[JPRT, 107th Congress]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]




                             Patsy T. Mink

                       LATE A REPRESENTATIVE FROM

                                 HAWAII

                                   a

                          
 
                           MEMORIAL ADDRESSES
                           AND OTHER TRIBUTES
                           HON. PATSY T. MINK

                                   a

                                   z

                               1927 -2002

                           hon. patsy t. mink

                                   a

                                   z

                               1927 -2002
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             [GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] T2489.001
             

Patsy T. Mink

                 




 Mary Ann Changg Photo/Hawaii


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                               Memorial Addresses and

                                   Other Tributes

                        HELD IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                                     AND SENATE

                                OF THE UNITED STATES

                           TOGETHER WITH MEMORIAL SERVICES

                                     IN HONOR OF

                                    PATSY T. MINK

                   Late a Representative from Hawaii

                      One Hundred Seventh Congress

                             Second Session

                                   a

                          
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                            Compiled under the direction

                                       of the

                            Joint Committee on Printing,

                               Chairman Robert W. Ney
                                      CONTENTS
             Proceedings in the House of Representatives:
                Tributes by Representatives:
                    Abercrombie, Neil, of Hawaii ................
                                         5, 6, 20, 21, 31, 47, 107, 116
                    Andrews, Robert E., of New Jersey..............
                                                                     35
                    Baca, Joe, of California.......................
                                                                     64
                    Berman, Howard L., of California...............
                                                                     58
                    Boehner, John A., of Ohio 
                     ...............................................
                     .....
                                                             4, 70, 106
                    Brown, Corrine, of Florida.....................
                                                                     14
                    Carson, Julia, of Indiana......................
                                                                     21
                    Christensen, Donna M., of Virgin Islands.......
                                                                     38
                    Clayton, Eva M., of North Carolina 
                     ........................................
                                                                41, 109
                    Crowley, Joseph, of New York...................
                                                                     78
                    Cummings, Elijah E., of Maryland...............
                                                                     66
                    Davis, Susan A., of California.................
                                                                     20
                    Davis, Danny K., of Illinois...................
                                                                     61
                    DeLauro, Rosa L., of Connecticut...............
                                                                     24
                    Dingell, John D., of Michigan..................
                                                                     53
                    Engel, Eliot L., of New York...................
                                                                     80
                    Etheridge, Bob, of North Carolina..............
                                                                     30
                    Faleomavaega, Eni F.H., of American Samoa......
                                                                 42, 48
                    Gephardt, Richard A., of Missouri..............
                                                                     52
                    Gilman, Benjamin A., of New York...............
                                                                     13
                    Green, Gene, of Texas..........................
                                                                     51
                    Gutierrez, Luis V., of Illinois................
                                                                     56
                    Hinojosa, Ruben, of Texas......................
                                                                  5, 57
                    Holt, Rush D., of New Jersey...................
                                                                     75
                    Honda, Michael M., of California...............
                                                                 32, 72
                    Houghton, Amo, of New York.....................
                                                                     30
                    Isakson, Johnny, of Georgia 
                     ...............................................

                                                            5, 103, 105
                    Jackson-Lee, Sheila, of Texas..................
                                                                     27
                    Johnson, Eddie Bernice, of Texas...............
                                                                     25
                    Jones, Stephanie Tubbs, of Ohio................
                                                                     73
                    Kaptur, Marcy, of Ohio.........................
                                                                      8
                    Kildee, Dale E., of Michigan...................
                                                                     76
                    Kind, Ron, of Wisconsin........................
                                                                      4
                    Lee, Barbara, of California....................
                                                                     22
                    Lewis, John, of Georgia........................
                                                                     23
                    Lofgren, Zoe, of California....................
                                                                     36
                    Lynch, Stephen F., of Massachusetts............
                                                                     82
                    Maloney, Carolyn B., of New York...............
                                                                     44
                    Matsui, Robert T., of California...............
                                                                     11
                    McCarthy, Carolyn, of New York 
                     .........................................
                                                             4, 54, 108
                    McCarthy, Karen, of Missouri...................
                                                                     59
                    McCollum, Betty, of Minnesota..................
                                                                     81
                    McKeon, Howard P. ``Buck,'' of California 
                     ...........................
                                                             5, 69, 105
                    McKinney, Cynthia A., of Georgia...............
                                                                     79
                    Meek, Carrie P., of Florida....................
                                                                 19, 20
                    Mica, John. L., of Florida.....................
                                                                     11
                    Millender-McDonald, Juanita, of California 
                     ...........................
                                                                16, 111
                    Miller, George, of California..................
                                                                     14
                    Norton, Eleanor Holmes, of District of Columbia
                                                                     34
                    Obey, David R., of Wisconsin...................
                                                                     16
                    Ortiz, Solomon P., of Texas....................
                                                                     53
                    Owens, Major R., of New York...................
                                                                 50, 83
                    Payne, Donald M., of New Jersey................
                                                                     65
                    Pelosi, Nancy, of California...................
                                                                     46
                    Pomeroy, Earl, of North Dakota.................
                                                                     81
                    Rahall, Nick J., II, of West Virginia..........
                                                                     63
                    Rangel, Charles B., of New York................
                                                                     71
                    Reyes, Silvestre, of Texas.....................
                                                                     63
                    Roemer, Tim, of Indiana........................
                                                                     68
                    Roybal-Allard, Lucille, of California..........
                                                                     55
                    Schakowsky, Janice D., of Illinois.............
                                                                     77
                    Scott, Robert C., of Virginia..................
                                                                     18
                    Shays, Christopher, of Connecticut.............
                                                                     18
                    Skelton, Ike, of Missouri......................
                                                                     60
                    Slaughter, Louise McIntosh, of New York........
                                                                     67
                    Solis, Hilda L., of California.................
                                                                     37
                    Tierney, John F., of Massachusetts.............
                                                                     14
                    Towns, Edolphus, of New York...................
                                                                    107
                    Velazquez, Nydia M., of New York...............
                                                                     35
                    Waters, Maxine, of California..................
                                                                     33
                    Watson, Diane E., of California................
                                                                     17
                    Wu, David, of Oregon...........................
                                                                     42
             Proceedings in the Senate:
                Tributes by Senators:
                    Akaka, Daniel K., of Hawaii 
                     ...............................................
                     ....
                                                               121, 129
                    Inouye, Daniel K., of Hawaii...................
                                                                    127
             Memorial Service......................................
                                                                    135
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                                 MEMORIAL ADDRESSES

                                         AND

                                   OTHER TRIBUTES

                                         FOR

                                    PATSY T. MINK
                     Proceedings in the House of Representatives
                                             Monday, September 30, 2002
                                       PRAYER
               The Chaplain, the Reverend Daniel P. Coughlin, offered 
             the following prayer:
               Life is fragile and a lifetime but a moment before Your 
             eternal presence, Almighty God. Today we mourn the loss of 
             one of Your servants and dearly elected Members of this 
             Congress: the Honorable Patsy Mink.
               Reward this gentle woman for her gracious service in 
             this House, to this Nation and the island people of 
             Hawaii. We know she will be fondly remembered by many and 
             richly rewarded by You, O Lord. You are the Lord and 
             master of the living and the dead, and before You we will 
             all have to appear and render an accounting.
               Be now her loving Saviour. Help her staff, family, and 
             many friends find some footing as You lead them on by Your 
             kindly light of faith and sustaining love revealed in 
             those around them. Be now their hope and consolation.
               May the Honorable Patsy Mink of Hawaii rest in peace. 
             Amen.
                                               Tuesday, October 1, 2002
                               MESSAGE FROM THE SENATE
               A message from the Senate by Mr. Monahan, one of its 
             clerks, announced that the Senate agreed to the following 
             resolution:
                                     S. Res. 331
               Resolved, That the Senate has heard with profound sorrow 
             and deep regret the announcement of the death of the 
             Honorable Patsy T. Mink, late a Representative from the 
             State of Hawaii.
               Resolved, That the Secretary communicate these 
             resolutions to the House of Representatives and transmit 
             an enrolled copy thereof to the family of the deceased.
               Resolved, That when the Senate adjourns or recesses 
             today, it stand adjourned or recessed as a further mark of 
             respect to the memory of the deceased Representative.
                                TRIBUTE TO PATSY MINK
               Mrs. McCARTHY of New York. I would like to take a moment 
             to remember a great colleague and friend in the Committee 
             on Education and the Workforce, the gentlewoman from 
             Hawaii. She will be greatly missed and always remembered 
             for her compassion and dedication to the people of Hawaii.

               Mr. BOEHNER. Let me pay tribute to a colleague and 
             friend, Patsy Mink. It is my understanding the House will 
             consider and adopt a formal resolution this week honoring 
             her service to our country, and I am pleased that we will 
             have that opportunity to pay tribute to her in that 
             fashion.
               Patsy was a vibrant, passionate, and effective voice for 
             the principles that she believed in. She was a true leader 
             on our committee, and I am deeply saddened by the news of 
             her passing. As chairman of the committee over the last 2 
             years, we worked together on the historic No Child Left 
             Behind Act, as well as bipartisan legislation to improve 
             access to higher education for our Nation's youth. Patsy 
             fought tirelessly for the causes she supported, and I 
             think we are all grateful for her long record of public 
             service. Her passing is a significant loss for our 
             committee, the people of Hawaii, and the people of the 
             United States. I offer my sincerest condolences to her 
             family and her constituents. She will be greatly missed.

               Mr. KIND. Madam Speaker, I want to preface my remarks by 
             stating that today is truly a sad day in the House of 
             Representatives for the people of the Second District of 
             Hawaii and for the people of the Nation who may not have 
             seen or appreciated the fine work that Patsy Mink did in 
             representing her constituents in Hawaii. In all my years 
             of public service, Madam Speaker, I never met anyone with 
             a deeper commitment and passion for serving her 
             constituents than Patsy Mink. I believe she was the first 
             woman of color to be elected to the U.S. Congress, and I 
             have had the pleasure of serving with her for three terms 
             now on the Committee on Education and the Workforce.
               She brought a depth of knowledge to the committee on 
             issues of education that was unrivaled. Also unrivaled was 
             her fight to ensure that quality of education was a 
             reality for native Hawaiian children. We will miss her 
             guidance, leadership and expertise in these areas. Most of 
             all, we will miss her for what she was, a dynamic 
             personality with unlimited energy and compassion for the 
             issues she felt so deeply about. I hope that the people 
             will in the next week take a little time to read a little 
             bit about Patsy Mink, the stories being written, to better 
             understand her contribution for our great democracy and 
             for the people of the Second District in Hawaii.

               Mr. McKEON. Madam Speaker, I associate myself with the 
             remarks of the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Boehner), the 
             gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Kind), and the gentlewoman 
             from New York (Mrs. McCarthy) regarding Mrs. Mink. The 
             gentlewoman will be missed by all of us, but I will 
             especially miss her because for the last 2 years she has 
             been the ranking member on this subcommittee, and we have 
             had the opportunity of getting to know each other and 
             working well together. I will miss her greatly.

               Mr. ISAKSON. Madam Speaker, I want to add my expression 
             of sympathy to the family of Patsy Mink and to the 
             citizens of Hawaii and recommend Members read an editorial 
             that I read on the plane today about the contributions of 
             her life, in particular in the field of politics and the 
             law where she broke the glass ceiling for women in an era 
             and a period where that ceiling was very low. She was an 
             outstanding colleague and an outstanding individual, and 
             she shall be missed.

               Mr. HINOJOSA. Madam Speaker, I also want to express my 
             condolences to the family of my good friend and colleague, 
             Patsy Mink. The people of Hawaii and this Nation have 
             experienced a tremendous loss. I worked with Patsy Mink 
             for 6 years on the Committee on Education and the 
             Workforce and always found her to be a tireless advocate 
             for children and workers. I will truly miss her wisdom, 
             her wit, and her fighting spirit. She fought for all 
             students to have an opportunity to access quality 
             education and have access to higher education.
                  MOURNING THE PASSING OF THE HONORABLE PATSY MINK
               Mr. ABERCROMBIE. Mr. Speaker, it is very difficult for 
             me to grasp that I would be standing here this evening to 
             announce to the House, with the most profound regret, that 
             our dear friend and colleague Patsy Mink has passed away.
               I know there are many Members who wish to express their 
             respects to John Mink and Wendy Mink, Patsy's husband and 
             daughter, and to share with other Members and perhaps 
             those who are observing our proceedings the measure of 
             their feelings for Patsy and about her.
               So at the proper time, Mr. Speaker, I will call up a 
             resolution expressing the sorrow of the House of 
             Representatives upon her death and offer the opportunity 
             for such Members as would like to speak to indicate to the 
             House their feelings on this profoundly sad occasion.
                 EXPRESSING SORROW OF THE HOUSE AT THE DEATH OF THE 
             HONORABLE PATSY T. MINK, MEMBER OF CONGRESS FROM THE STATE 
                                      OF HAWAII
               Mr. ABERCROMBIE. Mr. Speaker, I offer a privileged 
             resolution (H. Res. 566) and ask for its immediate 
             consideration.
               The Clerk read the resolution, as follows:
                                     H. Res. 566
               Resolved, That the House has heard with profound sorrow 
             of the death of the Honorable Patsy T. Mink, a 
             Representative from the State of Hawaii.
               Resolved, That a committee of such Members of the House 
             as the SPEAKER may designate, together with such Members 
             of the Senate as may be joined, be appointed to attend the 
             funeral.
               Resolved, That the Sergeant at Arms of the House be 
             authorized and directed to take such steps as may be 
             necessary for carrying out the provisions of these 
             resolutions and that the necessary expenses in connection 
             therewith be paid out of applicable accounts of the House.
               Resolved, That the Clerk communicate these resolutions 
             to the Senate and transmit a copy thereof to the family of 
             the deceased.
               Resolved, That when the House adjourns today, it adjourn 
             as a further mark of respect to the memory of the 
             deceased.

               Mr. ABERCROMBIE. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent 
             that at the end of the allotted time, the House rise for a 
             moment of silence out of respect for the Honorable Patsy 
             T. Mink.
               Mr. Speaker, it is with a heavy heart that I take this 
             action. The hearts of all of us here go out in sympathy to 
             Patsy's husband, John, and her daughter, Gwen; to her 
             brother, Eugene; to her staff in Washington and in Hawaii; 
             and to her large family of friends and admirers.
               Mr. Speaker, I am devastated by her loss. Patsy Mink was 
             more than my friend and my colleague; she was a true 
             daughter of Hawaii. She was a person of enormous spirit, 
             tenacity and inner strength. I will miss her terribly. I 
             will especially miss her wisdom, her energy, her readiness 
             to fight for principle. She fought all her life for social 
             and economic justice.
               Throughout nearly 50 years of public service, she 
             championed America's most deeply held values: equality, 
             fairness and above all honesty. Her courage, her 
             willingness to speak out and champion causes that others 
             might shun resulted in tremendous contributions in the 
             fields of civil rights and education. She has earned in my 
             estimation an honored place in the history of the U.S. 
             House of Representatives as the co-author of title IX, 
             which guarantees equality for women in education programs.
               Every single woman in this Nation who today has the 
             advantage of the capacity to command equal opportunity in 
             education, and by extension in virtually every other field 
             of endeavor, owes the impetus to that in modern times to 
             Patsy Mink. She was one of the pioneers who transformed 
             Hawaii and transformed this Nation. Her legacy will live 
             on in every campus in America and in the heart of every 
             American woman who aspires to greatness. Most profoundly, 
             it lives on in my estimation in hope, hope for the 
             millions of lives that she touched.
               Mr. Speaker, it is difficult for me to realize that I am 
             standing here this evening paying my respects to the 
             memory of Patsy Mink because my first memories of her go 
             back to when I was a student at the University of Hawaii 
             involved in one of her first campaigns, not for elective 
             office because she did that when Hawaii was still a 
             territory.
               She came back to Hawaii from her early plantation days, 
             running around as a little kid in the plantation ditches 
             over in Maui, encouraged by her family, most particularly 
             her father, to reach for her star in the Hawaii firmament.
               She was turned down for medical school, discriminated 
             against because she was female, because she was Japanese, 
             because she came from an unknown territory out in the 
             Pacific. That is why she went to law school, fought her 
             way into law school so that she could achieve a degree 
             that would enable her to fight against the discrimination 
             she had suffered.
               She was a champion then. We all recognized it. She was 
             smart and she was tough and she was articulate and she 
             would not quit. She was an inspiration then and now.
               Whenever any of us felt some sense of discouragement, 
             whenever any of us felt some sense of despair or feeling 
             that we could not succeed, it was only required for Patsy 
             to come in the room to change the atmosphere.
               Patsy Mink had the capacity to make dead air move. Patsy 
             Mink, this little lady from Hawaii, was a giant in her 
             heart and in her commitment. With every breath that she 
             took, she championed those who had no one to stand up and 
             speak out for them. A little lady with a big heart, a 
             lioness. We will not see her like again. Someone will take 
             her place here in the House, that is the way of it in our 
             democracy, but no one will replace her in the hearts of 
             the people of Hawaii. No one will replace her in the role 
             that she played in this House of Representatives. No one 
             was more beloved than Patsy Mink in this House.

               Ms. KAPTUR. Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank the 
             distinguished gentleman from Hawaii (Mr. Abercrombie), now 
             the senior Member representing that great State here for 
             our Republic in the House, and rise in support of his 
             Resolution with all of our colleagues on both sides of the 
             aisle to honor our friend and colleague Congresswoman 
             Patsy Mink, as this beautiful poster indicates, a woman of 
             hope.
               Patsy's service, now 24 years, places her among the 
             longest-serving women in the House, certainly currently. 
             She was honest and intelligent, gifted and dedicated, and 
             leaves behind a stellar record of accomplishments. For 
             almost half a century, she was a devoted advocate for her 
             constituents and her native State of Hawaii. She served 
             America with distinction. She will be deeply missed.
               She was a trailblazer. Her career embodied a series of 
             firsts. She was the first Asian-American woman to practice 
             law in Hawaii, and the first Asian-American woman to be 
             elected to the Hawaii territorial legislature. And then in 
             1964 she became the first, in her own words, woman of 
             color ever elected to the U.S. Congress, an Asian-American 
             woman of Japanese-American heritage from the then new 
             State of Hawaii.
               She transcended race and gender throughout her life. She 
             was a leader on women's rights, social and economic 
             justice, health care and child care, and no one here knew 
             more about education. She came to this House at the 
             beginning of the 88th Congress in 1965, served until 1977, 
             and then again from 1990 until her untimely passing this 
             past Sunday.
               When Patsy first began her career in this Congress, she 
             was one of only 11 women serving in the House. She watched 
             as Members came in the 1980s and began to double the 
             number of women to 24, up to the current level of 62 with 
             13 women now in the Senate.
               I agree with my colleagues that Patsy viewed as her most 
             important achievement, the passage of title IX of the 
             Education Amendments of 1972. She, as the gentleman from 
             Hawaii indicated, had experienced race and gender 
             discrimination. She often said her life experiences 
             challenged her to lead the fight for women and girls to 
             have equal access to education and athletic opportunities. 
             Title IX has torn down barriers for women and girls in 
             America. Title IX has had a dramatic impact on women's 
             access to higher education opportunities, especially 
             medical and law school, in addition to the more publicized 
             impact on girls' and women's athletics.
               Throughout our Nation, millions of girls participate in 
             sports programs today, and millions of girls and women 
             have more opportunities available to them because of 
             Congresswoman Patsy Mink. She stood up for them and for 
             us. Her legacy will survive in every classroom, every 
             school and every campus. In celebrating the 30th 
             anniversary of title IX, Patsy stated her belief that ``we 
             must rededicate ourselves to the continued pursuit of 
             educational opportunities for girls and women.'' Her 
             leadership on a wide range of issues--the environment, 
             poverty, civil rights--helped shape a stronger America.
               Patsy will live forever in our hearts and in this great 
             institution. She truly remains America's daughter for all 
             time, a woman of hope.
               In that regard, Mr. Speaker, I would like to place in 
             the Record and ask my colleagues to sign a letter being 
             sent to the Speaker from all of us that asks the Speaker 
             to work with the membership as the Speaker deems 
             appropriate to commission a portrait or sculpture of 
             Congresswoman Mink to memorialize her contributions to our 
             Nation. We would expect that the costs of this effort 
             would be privately financed, working with an appropriate 
             non-profit entity, and that following the completion of 
             this work of appropriate artistic quality, we would like 
             to have it placed in a fitting public space here in the 
             Capitol, perhaps in the new Capitol Visitors Center, so 
             that her story can continue to inspire the millions of 
             visitors who come to Washington to learn more about our 
             democratic system, which she strengthened every day of her 
             service to our country and indeed the world.
               Mr. Speaker, the text of the letter follows:

                                 Congress of the United States,
                                    Washington, DC, October 1, 2002.

             Hon. Dennis Hastert,
             Speaker of the House, U.S. House of Representatives, 
             Washington, DC.

               Dear Mr. Speaker: Appreciation for the diversity and 
             accomplishment of our Nation's leaders throughout our 
             history strengthens people's understanding of freedom's 
             legacy and potential. This is a key reason why so many of 
             us have urged that the artwork displayed in the public 
             spaces of the House be more representative of this rich 
             history of accomplishment, including correcting the 
             underrepresentation of women in the current collection on 
             display.

               The passing of our beloved colleague, Patsy Takemoto 
             Mink of Hawaii, offers us the opportunity to both improve 
             our representation of women who have contributed to this 
             institution and our Nation, as well as pay proper 
             recognition to a woman whose path-breaking efforts have 
             shaped a more optimistic future for generations of 
             Americans. Congresswoman Mink's life embodied a series of 
             firsts.

               She was the first Asian-American woman to practice law 
             in Hawaii, and was the first Asian-American woman to be 
             elected to the territorial House before Hawaii became a 
             State in 1959, and she was one of the pioneers that 
             advocated for Hawaii's statehood.

               In 1964, she became, in her words, the first woman of 
             color ever elected to the U.S. Congress. As the first 
             Asian-American woman of Japanese-American heritage 
             elected, she served with distinction twelve terms in the 
             House of Representatives for two 12-year periods.

               Congresswoman Mink transcended race and gender 
             discrimination throughout her career. Her life experiences 
             challenged her to lead the fight for women and girls to 
             have equal access to education and athletic opportunities. 
             She played the leading role in the enactment of title IX 
             of the Education Amendments of 1972, which prohibited for 
             the first time gender discrimination by federally funded 
             institutions.

               That law has become the major tool for women's fuller 
             participation not only in sports, but also in all aspects 
             of education.

               Patsy's leadership on a wide range of issues as the 
             environment, poverty, education, and civil rights shaped a 
             stronger America. During her tenure in Congress Mrs. Mink 
             helped write environmental protection laws safeguarding 
             land and water, and communities affected by coal strip 
             mining.

               For these reasons, Mr. Speaker, we respectfully request 
             the opportunity to work with you and other officials of 
             the House whom you deem appropriate to commission a 
             portrait or sculpture of Congresswoman Mink to memorialize 
             her contributions. We would expect that the costs of this 
             effort would be privately financed, with an appropriate 
             non-profit entity being designated for the receipt of any 
             contributions.

               Following the completion of this work of appropriate 
             artistic quality, we would like to have it displayed in a 
             fitting public space of the House, including possibly the 
             new Capitol Visitors' Center, so that her story can 
             continue to inspire the millions of visitors who come to 
             Washington to learn more about our democratic system which 
             calls for the inclusion of all Americans, regardless of 
             race, gender, or origin.

               We look forward to this opportunity to work with you.

                  Sincerely,

                                     Neil Abercrombie, Marcy Kaptur,
                               Robert A. Underwood, Diane E. Watson,
                                 Michael M. Honda, Robert T. Matsui,
                                                 Members of Congress.

               Mr. MICA. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for 
             yielding time, and I also extend my condolences to the 
             Hawaii delegation and especially to John Mink, to John and 
             his daughter Wendy.
               It is hard to believe that Patsy Mink is gone. Patsy 
             Mink was truly an American icon. I had the wonderful 
             privilege and opportunity to serve with Patsy. She was my 
             ranking member as I chaired the Subcommittee on Criminal 
             Justice, Drug Policy and Human Resources. Sometimes in 
             this body we get to know folks from a distance, but 
             sometimes when you work with them as I worked with Patsy, 
             you get to know them as a friend.
               This House and this Nation and certainly Hawaii just 
             received a tremendous legacy from her service. This lady 
             served in this Chamber as a role model for young women, 
             for Asian-Americans and for all Americans. I remember 
             Patsy because of her conviction, because of her 
             determination, because of her caring and love for people 
             truly in her heart, and I honestly cannot believe she has 
             left us. Not only will she be remembered for her public 
             service in local government, in the territory of Hawaii 
             and in the State of Hawaii, but for all she has done for 
             so many people. She worked with me on our national drug 
             policy, and the education program that we now have 
             nationally is a legacy from Patsy Mink.
               Again, her heart, her trust, and her love was with the 
             people that she represented. So I salute her on her years 
             of service. I will miss her from the bottom of my heart. 
             As I came to the Capitol, I saw the flags flying at half 
             mast, and how proud she would be that we honor her today 
             for her service, which she so richly deserves. She was a 
             great American and a great colleague, Patsy Mink, the 
             gentlewoman from Hawaii.

               Mr. MATSUI. Mr. Speaker, first I would like to offer my 
             condolences to John, Patsy's husband, and Wendy, Patsy's 
             daughter, and obviously her staff both in Hawaii and in 
             Washington, for the wonderful job that they have given her 
             and the people of her State over the past 24 years. And 
             this goes from the time she was in Congress, from 1964 to 
             1976, and from 1990 until she passed away last Saturday.
               It is somewhat unique when a colleague of ours dies. I 
             remember when Walter Capps, the Member from California, 
             passed away. We had a chance then to look at his 
             accomplishments over the years, and we began then to 
             realize what a great human being he really was. We see our 
             colleagues on the floor every day, and we obviously know 
             them, we like them, we have friendships, but not until 
             they leave us do we really have an opportunity to really 
             look at their careers. Unlike Members of the other body 
             and unlike Governors in statehouses, we do not have an 
             opportunity to view our colleagues as we do Patsy Mink 
             today.
               Her political career went over 46 years. If one really 
             thought about it, she was the first Asian-American, she 
             was the first woman of color to enter the House of 
             Representatives. I had not known that until this week. I 
             think many of my colleagues did not know that. She was the 
             first Asian-American woman to be admitted to the Hawaii 
             bar, and she had to do it by challenging the residency 
             requirements because her husband was from Pennsylvania, 
             and in those days she had to take the residency of her 
             husband, and so she was first not admitted. But at the age 
             of 26, Patsy Mink challenged the Hawaii residency 
             requirements in respect to admission to the bar, and her 
             life was like that.
               I think the gentlewoman from Ohio stated that Patsy was 
             the one who made an amendment through the Higher Education 
             Act, title IX, back in 1972. Because of her, young 
             elementary schoolgirls can say that they want to be like 
             Mia Hamm. A young woman in college now can aspire to be a 
             professional player in the WNBA. She has just done so 
             much.
               Two things stick out in my mind about Patsy, if I may 
             just say this, and I know there are so many speakers that 
             want to talk about Patsy. When she came back in 1990, Bill 
             Ford was the chairman of what was then known as the 
             Committee on Education and Labor. Bill said, ``Patsy Mink, 
             she's coming back. I'm going to get her on my committee. 
             She's just a great Member.''
               I said, ``Yeah, I know.''
               He said, ``No, no, you don't understand. Patsy Mink is a 
             great legislator. She knows how to bring people together, 
             she knows how to develop a consensus, she knows how to use 
             words that are words of art. She is a legislator's 
             legislator.'' I think all of us that have worked with 
             Patsy know that.
               Last, let me just say that I have worked with Patsy on 
             welfare and on a number of issues. I have never seen 
             anyone in this body, or in any body, any more impassioned, 
             any more committed to the forgotten people, the people 
             that perhaps do not have the chance that many of us have, 
             for people that really want to aspire in America. That is 
             what Patsy Mink means to me and to all of us. She is truly 
             a role model not just for Asian-Americans or women, but 
             for all Americans.

               Mr. GILMAN. Mr. Speaker, on days such as this, we sadly 
             woe the present but nostalgically reflect upon the past. 
             Hawaii and the Congress has lost one of its great leaders 
             this week, a Congresswoman whose life and her 24-year 
             congressional career have been nothing short of amazing. 
             The passing of Congresswoman Patsy Mink is felt not only 
             by her family, her husband John and daughter Wendy, and 
             those close to her, but also by her constituents and all 
             of us in the Congress who had the privilege to serve with 
             Patsy.
               I served with her on the Committee on Education years 
             ago. Known for her strong, sincere demeanor, Patsy Mink 
             has been an outstanding asset to Hawaii's Second 
             Congressional District. She achieved significant support 
             for the people of Hawaii. In those respects, Patsy was 
             close to us all. Mrs. Mink was one of our Nation's 
             strongest proponents of women's equality, pushing feminism 
             from a fringe cause to an important rallying cry. Her 
             sense of what was needed to be done to help her native 
             Hawaiians and immigrant citizens alike has marked her as a 
             sympathetic and caring congressional Member. She 
             championed important reforms in education, such as smaller 
             class sizes, passage of title IX, and more spending on 
             special education and school construction, and the need to 
             provide more assistance for Impact Aid, for which I had 
             the honor and pleasure of working with Patsy.
               All of Patsy's work in education demonstrates her desire 
             to improve the future of our children who one day will be 
             our Nation's leaders. This Congress will sorely miss Patsy 
             Mink. She will be remembered for her leadership, her 
             concerns, her compassion, for her positive aspects and the 
             efforts she has undertaken to make Hawaii a strong 
             political force in our Nation. May it be of some 
             consolation to her husband, John, to her daughter, Wendy, 
             that the people of Hawaii and so many others across the 
             country will not forget our outstanding colleague, 
             Congresswoman Patsy Mink.

               Mr. TIERNEY. Mr. Speaker, I rise to express my 
             condolences on the death of the Honorable Patsy Mink.
               Mr. Speaker. I rise this evening to join my colleagues 
             in commemoration of the remarkable life and tremendous 
             achievements of the woman who served with great 
             distinction in the House of Representatives, Patsy Mink. I 
             offer my condolences to the Mink family, especially her 
             husband John and daughter Wendy, and to the people of her 
             district who have lost a leader and a friend.
               From age 4 when she insisted on joining her brother at 
             school to her service as the first Asian-American woman to 
             practice law in Hawaii, and to her election as the first 
             woman of color to Congress, Patsy broke down barriers--
             first for herself, and then for others. Patsy left a 
             legacy for millions of working families she helped lift 
             out of poverty with education and job training programs 
             ranging from the war on poverty to welfare reform, and the 
             generation of female student athletes for whom she 
             drafted, passed and implemented title IX, the 30-year 
             anniversary of which we just commemorated this June.
               I was proud to serve with Patsy on both the House 
             Education and the Workforce Committee and the Government 
             Reform Committee, where she gave a voice to the voiceless 
             every day that she served.
               Patsy provided vision, courage and leadership--speaking 
             out on all the vital issues of the day and inspiring us, 
             her colleagues, with her fiery oratory on the House floor 
             and policy negotiations that combined her mastery of 
             education, labor and economic issues with the persuasive 
             power of Hawaiian chocolate-covered macadamia nuts.
               Mr. Speaker, the Members and staff of this great 
             institution mourn the loss of a valued friend and 
             colleague whose distinguished service to the House made a 
             difference in the lives of millions of Americans. We will 
             miss her dearly.

               Ms. BROWN of Florida. Mr. Speaker, I would just make a 
             quick comment to the family. My favorite scripture is ``To 
             whom God has given much, much is expected.'' Our colleague 
             has given much to this country on women's issues and on 
             education. She has done her work. We have to carry on the 
             legacy.

               Mr. GEORGE MILLER of California. Mr. Speaker, I thank 
             the gentleman for yielding me this time, and I thank him 
             for bringing this together this evening to be able to 
             express ourselves about Patsy and the wonderful person she 
             was.
               Patsy had a wonderful sense of urgency about being a 
             Member of Congress. She was so clearly aware that she had 
             been given a gift by the people of Hawaii, and she was so 
             clearly aware that it was not to be wasted and not a 
             moment was to be wasted as long as she was in this body.
               When I first came here in 1974, she was a very senior 
             member of the Committee on Natural Resources and of the 
             Committee on Education and Labor, and I was the most 
             junior member. When Patsy came back, I was one of the most 
             senior members of those two committees, and she was the 
             junior member of those two committees. The relationship 
             never changed from the first day in 1974. I admired her 
             skill on the Committee on Natural Resources as we argued 
             mining law, public lands issues, forest issues, law of the 
             sea. I asked her once, ``How do you do it?'' She was so 
             engaged in the debate, and that is when debate really took 
             place in the House of Representatives. She said, ``Read 
             the bill and make them defend it.'' And she did. She read 
             every word in the legislation. And in those committee 
             hearings, you had to defend your amendment; you had to 
             defend your bill. And if you could not, she was not with 
             you.
               No matter what the topic was, whether it was title IX or 
             pay equity or natural resources or mining law, the issues 
             that she was involved in span the globe, but the reason 
             was always the same: economic and social justice. She 
             never waivered. It did not matter if it was welfare reform 
             or water reform. She wanted to know what the implications 
             were for economic and social justice, who was getting and 
             who was giving.
               She never waivered from that, and for that she made many 
             of us uncomfortable, as we thought we could waiver; and 
             she would reach out and grab you and say, you cannot do 
             that. You cannot be for this. You cannot vote for this. 
             She said it to me when I was her chairman, and she said it 
             to me when I was her ranking member; and she said it to me 
             when I was a freshman member. That little woman that the 
             gentleman from Hawaii (Mr. Abercrombie) described was so 
             full of commitment that she was compelling in all of our 
             lives. There are so many firsts in her history.
               But her sense of urgency and her sense of justice were 
             her guiding stars. I think that when I came here at the 
             end of a war, and here we are on possibly the eve of yet 
             another war, and of those battles inside of the democratic 
             study group which basically amends organization, and this 
             woman went at it toe to head to toe to head on the 
             arguments of ending the war.
               I also think tonight that we send Ben Rosenthal and 
             Bella Abzug and Phil Burton a great companion in heaven.

               Ms. MILLENDER-McDONALD. Mr. Speaker, I rise to highlight 
             the legacy of one of the most distinguished and honorable 
             women of this august body, my friend, my colleague, 
             Congresswoman Patsy Mink.
               I shall remember her as a giant who spoke in gentle 
             tones, but very fierce and very deliberate, whose frame 
             towered with her ability to rise above the fray and get to 
             the substantive issues at hand. In a career that began 
             before territorial Hawaii became a State in 1959, Patsy 
             Mink, with authority, wit, and clear perspective, became 
             one of the best-known women politicians in these United 
             States and, of course, as everyone has said, the first 
             woman of color.
               I stand today to celebrate the role that Patsy played in 
             the life of this great Nation. Her career spanned over 24 
             years of service in this House of Representatives; and 
             Patsy concentrated upon the removal of negative factors, 
             social, economic, and educational restrictions which had 
             been directed against minority groups, and which prevented 
             the full development of an individual's ability and 
             dignity.
               It is hardly possible to stand here today to 
             recapitulate on the extraordinary career of Patsy Mink, 
             except to point out that a succession of legislative 
             victories are owed to her tireless work. Later on next 
             week, the women of the House will highlight the many 
             legislative victories that this great woman has brought to 
             the forefront, like improved opportunity in education, 
             elimination of much overt discrimination, and modifying 
             environmental policies which were part of the hallmark of 
             her career.
               Her persistent and passionate campaign for equity for 
             women is credited as a centerpiece for the Democratic 
             Party today. I can recall a couple of months ago when 
             Patsy celebrated 30 years of the passage of title IX, and 
             I came on the floor to talk with her and I asked Patsy, I 
             said, ``Patsy, are all of the States in compliance with 
             this law?'' She says, ``Juanita, I don't know, but why 
             don't you get on that?'' And Mr. Speaker, I have begun to 
             get on that. I thank her so much for giving me the courage 
             and tenacity to move forward on title IX.

               Mr. OBEY. Mr. Speaker, until last Saturday, Patsy was 
             one of the three people left in this House who was here 
             when I first came. At that time, she was one of a handful 
             of Progressives who would gather each week to discuss ways 
             that we could prod our own party into being more 
             aggressive in pushing for education and health and 
             retirement needs of working people. I learned so much from 
             her. She was one of the best debaters in this House. She 
             was a superb legislative craftsman; and above all, she had 
             steel, and she had something else. She had a passion for 
             justice, for women, for minorities, and the poor. She had 
             a sense of rage about the opportunities that this House 
             misses every day to do more for the people who have no 
             other resource. We respected her, we loved her, this tiny 
             woman with that giant heart. We were very lucky to have 
             her as long as we had her. She made us all better than we 
             ever expected to be.

               Ms. WATSON of California. Mr. Speaker, I join my 
             colleagues in paying tribute to an outstanding U.S. 
             Congresswoman. I am saddened, like the rest of my 
             colleagues, by the loss of a tireless advocate for civil 
             rights for women and minorities, especially native 
             Hawaiians.
               First elected in 1965, Patsy Mink was a pioneer for 
             women across this country. As the first minority woman 
             elected to Congress, Patsy has always been an inspiration 
             to me as an elected official. On the path of good policy, 
             Patsy Mink never backed down and she never gave up. Patsy 
             was a true champion for American values and ideals. Early 
             in her first term, she lent her unyielding support to the 
             creation of Medicare. I first became directly involved 
             with Patsy and her work when title IX was passed 30 years 
             ago. Back then, as a member of the Los Angeles Unified 
             School Board, I was charged with implementing a title IX 
             plan for the Los Angeles Community College system. I have 
             followed and I have had admiration for Patsy's work and 
             for her public service career ever since then.
               Now as a Member of the 107th Congress, replacing another 
             strong public servant prematurely taken from us, Julian 
             Dixon, and one of the highlights of my short time here so 
             far has been the opportunity to work with Patsy on welfare 
             reform. In the fast-moving world of Congress, I was able 
             to spend some quality time with Patsy after going on a 
             trip to Sacramento to collect the data on our welfare 
             reform program. We worked together to compile information 
             for legislation. We might have been unsuccessful; but in 
             working with her, I knew I had someone who really 
             understood what we were trying to achieve.
               Mr. Speaker, although our most recent attempt for 
             meaningful change was rebuffed in committee, I want my 
             colleagues to know that Patsy, that working with her, she 
             leaves a legacy that we can all model after. Her 
             dedication, her strength, her principled and hard-working 
             self will remain with us forever. Patsy, thank you for 
             what you have done for all of us, especially women.

               Mr. SHAYS. Patsy Mink was a thoughtful, passionate, 
             kind, strong, gentle, and lovely person who bravely and 
             courageously fought and spoke out for those who could not 
             always do it for themselves. She fought undeterred for 
             social and economic justice in our country and around the 
             world, and she never gave up. She is, in my eyes, Winston 
             Churchill's ideal model when he spoke to a group of young 
             men, young boys during the war, the Second World War, and 
             told them ``Never, give up. Never give up. Never, never, 
             never give up.''
               She was a giant. I did not even know that she was small 
             in figure. She always, to me, was a giant, a champion and 
             someone I wanted to know better. I loved her passion, but 
             I loved more understanding why she felt so passionate. She 
             wanted to make a difference in this place. I want her 
             family to know her efforts were worth every minute. She 
             did make a difference, a huge difference. I loved, no, I 
             want to say I love Patsy Mink.

               Mr. SCOTT. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to a 
             distinguished legislator and an amazing activist and a 
             wonderful person, Patsy Mink. President Kennedy once said, 
             ``A nation reveals itself not only by the men it produces, 
             but also by the men it honors, the men it remembers.'' 
             Because of Patsy, both from her example and her 
             legislative teachings, we know that quote needs to be 
             amended, for a Nation is revealed not only by its men, but 
             also by the women produced, honored, and remembered.
               As we know from working with her, Patsy made sure that, 
             as a Nation, we honored and remembered those who might 
             otherwise be pushed aside and forgotten. Patsy was a 
             voice, loud and strong, for those who had no voice, or 
             those whose voices were in danger of being drowned out.
               As the author of title IX, she drew attention to women's 
             educational needs and abilities. When we consider that 
             over 80 percent of women in senior executive positions 
             today report having participated in organized sports after 
             grammar school, we can know that Patsy Mink's work has 
             changed the face of the Nation.
               Through her years in the House, she tirelessly fought 
             for women, for the poor, for immigrants, for children, for 
             workers. She fought for civil rights, for health care, 
             education, child care, teachers' professional development.
               I had the honor of knowing Patsy for the last 10 years. 
             We were on the Committee on Education and the Workforce, 
             where I had the privilege of watching her at her best.
               Although we mourn the loss of Patsy, I will always honor 
             the privilege of having served alongside such a tenacious 
             and thoughtful legislator. The legacy of her life and 
             accomplishments are great lessons to us all. We owe many 
             thanks to her work and her memory, and that has revealed a 
             lot about this Nation. So today we are better for honoring 
             and remembering the gentlewoman from Hawaii, the Honorable 
             Patsy Mink.

               Mrs. MEEK of Florida. Mr. Speaker, my dear departed 
             friend and colleague, Patsy Mink, was a big girl. She was 
             slight and small in stature, but great in spirit and 
             heart.
               I think God thought about Patsy and decided he needed 
             somebody in the Congress who could reach out to everyone, 
             who could make laws, who could extend her hand to 
             everyone. God needed a very strong person. He needed a 
             woman who would stand up against everybody and bring a 
             voice to this Congress for the voiceless people.
               That is what he did: He chose Patsy. She came in and 
             broke down barriers. She opened doors. She did everything 
             God would have her do. In terms of race, color, gender, 
             she had nothing to stop her.
               Patsy was a woman of great honor, and we come here 
             tonight to honor her, because God chose Patsy. She spent a 
             lot of her time working for all of us. Every woman in this 
             country stands now on the shoulders of Patsy Mink. I feel 
             much stronger and taller because of what Patsy left, the 
             legacy she left to us. She was a tireless advocate for her 
             constituents in Hawaii. She was a great leader. She was a 
             great model.
               I remember the many things, being one of the older women 
             here in the Congress, of the work that Patsy did: Equal 
             pay for equal work; all of it. There is a litany of things 
             that Patsy did which I will put in the Record.
               She was a great friend and kindred spirit. She used to 
             send me candy on my birthday; and I had plenty of those, 
             Mr. Speaker. She would send me whatever those nuts are 
             that they grow in Hawaii.

               Mr. ABERCROMBIE. Mr. Speaker, I will keep on doing that 
             for the gentlewoman.

               Mrs. MEEK of Florida. Good. I hope the gentleman will 
             keep it up.
               Patsy Mink was the first woman of color admitted in 
             Congress, and the first Japanese woman admitted to the bar 
             in Hawaii.
               So I say, I stand on her shoulders, Mr. Speaker, and I 
             pray that each of us here would take a pattern from Patsy, 
             because she was a great leader who gave service to God for 
             the space she occupied.

               Mrs. DAVIS of California. Mr. Speaker, with real sorrow 
             I come to the podium today to honor a truly memorable 
             colleague, the Honorable Patsy Mink. As a freshman Member, 
             it has been so inspiring to serve on a committee with a 
             role model who has made a real mark on our society through 
             her lengthy service in the House of Representatives.
               It was an honor for me to join her at this podium on 
             June 19 in the commemoration of the 30th anniversary of 
             title IX. Seldom does one get to join forces with one of 
             the original sponsors of legislation that was not only 
             landmark legislation for our country, but was so formative 
             for my children's generation.
               When I was a local school board member, I remember how 
             hard we had to work to change the culture of our society 
             to implement the equality embodied in this bill. She lived 
             the battle for equal opportunity that that bill codified.
               I was so touched that she thanked those of us who spoke 
             honoring this legislation by presenting us with the T-
             shirt that I wear very, very proudly today.
               The comment has already been made: We know how giving 
             Patsy was, because whenever we did something that she 
             liked, she showered us with macadamia nuts so we would 
             have a taste of Hawaii.
               I thank my colleague, the gentleman from Hawaii (Mr. 
             Abercrombie), for bringing us all together this evening. 
             No one will easily fill the chair of Patsy Mink, but we 
             were all privileged to call ourselves her colleague, and 
             we will rekindle the commitment she made to the issues 
             which empowered her life: working for children, their 
             education, their homes, and their health care. I thank her 
             for showing us the way.

               Mr. ABERCROMBIE. Just before I go on, Mr. Speaker, I 
             most deeply want to thank everyone who has spoken so far. 
             There are many more people to come, as we can see, Mr. 
             Speaker, but the depth and the breadth of what Patsy 
             accomplished I think is now going on the record here in 
             the 107th Congress. It will be there for all to see and 
             view, and I know it will be an inspiration.
               I am very, very grateful, as are the people of Hawaii, 
             to all who have appeared so far and are yet to come for 
             letting everyone know of Patsy's legacy.

               Ms. CARSON of Indiana. Mr. Speaker, I want to first 
             include for the Record comments from my predecessor, the 
             Honorable Congressman from Indianapolis, Mr. Andy Jacobs, 
             who was in the class of the honorable gentlewoman from 
             Hawaii, Mrs. Mink. He wrote a letter to the family, John 
             and Wendy, which simply says: ``I hurt, dear God, do I 
             hurt. You are in my prayers and in my heart. Andy 
             Jacobs.''
               The letter referred to follows:

                                 Congressman Andy Jacobs (Ret.)
                                                          D-Indiana.
             To John--Wendy,

               I hurt, Dear God do I hurt.
               You are in my prayers and in my heart.
                                                        Andy Jacobs.

               Mr. Speaker, in the greatest book ever written, in the 
             most universally read book of all times, it is worth 
             recalling in this most special period in the U.S. House of 
             Representatives an inscription in the book of 
             Ecclesiastes.
               It says:

               For everything there is a season, and a time for every 
             purpose under heaven: A time to be born, and a time to 
             die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck up that which 
             has been planted.

               Representative Patsy Mink represented her seasons and 
             her purpose under heaven. She planted great, eternal seeds 
             in her season, and certainly fertilized them well.
               Often when I would see Mrs. Mink fight for a cause on 
             the floor, I was reminded of a cliche that we often used 
             when we were coming up describing Patsy Mink: She was a 
             little piece of leather, but well put together.
               Today I am filled with sorrow over the passing of 
             Congresswoman Patsy Mink. She was a remarkable, 
             extraordinary woman, and certainly a wonderful friend.
               Congresswoman Mink had on her Web page a quote from a 
             1973 news article. She said: ``It is easy enough to vote 
             right and be consistently with the majority, but it is 
             more often more important to be ahead of the majority, and 
             this means being willing to cut the first furrow in the 
             ground and stand alone for a while if necessary.''
               So please know, to the Mink family, her husband John and 
             daughter Wendy, her many loyal constituents, they are all 
             in my thoughts and prayers these days. I extend to all of 
             them my heartfelt appreciation for loaning us Patsy, even 
             if it was just for a little while, and something called 
             the chicken pox came through and decided that she needed 
             to do work elsewhere.

               Ms. LEE. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding 
             time to me, and for bringing this resolution honoring our 
             colleague, the gentlewoman from Hawaii, and our dear 
             friend.
               First I want to begin by extending my deepest and most 
             heartfelt condolences to Patsy's family, to John, Wendy, 
             friends, and constituents, and to the entire State of 
             Hawaii. My thoughts and prayers are with them during this 
             very difficult period.
               In the words of our Secretary of Transportation, Norm 
             Mineta:

               Patsy Mink spoke for the forgotten, the disenfranchised, 
             the poor, and worked unceasingly to remind the Nation of 
             its obligations to those whom it sometimes forgets.

               Patsy spoke not only for the forgotten, the 
             disenfranchised, the poor, but also to the conscience of 
             all Americans. The leadership that Patsy commanded on the 
             welfare reauthorization debate this year really 
             exemplified her values and her character.
               During that debate and during our work on that bill, 
             Patsy Mink authored a fair and compassionate bill that 
             would have helped women provide for their families and 
             enhance their futures through education. Although that 
             bill was not voted out of the House, it was really the 
             right bill, and many of my colleagues, myself included, 
             supported it. We were determined to stand by Patsy through 
             this. I am glad we did. She was right.
               I also appreciate her passion for peace. Patsy was an 
             early opponent of the Vietnam war, and accompanied another 
             great woman, Bella Abzug of New York, to Paris to 
             participate during the Vietnam-era peace talks.
               In 1967, right here on this floor, and I want to quote 
             this, because Patsy spoke of peace instead of war, she 
             said right here, ``America is not a country which needs to 
             punish its dissenters to preserve its honor.'' Patsy said, 
             ``America is not a country which needs to demand 
             conformity of all its people, for its strength lies in all 
             of our diversities converging in one common belief, that 
             of the importance of freedom as the essence of our 
             country.'' Patsy said that in 1967 right here.
               Of course, I have thought long on this issue, and truly 
             respect Patsy for her courage and her fortitude.
               She was tremendously supportive of me on many tough 
             issues and truly was an inspiration. Patsy had a brilliant 
             intellect, yet a big heart and a lot of soul. As a leader 
             and advocate on so many issues, she always took the time 
             to say thank you, as we heard earlier. Sometimes she sent 
             candy or flowers or nuts or coffee from her home State as 
             a token of her appreciation and her friendship.
               To know Patsy was really to love her. Many of us, myself 
             included, have benefited from Patsy's warm hospitality 
             when visiting her beautiful home, the State of Hawaii. She 
             happily shared information and knowledge about her home, 
             and wanted her friends to experience it to its fullest, 
             and to really feel at home.
               Mr. Speaker, let me just say, I will miss Patsy. She was 
             a woman whose wisdom and genius really helped us make a 
             better world. May she rest in peace.

               Mr. LEWIS of Georgia. Mr. Speaker, I know this is a very 
             hard and difficult time for the gentleman and for all of 
             us, and for the people of Hawaii.
               Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of this resolution 
             remembering the life and the work of our colleague, the 
             gentlewoman from Hawaii, Patsy Mink. Patsy was beautiful 
             and smart. I loved this woman. I loved Patsy Mink. 
             Sometimes on this floor when Patsy was sitting here, I 
             would just walk over and say, hello, Patsy, how are you? 
             What are you thinking about?
               I first met Patsy when she was a keynote speaker at a 
             Democratic convention during the 1960s. Patsy was one of 
             the most liberal and most progressive Members of this 
             Congress.
               When Patsy spoke, she spoke from her soul. She spoke 
             from her heart. She had the capacity to get our attention 
             and hold our attention when she stepped in the well of 
             this House. She spoke with passion. Determined, dedicated 
             and committed, Patsy was a fighter. She fought for civil 
             rights, social justice and equality. She was a champion of 
             education. Patsy stood by her convictions. She would not 
             yield to the prevailing wind. She did not put her fingers 
             into the air to see which way the wind was blowing.
               Patsy will be forever missed. We will miss her as a 
             Nation and as a people. We will never be so lucky, not so 
             blessed to see her likeness again.
               Mr. Speaker, when the Master created Patsy Mink, he 
             threw away the mold. May the mercy and the grace of God be 
             with her family and with all of us.

               Ms. DeLAURO. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from 
             Hawaii for bringing us together to acknowledge our dear 
             and loved colleague.
               It is a sad day for the House of Representatives. We 
             mourn the loss of a great American, not only a friend whom 
             we loved but a dedicated public servant who loved her 
             country, and through the course of her life literally 
             changed the course of history. How many people can we say 
             that about?
               We all come to this institution with the hope in trying 
             to make a difference. Patsy Mink made a difference, 
             whether it was fighting poverty, standing up for civil 
             rights, for education, for women's rights or her 
             passionate and articulate opposition to the Vietnam war.
               Patsy Mink was there in the forefront fighting for the 
             causes she believed in and for the people she believed 
             society had forgotten. She gave voice to those who did not 
             have a voice. Her legacy was about more than issues. Patsy 
             Mink personified the fight for social change, for social 
             justice, and for equality among all people, no matter 
             their race, religion or gender. Patsy may have been small 
             in stature, as we have said; but she was a giant when it 
             came to fighting for the causes that she believed in. 
             There would be no title IX without Patsy Mink. She was the 
             mother of title IX. And when we look at those soccer 
             fields with those little girls in their uniforms or when 
             we watch the UCONN women Huskies play that game, we know 
             who was responsible for making that happen. And only just 
             3 months ago, we honored her and her 30th anniversary on 
             title IX, perhaps her greatest triumph in a large and 
             distinguished career. But when you also think about 
             education, less than one in five young women completed 4 
             or more years of college 30 years ago, but by the middle 
             of this decade women are expected to earn more than half 
             of all bachelor's degrees.
               Patsy Mink made a difference. That we have come so far 
             is Patsy's legacy. She knew what it required to put our 
             country on a path to social justice. She knew how to make 
             her case, to bring people together, and make us a better 
             and more understanding Nation for it.
               Pushing against the social norms is what trailblazers 
             do, and Patsy Mink was a trailblazer to her core. Patsy 
             changed so many lives during her time here. We will miss 
             her passion and her voice; but what we will miss most is 
             her spirit, her easygoing sense of humor, her laughter, 
             and her eyes that crinkled up when she laughed. She was a 
             good friend to me, a kind soul, reliable, and profoundly 
             decent. We loved her and we will miss her more than words 
             can say.

               Ms. EDDIE BERNICE JOHNSON of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I rise 
             today to pay tribute to my dear friend and colleague, 
             Congresswoman Patsy Mink. Patsy spoke for the women of the 
             world, children of the world, and really broke so many 
             barriers that she also was a role model for women and 
             children of the world. She was an aggressive fighter for 
             what was best for citizens of the Second District in 
             Hawaii, but also for the Nation and for the whole world.
               She was a tireless supporter of the Congressional Black 
             Caucus and its agenda. She was a disciplined and focused 
             advocate for the voiceless, and she was my dear friend. As 
             heaven gains another angel, we in Congress mourn our 
             unfortunate loss. May God be with the Mink family.
               Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay final tribute to my 
             dear friend and colleague, Congresswoman Patsy Mink.
               Congresswoman Mink was able to break through racial and 
             gender barriers to attain goals that others thought were 
             impossible. Her career was a series of firsts: the first 
             woman of color elected to Congress, the first Asian-
             American woman to practice law in Hawaii, the first Asian-
             American woman to be elected to the territorial House.
               Representative Mink entered this world as a fighter for 
             equality. Born in Maui in December 1927, from her earliest 
             years, she was encouraged to excel in academic courses. As 
             a 4 year old, she recalled how she hung onto the shirt of 
             her older brother, demanding, and eventually winning the 
             right to accompany him to the first grade.
               As Patsy Mink grew up in Hawaii, she saw her life change 
             overnight with the bombing of Pearl Harbor. She turned 14 
             the day before the bombing of Pearl Harbor. At that time, 
             anyone who was looked up to in the Japanese community was 
             seen as a threat; this included her father. He was taken 
             away for questioning but returned to the family. Patsy 
             realized that anyone could be arrested for no reason 
             except that they were Japanese.
                Mink attended Maui High School, where she played 
             basketball at a time when girls played half-court because, 
             as Mink put it, ``they said it was too strenuous for us.'' 
             When she ran for student body president during her junior 
             year in high school and won that campaign, she began her 
             unofficial political career. In 1944 she graduated as high 
             school class valedictorian.
               Representative Mink went on to attend college at the 
             University of Hawaii, but transferred to the University of 
             Nebraska where she faced a policy of segregated student 
             housing. She arrived at the campus and was housed at the 
             international house. When she found that this housing was 
             for the ``colored'' students, she was outraged. Patsy 
             wrote a letter of protest and sent it to the local 
             newspaper. The accompanying protests and objections 
             resulted in the university changing its policies.
               However, Patsy was not able to enjoy the changes she had 
             caused to be made because she became very ill and had to 
             return to Hawaii where she finished her baccalaureate 
             degree.
               She returned to the University of Hawaii to prepare for 
             medical school and graduated with a degree in zoology and 
             chemistry. However, in 1948, none of the 20 medical 
             schools to which she applied would accept women.
               She decided to study law and was accepted by the 
             University of Chicago because they considered her a 
             ``foreign student.'' Choosing not to inform the university 
             that Hawaii was an American territory, she obtained her 
             Doctor of Jurisprudence in 1951.
               Getting a job in the legal field was not easy for a 
             woman at that time, but that did not deter Patsy. No one 
             was willing to hire her, even as a law clerk. She worked 
             at the University of Chicago Law School library until the 
             eighth month of her pregnancy. Six months after giving 
             birth, she, her husband John and baby daughter Gwendolyn 
             moved to Hawaii.
               When  she  found  no  law  firm  that  would  hire  a  
             woman, she decided to start her own firm. She became the 
             first Japanese-American woman lawyer in Hawaii. She also 
             taught at the University of Hawaii.
               In 1965, Patsy Mink was elected to the U.S. House of 
             Representatives and began the first of six consecutive 
             terms in the House of Representatives. Again, she was the 
             first woman of color to be elected to Congress.
                Mink's ability to build coalitions for progressive 
             legislation continued during her tenure in Congress. She 
             introduced the first comprehensive Early Childhood 
             Education Act and authored the Women's Educational Equity 
             Act.
                Mink believed one of her most significant 
             accomplishments in Congress was title IX of the Education 
             Act, which she helped authored in 1972. It mandated gender 
             equality in any education program or activity receiving 
             Federal financial assistance. Title IX has become the 
             major tool for women's fuller participation, not only in 
             sports, but in all aspects of education. The law promotes 
             equality in school athletics. Scholarship money for women 
             increased from $100,000 in 1972 to $179 million in 1997, 
             but was equally important in opening academics.
               Representative Mink was an early opponent of the Vietnam 
             war and accompanied fellow Representative Bella Abzug, D-
             NY, to Paris to talk to participants in the Vietnam war 
             peace talks. She supported women's rights, was against the 
             death penalty and had as her spending priorities 
             education, housing and health. Mink's strong liberal 
             stands led conservative opponents to dub her ``Patsy 
             Pink.''
               Her career included an appointment by President Jimmy 
             Carter as Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and 
             International, Environmental and Scientific Affairs from 
             1977 to 1978.
               Patsy Mink returned to Washington, DC, in 1990 and has 
             been here ever since.
               Congresswoman Patsy Mink was an aggressive fighter for 
             what was best for citizens of the Second District in 
             Hawaii, as well as this Nation as a whole. She was a 
             tireless supporter of the Congressional Black Caucus. She 
             was a disciplined and focused advocate for the voiceless. 
             And she was my dear friend. As Heaven gains another angel, 
             we in Congress morn our unfortunate loss. May God be with 
             the Mink family.

               Ms. JACKSON-LEE of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I cannot thank 
             the distinguished gentleman from Hawaii (Mr. Abercrombie) 
             enough for bringing us together for this very special 
             tribute. Might I also add my deepest sympathy to Patsy's 
             husband and daughter.
               I cannot recall when I last saw John with Patsy, but I 
             can assure you I have never seen such a bond, such a sense 
             of connection and friendship, such a joy of being 
             together. And I hope that as he mourns the loss of his 
             dearly beloved wife, he will remember her with the 
             wonderful memories that so many of us saw.
               This past summer I had the opportunity to speak in 
             Hawaii, and I took time to visit in and about the area and 
             mentioned Patsy's name frequently to those I would meet. 
             And interestingly enough, as I called her name Patsy, it 
             is not out of disrespect. It is because those who lived 
             there, they would say, That is our Patsy. That is how we 
             know her. That is how we vote for her. That is how she 
             comes to us. That is our Patsy.
               That is the way the Congresswoman was to her colleagues 
             as well, caring and nurturing; and I stand here this 
             evening just to thank the gods, if you will, to have 
             allowed me to not be in that timeframe between 1977 and 
             1990 but to come to this House when Patsy came back to 
             this House.
               We deal a lot now with 9/11 issues and there is fear in 
             America, but Patsy stood above that fear. And I want to 
             pay tribute to her ancestry, which is a noted classic 
             story of immigrants seeking and determined to live a 
             better life in America for themselves and their families. 
             Her four grandparents emigrated from Japan in the late 
             1800s to work as contract laborers in Maui's sugar 
             plantations. That is why she was a person who believed in 
             lifting the boats of all others. And if there was ever any 
             legislation to join, if you knew Patsy had authored it, 
             you needed to be on it. You needed to be on her welfare 
             reform legislation because she was ready to fight against 
             those who did not understand the need for child care and 
             transportation and training.
               And then, of course, if you just take a moment, just a 
             second of quietness, you can see Patsy running to the 
             front, coming to this mike, and then speaking in a booming 
             voice on her beliefs and causes.
               Thank you, Congresswoman Mink for title IX because I 
             knew what it was like when I grew up; but what joy as I 
             watch the Olympics time after time after time to see young 
             women rising because of you.
               I close briefly because I know time draws nigh to simply 
             say this in Patsy's words. She was asked what she wished 
             someone had said to her when she started and she said:

               When I was in high school and college I wanted to become 
             a medical doctor. I wish someone had told me then that 
             medical schools in the U.S. did not admit women students 
             except for one all-female school. I wish someone had told 
             me about sex discrimination and about how deeply embedded 
             it is and about how every day would be a struggle to 
             overcome it.

               Patsy, they may not have told you, but you were a 
             fighter. May you rest in peace.
               I would like to express my heartfelt condolences to the 
             many colleagues, constituents, friends, and relatives of 
             Congresswoman Patsy Mink of the Second Congressional 
             District of Hawaii. A coalition builder for greater 
             understanding, the Honorable Patsy Mink served in the 
             House of Representatives for 12 terms as the first woman 
             of Asian descent to serve in the U.S. Congress.
               Representative Mink was the first woman of an ethnic 
             minority elected to Federal office and had been a member 
             of the House for 24 years over two different stretches. 
             She won re-election 2 years ago by a nearly 2-to-1 margin, 
             and had been considered a sure winner in the November 5 
             general election.
               Her ancestry has been noted as a classic story of 
             immigrants seeking and determined to live a better life in 
             America for themselves and their families. Her four 
             grandparents emigrated from Japan in the late 1800s to 
             work as contract laborers in Maui's sugar plantations.
               She supported women's rights, was against the death 
             penalty and had as her spending priorities: education, 
             housing and health. Among her legislative involvement and 
             victories are the first comprehensive Early Childhood 
             Education Act and the enactment of title IX of the Higher 
             Education Act Amendments, prohibiting gender 
             discrimination by federally funded institutions. Her 
             legislation has served both as a catalyst and a major tool 
             for women's fuller participation both in sports and in all 
             aspects of education.
               From her scholastic accolades to her congressional 
             achievements, Congresswoman Mink accomplished much in 
             sustaining the American spirit. This very truth was 
             exhibited throughout her earlier academic years as a 
             student government representative and on through her 
             political career. As she galvanized individuals to unite 
             for the common good, I am reminded of her leadership and 
             keen ability to build coalitions for progressive 
             legislation throughout her tenure in Congress.
               When asked, ``What advice do you wish you had when you 
             started?,'' she responded by saying:

               When I was in high school and college, I wanted to 
             become a medical doctor. I wish someone had told me then 
             that medical schools in the United States did not admit 
             women students--except for one all-female school. I wish 
             someone had told me about sex discrimination--about how 
             deeply embedded it is and about how every day would be a 
             struggle to overcome it. I wouldn't have lived my life 
             differently. But I wish I had known that opportunities 
             would not come easily and that to excel in my work. I also 
             would have [fought] discrimination, not only for myself, 
             but for and with others.

               Toward this end, she shall be remembered as a lifelong 
             advocate for equal opportunity.
               Further, while we mourn her death, we are greatly 
             appreciative and shall be ever mindful of the legacy that 
             she has left for many generations to follow. Let it be 
             said that she was a champion for the rights of all human 
             beings and that she was bold in the face of adversity.

               Mr. HOUGHTON. Mr. Speaker, I would like to tell you a 
             story. There was a man called Robert Fulghum and he wrote 
             a book called ``Everything I Ever Learned I Learned in 
             Kindergarten.''
               He was in college and there was a Greek immigrant called 
             Dr. Papaderos and at the end of one of the courses he 
             said, ``What is the meaning of life, Dr. Papaderos?'' And 
             everybody laughed. And Dr. Papaderos took this thing very 
             seriously. He said, ``I will tell you a story. When I was 
             a little boy in Greece I ran across a German motorcycle 
             and there was a glass on the ground, a mirror. And I did 
             not have any toys to play with and I picked up the glass 
             and I ground it and I ground it. Soon it was perfectly 
             circular. It was a wonderful play thing for me, but as I 
             grew up and went into life, I realized it was sort of a 
             metaphor for what we were all about. When I used to shine 
             this mirror into dark places, it would light up and I 
             could see things.'' And he said, ``One of the things that 
             it taught me is that we are not the light, we are not the 
             source of the light; but through our own lives, we can 
             shine certain pieces of material, in this particular case 
             it was the glass, so that we can illuminate an issue.''
               This is the thing I think that Patsy did more than 
             anything for me on the other side of the aisle. She was 
             able to illuminate and humanize issues in a way I will 
             never forget.

               Mr. ETHERIDGE. Mr. Speaker, I rise tonight to join my 
             colleagues in honoring the passing of a great Member of 
             the U.S. House, Congresswoman Patsy Mink, and offer my 
             condolences to her family and to the members of her staff 
             and her many friends.
               As others have noted, Representative Mink was a 
             trailblazer whose career in Congress spanned four decades 
             and whose service has left our country a far better place.
               I want to focus my remarks very briefly on the work that 
             Patsy and I had an opportunity to do just on education; it 
             was a passion of hers and certainly is one of mine.
               Prior to my service in this body, I served as the State 
             superintendent of schools in my home State of North 
             Carolina; and when I came here in 1996, I was appointed as 
             co-chair along with Patsy and a number of others to the 
             Democratic Caucus Task Force. I wanted to thank Patsy 
             tonight for looking after the children of North Carolina 
             as I did many times.
               She was a longtime champion of the efforts to help our 
             public schools, and she fought when others were not 
             willing to fight. And as task force co-chairs, Patsy and I 
             worked side by side with our other colleagues here in 
             Washington on some very positive progressive policies to 
             strengthen public education in this country.
               We may have seemed something like an odd couple. Me, a 
             tall lanky Southerner and Patsy a little short lady from 
             Hawaii, but she was tough as a leather knot, as we say in 
             North Carolina, and a good Hawaiian lawyer and we made a 
             good team along with others.
               Together with the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Hinojosa), 
             the gentleman from Indiana (Mr. Roemer), the gentleman 
             from New Jersey (Mr. Menendez), and the gentleman from New 
             York (Mr. Owens) and a number of others, we repeatedly 
             fought back the efforts to cut education, against private 
             school vouchers and other anti-education items. We pushed 
             our message so successfully and Patsy was out there 
             hammering so hard, that the other party's Presidential 
             candidate borrowed our message and used it to talk about 
             improving quality public education in this country.
               Patsy would be proud of that tonight. Indeed, she made a 
             difference. The list of her accomplishments have been 
             listed already. And I thank Patsy for title IX and my 
             daughter thanks her. All the daughters of America thank 
             her. She made a difference in this country, in the title I 
             children that would not have had a chance, the poor 
             children, and all the others. I could not go through the 
             list. Others have gone through them. I will not read them.
               Most importantly, Patsy Mink was a leader whose country 
             will forever owe her a great debt of gratitude, and there 
             is a bright star burning in heaven tonight.

               Mr. ABERCROMBIE. Mr. Speaker, Patsy was so moved by the 
             gentleman from North Carolina's (Mr. Etheridge) remarks 
             that she let him know what she thought about it. She is 
             our guardian angel here tonight. She makes her presence 
             known.
               Mr. Speaker, I yield 2\1/4\ minutes to the gentleman 
             from California (Mr. Honda), who I might say could also 
             look Mrs. Mink eye to eye.

               Mr. HONDA. Mr. Speaker, I think this is what she has 
             done a lot is draw the podium down to her height.
               I thank the gentleman from Hawaii for yielding me the 
             time and for putting this session together, and I also 
             would like to share my deepest sympathies with Patsy 
             Mink's family, John Francis, her husband, her daughter 
             Wendy and her brother Eugene Takemoto. I also want to 
             share my sympathies to the people of Hawaii.
               Many things have been said here this evening, and as a 
             child growing up I remember reading about her. I remember 
             hearing about her in the community, her accomplishments, 
             Patsy Mink, and this session, my first session, I had the 
             privilege to get to know her, sit next to her through the 
             debates and through different issues that came up on the 
             floor, but what everybody said here this evening was new 
             to me. So I appreciate the Members sharing.
               I appreciate her life. I also appreciate the 
             accomplishments and the work that she has done because 
             although we say here tonight of her work, there would be 
             many people and future generations who will not know of 
             her work, but will be touched by her work. To her, I thank 
             her for that.
               Many quotes were given that she had said on the floor. 
             Many thoughts were shared by them of her, and I had not 
             had the fortune of being able to work with her through 
             many issues on the floor and in this body, but I am the 
             recipient of her work. I am the recipient of her toil.
               One thing I did learn listening to people tonight is 
             that many people did say, I did not know that she was the 
             first woman of color here. I learned that, too, and I 
             think there will be many people in this country who will 
             learn and do well by the lessons that she has done through 
             her life.
               When I hear other people talk, I understood that she 
             took her private and personal life and converted that into 
             public policy that would affect this country.
               Let me close with a quote that she has left behind. Many 
             things, many people have been memorialized by statues and 
             by the inscription of their sayings. Here is one I would 
             like to share with my colleagues that she said, and it is 
             especially poignant today because of what we face as a 
             Nation: ``If to believe in freedom and equality is to be a 
             radical, then I am a radical. So long as there remains 
             groups of our fellow Americans who are denied equal 
             opportunity and equal protection in the law, we must 
             remain steadfast to all shades of man we stand beside in 
             dignity and self-respect, to truly enjoy the fruits of 
             this great land.''
               Hawaii was found by Polynesians following the stars. 
             Tonight in the skies of Hawaii there is another star to 
             lead the islanders.

               Ms. WATERS. Mr. Speaker, when the gentleman from Hawaii 
             (Mr. Abercrombie) said to me last week he was concerned 
             about Patsy, that he thought she was at risk, I could not 
             grasp what he was saying to me. I could not think about 
             her being at the kind of risk that would cause her death.
               My sincere condolences to John and to her family. Patsy 
             was my friend. I knew her long before I ever came to the 
             Congress of the United States. Patsy was on the cutting 
             edge of the women's movement. Patsy was there when all of 
             the great strategies were formed, when all of the great 
             organizations got started. Patsy was there with Bella 
             Abzug and Gloria Steinem and women who dedicated their 
             lives so that women could have justice and equality in 
             America.
               She was there for ERA. She was there for pay equity, and 
             certainly it has been mentioned time and time again that 
             she co-sponsored title IX, women's educational equity.
               It was just a few months ago that I sat at the WNBA All 
             Star Game where Patsy was honored for 30 years' 
             recognition of Patsy's work. As I looked at all of those 
             strong, tall women out there playing and my dear child, 
             Lisa Leslie, who won the All-Star honor that evening, I 
             thought it was a short, little woman that caused this 
             tall, big woman to be able to realize her dreams, to be 
             able to hone her talents. What a wonderful moment that 
             was.
               We are going to miss her because she was a woman of 
             impeccable integrity. She was not about misleading 
             anybody. She did not do a lot of small talk. She was a 
             passionate woman, a brilliant woman, who was a passionate 
             and articulate debater and debate she could. When Patsy 
             took the floor and she decided to let anybody have it, she 
             really could do it.
               Let me just say, Patsy was an expert on any number of 
             subjects and certainly on education, but the mark of this 
             woman was the fact that this brilliant woman devoted her 
             time to poor women. Many people get very sophisticated and 
             want to talk about other kinds of subjects once they have 
             served in the Congress of the United States, but she 
             stayed with poor women.
               She was an advocate for poor women. She fought for poor 
             women to have a safety net as we debated welfare reform, 
             and people tried to make it something else. She simply 
             talked about the need for poor women and their children to 
             have a place to live and food to eat.
               We love you, Patsy. We will miss you.

               Ms. NORTON. Mr. Speaker, I thank my good friend and 
             classmate the gentleman from Hawaii (Mr. Abercrombie) for 
             yielding me the time, and I remember that Patsy was here a 
             few months ahead of us in the special election. She got 
             the jump on us in seniority. Actually she had been here 25 
             years ahead of us. Patsy had a second coming, and the 
             House is all the better for it, but the heart of the House 
             is broken today. Historic woman, first woman of color, 
             came here 4 years before even the great Shirley Chisholm, 
             the first African-American, came to the House.
               She is known for two signature issues among the many 
             issues that are around her name, education and equality. 
             Patsy, of course, is the mother and the godmother and the 
             protector and the fighter for title IX. I think she would 
             want this memorial to serve a purpose, especially today 
             when title IX is under attack.
               I remember 2 months ago when she came to this floor to 
             commemorate title IX, and she said this: ``We have heard 
             much about the many successes of title IX, particularly in 
             athletics. Most do not know of the long, arduous course we 
             took before the enactment of title IX and the battles that 
             we have fought to keep it intact.'' And as we remember her 
             tonight, remember, we are fighting a battle to keep it 
             intact tonight.
               She recounted some of those battles. She talked about 
             1975 when there was an amendment to keep then HEW from 
             promulgating regulations under title IX. That is how deep 
             it got. Even after title IX was passed, she had a way of 
             piercing to the truth, when they said there is no title 
             IX. It took four men to summarize what she said on the 
             floor, 2 months ago, that reductions in men's sports are 
             due to choices made by college administrators in favor of 
             the big-budget, revenue-generating programs such as 
             football and basketball. She told it like it was. She 
             could not help it.
               Let us remember as we commemorate and celebrate title IX 
             and celebrate Patsy's life what we are going through 
             today. There is an administration task force. With all her 
             being, Patsy opposed to fix what is not broken, title IX, 
             30 years later when we go from 32,000 female athletes to 
             150,000. Instead of commemorating, the administration is 
             fixing. Leave title IX alone. Let it stand. Let it be. Do 
             it for women, and do it for Patsy Mink.

               Ms. VELAZQUEZ. Mr. Speaker, the mark of an American hero 
             is a person who created reality and shaped the values that 
             we take for granted today. Patsy Mink is one such American 
             hero. Each time we look around at what America is today, 
             we should think of Patsy Mink because our Nation is a 
             better place due to the contributions she made throughout 
             her life on education, immigrants' rights, health care, 
             and protecting the poor.
               She fought for civil rights in an era of segregation. 
             She was an advocate for Asian-Americans after the 
             internment policy of World War II. She opposed a war 
             before it made headlines. She fought to provide every 
             child with a quality education, and she created 
             opportunities for girls to play college sports, sparking a 
             revolution for an entire generation that is now the envy 
             of the world.
               She was the first in so many things, the first female 
             student body president, the first Japanese-American woman 
             to practice law in Hawaii, the first woman of color to 
             serve in the U.S. Congress, all things we take for granted 
             today. We should always remember it was Patsy who fought 
             to get us here, especially women.
               Perhaps Patsy herself could sum up her life and legacy 
             best when she said, ``My career in politics has been a 
             crucible of challenges and crises where in the end the 
             principles to which I was committed prevailed.''
               We should all strive to be as dedicated to our process 
             and as passionate in our arguments as Patsy was to hers. 
             For the many causes she championed, there was no fiercer 
             advocate than Patsy Mink. I will miss her friendship, her 
             spirit and her sense of humanity.

               Mr. ANDREWS. I rise in sincere remembrance of a gentle 
             soul and a good friend, Patsy Mink. I offer my condolences 
             to her husband John, daughter Wendy, and my thanks to the 
             service that the entire family has given by permitting 
             their wife and mother to serve this Nation.
               Patsy has gone from our lives, but she will touch the 
             lives of so many people tomorrow whose names she will 
             never know. Tomorrow there will be welfare mothers who 
             will get up and have a first-rate child care center to 
             take their sons and daughters to because Patsy Mink made 
             sure that would happen. Tomorrow there will be young women 
             who will have a chance to learn math or science or go on 
             to engineering careers because Patsy Mink helped lead the 
             fight to let little girls know that they could be anything 
             they wanted to achieve in any discipline through her work 
             on women's equity in education.
               A few hours ago on the East Coast, and Mr. Speaker, 
             right now across the country, young women are coming home 
             from sports practice, from soccer and field hockey and all 
             the other sports that young women play.
               And the most talented ones know that they have a chance 
             to compete now at the intercollegiate level because Patsy 
             Mink wrote title IX and made sure it stuck.
               Patsy Mink will touch my life for years to come. My two 
             greatest achievements are 9 years old and 7 years old, my 
             two daughters; and I take comfort at this time of great 
             loss from the fact that they will live in a world where 
             they can be anything they set their minds to, reach any 
             heights to which they aspire, because in large part this 
             firebrand of a woman stood on this floor and served this 
             country.
               It is my honor to call her a friend. My great expression 
             of condolences to her family. May God rest her soul.

               Ms. LOFGREN. Mr. Speaker, this is a very sad day. I 
             remember when I first met Patsy and saw Patsy. It was in 
             1970, and I was on the staff of then-Congressman Don 
             Edwards, and I thought this was really somebody, and I 
             watched her and I watched her on the ERA, and I never 
             dreamed that many years later after she had gone back to 
             Hawaii and come back to the House that I would get to 
             serve with her, and I really value the years I served with 
             Patsy. I knew her really as just a tireless champion for 
             the underdog. She believed in the power of education, and 
             she fought to make sure that every person had the 
             opportunity to do more in life because they had an 
             education.
               I remember participating in a special order with Patsy 
             before the August recess, and we think about title IX 
             rightly about sports; but really Patsy and I were talking 
             about the other aspect of title IX when there were limits, 
             there were quotas on how many women would be admitted to a 
             college, and there were courses of study that women were 
             not allowed to take. So I know I benefited personally from 
             what Patsy did on title IX and my daughter still benefits 
             from what Patsy did.
               Patsy made her mark and she changed America. There are 
             not very many women in the House who are lawyers. Patsy 
             was one of them, and she had a fine legal mind. She was 
             someone who I always listened to when she had advice to 
             give. She was not afraid to lead. And petite as she was, 
             she was always big enough to share the limelight. How 
             someone could be so tough and so firm and yet be also warm 
             and kind is a wonder. She was funny, smart, brave, a 
             visionary. She helped teach all of us, and we are in her 
             debt.
               I give thanks to her husband, John, and her daughter, 
             Wendy, for sharing her with us and thanks to the people of 
             Hawaii for sending her to the Nation. People of Hawaii 
             have no idea how she and Neil would stand up and fight for 
             them whenever they needed them to do so. So I know I am 
             not alone in finding it hard to reconcile myself to her 
             absence. I miss her and America is profoundly improved by 
             her gift of time, energy, and pure goodness.

               Ms. SOLIS. Mr. Speaker, buenos noches, America. Today we 
             stand here in celebration of a dynamic woman, this woman 
             here, this face that many of us here in the House have 
             come to know, and I as a new Member am proud to say that I 
             was able to witness her intelligence, her tenacity, her 
             wherewithal, a true steel magnolia, a true profile in 
             courage, someone who fought even the last few days that we 
             were arguing about welfare reform, how important it was 
             for us to decide upon providing women with the ability to 
             have child care because if they chose to go to work and 
             could find work, the only way they were going to escape 
             poverty was to be able to get child care. And she fought 
             tooth and nail even sometimes against our own leadership, 
             and many of us stood with her.
               I learned a great deal from her, her compassion, and she 
             did shower us with support and friendship. And as a new 
             Member here in the House, she was someone I looked up to 
             in our Committee on Education and the Workforce, always 
             moving me, pushing me along: ``Hilda, keep going. Do not 
             give up. Stand up to those people. Do not let people make 
             you turn your back.''
               She taught us a powerful lesson. She is the first in 
             many categories in her own State and somebody who should 
             be given the dignity and honor to stand with us forever, 
             and that is by paying tribute to her and in either having 
             a commissioned portrait or a statue, a woman to represent 
             us, so proud, and throughout the world.
               I am proud to know her and her family and to have worked 
             with her staff. Somehow we need to find the courage that 
             she had to continue the fight because Patsy is watching us 
             and Patsy is going to hold us accountable, and she is 
             going to say, ``My work was not done in vain because I 
             have helped to lift so many people out of poverty and give 
             them hope.''
               And I know she has given us that. I have heard many here 
             speak about her attributes and everything that she gave so 
             unselfishly; and I too, like my colleagues, join the world 
             in praying for her because she is a wonderful, wonderful 
             role model for so many of us. I thank this House for the 
             opportunity to be able to pay tribute to her tonight.

               Ms. WOOLSEY. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from 
             Hawaii (Mr. Abercrombie) for making this possible for all 
             of us to come here to honor our colleague, Patsy Mink, 
             with the resolution and with memories that say so very 
             much about this woman that we loved so dearly. But as 
             everyone has heard, no words can capture the great loss 
             that we feel. The Congress, our country, and the rest of 
             this world have lost a most remarkable woman. I knew of 
             Patsy Mink from Hawaii by reputation for many, many years 
             before I met her. In fact, Patsy is one of the reasons I 
             decided to run for the House of Representatives. I was 
             convinced that I would be a help to her in her work for 
             civil rights and economic justice; but once I was elected 
             and sworn in in 1993, I think I was more work to Patsy 
             than I was help for her because she became a mentor, a 
             mentor to me, and through her I learned so very much about 
             standing up for my beliefs even when they were not always 
             popular, knowing and trusting my constituents, remembering 
             that those were the people that I work for and 
             passionately fighting for those who are less well off who 
             need a hand up.
               Women and minorities in our country have benefited 
             greatly because of Patsy Mink. She has taught us all so 
             very much. Patsy Mink will never be forgotten, and she 
             will always be honored.

               Mrs. CHRISTENSEN. I rise to join our other colleagues to 
             pay tribute to Patsy Mink's outstanding legacy which 
             spanned more than 24 years. Though small in stature, as 
             many of us have made reference to, the death of our dear 
             friend, colleague, and leader on so many important issues 
             has left a very large void in this body. Our hearts and 
             prayers go out to her husband, John; daughter, Wendy; 
             brother; and other family members and the community that 
             she loved and served so well.
               I consider myself privileged to have had the wonderful 
             opportunity to have worked with her on a number of issues. 
             I have been particularly grateful for her tenacity in our 
             work to eliminate health disparities for women and people 
             of color. Just this past spring, Patsy joined me in a 
             forum on improving health care quality for minority 
             Americans. As ranking member on the Subcommittee on 21st 
             Century Competitiveness of the Committee on Education and 
             the Workforce, the gentle lady from Hawaii used her 
             position to influence and improve education and work 
             opportunities for all.
               This summer we were all fortunate to be able to follow 
             her leadership as she worked to craft commonsense welfare 
             reform legislation which would not only prepare those on 
             welfare for work but lift them out of poverty and give 
             them the opportunity to improve their status and the 
             status of their families. She was always sensitive to the 
             unique issues of my district and the other offshore 
             territories.
               Congresswoman Mink is most remembered for her work on 
             title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 to eliminate 
             sex discrimination in all educational institutions 
             receiving Federal funds. Patsy Mink displayed a thirst for 
             justice, a drive to convince others that it is in the best 
             interest of all that women be treated equally, a zeal to 
             ensure that no young girl would ever be told that she 
             could not achieve her goals, and a disdain for any 
             antiquated approaches which would leave women behind.
               By challenging discrimination both at home and in the 
             Nation at large, she helped this country to better live up 
             to its obligation to improve the health and well-being of 
             all its residents and to close the wide gaps in service 
             and status for women and people of color.
               Patsy gave herself generously. She was a warrior who 
             never shied from the challenge when the cause was just; 
             and by her life, her service, she has lifted us all. I am, 
             we are all honored by having had the opportunity to know 
             her, to serve with her, and partake of her wisdom, her 
             warmth, and her friendship.
               Mr. Speaker, I rise to join our other colleagues to pay 
             tribute to Patsy Mink's outstanding legacy which spanned 
             more than 24 years.
               Though small in stature, the death of our dear friend, 
             colleague and leader on so many important issues, has left 
             a very large void in this body. Our hearts and prayers go 
             out to her husband John, daughter Wendy, brother, other 
             family members, and the community she loved and served so 
             well.
               I consider myself privileged to have had the wonderful 
             opportunity to work with her on a number of issues. I have 
             been particularly grateful for her tenacity in our work to 
             eliminate health disparities for women and people of 
             color.
               Just this past spring, Patsy joined me in a forum on 
             improving health care quality for minority Americans.
               As ranking member on the Education and the Workforce 
             Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness, the gentle 
             lady from Hawaii used her position to influence and 
             improve education and work opportunities for all.
               This summer we were all fortunate to be able to follow 
             her leadership as she worked to craft commonsense welfare 
             reform legislation which would not only prepare those on 
             welfare for work, but lift them out of poverty and give 
             them the opportunity to improve their status and the 
             status of their families. She was always sensitive to the 
             unique issues of my district and the other offshore 
             territories.
               Congresswoman Mink is most remembered for her work on 
             title IX of the Education Act Amendments of 1972 to 
             eliminate sex discrimination in all educational 
             institutions receiving Federal funds.
               Patsy Mink displayed a thirst for justice, a drive to 
             convince others that it is in the best interest of all 
             that women be treated equally, a zeal to ensure that no 
             young girl would ever be told that she could not achieve 
             her goals, and a disdain for antiquated approaches which 
             would leave women behind.
               By challenging discrimination both at home and in the 
             Nation at large, she helped this country to better live up 
             to its obligation to improve the health and well-being of 
             all of its residents and to close the wide gaps in service 
             and status for women and people of color.
               It is her legacy that allows the women of Congress to 
             walk these hallowed halls with sure footing. I thank Patsy 
             Mink for her grateful heart, her strong spirit, for 
             breaking down barriers, and for leading the way as the 
             first woman of color in the Congress of the United States. 
             Through her presence and her determination, she set the 
             stage to ensure that all issues--that minority issues and 
             women's issues are also American issues.
               To her family, staff and constituents, I express my 
             sincere condolences and that of my constituents of the 
             U.S. Virgin Islands.
               Patsy gave of herself generously. She was a warrior who 
             never shied from a challenge when the cause was just, and 
             by her life, and her service she has lifted us all.
               I am, we all, are honored by having had the opportunity 
             to know her, serve with her, and partake of her wisdom, 
             her warmth and her friendship.

               Mrs. CLAYTON. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentlewoman from 
             Ohio (Ms. Kaptur) for yielding me this time. I thank the 
             gentleman from Hawaii (Mr. Abercrombie) for organizing and 
             introducing the legislation allowing us to reflect on 
             Patsy Mink's life. I think all of us have a sense of loss 
             and especially those of us who feel that somehow we just 
             did not take seriously that she was that ill and we just 
             felt that we will have the rejoicing of her coming back 
             and to feel that somehow we did not understand that. But 
             perhaps it was wise that we did not. I was back there when 
             the gentleman from Hawaii (Mr. Abercrombie) mentioned that 
             too.
               I want to extend my sympathy to the family, John, and 
             her daughter. I got to travel on three occasions with 
             Patsy, and I also got to feel that I knew her husband. And 
             I remember Patsy sharing with me why I had wanted to be a 
             doctor and missionary, and she shared with me she wanted 
             to be a doctor and she had been discriminated against. She 
             could not be. I shared with her the reason I did not 
             become a doctor was because I did not do that well in 
             organic chemistry. And graduating from the University of 
             Chicago as a woman in 1971, an honor student, and she told 
             me she could hardly find a job as a clerk and the 
             difficulty they gave her in her birthplace to even pass 
             the bar.
               I also went to law school and I did not finish. I had 
             four kids, but I understood what it meant when she was 
             denied the right as a person, a resident of Hawaii not to 
             be allowed to take the bar other than through her husband. 
             That was a way of discriminating even among her own 
             natives. I will remember Patsy for a lot of reasons, for 
             all the legislative reasons that my colleagues know even 
             better; but one thing I remember about Patsy is that she 
             was a little person but had a loud voice and a very 
             forceful voice. And the 58th chapter of Isaiah says this, 
             and I am reading from the English version. It says: ``The 
             Lord says shout as loud as you can, tell my people Israel 
             about their sins.''
               Patsy spoke loudly but clearly, eloquently, about the 
             injustice, inequality, and she also is known not for what 
             she passed in legislation but what she was willing to 
             fight against. So we remember Patsy with passion and 
             dignity, and we pray that her life will be a shining life 
             for the rest of us to carry on in the same way.

               Mr. WU. Mr. Speaker, I rise to honor our friend and 
             colleague, Patsy Mink. I was honored to serve with her on 
             the Committee on Education and the Workforce, and I am 
             proud to be one of her successors as chair of the Asian 
             Pacific Caucus.
               Patsy was an absolutely wonderful person from a 
             wonderful place. Mr. Speaker, I can share with my 
             colleagues that the first time I was ever recognized on 
             this floor, I was recognized as the gentleman from Hawaii, 
             and I had to resist the temptation then, representing my 
             wonderful folks, the sensible folks from Oregon, from 
             saying yes, yes, I am the gentleman from Hawaii.
               Mr. Speaker, Hawaii is a wonderful place, a great 
             culture, good people and fine Representatives here in the 
             U.S. Congress. It has a wonderful language, words like 
             ohana and aloha. Sometimes we wonder whether they found 
             too much use for consonants, but a wonderful, beautiful 
             language; and those words embody for me what Patsy and her 
             service here was all about, community. Communities where 
             children, where every child would have a chance to build a 
             better future, where all of us will go forward together 
             rather than divided against each other.
               Aloha, the spirit of aloha where Patsy was so helpful to 
             us freshmen and junior Members. She was like a gentle 
             Hawaiian breeze, but we all knew about her issues; she 
             could storm up like a typhoon. I had the misfortune to 
             follow her on a podium once, and after my rather tepid 
             remarks, she pounded home her views and she was Olympian 
             in her stature, and it was like thunderbolts were coming 
             from her forehead.
               There is a time when God calls us all home; and I have 
             to say, Patsy, you are fortunate that God has called you 
             home to Hawaii. We will miss you.

               Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA. Mr. Speaker, it is with great sadness 
             that I rise to participate in this special order to share 
             with my colleagues of the House and with the American 
             people the tremendous loss to our Nation and the good 
             people of the State of Hawaii, the recent passing of the 
             gentlewoman from Hawaii, Patsy Takemoto Mink.
               Patsy was more than a friend to this Member. She was my 
             mentor, my teacher, my senior advisor on the nuances of 
             this institution. She was my champion fighter on any 
             issues taken by this body on anything relating to the 
             rights and lives of millions of American women, children, 
             minorities, and last but not least, the poor and the 
             needy.
               Some of my colleagues have outlined a listing of so many 
             of the accomplishments of Patsy's career in public 
             service. So as not to be repetitious, I want to share with 
             my colleagues and our Nation how I feel about Patsy Mink 
             as a person.
               Patsy did not share much with me concerning her early 
             youth. Born of a humble family, she grew up on the Island 
             of Maui, graduated from high school on Maui, and then 
             enrolled at the University of Hawaii. But as I can 
             remember, remember and well imagine the hardships Patsy 
             had to endure, especially after the sudden attack of Pearl 
             Harbor by Japanese war planes that Americans of Japanese 
             ancestry immediately, herded like cattle and placed in 
             what was then described as relocation camps but I consider 
             them as concentration camps, I have no doubt that Patsy 
             and her family were severely affected socially and 
             psychologically.
               How a Nation can unilaterally terminate the 
             constitutional rights of its citizens solely on the basis 
             of race--their lands and properties were confiscated, and 
             some 100,000 American citizens, men, women and children, 
             who happened to be of Japanese ancestry were placed in 
             these so-called relocation camps throughout the United 
             States. Despite all this, at the height of racism, hatred 
             and bigotry placed against Japanese-Americans during World 
             War II, some 10,000 Japanese-Americans, like Senator Dan 
             Inouye and the late Senator Spark Matsunaga among them, 
             nevertheless volunteered to fight against our Nation's 
             enemies in Europe. That was part of Patsy's early youth 
             and the legacy that was given under the 100 Battalion 442d 
             Infantry and what they did when they fought against enemy 
             forces in Europe.
               Mr. Speaker, this was the kind of atmosphere that Patsy 
             grew up with. The irony of it all is that Patsy Mink 
             wanted very much to be a doctor, a healer. I guess after 
             personally witnessing the horrors of war during her youth, 
             Patsy wanted to enter a profession that would save lives 
             rather than destroy them.
               Mr. Speaker, I want to convey my sincere aloha pumehana 
             and my sincere condolences on behalf of our Samoan 
             community living in the State of Hawaii to Patsy's dear 
             husband and my friend for many years, John Mink, and their 
             daughter, Wendy, and her brother, Eugene Takemoto, and to 
             Joan Manke, her administrative assistant, and members of 
             her staff.
               Patsy Takemoto Mink, may you have a successful journey.

               Mrs. MALONEY of New York. It is with great sadness that 
             we come to the floor this evening to honor the legacy and 
             hard work of my good friend and colleague, Patsy Mink. She 
             was a champion for women's rights, education, civil 
             rights, and America's workers. She was a tireless advocate 
             for our Nation.
               I have a long list of firsts where Patsy was the first 
             person to do a particular job or make a particular gift to 
             this Nation, and I would like to enter this into the 
             Record.
               In fact, she told me she never intended to come to 
             Congress. It was her dream to be a doctor. Like many very 
             talented and intelligent women, she applied to medical 
             school, and every single one of them turned her down. She 
             told me that she faced great discrimination in her life, 
             yet she turned adversity into a positive life of working 
             to help improve the lives of women, children, minorities, 
             and the equality of all people.
               One of the things that I loved about Patsy, there was 
             never an issue that was too large or too small for her to 
             champion and for her to work extremely hard on. Unlike 
             many of us, she was able to see the fruits of her hard 
             work. As one of the principle authors of title IX, she saw 
             the benefits of a whole generation of young women, 
             including my two daughters, who have benefited from the 
             equality in treatment of women in education and sports.
               When I first came to Congress, I would sometimes call 
             one of my friends and mentors from New York, Bella Abzug, 
             and Bella would always end the conversation by saying, 
             ``Carolyn, why in the world are you calling me when you 
             could talk to Patsy Mink on the floor?''
               Patsy told me that many of her colleagues would call her 
             in Hawaii, and because of the time difference, they would 
             wake her up at 2, 3 in the morning; yet she would always 
             wake up and be there to help.
               It is impossible to name all of Patsy's great 
             accomplishments, but tonight we can take the baton on one 
             that is tremendously important. Patsy authored the Women's 
             Educational Equity Act, and I call upon Members to name 
             this important act for Patsy. I am circulating a letter 
             which builds on Patsy's work. Patsy was working to restore 
             the funding for the Women's Educational Equity Act, which 
             has zeroed out; and the letter calls upon our President to 
             restore the $3 million and to name this important act 
             after our beloved friend and colleague, Patsy Mink.
               Patsy did so much and I am saddened tonight, and I am 
             going to close by saying I am saddened for many reasons, 
             and one is that I can no longer pick up the phone and call 
             Patsy and say, ``Let me pick your brain.'' She would 
             always have an idea. She would always have a strategy, and 
             she was always helpful. We will build on her work, and we 
             will succeed on the issues Patsy cared about because for 
             over 150 years women have fought against much larger odds 
             than the ones we now face in Congress. We will succeed 
             because Patsy Mink succeeded before us and because of 
             those who succeeded before her.
               Patsy the great, I am honored to have known her. She 
             will always be an inspiration to me and to women around 
             the world. My condolences to her family and her 
             constituents.

                                 Congress of the United States,
                                    Washington, DC, October 1, 2002.
             Hon. George W. Bush,
             President of the United States, The White House, 
             Washington, DC.

               Dear President Bush: We have stood together many times 
             with Representative Patsy Mink to help the women and girls 
             of this country. As you may know, Mrs. Mink was the 
             strongest proponent of the Women's Educational Equity Act 
             (WEEA) and worked very diligently in Committee to succeed 
             in getting WEEA on the list of authorized programs. 
             Unfortunately, your Administration zeroed out the funding 
             for this very important act.
               Mr. President, in honor of the memory of Representative 
             Mink, we ask that you fully fund the $3 million for the 
             Women's Educational Equity Act. We cannot think of a 
             better way to commemorate the work and dedication Mrs. 
             Mink offered to this body and to the people of this 
             country.
               As you know, the purpose of WEEA is to promote equal 
             educational opportunities for girls and women by providing 
             funds and assistance to help educational agencies and 
             institutions to meet the requirements of title IX of the 
             Educational Amendments of 1972. WEEA provides grants and 
             contracts for the development, implementation, and 
             evaluation of a broad range of programs at the community, 
             State, and national levels. WEEA grantees have offered 
             leadership for inclusive education reform and many of the 
             participants and beneficiaries of WEEA projects are at the 
             core of the development of equity initiatives in 
             education, work, and public life.
               Mr. President, on behalf of all girls and women in 
             America, and in memory of Representative Patsy Mink, we 
             request full funding of $3 million for the Women's 
             Educational Equity Act.
                  Sincerely,
                   Carolyn B. Maloney, Zoe Lofgren, Lynn C. Woolsey,
                       Nydia M. Velazquez, David Wu, Jan Schakowsky,
                Lynn N. Rivers, Eni Faleomavaega, Robert E. Andrews,
                  Neil Abercrombie, Corrine Brown, Michael M. Honda,
                          Eddie Bernice Johnson, Sheila Jackson-Lee,
                    Bob Etheridge, Eleanor H. Norton, Maxine Waters,
                                 Donna M. Christensen, Marcy Kaptur.

               Ms. PELOSI. My condolences go to Patsy's family; and our 
             condolences, of course, go to the people of Hawaii who 
             have suffered a great loss.
               For almost a generation, anyone who served in this House 
             of Representatives has had the privilege of serving with 
             Patsy Mink, has had the honor of calling her colleague. 
             Anyone who knew her, worked with her on a daily basis, had 
             his or her day brightened by the communication from Patsy. 
             She was a patriotic, committed, dedicated American.
               She was enthusiastic about America's children. She 
             worked her heart out for them. She literally gave her life 
             ministering to their needs, visiting a clinic for poor 
             children where she contracted chicken pox. It just does 
             not seem real that we have lost such a valuable person on 
             this Earth.
               I know it was intended by the gentleman from Hawaii (Mr. 
             Abercrombie) and the gentlewoman from Ohio (Ms. Kaptur) 
             for this to be a resolution with an hour of time, but the 
             people of Hawaii should know because of the outpouring of 
             love for Patsy Mink, it has not turned out to be an hour 
             of debate on a bill, but a vigil in honor of a beloved 
             Member of Congress.
               We all know how much the people of Hawaii thought of 
             Patsy Mink. We want them to know how much Members of 
             Congress revered her, respected her as a person, and are 
             mourning her leaving us so deeply.
               I am sure colleagues have spoken about her incredible 
             leadership on title IX. She conceived this idea and worked 
             very hard for its passage, and then an accident that 
             harmed her dear daughter, Wendy, called her away from the 
             floor on the day of the vote, and the bill lost by one 
             vote. True to her family values, she left immediately to 
             go to her daughter's side. Patsy did something so 
             incredible. She came back to Congress at a future time and 
             persuaded the speaker, then-Speaker Carl Albert to bring 
             the bill up again. That was not the normal regular order, 
             but he did, and it then passed. And now generations of 
             young women in our country can tear down the ``no girls 
             allowed'' sign off the school locker rooms and, in fact, 
             corporate board rooms, because it started momentum for 
             women and girls.
               I thank Patsy for being a mentor to so many of us, a joy 
             in our lives. Even when Patsy was fighting in her toughest 
             time, and she would be fighting as hard as she possibly 
             could, she always did it with a smile. So she attracted 
             people to her. She attracted people to her point of view. 
             She attracted people to her State, which she loved; and 
             some of us will be talking about Patsy for a long time to 
             come. We will never forget her. We will always be inspired 
             by her, and we know that although she is no longer with us 
             physically, that Patsy Mink lives.
               She lives in the spirit of young girls playing sports 
             all over America. She lives in the school rooms of America 
             for all she did for America's children. She lives in the 
             spirit that she leaves us with as she departs in such an 
             untimely fashion.
               Again, many of us will be going on Thursday, returning 
             Friday night. The plane leaves at the close of business. I 
             hope many Members will join those of us who are going to 
             Hawaii to bid to our dear Patsy Mink, aloha.

               Mr. ABERCROMBIE. As we draw the discussion for the 
             passage of this resolution to a conclusion, I would ask, 
             Mr. Speaker, that at the appropriate time if you could 
             indicate to the House that perhaps we could rise and 
             observe a moment of silence in honor of Patsy Mink with 
             the passage of the resolution, I would be very 
             appreciative, and I think it is the appropriate way to 
             finish our commemoration.
               Let me conclude my remarks, then, Mr. Speaker. I had not 
             intended to speak much further because of the eloquent, 
             articulate, certainly comprehensive manner in which the 
             Members tonight have discussed the great contributions of 
             Patsy to this body and to the Nation. But all through this 
             evening, Mr. Speaker, I have been unable to avoid looking 
             at the picture that has been down by the podium on the 
             floor. That picture of Patsy really captures the essence 
             of this tiny giant. You can see her steadfastness, her 
             sense of perseverance, the stalwart person that she was on 
             behalf of all those who had no hope.
               Mr. Speaker, it never occurred to me in my youth that I 
             would have the honor and privilege of serving in the 
             people's house, the House of Representatives. I look 
             around the floor at my colleagues here. I see my dear 
             friend Dana Rohrabacher and others here on the floor; 
             Nancy Pelosi, who has just finished speaking of her 
             friendship and love for Patsy, and I understand what it 
             was that I knew intellectually so many years ago when I 
             worked on Patsy's first campaign as a college student at 
             the University of Hawaii when she first came here to the 
             House of Representatives. I understood intellectually what 
             it was to serve in the House of Representatives. But I am 
             sure, Mr. Speaker, you know, as all of our colleagues do 
             here in the people's house, that those of us who have 
             sworn an oath to uphold and defend the Constitution in 
             this house of freedom know what it means to have had the 
             presence of someone like Patsy Mink.
               Surely, Mr. Speaker, there is no other people so 
             fortunate as we, free men and women, in the freest country 
             on the face of the Earth, in the history of the planet. No 
             one has embodied more the spirit of this House than this 
             gentlewoman from Hawaii, a true daughter of Hawaii who 
             celebrated in herself and in her service the true spirit 
             and meaning of aloha.
               Aloha means that our diversity defines us rather than 
             divides us. In this world of adversity and pain and terror 
             and cruelty and horror, Patsy Mink was able to stand for 
             those who could not speak for themselves and was the 
             living embodiment of what aloha meant not just for our 
             Rainbow State, not just for our multicultural, 
             multiethnic, multiracial people, but it gave the message 
             of aloha to this House, to this Nation and to this world.
               Aloha, Patsy.
               Mr. Speaker, I believe that the time is appropriate to 
             call for an expression of assent to the resolution before 
             us, and if I could ask for that to be in the form of 
             Members rising, Members and those present to rise with a 
             moment of silence not only in commemoration of Patsy Mink, 
             but to constitute passage of the resolution.

               Mr. FALEOMAVAEGA. Mr. Speaker, it is with great sadness 
             that I rise to participate in this special order to share 
             with my colleagues of the House, and with the American 
             people--a tremendous loss to our Nation, and the good 
             people of the State of Hawaii--the recent passing of the 
             gentle lady from Hawaii--Congresswoman Patsy Takemoto 
             Mink.
               Patsy was more than a friend to this Member. She was my 
             mentor, my teacher, my senior advisor on the resources of 
             this institution. She was my champion fighter when this 
             body takes up issues that affect the rights and the lives 
             of millions of Americans who are women, children, 
             minorities--and last but not least the poor and the needy.
               Mr. Speaker, some of my colleagues have already outlined 
             a listing of so many of the accomplishments of Patsy's 
             career in public service. So as not to be repetitious, I 
             want to share with my colleagues and to our Nation--how I 
             feel about Patsy Mink the person.
               Patsy did not share much with me in her early youth--
             born of a lovable family and grew up on the island of 
             Maui--graduated from high school in Maui and then enrolled 
             at the University of Hawaii.
               But I can well imagine the hardships Patsy had to endure 
             especially after the sudden attack of Pearl Harbor by 
             Japanese war planes--that Americans of Japanese ancestry 
             immediately herded like cattle and place in what was then 
             described as ``relocation camps,'' but I consider them as 
             concentration camps. I have no doubt Patsy and her family 
             were severely affected socially and psychologically--how a 
             nation can unilaterally terminate the constitutional 
             rights of its citizens solely on the basis of race. Their 
             lands and properties were confiscated, and some 100,000 
             American citizens--men, women and children who happen to 
             be of Japanese ancestry were placed in these so-called 
             relocation camps throughout the United States.
               And despite all this, Mr. Speaker--at the height of 
             racism, hatred and bigotry placed against Japanese-
             Americans during World War II--some 10,000 young Japanese-
             American men--Senator Dan Inouye and the late Senator 
             Spark Matsunaga--among them--nevertheless volunteered to 
             fight against our Nation's enemies in Europe.
               This was the kind of atmosphere Patsy grew up with--and 
             the irony of it all, Mr. Speaker, Patsy Mink wanted very 
             much to be a doctor--a healer--and I guess after 
             personally witnessing the horrors of war during her 
             youth--Patsy wanted to enter a profession that would save 
             lives, rather than destroy them.
               Things did not get any better--after submitting 
             applications to medical schools, Patsy soon realized that 
             she was denied admission for two reasons: her ethnicity 
             and her gender.
               Patsy's attention turned to law--and thanks to one of 
             our more progressive law schools in the country, she was 
             admitted to attend the University of Chicago Law School.
               With a law degree from the University of Chicago, and 
             after gaining admission to practice law in Hawaii, Patsy 
             Mink started her law practice, but eventually ended up in 
             the State senate and was elected as a Member of Congress.
               It was in this institution that Patsy made her mark not 
             only as an outstanding legislator to her constituents in 
             Hawaii, but to our Nation as well. As a senior member of 
             the House Education and Labor Committee, Patsy was 
             committed to providing greater educational opportunities 
             for the less fortunate. The protection of the rights of 
             women and children throughout our Nation was synonymous 
             with the name of this great lady from Hawaii--
             Congresswoman Patsy Takemoto Mink.
               I want to convey my aloha punehana, sincere condolences, 
             on behalf of our Samoan community living in Hawaii, to 
             Patsy's dear husband and my friend for years--John Mink 
             and their daughter, Wendy, her brother Eugene Takemoto, 
             and Joan Manke her administrative assistant and members of 
             her staff--Patsy Takemoto Mink--Ia manuia lace faiga 
             malaga (May you have a successful journey).

               Mr. OWENS. Mr. Speaker, Patsy Mink will be remembered 
             with a broad array of accolades. She was a warm 
             compassionate colleague, civil and generous even to the 
             opponents who angered her the most.
               For me, she will be remembered as my friend, mentor and 
             personal whip on the floor. At the door of the House 
             Chamber she would often meet me with instructions: ``We'' 
             are voting No or ``We'' are voting Yes on this one. I 
             consider it an honor to have been invited to function as 
             an ideological twin to Patsy Mink.
               In the Education and the Workforce Committee as well as 
             on the House floor, I was always inspired by Patsy's 
             convictions. She was always an independent spirit and she 
             pursued her causes with total dedication. She was not just 
             another advocate for education, for women, for job 
             training, for welfare mothers. Patsy Mink was forever a 
             fiery and intense advocate on these issues. She frequently 
             exuded an old-fashioned righteous indignation that seems 
             to have become extinct. For Patsy there were the right 
             policies and laws which she pushed with all the zeal she 
             could muster. And there were wrongheaded, hypocritical, 
             selfish and evil policies which had to be confronted and 
             engaged to the bitter end. When colleagues spoke of 
             bipartisan compromise negotiations, Patsy would quickly 
             warn Democrats to beware of an ambush or a trap.
               Her profound wisdom on all matters related to education 
             and human resources resulted from her long years of 
             service on the Education and Labor Committee which later 
             became the Education and the Workforce Committee. Too many 
             of us have forgotten the value of the institutional 
             memory. While the House is filled with Members who speak 
             as experts on education, Congresswoman Mink was among the 
             few with hard-earned credentials. She was a part of the 
             development and nurturing of title I to the point where it 
             has become the cornerstone of Federal education reform. 
             Title IX as a landmark reform to end the gender gap in 
             school athletics was conceived and defended by Patsy right 
             up until the recent skirmish in this 107th Congress. In 
             this Congress, Patsy also declared war on the oppressors 
             of welfare women. No one was more incensed and outraged 
             than the Member from Hawaii when the so-called welfare 
             reform program of President Bush threatened greater 
             burdens and smaller subsidies for welfare recipients. All 
             of Patsy's proposals in the House were voted down. But 
             briefly Patsy Mink stirred up a long dormant conscience 
             among Democrats which produced a continuing debate in the 
             Senate. That fight still goes on.
               Patsy Mink was a role model for decisionmakers of this 
             Congress and for the future. Compassion and righteous 
             indignation are still vital qualifications for the leaders 
             of a great nation. Patsy Mink was a great leader for this 
             great Nation.

               Mr. GREEN. Mr. Speaker, I rise to remember my colleague 
             of these past 10 years, Representative Patsy Mink, who 
             passed away this weekend.
               During my first years in Congress, I worked closely with 
             Patsy when we both served on the Education and Labor 
             Committee.
               Patsy was a wonderful person who believed in the power 
             of education. She wanted to ensure that all Americans, 
             especially women, received a quality education.
               She was a tireless warrior for women and education, 
             authoring the Women's Educational Equity Act of 1974, 
             which provided funding for schools attempting to eliminate 
             inequities and discrimination against women as required by 
             title IX.
               She worked to increase Impact Aid to Hawaiian public 
             schools, which helps offset the cost of educating the 
             children of Federal employees and military personnel.
               But Patsy did not limit herself to only education 
             issues.
               She was also a champion of all working Americans, 
             fighting to protect the landmark Davis-Bacon Act, which 
             requires Federal contractors to pay local prevailing 
             wages.
               She led efforts to protect the Legal Services 
             Corporation, which provides needy individuals nationwide 
             with legal assistance.
               In short, Patsy was a champion of the forgotten--the 
             poor, the homeless, those who needed financial assistance 
             for college, those who were without health insurance, and 
             those who were unemployed.
               And like the best Members of Congress, Patsy fought 
             hardest for her people at home.
               She was a champion for native Hawaiians, and actively 
             sought to make sure their interests were protected at the 
             Federal level.
               I have a special affinity for Patsy, for personal 
             reasons as well. When my son, Chris, graduated from 
             college, he went to Hawaii to work.
               I could always count on Patsy to occasionally check on 
             Chris, and tell me how he was doing when we both came back 
             to Washington the next week.
               Mr. Speaker, Patsy Mink has been part of the Hawaiian 
             political landscape since before statehood, and has served 
             as a mentor to generations of young Hawaiians.
               Her presence will be missed, both here in Washington, 
             but even more back home. This institution will miss her 
             greatly.

               Mr. GEPHARDT. Mr. Speaker, Patsy Mink was my friend and 
             my colleague and I am deeply saddened by her death.
               Patsy fought hard every day for the values and ideals 
             that make our Nation great. She worked to ensure access to 
             good public schools for every American child. She stood 
             out as a leading voice for women's rights, civil rights 
             and labor unions devoted to raising living standards and 
             providing opportunities to all Americans. And Patsy Mink 
             never lost her passion for righting the economic and 
             social injustices in Hawaii and across America.
               Patsy Mink blazed a trail unlike few members in the 
             history of the House. She was the first Asian-American 
             woman admitted to the Hawaii bar, the first Asian-American 
             woman elected to the State legislature and the first woman 
             of color to win national office in 1964. She knew first-
             hand the sting of discrimination as a young Asian-American 
             woman growing up in Hawaii, and she had the ability to use 
             her experience to lift up the hopes and dreams of other 
             human beings. I will always admire her willpower, courage 
             and faith in her country and in her fellow Americans.
               Through sheer force of her personality, Patsy breathed 
             life into the values and ideals enshrined in our 
             Constitution. While she had many legislative 
             accomplishments, her leadership on title IX deserves 
             special recognition for opening doors to women's 
             achievements in athletics and beyond. As a woman of color 
             advocating for economic and social justice as a leader of 
             America, Patsy Mink demonstrated that one person, fighting 
             for what's right, respecting every person, can make a 
             difference in the lives of her fellow citizens.
               I will miss her progressive voice and aggressive 
             leadership on issues important to the American people. I 
             hope and pray that this House will dedicate itself to 
             working in her extraordinary spirit in the important days 
             and months ahead.

               Mr. DINGELL. Mr. Speaker--I rise in sorrow to express my 
             sadness at the loss of the Honorable Patsy Mink, a 
             distinguished colleague and great public servant.
               She was a great lady, a superb legislator, an idealist 
             who loved her country and her fellow Americans. She 
             believed in the Congress and our system of government, and 
             she worked hard within the institution for its protection 
             and for the betterment of our people.
               She knew she was here to serve, and to serve those who 
             have the least and need the most. She knew our system is 
             good, but that it could be made better, and she worked to 
             make it so, and to make it better serve those who most 
             need the help of our country to realize their full 
             potential as valuable, productive and happy citizens.
               Patsy worked for the young, for their health and 
             education, for their nutrition and training.
               Patsy used her place in Congress to better the lives of 
             the young with legislation which helped them to achieve 
             their real value in our society.
               Every program to help people with greatest need enacted 
             by this Congress during her career bears the mark of her 
             character, her leadership, and her goodness.
               Her labors for the poor, downtrodden and the sick are 
             her shining monument. Her compassion, her energy, her 
             dedication and decency are her hallmark, and made her a 
             leader for those who needed her most.
               She is properly loved and will be long remembered for 
             her goodness and work. She will be missed, and never will 
             be replaced. We love her, we honor her memory and her 
             labors and accomplishments.
               We pray for her soul, we know God will receive her 
             lovingly. We know He greeted her warmly, with the 
             statement, ``Well done, good and faithful servant. Welcome 
             home. You have earned your place here in Heaven.''

               Mr. ORTIZ. Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague, the 
             gentlewoman from California, Ms. Millender-McDonald, for 
             organizing this tribute to a giant in the House of 
             Representatives.
               Patsy Mink was a fighter. She fought every day of her 
             public service for the inclusion of women at every level 
             of government and society. She was an inspiration to so 
             many people: women, Pacific Islanders, mothers, children, 
             and the working poor.
               Patsy was my neighbor in the southeast corner of the 
             Rayburn building for several years. We often walked back 
             and forth to votes together. We rarely found ourselves on 
             the same side of political issues, but we always marveled 
             that our party was big enough to include both of us.
               Patsy always spoke candidly, and never strayed from the 
             business at hand. Her office brightened our corner of the 
             hallway with beautiful, fresh exotic flowers from Hawaii 
             every week.
               Through her life, and via her work in Congress, Patsy 
             redefined the possibilities for generations of women to 
             come. She forced educational institutions to find equity 
             in education between men and women through her work on 
             title IX.
               Patsy championed her vision of equality and justice in 
             the Congress. From her support of Medicare in her first 
             term of service in the House--to her work in education, 
             labor, and Hawaiian agriculture--Patsy's legacy will live 
             on in classrooms, union halls and farm fields in Hawaii 
             and around the Nation.

               Mrs. McCARTHY of New York. Mr. Speaker, I rise today 
             saddened by the death of a dear friend and colleague, the 
             Honorable Patsy Mink. Throughout her public service 
             career, she was a tremendous force in breaking gender and 
             racial barriers by being the first Asian-American woman to 
             be elected to Congress, and the first woman of color. Her 
             dedication and drive had a major impact both at State and 
             national levels.
               One of Patsy's most influential pieces of legislation, 
             title IX, which she co-authored in 1972, is credited by 
             many with changing the face of women's sports and societal 
             attitudes about women, and bans gender discrimination in 
             schools that receive Federal funding.
               During my 6 years in Congress it was both an honor and a 
             joy to work with Congresswoman Mink on the Education 
             Committee. I will always remember her as a strong, 
             compassionate woman who was not only a superior colleague 
             but also a great friend.
               Not only will I miss her intelligence and her wit, but I 
             will also miss her generosity. Congresswoman Mink's 
             generosity was famous here in the House because of the 
             delicious chocolate-covered macadamia nuts she brought to 
             late night sessions. Her passing not only leaves a void in 
             Congress, but also the district and the State she 
             represented so proudly and honorably. We will all miss 
             her.

               Ms. ROYBAL-ALLARD. Mr. Speaker, it is with a heavy heart 
             that I rise to express my deep sadness upon the passing of 
             my fellow Congresswoman and friend, Patsy Mink.
               I had the privilege of knowing Patsy and of serving with 
             her in the House of Representatives for many years, 
             specifically on the Budget Committee and in the 
             Congressional Women's Caucus.
               Patsy was a trailblazer, a fighter for the rights of 
             women and minorities, and a role model for women and 
             people of color everywhere.
               Long before becoming the first Asian-American woman 
             elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, Patsy was 
             breaking barriers, refusing to let society's unfair and 
             discriminatory practices stand in the way of achieving her 
             goals.
               When Patsy was told she could not live in regular 
             student housing but had to live at the segregated 
             ``International House'' for minorities at the University 
             of Nebraska, she successfully led the effort that changed 
             the university's policies.
               When no law firm in her home State of Hawaii would hire 
             her because she was a woman, Patsy opened her own practice 
             and became the first Japanese-American woman lawyer in 
             Hawaii.
               After losing her first race for Congress, being a woman 
             of determination and perseverance, Patsy ran again, and in 
             1964, became the first Asian-American woman and woman of 
             color elected to the U.S. House of Representatives.
               Patsy Mink will be remembered as a Member of this House 
             who dedicated her career in Congress to opening doors of 
             opportunity for others. For example, Patsy played a key 
             role in the enactment of title IX--landmark legislation 
             that ensures equal educational opportunities for women and 
             girls in our country.
               Mr. Speaker, Patsy will be sorely missed in this House, 
             but she will be fondly remembered as a woman who used her 
             success and talents to tear down barriers and provide 
             fairness and equal opportunity for others, particularly 
             women and minorities. Her hard work, perseverance, and 
             dedication to the principles of equality will serve as an 
             enduring model to us all.
               I join with my colleagues and send my sincere 
             condolences to Patsy Mink's family and friends, and to the 
             constituents she represented so well.

               Mr. GUTIERREZ. Mr. Speaker, I rise today with a heavy 
             heart to honor and say goodbye to our good friend and 
             colleague Congresswoman Patsy Mink. For 24 years, 
             Congresswoman Mink served as a strong and courageous voice 
             for those who are not always heard in our political 
             process. She was an unwavering champion and tireless 
             advocate for women's rights, including authoring the 
             landmark title IX section of the Education Act. Among her 
             many accomplishments, we should never forget her ardent 
             and selfless struggles to promote equal opportunity for 
             all races, to improve the current education system across 
             the Nation and to protect our environment.
               As impressive as her legislative accomplishments were, 
             the personal and professional barriers that she had to 
             overcome in her life were, equal, if not more, impressive: 
             she was the first Asian-American woman to practice law in 
             Hawaii; the first Asian-American woman elected to her 
             State legislature and the first Asian-American woman 
             elected to Congress. The courageous choices she made in 
             her life made her a unique role model and afforded 
             countless others the opportunity to follow in her amazing 
             footsteps.
               Make no mistake about it, what Patsy may have lacked in 
             physical stature, she more than made up for with a heart 
             that could fill this room and the courage and tenacity to 
             match it.
               Robert F. Kennedy once said:

               It is not enough to understand, or to see clearly. The 
             future will be shaped in the arena of human activity by 
             those willing to commit their minds and their bodies to 
             the task.
               To the end, Congresswoman Mink embodied those attributes 
             and served as role model and beacon in the fight for 
             social and economic justice. I am humbled to have had the 
             opportunity to work closely with her.
               Congresswoman Mink received her law degree at the 
             University of Chicago. Although there is no doubt she 
             would have made enormous contributions to our city, Patsy 
             was destined to return to Hawaii, where her devotion and 
             dedication to public service helped shape the State and 
             also our Nation.
               Our hearts and prayers go out to Patsy's husband, John, 
             and daughter, Wendy.
               Congresswoman Mink was a true star from heaven, who 
             walked among us and touched our lives in countless ways.
               She will be greatly missed.

               Mr. HINOJOSA. Mr. Speaker, I rise tonight to honor one 
             of my esteemed colleagues, Congresswomen Patsy Mink of 
             Hawaii, who passed away this weekend, on September 28, 
             2002. This is a very sad day for me and for all of 
             Congress as we mourn the loss of a colleague, a patriot 
             and a friend.
               While Patsy's death does bring deep sadness to this 
             Congress and the State of Hawaii, this is a day for us to 
             reflect on the wonderful legacy that she has left behind. 
             I would like to state first and foremost that 
             Congresswoman Mink was indeed a true pioneer and a 
             maverick. I am honored to have served on the House 
             Education and the Workforce Committee with her during my 
             tenure here in Congress. She served as a great example of 
             someone who believed in her causes and would stop at 
             nothing to bring her dreams and those of her constituents 
             to fruition. Patsy will be remembered as a champion of 
             minority education, especially title IX legislation that 
             mandated equal financing for women's athletics and 
             academics at institutions receiving Federal money. She 
             will also be remembered as someone who defended workers' 
             rights and fought for a welfare system that truly helped 
             people receive the training and child care services they 
             need to move into the workplace.
               Patsy had the great distinction of being the first 
             Asian-American woman elected to Congress. Most of her 
             career was spent in politics, where her focus was on 
             education, childcare, the environment and equal 
             opportunity. Her dedication and drive resulted in a 
             significant impact on politics at both the State and 
             national levels.
               Patsy Mink grew up in Hawaii. After graduating as 
             valedictorian of Maui High School, she went on to the 
             University of Hawaii in Honolulu with hopes of becoming a 
             doctor. After the end of the war, Patsy had planned on 
             going to medical school. Luckily for us in Congress, for 
             those in her district and for the United States, Patsy 
             instead was accepted at the University of Chicago School 
             of Law, married and returned to Hawaii. She became the 
             first Japanese-American woman lawyer in Hawaii. Since no 
             law firm would hire her because she was a woman, Patsy 
             decided to open her own practice. She also taught at the 
             University of Hawaii. She became increasingly involved in 
             politics, and she started the Oahu Young Democrats and 
             then the Hawaii Young Democrats. From there, Patsy worked 
             on the 1954 elections. She decided to run for Congress and 
             easily won a seat in the territory of Hawaii House of 
             Representatives in 1956. In 1959, she became a member of 
             the territory of Hawaii Senate. When Hawaii became a State 
             in 1959, Patsy ran for Congress but lost to Daniel Inouye. 
             In 1960, she attended the Democratic National Convention 
             and was chosen to give the speech for the civil rights 
             plank. In 1962, she returned to the campaign trail and 
             easily won a seat in the Hawaii State senate. In 1964, she 
             ran for U.S. Congress once more. This time, she won and 
             was sworn in on January 4, 1965. She had worked long and 
             hard to win that seat, and she served 12 non-consecutive 
             terms.
               Recently, Congresswoman Mink and I had worked closely on 
             H.R. 1, the ``No Child Left Behind Act'' which passed both 
             houses of Congress and the President signed into law. 
             Patsy served as a key negotiator during our committee's 
             consideration of that bill. I will always admire her for 
             being the first member of the Education Committee to stand 
             by my side when I called for a boycott over the manner in 
             which the majority was organizing the Education Committee 
             this Congress. Because of her determination and courage, 
             all of the Democrats stood beside us. Consequently, we won 
             the fight, and jurisdiction over Hispanic serving 
             institutions now resides in the Subcommittee on 21st 
             Century Competitiveness where it belongs. What is truly 
             unfortunate for us here in Congress is that Congresswoman 
             Mink will be unable to play a key role in the upcoming 
             reauthorization of the Higher Education Reauthorization 
             Act. Her institutional knowledge of the subject is 
             irreplaceable.
               Again, Mr. Speaker, I rise to express my sadness at the 
             loss of a great person in Patsy Mink. I wish to express my 
             sympathy to her family and to her constituents. This 
             Congress, Hawaii and this Nation have lost a truly 
             wonderful person. History will be kind to her.

               Mr. BERMAN. Mr. Speaker, Patsy Mink was a wonderful 
             person with a compassionate heart and a warm and loving 
             spirit. She was tireless and forceful in her advocacy for 
             civil rights, for justice, for the environment, and for 
             adequate health care and education for the disadvantaged.
               Throughout her distinguished legislative career, her 
             work was characterized by great skill and a 
             straightforward approach that instilled confidence and won 
             her a reputation for being forthright and honest. She was 
             known for her ability to build coalitions for progressive 
             legislation.
               Hawaii was not yet a State when Patsy started down the 
             path of political activism. As the first Asian-American 
             woman elected to Congress, indeed the first woman of any 
             ethnic minority elected to Congress, she took very 
             seriously her responsibilities as a role model and mentor. 
             She fought fiercely against words, actions, and policies 
             that she saw as unfair or intolerant. She spent her life 
             breaking down barriers and dedicated herself to fighting 
             for equality.
               For me, Patsy was not only a talented professional, but 
             a friend and I will miss her greatly.

               Ms. McCARTHY of Missouri, Mr. Speaker, I rise today to 
             honor and remember the works of a great mentor, friend, 
             colleague, and champion in Congress, Representative Patsy 
             Mink.
               I am saddened by the sudden loss of such a great leader 
             and heroine. She inspired many of us through her tireless 
             work, commitment, and dedication throughout her tenure in 
             Congress. I send my love and condolences to Representative 
             Mink's family, Mr. John Francis Mink, her husband, and 
             Gwendolyn Rachel Mink, her daughter. You are in my 
             thoughts and prayers.
               Congresswoman Mink was the first Asian-American woman to 
             serve in Congress. During her time in Congress she 
             championed many issues including women's rights, 
             education, the environment, equal opportunity for all 
             citizens, and title IX of the Education Act. She will 
             always be remembered as an outspoken advocate for women, 
             children, the under-represented and humanity. She was the 
             kind of public servant we all want to emulate.
               She left a lasting legacy behind that has inspired us to 
             continue her work. She touched the lives of many 
             individuals, particularly women through her work on title 
             IX, which mandates gender equality in any education 
             program or activity receiving Federal financial 
             assistance. Title IX has been instrumental in prohibiting 
             discrimination on the basis of sex in educational programs 
             and sports activities that receive Federal funding. Before 
             title IX, many schools saw no problem in maintaining 
             strict limits on the admission of women or simply refusing 
             to admit them. Since the passage of title IX, this has 
             changed dramatically. In 1994, women received 38 percent 
             of medical degrees, 43 percent of law degrees, and 44 
             percent of all doctoral degrees. In 1972, women received 
             only 9 percent of medical degrees, 7 percent of law 
             degrees and 25 percent of doctoral degrees.
               Female participation in sports, like receiving a college 
             education, has had unexpected benefits for women through 
             title IX. Studies have shown that values learned from 
             sports participation, such as teamwork, leadership, 
             discipline and pride in accomplishment, are important 
             attributes as women increase their participation in the 
             workforce, as well as their entry into business management 
             and ownership positions.
               More and more women are entering and graduating from 
             college and graduate school. More women are entering and 
             excelling in sports activities. And, more women are 
             entering the corporate world and holding management 
             positions. Representative Mink's leadership in enacting 
             title IX will continue to make a difference for young 
             women. Thanks to her courage and foresight the country is 
             better as women have the opportunity to achieve their full 
             position.
               Her work enabled many young women to enter the field of 
             sports, medicine, law, and business. Women today have been 
             empowered to reach as far as they want because of the work 
             Representative Mink championed in Congress.
               Representative Patsy Mink's dedication and perseverance 
             will be admired. She will be forever known as a strong, 
             intelligent, and inspirational woman. She left a legacy 
             behind that motivated and touched me deeply. Her work has 
             allowed women to accomplish and reach for any dream they 
             desire to achieve. Thank you, Patsy Mink.

               Mr. SKELTON. Mr. Speaker, as we gather in the House 
             chamber with tremendous sadness over the passing of our 
             dear friend and colleague, the Honorable Patsy Mink of 
             Hawaii, I want to take this opportunity to pay tribute to 
             the career of a distinguished public servant who dedicated 
             her life to the people of Hawaii and the United States.
               Patsy graduated valedictorian of her Maui High School 
             class and received a bachelor's degree in zoology and 
             chemistry from the University of Hawaii and a law degree 
             from the University of Chicago, graduating as only one of 
             two women in a class of 200. She practiced law and turned 
             her sights to public service while mobilizing the 
             Democratic Party to take control of the Hawaii territorial 
             government in the mid-1950s. From that time, Patsy served 
             as an elected representative in the territorial and State 
             legislatures, a city councilwoman, a Federal official, and 
             a Member of Congress.
               In Congress, as a member of the House Education and the 
             Workforce Committee, she consistently championed 
             legislation that would improve education, child care, 
             welfare, and gender equality. Patsy was an especially 
             fierce advocate for women's issues and was instrumental in 
             the creation of title IX of the Federal Education Act, 
             which has opened many opportunities for women athletes in 
             schools and colleges across America.
               Patsy also cared deeply about the men and women who 
             serve in our Nation's military. The State of Hawaii and 
             its citizens play an instrumental role in advancing U.S. 
             national security presence throughout the Pacific region. 
             As a representative from Hawaii Patsy recognized the 
             important military function in her State, and promoted the 
             welfare of our troops and their families.
               As Members of the House pay tribute to the legacy of 
             this stateswoman, we should also take a moment to thank 
             Patsy's staff in Washington and in Hawaii for their hard 
             work and dedication. Because Patsy's office neighbors mine 
             in the Rayburn building, I have seen her staff members 
             burning the midnight oil on more than one occasion. With 
             several time zones between Washington and Hawaii, they 
             have often worked long hours to get the job done.
               Mr. Speaker, Congresswoman Patsy Mink was a remarkable 
             person who always stood for what she believed. She was a 
             strong, brave American who is a role model for women 
             throughout the Nation. Most importantly, however, Patsy 
             was a dear friend, and I will miss her. My wife Susie and 
             I offer our condolences to Patsy's husband, John, and to 
             their daughter Wendy.

               Mr. DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, for those who knew 
             her, Patsy Mink was a tiny woman physically. But don't let 
             appearances fool you--Patsy Mink was a giant. This Nation 
             has lost a great public servant and a true crusader for 
             social justice. For 74 years, every time she came to a 
             door that was slammed tightly closed--for no good reason--
             she used those tiny feet of hers to kick it open--and to 
             let others follow behind her.
               And those who benefited from her tenacity have not 
             forgotten Patsy Mink's pioneering steps. The National 
             Organization for Women, in its tribute to Representative 
             Mink, wrote:

               Girls and women . . . lost one of their most valiant and 
             steadfast champions. Every woman today who is enjoying the 
             fruits of her education and job opportunities, and every 
             girl who has a chance to play sports in school, owes a nod 
             of thanks to Mink who unremittingly and dauntlessly 
             challenged old stereotypes about ``women's place'' and 
             helped engineer the steady progress for women over the 
             last four decades--parallel to Mink's career in politics.

               Patsy Mink was born in Maui, Hawaii, in December 1927, 
             and began her political career when she ran for and won 
             the election for student body president during her junior 
             year in high school--she was the first girl to run. She 
             later went on to graduate as the class valedictorian of 
             Maui High School--but her academic achievement became less 
             important than her race and sex when she set off to 
             college. She attended Wilson College in Chambersburg, 
             Pennsylvania, and then the University of Nebraska, where 
             she faced segregated student housing. Patsy Mink worked 
             with others to end this discriminatory policy. She 
             returned to finish her studies in chemistry and zoology 
             from the University of Hawaii in 1948, with full 
             intentions of attending medical school. However, 20 
             medical schools rejected her--obviously, it was not 
             because of her grades, but because they would not accept 
             women.
               She then decided to go to law school, and graduated with 
             her J.D. degree in 1951 from the University of Chicago. 
             Ironically enough, she was accepted into the school 
             because they hadn't realized that Hawaii was an American 
             territory at the time, and she was accepted as a foreign 
             student!
               Armed with her law degree, Patsy Mink returned to Hawaii 
             and became the first Asian-American woman to practice law, 
             the first Asian-American woman elected to the territorial 
             House of Representatives, and then the first Asian-
             American woman to serve in the U.S. House of 
             Representatives. For 24 years over two different periods 
             she served in this body, and was re-elected 2 years ago by 
             a 2-to-1 margin. Incidentally, when she arrived in 
             Congress, she wasn't allowed in the House gym because it 
             was a males-only venue.
               As a champion for civil rights, family rights, 
             education, civil liberties, and equal rights and 
             opportunities, Representative Mink will be remembered for 
             many things. She wrote the Women's Educational Equity Act, 
             sponsored the first Early Childhood Education Act, and was 
             a passionate advocate for poor families, supporting 
             measures to provide education and skills to assist 
             families. However, her most crowning achievement was title 
             IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 to the Civil Rights 
             Act of 1964. By prohibiting schools that receive Federal 
             funding from discriminating because of sex, title IX has 
             singularly been credited with changing the face of 
             education and sports for American women--and opening up 
             many of those closed doors. There are many who believe we 
             would not have seen such a rise in women's athletics were 
             it not for title IX.
               Representative Mink said of title IX:

               It's rare as a legislator that you fight for legislation 
             you believe in and stay around or live long enough to see 
             it come to fruition . . . To be frank, I thought this was 
             great, a beginning statement of policy and intent. At the 
             moment we were doing it, we didn't think it would have 
             this fantastic momentum and the enforcement of the courts.

               I think the Honolulu Advertiser summed it up right when 
             it said: ``In a day when politics appears driven by polls 
             and focus groups, Mink stood out as a politician who was 
             true, first and foremost, to herself and the people she 
             served.''
               I will truly miss working with Patsy Mink, but I am 
             honored to have served with her. She set the standard for 
             public servants, and leaves some very big shoes to fill.

               Mr. RAHALL. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to 
             a treasured colleague, Congresswoman Patsy Mink, whom has 
             passed. I would also like to extend my heartfelt sympathy 
             to her family and to her staff.
               Congresswoman Mink leaves this Earth as a great leader 
             of her community, a dynamic Member of Congress and as a 
             strong woman. Most importantly, she leaves a legacy of 
             work that will continue on after her passing. Patsy Mink 
             spent a life in public service working to improve the 
             lives of her constituents, her beloved State of Hawaii, 
             the environment, the rights of minority communities and 
             the equality of women. She broke barriers. She opened 
             doors of opportunity. She gave a voice to causes and 
             people once silenced in political arenas.
               Congresswoman Mink's life was a series of firsts. She 
             was the first female student body president at Maui High 
             School where she went on to become the class valedictorian 
             months later. She was the first Asian-American woman to 
             practice law in Hawaii and the first to be elected to the 
             territorial House. And Congresswoman Mink was the first 
             woman of color to be elected to the U.S. House of 
             Representatives.
               One of Congresswoman Mink's most important legislative 
             victories opened the doors of collegiate sports to women. 
             She co-authored the trailblazing title IX of the Higher 
             Education Act Amendments in 1972 which prohibited gender 
             discrimination by educational institutions receiving 
             Federal funds. Thirty years after the passage of this 
             remarkable legislation we can look back at a great legacy 
             of American women's athletics and forward to its future; a 
             future made possible by a Congresswoman's desire to see 
             that women be treated equally on the playing field.
               I join with my colleagues in Congress mourning the 
             passing Congresswoman Patsy Mink--a trailblazing political 
             leader, a champion of civil rights, a strong woman and a 
             great friend whom will be missed.

               Mr. REYES. Mr. Speaker, this House, the State of Hawaii, 
             and the Nation lost a powerful figure on Saturday. Sadly, 
             our colleague, Congresswoman Patsy Mink, passed away in 
             her home State of Hawaii. My condolences, thoughts and 
             prayers are with her family and friends.
               Patsy spent more than four decades advancing civil 
             rights, expanding educational and health care 
             opportunities, and combating poverty. Her particular 
             efforts in promoting women's rights and equality have 
             helped change the face of this country for the better. My 
             daughters, and my granddaughter, have had and will have 
             greater opportunities to achieve their dreams in this 
             great country, thanks in part to the efforts of Patsy 
             Mink.
               Earlier this year, Patsy played a key role in a joint 
             retreat of members of the Congressional Black, Hispanic 
             and Asian Pacific Caucuses, contributing her enthusiasm to 
             strengthening bridges that unite Americans of different 
             backgrounds. As the current chair of the Congressional 
             Hispanic Caucus, it has been a pleasure and inspiration to 
             work with her on important issues such as providing 
             assistance to low-income families and protecting 
             immigrants' rights.
               Witnessing the energy Patsy brought to her work this 
             year never would have led me to believe I would have to 
             bid her farewell so soon. A woman of her stature, 
             experience, expertise and dedication will be impossible to 
             replace. Patsy Mink will be sorely missed.

               Mr. BACA. Mr. Speaker, I would like to pay tribute to 
             Patsy T. Mink, a very special individual to me and to the 
             entire 107th Congress. She was truly a beloved woman.
               Born December 6, 1927, Patsy was destined for greatness. 
             She made history as the first Asian Pacific American woman 
             admitted to the bar of Hawaii, the first Asian Pacific 
             American woman elected to State office in Hawaii, and in 
             1964 became the first woman of color to be elected to the 
             U.S. House of Representatives. Furthermore, her vision to 
             change the status quo and better the livelihood of all 
             Americans led her to sponsor title IX of the Education Act 
             of 1972, paving the way for every woman athlete in 
             America.
               Patsy represented her constituents of the Second 
             Congressional District of Hawaii, to the fullest of her 
             ability. Before being elected to Congress she served in 
             both the Hawaii State house of representatives and senate. 
             With more than 40 years in the political arena she 
             possessed a wealth of knowledge that poised her as one of 
             the most revered Members of Congress. She dedicated her 
             life to serving her fellow Hawaiians through diligently 
             working on legislation that addressed education, health, 
             women's and veterans issues. She was a beloved community 
             figure whose passionate voice spoke for every person 
             regardless of race or gender.
               Patsy is survived by her husband John and daughter 
             Wendy. My prayers and condolences are with her family and 
             friends as they have lost a great, loving, and kind woman. 
             She will be greatly missed.
               And so Mr. Speaker, I submit this loving memorial to be 
             included in the archives of the history of this great 
             Nation, for women like Patsy T. Mink are unique in their 
             generous contributions to this country.

               Mr. PAYNE. Mr. Speaker, I join with my colleagues in 
             expressing profound sorrow over the loss this weekend of 
             our esteemed colleague, Congresswoman Patsy Mink of 
             Hawaii. While her passing saddens me immensely, I find 
             myself reflecting this evening not so much on the loss of 
             a respected colleague and dear friend but rather on the 
             remarkable life of Patsy Mink, one of the most courageous 
             and inspiring women I have ever known.
               I had the great privilege of serving on the Committee on 
             Education and the Workforce with Congresswoman Mink, whose 
             political journey began in 1956 in the U.S. territory of 
             Hawaii, where she was elected to the territorial house of 
             representatives. She had originally intended to become a 
             medical doctor, but in 1948 few opportunities existed for 
             women wishing to pursue a career in medicine. Patsy Mink 
             applied to 20 medical schools, and was rejected by all of 
             them--not because of her academic record, which was highly 
             commendable, but rather because of her gender. She did not 
             abandon her dream of a challenging and meaningful career, 
             however, she simply shifted her focus. She decided to 
             pursue a career in law instead, and was accepted by the 
             University of Chicago School of Law. Upon finishing her 
             legal education in Chicago, she returned to Hawaii, where 
             she became the first Asian-American woman to practice law 
             in the territory. In 1965, Patsy Mink became the first 
             woman of color elected to the U.S. House of 
             Representatives. She would go on to serve 12 2-year terms 
             in Congress. During her time in office, Congresswoman Mink 
             fought tirelessly for those issues she cared about so 
             passionately: the environment, poverty, civil rights and, 
             most notably, education and equality for women. In fact, 
             she was a pioneer in the struggle for the equitable 
             treatment of women in education, authoring the Women's 
             Educational Equity Act. Additionally, Congresswoman Mink 
             worked to increase funding for research on diseases 
             primarily affecting women and to expand opportunities for 
             women to become physicians. Unquestionably, however, her 
             greatest accomplishment came with the passage of title IX 
             of the Education Act in 1972, which she co-authored. 
             Congresswoman Mink played an instrumental role in the 
             passage of this groundbreaking legislation, which 
             prohibits gender discrimination by federally funded 
             institutions. This law has become the vehicle by which 
             girls and women have achieved greater opportunities in the 
             professions and, most notably, athletics.
               I know that I am not alone when I say that I will sorely 
             miss the extraordinary Patsy Mink, an admirable woman who 
             bravely challenged the status quo--tirelessly fighting for 
             progressive legislation which has transformed not only her 
             home State of Hawaii but also the entire Nation.

               Mr. CUMMINGS. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in honor of the 
             passing of one of our own--Representative Patsy Mink was 
             in the truest sense a leader by example, and she will be 
             missed.
               Patsy's life is a remarkable story of achievement and 
             bravery, of fighting for what she believed in, and--at the 
             end of the day--of incredible success in improving the 
             lives of Hawaiians and all Americans.
               I think that to understand Patsy's determination to make 
             the United States a Nation of equal opportunity is to 
             understand her personal history. Patsy created opportunity 
             for herself, and in her success, she has helped make 
             opportunity for all Americans less elusive.
               Patsy Takemoto was born to poor parents on a sugar 
             plantation on the island of Maui in Hawaii. An excellent 
             student, she was elected president of her high school 
             class and, after graduation, attended the University of 
             Hawaii. Patsy then enrolled in the prestigious University 
             of Chicago School of Law. With her law degree, she 
             returned to Hawaii and became the first Japanese-American 
             woman to hold a law license in the State's history. As she 
             was her entire life, Patsy remained unfazed by doing what 
             had not been done before--with the bravado and grace that, 
             as her colleagues, we all know well.
               After election to the Hawaii territorial legislature in 
             1956, and the Hawaii State senate in 1958, Ms. Mink was 
             elected to the House of Representatives in 1965. Since 
             then, she has championed causes that mattered to her with 
             a rare sense of determination.
               I have long marveled at Patsy's ability to get things 
             done. She was a powerful advocate for the equal rights and 
             fair treatment of American women--among her many 
             achievements in this arena, she was a leading sponsor of 
             title IX funding that ensured that women's sports were 
             supported at equal levels as those of men. She was an 
             eloquent voice of caution during the unfolding debacle of 
             Vietnam. She was an ardent supporter of civil rights. She 
             was, in her later terms, one of the truly wise voices of 
             this body.
               Mr. Speaker, I believe I speak for all of us when I say 
             that I am a better legislator and this is a better 
             institution because of Patsy Mink. And I know I speak for 
             women, minorities, and all disadvantaged communities in 
             America when I say that this is a better Nation because of 
             the service of Congresswoman Mink.
               I would like to take this opportunity to send my 
             condolences to the entire Mink family, and to all of the 
             people who have shared in sustaining this loss.

               Ms. SLAUGHTER. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor my 
             friend and colleague, Congresswoman Patsy Takemoto Mink, 
             beloved Representative from the State of Hawaii for over 
             24 years, who passed away last week at age 74. She is 
             survived by her husband John Mink, and their daughter, 
             Gwendolyn, and I extend my deepest and most heartfelt 
             condolences to them on their loss.
               Congresswoman Mink has had a distinguished and 
             extraordinary career, both in the private sector and 
             public service. After serving the Hawaii State 
             legislature, she was first elected to the House of 
             Representatives in 1965, and was the first minority woman 
             to serve in the U.S. Congress. However, this was not the 
             first barrier she broke through. Congresswoman Mink earned 
             a law degree at the University of Chicago in 1951, and 
             subsequently was the first Japanese-American woman 
             attorney in Hawaii.
               Her frustration at her inability to find employment due 
             to her gender led to her first involvement in politics. 
             According to the Honolulu Advertiser, Congresswoman Mink 
             recalled that ``I didn't start off wanting to be in 
             politics--I wanted to be a learned professional, serving 
             the community. But they weren't hiring women just then. 
             Not being able to get a job from anybody changed things.''
               Her early first-hand experience with these issues led to 
             her vocal championing of legislative responses to the 
             problem--most notably the landmark Women's Educational 
             Equality Act, otherwise known as title IX, which was 
             passed 30 years ago and mandates gender equality in any 
             education program or activity receiving Federal financial 
             assistance. In the years since, the athletic scholarship 
             money available to women has increased from $100,000 in 
             1972 to $197 million in 1997. However, title IX also has a 
             significant impact in the fight for parity in academic 
             fields. One of the most important areas to reach parity in 
             is math and science education and access to technology and 
             technological training. These areas hold the key to 
             achievement and employment for women now and in the 
             future. The gains we have made in each of these areas 
             could not have been possible without her principled 
             leadership.
               Another issue on which Congresswoman Mink led was 
             opposition to the Vietnam war. After being elected in the 
             fall of 1964, she was one of Congress' most vocal 
             opponents of the prolonged military campaign. Indeed, she 
             and fellow Member, Representative Bella Abzug of New York, 
             flew to Paris to talk to participants in the Vietnam war 
             peace talks. Although this position brought her scathing 
             criticism from many sources, including her own 
             constituents, she always did what she felt was right, even 
             in the face of name calling, as she was labeled ``Patsy 
             Pink.''
               After leaving the House to pursue other political 
             opportunities in the 1970s, she returned to the House in 
             1990. Since then, she has continued to be a vocal leader 
             for progressive causes, most recently as the lead sponsor 
             of vital legislation on welfare reform. This legislation 
             would have expanded educational opportunities for women 
             struggling to leave government assistance, and provided 
             ample funding for child care. Her commitment to the needs 
             of women and children could never be questioned. Indeed, 
             in lieu of flowers, her family has asked that donations be 
             made to the Patsy Takemoto Mink Education Fund for Low-
             Income Women and Children, which will be established in 
             her honor. What a fitting tribute to her work.
               I am proud to have served with such a remarkable woman. 
             Congresswoman Mink will be greatly missed both in this 
             Chamber and in her home State.
               I thank the Speaker.

               Mr. ROEMER. Mr. Speaker, I rise to express my heartfelt 
             condolences to the family of the late Congresswoman Patsy 
             Mink, including her husband John and daughter Wendy, and 
             the people of Hawaii's Second Congressional District who 
             share our recent loss.
               Patsy Mink was a dedicated public servant and an 
             inspiring example of the great strides minority women have 
             achieved in our society. She was a fierce and courageous 
             advocate for women's rights and whose powerful voice 
             during political rallies and congressional debate belied 
             her petite frame.
               I am very proud of my 12 years together with her on the 
             Education and Labor Committee. I always admired her 
             compassion, insight, and extensive knowledge of each 
             matter considered before our committee. My colleagues and 
             I will miss her presence on the dais, but her spirit will 
             live on in the memory of her enduring contributions to her 
             priorities in education, women's rights, housing and 
             health care.
               I believe Patsy's greatest accomplishment was the 
             addition of title IX to the Education Act, which she 
             helped write in 1972. This landmark measure has a proven 
             track record for increasing scholarships for women and 
             promoting equality in athletics. Her contributions 
             positively impacted the lives of tens of thousands of 
             young American women. Without her leadership, the Women's 
             National Basketball Association, women's soccer and other 
             athletic endeavors for women would not be flourishing as 
             they do today. The Women's Educational Equity Act and 
             Native Hawaiian Education Act were also directly shaped by 
             Patsy's vision of equality and opportunity.
               I will always remember Patsy's friendship, collegiality 
             and generosity, particularly several boxes of chocolate 
             macadamia nuts from her native Hawaii that my family and I 
             have enjoyed so much over the years! My thoughts and 
             prayers remain with her family and constituents as we 
             remember Patsy Mink's contributions to Congress and public 
             service in America.

               The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Grucci). Pursuant to the 
             request of the gentleman from Hawaii, the Chair requests 
             that all Members stand to observe a moment of silence in 
             memory of the late Honorable Patsy T. Mink, a 
             Representative from the great State of Hawaii.
                 EXPRESSING SORROW OF THE HOUSE AT THE DEATH OF THE 
             HONORABLE PATSY T. MINK, MEMBER OF CONGRESS FROM THE STATE 
                                      OF HAWAII
               Mr. McKEON. Mr. Speaker, the death of Representative 
             Patsy Mink comes as great sorrow not only to her family, 
             friends and constituents, but also to the U.S. Congress as 
             well. We will long feel the loss of one of our most 
             passionate Members.
               I had the privilege of working with Patsy on the House 
             Education and the Workforce Committee recently in her role 
             as the ranking member of the 21st Century Competitiveness 
             Subcommittee, which I chair. She always presented her 
             views with a rare combination of elegance, conviction and 
             passion.
               As the first woman of color elected to Congress and the 
             first Asian-American woman to practice law in Hawaii, 
             Patsy was a trailblazer and a role model to young women 
             across the Nation.
               While Patsy has a long list of accomplishments, female 
             college students in America will forever be heirs to the 
             legacy of title IX, which she was integral in passing. 
             Title IX prohibits gender discrimination at any 
             educational institution receiving Federal funds.
               I am deeply saddened by this news of my friend and I 
             offer sincere condolences to her family.

               Mr. BOEHNER. Mr. Speaker, last weekend, the members of 
             our committee lost a friend and colleague. The people of 
             Hawaii lost a strong and trusted voice. And the people of 
             our country lost a leader.
               Patsy Mink was a vibrant, passionate, and effective 
             voice for the principles she believed in. She spent most 
             of her life serving her beloved State of Hawaii and the 
             people of the United States. Her service to the Nation as 
             a Member of this House came in two chapters: she first 
             served here from January 1965 to January 1977; then she 
             returned more than a decade later, in 1990, to resume her 
             work on behalf of her constituents.
               I was elected to the House that same year--1990. As 
             incoming members of the Education and the Workforce 
             Committee, we didn't see eye to eye on many issues. Our 
             committee was the scene of some of the nastiest partisan 
             sparring in the House, and there wasn't a lot of 
             communication between Members from different parties.
               Over the years, I went up against Patsy directly several 
             times, on the issue of the Native Hawaiian Education 
             Programs and Hawaii's Bishop Estate Trust. I won't mince 
             words: I lost--each and every time. During those debates I 
             learned first-hand what a fierce advocate she could be. 
             Take it from me: when Patsy Mink decided she was going to 
             fight for something, it wasn't much fun being on the 
             receiving end.
               As I mentioned, there wasn't much opportunity to get to 
             know Patsy when I first joined our committee in the early 
             1990s. But our committee is a different place than it was 
             10 years ago. And on days like today, it's a little bit 
             easier to understand why that's so important. Republicans 
             on our committee eventually got the opportunity to not 
             only know Patsy Mink, but to work with her side by side on 
             issues like education reform. I know I speak for all the 
             Republican members of our committee when I say I'm 
             sincerely grateful we got that chance.
               Patsy Mink's passionate commitment to the issues she 
             believed in gave our committee a spark that will not be 
             easily replaced. Many of the bills we've moved in the last 
             year and a half bear her unmistakable imprint. As ranking 
             member of the Subcommittee on 21st Century 
             Competitiveness, Patsy played a key role in passing the No 
             Child Left Behind Act, the bipartisan education bill 
             signed in January by President Bush. And this year, she 
             worked closely with the gentleman from California, Mr. 
             McKeon, on legislation to reduce Federal red tape in 
             higher education.
               I'm truly disappointed we won't have the chance to 
             continue this partnership with Patsy. We'll never know 
             exactly where it might have led, or the things that might 
             have been accomplished. But I do know one thing. I'm very 
             grateful for the chance to have served with her, and to 
             have worked alongside her to achieve some of the goals for 
             which she strived.
               Patsy Mink's passing is a significant loss for our 
             committee, the people of Hawaii, and the people of the 
             United States. I offer my sincere condolences to her 
             family and constituents. She will be greatly missed.

               Mr. RANGEL. Mr. Speaker, I rise before you today to join 
             with my colleagues in paying a richly deserved tribute to 
             the memory of our esteemed and devoted colleague here in 
             the Congress, Congresswoman Patsy Mink.
               The character of the life she lived could be summed up 
             in just a few words: she was compassionate, dedicated, 
             strong-spirited, a tireless worker, a real trailblazer, 
             and an inspiring leader. Congresswoman Mink was self-
             sacrificing and sincerely devoted to her constituents and 
             to this House.
               After becoming the first Asian-American woman elected to 
             Congress in 1964, Congresswoman Mink won a reputation for 
             taking the lead on issues involving civil rights, 
             education, the environment and poverty, as well as 
             opposition to the Vietnam war. She was one of the first 
             legislators to call for the impeachment of President 
             Richard M. Nixon over Watergate, and her pioneering 
             campaign for equality for women was credited with helping 
             to make the issue a focal point of Democratic politics.
               Congresswoman Mink was extremely proud of the leading 
             role she played in 1972 in the passage of title IX of the 
             Education Act which as a result opened many doors and 
             provided opportunities for young women in athletics. More 
             recently, she opposed the toughening of welfare laws 
             signed by former President Bill Clinton.
               Congresswoman Mink has served in the U.S. Congress for 
             24 years. She was a ``voice for the voiceless'' and worked 
             diligently for those who are oftentimes forgotten such as 
             the poor and the disenfranchised.
               Congresswoman Mink was a petite woman with a big heart 
             and great intellect. It was a privilege to serve with her 
             in the House and observe as she combined charm with an 
             unlimited energy and the highest integrity. Her leadership 
             and passion for justice will be missed not only by those 
             who served with her, but by her constituents which she 
             proudly served.
               In closing and to sum up the impact which I believe 
             Patsy Mink has had, I would like to paraphrase the words 
             of Abraham Lincoln who stated in a memorable address: 
             ``The world will little note, nor long remember what we 
             say here, but can never forget what they did here.''
               My deepest condolences to her husband John and daughter 
             Wendy, and to the constituents of the Second District of 
             Hawaii.

               Mr. HONDA. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from 
             Hawaii for yielding, it is with great sadness that I rise 
             today to address the House.
               I offer my deepest sympathies to Patsy Mink's family, 
             husband John Francis Mink, daughter Wendy and brother 
             Eugene Takemoto. Anyone who was fortunate enough to have 
             been touched by her life knows that this Nation has lost a 
             true warrior in the constant struggle for justice.
               We will all miss her counsel and guidance as well as her 
             friendship.
               She encountered early on the difficulties of prejudice 
             and sexism. She also understood the importance of 
             coalition building that she would carry on for the rest of 
             her career.
               She was a person of firsts: first Japanese-American 
             woman to become a lawyer in Hawaii in 1952, first Asian-
             American woman and woman of color elected to Congress, 
             being 1 of only 12 women total in 1964.
               Her abilities in awakening all of our social 
             consciousness through her tireless advocacy, work and 
             dedication, inspired students, community leaders, 
             political appointees and especially elected officials of 
             the APA community and beyond.
               Congresswoman Mink's record as an advocate for civil 
             rights is unassailable, a crowning achievement being the 
             passage of title IX of the Education Amendments in 1972. 
             This landmark legislation banned gender discrimination in 
             schools, whether it was in academics or athletics.
               As I have indicated, she has been a role model for 
             countless women as well as those of us from the Asian-
             American and Pacific Islander community. Though she is not 
             physically present, her spirit and legacy will live on 
             through those of us who believe that the fight for 
             fairness and equity is never over.
               Mr. Speaker, as we all know, Patsy had a fierce passion 
             for freedom and equal treatment for all persons and during 
             these tense times as our Nation faces growing poverty 
             rates and international turmoil, I'd like to close with 
             two quotes from Patsy Mink. The first quote underscores 
             her passion for the need to stand up for the under-
             represented and the second quote makes the point that when 
             our national security is tested, we as a people must not 
             ignore the basic principles that this country was founded 
             on:

               If to believe in freedom and equality is to be a 
             radical, then I am a radical. So long as there remain 
             groups of our fellow Americans who are denied equal 
             opportunity and equal protection under the law * * * we 
             must remain steadfast, till all shades of man may stand 
             side by side in dignity and self-respect to truly enjoy 
             the fruits of this great land.
               America is not a country which needs to punish its 
             dissenters to preserve its honor, America is not a country 
             which needs to demand conformity of all its people, for 
             its strength lies in all our diversities converging in one 
             common belief, that of the importance of freedom as the 
             essence of our country.

               We all know that Hawaii was founded by Polynesian 
             travelers guided by the stars. Today in the skies of 
             Hawaii shines yet another star in the constellations to 
             still guide the islanders and those of us here on the 
             mainland.
               I will miss her very much.

               Mrs. JONES of Ohio. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in 
             remembrance of my colleague Congresswoman Patsy Mink who 
             served in the House of Representatives for 12 terms. She 
             was the first woman of Asian descent to serve in the U.S. 
             Congress. Representative Patsy Mink's ancestry is the 
             classic story of immigrants seeking a better life in 
             America for themselves and their families. Her four 
             grandparents emigrated from Japan in the late 1800s to 
             work as contract laborers in Maui's sugar plantations.
               Representative Mink began college at the University of 
             Hawaii, but transferred to the University of Nebraska 
             where she faced a policy of segregated student housing. 
             Working with other students, their parents, and even 
             university trustees, this policy of discrimination was 
             ended. She returned to the University of Hawaii to prepare 
             for medical school and graduated with a degree in zoology 
             and chemistry. However, in 1948, none of the 20 medical 
             schools to which she applied would accept women. She 
             decided to study law and was accepted by the University of 
             Chicago because they considered her a ``foreign student.'' 
             Choosing not to inform the university that Hawaii was an 
             American territory, she obtained her Doctor of 
             Jurisprudence in 1951. Newly married, she became the first 
             Asian-American woman to practice law in Hawaii.
               In 1956, she was elected to the territorial House of 
             Representatives. It was the beginning of a long and 
             effective political life. In 1959, Hawaii became the 50th 
             State. In 1965, Patsy Mink was elected to the U.S. House 
             of Representatives and began the first of six consecutive 
             terms in the House of Representatives. She was the first 
             woman of color to be elected to Congress.
               Representative Mink's ability to build coalitions for 
             progressive legislation continued during her tenure in 
             Congress. She introduced the first comprehensive Early 
             Childhood Education Act and authored the Women's 
             Educational Equity Act.
               In the early 1970s, she played a key role in the 
             enactment of title IX of the Higher Education Act 
             Amendments. Written in 1972 to be enacted by 1977, title 
             IX, which prohibited gender discrimination by federally 
             funded institutions, has become the major tool for women's 
             fuller participation not only in sports, but in all 
             aspects of education. Title IX is the reason why girls and 
             women have made such gains in education and particularly 
             in sports. In 1971, only 294,015 girls participated in 
             high school athletics. Today, over 2.7 million girls 
             participate in high school athletics, an 847-percent 
             increase, according to the Department of Education.
               Mr. Speaker, I rise today to reiterate the importance of 
             the legacy of my dear friend Patsy Mink. Congresswoman 
             Mink will be remembered for her deep concern and support 
             of education, women's rights, and Pacific Islander issues. 
             Her struggles and accomplishments bear witness to the 
             strength of the American spirit.

               Mr. HOLT. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor and 
             remember the works of a great mentor, friend, colleague, 
             and champion in Congress, Representative Patsy Mink.
               I am saddened by the sudden loss of such a great leader 
             and heroine. She inspired many of us through her tireless 
             work, commitment, and dedication throughout her tenure in 
             Congress. I send my condolences to Representative Mink's 
             family, Mr. John Francis Mink, her husband, and Gwendolyn 
             Rachel Mink, her daughter. You are in my thoughts and 
             prayers.
               Congresswoman Mink was the first Asian-American woman to 
             serve in Congress. During her time in Congress she 
             championed many issues including women's rights, 
             education, the environment, equal opportunity for all 
             citizens, and title IX of the Education Act. She will 
             always be remembered as an outspoken advocate for women 
             and children. She was the kind of public servant we all 
             want to emulate.
               Patsy left a lasting legacy behind that has inspired us 
             to continue her work. She touched the lives of many 
             individuals, particularly women through her work on title 
             IX, which mandates gender equality in any education 
             program or activity receiving Federal financial 
             assistance. Title IX has been instrumental in prohibiting 
             discrimination on the basis of sex in educational programs 
             and sports activities that receive Federal funding. Before 
             title IX, many schools saw no problem in maintaining 
             strict limits on the admission of women or simply refusing 
             to admit them. Since the passage of title IX, this has 
             changed dramatically. In 1994, women received 38 percent 
             of medical degrees, 43 percent of law degrees, and 44 
             percent of all doctoral degrees. In 1972, women received 
             only 9 percent of medical degrees, 7 percent of law 
             degrees and 25 percent of doctoral degrees.
               Female participation in sports, like receiving a college 
             education, has had unexpected benefits for women through 
             title IX. Studies have shown that values learned from 
             sports participation, such as teamwork, leadership, 
             discipline and pride in accomplishment, are important 
             attributes as women increase their participation in the 
             workforce, as well as their entry into business management 
             and ownership positions.
               More and more women are entering and graduating from 
             college and graduate school. More women are entering and 
             excelling in sports activities. And, more women are 
             entering the corporate world and holding management 
             positions. Representative Mink's leadership in enacting 
             title IX will continue to make a difference for young 
             women. This is why today in the Education and the 
             Workforce Committee we passed a bill to name title IX 
             after Patsy Mink. Thanks to her courage and foresight the 
             country is better as women have the opportunity to achieve 
             their full position.
               Her work enabled many young women to enter the field of 
             sports, medicine, law, and business. Women today have been 
             empowered to reach as far as they want because of the work 
             Representative Mink championed in Congress.
               Representative Patsy Mink's dedication and perseverance 
             will be admired. She will be forever known as a strong, 
             intelligent, and inspirational woman. She left a legacy 
             behind that motivated and touched me deeply. Her work has 
             allowed women to accomplish and reach for any dream they 
             desire to achieve. Thank you, Patsy Mink.

               Mr. KILDEE. Mr. Speaker, I am deeply saddened by the 
             recent loss of my beloved colleague and dear friend, Patsy 
             Mink of Hawaii. While serving together on the Education 
             and the Workforce Committee, we developed a long-lasting 
             friendship and mutual admiration for each other. Patsy's 
             impact on this institution and our Nation's history should 
             never be overlooked or forgotten. Her legacy will remain 
             an inspiration for all those who struggle to overcome 
             social, racial and economic injustice.
               Patsy Mink will forever be remembered as a modern day 
             pioneer of gender and racial equality in government. 
             Throughout her distinguished career, Patsy continually 
             overcame insurmountable obstacles to achieve success and 
             acceptance in her professional and political career. In 
             Hawaii, she became the first Asian-American woman to 
             practice law and the first Asian-American woman to be 
             elected to the territorial House before Hawaii became a 
             State in 1959. While serving in the territorial House, she 
             became one of the leading advocates for Hawaii's 
             statehood. In 1964, she had the honor of becoming the 
             first Asian-American woman of Japanese-American heritage 
             to be elected to the U.S. House of Representatives.
               During her tenure, Congresswoman Mink became a leading 
             advocate for racial, gender and social equality. Inspired 
             by her lifelong challenges, Congresswoman Mink fought for 
             women to have equal access to education and athletic 
             opportunities. Thanks to her leadership and steadfast 
             commitment, title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 
             helped dismantle gender discrimination in schools across 
             this country. In order to preserve and protect her beloved 
             State of Hawaii, Congresswoman Mink also helped write 
             tough environmental protection laws safeguarding sacred 
             lands and fragile waters from over-development and 
             exploitation.
               I feel absolutely privileged to have served with this 
             historic and wonderful woman. Despite all the obstacles 
             and challenges, Patsy Mink was still able to achieve her 
             dreams and goals. Her perseverance and determination 
             should continue to be an inspiration for future 
             generations of Americans. I will forever admire my friend 
             and colleague for her lifelong commitment and service to 
             her country. Although it is difficult to say goodbye to my 
             colleague, I know that her profound contributions and 
             legacy will continue to influence our Nation's future.

               Ms. SCHAKOWSKY. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to thank Patsy 
             Mink, a leader, a visionary, a mentor, and a true advocate 
             for so many who had no voice. Patsy Mink was a woman I 
             looked up to, learned from, and was inspired by. As the 
             first woman of color elected to the U.S. Congress in 1964, 
             Patsy knew what it meant to break down barriers. Her 
             passion was for those who were otherwise forgotten or 
             pushed to the side.
               Patsy was a strong fighter for women's rights. Her 
             leadership in the fight for equality for women and girls 
             in education and sports has made an everlasting impact on 
             this country. The passage of title IX has literally 
             changed the lives of millions of young girls and women. It 
             opened the doors to countless opportunities for women and 
             girls and allowed us to dream bigger than we ever had 
             before. It allowed more people to see women as Olympic 
             athletes and competitors. It allowed parents to see their 
             daughters as softball players and runners. It challenged 
             school administrators and coaches to see the potential in 
             female athletes and embrace it.
               Patsy was a relentless fighter for low-income and poor 
             families. She had great compassion for those who were 
             struggling against the odds to work and provide for their 
             families. She wasn't afraid to make her voice heard in 
             standing up for fair treatment of women receiving welfare 
             benefits, workers' rights and fair pay, and children who 
             were lacking food or a good education. Patsy was a 
             fearless fighter for the environment. She helped protect 
             Hawaii's natural beauty in national parks and worked at 
             the local level to help communities preserve their lands. 
             Patsy was a lifelong fighter for civil rights. She knew 
             what it meant to stand up in the face of adversity and she 
             worked hard to break down barriers so those coming after 
             her would instead experience justice and equality.
               Patsy was tough and passionate. I can see her now 
             shaking her small but mighty fist as she eloquently 
             challenged an injustice. Patsy was a pioneer and a 
             trailblazer. As we honor the memory of Patsy Mink today, 
             we should also think about the future that she would want 
             and work to achieve it. Patsy would want us to pass a 
             Labor/HHS bill that truly leaves no child behind. She 
             would want us to fully fund the Women's Education Equity 
             Act. She wanted to see passage of a welfare bill that 
             lifts women and children out of poverty, not just off the 
             welfare rolls. Patsy wants us to make sure that all people 
             have a fair chance.
               Today, as I mourn with my colleagues and extend my 
             condolences to her family and to the people of Hawaii, I 
             honor the memory of Patsy Mink and all that she stood for. 
             And I deeply miss her beautiful smile.
                 EXPRESSING SORROW OF THE HOUSE AT THE DEATH OF THE 
             HONORABLE PATSY T. MINK, MEMBER OF CONGRESS FROM THE STATE 
                                      OF HAWAII
               Mr. CROWLEY. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in sadness at the 
             passing of my colleague and friend Patsy Mink.
               But I also rise in great joy and gratitude as I reflect 
             on the paths she cleared for so many people.
               Patsy Mink blazed trails for women and people of color. 
             She was a stalwart progressive voice and aggressive leader 
             on issues important to the American people.
               She is known all over this great country for her work on 
             minority affairs and equal rights. Various groups have 
             called her an inspirational role model for students and an 
             ``American political trailblazer extraordinaire.'' The 
             National Organization for Women called her a valiant 
             champion.
               One of her greatest successes was the passage of title 
             IX, which she sponsored. Title IX literally leveled the 
             playing field for women in academics and athletics, 
             bringing countless women into athletics in high schools 
             and colleges and universities, and helping to fuel the 
             successes of many professional women's teams today.
               Patsy Mink's biggest fans were also her most important 
             fans--the people she represented in Congress for 24 years, 
             as well as the Hawaii Legislature and the Honolulu City 
             Council, where she consistently advocated on behalf of and 
             delivered for her constituents. This tireless work 
             explains why her local papers described her as ``a true 
             champion of the people.''
               While there are words in honor of her vibrant life in 
             service to the American people, perhaps the most fitting 
             tribute is to strive to capture her extraordinary spirit 
             in this great House as we continue the critical work she 
             devoted her life to achieving--expanding job and education 
             opportunities for women, promoting peace in our troubled 
             world, and fighting for social justice.
               My own special memory of Patsy was of the annual gift of 
             chocolate-covered macadamia nuts she gave Members of 
             Congress from her native Hawaii. She was not only 
             thoughtful, she was an all-around class act.
               Mr. Speaker, we all came to Congress to help better the 
             lives of people we represent. We fight hard every day to 
             achieve results that will improve the quality of life for 
             people in our hometowns. But few can claim the results 
             that Patsy Mink delivered for the people of Hawaii. She is 
             an inspiration to all of us. While being a role model for 
             so many young people in Hawaii and across the Nation, she 
             is also a role model for each of us.
               God bless her distinguished career in public service. 
             And may God bless her family.

               Ms. McKINNEY. Mr. Speaker, I rise to remember our 
             colleague, Representative Patsy Mink.
               It was with great sadness that I learned of the death of 
             my friend and colleague, Congresswoman Patsy Mink this 
             weekend.
               I offer my deepest condolences to Patsy's family, her 
             constituents, and the State of Hawaii. Her passing is a 
             loss to us all.
               Patsy was a leader on many issues during her 23-year 
             tenure in Congress, and I believe that she truly did do 
             what many, if not all Representatives seek to accomplish 
             here in Washington, DC--she made a difference.
               Patsy was the co-author for title IX of the Education 
             Amendments Act of 1972, which mandated gender equality in 
             education. Thanks to her work, millions of women were 
             afforded greater access to education, school grants and 
             scholarships, and athletic opportunities.
               Patsy was also a leader on an issue that is close to my 
             heart, the Freedom of Information Act. In 1971, Patsy 
             filed suit along with 32 other Members of Congress to 
             force disclosure of reports on underground nuclear attacks 
             in the Aleutian Islands of Alaska. This case was later 
             cited as precedent by the U.S. Supreme Court in its ruling 
             for the release of the Watergate tapes.
               Patsy Mink was also an advocate for the protection and 
             conservation of the natural resources of our Nation, and 
             of Hawaii. A former Assistant Secretary of State for 
             Oceans and International, Environmental and Scientific 
             Affairs, where she helped strengthen protection of whales 
             and regulations of toxic dumping and ocean mining, Patsy 
             brought her advocacy back to Congress with her. In the 
             107th Congress, she introduced legislation to create the 
             East Maui National Heritage Area, to expand the Pu'uhonua 
             Honaunau National Historic Park, and to establish the 
             Kalaupapa National Historic Park. Further, Patsy was 
             involved in the successful effort to reform laws 
             permitting strip mining. It is fitting then that Patsy was 
             a recipient of the Friends of the National Parks Award 
             from the National Parks Conservation Association.
               On these, and many other fronts, Patsy was a dedicated 
             and devoted leader and champion. I consider it a privilege 
             to have served with Patsy, and I believe that Congress has 
             lost an important and respected Member.

               Mr. ENGEL. Mr. Speaker, I rise to honor the memory of 
             our colleague, Patsy Mink. I was extremely saddened by the 
             news of her death this weekend. Yet I am comforted by the 
             fact that her story will serve to inspire young men and 
             women all over the Nation to serve their country.
               Patsy's life was one of constantly overcoming barriers. 
             As a student at the University of Nebraska, Patsy worked 
             to end the policy of housing desegregation. Patsy wanted 
             to be a medical doctor but was prevented from doing so 
             because medical schools did not, at that time, accept 
             women. She then applied to law school, graduated from the 
             University of Chicago, only to be blocked from getting a 
             job as a lawyer because of her gender. Never allowing 
             barriers to stand in her way, Patsy started her own law 
             practice in Hawaii.
               As a Member of Congress, Patsy worked tirelessly to 
             fight for civil rights, our Nation's children, the 
             environment, and equal opportunity. Furthermore, as a 
             member of the House Education and the Workforce Committee 
             she led the fight for title IX which mandated gender 
             equality in any education program or activity receiving 
             Federal financial assistance. Today's great female 
             athletes, such as Mia Hamm, owe their success in part to 
             Patsy. I am thankful that I had the opportunity to serve 
             with someone who fought so indefatigably for economic and 
             social justice for all Americans.
               I am proud to have called Patsy Mink a friend and a 
             colleague. She will be sorely missed.

               Ms. McCOLLUM. Mr. Speaker, during my days in grade 
             school, the full participation of women in school 
             athletics was not only discouraged, but also frowned upon. 
             That all changed in 1972 when one woman challenged the 
             system, changed the rules and inspired and empowered a new 
             generation of young women. That woman is Patsy Mink.
               I offer my deepest condolences to Patsy Mink's family. I 
             know that they will miss her, as will all of us in 
             Congress who were fortunate enough to know her, not only 
             as a colleague, but also as a leader, mentor and friend.
               Patsy Mink was a pioneer--she opened so many doors for a 
             generation of women and for our daughters. She was the 
             driving force behind title IX, which mandated gender 
             equality in education.
               Without this landmark piece of legislation, our 
             daughters, granddaughters, nieces and young women 
             everywhere would not have the opportunity to excel and 
             display their talents in the classrooms and the playing 
             fields across this Nation.
               Without Patsy's unwavering efforts to implement this 
             law, title IX would have been the great idea that never 
             came to be.
               I am honored to have served with Congresswoman Mink on 
             the House Education and the Workforce Committee and feel 
             privileged to have worked closely with her on the 
             Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness. I know 
             firsthand her intense drive, dedication and devotion to 
             her home State and her constituency.
               As the first Asian woman elected to Congress, she 
             displayed unparalleled determination in fighting for human 
             rights, civil rights and the rights of minority groups 
             everywhere. We must now be vigilant and continue the 
             crucial work that Congresswoman Mink undertook on behalf 
             of people everywhere who felt they had no voice.
               Women, people of color and individuals throughout this 
             Nation owe a debt of gratitude to Patsy Mink and her 
             trailblazing efforts. Her legacy of equality and integrity 
             will live on not only in the Halls of Congress, but on the 
             playing fields and in the classrooms across this Nation.

               Mr. POMEROY. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor a friend 
             and colleague, the Honorable Patsy Mink. I have known 
             Patsy since being elected to Congress nearly a decade ago, 
             and it was with heartfelt sadness that I learned of her 
             passing on September 28, 2002.
               Patsy Mink, the first Congresswoman of Asian descent, 
             was first elected to the House of Representatives in 1964. 
             Throughout her career, she earned a reputation as a 
             fearless and outspoken advocate for minorities, women, and 
             children. Even at the age of 74, Patsy continued to be a 
             stalwart for social and economic justice in the House of 
             Representatives.
               In one of her proudest moments in 1972, Patsy co-
             authored and passed a landmark law prohibiting sex 
             discrimination in federally funded education programs, 
             popularly known as title IX. As a result, the number of 
             girls participating in high school sports has exploded in 
             recent decades, leading to increased opportunities for 
             women.
               Patsy Mink's tenacity and dedication to the Civil Rights 
             movement during the 1960s and 1970s shaped the Democratic 
             national agenda, making the interests of women and 
             minorities a centerpiece of the party's platform. During 
             the 1990s, her ability to build coalitions in a divided 
             Congress has made it possible to move much progressive 
             legislation to the floor.
               All of us here in Congress--Republicans and Democrats 
             alike--owe Patsy so much. She was known on both sides of 
             the aisle for her determination, courage and tenacity, and 
             was an inspiration for all of us in public service. We are 
             better legislators and better human beings for having 
             known and worked with this distinguished woman.

               Mr. LYNCH. Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleague for this 
             opportunity to remember and pay tribute to our dear 
             departed colleague, Patsy Mink of Hawaii. I am deeply 
             saddened by her passing, Patsy Mink was a wonderful woman 
             and a great leader for her constituents of Hawaii and for 
             our Nation.
               I had the honor and privilege of serving on the 
             Government Reform Committee with Congresswoman Mink. 
             During my short tenure on the committee, Patsy Mink's 
             passion and her belief in her work was evident and could 
             be felt by all that knew her.
               Mr. Speaker, Patsy Mink will always be remembered for 
             her legislative achievements. Her ability to build 
             coalitions for progressive legislation led to the first 
             comprehensive Early Childhood Education Act and authored 
             the Women's Educational Equity Act.
               Her constituents benefited from her dedication to 
             equality for women and she played a key role in the 
             enactment of title IX of the Higher Education Act 
             Amendments, which prohibited gender discrimination by 
             federally funded institutions. This legislation has become 
             the major tool for women's fuller participation not only 
             in sports, but also in all aspects of education.
               Most significantly, I have admired Patsy Mink for her 
             tireless commitment to the people of the Second District 
             of Hawaii. While this tribute cannot begin to communicate 
             her greatness as a leader and friend, I can say that this 
             body has been made better by her presence and is truly 
             diminished in her absence. She was a role model, and 
             always led by example.
               Mr. Speaker, when you come to Congress, you look to 
             certain people that set the framework on how you should 
             act and how you should conduct yourself. You cannot find a 
             better example of that than Patsy Mink. I consider myself 
             fortunate to have had the opportunity to know and work 
             with her. Congresswoman Mink's mark on this institution 
             has been left, and she will never be forgotten.
               Mr. Speaker, I ask all my colleagues to join me in 
             honoring the memory and celebrating the accomplishments of 
             Congresswoman Patsy Mink.
                                     ADJOURNMENT
               Mr. SANDLIN. Mr. Speaker, pursuant to House Resolution 
             566, I move the House do now adjourn in memory of the late 
             Honorable Patsy T. Mink.
               The motion was agreed to; accordingly (at 11 o'clock and 
             43 minutes p.m.), pursuant to House Resolution 566, the 
             House adjourned until tomorrow, Wednesday, October 2, 
             2002, at 10 a.m. in memory of the late Honorable Patsy T. 
             Mink.
                            PUBLIC BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS
               Under clause 2 of rule XII, public bills and resolutions 
             were introduced and severally referred, as follows:
               By Mr. ABERCROMBIE:
               H. Res. 566. A resolution expressing the condolences of 
             the House of Representatives on the death of the Honorable 
             Patsy T. Mink, a Representative from Hawaii; considered 
             and agreed to.
                                             Wednesday, October 2, 2002
                         TRIBUTE TO THE HONORABLE PATSY MINK
               Mr. OWENS. Mr. Speaker, I would like to begin by 
             congratulating my colleagues who provided the review of 
             the irresponsibility of the Republican majority toward the 
             economy and my previous speaker, the gentlewoman from 
             Ohio, in terms of her spirit of indignation expressed 
             about cavalier attitudes towards war.
               I think the subject that I want to talk about tonight, 
             the lady that I want to talk about, the Congresswoman I 
             want to talk about tonight, would very much approve of 
             what our previous colleagues have done here already 
             tonight. I want to talk about Congresswoman Patsy Mink, 
             who recently passed away in Hawaii.
               Patsy Mink is known for many things, but I knew her as 
             an individual who was filled with righteous indignation 
             and anger against injustice, and my colleagues have 
             presented tonight very intelligent presentations, well-
             documented presentations, but that will get all the time. 
             I think I heard in their voices also some outrage. They 
             were upset. They were angry about the irresponsibility of 
             the Republican majority, and that we have all too little 
             of here in this Congress, all too little righteous 
             indignation and anger.
               We are going to miss Patsy Mink because she was a lady 
             with great righteous indignation against injustice. She 
             was angry at the kind of callous approach to human welfare 
             that was exhibited too many times on the floor of this 
             Congress.
               Yesterday we had a resolution on Patsy Mink, and many 
             people spoke. I was not able to speak, but I did submit 
             for the Record a tribute to Congresswoman Patsy Mink, and 
             I would like to start with that tribute and make comments 
             on it. The tribute, of course, is in its entirety in the 
             Record, Tuesday, October 1.
               In Tuesday's Record this appears in its entirety, but I 
             would like to repeat it and comment as I go, because I 
             heard my colleagues yesterday talk about Patsy in many 
             ways. Most of the references were personal. I would like 
             to focus primarily tonight on Patsy Mink as a policy 
             manager, Patsy Mink as a champion of the poor, Patsy Mink 
             as a champion of women, Patsy Mink who could be very 
             intense, although she always was polite and warm, and lots 
             of people talked about that yesterday.
               Patsy Mink will be remembered with a broad array of 
             accolades. She was a warm, compassionate colleague. She 
             was civil and generous, even to the opponents who angered 
             her the most. As a member of the Committee on Education 
             and the Workforce, which when Patsy Mink first came to 
             Congress was called the Committee on Education and Labor, 
             as a member of that committee, in any long markup, and we 
             could have some long markups, we always knew that Patsy 
             would pull out macadamia nuts for all of us, and she would 
             share macadamia nuts with everybody, those who were 
             opponents as well as those who were allies.
               I remember her chiding me, joking with me when I talked 
             about how much I loved macadamia nuts. I was a macadamia 
             nut junkie, but I said to her, ``Do not bring any more 
             because I am on a diet, and these things certainly do not 
             help anybody's diet.'' The next time she came with 
             macadamia nuts, they were chocolate-covered macadamia 
             nuts, and they are even more delicious than regular 
             macadamia nuts and even more calories. But that was the 
             kind of person she was.
               She was quite warm, cared very much about everybody, but 
             she could be angry. She could be a piece of chain 
             lightning.
               For me, she will be remembered as my friend, mentor and 
             my personal whip on the floor. Often at the door of a 
             House Chamber, Patsy would meet me with instructions. 
             ``We,'' she said, ``are voting no,'' or, ``We are voting 
             yes on this one.'' I did not consider that to be 
             intimidation at all. I considered it always an honor to 
             have been invited to function as an ideological twin to 
             Patsy Mink. She was not telling me or instructing me. She 
             was making assumptions about how we would be together in 
             our analysis of the problem, our conclusions about what to 
             do with respect to voting. That was a great honor, and I 
             am going to miss that.
               In the Committee on Education and the Workforce, as well 
             as on the House floor, I was always inspired by Patsy's 
             convictions. She was always an independent spirit, and she 
             pursued her causes with total dedication. She was not just 
             another advocate for education or for women or for jobs 
             for welfare mothers, not just another one. Patsy Mink was 
             a special advocate.
               She was forever a fiery and intense advocate on these 
             issues. She frequently exuded an old-fashioned righteous 
             indignation that seems to have become extinct in the Halls 
             of Congress. For Patsy, there were the right policies and 
             laws which she pushed with all the zeal she could muster, 
             and there were the wrong-headed, hypocritical, selfish and 
             evil policies which had to be confronted, and they had to 
             be engaged to the bitter end.
               When colleagues spoke about partisan compromise 
             negotiations, Patsy would quickly warn Democrats to beware 
             of an ambush or a trap. I think Patsy in her encyclopedic 
             approach to her mission, encyclopedic concern about 
             anything that affected human beings, would have very much 
             appreciated the presentation by my colleagues before the 
             1-hour presentation on the economy.
               On the Committee on Education and Labor where Patsy 
             served and I have served for the 20 years that I have been 
             here in Congress, we used to have hearings and testimony 
             from economists, because this committee was charged and is 
             still charged with overall responsibility with respect to 
             the economy as it impacts on working families and working 
             men and women, and as the human resources interact with 
             the other factors in our economy. So we used to have many 
             economists come, and our approach was certainly not a 
             tunnel-vision approach.
               She would have been concerned and has been concerned all 
             year long about the fact that the economy has been 
             deteriorating, the fact that unemployment is increasing. 
             The unemployment rate averaged 4.1 percent in the year 
             2000 and reached a 30-year low of 3.9 percent in October 
             2000; but today the unemployment rate has increased to 5.7 
             percent nationwide. We have presently 8.1 million 
             unemployed Americans, an increase of 2.5 million compared 
             to the year 2000. The number of Americans experiencing 
             long-term unemployment over 27 weeks has almost doubled in 
             the last year.
               Some of this my colleagues heard from my previous 
             colleagues who spoke on the economy. I think this is 
             summarized very well by my colleague the gentleman from 
             California (Mr. Waxman), the ranking member of the 
             Committee on Government Reform. Job creation has reversed.
               In the year 2000, the year before President Bush took 
             office, the economy created 1.7 million new jobs. This 
             trend has been reversed, and the economy has lost almost 
             1.5 million jobs since President Bush took office in 
             January 2001. Poverty is increasing. After decreasing for 
             8 straight years, decreasing for 8 straight years and 
             reaching its lowest level in 25 years, the poverty rate 
             increased from 11.3 percent in 2000 to 11.7 percent in 
             2001. In the first year of the Bush administration, 1.3 
             million Americans slipped back into poverty, with a total 
             of 32.9 million Americans living in poverty in 2001.
               Incomes are falling. Hundreds of thousands of Americans 
             are filing for bankruptcy. Mortgage foreclosures are at a 
             record high. The Federal budget deficit is increasing. In 
             2000, the year before President Bush took office, the 
             Federal budget, excluding Social Security, showed a 
             surplus of $86.6 billion. The most recent figures from the 
             Congressional Budget Office indicate that for 2002 the 
             Federal budget excluding Social Security will show a 
             deficit of $314 billion. This represents the largest 
             budget decline in U.S. history, and it is the third 
             largest on-budget deficit in history, exceeded in size 
             only by the deficits of 1991 and 1992 under the first 
             President Bush.
               I think Patsy Mink would be, has shown all year long, 
             that she is very concerned about all of these matters. 
             Patsy Mink, in the 107th Congress, was one of the great 
             spirits continually pushing to get more activists going in 
             response to the decline of the economy.
               Patsy was a policymaker. Patsy should be remembered as a 
             policymaker, as a fighter. Whatever else we remember about 
             her as an individual, we should not trivialize her role in 
             the dynamics here in the Congress with respect to making 
             policy. Her profound wisdom on all matters related to 
             education in particular and matters relating to human 
             resources, whether it was job training or occupational 
             health and safety, whatever matters relating to human 
             resources, she had a profound wisdom about that because 
             she had been here for quite a long time. Her long years of 
             service on the Committee on Education and Labor, which 
             later became the Committee on Education and the Workforce, 
             afforded her that kind of wisdom.
               Too many of us in the Congress have forgotten the value 
             of institutional memory. While the House is filled with 
             Members who speak as experts on education, Patsy Mink was 
             among the few who had hard-earned credentials with respect 
             to education. She was a part of the development and the 
             nurturing of title I to the point where it has become the 
             cornerstone of Federal education reform. She was here 
             during the Great Society program creation. She served with 
             Adam Clayton Powell and Lyndon Johnson in the years that 
             they passed more social legislation than has ever been 
             passed in Congress.
               Title IX was a landmark reform to end the gender gap in 
             our educational institutions, in school athletics; but 
             also many other aspects of higher education. Title IX 
             belongs to Patsy. She conceived it decades ago, and she 
             had to fight all the way to the President. Even recently, 
             in this 107th Congress, there were skirmishes seeking to 
             cut back on the funding for title IX. Title IX was passed 
             in 1972, but right up until recently, the grumbling and 
             the attempts to undercut have persisted.
               I will talk more in greater detail about some of the 
             things that have happened along the way as Patsy was 
             forced to fight to keep title IX. As I said, she had an 
             encyclopedic approach. She was involved in many issues. 
             There were certain issues she would focus on tenaciously. 
             And because she focused on them, she was prepared to 
             defend them, and she very effectively saved many of these 
             programs from the jaws of those who would roll back 
             progress.
               Title IX, like many other Federal policies and programs, 
             was considered to be impossible, something else we could 
             not afford. We could not afford to have equality in our 
             education activities for women. That would be a burden on 
             our higher education institutions. That would be a burden 
             on higher education athletics, college athletics, or 
             school athletics. Always those who want to conscript and 
             limit the opportunities for a class of people insist that 
             it is not doable.
               Social Security originally was attacked. We know we did 
             not get a single Republican vote when Social Security was 
             implemented and passed. Social Security was attacked as 
             something that would wreck the economy. The minimum wage 
             was attacked. The minimum wage provision was attacked as 
             another item that would wreck the economy. Always reasons 
             are found to stop the spreading of the benefits of our 
             great American democracy and our great economy to all.
               They particularly hold on with respect to matters 
             relating to women. We are way, way behind, even in liberal 
             America, liberal and progressive America. We are still way 
             behind in recognizing full unfettered rights for all 
             women. There is no more category of human being more 
             oppressed in the world than women. If you want to look at 
             numbers, the greatest number of people oppressed 
             throughout the world are women. In all societies, just 
             about, there is oppression. In societies that suffer from 
             racial prejudice, an oppression because of race, or in 
             others who suffer as a result of colonialism, and all 
             those societies where everybody might suffer, the women 
             still suffer most of all because of male dominance. Male 
             chauvinism seems to hold on. It seems to be 
             institutionalized in certain religions. And when we 
             liberate women finally, we will have arrived as a 
             civilization.
               But there is a great need to have the fullest possible 
             liberation for women in America. We are more advanced in 
             this respect than probably any society. The mountaintop is 
             in view, and we should certainly go on to make certain 
             that all of the pathways are cleared so that women and men 
             are clearly equal in one society in the world, that is the 
             American society, and that this will spread first in the 
             Western world and on and on and break down any shibboleth 
             that may remain in terms of religions that insist that 
             women are inferior and women do not deserve complete 
             equality with men.
               Patsy was an advocate for total equality for women, and 
             that is quite appropriate. Her spirit will be missed. We 
             should remember Patsy as an advocate for women. She was 
             the co-author of title IX of the Higher Education 
             Amendments of 1972 that prohibits sex discrimination in 
             all education institutions receiving Federal funds. This 
             law, which Patsy cited as one of her greatest 
             accomplishments, has had a dramatic impact in opening up 
             opportunities for girls and women in the professions and 
             most visibly in athletics.
               In 1970, before the passage of title IX, only 8.4 
             percent of medical degrees were awarded to women. By 1980, 
             this figure had increased to 23.4 percent. By 1997, women 
             were earning 41 percent of medical degrees. So in addition 
             to athletics, in an area like medicine, Patsy's title IX 
             opened the way for women.
               I think her colleague, Senator Akaka, in honoring Patsy, 
             was able to bring some light on her personal travails as a 
             woman. Patsy wanted to be a doctor. She applied for 
             medical school after studying zoology and chemistry at the 
             University of Hawaii. She applied in 1948 to a medical 
             school there, but she was rejected, along with other 
             bright young women who were aspiring to be doctors at a 
             time when women made up only 2 to 3 percent of the 
             entering class. Patsy went on to apply to a law school 
             instead. She gained admission to the University of 
             Chicago.
               It was during her years at the University of Chicago 
             that she met and married her husband. Patsy returned to 
             Hawaii and gained admission to the Hawaii bar in 1953. But 
             as a woman, even then, she had difficulty, because it was 
             said that her husband was a native of Pennsylvania, and a 
             woman had to gain her bar admission in the area where her 
             husband lived. She challenged that piece of sexism and she 
             won. She was admitted to the Hawaii bar, and she became 
             the first Japanese-American woman to become a member of 
             the bar in Hawaii.
               In 1965, Patsy brought her views to the national stage 
             when she became the first woman of color elected to the 
             U.S. House of Representatives to represent Hawaii's Second 
             Congressional District--1965. You can see that she was 
             here during the time when Lyndon Johnson put forth his 
             Great Society programs, and she was a colleague of Adam 
             Clayton Powell as each one of those measures came through 
             the Committee on Education and Labor on its way to the 
             floor of the House to be passed successfully by a 
             democratically controlled Congress and Senate. So the 
             institutional memory, the institutional achievements of 
             Patsy Mink ought to be remembered as part of the Record.
               She is a role model that the present Members of Congress 
             should look up to. She is a role model that should be held 
             up to future Members of Congress. We need role models that 
             go beyond the fact that we are all very intelligent men 
             and women who come to this Congress. You will not find a 
             single person elected to Congress who is not intelligent. 
             You do not get here unless you are very intelligent. Most 
             of us have extensive formal education. Most of the Members 
             of Congress are college graduates. Many are people who 
             have gone beyond college and have professional degrees. So 
             intelligence is not a problem here.
               If intelligence were the kind of cleansing overall 
             virtue that I once believed it was when I was in high 
             school and college, that intelligent people always do the 
             right thing, intelligent people understand the world, they 
             understand what is right, and they do what is right. 
             Intelligence does not automatically lead to correct and 
             appropriate, democratic, generous, progressive, and 
             charitable behavior. So intelligence is not the problem 
             here in this Congress. The quality that is missing here is 
             indignation, righteous indignation, dedication to the 
             proposition that all men and women are created equal. And 
             if they are all created equal, they all have a right to 
             share in the prosperity and the benefits of this great 
             country.
               We have to make a way for them to do that, even if they 
             are people who are very poor and at one time or another 
             have to go on welfare. At one time or another they have to 
             be the recipients of the safety net benefits of our 
             Nation. We have safety net beneficiaries who are rich 
             farmers, yet we never are critical of them. But we have 
             safety net beneficiaries who are welfare mothers, mothers 
             of children; and you do not become a woman on welfare 
             unless you have children. It is Aid to Families with 
             Dependent Children. So welfare women, who we refer to, are 
             really mothers of children who are covered by the law Aid 
             to Families with Dependent Children.
               In this Congress, Patsy declared war on the oppressors 
             of welfare women. It was a lonely army that she led. A 
             very tiny platoon, I would say, that she led as she made 
             war on the oppressors of welfare women. No one was more 
             incensed and outraged than the Member from Hawaii when the 
             so-called welfare reform program of President Bush 
             threatened greater burdens and smaller subsidies for 
             welfare recipients. Patsy came to me often and said we 
             must fight this, we must do something, we must not allow 
             this to happen. We must point out the fact that welfare 
             benefits have been greatly reduced in most of the States. 
             We must point out the fact that in the model State of 
             Wisconsin, the State where the Secretary of Health and 
             Human Services, former Governor Thompson presided, they 
             have reduced the welfare benefits for a family of three to 
             less than $300 a month; and they are praising him for 
             having made that reduction. That is wonderful; that a 
             welfare family of three only gets less than $300 a month.
               That same Governor Thompson had transferred welfare 
             money that would have gone to welfare beneficiaries to 
             other functions in State government. Maybe he had a few 
             other cronies he wanted to employ, maybe he gave a few 
             more State banquets, who knows where the money went; but 
             the Federal money that was meant to go to welfare 
             beneficiaries, the law allowed him, if he saved it by 
             curtailing the benefits for welfare families, then he 
             could use it in other ways. No one was more incensed and 
             outraged by that kind of activity than Patsy Mink.
               Patsy said, We must do something. The Democrats are 
             going to be rubber stamps to the Republican proposals. The 
             Democrats are going to be rubber stamps to President 
             Bush's proposals. Patsy Mink came forward, and we had made 
             many proposals. We fought the greater burdens and smaller 
             subsidies for welfare recipients. All of Patsy's proposals 
             in the House were voted down. We did not pass anything at 
             all. But I admire and will always praise Patsy Mink for 
             leading the fight which stirred up the long-dormant 
             conscience among Democrats.
               Democrats did come to the floor with an alternative 
             bill. We did produce a fight on the floor. We did have a 
             debate on the floor. We offered an alternative. We set the 
             stage for what happened after the bill left this House and 
             went to the other body. We would like to believe that the 
             fact that deliberations on this very important matter, 
             welfare reform, continues and is stalled because we fought 
             valiantly under the leadership of Patsy Mink, and that 
             fight still goes on as a result of the record. We united 
             behind Patsy. We were voted down, but we were together.
               As I said before, Patsy Mink is a role model for what 
             needs to happen in this House. Some Members of Congress 
             focus on housing issues. Some focus on transportation 
             issues. Some focus on health issues. Whatever the issue, 
             they need to bring to it the kind of indignation and 
             determination that Patsy brought to the issues she cared 
             about. She cared about education and welfare mothers. 
             Nobody knew better than Patsy about the correlation 
             between poverty and poor performance in education. She had 
             many poor people in the rural parts of her district, and 
             Patsy Mink understood the correlation.
               There is a correlation between poor performance and the 
             ability of students to take full advantage of the 
             educational opportunities offered, and poverty. Poverty 
             and education should not be discussed separately, they 
             should be discussed together. What we do to welfare 
             families hurts education. When a welfare family has their 
             budget curtailed to the point where children go to school 
             hungry, and the best meal they get is the school free 
             lunch because supper is not going to be adequate, 
             breakfast is not adequate, and at some schools we have 
             begun to provide breakfast because of that, why not 
             provide higher benefits and substitutes for the families 
             so the children who are going to school get over that 
             first hurdle and they come to school prepared to learn 
             because they have a wholesome environment at home.
               We had on the floor today several resolutions which 
             attempted to force the issue. Again, I think Patsy Mink 
             would have been very pleased with what happened this 
             afternoon in the regular session. We had four resolutions 
             which showed some outrage, some indignation. We want to 
             force the issue. We do not want to bide time here in this 
             Congress the way that the Republican majority has decided 
             we should. We do not want to just be here and not deal 
             with the issues. I would hate to read history 50 years 
             from now and hear how the historians analyzed what 
             happened to the great America; that at its apex when it 
             was most powerful, most prosperous, the leader of the 
             entire world, the only remaining superpower sat around 
             and, like Nero, fiddled while Rome was burning.
               There are so many issues related to the changing 
             patterns of the weather, the climate, so many things that 
             reach beyond our economy; and, of course, the ongoing 
             fight against terrorism. That is no less an issue, but we 
             have to chew gum and walk, sing, dance and do a lot of 
             things at the same time, and we are letting most of our 
             resources, the tremendous brain power of the Congress lie 
             fallow, unutilized. There is tremendous brain power and 
             energy. The Congress is not being utilized because, for 
             political reasons, somebody has decided that it is best 
             for us to tread water and do nothing.
               My colleagues in the Democrat Party, the gentleman from 
             Pennsylvania (Mr. Holden), the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. 
             Brown), the gentleman from Indiana (Mr. Visclosky), and 
             the gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Obey), they offered 
             resolutions saying let us do something.
               The gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Holden) offered a 
             resolution relating to family farmers and bankruptcy. Be 
             it resolved that the House of Representatives should call 
             up for consideration H.R. 5348, the Family Farmers and 
             Family Fishermen Protection Act of 2002, which will once 
             and for all give family farmers the permanent bankruptcy 
             protections they have been waiting for for over 5 years.
               Mr. Speaker, why not? We are all here. Why do we not 
             debate an act on this vital resolution? No, the Republican 
             majority chose to vote it down. With a motion to table, 
             all you need is a majority of the votes, and a motion to 
             table takes effect.
               The gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Brown) wanted to deal with 
             the fact that patent drugs, the drug companies are playing 
             with patent law so they can hold on to patents longer and 
             keep the cost of drugs higher and avoid the utilization of 
             generic drugs. That was voted down, too.
               The Brown resolution attempted to call for some 
             constructive action, but it was also voted down, but he 
             did it, and Democrats rallied behind the gentleman 
             overwhelmingly out of a sense of indignation. Those of us 
             who are sick of being victimized by the majority, we are 
             held paralyzed. We are here, but we can do nothing. At 
             least we can vote for a resolution to call for action, and 
             we did. But again, the majority had the most votes, and 
             this resolution was voted down.
               The next resolution was by the gentleman from Indiana 
             (Mr. Visclosky). It was a simple resolution, after all of 
             the whereases, resolved that it is the sense of the House 
             of Representatives that the Congress should provide States 
             with the resources they need to fully implement the No 
             Child Left Behind Act as promised less than a year ago.
               Less than a year ago we passed the No Child Left Behind 
             Act. It was a bipartisan vote on final passage. I voted 
             for it. I voted for it because of the promises that were 
             made with respect to funding. The President said he would 
             double title I over a 2-year period. The President said he 
             would provide and support the funding for the 
             implementation for No Child Left Behind, meaning the 
             tests, the training and the administrative costs related 
             to that. The President said that he would support an 
             increase in the special education funding, but he has 
             reneged on those promises.
               We would like to see the resources provided by passing 
             the Health and Human Services and the Education and 
             related agencies appropriations. The gentleman from 
             Indiana (Mr. Visclosky) offered that resolution.
               I would like to note that Patsy Mink said No Child Left 
             Behind was a piece of legislation that was an ambush; it 
             was a trap. She voted against it in committee, and she 
             voted against it on the floor of the House. And now she 
             has been proven to be correct.
               We made some stringent requirements there. We placed on 
             the backs of school systems and teachers and students a 
             lot of new regulations and threats, provisions for 
             monitoring tests, and now we have reneged on paying the 
             costs of all of that, leaving it to them. In Patsy's 
             district, she complained several months ago that the 
             provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act were beginning 
             to upset parents because there are provisions that say if 
             your individual school is failing in terms of the 
             achievements of the students in reading and math, if it is 
             failing, then you have a right to go to another school, 
             transfer to another public school.
               Well, just about all of the schools in a certain area of 
             her district are failing, and the parents are frustrated 
             because they want to use that right, but in order to go to 
             another school, they would have to have air 
             transportation. The island is constructed such that the 
             only way they can get to a school that is better than the 
             schools in that locale would be to have planes to 
             transport them. The cost of transportation is so 
             prohibitive that the law has no meaning for them. She was 
             angry because they were angry at her, but they have been 
             stirred up by the promise that was offered by the No Child 
             Left Behind legislation.
               I think that the next resolution that was offered by the 
             gentleman from Wisconsin (Mr. Obey), who is the ranking 
             member of the Committee on Appropriations, was in the same 
             vein, concerned about the fact that we have reneged on the 
             promises of the legislation that we all voted for, most of 
             us voted for, in a bipartisan compromise. Patsy did not 
             vote for it. She said we would regret the compromise, and 
             now we are living to regret it.
               The Obey resolution resolved that it is the sense of the 
             House of Representatives that the Congress should complete 
             action on the fiscal year 2003 Labor, Health and Human 
             Services and Education and related agencies appropriation 
             before recessing, and should fund the No Child Left Behind 
             Act with levels commensurate with the levels promised by 
             the act less than a year ago.
               Mr. Speaker, we are here. We should act now. Why have we 
             defaulted on action to the point where there is a 
             discussion of nothing significant is going to happen until 
             after the election. Nothing significant is going to be 
             done about any appropriations issues until after the 
             election. That is a swindle. We owe it to the American 
             people to take action on critical activities and 
             demonstrate what we are made of. Let us have a record. Let 
             us go forward and not play with the public opinion polls 
             where we know that the great majority of the American 
             people rank education as a major issue. Education is 
             ranked as a major issue, and, therefore, we pay lip 
             service to education, but we do not want to really do 
             anything.
               The indignation shown by these resolutions, the attempt 
             to force some action or at least to dramatize it, the 
             mobilization of one party to make certain that this issue 
             was on the floor I think Patsy Mink would be quite proud 
             of.
               Patsy was always concerned about the fact that education 
             was so highly publicized by both parties. Patsy was 
             concerned about the fact that there barriers put up about 
             education costing too much, although in America we are 
             only spending in terms of Federal funds, we only pick up 7 
             percent of the cost of education. There is a continued 
             drumbeat that education costs too much. The Federal 
             Government should not be more involved in education.
               Our answer was, what activity is it that the American 
             Government is involved in that does not need education as 
             more than a footnote? Education is a force in whatever 
             activity we are engaged in and, therefore, what fools we 
             are to continue to ignore education when we talk about 
             critical issues. The Homeland Security Act, for example, 
             the creation of a homeland security agency does not talk 
             in any significant way about the role that education will 
             play. The Education Department is barely mentioned. Yet 
             the Homeland Security Act is a complex mechanism which 
             will not work unless it has very educated people. It will 
             not work unless it has cadres of people who are well-
             trained in various ways. Homeland security will not work 
             unless we train tremendous numbers of people in the 
             cleanup of anthrax or the cleanup of biological warfare 
             materials. We are preparing for that. We are discussing 
             each day how we have enough vaccine to vaccinate our whole 
             population in 10 days.
               There are a number of things happening, but we are not 
             discussing who is going to do it. Where are the people who 
             will give the vaccinations? We have a shortage of nurses. 
             We have a shortage of basic technicians in our hospitals. 
             We certainly cannot deal with complicated biological 
             warfare as exhibited by the way we handled the anthrax 
             emergency here in Washington.
               What happened in the anthrax emergency here in 
             Washington? I will not go through the whole scenario, but 
             Congress was threatened and the focus of attention of all 
             the experts was on Congress. The post office, on the other 
             hand, where the anthrax had to come through, was ignored. 
             Even when they discovered that there was anthrax in the 
             post office, all of the personnel were still focused here, 
             all the expertise.
               So we had two people die here in Washington. They were 
             postal employees, postmen, who died, because we did not 
             have enough personnel to do the total job and the total 
             job was not really of epic proportions. The anthrax 
             attack, whoever did it, they still do not know who did it, 
             of course, it was small in comparison to what terrorists 
             could do. I fear anthrax more than I fear nuclear weapons. 
             After watching what happened here in Washington, after 
             having been locked out of my office for several weeks, 
             even now we have to irradiate our mail, after watching it 
             take 4 months to clean up the anthrax in one Senate 
             building; and the experts, the hygienists who handle 
             anthrax, whoever the experts were, were so limited, the 
             technicians so limited till they only focused on the 
             Senate building. There were not enough to go around. We 
             could not deal with the post office. We still have not 
             dealt with the cleanup of post offices the way we should.
               So we have a shortage of people who can deal with 
             anthrax; and that is a clear and present threat, or 
             something similar to anthrax. But in the Homeland Security 
             Act, there is no provision for the training of more people 
             in this area. There is no provision for dealing with the 
             fact that we have a shortage of nurses. Who is going to do 
             all these vaccinations in case we have an epidemic as a 
             result of a biological attack? We have shortages of people 
             who are going into police departments. We have shortages 
             in fire departments in big cities like New York, for 
             example. They are working madly to recruit people to 
             replace the numerous firemen who lost their lives, but in 
             general there has been an attrition over the years of 
             applicants in terms of these agencies.
               Many of these positions do not require a Ph.D., graduate 
             education; but they do require some education. Getting 
             people to pass a basic test involving literacy and simple 
             calculations, getting graduates of our schools who can 
             pass those simple requirements has become a big problem. 
             We need to invest whatever is necessary if we are serious 
             about homeland security, or if we are serious about 
             fighting terrorism.
               One of the factors that keeps coming up is the very 
             embarrassing fact that we had a lot of data collected. 
             Many of the facts that had been assembled by our 
             reconnaissance agencies, by our satellites in the sky, 
             picking up electronic communications, many of those items 
             were there which told things that would have been very 
             useful in counteracting what happened on September 11; but 
             we did not have Arab translators. We did not have enough 
             translators.
               I have said here on the floor many times, that is 
             inexcusable, that there were not enough Arab translators 
             to stay current with the great amount of data that was 
             being collected from Arab sources. Arabs have been 
             terrorists for quite a long time. Since Ronald Reagan's 
             reign when they bombed the barracks in Beirut and killed 
             200 Marines, on and on, every major act of terrorism, 
             sabotage, Arabs have done it. So surely Arabs should have 
             been high on the radar screen and the number of people who 
             interpret Arabic should have been great. But it is not 
             there.
               I heard advertising on the radio and television in New 
             York a couple of months after September 11 advertising for 
             people who might want to be Arab interpreters. On and on 
             it could go, including the fact that in the field in 
             Afghanistan, where our troops have been victorious and 
             conducted a high-tech war in a very effective way, 
             nevertheless, the casualties, if you look at the 
             casualties that we have suffered, the majority of them 
             have been from friendly fire as a result of human error. 
             We have suffered casualties ourselves as a result of human 
             error and friendly fire. We have had a couple of 
             embarrassing incidents with respect to the Canadians and 
             with respect to some tribal groups as a result of human 
             error. So as war becomes more high tech, education becomes 
             an even more important factor.
               There is a recognition in the military world of the 
             value of education. I would like to juxtapose the fact 
             that they place a great deal of value on education on 
             specific things related to the military while at the same 
             time ignoring the greater funnel, the mass education that 
             has to funnel people into the military. For example, we 
             have quite a number of military academies beyond West 
             Point. Most people only think of West Point, the Navy at 
             Annapolis, the Air Force Academy; but we also have an 
             Industrial College of the Armed Forces, National War 
             College, Army War College, Naval War College, Naval Post 
             Graduate School, Air War College, Air Force Institute of 
             Technology graduate school and long-term training 
             arrangements and continued service arrangements which 
             allow members of the military to go to graduate schools 
             anywhere when needed.
               There is a great deal of understanding in the military 
             of the value of education. Their personnel are constantly 
             being put through a process of improving their education. 
             The military is not afraid to spend money, also. It costs 
             money to educate youngsters in this day and age.
               I hear complaints that education costs too much, that 
             when I was a kid we were only paying teachers so much and 
             school costs were at very low levels per child, but now 
             teacher salaries are too high, and we want computers. That 
             is the way of the modern world. When World War II started, 
             we only had four or five vehicles in the Federal arsenal 
             of transportation. Roosevelt had a car and four or five 
             other Cabinet Members. We were at that stage. Now we have 
             a whole fleet of cars. We have a fleet of planes. The 
             world has changed.
               If it has changed in every other respect, then surely it 
             has changed in respect to education. But we do not 
             recognize that when it comes to education. We do not look 
             at the fact that our military academies are spending 
             tremendous amounts of money. I have only got figures for 
             way back in 1990. They do not let you have current 
             figures. In 1990 we were spending tremendous amounts of 
             money for the Army academy, which is West Point; Naval 
             Academy, et cetera. But more important than what they were 
             spending overall, which is hard to deal with, as of 1996, 
             the budget office study showed again with 1990 figures, 
             that the amount of money being spent per officer, that is 
             where we can make some comparison.
               They say right now at Harvard and Yale, Ivy League 
             schools may cost you between $40,000 and $50,000 per 
             student per year now. In 1990, the cost per officer 
             commissioned in the Army was $299,000--$299,000 per 
             officer commissioned. In the Navy it was $197,000 per 
             officer commissioned. In the Air Force, $279,000 per 
             officer commissioned. We are willing to spend tremendous 
             amounts of money when it involves personnel serving the 
             military directly. If we are willing to spend $299,000 per 
             officer commissioned, surely we can spend more than $8,000 
             per child in the New York City school system and 
             understand that modern costs are such that $8,000 per 
             child is not going to get you very much in terms of what 
             is needed in this day and age.
               I checked before Ron Dellums left as the head of the 
             Armed Services Committee. I did get some figures which 
             showed that the cost at that time, I think that was about 
             7 or 8 years ago, was down to $120,000 per cadet at West 
             Point, if you left out the actual cost of the military 
             training and just the academic training. The academic 
             training at that time was $120,000 per student while 
             Harvard and Yale at that time were estimated to be about 
             $30,000 in the Ivy League. So either way you can see the 
             difference. We are willing to spend tremendous amounts of 
             money when we think it is important.
               Patsy Mink and I used to talk a great deal about the 
             great hypocrisy of American policymakers. In private 
             schools, the cost per child is far higher than $8,000 per 
             child, as it is in the New York City schools. The average 
             in New York City is $8,000 per child because it has so 
             many different schools. There is a low end in my district. 
             There are some schools where they are spending only $4,000 
             per child; and there is a high end where they are spending 
             $12,000 per child because the expenditure costs are driven 
             by the personnel costs. The greatest cost of personnel, 
             the more experienced teachers and administrators are in 
             certain schools in certain districts that they consider 
             highly desirable places to be. So their salaries raise the 
             cost per child in those districts, while the poorest 
             schools suffer from too many substitute teachers and 
             uncertified teachers and you have a very low cost. But 
             what I am saying is that as a Nation, we are investing 
             very highly in a well-qualified, well-educated military. 
             We are blind to the fact that all the other sectors must 
             go along.
               A complex, modern Nation, the leader of the free world, 
             needs to have a comparable concern about education across 
             the board. All of these Department of Defense graduate 
             institutions, is there a single peace initiative we have 
             which has Federal funding for graduate institutions? Is 
             there a single graduate institution that we know of? There 
             is a peace institute which you can hardly find in the 
             budget, it is so small; and it is very cautious about what 
             it does. But there is no place where we are training 
             diplomats. There is no plan to make certain that the 
             greatest Nation on Earth, the last superpower, has 
             knowledge of all the other societies on Earth.
               We not only have a shortage in people who can translate 
             Arabic but in Pakistan and some other countries, they 
             speak Urdu. In Afghanistan they speak Pashto. We have more 
             than 3,000 colleges and universities in this Nation. If 
             you have a plan, if the Homeland Security Act cared about 
             really dealing with terrorism across the world, you would 
             have a plan which showed that somewhere in America there 
             is a college or a university that has an institute or a 
             center which is not only learning the language, teaching 
             the language, but also teaching the culture of any group 
             of people anywhere on the face of the Earth.
               Certainly any nation in the United Nations, we should 
             have a program which has people who are studying it. We 
             can afford to do that. By chance we have experts probably 
             on everything, but single people who decide they want to 
             go off and study and are ready when we need them for these 
             kinds of assignments, that number is decreasing.
               Why not have a plan which guarantees that we will always 
             have enough people who speak Urdu to deal with increasing 
             our friendship with Pakistan? Pakistan is a friendly 
             Muslim nation. Pakistan is our ally in the fight against 
             terrorism. We need to know more about its culture and be 
             able to deal with it. If we are going to have nation-
             building, that is a word that was trivial, used and 
             ridiculed a few years ago, but now it is understood that 
             we cannot fight terrorism without nation-building. We do 
             not invest a large amount of energy, time, lives, effort 
             in a nation like Afghanistan and then walk off and leave 
             it to crumble back into the kind of primitive savagery 
             that existed under the Taliban. If we do not stay and we 
             do not do nation-building, we will have to do it all over 
             again in 10 or 20 years. So nation-building is part of a 
             process that we should have in our overall plan to fight 
             terrorism.
               Homeland security, military readiness, all that, we 
             should look at education first and foremost. The funnel 
             which feeds everything we do has to come up through our 
             public school system. Fifty-three million children are out 
             there in our public school system. They could supply every 
             expert we need, every category of technician, but they are 
             not doing it when they come out of high school, and they 
             can only barely read and write properly, when calculations 
             are minimal.
               A large part of public school is inhabited by 
             minorities, and one of the problems is, which Patsy and I 
             talked about many times, as the minority population has 
             increased in certain school systems, the big city school 
             systems in America, the commitment of the locality and the 
             commitment of the State government has gone down, and we 
             cannot get away from an observation that racism is at work 
             in decisionmaking.
               Doing less for the schools has happened as the 
             population has changed, but let us take a look at what 
             that means for America in one area. In our military those 
             same minorities who are being neglected in our public 
             schools make up a large part of our military relative to 
             their percentage of population. African-Americans are 
             considered by the Census Bureau to be about 13 percent of 
             the total population. In the Army African-Americans total 
             25.5 percent of the Army population; 480,435 people are 
             African-Americans. Hispanics are 9.3 percent. In the Navy 
             African-Americans, which are only 13 percent of the 
             population, are 18.9 percent of the Navy. African-
             Americans, who are only 13 percent of the population, are 
             16 percent of the soldiers in the Air Force. In the 
             Marines African-Americans are 18.9 percent.
               These same African-Americans who are in the inner-city 
             schools predominantly, the supply that goes into our 
             military, is jeopardized if you do not provide appropriate 
             education now. What would it be like in a few years? What 
             is it like now? Is the quality of the soldiers declining 
             at a time when the high-tech complexity of the military is 
             increasing?
               We should take a hard look at all the various activities 
             of our society and how they complement each other.
               Patsy Mink, as I said before, had an encyclopedic mind 
             when it came to looking at human resources and looking at 
             the various missions of a civilized society like ours 
             should have. Patsy Mink and I have talked about the fact 
             that it is ridiculous to have a homeland security program 
             which allocates no significant role to the Department of 
             Education or to the universities and colleges in America. 
             It is sort of doomed to failure.
               I would like to conclude by just refocusing on one 
             particular project or program that is identified most 
             immediately and specifically with Patsy Mink. That is 
             title IX. Many women who are doctors and lawyers, who had 
             a basically equal treatment in the university system and 
             graduate schools, have no idea what it was like before. I 
             think one of the women on the Supreme Court told a long 
             story about how she was denied access to decent jobs in 
             the law firms when she first came out of college and later 
             denied promotions, et cetera. So there are individual 
             stories that can be told, but the figures were outrageous 
             before title IX.
               Title IX has made a big difference, but title IX has 
             been fought step by step all the way. It was signed into 
             law in 1972, and Patsy had to go to war and fight the 
             Tower amendment in 1974. She had to fight certain other 
             Senate amendments that were attempted by Senator Helms and 
             S. 2146 in 1976 and 1977. On and on it goes. There have 
             been attempts to gut title IX.
               So title IX, the welfare rights, the welfare reform, all 
             of it was part of why I say that Patsy Mink was a role 
             model for decisionmakers of this Congress, and she is a 
             role model for decisionmakers in the future. Compassion 
             and righteous indignation are still vital qualifications 
             for the leaders of a Nation. Patsy Mink was a great leader 
             of this great Nation.
                                              Thursday, October 3, 2002
                APPOINTMENT OF MEMBERS TO ATTEND FUNERAL OF THE LATE 
                               HONORABLE PATSY T. MINK
               The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 
             566, the Chair announced the Speaker's appointment of the 
             following Members of the House to the committee to attend 
             the funeral of the late Patsy T. Mink:

               Mr. Abercrombie of Hawaii; Mr. Gephardt of Missouri; Ms. 
             Pelosi of California; Mr. Obey of Wisconsin; Mr. George 
             Miller of California; Mr. Sensenbrenner of Wisconsin; Mr. 
             Faleomavaega of American Samoa; Ms. DeLauro of 
             Connecticut; Ms. Waters of California; Mrs. Clayton of 
             North Carolina; Ms. Eshoo of California; Ms. Eddie Bernice 
             Johnson of Texas; Mr. Mica of Florida; Mr. Scott of 
             Virginia; Mr. Underwood of Guam; Ms. Woolsey of 
             California; Ms. Jackson-Lee of Texas; Ms. Lofgren of 
             California; Ms. Millender-McDonald of California; Ms. Lee 
             of California; Mr. Kind of Wisconsin; Mr. Wu of Oregon; 
             and Ms. Watson of California.
                                                Monday, October 7, 2002
                   RECOGNIZING THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF PATSY T. MINK
               Mr. ISAKSON. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules 
             and pass the joint resolution (H.J. Res. 113) recognizing 
             the contributions of Patsy T. Mink, as amended.
               The Clerk read as follows:
                                    H.J. Res. 113
               Whereas Patsy Takemoto Mink was one of the country's 
             leading voices for women's rights, civil rights, and 
             working families and was devoted to raising living 
             standards and providing economic and educational 
             opportunity to all Americans;
               Whereas Patsy Takemoto Mink was a passionate and 
             persistent fighter against economic and social injustices 
             in Hawaii and across America;
               Whereas Patsy Takemoto Mink was one of the first women 
             of color to win national office in 1964 and opened doors 
             of opportunity to millions of women and people of color 
             across America;
               Whereas Patsy Takemoto Mink won unprecedented 
             legislative accomplishments on issues affecting women's 
             health, children, students, and working families; and
               Whereas Patsy Takemoto Mink's heroic, visionary, and 
             tireless leadership to win the landmark passage of title 
             IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 opened doors to 
             women's academic and athletic achievements and redefined 
             what is possible for a generation of women and for future 
             generations of our Nation's daughters: Now, therefore, be 
             it
               Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
             the United States of America in Congress assembled, That 
             title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U.S.C. 
             1681 et seq.; P.L. 92-318) may be cited as the ``Patsy 
             Takemoto Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act''.

               Mr. ISAKSON. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of House 
             Joint Resolution 113 to recognize the many contributions 
             of Patsy Mink. Patsy Mink provided a great service to 
             Congress and the Nation as a whole; and she always 
             represented her constituents with grace, commitment, and 
             absolutely with determination. Patsy Mink was a 
             trailblazer as the first woman of color to win national 
             office. She was truly a person of honor. Patsy Mink stood 
             by her word and did not step away from controversial or 
             difficult issues. She never made decisions based on what 
             was politically easy; she made decisions based on what was 
             right. I am honored to have worked with her and to have 
             had the opportunity to know her drive, dedication, and 
             devotion to her home State and to her constituents. A 
             tribute to our former colleague and the legacy she leaves 
             behind is most appropriate. Patsy Mink's passing is a 
             significant loss to all of us, and I offer my heartfelt 
             condolences to her family and to her constituents.
               On a personal note, Mr. Speaker, I first met Patsy Mink 
             4 years ago when I was elected to the Congress of the 
             United States. She had served many years before I came and 
             her career before my election was far more important than 
             any election of mine. She had broken the glass ceiling for 
             women in Hawaii. She had been an outspoken leader. Patsy 
             and I were of a different sex, a different ethnicity, a 
             different generation, and a different political party. But 
             as goes so often unreported in this body but is so often 
             reality, those of us regardless of our differences come 
             together for what is right and what is best for the 
             American people. It should not go unnoted on this evening 
             that it was Patsy Mink as a member of the working group of 
             H.R. 1, No Child Left Behind, who articulated and fought 
             for her beliefs, found common ground, and allowed this 
             Congress and this country to address the needs of 
             America's most needy and deserving students.
               While it is easy for all of us to find fault from time 
             to time about what we in this House have not done, we must 
             always recognize that which on countless, thankless hours 
             has been accomplished by dedicated leaders of commitment 
             and perseverance. Patsy Mink was a lady. She was a friend, 
             she was a Member of this Congress, and she will be missed.

               Ms. WOOLSEY. I am proud to be an original co-sponsor of 
             H.J. Res. 113, which recognizes the many contributions 
             that Congresswoman Patsy Takemoto Mink from Hawaii made to 
             the people of this country, particularly to girls and 
             women. That is why it is fitting that this resolution 
             renames title IX of the Higher Education Act Amendments of 
             1972 the Patsy Takemoto Mink Equal Opportunity in 
             Education Act.
               In the early 1970s, Patsy played the key role in the 
             enactment of title IX, which prohibits gender 
             discrimination by federally funded institutions. When most 
             people think of title IX, they think of women's sports, 
             and the impact of title IX on women's sports can clearly 
             be seen. In fact, in 1972 scholarships for women's sports 
             nationally added up to $100,000 and in 1987 the 
             scholarships equaled over $200 million. Did she make a 
             difference? Yes, she did. We can see the impact of title 
             IX in the impressive accomplishments of American female 
             athletes at the Olympics and when we turn on the TV to 
             watch professional women's basketball or soccer, but we 
             should not forget that title IX has also been a major tool 
             for increasing women's participation in other aspects of 
             education as well.
               As we stand here on the floor today, title IX ensures 
             that girls have equal access to classes that lead to high-
             wage jobs so that women can support themselves and their 
             families as well as their male counterparts. But title IX 
             was only one of Patsy's contributions to girls and women 
             of America. She also authored the Women's Educational 
             Equity Act, known as WEEA, in 1974. WEEA remains the 
             primary resource for teachers and parents seeking 
             information on proven methods to ensure gender equity in 
             schools and communities. WEEA represents the Federal 
             commitment to ensuring that girls' future choices and 
             successes are determined not by their gender but by their 
             own interests, aspirations, and abilities.
               Mr. Speaker, there has been no stronger voice in 
             Congress for girls and women and minorities than Patsy 
             Takemoto Mink, and it will do Congress proud to remember 
             her and honor her by passing H.J. Res. 113 and renaming 
             title IX The Patsy Takemoto Mink Act.

               Mr. ISAKSON. Mr. Speaker, I would just close by 
             acknowledging all of the accomplishments as were cited by 
             the gentlewoman from California (Ms. Woolsey), and on 
             behalf of all the colleagues in the Congress of the United 
             States, our deep sympathy to the family of Patsy Mink and 
             to the people of Hawaii, but the great joy all of us 
             should have in recognizing her accomplishments on behalf 
             of her State, on behalf of all women in America, and on 
             behalf of this Congress. I urge all my colleagues to vote 
             unanimously for this resolution commending a great woman 
             and a great Member of Congress.

               Mr. McKEON. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of House 
             Joint Resolution 113 to recognize the many contributions 
             of Congresswoman Patsy Mink.
               As the Ranking Member of the House Education and the 
             Workforce Subcommittee on 21st Century Competitiveness, 
             Patsy Mink provided a great service to not only our 
             subcommittee, but the Nation as a whole. Her commitment to 
             our Nation's students and to her constituents never 
             wavered and she always represented them with grace and 
             determination.
               While I could talk about a great number of instances 
             where my friend, Patsy Mink, and I worked hand and hand to 
             improve academic achievement for our students, I want to 
             take this moment to highlight an issue that we recently 
             worked on that we both believed in--making postsecondary 
             education better and more accessible for students and 
             families. Last year, Patsy and I began the Fed Up 
             initiative in an effort to streamline a number of 
             burdensome regulations within the Higher Education Act. 
             She worked with me from its earliest stages, stood firm in 
             her commitment to me about how the process would move 
             forward, and during a difficult vote, she kept her word 
             and voted in a way that forced her to step away from her 
             own party's politics. She did this because she was a 
             person of honor and did what was right, even when it was 
             not easy.
               Patsy was a trailblazer as the first woman of color to 
             win national office, taking on one of many challenges she 
             would face. She never stepped away from controversial 
             issues if she believed what she was doing was right.
               I am honored to have worked with Patsy on our 
             subcommittee and to have had the opportunity to know her 
             drive, dedication and devotion to her home State and her 
             constituency.
               This tribute to our former colleague and the legacy she 
             leaves behind is more than appropriate. Patsy's passing is 
             a significant loss for all of us and I offer my heartfelt 
             condolences to her family and her constituents.
               Mr. Speaker, I stand with my colleagues in support of 
             this resolution and appreciate the opportunity to express 
             my thoughts and gratitude for Patsy Mink.

               Mr. BOEHNER. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of House 
             Joint Resolution 113 to honor and recognize the many 
             contributions of Patsy Mink. I want to thank my friend and 
             colleague from California, George Miller, for introducing 
             this most appropriate resolution.
               We were all stunned and saddened by the news last week 
             of the passing of our friend and colleague, Patsy Mink. As 
             I have stated before, not only did we lose a passionate 
             and committed Member of this body; the State of Hawaii and 
             the country as a whole lost a compelling and persuasive 
             representative voice.
               Patsy Mink placed a great emphasis on service to her 
             constituents and always stood firm in her beliefs. Patsy 
             did this even when it wasn't the easy or politically 
             popular thing to do. She had strong convictions by which 
             she lived and worked. While we did not always agree, I 
             know I, and the rest of us, are all better for having had 
             the experience of working with her during her tenure in 
             this House.
               In her role as ranking member on the Subcommittee on 
             21st Century Competitiveness, Patsy Mink played an 
             important role in passing the No Child Left Behind Act, 
             and worked closely with Chairman McKeon on legislation 
             reducing red tape and burdensome regulations in 
             postsecondary education. With her passing, we will miss 
             the opportunity to continue that partnership in working on 
             these and other critical issues facing our Nation.
               I will miss Patsy and her commitment to her State, her 
             constituents and to the ideals of this body. I am grateful 
             to have had the opportunity to work with her over these 
             many years.
               This resolution is an appropriate tribute to our former 
             colleague and the legacy she leaves behind. Patsy Mink's 
             passing is a significant loss for all of us and I offer my 
             sincere condolences to her family and her constituents.
               I know my colleagues will join me in support of this 
             resolution, Mr. Speaker, as a means of collectively saying 
             thank you and goodbye to a distinguished colleague and 
             friend.

               Mr. TOWNS. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of H.J. 
             Res. 113 in honor of our late colleague, Patsy Mink.
               I had the honor to serve with her on the House 
             Government Reform Committee after she returned to Congress 
             in 1990. I was particularly struck by her passionate 
             defense of progressive democratic policies. For example, 
             Patsy's commitment to such policies led her to actively 
             oppose the 1995 Welfare Reform Act because of its 
             implications for many poor women and their children. Her 
             opposition helped to limit some of the more draconian 
             provisions in the final version of the bill that was 
             enacted into law. Patsy could always be counted on to 
             defend the interests of all poor and disadvantaged 
             Americans. But she will always be remembered for her 
             leadership in guaranteeing equal opportunities for women 
             in education and athletics. One of the first women of 
             color elected to the House of Representatives, Patsy was a 
             trailblazer who will be sorely missed not only here in 
             Congress but also in her home State of Hawaii. I am proud 
             to have known and served with her.

               Mr. ABERCROMBIE. Mr. Speaker, I rise today to express my 
             strong support for this resolution and to thank the 
             leadership of the House for moving so expeditiously to 
             bring it to the floor.
               I have had the honor to share the responsibility of 
             representing Hawaii in the U.S. House of Representatives 
             with Patsy Mink for the last 12 years. However, my first 
             memories of her go back 40 years when I was a student at 
             the University of Hawaii involved in one of her early 
             campaigns. I admired her then and I hope through this 
             resolution to secure for her an honored place in the 
             history of this institution and this country.
               Throughout nearly 50 years of public service, Patsy Mink 
             championed America's most deeply held values: equality, 
             fairness, and above all honesty. Her courage, her 
             willingness to speak out and champion causes that others 
             might shun resulted in tremendous contributions in the 
             fields of civil rights and education. Every single woman 
             in this Nation who today has been given an equal 
             opportunity in education, and by extension in virtually 
             every other field of endeavor, owes the impetus to that in 
             modern times to Patsy Mink. She was one of the pioneers 
             who transformed Hawaii and transformed this Nation. Her 
             legacy will live on in every campus in America and in the 
             heart of every American woman who aspires to greatness. 
             Most profoundly, it lives on in my estimation in hope; 
             hope for the millions of lives that she touched.
               Someone will take Patsy Mink's place here in the House, 
             that is the way of it in our democracy, but no one will 
             replace her in the hearts of the people of Hawaii. No one 
             will replace her in the role that she played in this House 
             of Representatives. With the renaming of title IX as the 
             Patsy T. Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act, Congress 
             secures her memory as a heroic, visionary, and tireless 
             leader of this great Nation.

               Mrs. McCARTHY of New York. Mr. Speaker, we have seen 
             many Members of Congress pass through these halls. Many 
             have done some great things but, in my opinion, very few 
             have left this place being defined as one of the ``great 
             ones.'' We have just lost one of the ``great ones'' with 
             the passing of Patsy Mink.
               Legislating and getting things done here can be very 
             frustrating. But I would advise that whenever we think 
             frustration is getting the best of us, we need only 
             remember what, in spite of adversity, Congresswoman Mink 
             accomplished during her tenure because of her dedication, 
             perseverance, and never-ending fight for what she believed 
             in.
               From her earliest days, she advocated for noble causes. 
             When she was segregated into international housing at the 
             University of Nebraska, she sought to change 
             discriminatory policies and succeeded.
               After receiving her law degree from the University of 
             Chicago, she was in disbelief over the simple fact that 
             her gender disqualified her from positions she applied 
             for. Instead of accepting defeat, she opened her own 
             practice and became the first Asian-American woman lawyer 
             in Hawaii.
               In her first run for the U.S. Congress in 1959, her 
             defeat to Daniel Inouye didn't deter her from running 
             again. In 1964 she ran for U.S. Congress again and won, 
             making her the first woman of color to be elected to 
             Congress.
               Most significantly, over 2.7 million young women 
             participate in high school athletics compared to just 
             under 300,000 in 1971. This is because of the key role 
             Congresswoman Mink played in the enactment of title IX. 
             Title IX bans gender discrimination in schools that 
             receive Federal funding. Young women can now look to the 
             memory of Patsy Mink to thank for the chance to 
             participate in school athletics.
               The passing of one of the ``greats'' leaves a major void 
             in not only Congress itself but also in each one of us. We 
             need move on from this day forward with as much heart and 
             devotion as Congresswoman Mink did every day of her life.
                                               Tuesday, October 8, 2002
              FURTHER CONSIDERATION OF H. RES. 114, AUTHORIZATION FOR 
                USE OF MILITARY FORCE AGAINST IRAQ RESOLUTION OF 2002
               Mrs. CLAYTON. Mr. Speaker, I would like to include for 
             the Record an editorial on Patsy Mink. I remind my 
             colleagues that we lost Patsy Mink almost 10 days ago. In 
             the Honolulu Advertiser, the editorial is entitled 
             ``Remember Patsy Mink: Slow the Rush to War.''
               Mr. Speaker, that is very wise advice for us too.

                      Remember Patsy Mink: Slow the Rush to War
                As Patsy Mink is honored today in our State Capitol's 
             atrium, her colleagues in the Nation's Capitol begin in 
             earnest a debate on the language of a resolution 
             authorizing the use of military force against Iraq.
                How we wish she were there to participate in that 
             debate.
               Thirty years ago, Mrs. Mink, seemingly tilting at 
             windmills, ran for President of the United States in the 
             Oregon primary election in a campaign that made withdrawal 
             from Vietnam its only issue. Ignoring such epithets as 
             ``Patsy Pink,'' she won a scant 2 percent of the vote--and 
             the moral high ground.
                Today a handful of voices have been raised in warning 
             as this Nation teeters on the brink of war. They warn of 
             ``unintended consequences.'' By 1972, of course, most of 
             the dreadful consequences that Presidents Eisenhower, 
             Kennedy, Johnson and Nixon had failed to foresee in 
             Southeast Asia had become painfully clear. What had begun 
             as a war against a backward peasant nation became in many 
             ways, both home and in Vietnam, a wasted decade.
                Mrs. Mink, of course, would not fail to recognize the 
             evil intent of Saddam Hussein. Yet in today's debate, she 
             would not stand for one minute for her party's strategy 
             that says the quicker they can settle the war question, 
             the quicker they can turn the page to the domestic issues 
             on which they think they can get the traction needed to 
             make gains in the upcoming midterm elections.
                In this unseemly haste, the debate ignores momentous 
             issues: whether the United States must fight and pay for 
             this war alone, and what it would do to our global 
             standing; whether the Bush administration has any plan at 
             all for a post-Saddam Iraq; whether it has considered the 
             destructive forces that might be released from this Nation 
             hastily carved from the Ottoman Empire after World War I, 
             with its disparate population of Shiite, Sunni, and Kurd 
             and Turkmen peoples; whether it has accurately assessed 
             the cost of treasure and young blood in what could become 
             another decade of armed neo-colonialism.
                The Democrats have allowed this debate to become so 
             narrowly framed as to be nearly meaningless. The debate, 
             in essence, is over how soon we invade Iraq. That is, if 
             the Democrats get their way, they will need to be assured 
             by President Bush that he has exhausted diplomatic means; 
             that U.N. sanctions and inspections haven't worked; and 
             that the new war won't set back the ``old'' one--the war 
             against terrorism.
                These conditions may slow the coming war by weeks or 
             months, but they won't stop it.
               Omitted entirely from the debate is Bush's new National 
             Security Strategy, which advances a doctrine of ``pre-
             emptive'' war-making that suggests that Iraq is only the 
             first step in a violent reordering of the world.
               Congress has already effectively ceded to Bush the 
             authority to wage a unilateral, pre-emptive war against 
             Iraq, whether or not the United Nations approves.
               We urge the rest of Hawaii's congressional delegation to 
             reflect well on Mink's honorable legacy of peacemaking--
             and to carry it back with them to the debate in 
             Washington.
                                             Wednesday, October 9, 2002
                   RECOGNIZING THE CONTRIBUTIONS OF PATSY T. MINK
               The SPEAKER pro tempore. The unfinished business is the 
             question of suspending the rules and passing the joint 
             resolution, H.J. Res. 113, as amended.
               The Clerk read the title of the joint resolution.

               The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion 
             offered by the gentleman from Georgia (Mr. Isakson) that 
             the House suspend the rules and agree to the joint 
             resolution, H.J. Res. 113, as amended, on which the yeas 
             and nays are ordered.
               This will be a 5-minute vote.
               The vote was taken by electronic device, and there 
             were--yeas 410, nays 0, not voting 21.
               So (two-thirds having voted in favor thereof) the rules 
             were suspended and the joint resolution, as amended, was 
             passed.
               The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
               The title of the joint resolution was amended so as to 
             read: ``Joint resolution recognizing the contributions of 
             Patsy Takemoto Mink.''
               A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.
                                            Wednesday, October 16, 2002
                                ENROLLED BILLS SIGNED
               Mr. Trandahl, Clerk of the House, reported and found 
             truly enrolled joint resolutions of the House of the 
             following titles, which were thereupon signed by the 
             Speaker:
                H.J. Res. 113. Joint resolution recognizing the 
             contributions of Patsy Takemoto Mink.
                                               Monday, October 21, 2002
                          BILLS PRESENTED TO THE PRESIDENT
               Jeff Trandahl, Clerk of the House, reports that on 
             October 17, 2002 he presented to the President of the 
             United States, for his approval, the following bills.
                H.J. Res. 113. Recognizing the contributions of Patsy 
             Mink.
                                             Tuesday, November 19, 2002
                    TRIBUTE TO CONGRESSWOMAN PATSY TAKEMOTO MINK
               Ms. MILLENDER-McDONALD. Mr. Speaker, we gather today to 
             highlight the legacy of one of the most distinguished and 
             honorable Members of this august body, my colleague and 
             friend--Congresswoman Patsy Takemoto Mink.
               Though Patsy made it to one of the highest elected 
             offices in the land, she never lost the common touch. 
             Patsy was a champion of the dispossessed; the downtrodden; 
             the disenfranchised; the forgotten; she was the people's 
             representative. She was a mentor to many of us in 
             Congress. As the co-chair to the Congressional Caucus for 
             Women's Issues, she helped me many times to redirect my 
             course if barriers were placed in front of me! But that 
             was vintage Patsy. She was always able to redirect her 
             course if barriers were placed before her. Having been 
             denied entrance to medical school, she chose the legal 
             profession and was the first Japanese woman to pass the 
             bar in Hawaii. As I received the call of Patsy's passing 
             by my daughter Valerie, I was saddened only for a short 
             time, because I began to recall all the fond memories we 
             had together as a source of strength.
               We must all draw on those memories. We must celebrate 
             the life of our dear friend Patsy and remember how her 24 
             years of distinguished services shaped the lives of those 
             who had social impediments, economic inequality and 
             educational restrictions. The passage of the landmark 
             title IX legislation, which opened doors that had been 
             closed to girls in the athletic programs at schools around 
             this Nation, will be a lasting memory of how tenaciously 
             she fought to improve the lives of girls for generations 
             to come.
               In a career that began before territorial Hawaii became 
             a State in 1959, Patsy Mink, with authority, wit and clear 
             perspective, became one of the best-known women 
             politicians in the United States, and the first woman of 
             color elected to Congress. Patsy challenged us all! She 
             challenged us with the question, ``Does it matter whether 
             women are involved in politics?'' Her career speaks 
             volumes to that question and her accomplishments exemplify 
             the answer. Decisions are being made at the national level 
             that will determine the quality of our lives into the next 
             generation.
               Patsy Takemoto Mink--by crossing our paths--has given us 
             the leadership tools to advance the agenda for the common 
             good. Thank you Patsy! Mr. Speaker, on behalf of many 
             women and Asian-American organizations, I would like to 
             submit to the Congressional Record, the following 
             statements that highlight the life and legacy of 
             Congresswoman Patsy Takemoto Mink.
                         Tribute to Congresswoman Patsy Mink
                            Remarks of Karen K. Narasaki
              President and Executive Director, National Asian Pacific 
                              American Legal Consortium
               I believe that Patsy is looking down on us today and 
             smiling at the beautiful mosaic of faces. It is fitting 
             that this memorial has brought together so many strands of 
             her work--organizations and congressional leaders who 
             advocate on behalf of women, civil rights, immigrants, 
             workers, children and the poor have all come together to 
             celebrate her life.
               The Asian-American and Pacific Islander community misses 
             her greatly. She served as a role model and an inspiration 
             for so many of us. She forged a path that made it possible 
             for Japanese-American women like me and other women of 
             color to pursue our dreams and aspirations. She taught us 
             that it was possible to obtain great stature without 
             having to be physically tall, by defying the stereotypes 
             that too often become barriers for Asian-American women 
             who come from cultures where women were expected to be 
             seen and not heard. She was a feminist before being a 
             feminist was cool and she remained one her whole life.
               The other day, my niece in third grade ran for student 
             body secretary. I asked my sister to tell her that when 
             she was ready to run for Congress, I would work on her 
             campaign. Julia asked my sister to tell me that she 
             intended to be the first woman President and didn't see 
             any reason to start with Congress. This is one of Patsy's 
             greatest legacies--because of her life and work it is 
             possible today for a young Japanese-American girl to 
             believe she can be President.
               Like many others in this room, I can still hear her 
             voice gently and not so gently pushing us to challenge 
             authority and popular opinion and fight fiercely for those 
             most vulnerable in our communities. She was a tough 
             taskmaster who was never one to suffer fools gladly and 
             she asked a lot of her talented and loyal staff, but never 
             more than she asked of herself.
               I remember her call for fairness for immigrants and 
             families in poverty when she voted against the tide on 
             harsh welfare reform legislation. I hear the echoes of her 
             passionate speeches on the floor of the House about the 
             need to invest in quality education for all and job 
             training that would allow working families a living wage 
             and access to health care. Because she was never one to 
             toot her own horn, people visiting Washington would be 
             surprised when I told them to try to catch one of her 
             speeches because she was one of the last of the great 
             orators. She was always about the work--always focused on 
             the people she served.
               Robert F. Kennedy once said, ``each time a man stands up 
             for an ideal or acts to improve the lot of others or 
             strikes out against injustice he sends forth a tiny ripple 
             of hope . . .'' When Patsy stood up, she sent out tidal 
             waves of hope and the lives of all Americans are the 
             better because of her.
                                          a
                                           
                              Remarks of Dr. Jane Smith
               Thank you. I am Jane Smith, the Chief Executive Officer 
             of Business and Professional Women/USA.
               I join the many Members of Congress and other 
             representatives from the women's community here today 
             because Congresswoman Mink and BPW share a very long 
             history. The Congresswoman was a member of BPW for at 
             least 4 decades. But Congresswoman Mink was not simply an 
             affiliate member. She truly epitomized what BPW considers 
             its greatest strength--the grassroots member.
               Congresswoman Mink attended the meetings of her local 
             BPW organization regularly and even cast votes in BPW's 
             leadership elections. She spoke at our annual policy 
             conference many times, sharing her insight on the ins and 
             outs of what was happening here on Capitol Hill. In fact, 
             each year before BPW's policy conference she would call 
             her BPW contacts in Hawaii to find out who would be 
             attending the conference and when the BPW members arrived 
             in Washington she took them all out to lunch.
               One of my favorite stories about the Congresswoman took 
             place about 6 years ago when BPW's leadership was asked to 
             testify in front of the House Education and Workforce 
             Committee about increasing the minimum wage. A number of 
             BPW members, who were also small business owners, 
             presented testimony and at the conclusion of the hearing 
             Congresswoman Mink said that the hearing was her proudest 
             day as a BPW member.
               In 1998, the BPW Foundation awarded Congresswoman Mink a 
             Women Mean Business Award and BPW's political arm--
             BPWPAC--has endorsed her for Congress every time she ran. 
             BPW has honored Congresswoman Mink because she was a 
             grassroots member who exhibited incredible leadership and 
             vision. In the words of BPW's past national president and 
             BPW/Hawaii member--Leslie Wilkins, ``We have lost one of 
             our greatest mentors. My only solace is the legacy she has 
             left behind. She has inspired countless women--and men--to 
             go forward with her work.''
                                          a
                                           
                            Remarks of Bernice R. Sandler
              Senior Scholar, Women's Research and Education Institute
               Title IX was easily passed because hardly anyone 
             recognized the enormous changes it would require, and 
             because it was hidden away in the Education Amendments of 
             1972. It passed easily because two women laid the 
             groundwork for it in the House Committee on Education and 
             Labor, Representative Edith Green who introduced the bill 
             and shepherded it through the Congress, and Representative 
             Patsy Mink. They were the only 2 women on the committee 
             with 32 men. But together they forged a revolution.
               Of course after title IX was passed, people found out 
             what it would do. Between 1974 and 1977 there were at 
             least 10 bills introduced to weaken title IX, and Patsy 
             Mink was in the forefront defending title IX. If 
             supporting title IX and other women's issues were all she 
             had done, it would have been enough. But she didn't stop 
             there.
               Let me start by telling you about Arlene Horowitz, then 
             a secretary on the Hill who came to me about an idea for a 
             congressional bill in 1971, before title IX was even 
             passed. She asked: Why not have a bill so that the 
             government will fund materials for teachers and others 
             about women and girls to counter the effects of sex role 
             stereotyping? I thought Arlene was crazy and--no one in 
             their right mind in Congress would ever support such a 
             bill. Arlene, fortunately did not listen to me. She went 
             to other women who were also skeptical, and then to Patsy 
             Mink. Patsy Mink did not think Arlene was crazy. She gave 
             us the go ahead and so the Women's Educational Equity Act, 
             affectionately known as WEEA, was born.
               Even while we worked on the drafting of the bill, many 
             of us still thought it wouldn't pass but that if hearings 
             were held, maybe it would send a message to publishers to 
             begin publishing such materials on their own. In 1973, 
             Patsy Mink held hearings and convinced Senator Mondale to 
             do the same in the Senate, and in 1974 the bill passed.
               Just like title IX, WEEA was hidden away in another 
             bill, the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Patsy 
             Mink knew her politics.
               As the mother of the Women's Educational Equity Act, she 
             started a program that has developed hundreds of all kinds 
             of resources for educators and others concerned about the 
             education of women and girls. Yesterday I looked through 
             the catalog of the Educational Development Center which 
             publishes and disseminates WEEA materials. In addition to 
             materials such as ``600 Strategies That Really Work to 
             Increase Girls' Participation in Sciences, Mathematics and 
             Computers,'' there were materials about working with 
             immigrant girls, Native-American women and girls, Latina 
             women and girls, materials about women of the South, about 
             Cuban-American women, single sex education, a resource 
             manual for single mothers, materials for working with 
             disabled girls and yes, even materials for providing 
             equity for boys. All of these materials have had an 
             enormous impact on not only on teachers but on so many the 
             children and women in our educational institutions. Patsy 
             Mink leaves us a legacy--not only the legacy of defending 
             title IX but one which enriched title IX. She gave us the 
             educational tools to deal with the effects of sex 
             discimination and indeed to prevent sex discrimination 
             from occurring in the first place. Thank you, thank you, 
             Patsy. You have made a lasting difference.
                                          a
                                           
              Remarks from the Every Mother Is a Working Mother Network
               Grassroots women suffered a great loss with the passing 
             of Congresswoman Patsy Mink. Herself a woman of color, she 
             stood for us, she stood with us, and she stood as one of 
             us and we wonder now who will be our voice on the Hill. We 
             are proud to have known Congresswoman Mink, to have worked 
             with her and to have her encourage us. The last time we 
             saw her was at a congressional briefing we held in June of 
             this year on valuing the work of caregivers in welfare 
             policy. We invited her to the briefing because we wanted 
             to honor her for her unswerving insistence that the work 
             of mothers and other caregivers be valued. She told us 
             that we should not be honoring her, that instead she 
             should be thanking us for our work in the face of all 
             odds.
               You must understand we were not a typical beltway crowd. 
             We were a rather ragtag multiracial group of mothers and 
             grandmothers on welfare, some of us with disabilities, 
             some with our grandchildren in tow, who along with other 
             caregivers had gathered our pennies and traveled to 
             Washington, DC, to press our case from cities on the West 
             and East Coasts, as well as the Midwest. We are women who 
             are studied but not listened to, spoken about but not 
             given an opportunity to speak for ourselves. But her tone 
             to us was one of respect. She spoke to us as a sister, as 
             a friend, as people to whom she was accountable. Many of 
             us who heard her at our briefing speak with such truth, 
             conviction and clarity were moved to tears.
               From South Central LA to inner-city Philadelphia, 
             grassroots women in our network were devastated by the 
             news of Congresswoman Mink's passing and devastated 
             further by her passing being treated in much of the 
             mainstream media as merely a passing event. She touched 
             the lives of those living daily the impact of welfare 
             ``reform'': those of us on the bottom taking care of 
             children and other loved ones. To her colleagues on the 
             Hill, we hope she will always be a shining example of 
             principle, commitment, integrity and compassion from which 
             you can draw courage. To advocates we hope you will not 
             forget her message. EMWM honors Representative Patsy Mink, 
             her spirit; her courage in the face of sexism, racism and 
             ageism is one that will continue to inspire us, and lives 
             on in us in our daily work for justice. Congresswoman 
             Mink, you honored us, and we now in return are honoring 
             you. Our deepest condolences to Wendy and other loved ones 
             you have left behind.
                                          a
                                           
                Remarks by Kim Gandy on behalf of the members of the 
                           National Organization for Women
                                      President
               The world lost one of its greatest citizens on September 
             28 with the death of Hawaii Congresswoman Patsy Mink. 
             Girls and women also lost one of the most valiant and 
             steadfast champions. Every woman today who is enjoying the 
             fruits of her education and job opportunities, and every 
             girl who has a chance to play sports in school, owes a nod 
             of thanks to Patsy Mink who unremittingly and dauntlessly 
             challenged old stereotypes about ``women's place'' and 
             helped engineer the steady progress for women over the 
             last four decades--parallel to Mink's career in politics.
               Patsy Mink stood up and showed up for girls and women, 
             often outnumbered and sometimes outmaneuvered. But she 
             persisted, cajoled, humored and demanded of her colleagues 
             that Congress attend to the business of over half its 
             constituents. Among many accomplishments, she was a leader 
             in shepherding the passage of title IX in 1972 to promote 
             educational equity. One of only two women ever to receive 
             this honor, Patsy Mink was named a NOW Woman of Vision in 
             June 2002, in a ceremony honoring the 30th anniversary of 
             title IX. In celebrating her life we must rededicate 
             ourselves to protecting her legacy by preventing the 
             current efforts to dismantle this landmark legislation.
               In the last decade of her political leadership, Patsy 
             Mink was a vigorous advocate on behalf of poor families. 
             Faced with the bipartisan tidal wave that pounded poor 
             women, insisting that they ``get to work,'' Mink worked 
             tirelessly to promote policies that truly addressed the 
             realities of poverty and last year garnered substantial 
             support in the House of Representatives for her 
             legislation to provide additional education and skills 
             that would support true self-sufficiency.
               Patsy Mink will always be remembered with love and 
             respect and gratitude. She was our champion--a tireless 
             advocate and a hero to women and girls everywhere.

               Mr. ABERCROMBIE. Mr. Speaker, I would like to submit to 
             the appropriate Congressional Record, the following 
             statements on Congresswoman Patsy Takemoto Mink.
                 On the Passing of the Honorable Patsy Takemoto Mink
                            Statement of Jacqueline Woods
               Executive Director, American Association of University 
                                        Women
                                   October 1, 2002
               On behalf of the 150,000 members of the American 
             Association of University Women (AAUW), we express our 
             profound sadness at the loss of Congresswoman Patsy 
             Takemoto Mink. Congresswoman Mink was a true pioneer in 
             breaking down barriers in education and the workplace for 
             women and girls, and ensuring that the rights of all 
             Americans are advanced and protected. Mrs. Mink often said 
             that her greatest accomplishment was passage of title IX 
             of the Education Amendments of 1972. AAUW will continue to 
             ensure that title IX is protected in order to carry on 
             Congresswoman Mink's legacy so that future generations can 
             enjoy full access to all aspects of education. AAUW's 
             mission is to promote equity for all women and girls, 
             lifelong education, and positive societal change. 
             Congresswoman Mink's lifetime commitment to these issues 
             has made it possible for AAUW's mission to be realized in 
             so many areas that have touched the lives of countless 
             numbers of women and families. AAUW's long-term 
             relationship with Congresswoman Mink included her 
             membership with the Hilo Branch of AAUW of Hawaii and that 
             partnership was maintained throughout her stellar career 
             and lifetime. It was an honor and pleasure to work with 
             Congresswoman Mink to promote educational equity for all 
             women and girls, and we will continue in these efforts in 
             her honor and in her memory.
                                          a
                                           
                                   Irene Natividad
                                     Women Vote
               For anyone who still asks ``What difference does a woman 
             make in public office?,'' just tell them about Patsy Mink. 
             She was the force behind that one bill that created an 
             earthquake in women's and girls' lives. Whenever I see a 
             little girls soccer team playing on the weekend, or hear 
             about a great woman basketball player, or about another 
             women's team winning Olympic Gold, or the predominance of 
             women students at all levels of higher education, I think 
             of how much we owed to her. She changed American women and 
             girls' lives forever.
               I have been to many women's sports events, when women 
             athletes invoke with knowing familiarity title IX (they 
             even know the number) and I come away impressed that they 
             know their debt to this piece of legislation that the 
             average person does not know. Yet, I regretted that they 
             did not know their debt to an Asian-American women 
             legislator who crafted the language that made their 
             athletic or educational lives possible. There are women 
             leaders who did not know of Patsy's role in this piece of 
             legislation. There are Asian-Americans who don't know of 
             Patsy's great gift to all Americans, whether female or 
             male.
               But that is not their fault. Patsy Mink was an original. 
             She was extremely effective but not self-promoting. She 
             seemed slight and small, but she possessed a spine of 
             steel, as anyone who ever worked with her on a bill would 
             know. She seemed so polite and self-effacing, but she was 
             full of determination and passion. I told her one time how 
             I loved to watch people's reactions when she spoke. They 
             see this tiny woman and out springs from her mouth this 
             great big voice and this electric presentation. She said 
             ``There's value in being underestimated. We surprise them 
             each time.''
               I was proud to have had Patsy Mink as one of my 
             political mothers, along with Bella Abzug and Shirley 
             Chisholm. When I first came to Washington many years ago, 
             Bella gave me a piece of advice: ``Honey, just watch 
             Patsy. She'll show you how to get things done.'' And 
             indeed she has. Bella loved Patsy and she thought the 
             world of her and her work.
               In this town full of statues and buildings to 
             commemorate men's achievements, it is important for us 
             here in the room to remember not to let our heroines leave 
             us without acknowledging their great work while they're 
             still with us.
                               Ma. Cristina Caballero
                          President, Dialogue on Diversity
                                  October 16, 2002
               Dialogue on Diversity counted Patsy Mink a friend, 
             supporter, and inspirer. With our organizational goal of 
             advancing a creative dialog among women of America's and 
             the world's many diverse ethnic and cultural communities, 
             we found a natural ally and kindred spirit in 
             Representative Mink, and an energizing source of 
             encouragement and counsel in her ideas and passions as 
             they had evolved over a long and illustrious career in 
             public service.
               It was our great honor to present to Patsy Mink the 
             Diversity Award as part of Dialogue on Diversity's Public 
             Policy/Legislative Forum of 1997. Representative Xavier 
             Becerra, who presented the award, recalled his own first 
             days in the Congress. He had been brought under heavy 
             pressure to vote against a measure that his good 
             conscience told him was proper public policy. 
             Representative Mink came to him and asked: Are you going 
             to cave on your first day in Congress? No more needed to 
             be said. Conscience won on that occasion, and it was the 
             powerful moral and political presence of Patsy Mink that 
             ensured it did. We were delighted to welcome 
             Representative Mink to our conferences and forums on 
             several occasions. She generously gave her precious time 
             and attentive counsel, and brought her ever persuasive and 
             heartening message to her hearers.
               Patsy Mink was a person of passionate energies and of 
             great vitality of intellect as she busied herself with the 
             wide range of issues concerning women, minorities, and 
             others among the often forgotten and disadvantaged in 
             every corner of the Republic. To reflect on her career and 
             her friendship is to call forth a great many memories of 
             the battles and achievements in the civic life of America 
             in the last quarter of the 20th century, and to focus on 
             her figure, the untiring champion of those in American 
             society who most needed her aid. It is therefore hard to 
             realize that she is gone from our arena of action. Her 
             example has its own vitality, of course, which persists in 
             her many colleagues and admirers, and in a nation of 
             friends.
                Tribute by Marcia Greenberger and Nancy Duff Campbell
                             National Women's Law Center
               The National Women's Law Center is celebrating its 30th 
             anniversary this year, along with title IX.
               So, from the Center's very beginning, we have known of 
             and been grateful for the work of Congresswoman Patsy 
             Mink. Title IX has been one of the most important laws 
             ever enacted to expand young women's horizons and 
             transform their lives. In the Center's efforts since its 
             founding to ensure that title IX is enforced, we have 
             relied on Patsy Mink's ringing words in the floor debates 
             on title IX's sweeping purposes and its broad reach. Her 
             words have been especially powerful in court cases we have 
             brought to secure strong interpretations of title IX's 
             reach and effectiveness. The Center has called on her 
             wisdom and leadership to keep title IX strong in Congress 
             and in the court of public opinion as well--up to the very 
             time she became ill this summer.
               Make no mistake--title IX is under attack, and her 
             willingness to speak up and speak out was essential. On 
             the occasion of the National Women's Law Center's 30th 
             Anniversary Dinner this November 13, 2002, we will honor 
             Congresswoman Mink for all she did to make and keep title 
             IX strong, as well as for the battles she waged, in which 
             the Center has joined, to fight poverty and to create real 
             support systems for women and families most in need.
               Of course, her legislative accomplishments and 
             leadership are remarkable, and have enriched our Nation 
             and the world. But she also gave of herself for the 
             National Women's Law Center. She served on the board of 
             the National Women's Law Center at a key juncture in its 
             history, and even gave the Center its name. She exhorted 
             us as advocates to always persevere, but never set for us 
             a higher standard than the one she followed for herself. 
             She taught us to never give up, and never give in to the 
             status quo of unfairness and inequity. And she supported 
             us and was always there to fight with us and lend us her 
             expertise.
               She has made such a difference, and will into the 
             future. She will live on, we hope, in the work that we do 
             and the work of so many others with whom we join. We are 
             proud to count among our colleagues her daughter, 
             Gwendolyn Mink, a professor of women's studies at Smith 
             College, whose scholarship and activism--like her mother's 
             public service--have focused on ways to improve the lives 
             of the least fortunate women and children in our society. 
             As Patsy Mink well knew, and often said, our children are 
             our future. May we not only hold that thought, but 
             continue to act on it.
                                     Daphne Kwok
              Executive Director, Asian Pacific American Institute for 
                                Congressional Studies
                                  October 16, 2002
               Thank you so much Congresswoman Millender-McDonald for 
             the invitation to participate today. I would like to begin 
             by saying to Patsy Mink's former and current staff members 
             a very big thank you for all of their work that they did 
             for the national Asian-Pacific-American community all of 
             these years. We greatly appreciated the commitment you had 
             to all of our needs and for helping to advance the Asian-
             Pacific-American agenda.
               How will the Asian-Pacific-American community remember 
             Congresswoman Patsy Mink? We will remember her as: the 
             tireless advocate who always voted her conscience--from 
             fighting for justice for 2,000 Asian-Pacific-American 
             cannery workers of the Wards Cove Packing Co. left out of 
             the Civil Rights Act of 1991 to voting against campaign 
             finance reform because of a provision that would deny 
             legal permanent residents the right to contribute to 
             political campaigns.
               The fighter who was always ready to make a verbal 
             statement or a symbolic statement on the issues that she 
             was so passionate about. How can we ever forget the image 
             a few years ago of the Reverend Jesse Jackson and a mass 
             group of Members and advocates flooding a House Committee 
             mark-up session on an anti-affirmative action bill. The 
             overwhelming support against the bill caused the chairman 
             to cancel the mark-up. The group then marched over to the 
             Senate side. And guess who was standing next to Reverend 
             Jackson and standing just as tall as him? Patsy!
               Or the time that we were at the Lincoln Memorial on a 
             blistery cold winter day for a press conference demanding 
             that Bill Lann Lee receive a Senate vote for his 
             nomination as Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights. 
             Who was there all bundled up in a big wool coat, scarf, 
             hat and gloves, with her fiery oratory keeping us warm as 
             she ignited the flames within us of this unfairness? 
             Patsy!
               But most especially, we will remember Patsy for the 
             generous time she carved out from her jampacked schedule 
             to always graciously meet with and inspire Asian-Pacific-
             American elected officials, Asian-Pacific-American student 
             interns, Asian-Pacific-American community leaders, and the 
             Asian-Pacific-American grassroots community sending them 
             home with pearls of wisdom and a charge to do good for 
             others and to serve this Nation.
               This is how the Asian-Pacific-American community will 
             forever remember the incredibly vibrant Congresswoman from 
             Hawaii--Patsy T. Mink.
                 
                              Proceedings in the Senate
                                             Monday, September 30, 2002
                        HONORING CONGRESSWOMAN PATSY T. MINK
               Mr. AKAKA. Mr. President, I rise to offer a few words in 
             tribute to a distinguished colleague and dear friend, 
             Congresswoman Patsy Takemoto Mink, who passed away 
             Saturday afternoon in Honolulu, HI. I am deeply saddened 
             by the passing of my friend and colleague, Patsy Mink, and 
             I join our congressional delegation, and the people of 
             Hawaii and the Nation in extending heartfelt sympathy to 
             John and Wendy Mink, her husband and daughter, Eugene 
             Takemoto, her brother, and all of Patsy's extended family 
             and her loyal staff in Washington and Hawaii.
               I feel a tremendous sense of loss at the untimely death 
             of Congresswoman Patsy Takemoto Mink. Her passing leaves a 
             void in the House of Representatives, the Hawaii 
             congressional delegation, and the political life of our 
             Nation. It is difficult to put her spirit into words, but 
             those that come immediately to mind as fitting 
             characterizations of the woman we honor today include 
             courageous, forthright, tenacious, gutsy, outspoken, bold, 
             meticulous, and determined. She was my friend, a dedicated 
             public servant for Hawaii, a strong pillar in our State's 
             delegation, and an advocate for those in America who feel 
             scared, small, alone, mistreated, neglected or forgotten.
               Patsy was a petite woman with a powerful voice and a 
             peerless reputation as a champion for equal opportunity, 
             civil rights, and education. She was a courageous and 
             tenacious leader whose lifetime of public service made 
             Hawaii a better place. Her leadership in health, 
             education, child welfare, and social services will endure 
             and continue to benefit Hawaii's people and all Americans.
               In the course of her life, Patsy was a pioneer, a 
             trailblazer for women, workers, minorities, the poor, and 
             the powerless. In the history of Hawaii and our Nation in 
             the 20th century, Patsy Mink is one of the giants whose 
             vision of hope and passion for justice led Hawaii to 
             statehood and whose efforts broke down barriers and opened 
             doors to opportunity for everyone, regardless of race, 
             gender, or religion. Her passing silences a dynamic voice, 
             but her many accomplishments, her unimpeachable integrity, 
             and passion for justice stand as an incredible legacy to a 
             magnificent woman.
               I commend to my colleagues and all those interested in 
             Patsy's remarkable life, a biography by Esther Arinaga and 
             Rene Ojiri included in a book titled Called from Within: 
             Early Women Lawyers of Hawaii, edited by Mari Matsuda. I 
             wish to recap some of her brilliant life and career for 
             the Record.
               Born on December 6, 1927, in Paia, Maui, Patsy was 
             independent and ambitious from the start. As an 
             illustration, one family story recalls that she insisted 
             at age 4 on beginning school a year early. She was driven 
             throughout her young life, and was elected student body 
             president at Maui High School. She graduated as 
             valedictorian in 1944, a year marked by global strife and 
             war.
               Patsy's childhood curiosity about medicine led her to 
             study zoology and chemistry at the University of Hawaii. 
             After graduating in 1948, she applied to medical school, 
             only to be rejected along with other bright young women 
             aspiring to be doctors, in a time when women made up only 
             2 to 3 percent of an entering class. Another factor 
             daunting her efforts was the return of our war veterans 
             and a resulting boom in applications for graduate and 
             postgraduate programs. Although discouraged, Patsy took 
             wise counsel from a mentor and applied to law schools. She 
             gained admission to the University of Chicago. It was 
             during her years of law studies that she would meet and 
             marry John Mink, a respected hydrologist and geologist, 
             her loyal campaign advisor, and her lifelong companion. It 
             was in Chicago that they would have their daughter, Wendy, 
             a professor at Smith College.
               Returning to Hawaii, Patsy gained admission to the 
             Hawaii bar in 1953, but only after a successful challenge 
             of a statute that required a woman to take the residency 
             status of her husband, who was a native Pennsylvanian. 
             Such an action represented only one of several challenges 
             to sexism that she would undertake during her professional 
             career. In being admitted to the bar, she also logged one 
             of many firsts by becoming the first Japanese-American 
             woman to do so in Hawaii.
               In the 1950s, Patsy began to take a serious interest in 
             politics and making her mark on the Democratic Party by 
             helping to build the party and draw many young people into 
             its ranks. Patsy's first step into public elected office 
             in the territorial legislature in 1956 awoke for Hawaii 
             and the world a powerful voice that would only gain 
             strength in its impact and not be silenced until the new 
             millennium. From that moment forward, Patsy's professional 
             and political record would run as if by perpetual motion.
               The momentous year of 1959 brought statehood for Hawaii, 
             and by then, Patsy had easily won election to the 
             territorial senate. Leading up to statehood, while the 
             legislature worked on landmark issues that would lend 
             shape to Hawaii's new society, Patsy authored an ``equal 
             pay for equal work'' law and scrutinized the Department of 
             Education toward improving education for Hawaii's 
             children--a cause close to my heart, as one who previously 
             served as a teacher and principal in Hawaii's schools.
               In 1965, Patsy brought her views to the national stage 
             when she became the first woman of color elected to the 
             U.S. House of Representatives to represent Hawaii's Second 
             Congressional District--a seat I was proud to hold for 
             almost 14 years, before I entered the Senate. Patsy was 
             articulate about the causes she tenaciously shepherded. 
             President Franklin Delano Roosevelt's fireside chats, 
             heard years ago on Maui by a young Patsy, had provided her 
             with a foundation of ideals and rhetoric from which she 
             would draw upon for many years in her political career.
               During her first tenure in Congress, Patsy served her 
             various constituencies, both in Hawaii and around this 
             Nation, with a strong commitment to wide-ranging domestic 
             issues, including education, the environment, child care, 
             open government, workers' rights, and equal opportunity. 
             She introduced the first Early Childhood Education Act, 
             authored the Women's Education Equity Act, supported strip 
             mining regulation, and became an early critic of the 
             Vietnam war. In 1971, she entered the Oregon Democratic 
             Presidential primary. Her candidacy reflected her 
             determined independence and frustration with government 
             cutbacks in social services spending and the ongoing war.
               In 1971, in connection with planned underground nuclear 
             tests at Amchitka Island in the Aleutian chain, she filed 
             suit with 32 other Members of Congress to compel 
             disclosure of reports under the Freedom of Information 
             Act, FOIA. She took issue with alleged Presidential 
             authority to exempt certain information from FOIA and 
             withhold it from judicial or legislative review. In the 
             final outcome, in what had been described by Patsy as a 
             sort of Waterloo of the Freedom of Information Act, the 
             U.S. Court of Appeals ruled that Congress could legislate 
             new disclosure guidelines to permit judicial review of the 
             President's actions. In the end, the case gained 
             tremendous historical significance when the U.S. Supreme 
             Court cited it as precedent for the release of the 
             Watergate tapes.
               In perhaps her farthest-reaching accomplishment, Patsy 
             co-authored title IX of the Higher Education Act 
             Amendments, which prohibits gender discrimination by 
             educational institutions receiving Federal funds. The 
             landmark provision was enacted in 1972 and has since, in 
             its 30 years of existence, introduced equality in college 
             sports and contributed greatly to the rise in women's 
             athletics.
               An unsuccessful Senate bid ended her first set of years 
             in Federal office in 1977, but it did not quiet her 
             political involvement or public service. Indeed, in 1990 
             she returned to the House. In the interim, she assumed the 
             position of Assistant Secretary of State for Oceans and 
             International, Environmental, and Scientific Affairs, 
             where she helped to strengthen environmental policies, 
             particularly with regard to protection of whales, toxic 
             chemical disposal and ocean mining. In 1980, she took the 
             helm as the first woman president of the Americans for 
             Democratic Action. Two years later, she returned to 
             elected office in Hawaii by taking the gavel as 
             chairperson of the Honolulu City Council. She twice ran 
             unsuccessfully for other office, this time for Governor 
             and mayor of Honolulu, then triumphed in 1990 in a special 
             election for the remainder of my term in the other body, 
             at the passing of our beloved colleague, Spark Matsunaga.
               Since 1990, she continued in characteristic style, 
             advocating and articulating the ideals that she had 
             espoused during her first terms in the other body. I 
             remember Patsy marching up the Capitol steps with vigor, 
             alongside her other female colleagues, to show her support 
             for Anita Hill in 1991. I was pleased to work with Patsy, 
             the distinguished senior Senator from Hawaii, Senator Dan 
             Inouye, the Honorable Secretary of Transportation, Norm 
             Mineta, and my other colleagues in the establishment of a 
             congressional caucus to address the needs of Asian-
             Americans and Pacific Islanders in 1994.
               I recall her leadership in 1996 on a successful boycott 
             of a joint session speech by French President Jacques 
             Chirac, in protest of French nuclear testing in the 
             Pacific, much in line with our shared commitment to 
             championing the disenfranchised peoples of the Pacific in 
             our respective bodies. As we hope to complete action on a 
             welfare reauthorization bill in this session, I remember 
             Patsy's steadfast efforts before the passage of the 1996 
             welfare reform law in keeping us mindful about the 
             possible effects of social policy changes on children. She 
             had continued the battle cry with the current welfare 
             reauthorization and ensured that the voices of the 
             smallest and most vulnerable were heard.
               Patsy was one of the last Members of the 107th Congress 
             who served in the historic 89th Congress that passed much 
             of the landmark Great Society legislation. Patsy's 
             lifelong efforts to open educational access to countless 
             Americans and ensure them the best educational 
             opportunities were the achievements that brought her the 
             greatest satisfaction. ``Anything for the children,'' was 
             Patsy's guiding conviction. I believe we shared the same 
             view about education that this crucial area is where we 
             can do the most good for the most people.
               A great spirit has come and gone before us. Patsy's 
             vigor and courage to tackle difficult issues in the wide 
             realm of social policy will be sorely missed. There are 
             fewer trails for women and minorities to blaze, thanks to 
             Patsy's determination and spirit. Indeed, her trailblazing 
             efforts will not end with her death, for the things she 
             put into place will continue to benefit the lives of 
             countless individuals, in our lifetime and for generations 
             to come, in ways that may not ever be truly appreciated.
               We are enjoined to carry forth the mission that my dear 
             colleague pursued during her remarkable career. With great 
             sadness, we bid a final farewell and aloha pumehana to a 
             fearless and remarkable lady, the most honorable Patsy 
             Takemoto Mink.
             SUBMITTED RESOLUTIONS--SENATE RESOLUTION 331--RELATIVE TO 
                 THE DEATH OF REPRESENTATIVE PATSY T. MINK OF HAWAII
               Mr. DASCHLE (for himself, Mr. Lott, Mr. Inouye, and Mr. 
             Akaka) submitted the following resolution; which was 
             considered and agreed to:
                                     S. Res. 331
                Resolved, That the Senate has heard with profound 
             sorrow and deep regret the announcement of the death of 
             the Honorable Patsy T. Mink, late a Representative from 
             the State of Hawaii.
                Resolved, That the Secretary communicate these 
             resolutions to the House of Representatives and transmit 
             an enrolled copy thereof to the family of the deceased.
                Resolved, That when the Senate adjourns or recesses 
             today, it stand adjourned or recessed as a further mark of 
             respect to the memory of the deceased Representative.
                   DEATH OF REPRESENTATIVE PATSY T. MINK OF HAWAII
               Mr. REID. I ask unanimous consent the Senate proceed to 
             the consideration of S. Res. 331 submitted earlier today 
             by the majority and the Republican leaders.

               The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the 
             resolution by title.
               The legislative clerk read as follows:

                A resolution (S. Res. 331) relative to the death of 
             Representative Patsy T. Mink of Hawaii.

               There being no objection, the Senate proceeded to the 
             consideration of the resolution.

               Mr. REID. I ask unanimous consent the resolution be 
             agreed to and the motion to reconsider laid on the table, 
             with no intervening action or debate.

               The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so 
             ordered.
               The resolution (S. Res. 331) was agreed to, as follows:
                                     S. Res. 331
                Resolved, That the Senate has heard with profound 
             sorrow and deep regret the announcement of the death of 
             the Honorable Patsy T. Mink, late a Representative from 
             the State of Hawaii.
                Resolved, That the Secretary communicate these 
             resolutions to the House of Representatives and transmit 
             an enrolled copy thereof to the family of the deceased.
                Resolved, That when the Senate adjourns or recesses 
             today, it stand adjourned or recessed as a further mark of 
             respect to the memory of the deceased Representative.
                        ADJOURNMENT UNTIL 9:30 A.M., TOMORROW
               Mr. REID. If there is no further business to come before 
             the Senate, I ask unanimous consent that the Senate stand 
             in adjournment under the parameters of S. Res. 331, as a 
             further mark of respect to the memory of the deceased 
             Patsy Mink.
               There being no objection, the Senate, at 6:16 p.m., 
             adjourned until Tuesday, October 1, 2002, at 9:30 a.m.
                                               Tuesday, October 1, 2002
                       TRIBUTE TO CONGRESSWOMAN PATSY T. MINK
               Mr. INOUYE. Mr. President, on Saturday, September 28, 
             2002, Hawaii lost a beloved and extraordinary daughter, 
             Patsy Takemoto Mink, who represented Hawaii in the U.S. 
             House of Representatives for 24 years. I extend to her 
             husband, John, and daughter, Wendy, my sincerest 
             condolences.
               The passing of Congresswoman Mink is a great loss for 
             our Nation and our State, and it is a personal loss for 
             me. She was an honorable colleague and a dear friend 
             throughout our political careers.
               I was privileged to work with Patsy in 1956 when we were 
             both members of the Hawaii territorial house of 
             representatives. She was the first Asian-American woman 
             elected to the Hawaii Legislature. In the 1960s, we both 
             gave speeches at Democratic National Conventions. She was 
             Chairwoman of the Honolulu City Council. In 1964, she 
             joined me as a member of Hawaii's congressional delegation 
             when she became the first Asian-American woman elected to 
             the U.S. House of Representatives. For 24 years, she was 
             an integral part of the Hawaii delegation. I appreciated 
             her honesty, I respected her thoughts, and I admired her 
             resolve.
               Throughout her public service, Patsy concerned herself 
             with making our country a better place for all people. She 
             will be remembered for her powerful and passionate voice 
             as she championed causes for women, children, the elderly, 
             and the needy. For those who were vulnerable or 
             mistreated, she was their able and loyal defender.
               Born Patsy Takemoto in a plantation community in Paia, 
             Maui, on December 6, 1927, Patsy had the intelligence and 
             work ethic to succeed in any profession. However, medical 
             school eluded her and the legal community did not embrace 
             her after she received her law degree from the University 
             of Chicago in 1951. The reason she was rejected by medical 
             schools and legal circles? Her race and her gender.
               Rather than accept defeat, the strong-willed Patsy set 
             out to eliminate the societal barriers of the day, and ran 
             for office in the U.S. House of Representatives, which at 
             that time was comprised of mostly white and mostly male 
             Members. She won the election and went on to pave the way 
             for new generations of women to more fully enjoy their 
             rights as citizens of a great Nation.
               Patsy co-authored and spearheaded the difficult passage 
             of title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, which 
             prohibits discrimination in educational opportunities 
             based on gender at institutions receiving Federal funds. 
             It opened academic opportunities for women, and 
             revolutionized the world of sports. Since the passage of 
             this landmark legislation, participation by girls in high 
             school athletics nationwide has increased nearly tenfold, 
             and college participation has grown almost five times. 
             College scholarships awarded to women in 2002 were worth 
             $180 million. Title IX serves as the foundation of the 
             careers of today's top professional U.S. female athletes. 
             The U.S. women soccer team's 1999 World Cup triumph, U.S. 
             women's domination of Olympic sports, and the birth of the 
             women's professional National Basketball Association are 
             rooted in title IX.
               To fully appreciate the significance of title IX, 
             compare women's sports in 1972 to today as reported by the 
             Honolulu Advertiser. In 1972, the only woman with an 
             athletic scholarship at the University of Hawaii was a 
             drum majorette. Of UH's $1 million athletic budget, $5,000 
             was given to women's club sports. Today, UH spends $4 
             million annually on 11 women's teams.
                Patsy's reputation as a relentless and formidable 
             lawmaker extends beyond the passage of title IX. She 
             advocated for civil rights, peace, education, health care, 
             and the environment with equal eloquence and 
             effectiveness.
                I last spoke with my friend, Patsy, in August at a 
             fund-raising event in Hawaii. She mingled and talked with 
             constituents with her trademark vim and vigor. Her deep 
             love for her constituents and her Nation was evident. She 
             was focused on the future and continuing her service to 
             the people of Hawaii.
                Patsy answered the call to public service to the end, 
             and her work immeasurably improved America's landscape for 
             the under-represented and downtrodden for whom she had so 
             much compassion. As my colleagues and I continue our work, 
             we will long be able to look to Mrs. Patsy Mink's life of 
             service for inspiration and hope.
                                             Wednesday, October 2, 2002
                               MESSAGE FROM THE HOUSE
                At 3:27 p.m., a message from the House of 
             Representatives, delivered by Ms. Niland, one of its 
             reading clerks, announced that the House has agreed to the 
             following resolution:
               H. Res. 566. Resolution stating that the House has heard 
             with profound sorrow of the death of the Honorable Patsy 
             T. Mink, a Representative from the State of Hawaii.
                                               Tuesday, October 8, 2002
               By Mr. AKAKA (for himself, Mr. Inouye, Mr. Kennedy, Mr. 
             Reed, Ms. Mikulski, Mr. Wellstone, Mr. Jeffords, Mr. 
             Edwards, Mr. Bingaman, Mr. Dodd, Mrs. Clinton, Mr. 
             Lieberman, Mr. Kerry, Mr. Torricelli, and Mrs. Boxer):
                S.J. Res. 49. A joint resolution recognizing the 
             contributions of Patsy Takemoto Mink; to the Committee on 
             Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.
                Mr. AKAKA. Mr. President, I rise to introduce a 
             resolution passed last night in the other body, along with 
             my colleagues Senators Inouye, Kennedy, and others, which 
             continues our tribute to Congresswoman Patsy Takemoto Mink 
             in the wake of her untimely passing on September 28, 2002. 
             The resolution honors a remarkable woman and her 
             accomplishments for equal opportunity and education by 
             renaming after her a provision in law commonly known as 
             title IX that consists of few words but has had 
             incomprehensible and tremendous positive impact on the 
             lives of countless numbers of girls and women in our 
             country. With our combined action, title IX of the 
             Education Amendments of 1972 will now be known as the 
             Patsy Takemoto Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act.
                As we honor our colleague, we can also recount some of 
             the milestones in the 30-year history of title IX and the 
             efforts to establish standards of equal opportunity of 
             women. The progress we as a Nation have made in 30 years 
             has been remarkable, and we have Patsy and a few of her 
             visionary colleagues to thank for the equal opportunities 
             our children enjoy today. In 1970, the U.S. House of 
             Representatives Committee on Education and Labor held the 
             first congressional hearings on sex discrimination in 
             education. At those hearings, Patsy made the following 
             statement,

               Discrimination against women in education is one of the 
             most insidious forms of prejudice extant in our Nation. 
             Few people realize the extent to which our society is 
             denied full use of our human resources because of this 
             type of discrimination. Most large colleges and 
             universities in the United States routinely impose quotas 
             by sex on the admission of students. Fewer women are 
             admitted than men, and those few women allowed to pursue 
             higher education must have attained exceptional 
             intellectual standing to win admission.

               She went on to state,

               Our Nation can no longer afford this system which 
             demoralizes and demeans half of the population and 
             deprives them of the means to participate fully in our 
             society as equal citizens. Lacking the contribution which 
             women are capable of making to human betterment, our 
             Nation is the loser so long as this discrimination is 
             allowed to continue.

                In April, 1972, Congresswoman Mink introduced the 
             Women's Education Act of 1972. On the day of introduction, 
             on the floor of the other body, she said,

               We need the input of every individual to continue the 
             progress we enjoy. All persons, regardless of their sex, 
             must have enough opportunities open so that they can 
             contribute as much to their lives and this society as they 
             can.

               She further noted that,

               It is essential to the existence of our country that 
             sincere and realistic attention to the realignment of our 
             attitudes and educational priorities be made. I suggest 
             that education is the first place to start in a 
             reexamination of our national goals.

                On June 23, 1972, Congresswoman Mink, working with 
             Congresswoman Edith Green of Oregon and others on the then 
             Education and Labor Committee, saw their efforts on an 
             important education package come top fruition as the 
             Education Amendments of 1972 were signed into law. Title 
             IX was included in that package. Final regulations for 
             title IX were issued on June 4, 1975. On June 17, 1997, 
             President Clinton announced that he issued an executive 
             memo directing all appropriate Federal agencies to review 
             their title IX obligation and report their findings within 
             90 days to the Attorney General. In all, although the 
             reach of title IX has been felt the most in the athletics 
             arena, the landmark statutes about gender roles in our 
             society have helped to correct inequalities in areas such 
             as educational attainment by women, educator pay, and the 
             wide range of extracurricular activities enjoyed by female 
             students of all ages. Much of this would not have been 
             possible were it not for the immense vision and 
             determination of Patsy Mink.
                Last Friday I attended a most fitting and moving 
             memorial service for Patsy in Honolulu, HI. I joined the 
             senior Senator from Hawaii and many dignitaries from the 
             other body, as well as many of Hawaii's other 
             distinguished elected officials and thousands of Hawaii 
             residents, in attendance to pay tribute to Patsy Mink. 
             Among the eloquent speakers, University of Hawaii 
             Assistant Athletics Director Marilyn Moniz-Kahoohanohano 
             called herself, ``a living example of Mrs. Mink's vision 
             of equality for women.'' Marilyn recounted how she had 
             just graduated from high school after the passage of title 
             IX, and the University of Hawaii formed the Rainbow Wahine 
             athletic teams. She recalled, with joy, how she and her 
             team placed second for the national volleyball title and 
             took pictures with Patsy on the steps of the Capitol. 
             Marilyn's powerful words on Friday range true for many 
             female athletes in Hawaii and around the country, as she 
             said, ``Because of you, we can play the game.''
                I urge the Senate to act quickly on this resolution to 
             honor the groundbreaking efforts of Congresswoman Patsy 
             Takemoto Mink on behalf of countless girls and women of 
             America. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the 
             text of the joint resolution be printed in the Record.
                There being no objection, the joint resolution was 
             ordered to be printed in the Record, as follows:
                                     S.J. Res. 49
               Whereas Patsy Takemoto Mink was one of the Nation's 
             leading voices for women's rights, civil rights, and 
             working families and was devoted to raising living 
             standards and providing economic and educational 
             opportunity to all Americans;
               Whereas Patsy Takemoto Mink was a passionate and 
             persistent fighter against economic and social injustices 
             in Hawaii and across the Nation;
               Whereas Patsy Takemoto Mink was one of the first women 
             of color to win national office in 1964 and opened doors 
             of opportunity to millions of women and people of color 
             across the Nation;
               Whereas Patsy Takemoto Mink had unprecedented 
             legislative accomplishments on issues affecting women's 
             health, children, students, and working families; and
               Whereas Patsy Takemoto Mink's heroic, visionary, and 
             tireless leadership to win the landmark passage of title 
             IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 opened doors to 
             women's academic and athletic achievements and redefined 
             what is possible for a generation of women and for future 
             generations of the Nation's daughters: Now, therefore, be 
             it
               Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
             the United States of America in Congress assembled,
               SECTION 1. PATSY TAKEMOTO MINK EQUAL OPPORTUNITY IN 
             EDUCATION ACT.
               Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 (20 U.S.C. 
             1681 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the 
             following:
               ``SEC. 910. SHORT TITLE.
               ``This title may be cited as the `Patsy Takemoto Mink 
             Equal Opportunity in Education Act'.''.
                                             Wednesday, October 9, 2002
                                MESSAGE FROM THE HOUSE
                At 1:20 p.m., a message from the House of 
             Representatives, delivered by Mr. Hays, one of its reading 
             clerks, announced that the House has passed the following 
             bills and joint resolution, in which it requests the 
             concurrence of the Senate :
               H.J. Res. 113. A joint resolution recognizing the 
             contributions of Patsy Takemoto Mink.
                                             Thursday, October 10, 2002
                                 PATSY TAKEMOTO MINK
                Mr. REID. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that 
             the Senate proceed to the consideration of H.J. Res. 113, 
             which has been received from the House and is now at the 
             desk.
                The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the joint 
             resolution by title.
                The legislative clerk read as follows:

               A joint resolution (H.J. Res. 113) recognizing the 
             contributions of Patsy Takemoto Mink.

                There being no objection, the Senate proceeded to 
             consider the joint resolution.
                Mr. REID. I ask unanimous consent that the joint 
             resolution be read three times, passed, the motion to 
             reconsider be laid upon the table, the preamble be agreed 
             to, and that any statements relating thereto be printed in 
             the Record, with no intervening action or debate.
                The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so 
             ordered.
                The joint resolution (H.J. Res. 113) was read the third 
             time and passed.
                The preamble was agreed to.
                                            Wednesday, October 16, 2002
                      ENROLLED BILLS AND JOINT RESOLUTION SIGNED
                The message also announced that the Speaker has signed 
             the following enrolled bills and joint resolution:
               H.J. Res. 113. A joint resolution recognizing the 
             contributions of Patsy Takemoto Mink.
                                             Thursday, October 17, 2002
                               MESSAGES FROM THE HOUSE
                      enrolled bills and joint resolution signed
                At 11:02 a.m., a message from the House of 
             Representatives, delivered by Ms. Niland, one of its 
             reading clerks, announced that the Speaker has signed the 
             following enrolled bills and joint resolution:
                The following enrolled bills and joint resolution, 
             previously signed by the Speaker of the House, were signed 
             on today, October 17, 2002, by the President pro tempore 
             (Mr. Byrd).
               H.J. Res. 113. A joint resolution recognizing the 
             contributions of Patsy Takemoto Mink.
                 

                                 Patsy Takemoto Mink
                                      1927-2002


                                     In Memoriam




             Friday, October 4, 2002, 10 a.m.

             State Capitol Rotunda

             Honolulu, Hawai'i
                                        Music
                                      Herb Lee
                                   Queen's Prayer
                                  Van Horn Diamond
                                   Hale O Na Alii
                                      Presiding
                                    Richard Port
                      Former Chair, Democratic Party of Hawai'i
                                   Opening Prayer
                                 Reverend O.W. Efurd
               Executive Director, Hawai'i Pacific Baptist Convention
                                    Kanaka Waiwai
                                   Danny Kaleikini
                                      Speakers
                             Governor Benjamin Cayetano
                                  State of Hawai'i
                            Congressman Richard Gephardt
                   Minority Leader, U.S. House of Representatives
                             Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi
                    Minority Whip, U.S. House of Representatives
                                    Karen Ginoza
                                   President, HSTA
                            U.S. Senator Daniel K. Inouye
                            U.S. Senator Daniel K. Akaka
                             Congresswoman Lynn Woolsey
                             Marilyn Moniz-Kahoohanohano
                              Congressman George Miller
                             Congresswoman Maxine Waters
                           Congressman James Sensenbrenner
                            Congressman Neil Abercrombie
                                    June Motokawa
                                      Educator
                               Secretary Norman Mineta
                          U.S. Department of Transportation
                                 Message of Comfort
                                 Reverend O.W. Efurd
                                       Family
                                    Calvin Tamura
                                     Benediction
                                 Reverend O.W. Efurd
                                    Hawai'i Aloha
                            U.S. Senator Daniel K. Akaka
                                    Hawai'i Aloha
                            E Hawai'i e ku'u one hanau e
                                Ku'u home kulaiwa nei
                            'Oli no au i na pono lani ou
                                 E Hawai'i, aloha e

                                        Hui:
                          E ha'u'oli na 'opio o Hawai'i nei
                                   'Oli e! 'Oli e!
                          Mai na aheahe makani e pa mai nei
                               Mau ke aloha no Hawai'i
               Richard Port. We welcome with deep appreciation all of 
             you who have come from near and far to attend this 
             memorial service, as well as those of you watching this 
             service all across Hawaii Nei and across our Nation.
               We honor today a very special lady, Congresswoman Patsy 
             Mink, who has served our State and our Nation so well as a 
             member of our territorial and State legislature, a member 
             and chair of the Honolulu City Council, Assistant 
             Secretary of State in the Department of State under 
             President Carter, and as a Member of Congress from 1965 to 
             1977 and again from 1990 to 2002. However, it is not 
             merely the length of her service or even the range of 
             positions that she has held that brings us here today, but 
             the quality of her performance. It is her achievement on 
             our behalf and the honesty, integrity, and 
             conscienciousness that she brought to her service that 
             calls us and compels us to be present today.
               Our thoughts and prayers go out to Patsy's husband, John 
             Mink, to their daughter Gwendolyn and to Patsy's brother 
             Eugene and to her entire family. We can only imagine their 
             pain as they watched by Patsy's side for almost a month 
             hoping against hope as all of us did for Patsy's recovery.
               To begin our memorial service today, I call upon 
             Reverend Efurd, executive director of the Hawaii Pacific 
             Baptist Convention.
               [Reverend Efurd gave the opening prayer.]
               [Benjamin Cayetano, Governor of the State of Hawai'i, 
             spoke.]

               Richard Gephardt. John, Gwendolyn, Senator Inouye, 
             Congressman Abercrombie, my colleagues from the House of 
             Representatives, State and local officials, distinguished 
             guests. We are so honored to be here today. We appreciate 
             the opportunity to share with you some reflections on the 
             life of an amazing woman, my friend, our colleague, Patsy 
             Mink. To Patsy's husband John, her daughter Gwendolyn, her 
             brother Eugene, Patsy's friends, Patsy's constituents and 
             to all of her staff present and past; we say to you today 
             that our hearts and prayers go out to you at this time of 
             grief and sorrow in your lives. I came to the Congress in 
             1977. That was the year that Patsy Mink was leaving. So in 
             the early years in my experience in the Congress, I knew 
             Patsy Mink's reputation. I heard about it often for 
             women's rights, for human rights, for health care, for 
             education, for the people of Hawaii. Then in 1990, Patsy 
             returned. I was finally really her colleague. And for me 
             the human being now merged with her reputation and I 
             quickly learned that she was one of those rare individuals 
             who when you're with them day after day always exceed 
             their reputations. Let me spend a moment reflecting on 
             what I think Patsy Mink accomplished as a human being and 
             a public servant.
               First, she was a pioneer in the true sense of the word. 
             In the 1940s, she tried to enroll in 12 different medical 
             schools. She wanted to be a doctor. She was turned down 12 
             times because she was a woman. She finally convinced the 
             University of Chicago to let her go to law school. Then 
             she came to Honolulu to try to join one of the large law 
             firms here.
               She was refused because she was a woman. She was the 
             first Asian-American woman ever admitted to the bar in 
             Hawaii. She was the first Asian-American woman elected to 
             the State legislature in Hawaii. She was the first woman 
             of color to win national office in the House of 
             Representatives in 1964. So she was a pioneer. She blazed 
             trails. She made it possible for others to follow in her 
             wake, but she also fought for human rights. I'm sure that 
             when she was refused entrance in the medical school or in 
             the law firm, she was angry, but she didn't get consumed 
             with her anger. She didn't get consumed with hatred. She 
             simply did something about it. She had the patience and 
             the perseverance to see it through.
               Robert Kennedy once said, ``Some see things as they are 
             and ask why? I see things as they should be and ask why 
             not?'' Patsy Mink asked ``Why not?'' And then she 
             authored, in 1972, Title IX of the Education Act. And I 
             could assure you in 1972, no one quite knew what that 
             title meant or what it would do. This week, the House of 
             Representatives renamed Title IX of the Education Act to 
             be called the Patsy Mink Act.
               That many years ago this strong-willed woman changed the 
             face of America forever. Imagine just commonplace now the 
             thousands of young women who have access not just to 
             sports but to education, to opportunity. Doors have been 
             open for thousands of women because of Patsy Mink. And 
             hear this, because of the Patsy Mink Act, college athletic 
             scholarships went from $100,000 in 1972 to $179,000,000 in 
             1997.
               Women all across this country, known and unknown, seen 
             and unseen, are today thanking Patsy Mink for what she did 
             for them. She helped propel one of the great revolutions 
             of our society, the women's movement, into the mainstream 
             of American life. She got human rights for millions of our 
             citizens that were denied those rights for years and years 
             in this country. Thousands have benefited not only in 
             America but across the world because of her work. She was 
             a patriot. She loved this country. She honored our beliefs 
             and our tradition. She loved it so much that she was a 
             constant reminder that we must not lose our way, that we 
             must protect our rights and our freedom. More than once 
             she would confront me on the floor or in the caucus. And 
             believe me you don't want to be confronted by Patsy Mink. 
             She put her finger in my chest and she said, ``You're not 
             doing this right. This is not the tradition of our country 
             and our party. We've got to change our ways.'' And she 
             always made her point. She was such a patriot that she 
             voted against the Patriot Act and she voted against the 
             Homeland Security Act because they did not measure up to 
             her sense of patriotism. They did not protect the values 
             that we are fighting for.
               She loved this State. Oh, did she love this State. She 
             would talk to us about how beautiful this State is. She 
             would talk about the environment in this State and how it 
             had to be protected. She would talk about the needs of the 
             people in this State and about 5 years ago I was here and 
             she took me to a meeting to meet people who were 
             participating in your universal health care coverage in 
             this State. She said all of America could have what Hawaii 
             has, which is universal health care for all of the people 
             of Hawaii.
               And finally, she was an unabashed, unapologetic, proud, 
             liberal Democrat. I loved her so much for that. In a time 
             when politics is cautious and careful and filled with 
             sound bites and TV ads, Patsy was the genuine article. She 
             knew what she believed and she said what she believed no 
             matter what the political fallout. She cared about the 
             poor and the discriminated against, and always put them 
             first. And she believed that government has a higher 
             responsibility to always think first of the poor and the 
             discriminated against and the downtrodden in this society. 
             She never wavered from this view. Her campaigns for office 
             were not highly financed, highly consulted campaign 
             efforts. Her entire campaign staff was her family and they 
             won every election she got involved in.
               And finally, she always argued her views. The 
             positives--not negatives, with passion--not anger, with 
             respect--not bitterness, with love--not hate. And so today 
             all of us together with her family, her friends, her 
             constituents, her colleagues yield her to the complete, 
             perfect, ultimate love of God. And in that place she will 
             surely be at home because she loves all of us so very 
             much.

               Nancy Pelosi. Aloha. I'm very pleased to join our 
             minority leader, Representative Sensenbrenner here 
             representing Speaker Hastert, the Speaker of the House, of 
             course our colleague Neil Abercrombie and Senators Inouye 
             and Akaka in extending to John, Wendy and Eugene, and to 
             the entire Takemoto family the deepest sympathy of the 
             families of our colleagues and of our constituents. We are 
             so very saddened about Patsy's untimely passing. Everyone 
             who knew Patsy, knew how much she loved her family, how 
             much she loved John and Wendy and the Takemoto family and 
             how proud she was of her Japanese-American heritage. With 
             her wonderful family and her magnificent education, Patsy 
             could have had a comfortable, normal life away from the 
             rough and tumble of politics, but as has been written 
             about Eleanor Roosevelt, Patsy too, had a burdensome 
             conscience. She dedicated her life to helping people and 
             challenging our conscience. As the Governor said, Patsy 
             considered public service a noble calling and her public 
             service was distinguished by a deep patriotism and a love 
             of America. That's why I am so pleased to see our dear 
             precious Patsy draped in the American flag. How 
             appropriate. No one understood or worked harder to protect 
             the principles for which that flag stood and stands. She 
             truly deserves that honor. Maybe Patsy loved America so 
             much because she knew what it took to make Hawaii part of 
             the United States as the 50th State. Maybe it was because 
             of what she experienced as a young Japanese-American 
             woman. Maybe it was because of the extraordinary intellect 
             she possessed. Whatever the reason, Patsy understood 
             America. Patsy understood America's possibilities. Patsy 
             took her oath of office to protect and defend the 
             Constitution of the United States from all enemies foreign 
             and domestic very seriously. She was a fighter for the 
             freedoms in the Constitution and especially freedom of 
             speech and dissent. She cherished our civil liberties and 
             staunchly defended them. That's one part of America. And 
             viewed with a Hawaiian love of nature, Patsy became a 
             champion of America's patrimony from sea to shining sea; 
             from the mountains to the prairies to the ocean, 
             especially the Pacific Ocean. She not only led the way, 
             but she mentored future leaders like George Miller who's 
             here and who did become the chair of the Natural Resources 
             Committee. She mentored leaders to preserve that natural 
             legacy for generations to come. Patsy was about the future 
             and nothing spoke more to the future than our children 
             America's children. Patsy worked to improve the quality of 
             education and the quality of life for children and her 
             work is legendary. As mentioned by our leaders, Patsy left 
             a powerful legacy that includes changing the way America 
             educates girls and women. Title IX which opened the locker 
             room doors to women in sports simply could not have 
             happened without Patsy's leadership. With a twinkle in her 
             eye, that dazzling smile, that wonderful laugh, Patsy 
             worked her magic on our country and made history and 
             progress.
               When Hawaii became a State it lifted the spirits of 
             America. It was a wonderfully exhilarating experience for 
             all of the United States. When Patsy came to Congress, she 
             lifted the spirits of the country and of Congress. Like 
             Hawaii, Patsy was irresistible and that was a good thing 
             because she never took no for an answer. Just on a 
             personal note, I remember one day she said to me, ``You 
             have to come to Hawaii for my dinner.'' ``When is it?'' 
             She told me. I said, ``I'm sorry Patsy, I have to speak 
             that day in San Francisco.'' ``What time''? she asked. I 
             said, ``10 in the morning.'' She said, ``That's OK, you 
             can be on a 1 o'clock flight to Honolulu.'' ``But Patsy I 
             have to speak the next morning in San Francisco.'' 
             ``That's OK, you can go back on the redeye.'' And of 
             course, I was honored to come to Hawaii for 5 hours, have 
             a good time, half of which time was spent coming and going 
             from the airport to tell the people gathered at the dinner 
             the high regard and enormous respect and great love that 
             her colleagues in the Congress felt for her and how 
             important she was to Congress. You know how important she 
             is we just want everyone to know how Congress regards her 
             work. So anyway, I got more mileage out of that trip. 
             Patsy told that story over and over and how fortunate for 
             me she gave me an opportunity to show my love to her. I 
             have many stories about Patsy but we have many speakers. I 
             will say one more thing and that is the Members of 
             Congress would follow Patsy anywhere and we have stories 
             of where she took us to do one thing and another because 
             it was right. And Patsy would say it's the right thing to 
             do. And one of the things where many Members heeded 
             Patsy's call was in 1996 to follow her and her successful 
             boycott of a speech that the President of France made to a 
             Joint Session of Congress. He came and practically nobody 
             was there. In doing so we were joining Patsy in protesting 
             the French nuclear testing in the Pacific and we joined 
             Patsy on behalf of the Pacific Islander people and the 
             environment of the Pacific. When Patsy said it isn't right 
             to go, we didn't go.
               Patsy took great pride in representing Hawaii. I'm sure 
             you know that. She told us all a great deal about Native 
             Hawaiian education, health care and housing. And all that 
             she did in Congress she brought great honor and dignity to 
             this magnificent State. Thank you, Hawaii, for sending 
             such a remarkable spirit to Congress. Thank you, John and 
             Wendy, for sharing Patsy with us. We all know how much she 
             loved her family. I hope it is a comfort to you that so 
             many people mourn her loss and are praying for you at this 
             sad time. Yes, Patsy will be missed as a beloved wife, a 
             loving and proud mom, a pioneer, a teacher, a lawyer, a 
             legislator and a friend. I will want to acknowledge Patsy 
             as a great patriot. Her work to protect our Constitution, 
             our natural resources, our country's future and our 
             children is legendary. And so today, as we mourn Patsy's 
             passing we know one thing--that on the day she was born 
             God blessed America. Thank you.

               Karen Ginoza [reading a statement by Reg Weaver, 
             President, National Education Association]. With the 
             passing of Representative Patsy Mink, we at the National 
             Education Association have lost a wonderful friend, a 
             stalwart ally, and a feisty champion of public education. 
             We have lost Patsy. But what a legacy she leaves behind--a 
             legacy that is visible on campuses, in classrooms, and on 
             playing fields all across America. Bear in mind that 
             Patsy's great legislative achievement, Title IX, did even 
             more than open the door to women's fuller participation in 
             sports; it opened the door to women's equal participation 
             in all aspects of education. Our daughters and 
             granddaughters live in a world of opportunities and 
             options that were made possible, in large measure, because 
             Patsy Mink dreamed and dared to demand change. So, this 
             week, we grieve that Patsy lost her last battle with 
             illness. But we celebrate her many victories on behalf of 
             women, children and public education. In absentia, I am 
             honored to join with Patsy's many family members, friends, 
             and supporters in remembering this wonderful woman and 
             passionate public servant. Today, we stand not in Patsy's 
             shadow, but in her light.

               Karen Ginoza. President Lyndon B. Johnson said, ``I 
             believe a woman's place is not only in the home, but in 
             the House and Senate and throughout the government.'' 
             Representative Patsy Mink made a home for herself in the 
             U.S. House of Representatives and for this we are 
             extremely fortunate. She was a champion, a prizefighter 
             who never gave up on a good cause.
               Public education was one of her good causes. From her 
             first day in office, she fought on our behalf, making a 
             better, stronger country one child at a time. There was 
             never a time when she was too busy to help, never a time 
             she was too overwhelmed to make headway, never a time she 
             was even tempted to drop the gloves and abandon the fight.
               Patsy also was a dreamer. She was constantly dreaming 
             about how she could put her office to work to make life 
             better for others. Her dreams led her to build classrooms 
             in the sky. After building these dream classrooms, she 
             went about laying the foundation under them. She knew that 
             good schools need equality for every child, so she battled 
             for Title IX. She knew that good schools require adequate 
             funding, so she captured every dollar she could bring our 
             way. Children in Hawaii and all over the country are 
             reaping the benefits of Patsy's dreams.
               The National Education Association took notice of all 
             that Patsy did and bestowed upon her the annual ``Creative 
             Leadership in Women's Rights Award'' in 1977. This award 
             recognizes individuals whose leadership, actions, and 
             support have contributed to the improvement of American 
             women at the national level.
               While women and children stood in this, waiting for 
             their chances at equality, Patsy was at the head of it, 
             quietly holding the door open, shepherding everyone 
             through it. Her passing leaves a void in our community, 
             and today we grieve for our lost friend, dreamer, and 
             ally. But we are heartened by knowing that her legacy will 
             live on in the lives of Hawaii's schoolchildren.
               Thank you, Patsy. We will continue in your good name. 
             Rest in peace.

               Senator Daniel K. Inouye. Aloha. John, Wendy, our hearts 
             go out to you. My fellow Americans and ladies and 
             gentlemen we gather this day in mourning but we also 
             gather this day to celebrate the life of Patsy Mink.
               As some have indicated this morning, Patsy was an 
             American patriot. She was an authentic American hero. Her 
             shield was her integrity, her weapons her words--her words 
             of inspiration--her words of wisdom--her words of 
             compassion. She could not tolerate abused and abandoned 
             children and abused and abandoned wives and she called us 
             all to arms. She could not tolerate discrimination and 
             hatred and prejudice. Her mark is clearly made in our 
             Nation's history. And she wanted every child to have a 
             decent education. But coming from the plantation, she felt 
             that it was not only a constitutional right but a Godgiven 
             right for every person who can work to have a job and to 
             organize if that is his wish. She stood tall for the labor 
             movement. Her voice is still now. We will not have the 
             privilege of listening to her again but somehow I feel she 
             is with us here today and she will be with us for the rest 
             of our lives. I can almost see Patsy at this moment 
             embarrassed because of accolade after accolade being 
             poured upon her with words of praise. Sometimes I wonder 
             why we wait until one passes away to say these words of 
             praise and gratitude, but I can also see Patsy smiling 
             with a little twinkle in her eyes and saying to herself it 
             was worth it. It was not in vain. We love you, Patsy.

               Senator Daniel K. Akaka. John, Wendy, Eugene, members of 
             Patsy's extended family and her Hawaii and DC staff, 
             congressional colleagues, Governor Cayetano and friends, 
             we all share your profound sense of loss with the passing 
             of Congresswoman Patsy Takemoto Mink. Her passing leaves a 
             void in the House of Representatives, our Hawaii 
             congressional delegation, our State--which Patsy loved so 
             much and served so well--and her passing leaves a void in 
             the political life of our Nation. It is not easy to put 
             her spirit into words, but those that come immediately to 
             mind as fitting characterizations of the woman we remember 
             and bid aloha today include courageous, forthright, 
             tenacious, gutsy, outspoken, bold, meticulous and 
             determined. Patsy was my friend, a dedicated public 
             servant for Hawaii, and an advocate for those in America 
             who feel scared, small, alone, mistreated, neglected or 
             forgotten. Her lifetime of public service made Hawaii and 
             our great Nation a better place. At the U.S. Capitol, many 
             expressions of condolences from colleagues, staff, and 
             police officers were received.
               Patsy was a pioneer, a trailblazer for women, workers, 
             minorities, the poor and the powerless. In the history of 
             Hawaii and our Nation in the 20th century, Patsy Mink is 
             one of the giants whose presence has forever altered 
             Hawaii's and America's political landscape. Her vision of 
             hope, passion for justice, and commitment to equal 
             opportunity shaped our young State and Nation. Her efforts 
             broke down barriers and opened doors to opportunity for 
             everyone. Her passing silences a dynamic voice, but her 
             many accomplishments and her unimpeachable integrity stand 
             as an incredible legacy to a magnificent woman.
                Since 1990, it has been a privilege to serve with Patsy 
             in our Hawaii delegation. She returned to Washington in 
             characteristic style, advocating and articulating the 
             ideals that she had espoused in Congress as a member of 
             the historic 89th Congress that passed much of the 
             landmark Great Society legislation. Patsy's lifelong 
             efforts to open educational access to countless Americans 
             and ensure them the best educational opportunities were 
             the achievements that brought her the greatest 
             satisfaction. ``Anything for the children,'' was Patsy's 
             guiding conviction, certain that this crucial area is 
             where we can do the most good for the most people.
               I remember Patsy marching up the Capitol steps, leading 
             other women of the House, to show her support for Anita 
             Hill. I was pleased to work with Patsy, Dan, Neil, and our 
             friend Norm Mineta, now Secretary of Transportation, to 
             establish a congressional caucus to address the needs of 
             Asian-Americans and Pacific Islanders in 1994. Whether it 
             involved protesting nuclear testing in the Pacific, 
             championing the interests of children in welfare reform 
             legislation on the House floor, or helping a widow in Hilo 
             deal with the Social Security Administration, Patsy stood 
             with and spoke for the disenfranchised and the powerless. 
             Her determination ensured the voices of the smallest and 
             most vulnerable were heard in the corridors of power.
                A great spirit has come and gone before us. Patsy's 
             vigor and courage will be sorely missed. There are fewer 
             trails for women and minorities to blaze, thanks to 
             Patsy's determination and spirit. Indeed, her trailblazing 
             efforts did not end with her death, for her legacy 
             benefits the lives of countless individuals, in our 
             lifetime and for generations to come.
                As we bid our dear friend and colleague aloha, I am 
             reminded of a passage from Scriptures, from the book of 
             Matthew 25:23, ``His Master said unto her, Well done, good 
             and faithful servant; you have been good and faithful . . 
             . Now enter into the joy of your Master.'' We are enjoined 
             to carry forth the mission that our dear colleague pursued 
             during her remarkable career. With great sadness, we bid a 
             final farewell and aloha pumehana, our warmest love, to a 
             fearless and remarkable lady, the Most Honorable Patsy 
             Mink.

               Lynn Woolsey. Aloha. Standing here before you, Patsy's 
             family, John, Wendy, Eugene and extended family, Patsy's 
             friends, her staff, her constituents, and her colleagues 
             is truly an honor. But it is an honor that I want to 
             forestall. It's an honor I don't want to have for many 
             many years to come. We are not ready for a world without 
             Patsy Mink.
               We still have work to do to protect the civil liberties 
             and the civil rights we enjoy here in our country--rights 
             that Patsy helped to achieve and always worked to protect. 
             She was always a leader--a leader in providing equal 
             opportunity for girls and women in education, in sports 
             and in employment. Patsy brought women a long way for a 
             true equality, but who will make sure we don't slide back. 
             Who will insist we finish the job that she started. And oh 
             my, families, particularly women and children in need. 
             Those particularly on welfare lost an ally with the 
             passing of Patsy Mink. She knew without a doubt that 
             education is the prevention and the cure for poverty. We 
             cannot and we must not forget what Patsy has taught us 
             about the needs of those less fortunate, about those who 
             have yet to benefit from equal opportunity and equal 
             treatment under our laws and about the importance of 
             education for every single human being on this globe. 
             Patsy showed us that you don't have to be physically large 
             to have a big vision and a big effective voice. In fact, 
             this week after Patsy's passing, one of our newer 
             colleagues came up to me because we have had several hours 
             on the House floor talking about Patsy and what she meant 
             to us and many people remarked at her tininess how her 
             size was small but her will and her vision was so large. 
             He said you know I never even thought of Patsy Mink as 
             being small. And I looked up at him because he was a big 
             guy and I said but I bet you were scared to death of her 
             weren't you? She taught us the importance of passion, the 
             necessity of knowing your issue and your topic inside and 
             out. She proved that some efforts can be accomplished a 
             step at a time, that no effort can be allowed to languish 
             and never should we go backward.
               Patsy Mink knew what was important for our world, for 
             our Nation, for her wonderful Hawaii and for her 
             constituents who she truly loved and we must promise every 
             single one of us here and now to continue her work. We 
             mustn't stop until we have a just and peaceful world. A 
             world that Patsy would be proud of, but I cannot imagine 
             that world without her.

               Marilyn Moniz-Kahoohanohano. Today we are here to 
             celebrate the extraordinary life of a remarkable woman--a 
             woman ahead of her time, of the generation of my parents 
             (my dad was a Maui boy), growing up in the forties during 
             war time, experiencing first-hand discrimination when 
             pursuing her dream to become a physician. Instead Patsy 
             Takemoto went to law school and became an attorney, 
             practiced law, became politically active, became a State 
             legislator, and then Congresswoman and the rest of her 
             life is history in the making.
               Over 30 years ago Congresswoman Mink played an 
             instrumental role in the passage of Title IX of the 
             Education Amendments which simply states ``No person in 
             the United States shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded 
             from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be 
             subjected to discrimination under any education program or 
             activity receiving financial assistance.'' She labored 
             long and hard to get it to pass the House and as recently 
             as the late nineties continued to champion the cause of 
             Title IX fighting of any amendments attempting to weaken 
             its impact in the athletic arena. In order to combat this 
             move Mrs. Mink asked GAO to review and report on Title IX 
             contributions to changes in higher education academically 
             and athletically focusing on men's and women's 
             participation in higher education. She wanted to document 
             the positive impact that Title IX had on women and try to 
             combat those who emphasize the negative impact on men's 
             participation. She was ever vigilant.
                No other law has impacted the lives of girls and women 
             more, as Congresswoman Mink knew how important access to 
             higher education was. Title IX is known as the equal 
             opportunity law and was borne out of her strong sense and 
             passion for fairness, equality and justice. As a result of 
             participating in sports, girls and women have changed 
             their life view, their confidence in their abilities has 
             risen, and their horizons have broadened.
               I am a living example of Mrs. Mink's vision of equality 
             for women and I represent almost 1,000 Rainbow Wahine 
             athletes over the past three decades who received the 
             opportunity to play. I graduated from high school in May 
             1972. Title IX passed in June and in fall 1972 the Rainbow 
             Wahine athletics program was born. In 1975 the team played 
             at Princeton. Patsy honored the team at the State Capitol. 
             Mrs. Mink's destiny was to change the world and her legacy 
             will live on forever. My role models were Dr. Donnis 
             Thompson, the first women's athletic director who 
             implemented Title IX and Mrs. Mink who coauthored Title 
             IX. Both worked together to ensure the athletics program 
             got off to a good start and ever since Mrs. Mink has been 
             our program's guardian angel, taking pride in our growth 
             and accomplishments. She is and will always be an honorary 
             member of our Rainbow Wahine Hui--our support group--in 
             fact she was always interested in our progress gender-
             equity-wise and made it a point to review our Annual 
             Equity in Athletics Disclosure Act Report to make sure we 
             were making progress. It is part of my job to ensure we 
             are complying with Title IX and providing equal 
             opportunity for our athletes.
               She has long been an advocate for girls and women in 
             need, and those who have been treated unfairly at the 
             local and the national level. She is truly an exceptional 
             leader--bold, strong, and tough. In November 1999 she 
             wrote me after the reauthorization of the Women's 
             Educational Equity Act, which she was fighting the fight 
             to retain the gender equity provisions and said ``this 
             victory will ensure that a girl's future is determined not 
             by her gender but by her own aspirations and abilities.''
               Through her life accomplishments, she has empowered, 
             strengthened, inspired, and encouraged us so we can 
             continue to do our good works, to take a stand, to fight, 
             to persevere . . . there is still a lot of work to be done 
             before we achieve equity. Congresswoman Mink's original 
             dreams have come true for countless little girls and how 
             many lives have been improved because she cared . . . 
             because she dared to make a difference for generations to 
             come. In the twinkle of a little soccer player's eye, 
             Patsy's legacy will go on.
                We will miss you terribly, our fearless leader, our 
             advocate, our role model, our champion. Because of you we 
             can play the game. You have left our world a better place 
             and we are comforted to know that you will continue to be 
             our guardian angel . . . we love you Patsy!
               John and Gwen--Our heartfelt thoughts and prayers are 
             with you from the athletic department and the Rainbow 
             Wahine. Aloha.

               George Miller. We are here today to pay tribute to a 
             trailblazing legend in the history of women's rights and 
             the Congress, Patsy Takemoto Mink. I am one of a 
             delegation of her colleagues and frineds in the House of 
             Representatives who flew here from Washington to honor her 
             for her many years of leadership, of service and of 
             example.
               Before just about any of us was elected to the Congress, 
             Patsy Mink was not only a Member, but a star. A fearless, 
             outspoken, intelligent legislator who knew what she wanted 
             to do, and knew how to do it. And like the best of 
             legislators, she never lost her enthusiasm or her faith 
             that she would prevail.
                And she did prevail, more often that most. Her 
             victories were victories not just for Patsy Mink, but for 
             millions of women past, present and future, whose 
             opportunities in school, in sports, in the professions, 
             and in politics are fundamentally greater because Hawaii 
             shared Patsy Mink with the Nation for a quarter century of 
             service.
                And because she retained her drive and her dedication 
             to the end, her sudden passing last weekend stunned the 
             Members of Congress and especially the members of the 
             Committee on Education and the Workforce where she served 
             so long. It is no exaggeration to say that it is difficult 
             for many of us to conceive of either the Congress or the 
             committee without the commitment, energy, and wisdom that 
             Patsy Mink brought to work every day.
                It is difficult to summarize her life and achievements 
             in this sad moment. But earlier in the week, our committee 
             found a bipartisan way to pay tribute. When future 
             generations see a young woman win a gold medal, or a 
             girls' soccer team win the city trophy; when a young woman 
             gets her law degree, or convenes a board meeting, or takes 
             her oath of office--the spirit of Patsy Mink is standing 
             next to her because Patsy not only broke through barriers, 
             but she held the door open for others, too.
                And that is why our committee voted unanimously to name 
             the Title IX Equal Opportunity Program for Women in honor 
             of Patsy Mink, and I am very hopeful the full House and 
             Senate will follow suit before the 107th Congress 
             adjourns.
                No person was more closely associated with enactment of 
             that landmark legislation which has changed the lives of 
             tens of millions of women. When you look at the faces in 
             Congress today and compare it to the day Patsy took her 
             seat in 1964 as the first Asian-American woman ever 
             elected to that body, it is a very different institution. 
             Women and minorities are not only Members, but senior 
             Members with legislative power and leadership skills. And 
             Patsy Mink stood at the fore.
                But people in Congress did not look to Patsy simply 
             because she was a woman or an Asian-American. Whether on 
             the environment, or education or labor issues, Patsy was a 
             moral filter for the Congress, a questioning and 
             unflappable inquisitor of whether an initiative moved 
             justice forward in America and the world, or did not. And 
             woe to the proposal that she judged if it failed to meet 
             that test. Her questioning and determination made people 
             uncomfortable and maybe frustrated; but in the end, she 
             forced us closer to the ideal goals of economic and social 
             justice in this country, and we all owe her an unrepayable 
             debt of gratitude.
                To John, her partner since graduate school, and to 
             Wendy, whose scholarly work on welfare reform and women's 
             history both continued her mother's tradition and expanded 
             on our understanding of these important topics, we thank 
             you for the sacrifices that come with being the family of 
             a Member of Congress.
                To the people of Hawaii, to her colleagues Dan Inouye 
             and Danny Akaka, and Neil Abercrombie who serve your State 
             so well, we thank you for sending us one tough lady whose 
             leadership will not be forgotten, and who assuredly has 
             changed our Nation for the better forever.

               Maxine Waters. Aloha. To John and Wendy and all of 
             Congresswoman Patsy Mink's relatives, friends and family. 
             To all of our elected officials who are here today, the 
             appointed officials, leaders of groups and organizations 
             and especially to my friend Neil Abercrombie who has kept 
             us connected with these last difficult days of Patsy 
             Mink's existence. I have traveled to Patsy's beloved 
             Hawaii to pay my respects to a tremendously accomplished 
             woman of grace and substance. I am here today to add my 
             voice to the voices of her many friends, colleagues, and 
             constituents as we memorialize a pioneer, a leader and one 
             of the finest and most respected public policymakers that 
             ever served in the Congress of the United States of 
             America.
               I am so proud to have had Patsy Mink as one of my 
             friends and colleagues. I first met Patsy Mink in the 
             early 1970s when we had the opportunity to assist in the 
             organizing and founding of the First International Women's 
             Year Conference in Houston, TX, in 1977. This conference 
             brought together the giants of the women's movement who 
             were leading this Nation toward justice and equality for 
             women. Congresswoman Patsy Mink was there. She negotiated 
             with then-President Carter along with Bella Abzug, Gloria 
             Steinem, Barbara McKowsky and others to help create the 
             National Women's Commission to advise and lead the 
             President on women's issues. Well, we encouraged President 
             Carter to appoint Bella Abzug to chair that commission. It 
             was not long after that he invited her to resign. And we 
             got together and decided we would all resign with Bella 
             Abzug. And we did that because we were on a mission and 
             Patsy Mink was playing a leading role in the advocacy of 
             the equal rights amendment. She helped to forge the fight 
             for pay equity and freedom of choice and developed all of 
             the important strategies that were moving women forward in 
             this country. Her work is well documented in so many ways. 
             Her signature is recorded in history on the celebrated 
             Title IX of the Federal Education Act.
               This year, I sat in the great Oracle Center in 
             Washington, DC, and Patsy was honored at the Women's 
             National Basketball Association's All-Star game in 
             recognition of the 30th anniversary of Title IX. Patsy 
             Mink was called to the center of the arena where young 
             women basketball players some standing 67" tall learned 
             for the first time that their dream to play professional 
             basketball was realized because a woman small in physical 
             stature but with a giant vision for women's equality had 
             paved the way for them to have programs, training and 
             development that help them realize their potential. Patsy 
             Mink the trailblazer. The first Asian-American woman 
             lawyer in Hawaii. Patsy Mink--the first minority woman 
             elected to Congress. Patsy Mink--a woman of courage who 
             became a leading voice for civil rights, an uncompromising 
             spokeswoman for poor people and children, education and 
             the environment. Patsy Mink--a woman of impeccable 
             integrity lived a life of commitment to public service. 
             She truly believed that indeed we are all created equal 
             and endowed by our creator with certain inalienable 
             rights. And when Patsy took the floor of Congress to 
             debate the issues of justice and equality, her sincerity 
             and her passion defined her character and her values. Her 
             legacy is embodied in her tremendous work and her 
             accomplishments. She never shied away from the difficult 
             issues. As late as May of this year her remarks are 
             recorded in the Congressional Record because during that 
             debate on the Personal Responsibility, Work and Family 
             Promotion Act of 2002, Patsy Mink took time to remind all 
             of the Members of Congress not to politicize welfare 
             reform. She said, ``welfare should be about children but 
             sadly this debate is not about what is good for children 
             in poverty. Congress and the White House have turned 
             welfare into a hardball game aimed at single moms.'' Now 
             that's the stand-up woman I'll always remember. That's the 
             woman whose integrity and passion has inspired me on so 
             many occasions. That's the woman we all love. That's the 
             woman we shall always remember.

               James Sensenbrenner. John, Wendy--I am here as the 
             representative of Speaker Dennis Hastert, who 
             unfortunately could not make it today. I am here to 
             express his personal condolences and that of the entire 
             U.S. House of Representatives on the loss of your wife, 
             mother and most of all, your best friend.
               From my perspective sitting on the opposite side of the 
             aisle that Patsy sat on, I perhaps can give you a little 
             different insight than my democratic friends who have been 
             extolling Patsy's virtues. And as one who has been on the 
             receiving end of the fiery features that Patsy was so 
             famous for giving, I can tell you that even though I 
             disagreed quite often with the positions that Patsy took 
             there were two things that came through loud and clear 
             whenever she took the microphone in the House of 
             Representatives--sincerity and integrity. When Patsy got 
             up to speak you knew she meant what she said and you knew 
             that she was prepared to give every favorable argument on 
             behalf of her position that there was to give. And that's 
             why she had an impact far beyond those words that were 
             written in the Congressional Record and are sent off to 
             the Library to gather dust with so many other speeches 
             that many of us give.
               And the second trait that Patsy had was she was a woman 
             of unimpeachable integrity. She never tried to game the 
             system either for personal advancement or for the 
             advancement of the point of view that she expressed. But 
             she was also a wife and a mother. And one of the things 
             that many of us who serve in public office frequently 
             forget is that we are human beings, we have obligations to 
             our family and to our friends. Long before I got to 
             Congress 24 years ago, Patsy did something that I think 
             showed her character. There was a big debate going on in 
             the House of Representatives, and I was told about this 
             several years after it happened. And it was on an issue of 
             great importance to her. It involved the rights of women 
             and the place women played in modern American society. And 
             during that debate, it was about the time that roll was 
             being called, she got the word that her daughter had been 
             seriously hurt and she walked out of the Congress to do 
             her responsibility as a family member and as a mother, and 
             she was criticized for it by some of the groups that were 
             the biggest supporters of her particular point of view. 
             Then-Speaker of the House, Carl Albert, called a press 
             conference and said, ``Look, we are human beings. We have 
             family obligations and just because some Governor signs a 
             certificate of election doesn't mean that we have to 
             forget about all the votes.'' So when there is a family 
             crisis, our public officials expressed their family values 
             by doing what any other family member would do and that's 
             exactly what Patsy did even though she cherished the issue 
             that was being debated and voted upon. Since the First 
             Congress met in 1789, over 14,000 men and women have been 
             chosen by the citizens of their communities to represent 
             them in the U.S. House of Representatives. Fifty years 
             after most of us leave Congress, very little of what we 
             have done while in Congress will be remembered by anybody. 
             Patsy Mink is an exception because what we have been 
             hearing today about her accomplishments, the ideas that 
             she helped shepherd into law and most important, help 
             implemented once the bill signing ceremony in the White 
             House Rose Garden was over will shape American society. 
             Patsy, whether you are a Republican or a Democrat, a 
             liberal or a conservative, you've made your mark on this 
             country. God bless you.

               Neil Abercrombie. Aloha everyone. Aloha John and Wendy, 
             Eugene, all the family, staff and dear friends of Patsy 
             throughout Hawaii.
               We are engaged in a great ritual as my dear friend 
             George Miller has indicated or perhaps at a time in the 
             program taking place today when the words begin to blend 
             into one another. The atmosphere becomes perhaps a bit 
             trying upon us, but ritual is the great conserver of 
             value. All creatures pass from this Earth, but our species 
             has the capacity of no other creature on this Earth--the 
             capacity to reflect. We pass judgment on ourselves in our 
             lives. The fact that we know that we are passing from this 
             Earth does not make us morbid. It does not make us 
             despair. On the contrary, it gives meaning to our lives. 
             It gives us the understanding that what we are and who we 
             are accounts for something. It's not a question of 
             accomplishment. It's not a question of achievement. It's a 
             question of respect for ourselves in our knowledge that 
             what we do and who we are and how we act and what we say 
             and what we think has meaning and has consequences for 
             others. We are an island people. We know where the edge of 
             our existence is. We know that these islands were thrust 
             up out of the ocean by great forces of nature and that no 
             one and no thing was on these islands and that everything 
             that we have and everything that we are and all that we 
             mean to one another comes as a result of the humans who 
             came from afar starting with our Polynesian ancestors who 
             came over the ocean to people these islands and all those 
             who have come since including as we speak now as we share 
             our grief with one another today someone is coming to 
             Hawaii today seeking justice, seeking opportunity, seeking 
             freedom hoping to make a better life. And that person as 
             humble as their circumstances might have been upon their 
             origin on this Earth will be the direct beneficiary of the 
             life of Patsy Mink because she embodied all of those 
             things that we cherish among our island people.
               This morning as I went to pick up my dear mother-in-law, 
             Ellen Caraway, Nancy and I stopped up at Manoa Gardens 
             where many of our seniors are spending their retirement 
             years. Joseph Martin came up to the window of the car, 
             reached in and grabbed my hand. He knew I was coming here 
             today and asked me to express on his behalf, not the 
             behalf of those of us who are privileged to sit on this 
             platform and reflect upon her life or be given the 
             privilege to speak, but on behalf of all the people of 
             Hawaii. I hope these cameras have played upon the crowd 
             that's gathered here today and is representative of the 
             Joseph Martins all across these islands. As he said to me 
             holding my hand she was our voice she was our voice and 
             this voice will not be still because everything that she 
             represented and everything that she was will be carried on 
             by those of us who have not only respect for that but the 
             understanding that if we truly loved her, if we truly want 
             to honor her that we will live everyday and bask in the 
             reflective light of the glory that was Patsy Mink.

               June Motokawa. To John, Wendy, Eugene. There is so much 
             sorrow and sadness in me; my deepest condolences to you. 
             My heart is heavy as I stand humbly honored to speak to 
             you about Patsy Takemoto Mink, a woman I loved and looked 
             up to. A woman of such clear vision, passion, courage and 
             commitment for the quality of life for all of Hawaii's 
             people. You know the story of her work for justice for 
             all. I'd like to share with you her work for education for 
             schools, public schools where 90 percent of America's 
             children are educated. Patsy's focus in the U.S. Congress 
             was working in the Education and Workforce Committee. She 
             sat on the committee from 1965 to 1977 and then from 1990 
             to this past Saturday for 24 years. She was the ranking 
             member of the many subcommittees from Early Childhood to 
             Post Secondary Education. Patsy believed that education, 
             public education, is a major vehicle for shaping our 
             society--a place to educate all children and a place to 
             enable them to become responsible contributing 
             participants in our democracy. Her energies and 
             contributions from the 1965 Elementary and Secondary Act, 
             a primary vehicle for funding to support public education, 
             her 1972 landmark Title IX legislation, and I heard that 
             they will be renaming Title IX. I'm so pleased to hear 
             that. We have heard of those two issues over and over. 
             We're so proud, but let me tell you about some other 
             issues that we educators are very concerned about and that 
             she championed. She stood up for us. She championed the 
             battle against school vouchers, the use of public dollars 
             for private schools. She championed the battle for 
             targeted funds for the poor and disadvantaged students 
             instead of block grants to States where funds could go to 
             other uses. She championed and battled for Americans to 
             gain access to college education by improving student aid. 
             She championed to keep provisions for unbiased teaching 
             materials, programs and projects such as drop out 
             prevention programs designed to help pregnant teens and 
             parenting teens to stay in school. She championed shifting 
             the focus on reducing welfare to reducing poverty. As you 
             know a very large percentage of our children are in 
             poverty. And last, out of the long long list, I really 
             wanted to say this. She was a champion and helped 
             tremendously to defeat at least the movement called 
             English only. All schools, preschools to graduate schools 
             have lost a champion. It's truly a sad time for us. We 
             will miss Patsy's voice for us. Aloha.

               Norman Mineta. Each of us faces tests in life. We are 
             tested by adversity, both from the circumstances of our 
             lives and sometimes from the attitudes of others.
               Patsy encountered adversity in ways that many Americans 
             today have forgotten.
               She was born into a Nation that thought an American of 
             Japanese ancestry was a contradiction in terms. She was 
             born into a Nation that, far too often, barred women not 
             only from achieving their dreams, but even from the right 
             to try.
               She witnessed the internment of Japanese-Americans on 
             the mainland during the Second World War, and she saw the 
             discrimination and distrust to which our community was 
             subjected here in Hawaii.
               She was denied entry to medical school because of her 
             gender. And she was discouraged early in her career as a 
             lawyer and as an elected official, both because of her 
             gender and as an Asian Pacific American.
               If many Americans today do not remember the kind of 
             discrimination that Patsy faced in her life, it is because 
             she dedicated her life to removing it.
               If many Americans today do not remember the barriers 
             that she encountered, it is because she dedicated her life 
             to removing them.
               The world had a set way of doing things when Patsy came 
             into the world.
               And Patsy didn't like it.
               Guess who won?
               She had a talent for making people rethink the 
             boundaries of possibility--something she did in a very 
             direct way--by simply exceeding them herself.
               She was the first Japanese-American woman admitted to 
             the bar in Hawai'i. She was the first Japanese-American 
             woman elected to the Territorial (State) legislature. In 
             1964, she became the first woman of color elected to 
             national office in the history of this Nation when she was 
             elected to the U.S. House of Representatives.
               And she became the first woman to run for President on a 
             major party ticket.
               Of all the battles she fought and won, there is one that 
             will always stand out--one that she rightly considered her 
             proudest legislative achievement: and that was Title IX of 
             the Education Act.
               Her contribution to that act--its ban on gender 
             discrimination in education--was nothing less than an 
             emancipation proclamation for the women of America--
             because it gave them the right to pursue their dreams.
               We may never know exactly how many Americans were 
             inspired by her achievements, or how many were prompted to 
             reconsider the limits of what they thought they could 
             achieve.
               But there is one standing here at his podium today.
               Patsy had already served in the U.S. House of 
             Representatives for a decade when I arrived on Capitol 
             Hill in 1974. She was already a role model. I was 
             privileged to call her a mentor, and was honored to call 
             her a friend.
               Throughout her public life, she used her voice to call 
             for the best from the people of Hawai'i and the people of 
             the United States. And she never gave us any less than her 
             best.
               John and Wendy, there are no words to express the depth 
             of our sorrow at Patsy's passing.
               Patsy's loss is one that can never be replaced.
               But her legacy will be that she left the United States a 
             better and more noble Nation than she found it.
               Each of us, as Americans, will forever be in her debt.

               Richard Port. We have heard today from many 
             distinguished elected officials. What have Hawaii's 
             ordinary citizens had to say about Congresswoman Patsy 
             Mink. Here's just a sample.
               A citizen from Kalaheo, Kauai, wrote:

               The State of Hawaii and our country mourn the passing of 
             our beloved Congresswoman Patsy T. Mink. Her unquestioned 
             resolve, integrity, honesty and ethics are examples for 
             all who serve and wish to serve in public office. There 
             was no one better than Patsy.

               A citizen from Wailuku, Maui, wrote:

               Patsy was concerned about the needs of people who had 
             disabilities. We will miss her at this year's annual Maui 
             Disability Alliance Legislative Forum. She was truly an 
             inspirational and remarkable woman.

               Still another citizen from Maui wrote:

               My admiration for Patsy Mink started in the late 1960s 
             when I became aware of her political contribution, one of 
             which was her sponsorship of education bills that 
             significantly help kids get money for college. I was one 
             of them.

               A citizen from Oahu wrote:

               Thank you, Patsy Mink, for the many years of passionate, 
             dedicated service you have given the citizens of Hawaii 
             and in particular the women of Hawaii. You were brave 
             enough to follow your instincts as the humanitarian that 
             you are. Thank you for being you.

               Another citizen from Oahu wrote:

               Patsy made a mark not only on our society and our 
             history, but in our hearts.

               And this from a former staff member in Long Beach, CA:

               How many heroes do we get in a lifetime. Saturday I lost 
             one of mine, but I know she will always be with us so long 
             as I and the many others whose lives have been influenced 
             by her are able to live up to the standards she set as an 
             individual, as a member of the community, and as a public 
             servant.

               And one of our two daily newspapers, the Honolulu 
             Advertiser, wrote:

               Hawaii has lost a true champion of the people. In a day 
             when politics appears driven by polls and focus groups 
             Patsy Mink stood out as a politician who was true first 
             and foremost to herself and the people she served. Hawaii 
             will miss her greatly.

               And finally, the Honolulu Star Bulletin wrote:

               Patsy Takemoto Mink forged an outstanding career in 
             politics with her tenacious battles for civil rights, 
             education, and environmental protection by breaking 
             through the walls of an arena that women and minorities 
             had not penetrated before. Hawaii has lost a dedicated 
             public servant whose string of firsts marked the opening 
             of the halls of power to those who had previously been 
             denied entry.

               At this time, I call forward Reverend Efurd for a 
             message of comfort.
               [Reverend Efurd gave the message of comfort.]

               Calvin Tamura. Aloha. I have been asked to deliver the 
             thank you's from the family. So let me begin by first 
             telling you a little bit about that family.
               It began on Maui. A couple--farmers. They lived in a 
             dirt floor house and they had 11 children, and within 2 
             generations that family couldn't have imagined that they 
             would have doctors, engineers, accountants, school 
             teachers, computer programmers, museum curators, rock 
             musicians, hotel workers and of course, yes, one U.S. 
             Congresswoman.
               So let me begin with the thank you's. To the worthy 
             opponent whether it be Republican or Democrat, Libertarian 
             or Green, thank you. For if you fought for what you truly 
             believed in then you raised the level of discussion and 
             understanding and my cousin would like that.
               To her supporters on all of our islands. You have been 
             called upon to silk screen, stuff envelopes, lick stamps, 
             knock on doors, wave signs and in fact even make sushi. 
             Thank you for no matter what you were asked to do you were 
             there because you believed in the message and yes you 
             believed in the messenger.
               To those who have traveled far to get here today, 
             whether it be from Waipahu or Waianae, Maui, the Big 
             Island, California or Washington, DC, we appreciate your 
             effort that you have come to honor this woman. Your words 
             of support will echo with us forever.
               To the office and campaign staff past and present from 
             each of our islands and from Washington, DC. To Laura, 
             Joan and Helen. I know it was never easy, but you 
             accomplished miracles and Patsy was always grateful for 
             your tireless grasp of the minutia. Thank you for always 
             being brilliant.
               To John and Wendy and Eugene. Thank you for sharing 
             Patsy with us. She will always be remembered as a 
             firebrand, a lightning rod, a rebel. But we know that she 
             was really a very shy, private person in a very public 
             place. And away from the public arena she was soft spoken, 
             funny and really loved to laugh.
               And finally, to the voters of Hawaii. As a politician, 
             Patsy always asked at each campaign for you to leave the 
             comfort of your home to express your opinion by casting 
             your vote. Sometimes she lost, or Patsy would have been 
             Mayor, Governor, or the President of these United States. 
             She won often enough however to serve over 50 years.
               Thank you for your vote of confidence. And if I may be 
             allowed to paraphrase my cousin, get out there and vote. 
             We must fight, fight, fight, for what we believe in so we 
             can all win.
               And so a story has been told in the great Pacific Ocean. 
             A stone has fallen into the deep blue water. And even as 
             it comes to rest, the ripples from the journey will shape 
             our future forever.