly. I am concerned that we cannot have a 
meaningful discussion on full-year appropriations without a similar 
understanding going in.
  Madam Speaker, that is why, in a few moments, I will offer a motion 
to recommit. My motion would simply send this bill back to committee so 
that we can come to agreement on a process for addressing full-year 
bills.
  Madam Speaker, to return to our strong bipartisan traditions, I urge 
support for the motion, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 829, the 
previous question is ordered on the bill.
  The question is on the engrossment and third reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.


                           Motion to Recommit

  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, I have a motion to recommit at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit.
  The Clerk read as follows:
       Mr. Calvert moves to recommit the bill, H.R. 6119, to the 
     Committee on Appropriations.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 2(b) of rule XIX, the 
previous question is ordered on the motion to recommit.
  The question is on the motion to recommit.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the noes appeared to have it.


 =========================== NOTE =========================== 

  
  December 2, 2021, on page H6889, in the first column, the 
following appeared: The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 
2(b) of rule XIX, the previous question is ordered on the motion 
to recommit. The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore 
announced that the noes appeared to have it.
  
  The online version has been corrected to read: The SPEAKER pro 
tempore. Pursuant to clause 2(b) of rule XIX, the previous 
question is ordered on the motion to recommit. The question is on 
the motion to recommit. The question was taken; and the Speaker 
pro tempore announced that the noes appeared to have it.


 ========================= END NOTE ========================= 


  Mr. CALVERT. Madam Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to section 3(s) of House Resolution 
8, the yeas and nays are ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 211, 
nays 219, not voting 3, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 398]

                               YEAS--211

     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bentz
     Bergman
     Bice (OK)
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (NC)
     Boebert
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Cammack
     Carey
     Carl
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Cawthorn
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Clyde
     Cole
     Comer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curtis
     Davidson
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Donalds
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Ellzey
     Emmer
     Estes
     Fallon
     Feenstra
     Ferguson
     Fischbach
     Fitzgerald
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franklin, C. Scott
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Garbarino
     Garcia (CA)
     Gibbs
     Gimenez
     Gohmert
     Gonzales, Tony
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Good (VA)
     Gooden (TX)
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Greene (GA)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Harshbarger
     Hern
     Herrell
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (LA)
     Hill
     Hinson
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Issa
     Jackson
     Jacobs (NY)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kim (CA)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff
     LaHood
     Lamborn
     Latta
     LaTurner
     Lesko
     Letlow
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Mace
     Malliotakis
     Mann
     Massie
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClain
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meijer
     Meuser
     Miller (IL)
     Miller (WV)
     Miller-Meeks
     Moolenaar
     Mooney
     Moore (AL)
     Moore (UT)
     Mullin
     Murphy (NC)
     Nehls
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Obernolte
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Pfluger
     Posey
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Rodgers (WA)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose
     Rosendale
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Salazar
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spartz
     Stauber
     Steel
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Taylor
     Tenney
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiffany
     Timmons
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Drew
     Van Duyne
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams (TX)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Young
     Zeldin

                               NAYS--219

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Auchincloss
     Axne
     Barragan
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Bourdeaux
     Bowman
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brown (MD)
     Brown (OH)
     Brownley
     Bush
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson
     Carter (LA)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Davids (KS)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel, Lois
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez, Vicente
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Harder (CA)
     Hayes
     Higgins (NY)
     Himes
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jacobs (CA)
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Jones
     Kahele
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim (NJ)
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Leger Fernandez
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lieu
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Manning
     Matsui
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Mfume
     Moore (WI)
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mrvan
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Newman
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Ross
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stansbury
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Strickland
     Suozzi
     Swalwell
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres (NY)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Williams (GA)
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--3

     Bass
     Hartzler
     LaMalfa

                              {time}  1710

  Messrs. DELGADO, QUIGLEY, CASE, LARSON of Connecticut, CORREA, and 
TORRES of New York changed their vote from ``yea'' to ``nay.''
  Messrs. ALLEN and WALBERG changed their vote from ``nay'' to ``yea.''
  So the motion to recommit was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mrs. HARTZLER. Madam Speaker, on Thursday, December 2, 2021, I was 
unable to vote on Roll Call No. 398. Had I been present, I would have 
voted as follows: YEA on Roll Call No. 398.


    Members Recorded Pursuant to House Resolution 8, 117th Congress

     Adams (Brown (MD))
     Butterfield (Ryan)
     Cardenas (Soto)
     Cawthorn (Nehls)
     Crist (Wasserman Schultz)
     Curtis (Meijer)
     DeFazio (Carbajal)
     Donalds (McClain)
     Frankel, Lois (Kuster)
     Fulcher (Johnson (OH))
     Garcia (TX) (Jeffries)
     Green (TX) (Cuellar)
     Hagedorn (Moolenaar)
     Kildee (Ryan)
     Lawrence (Johnson (GA))
     Lawson (FL) (Evans)
     Lesko (Miller (WV))
     Meng (Kuster)
     Moore (UT) (Owens)
     Palazzo (Fleischmann)
     Payne (Pallone)
     Porter (Wexton)
     Posey (Cammack)
     Reed (Kelly (PA))
     Reschenthaler (Meuser)
     Ruiz (Aguilar)
     Rush (Quigley)
     Sires (Pallone)
     Stewart (Owens)

[[Page H6890]]


     Swalwell (Gomez)
     Takano (Chu)
     Underwood (Casten)
     Vela (Gomez)
     Watson Coleman (Pallone)
     Wilson (FL) (Hayes)
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on passage of the bill.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.
  Mr. NEWHOUSE. Madam Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to section 3(s) of House Resolution 
8, the yeas and nays are ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 221, 
nays 212, not voting 0, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 399]

                               YEAS--221

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Auchincloss
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Bourdeaux
     Bowman
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brown (MD)
     Brown (OH)
     Brownley
     Bush
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson
     Carter (LA)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Davids (KS)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel, Lois
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez, Vicente
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Harder (CA)
     Hayes
     Higgins (NY)
     Himes
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jacobs (CA)
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Jones
     Kahele
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim (NJ)
     Kind
     Kinzinger
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Leger Fernandez
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lieu
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Manning
     Matsui
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Mfume
     Moore (WI)
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mrvan
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Newman
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Ross
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stansbury
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Strickland
     Suozzi
     Swalwell
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres (NY)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Williams (GA)
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NAYS--212

     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bentz
     Bergman
     Bice (OK)
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (NC)
     Boebert
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Cammack
     Carey
     Carl
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Cawthorn
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Clyde
     Cole
     Comer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curtis
     Davidson
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Donalds
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Ellzey
     Emmer
     Estes
     Fallon
     Feenstra
     Ferguson
     Fischbach
     Fitzgerald
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franklin, C. Scott
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Garbarino
     Garcia (CA)
     Gibbs
     Gimenez
     Gohmert
     Gonzales, Tony
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Good (VA)
     Gooden (TX)
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Greene (GA)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Harshbarger
     Hartzler
     Hern
     Herrell
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (LA)
     Hill
     Hinson
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Issa
     Jackson
     Jacobs (NY)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kim (CA)
     Kustoff
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     LaTurner
     Lesko
     Letlow
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Mace
     Malliotakis
     Mann
     Massie
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClain
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meijer
     Meuser
     Miller (IL)
     Miller (WV)
     Miller-Meeks
     Moolenaar
     Mooney
     Moore (AL)
     Moore (UT)
     Mullin
     Murphy (NC)
     Nehls
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Obernolte
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Pfluger
     Posey
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Rodgers (WA)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose
     Rosendale
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Salazar
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spartz
     Stauber
     Steel
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Taylor
     Tenney
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiffany
     Timmons
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Drew
     Van Duyne
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams (TX)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Young
     Zeldin

                              {time}  1730

  Mr. WITTMAN changed his vote from ``yea'' to ``nay.''
  So the bill was passed.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Ms. DeGette). Without objection, a motion to 
reconsider is laid on the table.
  Mr. ROY. Madam Speaker, I object.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Objection is heard.


    Members Recorded Pursuant to House Resolution 8, 117th Congress

     Adams (Brown (MD))
     Butterfield (Ryan)
     Cardenas (Soto)
     Cawthorn (Nehls)
     Crist (Wasserman Schultz)
     Curtis (Meijer)
     DeFazio (Carbajal)
     Donalds (McClain)
     Frankel, Lois (Kuster)
     Fulcher (Johnson (OH))
     Garcia (TX) (Jeffries)
     Green (TX) (Cuellar)
     Hagedorn (Moolenaar)
     Lawrence (Johnson (GA))
     Lawson (FL) (Evans)
     Lesko (Miller (WV))
     Meng (Kuster)
     Moore (UT) (Owens)
     Palazzo (Fleischmann)
     Payne (Pallone)
     Porter (Wexton)
     Posey (Cammack)
     Reed (Kelly (PA))
     Reschenthaler (Meuser)
     Ruiz (Aguilar)
     Rush (Quigley)
     Sires (Pallone)
     Stewart (Owens)
     Swalwell (Gomez)
     Takano (Chu)
     Underwood (Casten)
     Vela (Gomez)
     Watson Coleman (Pallone)
     Wilson (FL) (Hayes)


                          Motion to Reconsider

  Mr. EVANS. Madam Speaker, I have a motion at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Mr. Evans moves to reconsider H.R. 6119.


                            Motion to Table

  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I have a motion at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion.
  The Clerk read as follows:
       Ms. DeLauro moves to table the motion to reconsider.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to table.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.
  Mr. ROY. Madam Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to section 3(s) of House Resolution 
8, the yeas and nays are ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 217, 
nays 209, not voting 7, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 400]

                               YEAS--217

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Auchincloss
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Bourdeaux
     Bowman
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brown (MD)
     Brown (OH)
     Brownley
     Bush
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson
     Carter (LA)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Davids (KS)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel, Lois
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez, Vicente
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Harder (CA)
     Hayes
     Higgins (NY)
     Himes
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jacobs (CA)
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Jones
     Kahele
     Kaptur
     Kelly (IL)
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim (NJ)
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Leger Fernandez
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lieu
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Manning
     Matsui
     McBath
     McCollum

[[Page H6891]]


     McEachin
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Mfume
     Moore (WI)
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mrvan
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Newman
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Ross
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stansbury
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Strickland
     Suozzi
     Swalwell
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres (NY)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Williams (GA)
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NAYS--209

     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bentz
     Bergman
     Bice (OK)
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (NC)
     Boebert
     Bost
     Brooks
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Calvert
     Cammack
     Carey
     Carl
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Cawthorn
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Clyde
     Cole
     Comer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curtis
     Davidson
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Donalds
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Ellzey
     Emmer
     Estes
     Fallon
     Feenstra
     Ferguson
     Fischbach
     Fitzgerald
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franklin, C. Scott
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Garbarino
     Garcia (CA)
     Gibbs
     Gimenez
     Gohmert
     Gonzales, Tony
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Good (VA)
     Gooden (TX)
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Greene (GA)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Harshbarger
     Hartzler
     Herrell
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (LA)
     Hill
     Hinson
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Issa
     Jackson
     Jacobs (NY)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kim (CA)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     LaTurner
     Lesko
     Letlow
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Mace
     Malliotakis
     Mann
     Massie
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClain
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meijer
     Meuser
     Miller (IL)
     Miller (WV)
     Miller-Meeks
     Moolenaar
     Mooney
     Moore (AL)
     Moore (UT)
     Mullin
     Murphy (NC)
     Nehls
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Obernolte
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Pfluger
     Posey
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Rodgers (WA)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose
     Rosendale
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Salazar
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Stauber
     Steel
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Taylor
     Tenney
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiffany
     Timmons
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Drew
     Van Duyne
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams (TX)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--7

     Brady
     Burgess
     Hern
     Keating
     Meng
     Porter
     Spartz


                Announcement by the Speaker Pro Tempore

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (during the vote). There are 2 minutes 
remaining.

                              {time}  1748

  Mr. McCAUL changed his vote from ``yea'' to ``nay.''
  So the motion to table was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Ms. PORTER. Madam Speaker, I was unable to vote on the Motion to 
Table the Republican Motion to Reconsider, H.R. 6119--Further Extending 
Government Act. Had I been present, I would have voted ``yea.''
  Stated against:
  Mrs. SPARTZ. Madam Speaker, I was present but did not realize I was 
not recorded. I would have voted ``nay'' on rollcall No. 400.


    Members Recorded Pursuant to House Resolution 8, 117th Congress

     Adams (Brown (MD))
     Butterfield (Ryan)
     Cardenas (Soto)
     Cawthorn (Nehls)
     Crist (Wasserman Schultz)
     Curtis (Meijer)
     DeFazio (Carbajal)
     Donalds (McClain)
     Frankel, Lois (Kuster)
     Fulcher (Johnson (OH))
     Garcia (TX) (Jeffries)
     Green (TX) (Cuellar)
     Hagedorn (Moolenaar)
     Lawrence (Johnson (GA))
     Lawson (FL) (Evans)
     Lesko (Miller (WV))
     Luetkemeyer (Meuser)
     Moore (UT) (Owens)
     Palazzo (Fleischmann)
     Payne (Pallone)
     Posey (Cammack)
     Reed (Kelly (PA))
     Reschenthaler (Meuser)
     Ruiz (Aguilar)
     Rush (Quigley)
     Sires (Pallone)
     Stewart (Owens)
     Swalwell (Gomez)
     Takano (Chu)
     Underwood (Casten)
     Vela (Gomez)
     Watson Coleman (Pallone)
     Wilson (FL) (Hayes)

                          ____________________