[Congressional Record Volume 167, Number 200 (Wednesday, November 17, 2021)]
[House]
[Pages H6336-H6348]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




                  CENSURING REPRESENTATIVE PAUL GOSAR

  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, pursuant to House Resolution 795, I call 
up the resolution (H. Res. 789) censuring Representative Paul Gosar, 
and ask for its immediate consideration.
  The Clerk read the title of the resolution.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Ms. DeGette). Pursuant to House Resolution 
795, the amendment printed in House Report 117-174 is adopted, and the 
resolution, as amended, is considered read.
  The text of the resolution, as amended, is as follows:

                              H. Res. 789

       Whereas, on November 7, 2021, Representative Paul Gosar 
     posted a manipulated video on his social media accounts 
     depicting himself killing Representative Alexandria Ocasio-
     Cortez and attacking President Joseph Biden;
       Whereas the video was posted on Representative Gosar's 
     official Instagram account and used the resources of the 
     House of Representatives to further violence against elected 
     officials;
       Whereas Representative Gosar issued a statement on November 
     9, 2021, defending the video as a ``symbolic cartoon'' and 
     spreading hateful and false rhetoric about immigrants;
       Whereas the leadership of the Republican Party has failed 
     to condemn Representative Gosar's threats of violence against 
     the President of the United States and a fellow Member of 
     Congress;
       Whereas the Speaker of the House made clear that threats of 
     violence against Members of Congress and the President of the 
     United States should not be tolerated and called on the 
     Committee on Ethics of the House and law enforcement to 
     investigate the video;
       Whereas depictions of violence can foment actual violence 
     and jeopardize the safety of elected officials, as witnessed 
     in this chamber on January 6, 2021;
       Whereas violence against women in politics is a global 
     phenomenon meant to silence women and discourage them from 
     seeking positions of authority and participating in public 
     life, with women of color disproportionately impacted;
       Whereas a 2016 survey by the Inter-Parliamentary Union 
     found that 82 percent of women parliamentarians have 
     experienced psychological violence and 44 percent received 
     threats of death, sexual violence, beatings, or abduction 
     during their term; and
       Whereas the participation of women in politics makes our 
     government more representative and just: Now, therefore, be 
     it
       Resolved, That--

[[Page H6337]]

       (1) Representative Paul Gosar of Arizona be censured;
       (2) Representative Paul Gosar forthwith present himself in 
     the well of the House of Representatives for the 
     pronouncement of censure;
       (3) Representative Paul Gosar be censured with the public 
     reading of this resolution by the Speaker; and
       (4) Representative Paul Gosar be, and is hereby, removed 
     from the Committee on Natural Resources and the Committee on 
     Oversight and Reform.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The resolution, as amended, shall be 
debatable for 1 hour, equally divided and controlled by the chair and 
ranking minority member of the Committee on Ethics or their respective 
designees.
  The gentleman from Florida (Mr. Deutch) and the gentlewoman from 
Indiana (Mrs. Walorski) each will control 30 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Florida.


                             General Leave

  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members 
have 5 legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and 
to include extraneous material on H. Res. 789.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Florida?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
California (Ms. Pelosi).
  Ms. PELOSI. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for his recognition 
and for his distinguished service as the chair of the Ethics Committee. 
I call it by its official name having served there for 7 years myself.
  Madam Speaker, I rise today as the Speaker of the House of 
Representatives, an institution that was designed by our Founders to be 
the people's House, a House constantly invigorated by its 
accountability to the people every year. It is a place where slavery 
was abolished; a place where we have taken our men and women into 
service to protect freedom and democracy throughout the world; and a 
place where Medicare, Medicaid, Social Security, and so many 
institutions meeting the needs of the American people were established. 
The list goes on and on about the distinguished nature of the House of 
Representatives.
  Maybe 12- or 13,000 people have been elected to this body over time--
only a few hundred women--but all very distinguished, and great heroes 
of our country have served in this institution including President 
Abraham Lincoln. That was before the Chamber was the meeting ground. 
Statuary Hall is the place where his desk is memorialized to this day.
  So, Madam Speaker, when we come to this great institution, we 
understand that there are 435 Members of Congress, but only one from 
each district. Only one of us represents the thoughts, aspirations, 
dreams, fears, and hopes of our constituents.

                              {time}  1415

  There is no bigger privilege for any one of us in the House, be it 
Speaker, whip, leader, any of the titles that our caucuses may bestow 
on us, that is as prestigious as saying that I speak for the people of 
my district, in my case, the district of San Francisco.
  So when we come here, we have a responsibility to uphold a high 
standard of integrity, decency, and respect for this institution.
  The Constitution charges us to be accountable to the people, and we 
must represent the United States House of Representatives in a spirit 
in which our constituents and all Americans should be very proud.
  House rule XXIII provides for our Code of Official Conduct. This 
provision of our rules requires that we ``shall behave at all times in 
a manner that shall reflect creditably on the House.''
  Sadly, extremely disturbing actions taken last week by a Member of 
Congress, threatening another Member, wildly violate this standard. 
These actions demand a response.
  We cannot have Members joking about murdering each other or 
threatening the President of the United States. This is both an 
endangerment of our elected officials and an insult to the institution 
of the House of Representatives.
  It is not just about us as Members of Congress. It is the danger that 
it represents to everyone in the country. If you are viewing this and 
thinking, well, when you run for Congress, you get threats and the 
rest. You don't expect to get them from your colleagues.
  But, nonetheless, the example set in this House is one that is viewed 
across the country. Women across the country particularly feel 
vulnerable if insults of the nature that exist in this House are 
allowed to stand. I will speak about that in a moment.
  Again, when a Member uses his or her national platform to encourage 
violence, tragically, people listen to those words and they may act 
upon them. Words spoken by elected officials weigh a ton. People hear 
them very differently.
  As the resolution that the committee is putting forth states: 
``Depictions of violence can foment actual violence and jeopardize the 
safety of elected officials, as witnessed in this Chamber on January 6, 
2021.''
  It is inconceivable that a member of our community here would wish to 
repeat the violence of that dark day, that deadly day.
  As a woman Speaker of the House, I want to be clear. These threats 
specifically target a woman, a woman of color, which is part of, as the 
resolution states, a ``global phenomenon meant to silence women and 
discourage them from seeking positions of authority and participating 
in public life.''
  Again, this is about workplace harassment and violence against women.
  Yet, the Member has never apologized for his actions. ``It's a 
cartoon. Relax,'' he said.
  Really? A cartoon? Relax?
  And he wrote to supporters:

       The hyperventilating and shrill accusations that this 
     cartoon is dangerous are laughable or intentionally 
     hyperbolic.

  ``I am entitled to speak to the people and to do so in a manner that 
is engaging,'' he said.
  Really? Is it engaging to depict killing a colleague or anyone? It is 
not just about Members of Congress; anyone, threatening anyone.
  Disguising death threats against a Member of Congress and the 
President of the United States in an animated video does not make those 
death threats any less real or less serious. And indeed, conveying them 
this way makes them potentially more dangerous by normalizing violence.
  It isn't funny. And yes, you have a right to speak; and so do we have 
a right to react to what you are saying when you are threatening the 
lives of Members of Congress and the President of the United States.
  It is sad that this entire House must take this step because of the 
refusal of the leadership of the other party. Indeed, it took 9 days 
before the minority leader publicly spoke out about this threat; and 
when he did, he merely said:

       It was not the Member's intent to ever harm anyone.

  Really?
  And many other Members on the other side of the aisle have refused to 
strongly condemn these actions. One member of leadership said: 
``Unfortunately, in this world we are in right now, we all get death 
threats, no matter what the issue is.
  Death threats from our colleagues? Death threats from Members of 
Congress? We all get death threats?
  So Members think it is okay to use their platforms to directly 
encourage more death threats against their own colleagues?
  The resolution on the floor today is about accountability. It is 
about integrity in this House. And it will serve as a reminder to this 
Congress and to this country that the House is committed to upholding 
the highest standards of decorum in all that we do, as is said in rule 
XXIII, ``shall behave at all times in a manner that shall reflect 
creditably on the House.''
  In our actions, we must be mindful of all who make up our 
congressional community, including not only Members, but also the 
committees, the committee staff, the institutional staff--and thank you 
for your service--the custodians of the Capitol, the Capitol Police, 
and others.
  As we proceed to make progress for the people, let us be guided by 
our love of this institution, respect for this institution in which we 
serve and, again, an example that we wish to show to the world.
  Again, a threat against anyone is wrong, whether you are a Member of

[[Page H6338]]

Congress or not. So this is just about the example, again, that is 
total violation by the action of the Member.
  Yes, indeed, Madam Speaker, it is a sad day for the House of 
Representatives, but a necessary day, so that we can, again, behave at 
all times in a manner that shall reflect creditably on the House.
  Madam Speaker, I thank the distinguished chairman, again. I thank 
Congresswoman Jackie Speier for her leadership in bringing this 
legislation forward, this resolution forward.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I am pleased to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from California (Mr. McCarthy), the distinguished minority 
leader.
  Mr. McCARTHY. Madam Speaker, it is an old definition of abuse of 
power: ``Rules for thee, but not for me.'' That is exactly what is 
happening here today.
  House Democrats are preparing, once again, to break another precedent 
of the United States House of Representatives.
  It is an open secret that the American people are facing substantial 
challenges today. Many of these challenges are Washington-inflicted, of 
one-party rule, caused by the Biden administration's incompetence and 
radicalism.
  Absolute chaos on the southern border; out-of-control crime; record-
breaking gas prices and inflation; a broken supply chain; a historic 
labor shortage; a failing education system and, of course, the 
humiliating surrender in Afghanistan.
  Will this Congress be remembered as the Congress that addressed those 
serious challenges? Not a chance?
  Instead, I believe this Congress will go down in history as the 
broken Congress.
  For nearly 4 years, as the House Republicans have been voicing the 
needs of millions of Americans, House Democrats have broken nearly 
every rule and standard in order to silence dissent and stack the deck 
for their radical, unpopular agenda.
  They broke the motion to recommit, the first time in the history of 
Congress. They broke impeachment, not once, but twice. They broke in-
person voting and replaced it with proxy voting, for the first time in 
history. And they broke the minority's right to appoint members of its 
own choosing to committees.
  The Speaker is burning down the House on her way out the door.
  What's worse, we got to this point on the basis of a double standard. 
Democrats want to change the rules but refuse to apply them to their 
own caucus.
  I listened to the Speaker talk about the highest standards.
  Madam Speaker, when a Democratic chairwoman flew to Minneapolis and 
told an angry crowd during the trial to ``stay on the streets,'' ``get 
more active,'' ``get more confrontational.'' ``We've got to make sure 
they know we mean business.'' That high standard, the Democrats refused 
to take action.
  The trial judge actually singled her out on her comments on an 
ongoing basis, which he said could become an issue on appeal.
  But this wasn't the first time. No. This is three times.
  At a rally in Los Angeles, that same chairwoman, she told a mob: ``If 
you see anyone from that Cabinet in a restaurant, in a department 
store, at a gasoline station, you get out and you create a crowd. And 
you push back on them. And you tell them that they're not welcome 
anymore, anywhere.''
  She later defended that comment in another speech in L.A., saying--
this same chairwoman, of the high standards--

       I did not threaten Trump constituents and supporters. I do 
     that all the time, but I didn't do it that time.

  This side of the aisle didn't ask that chairwoman to lose her 
committee. We simply asked for an apology.
  Meanwhile, with that high standard, Speaker Pelosi and Leader Hoyer 
defended her. When asked about her Minneapolis comment, Leader Hoyer 
described her as ``passionate--she believes in her issues.'' She 
believes she should get in your faces.
  And Speaker Pelosi, oh, what did she do with that high standard? She 
compared her comments in Minneapolis to Dr. King's civil rights 
movement. You see, why would they do that? Rules for thee, but not for 
me.
  Just this month, the dossier's principal source was arrested by 
Special Counsel Durham for lying to the FBI. Think about everything 
that dossier put this country through for 2 years, based on fabricated 
evidence. The infringements to due process; the spying on the 
Presidential campaign; and, of course, the $32 million spent by 
hardworking taxpayers for a Mueller investigation.
  And yet, the Democratic chairman says, ``I don't regret it.'' Why? 
Rules for thee, but not for me.
  When the Speaker of the House, on this very floor, engaged in 
personalities, the floor shut down for 3 hours because no one wanted to 
take it to the top. Her entire caucus that believed in the higher 
standard voted to keep her words in the Record rather than strike them 
down. Why?
  Rules for thee, but not for me.
  The Speaker said: ``I stand by my statement. I'm proud of the 
attention that's being called to it.''
  Never happened before in the history of this body. Why? Because it is 
a broken Congress that believes in rules for thee, but not for me.
  This is part of a larger pattern. When a Congressman on the 
Intelligence Committee was targeted by a suspected Chinese Communist 
Party agent for years, the Democrats kept him on the committee. Why? 
Rules for thee, but not for me.
  When a Democrat Congresswoman said: ``Israel has hypnotized the 
world,'' supporting Israel is ``all about the Benjamins,'' and that 9/
11 was ``some people did something,'' Democrats actually defended her. 
Why? Rules for thee, but not for me.
  And when a Member of the Democratic leadership tweeted a week ago, 
``Lock up Kyle Rittenhouse and throw away the key,'' in an attempt to 
sway an ongoing trial, the Democrats said nothing. Why? Rules for thee, 
but not for me.
  Let me be clear: I do not condone violence, and Representative Gosar 
has echoed that sentiment. The video was deleted. Democrats won't 
listen because they will do anything to distract from the failures of 
one-party rule in 1 year destroying a Nation.

                              {time}  1430

  For Democrats, this vote isn't about a video; it is about control. 
That is the one and only thing Democrats are interested in--not 
condemning violence, not protecting the institution, not decorum or 
decency, just control.
  The Democrats want control, and they don't care about the 
consequences. They are destroying this institution, silencing the 
minority, and, therefore, silencing millions of Americans.
  When I talked to Democrat leadership when they told me what they 
wanted to do, I asked a simple question: Have you seen the video? No, 
haven't seen it. But they knew exactly what they wanted to do. It is 
interesting. Without even watching, they decide the punishment. Why? No 
need. Rules for thee but not for me.
  What they have started cannot be easily undone. Their actions today 
and in the past have forever changed the way the House operates. It 
means that the minority rights that have served this body so well are a 
thing of the past. Furthermore, it means that, under the Pelosi 
precedent, all the Members that I mentioned earlier will need the 
approval of a majority to keep those positions in the future.
  What was interesting is, it is not just the Speaker who is making 
those decisions. When the chairwoman incited those ideas three times, 
everyone in the Democratic Party had the ability to vote what they 
thought. Because of those high standards, they all voted to table. They 
all voted to table, not to remove this chairwoman from committees or 
ask for an apology. Why? Because you all believe in rules for thee but 
not for me.
  That legacy is a real culmination of Speaker Pelosi's career. Make no 
mistake, the House is weaker, more partisan, more self-focused today 
than when Speaker Pelosi became Speaker less than 4 years ago. Future 
Congresses will suffer for it. More importantly, the American people 
have needlessly suffered because of it. They won't soon forget it.
  It is about control. It is not about a standard that everybody lives 
by. It is a standard you enforce on one but not

[[Page H6339]]

upon yourself. You encouraged your own side to engage further when you 
all took a vote to table.
  It would be interesting to see, if your leadership hasn't watched the 
video, how many of you who vote today have watched it.
  When it was requested, I contacted the Member. He took the video 
down. He put out a statement that he does not believe in violence to 
anyone.
  But, you see, when others on the other side of the aisle incite 
violence, it is okay because it is rules for thee but not for me.
  Unfortunately, this body has suffered greatly, and a new standard 
will continue to be applied in the future.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Members are reminded to address their 
remarks to the Chair.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield 5 minutes to the gentlewoman from 
New York (Ms. Ocasio-Cortez).
  Ms. OCASIO-CORTEZ. Madam Speaker, I have been serving in this body 
just under 3 years. In that 3 years, an enormous amount has happened.
  In response to the Republican leader's remarks, when he says that 
this action is unprecedented, what I believe is unprecedented is for a 
Member of House leadership, of either party, to be unable to condemn 
incitement of violence against a Member of this body.
  It is a sad day when a Member who leads a political party in the 
United States of America cannot bring himself to say that issuing a 
depiction of murdering a Member of Congress is wrong and instead 
decides to venture off into a tangent about gas prices and inflation.
  What is so hard? What is so hard about saying that this is wrong?
  This is not about me. This is not about Representative Gosar. But 
this is about what we are willing to accept.
  Not just the Republican leader, but I have seen other Members of this 
party advance the argument, including Representative Gosar himself, the 
illusion that this was just a joke, that what we say and what we do 
does not matter so long as we claim a lack of meaning.
  This nihilism runs deep, and it conveys and betrays a certain 
contempt for the meaning and importance of our work here; that what we 
do, so long as we claim that it is a joke, doesn't matter; that what we 
say here doesn't matter; that our actions, every day, as elected 
leaders in the United States of America don't matter; that this Chamber 
and what happens in it doesn't matter.
  I am here to rise to say that it does. Our work here matters. Our 
example matters.
  There is meaning in our service. As leaders in this country, when we 
incite violence with depictions against our colleagues, that trickles 
down into violence in this country.
  That is where we must draw the line, independent of party identity or 
belief. It is about a core recognition of human dignity and value and 
worth.
  When we talk about, as mentioned in the resolution, that these 
depictions are part of a larger trend of misogyny and racist misogyny, 
this has results in dampening the participation.
  This vote is not as complex as, perhaps, the Republican leader would 
like to make folks believe. It is pretty cut and dry: Does anyone in 
this Chamber find this behavior acceptable? Would you allow depictions 
of violence against women, against colleagues, in your home? Do you 
think this should happen on a school board, in a city council, in a 
church? If it is not acceptable there, why should it be accepted here?
  Lastly, when the Republican leader rose to talk about how there are 
all of these double standards and lists a litany of all of these 
different things, not once did he list an example of a Member of 
Congress threatening the life of another.
  This is not about a double standard. What is unprecedented and what 
is tragic is the descent of transgression in this body.
  I grew up as a little girl with awe about our Nation's Capitol, the 
reverence and the importance and the gravity of our work here.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield an additional 30 seconds to the 
gentlewoman from New York.
  Ms. OCASIO-CORTEZ. So, Madam Speaker, the question I pose to this 
body in response is: Will we live up to the promises we make our 
children, that this is a place where we will defend one another, 
regardless of belief, that our core human dignity matters?
  If you believe that this behavior is acceptable, go ahead, vote 
``no.'' But if you believe that this behavior should not be accepted, 
then vote ``yes.'' It is really that simple.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  First, let me say I am not here to defend any comments or actions 
made by Representative Gosar or his staff. Let me be clear. I condemn 
all acts of violence.
  In fact, I am a recent victim of violence. Just a few months ago, a 
political activist attempted to run me over with his car. When this 
happened, I immediately contacted law enforcement.
  If a Member of Congress, anywhere, anytime, feels threatened, they 
should contact the police.
  Unfortunately, this posted video is not the first video or statement 
by a Member of Congress inciting or depicting violence. Members on both 
sides of the aisle have made choices that I surely wouldn't have made.
  But as the ranking member of the House Ethics Committee, I find 
myself on the floor now for the second time this year to address an 
issue that has been referred to the Ethics Committee but which has seen 
no committee process before coming to the floor for a vote.
  Yesterday afternoon, the majority party drafted this resolution and 
scheduled this debate and floor vote today. The House Ethics Committee 
has had no time to consider this matter through the Ethics Committee 
process.
  And there is a process. The nonpartisan staff should have had the 
time to research and gather information, and the committee members 
should have conversations before making a decision on whether and how 
to move forward with any further investigation.
  The chairman claims to have reached out to schedule an emergency 
committee meeting last night, but the reality is that he did so at a 
time when we had just been notified to appear on this resolution in 
front of the Rules Committee last night.
  Just for the record, the majority controls when this resolution was 
introduced, when the Rules Committee was scheduled, when the Ethics 
Committee meets, and when the resolution comes to the floor for a vote. 
If there is a scheduling conflict or an excuse as to why we are 
standing here today rushing this to the floor, it is a conflict that 
was totally intended by the majority.
  So, here we are today, voting to remove a Representative from his 
committee and censure him on the House floor.
  Traditionally, Members are placed on committees by their own party, 
and they are removed from committees by their own party. Yet, this 
majority has broken precedent again and is removing a second Republican 
Member during this Congress from their committees.
  Let me just say again: Members on both sides of the aisle have made 
choices that many of us would not have made.
  By rushing this vote to the floor today and ignoring the 
institutional process, the majority is setting a precedent again that 
may not serve this institution well in the future.
  Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Madam Speaker, this resolution, which was referred to the Committee 
on Ethics, seeks to censure Representative Gosar and remove him from 
his positions on committees.
  We are acting on this resolution today because Representative Gosar 
recently used House resources to disseminate and celebrate a video that 
depicts the murder of a fellow colleague.
  I did see the video. I am sorry that the distinguished leader of the 
Republican side apparently chose not to or viewed it and deemed it 
something less than what it is, which is the horrific depiction of the 
murder of a fellow colleague and threats to the President of the United 
States.
  We are acting on this resolution because Republican leadership has 
not

[[Page H6340]]

taken responsibility for members of its own Conference.
  When a fellow Member of Congress has been threatened with violence, 
the House cannot wait indefinitely for Republican leadership to find 
its collective conscience and condemn the threat. When our colleague 
has been victimized, as women of color so often are, the House cannot 
ignore that threat.
  The full House must roundly reject Representative Gosar's conduct and 
prevent the normalization of violent imagery and rhetoric directed 
against Members of Congress.
  Just 10 months ago, this very Chamber was attacked in an act of 
brutal, bloody savagery. All of us experienced it firsthand. Some of us 
were trapped in the upper gallery while an angry mob, wielding weapons, 
tried to beat down the Chamber doors to disrupt certification of 
President Biden's electoral college victory.

                              {time}  1445

  Since January 6, death threats against Members of Congress have 
multiplied, and several individuals have been arrested. The threat of 
actual violence against Members is real, and it is growing.
  So this resolution is vital to protecting our Members' safety, but it 
is also vital to stemming the pernicious wave of political violence 
rising across this country, which is why Representative Gosar's video 
and his subsequent failure to publicly apologize or take full 
responsibility must be swiftly condemned.
  Any Member who uses his public platform to depict physical violence 
against another Member and the President reflects extreme discredit on 
this body. Such conduct violates the most basic standards of 
collegiality, civil discourse, and public decency.
  Clause 1 of our code of conduct requires Members to behave ``at all 
times in a manner that shall reflect creditably on the House.'' If that 
rule is to have any meaning whatsoever, and if we are to fulfill our 
responsibility to uphold the reputation of the House, Representative 
Gosar must face consequences for his conduct.
  Our Republican colleagues make hollow appeals to process, claiming 
that this resolution wrongly bypasses the Ethics Committee. But the 
ultimate power to censure a Member and remove that Member from a 
committee rests with this House.
  The committee can recommend such a sanction to the full House, but 
nothing in our rules requires the House to wait, nor should the House 
wait in this instance. Not when there is a clear and present need to 
remove Representative Gosar from a committee on which Representative 
Ocasio-Cortez herself serves.
  There are no unresolved questions of intent. It is clear from the 
video, and from Representative Gosar's public comments minimizing it, 
that censure is appropriate and his immediate removal from the Natural 
Resources and Oversight and Government Reform Committees is warranted.
  That is why the House must take this action today and why I urge my 
colleagues to support the resolution. Madam Speaker, I reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Arizona (Mr. Gosar).
  Mr. GOSAR. Madam Speaker, I rise today to address and reject the 
mischaracterized accusations from many in this body that the cartoon 
from my office is dangerous or threatening. It was not, and I reject 
the false narrative categorically.
  I do not espouse violence toward anyone. I never have. It was not my 
purpose to make anyone upset.
  I voluntarily took the cartoon down not because it was itself a 
threat, but because some thought it was. Out of compassion for those 
who genuinely felt offense, I self-censored.
  Last week, my staff posted a video depicting a policy battle 
regarding amnesty for tens of millions of illegal aliens. This was an 
anime that speaks to young voters who are too often overlooked.
  Even Twitter, the left's mouthpiece, did not remove the cartoon, 
noting it was in the public's interest for it to remain. The cartoon 
directly contributes to the understanding and the discussion of the 
real-life battle resulting from this administration's open border 
policies.
  This body is considering passage of Mr. Biden's reckless, socialist/
Marxist $4.9 trillion spending bill that provides $100 billion for 
amnesty to tens of millions of illegal aliens already in this country. 
This is what the left doesn't want the American people to know.
  Our country is suffering from the plague of illegal immigration. I 
won't stop pointing this out.
  Millions of illegal aliens, drugs, and human traffickers are being 
let in and moved around our country in the dead of night, all condoned 
by this administration.
  For this cartoon, some in Congress suggest I should be punished. I 
have said decisively there is no threat in the cartoon other than the 
threat that immigration poses to our country, and no threat was 
intended by my staff or me.
  The American people deserve to have their voices heard in Congress. 
No matter how much the left tries to quiet me, I will continue to speak 
out against amnesty for illegal aliens, defend the rule of law, and 
advance the America First agenda.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I yield an additional 30 seconds to the 
gentleman.
  Mr. GOSAR. If I must join Alexander Hamilton, the first person 
attempted to be censured by this House, so be it. It is done.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield 3 minutes to the gentlewoman from 
California (Ms. Speier), the author of this resolution.
  Ms. SPEIER. Madam Speaker, I take no pleasure in introducing this 
resolution. No one asked me to introduce it, no one tapped me on the 
shoulder.
  I am a victim of violence. I know what it is like. I also was in the 
gallery clamoring for life when the shots rang out in the Speaker's 
lobby.
  We are here today because a sitting Member thought it was okay to 
post a deranged, animated video of himself killing a fellow Member of 
this House and also attacking the President of the United States. That 
video has been seen by three million people. It was up for over 2 days 
before it was taken down.
  Inciting violence begets violence. Congresswoman Ocasio-Cortez has 
become the go-to subject of the radical right to stir up their base, as 
too often is the case for women of color. It is disgusting and 
profoundly unacceptable. Tragically, the minority leader has not 
condemned the video. For 8 days, he said nothing. Silence speaks 
volumes. Silence normalizes violence.
  Violence against women in politics is a global phenomenon. A 2016 
survey by the Inter-Parliamentary Union found that 82 percent of women 
parliamentarians have experienced psychological violence, and 44 
percent have received threats of death, rape, beatings, or abduction.

  The intent of these online threats against women is clear: Silence 
them, strip them of their power, and discourage them from running for 
office.
  The Congressman defends his post, published with House resources and 
posted on his official Twitter and Instagram accounts. It didn't stop 
there. He sent an email to supporters that weekend stating that the 
``faux outrage'' was ``infantile''--this is not faux outrage. This is 
not infantile--and the accusations are ``shrill'' and 
``hyperventilating.''
  It doesn't take a rocket scientist to glean that this is gendered, 
coded language. The Congressman shows no remorse. In fact, yesterday 
the Congressman said, ``I did not apologize.''
  Twenty-three Members of the House in the history of this country have 
been censured for actions including insulting the Speaker or using 
unparliamentary language. Certainly, conduct by a Member depicting 
murdering another Member of the House deserves censure.
  Let me be clear. If a Democrat did the same thing, I would introduce 
the same resolution.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Indiana (Mr. Baird).
  Mr. BAIRD. Madam Speaker, today I rise because, in light of recent 
events, I no longer feel like I can stay silent.
  The hypocrisy of this body considering the censuring and stripping of 
committee assignments of Representative Gosar is illustrative of the 
inability of this body to effectively legislate.

[[Page H6341]]

  It demonstrates why many Americans have lost all confidence in our 
ability to be and provide effective leadership.
  I have found Mr. Paul Gosar to be an honorable and effective 
legislator, and I have found him to care deeply for his colleagues and 
America.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Rhode Island (Mr. Cicilline).
  Mr. CICILLINE. Madam Speaker, I rise in strong support of this 
censure resolution.
  I watched this video, and I was sickened when I saw Mr. Gosar 
depicting the killing of another Member of this body and brandishing 
swords at the President of the United States.
  This kind of rhetoric is not just unfitting of a U.S. Representative, 
it is dangerous, and it can be deadly, as we saw on January 6 and in 
2011 when an individual shot then-Congresswoman Gabby Giffords after 
Sarah Palin sent out a video with shooting targets on various 
congressional districts, including Gabby's.
  This is not a joke. This is not about politics. It is about safety.
  While healthy debate on the issues, on policy, is important, it is 
what keeps our democracy alive. This is not that. We cannot allow 
Members to encourage and incite violence, period.
  Mr. Gosar, you are no Alexander Hamilton. You must be held 
accountable.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Members are again reminded to address their 
remarks to the Chair.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Arizona (Mr. Biggs).
  Mr. BIGGS. Madam Speaker, let's take a look at what Democrats are 
ignoring so they can censure a conservative Republican because he 
posted a cartoon they found offensive and which he took down himself:
  More than two million illegal aliens crossing our border this 
calendar year;
  Attorney General Garland deploying Federal agents to spy on parents;
  Inflation driving gas prices up;
  Everybody's Thanksgiving dinner is going up;
  A vax mandate that is clearly unconstitutional;
  A bankruptcy-inducing, bureaucracy-bloating spending bill by 
Democrats;
  Supply chain in shambles;
  Democrats consistently ignoring calls to violence and anti-Semitic 
statements of their own;
  Foreign policy embarrassments;
  Americans languishing behind in Taliban-controlled Afghanistan;
  China, Iran, North Korea on the move.
  Yeah, we have been ignoring those things. But we are here today.
  I lived in Japan for several years. I speak Japanese. I read and 
write Japanese. This is an anime. It is ``Shingeki no Kyojin'', highly 
popular, stylized, intended to demonstrate the alienation people feel, 
particularly young people in their cultures.
  Now, does anime have violence? Yes. It is highly stylized violence. 
It is not meant to induce people to violence.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I yield an additional 30 seconds to the 
gentleman.
  Mr. BIGGS. It was not Mr. Gosar's intention, I believe, and he has 
made that clear, to induce anyone to violence. Like he, I also condemn 
violence, but I would ask you to reconsider further usurping and taking 
control of this body for political purposes because that is what is 
happening here today.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Members are again reminded to address their 
remarks to the Chair.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Maryland (Mr. Hoyer), the House majority leader.
  Mr. HOYER. Madam Speaker, I think all of us would wish that we were 
not here on a subject of this gravity, on a subject so present in our 
society at large: The exhortation to violence to accomplish one's 
objectives.
  I have been sitting here since we started the debate, which was about 
45 minutes ago. So many get up and say, ``I do not support violence,'' 
``I do not support this action,'' but I will do nothing about it.
  Now, of course, they don't say the last sentence. They just don't do 
anything.
  As I sat there as Mr. McCarthy was talking, I was thinking that he 
was getting up in my face and up in Nancy Pelosi's face. I think that 
is what he was doing. I expect that in vigorous debate.
  They focused on a non-analogous action by a Member of this House, the 
chairman of the Financial Services Committee. Why did they do that? 
Because there is no analogous event to this one. In the 40-plus years 
that I have served here, there has never been a case like this. Never.

                              {time}  1500

  This is not about control, as the majority leader would represent. It 
is about decency, democracy, and security, and the rule of law.
  We have seen, Madam Speaker, over and over again in our politics that 
words matter, and actions matter even more. Vitriol, the glorification 
and promotion of violence, hate speech, and the failure to condemn all 
of these when they occur have created an atmosphere in our country, 
which sadly has now and too frequently been visited on this floor, that 
is not conducive to the exercise of free constitutional politics.
  A former leader of my party Dick Gephardt said that democracy was a 
substitute for war, that we should settle our differences peacefully 
and nonviolently.
  The speech that has been the subject of this resolution whittles away 
at the rule of law and the civility needed for constructive debate.
  Indeed, violent words and images are too often a precursor to the 
practice of violence. We have seen that. We saw it on January 6 as the 
President of the United States incited and urged people to come to the 
Congress to stop democracy in its tracks.
  And people wanted to hang the Vice President of the United States as 
a result of those words because he was not doing that because he 
thought it was not legal. He wanted to follow the law.
  My friend Gabby Giffords and Senator Kelly know that all too well, 
that violent words and images are too often a precursor, as does 
Representative Speier who worked for the late Representative Leo Ryan 
and was herself badly injured in the shooting that took his life. My 
friend, the Republican whip, and his family know that words can 
encourage and result in violence. Last month, the family and 
constituents of Sir David Amess in the United Kingdom experienced the 
same pain.
  All of us who were in this Capitol on January 6 and those who stood 
in defense of it know that pain.
  The loved ones of Officers Sicknick, Liebengood, Smith, DeFreytag, 
and Hashida carry that pain with them every day.
  Officer Evans' family, as well, has been carrying that pain since 
April.
  Madam Speaker, so do the families of elected officials, journalists, 
and civil society leaders who have been killed or maimed by political 
violence across the world incited by rhetoric that is rationalized as 
acceptable in the political environment. And then, oh, I don't support 
violence. I don't know how that happened. Yes, I said in front of the 
White House, ``Go down to the Capitol,'' and although it wasn't the 
exact words of ``be violent,'' it is what those who came down here 
expected the exhortation to be.
  It would be naive, Madam Speaker, to suppose that we can eradicate 
the promotion of violence in wider society, either in our country or 
abroad.
  Such evil has always existed, and the internet and social media make 
it easier to disseminate that malicious type of speech.
  But constitutional parliamentarians worldwide have long understood 
that in order to maintain the level of civility required to carry out 
the business of legislating for the people, we must have rules of 
decorum and limits on speech that would cause civil debate to devolve 
into uncivil attacks and political violence.
  That is why we have rules in this House to enforce decorum and ensure 
civility. That is why we have rules of conduct, which the chairman of 
the Ethics Committee read a little earlier. It should be and is 
undebatable that this conduct violated that rule.
  Those rules apply not only to this floor but everywhere a sitting 
Member engages in work relating to his or her service as a 
Representative.

[[Page H6342]]

  When those rules were written, they did not anticipate that a Member 
would threaten violence directly against another Member. Not because it 
has never happened. A Congressman from South Carolina nearly beat to 
death a Senator from Massachusetts, Senator Sumner, because he wanted 
to abolish slavery. That, of course, was a crime.
  In some countries threatening public officials is a crime. They 
didn't have to spell that out explicitly because it has always been 
understood that such behavior is unacceptable in this institution and 
incompatible with our service.
  Indeed, any kindergartner, frankly, Madam Speaker, will tell you that 
such behavior is wrong anywhere.
  The actions of Representative Gosar this week and in weeks 
previously--much like the actions of Representative Greene earlier this 
year--would convey a dangerous lesson to our children and teenagers 
that the opposite is true, that threatening violence against those with 
whom one disagrees is acceptable. It is not. That bullying and 
encouraging one's followers to menace another person or another group 
is somehow compatible with citizenship in a democracy and indeed a 
civilized society. It is not.
  The resolution before us today is necessary because we in this House 
who speak for the American people must reflect, as the Speaker said, 
the highest standards of American society.
  I just came from the Speaker's office not too long ago. I don't know 
how many of you have been there, but over the door it says it is Robert 
H. Michel Rooms.
  I had the opportunity to serve with Robert Michel. Robert Michel was 
a Republican, and he was from Peoria, Illinois. He was one of the 
finest, most decent men that I have known, not just serving in the 
Congress of the United States, but have known. He said this: ``Civility 
means being tough without being mean, being witty without being 
malicious, and . . . believing in the power of reason to influence 
public debate while still being aware of the power''--hear these last 
words--``being aware of the power of irrationality in public life.''
  This resolution, Madam Speaker, is necessary because when Members of 
Congress and other elected officials speak and act, our constituents 
and followers give great weight to our words and actions.
  It is a way for them to rationalize unacceptable behavior as was done 
on January 6. It is disgusting, Madam Speaker, whenever someone out in 
the world tweets a threat of violence or hateful content.

  But when a Member of this House does so, no matter how you 
rationalize it, no matter how you try to put lipstick on that pig, it 
is a threat of violence.
  What Representative Gosar did last week is not just worthy of 
censure, it demands it.
  And for anyone who threatens to apply the same standard to Democrats 
in the future, as Ms. Speier said, I am with you. This is not about 
Republicans or Democrats; this is about decency. This is about security 
for our Members. This is about democracy, not violent overthrow or 
opposition.
  I, for one, will join you in enforcing that standard on any Democrat 
who violates it. But I will tell you this, Madam Speaker, the analogies 
that the Republicans have been making limp badly.
  I am certain my fellow Democrats will do the same. Because this is 
not about party, it is not about politics, it is not about 
partisanship. It is about decorum, civility, safety, and, yes, the rule 
of law that was trampled upon on January 6.
  But this is not about January 6. This is about this incident of a 
Member using whatever medium you want to say on the public dime 
threatening and showing the killing of a Member of this House. Can't 
that appall you, even that act? Do you have no shame? Madam Speaker, 
those are the questions that I would ask.
  No one--Democrat or Republican--ought to be allowed to engage in the 
promotion of violence against a fellow Member, or indeed, a fellow 
American. Because we know where the glorification and promotion of 
violence leads, and we have seen it. We have seen it this year and in 
previous years.
  Piercing tweets become sharp knives.
  Fiery words bring out deadly firearms.
  And cartoon killing begets real life bloodshed.
  This resolution specifically addresses Representative Gosar's 
actions, but it also reflects more generally, Madam Speaker, what I 
hope is a sentiment shared by Members from both parties that we have 
seen too much of violent speech in our politics and in this country, 
and it must end.
  In February, when we considered a resolution relating to the 
violence-promoting and undecorous actions of Representative Greene, I 
recalled the famous words of Edmund Burke, who viewed service in his 
nation's Parliament as the highest calling.
  He said the only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good 
men and women--he did not add that but would today, certainly--that 
good men and good women do nothing.
  Once again, the Republican leadership in this House has chosen to do 
nothing. It is interesting because a far lesser offense resulted in the 
removal of a Republican by the Republicans from committee,  Steve King 
of Iowa.
  So, again, the House, in light of that void, must take action.
  I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on both sides of the aisle to 
uphold a standard that should be critical to us all. Some modicum of 
respect for those who are political opponents, Madam Speaker, and some 
restraint is in the way we depict them and ourselves.
  Vote ``yes'' on this resolution.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Kentucky (Mr. Comer), the ranking member of the Oversight and Reform 
Committee.
  Mr. COMER. Madam Speaker, during Democrat's leadership of the House, 
we have seen an unprecedented exercise of authority that only a 
Democrat could wield due to the authoritarian nature of the actions.
  Democrat leadership has fined Republican Members for not masking, 
installed metal detectors, stripped another Republican of committee 
assignments, issued and sought to enforce sweeping subpoenas against 
the former President and his top advisers, and I am not just talking 
about subpoenas related to the events of January 6.
  Democrats on the Oversight Committee are chilling, if not infringing, 
the First Amendment rights of advocacy groups, corporations, and 
individuals.
  They have asked for communications between certain nonprofit 
organizations and certain Members' offices. These communications fall 
squarely within the right to petition and freely associate.
  And today, we are debating a resolution to censure Dr. Gosar for 
something he posted to his Twitter account.
  While Republicans certainly do not condone violence and extreme 
behavior, my question for this body is: When will we exact punishment 
in an equitable--that is one of the favorite words of my Democrat 
colleagues--equitable manner?
  Madam Speaker, we have Democrat colleagues who routinely call for 
violence in the streets, make anti-Semitic comments on Twitter, launch 
obscenities at our elected officials, and engage in inappropriate 
relationships with Chinese operatives.
  Yet, Madam Speaker, these Democrats maintain even their leadership 
positions on prestigious and sensitive committees like the Intelligence 
Committee.
  The last time we took this extraordinary step to censure a member of 
this House it was Congressman Rangel, and that was after a thorough 
Ethics Committee investigation into tax evasion, improper use of 
official resources, and other improper benefits.
  Instead of solving America's crises--drugs flowing across the 
southern border, rising gas prices and grocery prices, and this ongoing 
pandemic--we are here on the floor debating the censure of Dr. Gosar.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I yield an additional 30 seconds to the 
gentleman.
  Mr. COMER. Madam Speaker, I urge my colleagues to vote against this 
resolution.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentlewoman 
from Texas (Ms. Escobar), a member of the House Ethics Committee.

[[Page H6343]]

  


                              {time}  1515

  Ms. ESCOBAR. Madam Speaker, like Representative Ocasio-Cortez, I, 
too, have served in this House for 3 years, and I have found the 
dignity and respect that we deserve and owe one another in this Chamber 
has been severely lacking.
  While my Democratic colleagues and I continue to work on critical 
legislation that improves the lives of Americans, Mr. Gosar, a Member 
of the Republican Conference, has decided to focus on promoting 
xenophobia and fetishizing violence, fanning the flames of hate.
  Words have power. My community knows that only too well. And the 
example we set as Members of Congress is followed by millions of 
Americans. Mr. Gosar's actions continue to lower the bar, obliterate 
standards for respect and civility, and make this workplace unsafe by 
targeting a colleague--a woman of color. I would like to note that 
women of color are frequent targets of hateful rhetoric and attacks 
like these.
  In any other environment, someone like Mr. Gosar would have 
immediately faced termination, would have to live with the consequences 
of his dangerous actions and words, but not in the Republican 
Conference.
  Mr. Gosar's video, which glorifies the gruesome killing of our 
colleague and a violent attack against our President should have 
sparked immediate condemnation and action by the minority leader and 
his entire conference. But instead, we are told to relax, and we are 
threatened, told that if we dare take action, we will face retaliation.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield an additional 15 seconds to the 
gentlewoman.
  Ms. ESCOBAR. Madam Speaker, I thank the chairman.
  Madam Speaker, I say to my colleagues, when you give hate, racism, 
and violence cover, you give it life. With this vote, we are saying 
``not on our watch.''
  Madam Speaker, I invite my Republican colleagues to do what is right 
and support this resolution.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Roy).
  Mr. ROY. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentlewoman for yielding.
  Madam Speaker, my colleague just referenced the phrase ``any other 
environment'' that there would be some consequences. Well, this is not 
any other environment. This is the House of Representatives. We have 
constituents who elect us, send us to Washington to represent them, 
engage in debate, engage in often heated discussions with each other. 
This is not the same.
  One of the fundamental problems we have as a Chamber right now is 
that it is being treated that way. It is being treated that way by the 
majority. Shutting down our ability to engage in actual debate; 
shutting down our ability to move about the Chamber wearing these 
masks; talking about right now with CMS and what is happening, as early 
as December 5, doctors in San Antonio, Texas, which I represent, being 
unable to perform their tasks as doctors, potentially resulting in loss 
of life and being able to carry out their livelihoods through vaccine 
mandates.
  We have got untold harm occurring in South Texas with bodies in body 
trailers. We have got people dying. We have got actual consequences 
from these vaccine mandates causing people to lose their jobs, whether 
it is OSHA-related, private-sector jobs, military, defense, border 
patrol; all this happening as we head towards December 3 with a 
potential government shutdown. And this is what we are having an actual 
debate on the floor of the House for.
  I have not seen this Chamber look like this since I have been in 
Congress where we are debating an issue and we have got 100 Members on 
the floor. We are down here usually giving speeches to an empty 
Chamber.
  Now, look, let me be clear. I would not have posted that video. I 
would have told my staff I don't want to do that, if I knew what was in 
it, okay? But the video that was posted was an effort to make a point.
  The SPEAKER PRO TEMPORE. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I yield an additional 30 seconds to the 
gentleman.
  Mr. ROY. And we are now getting into the business of chilling debate 
and discussion about censuring our Members and going down the road of 
pulling each other off of committees. Where is this going to end? When 
Republicans are back in majority, where is that going to end?
  When my colleague, Ms. Ocasio-Cortez, in January called my former 
boss and my good friend, Ted Cruz, an attempted murderer, and I sent a 
letter to the leader saying, I am not asking for her to be stripped 
from committees but just to apologize, it was met with utter silence.
  I called then and I call now for us to drop that down and actually 
engage in debate on the issues that matter, actually engage in debate 
on what is occurring right now in America where people are getting 
harmed with vaccine mandates, tyranny, and open borders.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
Texas (Ms. Garcia).
  Ms. GARCIA of Texas. Madam Speaker, Representative Gosar's behavior 
is alarming, unacceptable, and should never, ever be tolerated.
  The official communication accounts of a Member of the United States 
Congress should never in any way show or encourage violence against a 
colleague or threaten the President of the United States.
  On January 6, we personally experienced the consequences of allowing 
this kind of viciousness and vulgarity. Put simply, violent images in 
our politics encourages violence against any of us. No one, especially 
women and women of color, should fear coming to do the work they were 
elected to do for the people.
  We must encourage our women to lead, not silence them by tolerating 
threats like Congressman Gosar's. As Members of Congress, we must set 
an example for the entire country instead of encouraging violence 
against others. It is our moral imperative to be collegial to one 
another. It is our responsibility to hold ourselves accountable. And it 
is our obligation to protect the integrity and honor of the United 
States Congress.

  Madam Speaker, children are watching. The world is watching. We must 
do better.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
North Dakota (Mr. Armstrong).
  Mr. ARMSTRONG. Madam Speaker, I was in Minneapolis the Saturday that 
speech was given, so to say that it wasn't analogous, I think, is 
fairly uncertain. The entire town was a tinderbox.
  So as we continue to move through this, I would appreciate a little 
less of the self-righteous indignation. What is really damaging here 
and what is really unfortunate is that we have abandoned any 
recognition of institutional integrity, any pretense of fairness, any 
notion that something should be above partisanship.
  Because I got news--and I believe this--I thought what was said in 
Minneapolis doesn't rise to incitement of violence. Jury tampering, 
possibly. Irresponsible, absolutely. The same thing goes for this post. 
It was dumb. It was silly. It was stupid. It was mean-spirited. But you 
know what it is not? It is not incitement of violence. And when we use 
hyperbole in those words, we cause ourselves problems, but there is no 
point and attempt with the majority at this point to follow through on 
any rules or procedures.
  The U.S. House of Representatives looks significantly more like a 
junior high lunchroom than a legislative body. If you are in our 
clique, you are okay. If not, tough. If we like you, no fines. If we 
don't, we will take it out of your paycheck. A Member on your side 
calls for violence, motion to table; a Member on our side, stand in the 
well and answer for your sins. Rules matter, process matters, the 
institution matters.
  Madam Speaker, this will be the fourth Member of the minority 
stripped of their committees by the majority this Congress. That has 
never happened before, but it is going to happen again.
  And that is what I don't understand. I understand completely why the 
majority's leadership is willing to do anything to maintain control 
over the caucus until the next election. But in the process, you are 
all negatively and permanently changing the way this body

[[Page H6344]]

functions--forever. You are weaponizing the gavel against minority 
Members. And if you think it stops at the next election, I have no 
doubt that the leadership in the majority has no intention of going 
back to being a rank-and-file Member in the minority, but the rest of 
you all will. And how do you think this ends? When the pendulum swings, 
and it will, we are all going to suffer the consequences.
  The SPEAKER PRO TEMPORE. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I yield an additional 30 seconds to the 
gentleman.
  Mr. ARMSTRONG. Madam Speaker, the institution is going to suffer for 
it, and it is already suffering for it.
  Committee structures, scheduling hearings, witness lists, these are 
all purviews of the majority. But rules of conduct and decorum have to 
be applied equally to all Members or the institution continues to 
degrade.
  Madam Speaker, the rules are not being applied equally. It is noticed 
by us. It is noticed by the American people. It is unfortunate, and it 
is sad.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Members are again reminded to address their 
remarks to the Chair.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
South Carolina (Mr. Clyburn), the House majority whip.
  Mr. CLYBURN. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding me the 
time.
  Madam Speaker, I rise in strong support of this censure resolution. 
Today's action is necessary due to Representative Gosar's shocking 
depiction of a murder of a colleague and a violent attack against the 
President of the United States. This incendiary behavior cannot go 
unaddressed. The minority leader's failure to hold his conference 
Member accountable leaves us no choice but to proceed with this action.
  I often refer to the Hall of this House as America's classroom. As 
Members of this august body, we should conduct ourselves in the way 
that we want our students to emulate. Mr. Gosar's behavior fails our 
students, fails our colleagues, and fails our Nation and ideals we 
espouse.
  Madam Speaker, I urge a unanimous vote for this resolution.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Virginia (Mr. Good).
  Mr. GOOD of Virginia. Madam Speaker, as my colleagues before me have 
said, this is not about Mr. Gosar. This is about hypocrisy from the 
majority and the double standard. Does anyone in this Chamber think we 
would be here today if the exact situation was reversed? Clearly, we 
would not be here today.
  Madam Speaker, the American people don't care about what we are doing 
here today. When we get back to our districts next week, no one will 
ask us, Well, what about the cartoon video? What happened with that? 
The media cares--as we can see here today--my colleagues across the 
aisle care because they have an opportunity again here. But what our 
hardworking constituents care about is the disastrous policies enacted 
by this administration and the majority; the disastrous policies, none 
of which are working.
  We cannot point to one thing in the country that is going well under 
these disastrous policies. The border invasion, the rising gas prices, 
the out-of-control inflation, the reckless spending of our children's 
future, the failure in Afghanistan, the failure of our standing around 
the world. There is not one issue--rising crime--nothing they can point 
to.
  So instead, we point to a distraction here today to pretend that this 
matters to the American people. We have got this faux outrage, as 
others who have said, because the Rasmussen poll said just this week 
that on the generic ballot Republicans are up by 13 percent, but the 
tone-deaf majority is trying to ram through as much of their partisan 
agenda as they can.

  But what they are going to find out is America spoke two weeks ago in 
the election, and there are many of their constituents, and now former 
Democrats who spoke two weeks ago as well, and they are saying, what in 
the world are we doing here on the House floor today? We are stalling 
before we try to pass a radical build back bankrupt Bernie and AOC's 
budget bill. And here we are today trying to punish a Member, another 
ounce of flesh, trying to silence Republican voices on committees.
  Madam Speaker, I urge all of my colleagues to vote against this sham 
bill and resolution.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentlewoman 
from Florida (Ms. Wasserman Schultz).
  Ms. WASSERMAN SCHULTZ. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for 
yielding.
  Madam Speaker, I rise to urge the censure and the removal from 
committees of Mr. Gosar for portraying the murder of a fellow colleague 
and promoting violence against immigrants. We know that promoting 
visions of violence and spreading false, hateful rhetoric foments 
actual violence. January 6 taught us that. And surely, we cannot use 
taxpayers' own money to promote violent images and conduct directed at 
other Members.
  I still see bedside visions of my friend, Gabby Giffords, fighting 
for her life after being shot at a district event, her aide already 
dead. I shudder to recall our own colleague, Mr. Scalise, limping to 
this very Chamber on a cane because someone tried to assassinate him. 
Explosive residue still clings to a stairwell outside my district 
office where a pipe bomb, sent by a deranged Trump supporter and 
handled by my staff later, had to be safely detonated.
  The history of violence aimed at women and people of color and those 
who defend them are among humankind's worst chapters.
  Madam Speaker, it is ironic that Mr. Gosar compares himself to 
Alexander Hamilton and another Member condones the stylized violence 
portrayed by Mr. Gosar, because Hamilton was actually killed by 
accepted high-class violence in his day in a duel.
  Madam Speaker, promoting and glorifying such conduct cannot be 
condoned or ignored by this body. Voting to censure Mr. Gosar today 
firmly denounces it unequivocally.

                              {time}  1530

  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Louisiana (Mr. Higgins).
  Mr. HIGGINS of Louisiana. Madam Speaker, America is being crushed 
under the oppressive weight of the Democrats' greed for lust and power. 
They want totalitarian control over every aspect of American life, and 
they are ruling the people's House as if they were royalty. America is 
dissolving under our feet, and Democrats are worried about cartoons.
  In Afghanistan, Democrats led the betrayal of American honor and 
abandonment of American citizens, granting control of the Afghan 
theater to Taliban terrorists and arming those jihadist terrorists with 
billions of dollars worth of American weapons systems.
  Our southern border control has disintegrated, American sovereignty 
lost, and control of our own border completely ceded to criminal 
cartels.
  American parents are tracked like terrorists and persecuted by our 
own FBI because parents had the audacity to challenge government 
indoctrination of their children, assembling to redress their 
grievances at their own school boards in their own communities. 
American parents are treated like criminals.
  Americans are dealing with unbelievable inflation. Families cannot 
afford groceries and fuel.
  Millions of Americans are being commanded by Federal decree to choose 
between losing their job or kneeling to comply with an 
unconstitutional, mandated medical procedure.
  And the oppressors intend to distract you with cartoons.
  Over the Speaker's podium are forever etched the words ``In God We 
Trust.'' Scripture says: A friend loveth at all times, and a brother is 
born for adversity.
  Madam Speaker, I stand today with my brother Paul Gosar because I 
stand against oppression and persecution.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from New 
York (Mr. Jones), an Ethics Committee member.
  Mr. JONES. Madam Speaker, not since the Civil War has Congress 
operated under the constant threat of violence from some of its own 
Members, but here we are. That is the behavior that Mr. Gosar has 
encouraged.

[[Page H6345]]

  Maybe I shouldn't be surprised, having watched so many of my 
colleagues on the other side of the aisle incite and then express 
support for the insurrectionists who nearly killed us in this Chamber 
on January 6.
  We cannot let the Republican Party make Congress the only workplace 
in America where violence against your coworkers is not a crime but a 
credential.
  If we don't hold people like Mr. Gosar accountable, we will only 
embolden the worst people in our politics to bring their fever dreams 
to life.
  That is why, today, we are standing up for the safety of our 
colleagues, for the safety of Congresswoman Ocasio-Cortez, and for the 
future of our democracy.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Gohmert).
  Mr. GOHMERT. Madam Speaker, I looked at the video anime and was 
trying to figure it out. I couldn't see it. I am told if you stop it 
frame by frame, you can see what my Democrat friends are talking about. 
I couldn't see it. I tried to freeze-frame, and I saw what I was told 
was supposed to be our colleague, Congresswoman Ocasio-Cortez. I was 
insulted for her. If that is supposed to be her, that is really unfair.
  Madam Speaker, I didn't see the violence being talked about. We 
should not condone violence. The reason it is so hard to sit here and 
listen to the condemnation from the other side is because when there 
was violence against us, there was no condemnation.
  My wife and I went to a speech at the White House, and I have yet to 
hear anybody condemn the attempted violence on us. We were chased for 
two blocks. Rand Paul was on TV when he was chased because he had 
cameras and Secret Service around him. We didn't have that.
  If it weren't for a guy popping up and opening a locked door, we 
would have--I told Kathy: Look, I am afraid they are going to get here 
before this door is opened. You run on down to Pennsylvania Avenue. 
There are cops down there. They will be beating on me; you just get 
away.
  Nobody has condemned all that violence that I have ever heard.
  This is where we ought to be able to come together. Oh, and by the 
way, people who committed violence and did crimes in this building need 
to be punished. For many of them, the most serious crime was 
obstructing an official session of Congress.
  I didn't know it was a crime in 2016, but most of the Democratic 
Party committed a felony right here in this Chamber by obstructing an 
official session of Congress, not 6 hours like January 6, but 26 hours.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
California (Ms. Lee).
  Ms. LEE of California. Madam Speaker, I thank Congresswoman Speier 
for her leadership as well as Chairman Deutch and the Speaker for 
bringing this with urgency.
  Representative Gosar used taxpayer-funded resources to publicize a 
cartoon of him killing one of our House colleagues, Congresswoman 
Ocasio-Cortez, and threatening to kill the President.
  When Republicans don't condemn death threats against their colleagues 
and the President, it sends a message to the public that these threats 
are condoned. Their silence and misrepresentation in light of these 
threats speak volumes.
  Now, it might be easy for Mr. Gosar to shrug this off as a joke, but 
it is not only Members of Congress but women and people of color 
throughout the country who deal daily with the threat of physical 
violence. This is no laughing matter.
  As someone who for decades has had to live with death threats, this 
is a moment when we need to say enough is enough. Hate speech leads to 
hate violence. Death threats can lead to death. Threats to murder 
people can lead to criminal charges.
  This is the minimum we need to do. It reinforces that this behavior 
will not be tolerated.

  Madam Speaker, I urge my colleagues to support this resolution.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Ohio (Mr. Jordan), the ranking member on the Judiciary Committee.
  Mr. JORDAN. Madam Speaker, as we speak, the FBI is treating parents 
as terrorists. The Department of Justice is getting ready to pay people 
$450,000 who illegally entered our country. And Democrats in Congress 
later this week plan to spend $2 trillion more, which we all know will 
only exacerbate the already 30-year-high inflation.
  What are they doing today? Censuring a Member for a cartoon. You have 
got to be kidding me. You have got to be kidding me.
  What scares me most about all of this is the attack that we have seen 
on the First Amendment over the last year from the left, from the 
Democratic Party. They are attacking moms for standing up and speaking 
at a school board meeting. There are still places in this country where 
a full congregation cannot meet on a Sunday morning, stopping Americans 
from exercising their First Amendment freedom of religion rights.
  The Speaker of the House stopped Americans from petitioning their 
Member of Congress to redress their grievances and wouldn't even let 
them in their own Capitol.
  Now, here we go again, censuring speech. The most fundamental liberty 
we have is our right to speak, our right to talk, our right to 
communicate, and they are going after that today because they don't 
like freedom. You can see it. They don't like it.
  This is wrong. We know it is wrong, what they are doing to our 
colleague, Mr. Gosar. I hope they will have second thoughts and that we 
will vote this down.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield 1\1/4\ minutes to the gentleman 
from Minnesota (Mr. Phillips), an Ethics Committee member.
  Mr. PHILLIPS. Madam Speaker, I love freedom. I love George 
Washington. I keep this book on my desk, ``George Washington's Rules of 
Civility and Decent Behaviour.'' I encourage every colleague in this 
body--every one of us--to keep this on your desk and refer to it.
  I have heard everything talked about today--inflation, Afghanistan, 
schools--except the issue we are here for: a censure of a Member of 
Congress who issued a despicable video showing the killing of a fellow 
Member of Congress.
  Worst of all, most despicable of all, the object of the censure said 
it was to attract a new generation. Think about that: to attract a new 
generation of Americans.
  We have to do better, my friends. Come on.
  To my friend from Virginia who said, if Democrats had done this, what 
would we do? Rest assured, my friends, every one of you, we would do 
the same thing because I will never ever allow a fellow Member of 
Congress to threaten or distribute a video showing the killing of one 
of us, let alone another American.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman 
from Colorado (Mrs. Boebert).
  Mrs. BOEBERT. Madam Speaker, Democrat policies are so pathetic and 
have done so poorly that the left has nothing else to do but troll the 
internet, looking for ways to get offended, and then try to target 
Members and strip them of their committees. This is a dumb waste of the 
House's time. But since the Speaker has designated the floor to discuss 
Members' inappropriate actions, shall we?
  The jihad squad member from Minnesota has paid her husband--and not 
her brother husband, the other one--over a million dollars in campaign 
funds. This Member is allowed on the Foreign Affairs Committee while 
praising terrorists.
  A Democrat chairwoman incited further violence in the streets outside 
of a courthouse.
  Then the cherry on top, my colleague and 3-month Presidential 
candidate from California, who is on the Intelligence Committee, slept 
with Fang Fang, a Chinese spy. Let me say that again. A Member of 
Congress who received classified briefings was sleeping with the enemy.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
Pennsylvania (Ms. Wild), an Ethics Committee member.
  Ms. WILD. Madam Speaker, as Maya Angelou said, ``When someone shows 
you who they are, believe them the first time.''

[[Page H6346]]

  Despite Paul Gosar's history of dangerous rhetoric, and despite his 
conduct showing him to be a dangerous extremist, he is still here in 
Congress. Now he has depicted himself killing one of our colleagues and 
the President of the United States.
  Never doubt that leaders' calls for violence can lead to actual 
violence. We have seen it throughout the world, and we have seen it 
right here on January 6.

  Nor should the actions of his taxpayer-paid staff in creating and 
disseminating this vile video be ignored. They are grown adults, and 
they have cultivated a hostile work environment for the subject of this 
disgusting video and for her staff.
  Paul Gosar has glorified violence against a duly elected official who 
came here to serve her district. She, nor any of us, sign up for this 
kind of abuse. Our families should not have to live with the fear that 
we will be the subject of violent attacks.
  Paul Gosar has shown who he is. Believe him. Censure him.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I am pleased to yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from South Carolina (Mr. Rice).
  Mr. RICE of South Carolina. Madam Speaker, with so many real problems 
facing Americans created by the Biden administration--open borders, 
soaring gas prices, sky-high grocery bills, and our embarrassment in 
Afghanistan--my friends across the aisle assemble us here today to 
debate a cartoon.
  Political cartoons routinely depict violence. It is not new. Cartoons 
have depicted violence since there were cartoons.
  If you don't believe me, google ``political cartoons 2021.'' You will 
see a depiction of Joe Biden killing a Republican with a steamroller 
and a Republican elephant trampling voters, among many others.
  Now, I will ask all of you out there to watch the Gosar cartoon that 
is occupying the floor of the United States Congress for over an hour 
today. Is it inappropriate? Yes. Childish? Of course. Stupid? Without 
question. But is it a threat? Absolutely not.
  Now, I know some Members may need to seek therapy because they saw 
this cartoon. But is it a threat? Absolutely not.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
Massachusetts (Ms. Clark), the Assistant Speaker of the U.S. House of 
Representatives.
  Ms. CLARK of Massachusetts. Madam Speaker, it started with a white 
supremacist online fringe movement, and it turned into a deadly January 
6 insurrection.
  Now I stand before you because a Member of this body has once again 
had her life threatened, but this time by a colleague who posted a 
video of killing her on his official account. Think about that.
  It is no coincidence that the recipients of this violence are most 
often women and women of color because this violence is directly 
connected to sexism and racism.
  We cannot and must not accept this behavior. Silence and excuses are 
condoning it. And the excuses we have heard today--this is okay because 
it is a highly stylized killing; it is a cartoon; it was some sort of 
youth outreach--are grotesque.
  Enough is enough. Vote for this resolution. Vote for censure. Vote 
for decency.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1545

  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Aguilar), who is the vice chair of the Democratic 
Caucus.
  Mr. AGUILAR. Madam Speaker, when an armed mob stormed the Capitol 
earlier this year, they did so under the belief that political violence 
was an acceptable means to an end. As leaders and as Members of this 
body, every one of us has a responsibility to stand up and to make 
clear that way of thinking is unacceptable.
  We have a responsibility here to work together to keep our 
colleagues, our staff, and all of the people who work in this building 
safe. That goal becomes more difficult when Members are making open 
threats of violence on social media.
  It is not acceptable for a Member of Congress to insinuate that they 
want to violently kill another Member, and we need to directly respond 
to this threat.
  Today, we have an opportunity to send a strong, unified, bipartisan 
message against this kind of conduct.
  Madam Speaker, I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on the resolution 
to ensure accountability and recommit ourselves to the safety of every 
Member and future Member of this body.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from New 
York (Mr. Jeffries), who is the chairman of the House Democratic 
Caucus.
  Mr. JEFFRIES. Madam Speaker, I rise in strong support of this censure 
resolution. Inciting violence is unacceptable. Threatening to kill a 
colleague, the President of the United States, or any American, is 
unacceptable.
  I rise to make it clear that we have an opportunity today to choose 
decency over demonization, to choose civility over cynicism, and to 
choose the rule of law over recklessly violent behavior. That is why 
the House of Representatives is acting and acting decisively. We cannot 
normalize violence today, we cannot normalize violence tomorrow, and we 
cannot normalize violence at any point moving forward in our future. 
The House will hold Paul Gosar accountable for his violent and 
deplorable behavior whether the cover-up caucus likes it or not.
  Madam Speaker, vote ``yes'' on this censure resolution.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield 45 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
New Mexico (Ms. Leger Fernandez).
  Ms. LEGER FERNANDEZ. Madam Speaker, serving in public office is and 
should be a sacred responsibility, and that responsibility calls upon 
us to condemn hate when we see it. If we let hate fester and spread, 
then it will destroy us. That is why one in three women have been 
attacked violently in this country and around the world.
  But instead of apologizing today, Republicans chose to vilify 
immigrants yet again which is an outrage when the victim is herself a 
Latina.
  Madam Speaker, do you remember the gunman who traveled to El Paso to 
kill Mexicans after Republican politicians demonized them?
  Scripture says: Love thy neighbor as thyself.
  And we must also love this institution. It is the love for this 
institution and the love for our fellow Members which is calling upon 
us to pass this resolution.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I am prepared to close. I reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I have no further speakers, and I reserve 
the balance of my time.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I yield myself the balance of my time.
  Madam Speaker, I absolutely reject violence and calls for violence 
against any Member of Congress or anyone else. But by rushing this vote 
to the floor today and ignoring the process, the majority is setting a 
precedent that I fear may not serve this institution well in the 
future.
  The majority should withdraw this resolution, and, if it chooses, 
pursue this matter properly through law enforcement and/or the Ethics 
Committee.
  If the resolution is not withdrawn, then I am going to vote ``no'' 
and hope at some point that the Ethics Committee will, once again, 
serve this body as it was intended.
  Madam Speaker, I ask my colleagues to vote ``no,'' and I yield back 
the balance of my time.
  Mr. DEUTCH. Madam Speaker, I yield myself the balance of my time to 
close.
  Madam Speaker, none of us wants to be here today revisiting the 
violent imagery and the vile, hateful content that Representative Gosar 
delighted in disseminating over his official social media accounts--
material defended over and over and over today by our colleagues.
  Had Republican leadership acted as they should have to hold their own 
Members accountable when they breach the most basic standards of 
decorum and decency, we wouldn't be here. Yet, the House cannot ignore

[[Page H6347]]

Representative Gosar's conduct as Republicans would have us do.
  January 6 must serve as a reminder of just how important this action 
is that we are about to take. On January 6, violence stoked by hateful 
imagery and inflammatory rhetoric over social media found its way to 
the steps of the United States Capitol and the doors of this Chamber.
  On that day, insurrectionists broke those windows right near where I 
stand. Capitol Police officers drew their weapons, and Members bravely 
blocked the entrance. Heroes valiantly repelled the attack on our 
democracy.
  On this day, with our votes on this resolution, let us reject the 
notion that it is ever acceptable for a Member of Congress to threaten 
the safety of a fellow Member or depict the murder of a fellow Member. 
Let this resolution serve as an unwavering statement that never in this 
House should this type of horrific, violent imagery be deemed 
acceptable.
  Madam Speaker, I ask my colleagues on the other side of the aisle to 
smash the partisan lens through which they view this behavior and this 
debate. I ask all of my colleagues to support safety, civility, and 
decency by voting for H. Res. 789.
  Madam Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. VELAZQUEZ. Madam Speaker, Representative Gosar is a member of 
this institution as am I, and as is Representative Ocasio-Cortez, and 
so are roughly fifty other women of color.
  We all walk the same hallways and took the same oath of office. We 
are here to serve our districts and the American people. The graphic 
video that Rep. Gosar posted violates every sense of mutual respect 
that we should have for one another. Not only that, but it also 
dangerously promotes violence towards a sitting member of Congress who 
is a powerful Latina. It's exactly the type of misogynistic and racist 
recklessness that the previous President deployed, and social media 
companies eventually stripped him of his accounts.
  Rep. Gosar needs to be held accountable for this and that's what we 
are doing today. We need to deliver a message that in the people's 
house, this dangerous behavior will not be tolerated.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 795, the 
previous question is ordered on the resolution and the preamble, as 
amended.
  The question is on the resolution.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to section 3(s) of House Resolution 
8, the yeas and nays are ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 223, 
nays 207, answered ``present'' 1, not voting 3, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 379]

                               YEAS--223

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Auchincloss
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Bourdeaux
     Bowman
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brown (MD)
     Brown (OH)
     Brownley
     Bush
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson
     Carter (LA)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Cheney
     Chu
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Davids (KS)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel, Lois
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez, Vicente
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Harder (CA)
     Hayes
     Higgins (NY)
     Himes
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jacobs (CA)
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Jones
     Kahele
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim (NJ)
     Kind
     Kinzinger
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Leger Fernandez
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lieu
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Manning
     Matsui
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Mfume
     Moore (WI)
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mrvan
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Newman
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Ross
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sewell
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stansbury
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Strickland
     Suozzi
     Swalwell
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres (NY)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Williams (GA)
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NAYS--207

     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bentz
     Bergman
     Bice (OK)
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (NC)
     Boebert
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Cammack
     Carey
     Carl
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Cawthorn
     Chabot
     Cline
     Cloud
     Clyde
     Cole
     Comer
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curtis
     Davidson
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Donalds
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Ellzey
     Emmer
     Estes
     Fallon
     Feenstra
     Ferguson
     Fischbach
     Fitzgerald
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fortenberry
     Foxx
     Franklin, C. Scott
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Garbarino
     Garcia (CA)
     Gibbs
     Gimenez
     Gohmert
     Gonzales, Tony
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Good (VA)
     Gooden (TX)
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Greene (GA)
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Harshbarger
     Hartzler
     Hern
     Herrell
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (LA)
     Hill
     Hinson
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Issa
     Jackson
     Jacobs (NY)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kim (CA)
     Kustoff
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     LaTurner
     Lesko
     Letlow
     Long
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Mace
     Malliotakis
     Mann
     Massie
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClain
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meijer
     Meuser
     Miller (IL)
     Miller (WV)
     Miller-Meeks
     Moolenaar
     Mooney
     Moore (AL)
     Moore (UT)
     Mullin
     Murphy (NC)
     Nehls
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Obernolte
     Owens
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Pfluger
     Posey
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Rodgers (WA)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose
     Rosendale
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Salazar
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sessions
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spartz
     Stauber
     Steel
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Taylor
     Tenney
     Thompson (PA)
     Tiffany
     Timmons
     Turner
     Upton
     Valadao
     Van Drew
     Van Duyne
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams (TX)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Young
     Zeldin

                        ANSWERED ``PRESENT''--1

       
     Joyce (OH)
       

                             NOT VOTING--3

     Griffith
     Loudermilk
     Perry

                              {time}  1627

  So the resolution was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.


    Members Recorded Pursuant to House Resolution 8, 117th Congress

     Amodei (Balderson)
     Auchincloss (Clark (MA))
     Banks (Walorski)
     Blumenauer (Beyer)
     Carter (LA) (Kahele)
     Cawthorn (Nehls)
     DeFazio (Brown (MD))
     Dingell (Clark (MA))
     Gonzalez (OH) (Armstrong)
     Kelly (IL) (Clarke (NY))
     Khanna (Gomez)
     Kildee (Butterfield)
     Kirkpatrick (Stanton)
     Lawrence (Beatty)
     Lawson (FL) (Evans)
     Lesko (Joyce (PA))
     Levin (MI) (Raskin)
     Lowenthal (Beyer)
     McEachin (Wexton)
     Nunes (Garcia (CA))
     Porter (Wexton)
     Reed (Walorski)
     Rice (NY) (Murphy (FL))
     Roybal-Allard (McCollum)
     Rush (Quigley)
     Stevens (Lee (NV))
     Swalwell (Gomez)
     Tlaib (Bowman)
     Underwood (Casten)
     Waltz (Salazar)
     Wilson (FL) (Hayes)
  The SPEAKER. Will the gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Gosar) present 
himself in the well.
  By its adoption of House Resolution 789, the House has resolved that 
Representative Paul Gosar of Arizona be censured; that Representative 
Paul Gosar forthwith present himself in the

[[Page H6348]]

well of the House for the pronouncement of censure; that Representative 
Paul Gosar be censured with the public reading of this resolution by 
the Speaker; and that Representative Paul Gosar be, and is hereby, 
removed from the Committee on Natural Resources and the Committee on 
Oversight and Reform.

                          ____________________