[Congressional Record Volume 149, Number 82 (Thursday, June 5, 2003)]
[House]
[Pages H5028-H5029]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




              GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK LAND EXCHANGE ACT

  Mrs. CUBIN. Mr. Speaker, pursuant to House Resolution 258, I call up 
the Senate bill (S. 273) to provide for the expeditious completion of 
the acquisition of land owned by the State of Wyoming within the 
boundaries of Grand Teton National Park, and for other purposes, and 
ask for its immediate consideration.
  The Clerk read the title of the Senate bill.
  The text of S. 273 is as follows:

                                 S. 273

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``Grand Teton National Park 
     Land Exchange Act''.

     SEC. 2. DEFINITIONS.

       As used in this Act:
       (1) The term ``Federal lands'' means public lands as 
     defined in section 103(e) of the Federal Land Policy and 
     Management Act of 1976 (43 U.S.C. 1702(e)).
       (2) The term ``Governor'' means the Governor of the State 
     of Wyoming.
       (3) The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary of the 
     Interior.
       (4) The term ``State lands'' means lands and interest in 
     lands owned by the State of Wyoming within the boundaries of 
     Grand Teton National Park as identified on a map titled 
     ``Private, State & County Inholdings Grand Teton National 
     Park'', dated March 2001, and numbered GTNP/0001.

     SEC. 3. ACQUISITION OF STATE LANDS.

       (a) The Secretary is authorized to acquire approximately 
     1,406 acres of State lands within the exterior boundaries of 
     Grand Teton National Park, as generally depicted on the map 
     referenced in section 2(4), by any one or a combination of 
     the following--
       (1) donation;
       (2) purchase with donated or appropriated funds; or
       (3) exchange of Federal lands in the State of Wyoming that 
     are identified for disposal under approved land use plans in 
     effect on the date of enactment of this Act under section 202 
     of the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (43 
     U.S.C. 1712) that are of equal value to the State lands 
     acquired in the exchange.
       (b) In the event that the Secretary or the Governor 
     determines that the Federal lands eligible for exchange under 
     subsection (a)(3) are not sufficient or acceptable for the 
     acquisition of all the State lands identified in section 
     2(4), the Secretary shall identify other Federal lands or 
     interests therein in the State of Wyoming for possible 
     exchange and shall identify such lands or interests together 
     with their estimated value in a report to the Committee on 
     Energy and Natural Resources of the United States Senate and 
     the Committee on Resources of the House of Representatives. 
     Such lands or interests shall not be available for exchange 
     unless authorized by an Act of Congress enacted after the 
     date of submission of the report.

     SEC. 4. VALUATION OF STATE AND FEDERAL INTERESTS.

       (a) Agreement on Appraiser.--If the Secretary and the 
     Governor are unable to agree on the value of any Federal 
     lands eligible for exchange under section 3(a)(3) or State 
     lands, then the Secretary and the Governor may select a 
     qualified appraiser to conduct an appraisal of those lands. 
     The purchase or exchange under section 3(a) shall be 
     conducted based on the values determined by the appraisal.
       (b) No Agreement on Appraiser.--If the Secretary and the 
     Governor are unable to agree on the selection of a qualified 
     appraiser under subsection (a), then the Secretary and the 
     Governor shall each designate a qualified appraiser. The two 
     designated appraisers shall select a qualified third 
     appraiser to conduct the appraisal with the advice and 
     assistance of the two designated appraisers. The purchase or 
     exchange under section 3(a) shall be conducted based on the 
     values determined by the appraisal.
       (c) Appraisal Costs.--The Secretary and the State of 
     Wyoming shall each pay one-half of the appraisal costs under 
     subsections (a) and (b).

     SEC. 5. ADMINISTRATION OF STATE LANDS ACQUIRED BY THE UNITED 
                   STATES.

       The State lands conveyed to the United States under section 
     3(a) shall become part of Grand Teton National Park. The 
     Secretary shall manage such lands under the Act of August 25, 
     1916 (commonly know as the ``National Park Service Organic 
     Act''), and other laws, rules, and regulations applicable to 
     Grand Teton National Park.

     SEC. 6. AUTHORIZATION FOR APPROPRIATIONS.

       There are authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be 
     necessary for the purposes of this Act.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 258, the 
gentlewoman from Wyoming (Mrs. Cubin) and the gentleman from New Mexico 
(Mr. Udall) each will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Wyoming (Mrs. Cubin).
  Mrs. CUBIN. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, having already debated this bill, I urge its adoption.
  I rise in support of S. 273, and ask that this body support its 
passage.
  The Grand Teton National Park Land Exchange Act was introduced by 
Senator Thomas, co-sponsored by Senator Enzi, and is supported by all 
five elected Wyoming state officials, the National Park Service and the 
local communities.

[[Page H5029]]

  The measure passed the Senate on April 3, 2003, under unanimous 
consent.
  This bill presents a very unique opportunity with regards to federal 
land management in our National Parks that will greatly benefit the 
American public as well as Wymoning school children.
  The Jackson Valley has a history as colorful and amazing as the Grand 
Tetons that rise nearly 14,000 feet above the glacial lakes at their 
base.
  The first visitors to the Grand Tetons and the Jackson Valley were 
the Shoshone, Crow, Blackfoot, and Gros Ventre Indian tribes who 
treated the area as a summer hunting ground and sacred area.
  Later, in the 1800's, many fur trappers visited this consecrated 
ground, and were stunned by its raw beauty and diverse ecosystem. In 
1807 even John Colter, who had separated from the Lewis and Clark 
expedition, explored the area and returned with far fetched tales of 
geysers, hot springs, and mountains that touched the sky.
  It was years before his supposed hallucinations were indeed found to 
be true. From 1824-1840 the Grand Tetons were the central rendezvous 
site for mountain men all across the west, swapping tall tales and 
pelts. The Green River Rendezvous continues to this very day.
  After the area was settled at the turn of the century, the town of 
Jackson elected a Town Mayor and City Council entirely comprised of 
women . . . showing just how intelligent the people of Wyoming were, 
and are, to this very day. This was the first All-Female town 
government in our Nation's history. This, of course, occurred in my 
home state of Wyoming, the Equality State.
  Grand Teton National Park was later established by Congress on 
February 29, 1929, to protect the natural resources of the Teton range 
and the Jackson area's unique beauty.
  On March 15, 1943, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt established 
the Jackson Hole National Monument adjacent to the Park.
  Grand Teton National Park was expanded to its present size by 
Congress on September 14, 1950, to include a portion of the land from 
the Jackson Hole National Monument.
  The Park currently encompasses approximately 310,000 acres of 
wilderness and some of the most amazing scenery to be found in any 
corner of the world.
  However, when Wyoming received its statehood in 1890, sections of 
land were set aside for school revenue purposes. All income from these 
lands--rents, grazing fees, sales or other sources--is placed in a 
special trust fund for the benefit of students in the state.
  The establishment of these school sections pre-dates the creation of 
most national parks or monuments within our state boundaries, creating 
several state in-holdings within federal land masses, such as in Grand 
Teton National Park.
  Currently over 1406 acres of state surface and mineral acres are held 
by the state of Wyoming in isolated plots within Grand Teton National 
Park.
  This legislation would allow the State of Wyoming to trade or sell 
these precious state lands locked up inside the Park to the federal 
government in exchange for other federal lands, minerals or 
appropriated dollars, or a combination of all three, to address 
Wyoming's public school funding needs.
  Further, the American public can consolidate under National Park 
Service management the lands within Grand Teton National Park's borders 
and protect them from future development pressures placed upon the 
state for the benefit of our schoolchildren.
  It is a win-win scenario for everyone involved.
  Within 90 days after this bill is signed into law, the land would be 
valued through agreement by the Wyoming Governor and the Secretary of 
the Interior. If there is no agreement, an appraisal process will be 
set up to determine the value of the lands or minerals in question to 
ensure fairness to all parties.
  There will also be an appeals process to further ensure fairness to 
both the Federal Government and the state of Wyoming.
  Within 180 days after the state land value is determined, the 
Interior Secretary, in consultation with the Governor, shall determine 
an exchange of federal assets of equal value for the state lands.
  This body has an incredible opportunity to allow the consolidation of 
lands within Grand Teton National Park borders, and to allow the state 
of Wyoming to capture fair value for their property to benefit all 
Wyoming school children.
  I respectfully request that the members of this body support the 
Grand Teton National Park Land Exchange Act.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. UDALL of New Mexico. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I 
may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, this is a good bill. I support the Senate bill.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mrs. CUBIN. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. All time for debate has expired.
  Pursuant to House Resolution 258, the Senate bill is considered read 
for amendment and the previous question is ordered.
  The question is on third reading of the Senate bill.
  The Senate bill was ordered to be read a third time, and was read the 
third time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the Senate 
bill.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.
  Mr. UDALL of New Mexico. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and 
nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 of rule XX, further 
proceedings on this question will be postponed.

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