[House Document 108-118]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]



                                     

108th Congress, 1st Session - - - - - - - - - - - - House Document 108-118

 
                 CONTINUATION OF THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY
                          WITH RESPECT TO IRAQ

                               __________

                             COMMUNICATION

                                  from

                   THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES

                              TRANSMITTING

NOTIFICATION THAT THE NATIONAL EMERGENCY DECLARED WITH RESPECT TO IRAQ 
 IS TO CONTINUE IN EFFECT BEYOND AUGUST 2, 2003, PURSUANT TO 50 U.S.C. 
                                1622(d).




    September 3, 2003.--Referred to the Committee on International 
                  Relations and ordered to be printed
                                           The White House,
                                         Washington, July 31, 2003.
Hon. J. Dennis Hastert,
Speaker of the House of Representatives,
Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Speaker: Section 202(d) of the National 
Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)) provides for the automatic 
termination of a national emergency unless, prior to the 
anniversary date of its declaration, the President publishes in 
the Federal Register and transmits to the Congress a notice 
stating that the emergency is to continue in effect beyond the 
anniversary date. Consistent with this provision, I have sent 
the enclosed notice, stating that the Iraq emergency is to 
continue in effect beyond August 2, 2003, to the Federal 
Register for publication. The most recent notice continuing 
this emergency was published in the Federal Register on August 
1, 2002, (67 Fed. Reg. 50341).
    The crisis that led to the declaration of a national 
emergency on August 2, 1990, has not been fully resolved. The 
United States, along with its coalition partners, continues to 
work to stabilize Iraq, identify and dismantle Iraq's weapons 
of mass destruction, capture former regime leaders, and locate 
and return Iraqi assets overseas for the benefit of the Iraqi 
people. As part of the Coalition Provisional Authority, the 
United States is providing for the temporary governance of 
Iraq, including the establishment of a process to lead to a new 
internationally recognized government. For these reasons, I 
have determined that it is necessary to continue the national 
emergency declared with respect to Iraq.
            Sincerely,
                                                    George W. Bush.
                                 Notice

                              ----------                              


      Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Iraq

    On August 2, 1990, by Executive Order 12722, President Bush 
declared a national emergency with respect to Iraq pursuant to 
the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 U.S.C. 
1701-1706) to deal with the unusual and extraordinary threat to 
the national security and foreign policy of the United States 
constituted by the actions and policies of the Government of 
Iraq--the Saddam Hussein regime. By Executive Orders 12722 of 
August 2, 1990, and 12724 of August 9, 1990, the President 
imposed trade sanctions on Iraq and blocked Iraqi government 
assets. Additional measures were taken with respect to this 
national emergency by Executive Order 13290 of March 20, 2003. 
Because of the continued instability in Iraq, the United States 
and Coalition partners' role as the temporary authority in 
Iraq, and the need to ensure the establishment of a process 
leading to representative Iraqi self-rule, the national 
emergency declared on August 2, 1990, and the measures adopted 
on August 2 and August 9, 1990, and March 20, 2003, to deal 
with that emergency must continue in effect beyond August 2, 
2003. Therefore, in accordance with section 202(d) of the 
National Emergencies Act (50 U.S.C. 1622(d)), I am continuing 
for 1 year the national emergency with respect to Iraq.
    This notice shall be published in the Federal Register and 
transmitted to the Congress.
                                                    George W. Bush.
    The White House, July 31, 2003.