[House Document 107-285]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]






       107th Congress, 2d Session       House Document No. 107-285

    Commemorative Joint Meeting of the Congress of the United States
 
      In Remembrance of the Victims and Heroes of September 11, 2001


                       Federal Hall, New York, NY

                        Friday, September 6, 2002


                   Compiled Under the Direction of the

                      Joint Committee on Printing,

                         Chairman Robert W. Ney


                UNITED STATES GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE
                            WASHINGTON : 2003


                     House Concurrent Resolution 448


          Whereas on September 11, 2001, thousands of 
          innocent people were killed and injured in 
          combined terrorist attacks involving four hijacked 
          airliners, the World Trade Center, and the 
          Pentagon;
          Whereas in the aftermath of the attacks, thousands 
          more were left grieving for beloved family and 
          friends, livelihoods were compromised, and 
          businesses and property were damaged and lost;
          Whereas the greatest loss of life, personal 
          injury, and physical destruction occurred in and 
          was sustained by the City of New York;
          Whereas government and the American people 
          responded decisively, through the bravery, 
          sacrifice and toil of the fire and rescue workers, 
          law enforcement, building trades, caregivers, 
          Armed Forces, and millions more who through their 
          many expressions of care and compassion brought 
          forth comfort, hope, and the promise of recovery;
          Whereas the City of New York attended to the 
          aftermath of the destruction of the World Trade 
          Center with profound respect for the victims and 
          compassion to the survivors;
          Whereas the City of New York has invited the 
          Congress to meet at the site of the original 
          Federal Hall, where the First Congress of the 
          United States convened on March 4, 1789; Now, 
          therefore be it
          Resolved by the House of Representatives (the 
          Senate concurring), That, in remembrance of the 
          victims and the heroes of September 11, 2001, and 
          in recognition of the courage and spirit of the 
          City of New York, the Congress shall conduct a 
          special meeting in Federal Hall in New York, New 
          York, on September 6, 2002.


                     House Concurrent Resolution 487


          Resolved by the House of Representatives (the 
          Senate concurring),
          SECTION 1. AUTHORIZING PRINTING OF VOLUME OF 
          TRANSCRIPTS OF NEW YORK CITY MEETING AND 
          STATEMENTS OF TERRORIST ATTACKS OF SEPTEMBER 11.
          (a) In General.--A volume consisting of the 
          transcripts of the ceremonial meeting of the House 
          of Representatives and Senate in New York City on 
          September 6, 2002, and a collection of statements 
          by Members of the House of Representatives and 
          Senators on the terrorist attacks of September 11, 
          2001, shall be printed as a House document under 
          the direction of the Joint Committee on Printing, 
          with suitable binding.
          (b) Statements To Be Included in Volume.--A 
          statement by a Member of the House of 
          Representatives or a Senator on the terrorist 
          attacks of September 11, 2001, shall be included 
          in the volume printed under subsection (a) if the 
          statement--
          (1) was printed in the Congressional Record prior 
          to the most recent date on which the House of 
          Representatives adjourned prior to the date of the 
          regularly scheduled general election in November 
          2002; and
          (2) is approved for inclusion in the volume by the 
          Committee on House Administration of the House of 
          Representatives (in the case of a statement by a 
          Member of the House), or the Committee on Rules 
          and Administration of the Senate (in the case of a 
          statement by a Senator).
          SEC. 2. NUMBER OF COPIES.
          The number of copies of the document printed under 
          section 1 shall be 15,000 casebound copies, of 
          which--
          (1) 15 shall be provided to each Member of the 
          House of Representatives;
          (2) 25 shall be provided to each Senator; and
          (3) the balance shall be distributed by the Joint 
          Committee on Printing to Members of the House of 
          Representatives and Senators, based on requests 
          submitted to the Joint Committee by Members and 
          Senators.
          SEC. 3. MEMBER DEFINED.
          In this concurrent resolution, the term ``Member 
          of the House of Representatives'' includes a 
          Delegate or Resident Commissioner to the Congress.
                                                                          
                                   Photograph by Mark Abraham.

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] T3000.012

                                                                     
   Photograph by U.S. House of Representatives, Office of Photography.

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] T3000.002

                                                                     
  Photograph by U.S. House of Representatives, House Recording Studio, 
                              Todd Redlin.

[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] T3000.004

                                Contents

                                                                    Page
      Proceedings in Federal Hall.............................
                                                                       3
        Bloomberg, Michael R., Mayor of New York City .
                                                  23, 28, 30, 32, 33, 34
        Cheney, Richard B., Vice President of the United 
        States................................................
                                                                    5, 6
        Clinton, Hillary Rodham, a Senator from the State of 
        New York..............................................
                                                                      13
        Collins, Billy, Poet Laureate of the United States....
                                                                      14
        Collins, Susan M., a Senator from the State of Maine..
                                                                      14
        Daschle, Tom, Senate Majority Leader and a Senator 
        from the State of South Dakota........................
                                                                  18, 33
        Engel, Eliot L., a Representative from the State of 
        New York..............................................
                                                                      19
        Fossella, Vito, a Representative from the State of New 
        York..................................................
                                                                      14
        Gephardt, Richard A., House Minority Leader and a 
        Representative from the State of Missouri.............
                                                                  16, 33
        Gilman, Benjamin A., a Representative from the State 
        of New York...........................................
                                                                      13
        Hastert, J. Dennis, Speaker of the House and a 
        Representative from the State of Illinois.............
                                                                      33
        Lott, Trent, Senate Minority Leader and a Senator from 
        the State of Mississippi..............................
                                                                  17, 33
        Magazine, Susan, Assistant Commissioner, New York City 
        Fire Department.......................................
                                                                      30
        Pataki, George E., Governor of New York...............
                                                                      26
        Rangel, Charles B., a Representative from the State of 
        New York..............................................
                                                                  13, 28
        Schumer, Charles, a Senator from the State of New York
                                                                      13

Proceedings in the House of Representatives:

        Acevedo-Vila, Anibal, of Puerto Rico..................
                                                                      53
        Armey, Richard K., of Texas...........................
                                                                  48, 54
        Baca, Joe, of California..............................
                                                                     104
        Baird, Brian, of Washington...........................
                                                                     158
        Baldacci, John Elias, of Maine........................
                                                                     183
        Baldwin, Tammy, of Wisconsin..........................
                                                                      37
        Barcia, James A., of Michigan.........................
                                                                     214
        Becerra, Xavier, of California........................
                                                                     118
        Bentsen, Ken, of Texas................................
                                                                133, 202
        Bereuter, Doug, of Nebraska...........................
                                                                  69, 83
        Bilirakis, Michael, of Florida........................
                                                                      68
        Blumenauer, Earl, of Oregon...........................
                                                                      76
        Boehlert, Sherwood L., of New York....................
                                                                     193
        Borski, Robert A., of Pennsylvania....................
                                                                      36
        Brown, Henry E., Jr., of South Carolina...............
                                                                     181
        Burton, Dan, of Indiana...............................
                                                                     166
        Calvert, Ken, of California...........................
                                                                     185
        Camp, Dave, of Michigan...............................
                                                                     157
        Capps, Lois, of California............................
                                                                      72
        Capuano, Michael E., of Massachusetts.................
                                                                     104
        Cardin, Benjamin L., of Maryland......................
                                                                      80
        Castle, Michael N., of Delaware.......................
                                                                      64
        Chambliss, Saxby, of Georgia..........................
                                                                      65
        Clyburn, James E., of South Carolina..................
                                                                     203
        Collins, Mac, of Georgia..............................
                                                                     201
        Costello, Jerry F., of Illinois 
        ............................................
                                                            97, 179, 197
        Cox, Christopher, of California.......................
                                                                      70
        Cramer, Robert E. (Bud), Jr., of Alabama..............
                                                                     193
        Crane, Philip M., of Illinois.........................
                                                                 35, 156
        Cummings, Elijah E., of Maryland......................
                                                                  41, 85
        Cunningham, Randy ``Duke,'' of California.............
                                                                 38, 120
        Davis, Danny K., of Illinois..........................
                                                                  45, 79
        Davis, Jim, of Florida 
        .......................................................
        ....
                                                                109, 201
        Davis, Jo Ann, of Virginia 
        ................................................
                                                             44, 46, 122
        Davis, Tom, of Virginia...............................
                                                                      86
        DeLauro, Rosa L., of Connecticut......................
                                                                     110
        DeLay, Tom, of Texas..................................
                                                                      99
        Diaz-Balart, Lincoln, of Florida......................
                                                                      96
        Dreier, David, of California..........................
                                                                      77
        Ehrlich, Robert L., Jr., of Maryland..................
                                                                     209
        Emerson, Jo Ann, of Missouri..........................
                                                                     162
        Engel, Eliot L., of New York 
        ..........................................
                                                           140, 142, 198
        Eshoo, Anna G., of California.........................
                                                                     147
        Etheridge, Bob, of North Carolina.....................
                                                                 35, 215
        Evans, Lane, of Illinois..............................
                                                                     111
        Faleomavaega, Eni F.H., of American Samoa.............
                                                                     113
        Fletcher, Ernie, of Kentucky..........................
                                                                     168
        Foley, Mark, of Florida...............................
                                                                     158
        Fossella, Vito, of New York...........................
                                                                 49, 160
        Frelinghuysen, Rodney P., of New Jersey...............
                                                                      52
        Gekas, George W., of Pennsylvania.....................
                                                                     192
        Gephardt, Richard A., of Missouri.....................
                                                                      55
        Gibbons, Jim, of Nevada...............................
                                                                      79
        Gilman, Benjamin A., of New York 
        .........................
                                                       61, 176, 198, 207
        Goodlatte, Bob, of Virginia...........................
                                                                     195
        Goss, Porter J., of Florida...........................
                                                                      58
        Graves, Sam, of Missouri..............................
                                                                117, 185
        Grucci, Felix J., Jr., of New York....................
                                                                     192
        Gutknecht, Gil, of Minnesota..........................
                                                                     215
        Hall, Ralph M., of Texas..............................
                                                                     178
        Hansen, James V., of Utah.............................
                                                                     172
        Harman, Jane, of California...........................
                                                                     118
        Hart, Melissa A., of Pennsylvania.....................
                                                                     116
        Hefley, Joel, of Colorado.............................
                                                                     195
        Hinojosa, Ruben, of Texas.............................
                                                                     105
        Hoeffel, Joseph M., of Pennsylvania...................
                                                                 47, 160
        Holt, Rush D., of New Jersey 
        ..........................................
                                                           150, 151, 152
        Honda, Michael M., of California......................
                                                                      88
        Hoyer, Steny H., of Maryland..........................
                                                                      61
        Hyde, Henry J., of Illinois...........................
                                                                      57
        Inslee, Jay, of Washington............................
                                                                      78
        Israel, Steve, of New York 
        ....................................................
                                                                176, 200
        Issa, Darrell E., of California.......................
                                                                     108
        Jackson-Lee, Sheila, of Texas.........................
                                                                  50, 64
        Johnson, Timothy V., of Illinois......................
                                                                     168
        Kind, Ron, of Wisconsin...............................
                                                                      66
        King, Peter T., of New York 
        ............................................
                                                             36, 45, 206
        Kingston, Jack, of Georgia............................
                                                                     107
        Kleczka, Gerald D., of Wisconsin......................
                                                                     116
        Lampson, Nick, of Texas...............................
                                                                      53
        Langevin, James R., of Rhode Island...................
                                                                      64
        Lantos, Tom, of California............................
                                                                  58, 82
        Larson, John B., of Connecticut.......................
                                                                     120
        Lee, Barbara, of California...........................
                                                                111, 159
        Linder, John, of Georgia..............................
                                                                      74
        Lipinski, William O., of Illinois.....................
                                                                     154
        Lowey, Nita M., of New York...........................
                                                                     187
        Lucas, Ken, of Kentucky...............................
                                                                     105
        Luther, Bill, of Minnesota............................
                                                                     112
        Lynch, Stephen F., of Massachusetts...................
                                                                     154
        Maloney, Carolyn B., of New York......................
                                                                 97, 167
        Maloney, James H., of Connecticut.....................
                                                                 96, 187
        Markey, Edward J., of Massachusetts...................
                                                                     107
        Matheson, Jim, of Utah................................
                                                                 98, 171
        McCarthy, Carolyn, of New York........................
                                                                101, 171
        McCarthy, Karen, of Missouri..........................
                                                                      90
        McCollum, Betty, of Minnesota.........................
                                                                     156
        McGovern, James P., of Massachusetts..................
                                                                      70
        McNulty, Michael R., of New York......................
                                                                 53, 188
        Meeks, Gregory W., of New York........................
                                                                      80
        Menendez, Robert, of New Jersey 
        ...................................
                                                           164, 165, 207
        Mica, John L., of Florida.............................
                                                                     169
        Millender-McDonald, Juanita, of California............
                                                                  39, 83
        Miller, Dan, of Florida...............................
                                                                      84
        Miller, Jeff, of Florida..............................
                                                                      96
        Moore, Dennis, of Kansas..............................
                                                                     210
        Moran, James P., of Virginia 
        ...........................................
                                                           100, 113, 167
        Morella, Constance A., of Maryland....................
                                                                      39
        Myrick, Sue Wilkins, of New York......................
                                                                     204
        Nadler, Jerrold, of New York..........................
                                                                      37
        Nethercutt, George R., Jr., of Washington.............
                                                                     120
        Ney, Robert W., of Ohio...............................
                                                                     112
        Norton, Eleanor Holmes, of District of Columbia.......
                                                                 60, 175
        Ortiz, Solomon P., of Texas...........................
                                                                     119
        Owens, Major R., of New York..........................
                                                                     177
        Pallone, Frank, Jr., of New Jersey 
        ...................................
                                                           136, 139, 142
        Pascrell, Bill, Jr., of New Jersey....................
                                                                     106
        Pelosi, Nancy, of California..........................
                                                                 48, 141
        Pence, Mike, of Indiana 
        ...................................................
                                                            49, 117, 165
        Peterson, John E., of Pennsylvania....................
                                                                     182
        Petri, Thomas E., of Wisconsin........................
                                                                      40
        Phelps, David D., of Illinois.........................
                                                                     116
        Pitts, Joseph R., of Pennsylvania.....................
                                                                     194
        Platts, Todd Russell, of Pennsylvania.................
                                                                      67
        Portman, Rob, of Ohio.................................
                                                                     211
        Pryce, Deborah, of Ohio 
        ..................................................
                                                           153, 183, 212
        Putnam, Adam H., of Florida...........................
                                                                      72
        Radanovich, George, of California.....................
                                                                     209
        Rahall, Nick J., II, of West Virginia 
        .................................
                                                            41, 174, 181
        Rehberg, Dennis R., of Montana........................
                                                                     185
        Roemer, Tim, of Indiana...............................
                                                                     100
        Rogers, Mike, of Michigan.............................
                                                                     144
        Rohrabacher, Dana, of California......................
                                                                     123
        Ross, Mike, of Arkansas...............................
                                                                      69
        Rothman, Steven R., of New Jersey.....................
                                                                     180
        Roukema, Marge, of New Jersey.........................
                                                                161, 212
        Sanders, Bernard, of Vermont..........................
                                                                 73, 188
        Schaffer, Bob, of Colorado............................
                                                                     133
        Schakowsky, Janice D., of Illinois....................
                                                                      87
        Schiff, Adam B., of California........................
                                                                      75
        Sensenbrenner, F. James, Jr., of Wisconsin............
                                                                     186
        Shuster, Bud, of Pennsylvania.........................
                                                                     109
        Simmons, Rob, of Connecticut 
        ..........................................
                                                            42, 121, 163
        Slaughter, Louise McIntosh, of New York...............
                                                                     115
        Smith, Christopher H., of New Jersey 
        ..................................
                                                                196, 208
        Smith, Nick, of Michigan 
        .................................................
                                                             49, 98, 190
        Solis, Hilda L., of California........................
                                                                     114
        Stearns, Cliff, of Florida............................
                                                                102, 184
        Stenholm, Charles W., of Texas........................
                                                                      67
        Strickland, Ted, of Ohio..............................
                                                                      91
        Stupak, Bart, of Michigan.............................
                                                                     156
        Tierney, John F., of Massachusetts....................
                                                                     182
        Towns, Edolphus, of New York..........................
                                                                     155
        Turner, Jim, of Texas.................................
                                                                135, 173
        Udall, Tom, of New Mexico.............................
                                                                      89
        Underwood, Robert A., of Guam.........................
                                                                 87, 169
        Vitter, David, of Louisiana...........................
                                                                     189
        Walden, Greg, of Oregon...............................
                                                                     109
        Wamp, Zach, of Tennessee..............................
                                                                 63, 179
        Waters, Maxine, of California.........................
                                                                     138
        Weldon, Curt, of Pennsylvania.........................
                                                                     190
        Weldon, Dave, of Florida..............................
                                                                      91
        Weller, Jerry, of Illinois............................
                                                                     199
        Wexler, Robert, of Florida............................
                                                                      81
        Wilson, Heather, of New Mexico........................
                                                                     102
        Wolf, Frank R., of Virginia...........................
                                                                      50
        Woolsey, Lynn C., of California.......................
                                                                      47
        Wu, David, of Oregon..................................
                                                                     102

Proceedings in the Senate:

        Allen, George, of Virginia............................
                                                                     232
        Bennett, Robert F., of Utah...........................
                                                                     257
        Bingaman, Jeff, of New Mexico.........................
                                                                     275
        Boxer, Barbara, of California 
        ............................
                                                 223, 296, 300, 301, 302
        Brownback, Sam, of Kansas.............................
                                                                     261
        Bunning, Jim, of Kentucky.............................
                                                                     271
        Clinton, Hillary Rodham, of New York 
        .........................
                                                           219, 290, 303
        Conrad, Kent, of North Dakota.........................
                                                                     277
        Craig, Larry E., of Idaho.............................
                                                                265, 287
        Daschle, Thomas A., of South Dakota...................
                                                                239, 283
        Dodd, Christopher J., of Connecticut..................
                                                                     222
        Domenici, Pete V., of New Mexico......................
                                                                     274
        Dorgan, Byron L., of North Dakota.....................
                                                                     251
        Durbin, Richard J., of Illinois.......................
                                                                     262
        Ensign, John, of Nevada...............................
                                                                     292
        Enzi, Michael B., of Wyoming..........................
                                                                     283
        Feingold, Russell D., of Wisconsin....................
                                                                     235
        Feinstein, Dianne, of California......................
                                                                217, 242
        Frist, Bill, of Tennessee.............................
                                                                     266
        Gramm, Phil, of Texas.................................
                                                                     244
        Grassley, Charles E., of Iowa.........................
                                                                     280
        Hatch, Orrin G., of Utah..............................
                                                                     273
        Hollings, Ernest F., of South Carolina................
                                                                     274
        Hutchison, Kay Bailey, of Texas.......................
                                                                     243
        Inhofe, James M., of Oklahoma.........................
                                                                     270
        Jeffords, James M., of Vermont........................
                                                                     281
        Johnson, Tim, of South Dakota.........................
                                                                     256
        Kennedy, Edward M., of Massachusetts 
        ................................
                                                                291, 293
        Kohl, Herb, of Wisconsin..............................
                                                                     278
        Landrieu, Mary L., of Louisiana 
        ............................................
                                                                272, 289
        Leahy, Patrick J., of Vermont.........................
                                                                     241
        Levin, Carl, of Michigan..............................
                                                                     245
        Lieberman, Joseph I., of Connecticut 
        ..............................
                                                           259, 291, 298
        Lott, Trent, of Mississippi...........................
                                                                     237
        Lugar, Richard C., of Indiana.........................
                                                                     270
        McCain, John, of Arizona..............................
                                                                     297
        McConnell, Mitch, of Kentucky.........................
                                                                     264
        Nelson, E. Benjamin, of Nebraska......................
                                                                     278
        Nickles, Don, of Oklahoma 
        ..................................................
                                                                268, 285
        Reid, Harry, of Nevada 
        .......................................................
        .
                                                                228, 230
        Santorum, Rick, of Pennsylvania.......................
                                                                     295
        Sarbanes, Paul S., of Maryland........................
                                                                     268
        Sessions, Jeff, of Alabama............................
                                                                     299
        Shelby, Richard C., of Alabama........................
                                                                     253
        Snowe, Olympia J., of Maine...........................
                                                                     250
        Specter, Arlen, of Pennsylvania 
        ............................................
                                                                220, 253
        Stevens, Ted, of Alaska 
        .......................................................
        ..
                                                                236, 241
        Thomas, Craig, of Wyoming.............................
                                                                     237
        Thurmond, Strom, of South Carolina....................
                                                                     276
        Torricelli, Robert G., of New Jersey 
        .....................................
                                                                278, 289
        Warner, John W., of Virginia..........................
                                                                     241
        Wellstone, Paul D., of Minnesota......................
                                                                     220
      List of Victims and Heroes of 9/11......................
                                                                     305
                                     

    Commemorative Joint Meeting of the Congress of the United States

                    In Remembrance of the Victims and

                      Heroes of September 11, 2001
  Commemorative Joint Meeting of the Congress of the United States in 
                       Federal Hall, New York, NY


                        Friday, September 6, 2002

    The SPEAKER. The special ceremonial meeting will be in order.
    The invocation will be given by the Reverend Daniel P. Coughlin, 
Chaplain of the House of Representatives.
    The Chaplain of the House of Representatives, the Reverend Daniel P. 
Coughlin, offered the following invocation:
    Lord God, this is a day of history. Bless this exceptional joint 
meeting of the 107th Congress which commemorates the tragic events that 
occurred here last September 11. The gaping hole left in this city tore 
into the fabric of this Nation, but there was no greater suffering than 
in New York.
    Once again, we commend to Your loving mercy, the victims, survivors, 
and their families. We also honor those public servants and ordinary 
citizens who joined professionals in healing wounds and rebuilding lives 
in this proud city of life and diversity.
    Gathered in this historic place, You alone can renew us as You have 
in the past. May the vision of the Founding Fathers come alive again in 
this body politic to preserve the balance of power and assure the 
freedom of the law-abiding people of this Nation.
    The Bible here, used by George Washington when sworn in as 
President, speaks to Your consoling word: ``I am with you.''
    Lord God, today is Rosh Hashanah. The traditional Jewish New Year 
prayer is for a good and sweet year. Many things You send us, Lord, are 
good, but they may hurt or are hurried. So with our Jewish brothers and 
sisters we pray today not only for a year of good things, but a year of 
sweetness, a chance to relish the blessings of the world and the 
freedoms You give us, and to enjoy the sweet kindness and love of one 
another.
    May this be a good year for all Americans of all faiths, 
backgrounds, and traditions. We pray for a good year for America and for 
the world.
    Amen.
                          Pledge of Allegiance
    The SPEAKER. The Chair recognizes the Honorable Jerrold Nadler, 
Representative from New York, and the Honorable Harry Reid, Senator from 
Nevada, to lead us in the Pledge of Allegiance to our flag.
    Mr. Nadler and Senator Reid led the Pledge of Allegiance as follows:

            I pledge allegiance to the Flag of the United 
          States of America, and to the Republic for which 
          it stands, one Nation under God, indivisible, with 
          liberty and justice for all.

    The SPEAKER. Our national anthem will now be sung by LaChanze.
    The national anthem was sung by LaChanze.
    The SPEAKER. My colleagues, we are here in Federal Hall in New York, 
NY, pursuant to H. Con. Res. 448 of the 107th Congress to conduct a 
special ceremonial meeting in remembrance of the victims and the heroes 
of September 11, 2001, and in recognition of the courage and the spirit 
of the City of New York.
    When representatives of the New York delegation introduced in the 
House and the Senate in 2001 concurrent resolutions that suggested the 
Congress convene outside the seat of government to symbolize the 
Nation's solidarity with New Yorkers who epitomize the human spirit of 
courage, resilience and strength, my initial reaction of support was 
tempered by the realization that under article 1, section 5, clause 4 of 
the Constitution, ``Neither House shall, without the consent of the 
other, adjourn to any other place than that in which the two houses 
shall be sitting.''
    There is no precedent for the convening of an actual session of 
Congress outside the seat of government, but on one special occasion the 
Congress engaged in ceremonial functions outside the seat of government. 
Members of both houses traveled to Philadelphia on July 16, 1987, for 
organized festivities surrounding the bicentennial anniversary of the 
Constitution pursuant to a similar concurrent resolution.
    On the strength of the precedent of the uniquely historical and 
national significance of that occasion, it is appropriate to dedicate 
another ceremonial gathering to a matter of transcendent importance at 
another place of basic institutional relevance to the Congress.
    Thus, we are gathered in Federal Hall where the First Congress met 
in 1789 before moving the third session of that Congress to Congress 
Hall in Philadelphia, PA, in 1790.
    Ladies and gentlemen, we are, therefore, meeting here under that 
precedent.
    The Chair recognizes the Honorable Richard B. Cheney, the Vice 
President of the United States and President of the U.S. Senate.
    Vice President CHENEY. Thank you, Mr. Speaker. Each time Congress 
meets, we are mindful of the great charge that we have all been given as 
public servants. Assembled today in Federal Hall we are reminded of the 
ones who served before us and those who served first. It is a humbling 
experience to stand on the site where the First Congress met, where the 
first President was sworn in, where the Bill of Rights was introduced.
    Every Member of the House and Senate and every citizen of this 
country can draw a straight line from the events in Federal Hall to the 
life we all know today. When Congress convened here, America was a 
Nation of scarcely 4 million souls. The tallest structure in the city 
was Trinity Church, which still stands at the corner of Broadway and 
Wall Street.
    The roll call of that First Congress included signers of the 
Declaration of Independence and men who marched in George Washington's 
army. Two gentlemen from Virginia still in their 30s served in that 
Congress. Their names were Madison and Monroe. All the Members knew that 
great responsibilities had come to them.
    As Vice President John Adams observed, ``A trust of the greatest 
magnitude is committed to this legislature and the eyes of the world are 
upon you.''
    In their actions, the Members of the First Congress met that test. 
And although this city was the Nation's Capital for only a short time, 
from those early days, the eyes of the world have continued to be on New 
York. One year ago, this great center of history, enterprise, and 
creativity suffered the gravest of cruelties and showed itself to be a 
place of valor and generosity and grace. Here, where so many innocent 
lives were suddenly taken, the world saw acts of kindness and heroism 
that will be remembered forever.
    When President Bush introduced Mayor Giuliani and Governor Pataki at 
the joint session last September, it was, said one New Yorker, as if the 
Members of Congress had recognized that these two men had come directly 
off the battlefield.
    Today, Congress gathers near that battlefield to honor the character 
and the courage shown in New York these last 360 days, and to remember 
every innocent life taken in the attacks of September 11. Since the hour 
of those attacks, we have been a Nation at war called once again to 
defend our liberty and our lives and to save humanity from the worst of 
wars. As a Nation born in revolution, we know that our freedom came at a 
very high price. We have no intention now of letting it slip away.
    The Members of the First Congress shaped events long into the 
future. The same is now asked of us. In the principles we stand for, the 
values we uphold, and the decisions we make we will set the course of 
this Nation and with it the future of human freedom and the peace of the 
world.
    It is not given to us to know every turn of events to come. We know, 
however, that we are the elected servants of a good, a just, and a 
decent people. May we always act in that spirit, confident in our 
founding principles, clear in our purposes, choosing wisely and bowing 
only to divine providence.
    The SPEAKER. The Clerk of the House of Representatives has laid upon 
the desk the list of representatives in attendance.
    Vice President CHENEY. The Secretary of the Senate has laid upon the 
desk the list of Senators in attendance.
    U.S. House of Representatives Member, Delegate, and Resident 
Commissioner attendance is as follows:
       Members of the U.S. House of Representatives in Attendance

          The Honorable Anibal Acevedo-Vila
          The Honorable Gary L. Ackerman
          The Honorable Robert B. Aderholt
          The Honorable W. Todd Akin
          The Honorable Thomas H. Allen
          The Honorable Robert E. Andrews
          The Honorable Richard K. Armey
          The Honorable Spencer Bachus
          The Honorable John Elias Baldacci
          The Honorable Tammy Baldwin
          The Honorable Charles F. Bass
          The Honorable Ken Bentsen
          The Honorable Marion Berry
          The Honorable Judy Biggert
          The Honorable Rod R. Blagojevich
          The Honorable Roy Blunt
          The Honorable Sherwood L. Boehlert
          The Honorable John A. Boehner
          The Honorable Henry Bonilla
          The Honorable David E. Bonior
          The Honorable John Boozman
          The Honorable Robert A. Borski
          The Honorable Leonard L. Boswell
          The Honorable Kevin Brady
          The Honorable Henry E. Brown, Jr.
          The Honorable Richard Burr
          The Honorable Dan Burton
          The Honorable Ken Calvert
          The Honorable Shelley Moore Capito
          The Honorable Michael E. Capuano
          The Honorable Brad Carson
          The Honorable Michael N. Castle
          The Honorable Steve Chabot
          The Honorable Saxby Chambliss
          The Honorable Donna M. Christensen
          The Honorable Eva M. Clayton
          The Honorable Mac Collins
          The Honorable John Conyers, Jr.
          The Honorable John Cooksey
          The Honorable Jerry F. Costello
          The Honorable Christopher Cox
          The Honorable Philip M. Crane
          The Honorable Joseph Crowley
          The Honorable John Abney Culberson
          The Honorable Elijah E. Cummings
          The Honorable Jim Davis
          The Honorable Jo Ann Davis
          The Honorable Susan A. Davis
          The Honorable Tom Davis
          The Honorable Diana DeGette
          The Honorable Rosa L. DeLauro
          The Honorable Lincoln Diaz-Balart
          The Honorable John T. Doolittle
          The Honorable David Dreier
          The Honorable John J. Duncan, Jr.
          The Honorable Jennifer Dunn
          The Honorable Chet Edwards
          The Honorable Robert L. Ehrlich, Jr.
          The Honorable Jo Ann Emerson
          The Honorable Eliot L. Engel
          The Honorable Phil English
          The Honorable Anna G. Eshoo
          The Honorable Bob Etheridge
          The Honorable Lane Evans
          The Honorable Sam Farr
          The Honorable Mike Ferguson
          The Honorable Mark Foley
          The Honorable J. Randy Forbes
          The Honorable Harold E. Ford, Jr.
          The Honorable Vito Fossella
          The Honorable Rodney P. Frelinghuysen
          The Honorable Martin Frost
          The Honorable Richard A. Gephardt
          The Honorable Jim Gibbons
          The Honorable Wayne T. Gilchrest
          The Honorable Benjamin A. Gilman
          The Honorable Bob Goodlatte
          The Honorable Lindsey O. Graham
          The Honorable Sam Graves
          The Honorable Gene Green
          The Honorable Mark Green
          The Honorable James C. Greenwood
          The Honorable Felix J. Grucci, Jr.
          The Honorable Gil Gutknecht
          The Honorable Tony P. Hall
          The Honorable James V. Hansen
          The Honorable Jane Harman
          The Honorable Melissa A. Hart
          The Honorable J. Dennis Hastert
          The Honorable Alcee L. Hastings
          The Honorable Robin Hayes
          The Honorable J.D. Hayworth
          The Honorable Wally Herger
          The Honorable Baron P. Hill
          The Honorable Earl F. Hilliard
          The Honorable Maurice D. Hinchey
          The Honorable David L. Hobson
          The Honorable Joseph M. Hoeffel
          The Honorable Rush D. Holt
          The Honorable Darlene Hooley
          The Honorable Stephen Horn
          The Honorable Amo Houghton
          The Honorable Steny H. Hoyer
          The Honorable Kenny C. Hulshof
          The Honorable Jay Inslee
          The Honorable Johnny Isakson
          The Honorable Steve Israel
          The Honorable Darrell E. Issa
          The Honorable Jesse L. Jackson, Jr.
          The Honorable Sheila Jackson-Lee
          The Honorable Christopher John
          The Honorable Eddie Bernice Johnson
          The Honorable Nancy L. Johnson
          The Honorable Stephanie Tubbs Jones
          The Honorable Paul E. Kanjorski
          The Honorable Marcy Kaptur
          The Honorable Ric Keller
          The Honorable Sue W. Kelly
          The Honorable Mark R. Kennedy
          The Honorable Patrick J. Kennedy
          The Honorable Peter T. King
          The Honorable Jack Kingston
          The Honorable Mark Steven Kirk
          The Honorable Dennis J. Kucinich
          The Honorable Ray LaHood
          The Honorable Nick Lampson
          The Honorable James R. Langevin
          The Honorable Rick Larsen
          The Honorable John B. Larson
          The Honorable Tom Latham
          The Honorable Steven C. LaTourette
          The Honorable James A. Leach
          The Honorable Barbara Lee
          The Honorable Sander M. Levin
          The Honorable Jerry Lewis
          The Honorable John Lewis
          The Honorable Ron Lewis
          The Honorable Frank A. LoBiondo
          The Honorable Nita M. Lowey
          The Honorable Frank D. Lucas
          The Honorable Ken Lucas
          The Honorable Bill Luther
          The Honorable Stephen F. Lynch
          The Honorable Carolyn McCarthy
          The Honorable Karen McCarthy
          The Honorable James P. McGovern
          The Honorable John M. McHugh
          The Honorable Scott McInnis
          The Honorable Howard P. ``Buck'' McKeon
          The Honorable Michael R. McNulty
          The Honorable Carolyn B. Maloney
          The Honorable James H. Maloney
          The Honorable Jim Matheson
          The Honorable Martin T. Meehan
          The Honorable Carrie P. Meek
          The Honorable Gregory W. Meeks
          The Honorable Robert Menendez
          The Honorable John L. Mica
          The Honorable Juanita Millender-McDonald
          The Honorable Dan Miller
          The Honorable Jeff Miller
          The Honorable Dennis Moore
          The Honorable James P. Moran
          The Honorable Constance A. Morella
          The Honorable Sue Wilkins Myrick
          The Honorable Jerrold Nadler
          The Honorable Grace F. Napolitano
          The Honorable Richard E. Neal
          The Honorable George R. Nethercutt, Jr.
          The Honorable Robert W. Ney
          The Honorable Eleanor Holmes Norton
          The Honorable Charlie Norwood
          The Honorable James L. Oberstar
          The Honorable John W. Olver
          The Honorable Major R. Owens
          The Honorable Michael G. Oxley
          The Honorable Bill Pascrell, Jr.
          The Honorable Donald M. Payne
          The Honorable Nancy Pelosi
          The Honorable Mike Pence
          The Honorable John E. Peterson
          The Honorable Thomas E. Petri
          The Honorable David D. Phelps
          The Honorable Joseph R. Pitts
          The Honorable Todd Russell Platts
          The Honorable Richard W. Pombo
          The Honorable Earl Pomeroy
          The Honorable Rob Portman
          The Honorable David E. Price
          The Honorable Deborah Pryce
          The Honorable Adam H. Putnam
          The Honorable Jack Quinn
          The Honorable Jim Ramstad
          The Honorable Charles B. Rangel
          The Honorable Thomas M. Reynolds
          The Honorable Bob Riley
          The Honorable Ileana Ros-Lehtinen
          The Honorable Mike Ross
          The Honorable Steven R. Rothman
          The Honorable Edward R. Royce
          The Honorable Paul Ryan
          The Honorable Jim Ryun
          The Honorable Loretta Sanchez
          The Honorable Bernard Sanders
          The Honorable Jim Saxton
          The Honorable Bob Schaffer
          The Honorable Adam B. Schiff
          The Honorable Robert C. Scott
          The Honorable Jose E. Serrano
          The Honorable Pete Sessions
          The Honorable E. Clay Shaw, Jr.
          The Honorable Christopher Shays
          The Honorable Don Sherwood
          The Honorable John Shimkus
          The Honorable Bill Shuster
          The Honorable Rob Simmons
          The Honorable Nick Smith
          The Honorable Vic Snyder
          The Honorable John M. Spratt, Jr.
          The Honorable Cliff Stearns
          The Honorable Ted Strickland
          The Honorable John Sullivan
          The Honorable John E. Sununu
          The Honorable John E. Sweeney
          The Honorable Thomas G. Tancredo
          The Honorable Ellen O. Tauscher
          The Honorable John R. Thune
          The Honorable Todd Tiahrt
          The Honorable Patrick J. Tiberi
          The Honorable John F. Tierney
          The Honorable Patrick J. Toomey
          The Honorable Edolphus Towns
          The Honorable Jim Turner
          The Honorable Fred Upton
          The Honorable Nydia M. Velazquez
          The Honorable David Vitter
          The Honorable Greg Walden
          The Honorable James T. Walsh
          The Honorable Zach Wamp
          The Honorable Maxine Waters
          The Honorable Wes Watkins
          The Honorable Diane E. Watson
          The Honorable Melvin L. Watt
          The Honorable J.C. Watts, Jr.
          The Honorable Anthony D. Weiner
          The Honorable Curt Weldon
          The Honorable Dave Weldon
          The Honorable Ed Whitfield
          The Honorable Roger F. Wicker
          The Honorable Joe Wilson
          The Honorable Lynn C. Woolsey
          The Honorable David Wu
          The Honorable C.W. Bill Young

    U.S. Senate Member attendance is as follows:
                Members of the U.S. Senate in Attendance

          The Honorable George Allen
          The Honorable Max Baucus
          The Honorable Robert F. Bennett
          The Honorable John B. Breaux
          The Honorable Sam Brownback
          The Honorable Maria Cantwell
          The Honorable Jean Carnahan
          The Honorable Lincoln D. Chafee
          The Honorable Hillary Rodham Clinton
          The Honorable Susan M. Collins
          The Honorable Jon S. Corzine
          The Honorable Tom Daschle
          The Honorable Mike DeWine
          The Honorable Christopher J. Dodd
          The Honorable Russell D. Feingold
          The Honorable Bill Frist
          The Honorable Bob Graham
          The Honorable Judd Gregg
          The Honorable James M. Jeffords
          The Honorable Edward M. Kennedy
          The Honorable John F. Kerry
          The Honorable Mary L. Landrieu
          The Honorable Patrick J. Leahy
          The Honorable Carl Levin
          The Honorable Joseph I. Lieberman
          The Honorable Trent Lott
          The Honorable John McCain
          The Honorable Barbara A. Mikulski
          The Honorable Frank H. Murkowski
          The Honorable Bill Nelson
          The Honorable Don Nickles
          The Honorable Jack Reed
          The Honorable Harry Reid
          The Honorable John D. Rockefeller IV
          The Honorable Paul S. Sarbanes
          The Honorable Charles E. Schumer
          The Honorable Richard C. Shelby
          The Honorable Gordon Smith
          The Honorable Olympia J. Snowe
          The Honorable Arlen Specter
          The Honorable Debbie Stabenow
          The Honorable Craig Thomas
          The Honorable Fred Thompson
          The Honorable George V. Voinovich
          The Honorable John W. Warner
          The Honorable Paul Wellstone
          The Honorable Ron Wyden

    The SPEAKER. The Chair recognizes the Honorable Benjamin Gilman and 
the Honorable Charles Rangel, Representatives from New York, and the 
Honorable Hillary Rodham Clinton and the Honorable Charles Schumer, 
Senators from New York, in a reading and presentation of H. Con. Res. 
448.
              Reading and Presentation of H. Con. Res. 448
    Representative RANGEL. Mr. Speaker, Mr. Vice President, leaders of 
the House and the Senate, on behalf of Ben Gilman, Senator Schumer and 
Senator Clinton, and the entire New York congressional delegation, we 
would like to thank you for your support of this resolution that gives 
us in New York an opportunity to say thank you for the way you responded 
to the attack on our city and our State.
    You give our mayor and our Governor an opportunity to be here on 
this historic event to say you did not treat us like New Yorkers, you 
treated us like Americans.
    The text of the concurrent resolution was read as follows:
    Representative RANGEL. ``Whereas on September the 11, 2001, 
thousands of innocent people were killed and injured in a combined 
terrorist attack involving four hijacked aircraft, the World Trade 
Center, and the Pentagon;
    ``Whereas in the aftermath of the attacks, thousands more were left 
grieving for beloved family and friends, livelihoods were compromised, 
and businesses and property were damaged and lost;''
    Representative GILMAN. ``Whereas the greatest loss of life, personal 
injury, and physical destruction occurred in and was sustained by the 
City of New York;
    ``Whereas Government and the American people responded decisively 
through the bravery, sacrifice and toil of the fire and rescue workers, 
law enforcement, building trades, caregivers, Armed Forces, and millions 
more who through their many expressions of care and compassion brought 
forth comfort, hope, and the promise of recovery;''
    Senator CLINTON. ``Whereas the City of New York attended to the 
aftermath of the destruction of the World Trade Center with profound 
respect for the victims and compassion to the survivors; and
    ``Whereas the City of New York has invited the Congress to meet at 
the site of the original Federal Hall, where the First Congress of the 
United States convened on March 4, 1789: Now, therefore, be it''
    Senator SCHUMER. ``Resolved by the House of Representatives (the 
Senate concurring), That, in remembrance of the victims and the heroes 
of September 11, 2001, and in recognition of the courage and spirit of 
the City of New York, the Congress shall conduct a special meeting in 
Federal Hall, New York, New York, on September 6, 2002.
    Passed by the House of Representatives, July 25, 2002.
    Passed by the Senate, July 26, 2002.''
    The SPEAKER. Without objection, the Members present, on behalf of 
themselves and the Congress of the United States, do hereby affirm the 
aforesaid concurrent resolution.
    Would Mayor Bloomberg and Governor Pataki please come forward and 
accept the concurrent resolution.
    Mayor Bloomberg and Governor Pataki of New York accepted the 
concurrent resolution.
    The SPEAKER. The Chair recognizes the Honorable Vito Fossella, 
Representative from New York, and the Honorable Susan Collins, Senator 
from Maine, in a reading and presentation of the commemorative plaque.
            Reading and Presentation of Commemorative Plaque
    Senator COLLINS. Mr. Speaker, Mr. Vice President, on behalf of the 
U.S. Congress, we present this commemorative plaque to Director Mainella 
for her stewardship of our Nation's treasures, especially this building, 
Federal Hall.
    The plaque is inscribed as follows:
    ``Commemorative Joint Meeting of the Congress of the United States 
of America in Federal Hall, New York, New York, this Sixth Day of 
September, Two Thousand and Two.''
    Representative FOSSELLA. ``Convened in remembrance of the victims 
and heroes of September 11, 2001, and in recognition of the courage and 
spirit of the City of New York.
    ``This gift to Federal Hall from the Congress of the United States 
of America was made from a section of Aquia Creek, VA, sandstone and 
used as an original building material of the United States Capitol. It 
was removed on the East Central Front extension in 1958.''
    The SPEAKER. Director Mainella, please come forward and accept the 
commemorative plaque.
    Director Mainella accepted the commemorative plaque.
    The SPEAKER. Billy Collins, Poet Laureate of the United States of 
America, will now read a poem written for this occasion entitled ``The 
Names.''
 Reading of ``The Names'' by Billy Collins, Poet Laureate of the United 
                                 States
    Mr. COLLINS. This poem is dedicated to the victims of September 11, 
and to their survivors.
                              ``The Names''

          Yesterday, I lay awake in the palm of the night.
          A fine rain stole in, unhelped by any breeze,
          And when I saw the silver glaze on the windows,
          I started with A, with Ackerman, as it happened,
          Then Baxter and Calabro,
          Davis and Eberling, names falling into place
          As droplets fell through the dark.

          Names printed on the ceiling of the night.
          Names slipping around a water bend.
          Twenty-six willows on the banks of a stream.
          In the morning, I walked out barefoot
          Among thousands of flowers
          Heavy with dew like the eyes of tears,
          And each had a name--
          Fiori inscribed on a yellow petal
          Then Gonzalez and Han, Ishikawa and Jenkins.

          Names written in the air
          And stitched into the cloth of the day.
          A name under a photograph taped to a mailbox.
          Monogram on a torn shirt.
          I see you spelled out on storefront windows
          And on the bright unfurled awnings of this city,
          I say the syllables as I turn a corner--
          Kelly and Lee,
          Medina, Nardella, and O'Connor.

          When I peer into the woods,
          I see a thick tangle where letters are hidden
          As in a puzzle concocted for children.
          Parker and Quigley in the twigs of an ash,
          Rizzo, Schubert, Torres, and Upton.
          Secrets in the boughs of an ancient maple.

          Names written in the pale sky.
          Names rising in the updraft amid buildings.
          Names silent in stone
          Or cried out behind a door.
          Names blown over the Earth and out to sea.

          In the evenings--weakening light, the last 
          swallows.
          A boy on a lake lifts his oars.
          A woman by a window puts a match to a candle,
          And the names are outlined on the rose clouds--
          Vanacore and Wallace,
          (let X stand, if it can, for the ones unfound)
          Then Young and Ziminsky, the final jolt of Z.

          Names etched on the head of a pin.
          One name spanning a bridge, another undergoing a 
          tunnel.
          A blue name needled into the skin.
          Names of citizens, workers, mothers and fathers,
          The bright-eyed daughter, the quick son.
          Alphabet of names in green rows in a field.
          Names in the small tracks of birds.
          Names lifted from a hat
          Or balanced on the tip of the tongue.
          Names wheeled into the dim warehouse of memory.
          So many names, there is barely room on the walls 
          of the heart.

    The SPEAKER. The Chair now recognizes the Honorable Richard 
Gephardt, Representative from Missouri and Democratic Leader of the U.S. 
House of Representatives.
    Representative GEPHARDT. Mr. Vice President, Mr. Speaker, and my 
fellow colleagues of the U.S. Congress, today we speak of the 
unspeakable, we remember the unimaginable, and we reaffirm our utmost 
resolve to defend the birthright of this land and our gift outright to 
this world: Ideals of liberty and tolerance that will never die.
    Today, we say to the families who look to this September 11 and know 
that they will know the pain of their piercing loss all over again, we 
are with you as one, as the family of America. We pray that, for you, 
memory will bring hope as well as tears.
    We have faith that love outlasts life, and you prove it every day as 
you carry on the dream of a lost husband or a wife, for the child that 
was both of yours and, in the truest sense, always will be.
    We think of those last calls on cell phones from a doomed building 
or plane. Those last goodbyes. Yet the life of a good person is like a 
wellspring that does not run dry. Nothing reminds us more powerfully of 
that than the rescuers of September 11, so many of them taken too, who 
rescued our national spirit and, amid the smoke and the darkness at 
noon, sent a flickering light that became a shining beacon for America.
    So we have wept together, we have prayed together, given to each 
other, and stood side by side since September 11 in common humanity and 
national purpose. The sorrow has been matched by strength. America is on 
a mission. Not retribution or revenge, not just to defeat terrorism, but 
to show once again that good can triumph over evil and freedom can 
overcome fanaticism, as we did in different forums in a global arena 
twice before in the past century.
    Some say that September 11, 2001, is another date that will live in 
infamy. Surely that is true, but it is also true that we have never 
known an assault like this, not just on our Armed Forces, but on our 
people. Not just on our buildings and our possessions, or even on the 
principles that we profess, but on the very foundation of this open, 
diverse, democratic society.
    We have grown accustomed, too accustomed, to war and slaughter in 
our world. But most always it was ``over there.'' One place it came 
before in the heartland was the homegrown terrorism that struck in 
Oklahoma City. Today, our caring and thoughts are there as well. And 
they are a half a world away with the young Americans who are on the 
front lines of freedom from fear.
    For all our differences, how remarkably one we are all today. From 
Ground Zero to a sacred field in Pennsylvania, to a shattered but now 
rebuilt wing of the Pentagon, and all across this broad land. On the 
fatal flights of September 11, courage and resistance knew no bounds of 
party or race or status. They included a young father, a conservative 
columnist, and a gay man.
    E Pluribus Unum.
    So while we discuss and debate the next decisions, on the 
fundamental issue let there be no doubt. In this great and faithful 
struggle there are no Republicans, there are no Democrats, there are 
only Americans. None of us, no matter how long we live or what else 
marks our time, will ever forget September 11. And all of us, in the 
name of those who were lost for a concept of liberty that must never be 
lost, and in the cause of civilization itself, are as determined as an 
earlier generation of Americans to gain the inevitable triumph, so help 
us God.
    The SPEAKER. The Chair now recognizes the Honorable Trent Lott, the 
Senator from Mississippi and the Republican Leader of the U.S. Senate.
    Senator LOTT. Mr. Vice President, Mr. Speaker, Members of the 
Congress, and distinguished guests, on behalf of the Senate and a united 
Congress, it is truly an honor to stand in this place in this city, New 
York City, today.
    We are here to remember and to continue to mourn those who lost 
their lives, those innocent men, women, and children who were killed in 
that horrible event, September 11, a year ago.
    We are here to show our continued appreciation for those who 
struggled so mightily to free and to save those who were trapped in the 
aftermath of the experience here in New York City and at the Pentagon.
    But we are also here to express our recommitment to the people of 
New York and Pennsylvania and Virginia that we are with you. We will 
continue our efforts to help you to rebuild physically and spiritually, 
and to recommit ourselves to do everything in our power to make sure 
that America is secure against this horrible event or anything like it 
ever happening again.
    Over the years, New York City has been called many things, from New 
Amsterdam to the Big Apple. Today, the Congress of the United States, 
Congressman Rangel, call it home. We are here, we are comfortable here. 
We are here to stand with the people in this city because it is symbolic 
of how we stand together all across America.
    We came here a year ago, the week after the infamous date. We 
expressed our commitment and we have been working every since to keep 
that commitment, and we will continue to do so.
    This is a special place, as has already been said, because the First 
Congress began the work here that we continue to this day. The work of 
ordered liberty, preserving, expanding the freedoms that now, as then, 
are the inalienable right of every person.
    Two centuries ago, there were those who thought this was all 
nonsense. In their ignorance and arrogance, they called America a doomed 
folly. But history overtook them and their crowns and armies are part of 
the dustbin of history. There are those like them today who cannot see 
beyond the limits of their own hatred. It is so hard for us in America 
to even understand why there would be this hatred. They do not 
understand that in the unending struggle against tyranny, divine 
providence by whatever name we use is always on the side of freedom.
    When the First Congress was meeting here in New York in January 
1790, President Washington asked its Members for ``the cool and 
deliberate exertion of your patriotism, firmness and wisdom.'' As we 
face today's challenge to our country, we pledge to the people of New 
York just what we ask of them and all Americans: The cool and deliberate 
exertion of your patriotism, firmness, and wisdom.
    We have seen it in this city. We have seen it in America, and we are 
here to do our part in that effort. The duration of our present conflict 
and its eventual price may be in doubt, but there can be no doubt as to 
its outcome. From this city's day of horror, out of all the loss and 
sorrow, has come a strength. I have seen it all across America. A 
resolve. A determination which, from Manhattan, to Mississippi, now 
binds us together for the mighty work that lies ahead. Thank you very 
much.
    The SPEAKER. The Chair now recognizes the Honorable Tom Daschle, the 
Senator from South Dakota and majority leader of the U.S. Senate.
    Senator DASCHLE. Mr. Vice President, Mr. Speaker, distinguished 
visitors and my colleagues, the U.S. Congress has come here to 
commemorate a shattering experience. One that has transformed America.
    The poet Yeats, after a moment of violent upheaval in his own 
country, wrote: ``All is changed. Changed utterly. A terrible beauty is 
born.''
    As we near the first anniversary of September 11 with profound 
sadness, our hearts ache for those who died and for their families and 
loved ones. At the same time, we are filled with an abiding sense of 
gratitude to the people who live and work in this great city, especially 
the courageous workers and rescuers, for the way they inspired and 
stunned a wounded Nation.
    In their countless acts of heroism and compassion, a terrible beauty 
was born. In an hour of horror and grief, they showed us how to go on.
    Here in New York, at the Pentagon, and in that lonely field in 
Pennsylvania, the wounds the terrorist inflicted were deep. But 
America's resolve was even deeper.
    Let history record that the terrorists failed. They sought to 
destroy America by attacking what they thought were our greatest 
strengths, but they did not understand that the true strength of America 
is not steel, it is not concrete, it is our belief in the ideals 
enshrined in our Constitution and in our Bill of Rights. It is in our 
shared faith in liberty and our unwavering commitment to each other.
    So what happened on September 11 did not diminish our strength. It 
renewed it. We stand united today as proud citizens of the oldest and 
strongest democracy on Earth. Our faith in that democracy and in our 
future is absolute and unshakable.
    Next Wednesday, September 11, an eternal flame will be lit in 
Battery Park. That flame will symbolize our determination never, ever to 
forget.
    We will never forget the heartbreaking loss.
    We will never forget the selfless heroism.
    We will never forget the terrible beauty that was born here 1 year 
ago.
    Thank you.
    The SPEAKER. The Chair now recognizes the Honorable Eliot Engel, 
Representative from New York.
    Representative ENGEL. Mr. Speaker, I rise first to thank all my 
colleagues for voting to bring the Congress here to New York. It's been 
more than 200 years since Congress last met in New York City. It is a 
fitting tribute that Congress has returned here at this most sorrowful 
time.
    The past year has been a tragic and very difficult time for me and 
my fellow New Yorkers. We watched in horror as terrorists hijacked two 
commercial airliners and slammed them into the World Trade Center. We 
watched in horror as the Twin Towers came down and dust and debris 
blanketed lower Manhattan. We watched in horror as the names of the more 
than 3,000 people murdered that day were announced.
    But, in the days and weeks that followed, we New Yorkers experienced 
something else. We felt the hopes and prayers of millions of Americans 
flow over us. We felt the pride of being an American swell and 
invigorate us all. We felt the determination of the greatest Nation the 
Earth has every known renew itself and commit to rebuilding.
    The terrorists intended many things with their attack. They sought 
to grievously wound our Nation. And we were--we paid with the blood of 
our fathers and mothers, sons and daughters, and brother and sisters. 
They sought to disrupt our economy. And they did--billions of dollars 
have been lost and will be spent on recovery.
    The terrorists also sought to incite fear into the hearts and souls 
of every American. But they failed. Instead, they inspired a Nation of 
freedom-loving people to stand up to those who would seek to deny them 
their liberties, their justice, and the American way of life. They 
inspired us to fight back, so that our children's children will grow up 
in a world where they can safely speak their views, engage in the 
political system, and worship in their own way.
    As we meet here, in this historic location, I am reminded of one of 
our country's greatest Presidents, Abraham Lincoln. His words, spoken 
more than a century ago, are most fitting today:

            We here highly resolve that these dead shall not 
          have died in vain; that this Nation shall have a 
          new birth of freedom; and that this government of 
          the people, by the people, for the people, shall 
          not perish from the Earth.

    The SPEAKER. We are gathered here today in this ceremonial session 
to pay tribute to the people of New York and to the people of New York 
City who have suffered great loss, but persevered in the face of 
adversity. In doing so, we pay tribute to the American spirit.
    It is altogether appropriate that we meet here today in Federal 
Hall. After all, it was here that the First Congress met to ratify the 
Bill of Rights and to inaugurate our first President of the United 
States, George Washington.
    As in 1789, when ordinary Americans did extraordinary things to 
create a new Nation conceived in liberty and dedication to freedom, on 
September 11, ordinary Americans exhibited extraordinary courage in 
fighting a horrific evil.
    New York lost hundreds of sons and daughters in that brutal attack 
on our Nation's freedom. She lost firemen and custodians, stockbrokers, 
police officers, construction workers and executives.
    We also suffered a great loss in Virginia when a plane slammed into 
the Pentagon, and in Somerset County, PA, when another plane that was 
headed for Washington, DC, was brought down by the efforts of brave 
passengers.
    We still feel the loss of every single person who perished on that 
fateful day. But as we lament the loss of life, we can marvel at the 
bravery of those who rushed in to help.
    Such bravery was on display when Battalion Chief Orio J. Palmer and 
Fire Marshal Ronald Bucca of the New York Fire Department climbed to the 
78th floor of the World Trade Center to organize a rescue. Their efforts 
saved the lives of dozens of people.
    Bravery was also on display when several passengers of United flight 
93 decided that they would not let the terrorist complete their plans. 
They sacrificed themselves rather than let the terrorists win.
    Stories of uncommon heroism were common on September 11. The genius 
of America could be found in the sacrifices of these brave martyrs of 
freedom.
    As we remember September 11, we must look forward to the day when we 
complete the task at hand, when we vanquish once and for all the 
terrorists who seek to take away our Nation's freedom.
    We thank those Americans who serve in our Nation's Armed Forces who 
fight to preserve our freedom and still work to bring terrorists to 
justice.
    We elected Members of the 107th Congress, like those Members 
gathered in this location of the First Congress, simply reflect the 
desires of a people who cherish liberty and are willing to fight for 
freedom.
    Let us always remember those we lost on September 11, and may God 
continue to bless America.
    Thank you.
``God Bless America'' Sung by Chamber Choir, Stuyvesant High School, New 
                                York City
    The SPEAKER. The Stuyvesant High School Chamber Choir will now sing 
``God Bless America.''
    The Chamber Choir, Stuyvesant High School, sang ``God Bless 
America.''
    The Members and guests sang ``God Bless America.''
    The SPEAKER. Ladies and gentlemen of the House and the Senate, this 
concludes the special ceremonial meeting of the Congress. Members are 
asked to remain in their seats and make their exit with the colors.
    The Chair will assure that the record of these proceedings will be 
printed in the Congressional Record.
    The proceedings are closed.
    The Colors were retired by the Color Guard composed of members of 
the New York City Fire Department, New York City Police Department, New 
York State Unified Court System Officers, Port Authority of New York and 
New Jersey Police, and the U.S. Capitol Police.
    [Whereupon, the commemorative joint meeting of the Congress was 
adjourned.]
[GRAPHIC] [TIFF OMITTED] T3000.003

                                                                          
                 Photograph by Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times.
      
              Luncheon Hosted by Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg
    Mayor BLOOMBERG. Ladies and gentlemen, I'm Mike Bloomberg, and I'm 
pleased to be the mayor of the City of New York. Thank you.
    There is an expression that you will hear in New York frequently at 
this time of the year that you may or may not be familiar with. It 
sounds like ``chana tova,'' which means ``happy new year.'' And for 
those of you who care, happy new year.
    Speaker Hastert, Majority Leader Daschle, Minority Leader Gephardt, 
Minority Leader Lott, distinguished Members of Congress, including the 
dean of New York State's delegation, the Honorable Charles Rangel, and 
our two great Members of the Upper Chamber, Senators Schumer and 
Clinton, good afternoon. I am delighted to welcome you to New York for 
this truly historic occasion.
    Today, we hearken back to the early days of our republic, when the 
First Congress convened in New York and George Washington was 
inaugurated as our President. Many of our Founding Fathers lived in New 
York in those days, including Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, John Hancock 
and others. So many others, in fact, that the painter of ``The 
Declaration of Independence,'' the famous canvas that hangs in the 
Capitol Rotunda, had to move to New York to finish his work.
    It's often been pointed out that the decision Congress made to move 
the capital from New York to a new site on the banks of the Potomac, in 
effect, gave the United States two capitals. We now have one capital in 
Washington, DC, for the government, and one here, for business and 
culture. Rather than feel slighted, New York has always embraced its 
role.
    Today's joint session, for however briefly, made New York the 
Nation's Capital once again. But now we'll just have to revert to our 
regular status: as capital of the free world.
    I would like to acknowledge an institution without which this day 
would not have been possible, the Annenberg Foundation.
    The foundation generously donated $1 million to cover all the 
travel, food and security expenses associated with today's wonderful 
show of support for freedom.
    We are blessed to have with us today, from Pennsylvania and from 
California, Lee Annenberg.
    Would you please stand and let us say thank you?
    Congress' decision to return to New York symbolically closes a 
circle at a crucial time in our history. It brings Congress back to its 
first home, if only for 1 day, to send a message to the Nation and the 
entire world: The spirit of this city and the spirit of this country 
remains unshaken.
    We are as united today as we were when the First Congress met in 
lower Manhattan more than 200 years ago, because our commitment to 
freedom has never been stronger. As a Nation, and as a city, we learned 
a lot about ourselves on September 11, when the unimaginable became a 
reality. What happened down the street from here wasn't just an assault 
on New York, it was an attack on our Nation and on all freedom-loving 
people around the world.
    That day, as the world watched, our rescue teams battled the smoke 
and the chaos. It didn't matter whether you came from Astoria or Atlanta 
or Australia, from Queens or Kansas or Kenya; New York was everybody's 
hometown that day.
    The stakes for our Nation were raised. Someone placed a big bet that 
they could destroy New York, a city that has contributed immeasurably to 
building the greatest democracy on Earth. This city has responded. This 
Nation has responded. America is a Nation founded on a particular set of 
ideas: the right to express yourself as you see fit, the right to 
worship God in your own way and the right to live without fear.
    What happened on September 11 was not only an attack on our people, 
but on those freedoms and our basic way of life. And all Americans 
understand that.
    New Yorkers recognize that we would not have made it through the 
darkest days in our city's history without our Nation's help. It poured 
in from around the country in the form of food, equipment and 
volunteers, and through emotional and moral support beyond value. And I 
want all Americans to understand that we know you were there for us when 
we needed you, and we will be there for you if you ever need us.
    Congress has also stood with us. More than we ever had a right to 
expect, you helped and are continuing to help New York to rebuild and 
recover. And on behalf of all New Yorkers, it is my honor to say, 
``Thank you.''
    As you know, our work is not done yet, not by any means. But the 
recovery that began on 9/11 and the work we've done since simply could 
not have happened without your support. And let me also convey our 
appreciation to President Bush for his courageous leadership in a time 
of crisis, for coming to New York to share our grief and to share our 
determination to not just endure the tragedy visited upon us, but to 
emerge stronger from the events of September 11.
    I am pleased to report that, with your help, we have made triumphant 
progress since that day. Because of remarkable bipartisan cooperation 
among all levels of government, labor and the private sector, we 
finished the recovery work at the World Trade Center site ahead of 
schedule, under budget, and with no additional loss of life.
    This happened while the search for the remains of our loved ones 
went forward with dignity and honor. We created a temporary memorial in 
Battery Park, where the sphere sculpture from the World Trade Center 
Plaza now sits. Next Wednesday, during the 1-year commemoration of that 
fateful day, U.N. Secretary General Kofi Annan and our Secretary of 
State, Colin Powell, along with the heads of state from around the 
world, will join a ceremony there. At that observance, an eternal flame 
will be lighted near the base of the sphere in honor of those we lost, 
and to show that democracy and freedom will always endure. We also honor 
those we lost by building a better city for the future. With Congress' 
help, we are doing just that.
    Largely due to an economic incentive program which you have funded, 
many companies that were displaced plan to rejoin those, such as 
American Express, Merrill Lynch and Dow Jones, that have already moved 
back and made long-term commitments to staying in lower Manhattan.
    Because of a residential incentive program you have funded and 
because lower Manhattan is a great place to live, more than 90 percent 
of the housing in lower Manhattan is currently occupied. And the 
federally funded liberty bonds program will spur billions of dollars in 
construction in lower Manhattan for new commercial spaces and housing.
    The Federal, State and local governments have forged a genuine 
partnership to revive lower Manhattan and to rebuild our essential 
transportation, telecommunications and energy structures. Just last 
month, FEMA granted us unprecedented flexibility to spend Federal funds 
to create a transportation center for the 21st century that will make 
lower Manhattan more accessible than ever.
    The future of lower Manhattan is promising, as is the future of all 
New York City and indeed of the entire country. Here, our city continues 
to be the safest large city in the Nation.
    We have committed increased resources to combat the new threats we 
now face from enemies foreign and domestic. We've strengthened our 
counterterrorism and intelligence operations. And as they take on new 
burdens, our police department continues to drive crime down.
    New York has no intention of relinquishing its title of capital of 
the free world. New York is a city of big ideas, big projects and big 
events, and that will never change. For example, in the year since the 
September 11 attack, New York City has been host to a World Series, the 
New York City Marathon, the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade, the New 
Year's Eve celebration in Times Square where I was inaugurated, the 
World Economic Forum, a new international film festival, the Fourth of 
July fireworks spectacular which was telecast nationally, the U.S. 
Tennis Open which is currently going on, and last night's Times Square 
kick-off of the NFL season, where I met Jon Bon Jovi. We even held a 
world-class grand prix bicycle race right here on Wall Street this 
summer.
    Since we're not the type to rest on our laurels, we are trying to 
convince both the Republican and Democratic National Committees to hold 
both conventions here in the year 2004.
    As a matter of fact, this joint session is a perfect opportunity to 
go after both at the same time. How bipartisan can you be?
    We are also pursuing a Super Bowl and the 2012 Summer Olympics. I 
see Nancy Pelosi is here from our fellow Olympic finalist San Francisco: 
Do you want me to arm wrestle for it, Nancy?
    I better start training though. After all, Nancy, you are the 
minority whip. But that's just the kind of ambition you'd expect of this 
city. And, if anything, 9/11 has made us even more committed to 
demonstrating the energy and vibrant cultural life of our city. We will 
create a memorial on the site of the World Trade Center that everyone 
can be proud of: a memorial that not only honors those that were taken, 
but reaffirms the values that triumphed on that day and the days after.
    In our actions, in our passion, we can do great things and show that 
we do not allow our lives to be ruled by fear, but are guided by the 
very principles of democracy which you, the Congress, represent and 
which the terrorists found so threatening.
    When you look at New York today, when you look at the city where 
people from all parts of the world live next to each other, where more 
than 120 different languages are spoken and where virtually every 
religion in the world is practiced, you realize what makes America and 
what makes New York great. We thrive because of our diversity, because 
of our respect for one another and because a free society is a strong 
society.
    In conclusion, let me recall what our President said about that 
September morning. He described it as a battle between fear and freedom.
    By convening in our city, you, the U.S. Congress, have demonstrated 
to all New Yorkers and all the world that fear can never prevail as long 
as freedom is strong.
    Thank you very much. Thank you. Thank you. Please be seated.
    One of our Founding Fathers, an eminent New Yorker, Alexander 
Hamilton, wrote in the Federalist Papers, ``Energy in the executive is a 
leading character in the definition of good government.''
    New York State is fortunate to have an energetic chief executive who 
has wisely and skillfully guided our city and State through the crisis 
created by the attack of 9/11. Our next speaker is the great Governor of 
the wonderful State of New York, the Honorable George E. Pataki.
    Governor PATAKI. Thank you very much, Mayor Bloomberg. And thank you 
for those inspiring words on behalf of the people of New York City.
    To Speaker Hastert, Leader Daschle, Leader Gephardt, Leader Lott, 
ladies and gentlemen of the 107th Congress, welcome to the greatest city 
in the world.
    It's been 212 years since Congress last gathered here, only blocks 
away from where we're assembled right now. It was here that America's 
First Congress met, here that George Washington took the oath of office 
and here that the Bill of Rights was ratified, protecting the freedoms 
of American citizens. So it is altogether fitting that you, the men and 
women of the 107th Congress, have returned here to affirm once more our 
Nation's commitment to preserving those freedoms from those who would 
seek to destroy them.
    We meet nearly 1 year after the worst terrorist attack ever launched 
against the United States. Our Nation is 226 years old, but the 
vigilance needed to preserve our liberty and to protect our democracy 
must be eternal.
    It was in this spirit, fueled by our love for America and our 
reverence for freedom, that New Yorkers responded in the early morning 
hours of September 11. And in times of crisis, there are no stronger 
people than the people of New York. Police officers, firefighters, court 
officers, port authority officers, EMTs, construction workers, 
volunteers and citizens from all backgrounds rushed to the scene in a 
demonstration of extraordinary courage and sacrifice. We met adversity 
with resolve. We answered terror with strength. We responded to evil 
with good. We defeated hatred with tolerance.
    Your assembling here today sends a powerful message to the people of 
the world, to our allies and to our enemies. Inspired by the strength, 
perseverance and compassion of our heroes and the people across America, 
our unity and our resolve has only grown stronger. We will remember. We 
will rebuild. And we will move forward with the unity and confidence of 
a free people.
    Our sadness from the images of destruction and our memories of those 
we lost on September 11 will forever be embedded in our minds. Yet when 
we look back on that fateful day, we will look back not just in sadness, 
but also with pride, in the actions of New Yorkers and of Americans 
across this great land, who stepped forward in our cities in our 
Nation's hour of adversity.
    And to President Bush, and to this united Congress, you stepped 
forward for New York and for America, helping families and helping this 
city to recover, to rebuild and to reclaim its destiny.
    You came to Ground Zero. You saw the destruction. And like so many 
other Americans, you responded and did your part. On behalf of all New 
Yorkers, I'd like to say thank you.
    Freedom is our legacy and our inalienable right as citizens of this 
great Nation. It is our heritage. It is our birthright that was 
established here by the First Congress 212 years ago, and then 
reaffirmed today by this Congress 212 years later. Your presence here 
today means a great deal to all Americans, but especially to New 
Yorkers. It shows we have not forgotten, nor will future generations of 
America forget.
    A century from now, they will know that the terrorists failed. They 
will know that in the face of destruction--we faced destruction with 
determination. We turned despair into hope. And we turned tragedy into 
triumph. We are united in our fight against terror. And in our defense 
of freedom, we are vigilant, we are strong, we are New Yorkers, we are 
Americans. Thank you. God bless New York. And God bless the United 
States of America. Thank you.
    Mayor BLOOMBERG. Fourteen days after September 11, New York's 
newspaper, the Daily News, first proposed New York's hosting of a joint 
congressional session. It wrote that such a session would be a symbol, 
``of unity, strength and resolve such as the world has never seen.'' Now 
I would like to introduce the earliest governmental champion of that 
idea, the dean of New York's congressional delegation, Charlie Rangel.
    Representative RANGEL. You people look beautiful.
    Thank you, Mr. Mayor and Governor.
    On behalf of our New York delegation, and especially Ben Gilman, who 
has been my friend for over 30 years, who leaves us--where are you, 
Ben?, and our entire delegation, which I hope would rise at this time, 
the supporters of our resolution--I want to thank the leadership in the 
House and the Senate for supporting this resolution, Mayor Bloomberg and 
Governor Pataki for giving it its political support, Ms. Annenberg for 
giving us our financial support, and most important all of you who took 
time from your busy schedules, and indeed our legislative schedules, to 
come to our great city to give us an opportunity to say thank you. 
History is a strange thing when you're making it. You're just not aware 
of the courage you may have or the shortcomings that you may have. And 
as the mayor, in telling you about the attributes of New York, it could 
be perceived that most of us from New York City have a little more self-
esteem than we really need to get by.
    But when we were hit, we were afraid, we were scared. We didn't know 
whether we were going to be hit again. And Jerry Nadler, whose district 
was hit, was one of the first to get there.
    And as Mayor Bloomberg and Governor Pataki said, people came from 
all over. Not just our heroic policemen and firemen and emergency 
workers, but kids came, flags were there, food was there, doctors were 
there. Everyone wanted to help.
    Most of the New York congressional delegation in the city were there 
because it was a primary day. And so when we got back to Washington, we 
didn't know what to expect. We went by car. We went by bus. We went by 
train. And when we saw our colleagues there, singing ``God Bless 
America,'' we recognized that we were not just New Yorkers; that we were 
Americans.
    It wasn't just our great city that was hit, it was our great country 
that was attacked. And we did come together, not as Republicans and 
Democrats and liberals and conservatives, but we came together in 
support of our President and our legislative leaders to let all of our 
foes know that we were united in our resolve to make certain that we 
would do all that we could to see that this does not happen again.
    And even now as we gather to praise those who fought so hard for our 
country, who became our heroes, we send a message to our enemies that it 
is our resolve to say once again: ``Don't tread on the United States of 
America; we are prepared to do whatever is necessary to seek out and to 
destroy those who seek to destroy our way of life.''
    And we come back to where Congress met over 200 years ago, and I 
cannot help but be emotionally involved in believing how proud our 
forefathers should be of us, to come back after 200 years, and to see 
what we have done with their Constitution, how much we treasured it, how 
much we expanded it, and how much today as we meet are we prepared to 
protect it. How little did they know that those who picked cotton during 
those days, those that would come into our country to build our roads 
and our railroads, those who would come from foreign countries seeking 
religious and economic freedom, would be coming here as a part of the 
U.S. Congress 200 years later.
    U.S. history is strange because not only are we living it, but to 
give New Yorkers an opportunity to say thank you to our colleagues in 
the House means that we're saying thank you to America. We are basically 
saying, as New Yorkers, ``God bless this great country that gives us an 
opportunity to have our diversity. We will continue to believe that a 
part of the legacy that we are going to leave to those who follow us is 
that we're not going to allow terrorism to instill terror in our hearts. 
Our basic commitment has to be that while we would not allow an enemy to 
intimidate us, we're not going to allow terror to take away our basic 
freedoms. We're not going to strike any unknown country without knowing 
where the enemy actually is. The opportunities that we have been given 
as a people--education, Social Security, health care--we're going to 
make certain that, as we protect this country, we protect those civil 
liberties that have been passed on to us so that when the next Congress 
meets, no matter where they meet, they will be saying that we protected 
the Constitution that was given to us over 200 years ago.''
    My mother, your mother, everyone always said that during times of 
pain you'd have to seek and you can find some good in it. But the truth 
of the matter is that when we were struck, it was hard to believe that 
we could find some good.
    But there was good that we found: America gave us an opportunity to 
say thank you to each other. America gave us an opportunity to see how 
blessed we were; that we could look at each other without seeing color, 
without seeing party label, without seeing where we came from, and 
recognize that we had an obligation to protect what we have.
    Mr. Governor, Mr. Mayor, thank you for giving us the support of 
bringing us together. And now we can say that we really owe a lot to 
each other, because we need each other. We hope this never happens 
again, but thank you, Congress, for helping us when we needed you, and 
not withstanding our attitude, we deeply appreciate the opportunity.
    Mayor BLOOMBERG. More than 2,800 people lost their lives at the 
World Trade Center, but the toll could have been far, far worse if it 
were not for the valor and professionalism of our local and regional 
firefighters, police officers and emergency service personnel.
    Showing tremendous courage, they effected the rescue of more than 
25,000 people from the World Trade Center, the largest and most 
successful emergency evacuation in modem history. Their heroism inspired 
the Nation.
    Three hundred and forty-three members of the Fire Department of New 
York City gave their lives for freedom on 9/11. We will never forget 
their bravery and their sacrifice.
    It is now my privilege to introduce Susan Magazine. She is the 
assistant commissioner in charge of the fire department's family 
assistance unit. She is also a woman who lost her husband Jay, who 
worked at the World Trade Center.
    Susan.
    Ms. MAGAZINE. Thank you, Mayor Bloomberg.
    Mayor, Governor Pataki, distinguished Members of Congress, honored 
guests, I am honored to have been asked to come here this afternoon to 
speak with you. I came here because I think it's very important that 
you, our Nation's leaders, hear directly from someone who lost a loved 
one, a family member, last September 11.
    As the mayor said, my husband Jay was one of the more than 2,800 
people who perished at the World Trade Center on that day. Jay and I 
spent our entire adult lives together. On the 17th of next month, we 
would have celebrated our 20th wedding anniversary.
    We have two children. Melissa is 14 and Andrew is 11. Melissa starts 
high school next week, and Andrew starts middle school.
    Jay was the catering sales manager at Windows on the World, the 
spectacular restaurant at the top of the North Tower. One of our 
favorite shared family memories was all of us--Jay, me, Melissa and 
Andrew--going up to the restaurant all wearing hard hats during the 
construction work to reopen Windows on the World.
    What a beautiful restaurant it was. When you were up there you felt 
like you were on top of the world. And Jay loved it. He loved working at 
Windows. He loved working in the Trade Center. He loved the vibrancy of 
downtown Manhattan.
    I recently attended a dinner for a hunger relief organization that 
Jay was involved with to present the first annual Jay Magazine Award of 
Excellence. The recipient of the award was Jay's friend, Michael 
Lomonaco, who was the chef at Windows.
    When Michael accepted the award he told a story about how he and Jay 
would meet almost every morning in the Windows cafeteria for coffee. And 
every morning as they were leaving, Jay would turn to Michael and say, 
``You know, we're the luckiest guys in the world to be working here.''
    When our kids went to visit Jay, which was often, they would look 
out of his office window. You felt like you could see all of New York 
City from there. And he would tell them that if they looked really, 
really hard uptown that they could see our apartment. It was so magical 
up there. Now, like thousands of other families, Melissa, Andrew and I 
are trying to figure out how to move on and how to live our lives. That 
doesn't mean that we will ever forget. It doesn't mean that we're trying 
to get back to normal. Normal does not exist anymore for any one of the 
families who lost someone that they loved on that day.
    It means that each one of us has to find a new normal. We have no 
choice. And my family is doing that. We're surrounded by incredible 
family, wonderful friends and support of communities. And we're doing it 
with the assistance of our neighbors, of our communities and you, our 
policymakers. And we are extremely thankful for all of the support that 
we have received from people everywhere.
    Let me illustrate with a personal story. Our family held a memorial 
service for Jay at the end of September. Jay had always been in the 
catering and restaurant businesses and had many friends, colleagues and 
clients all over the country.
    At that service blank cards were distributed with envelopes 
addressed to our children. People were asked to write down their 
memories of Jay, to tell us stories about the Jay that they knew. The 
response was unbelievable. Hundreds and hundreds of cards have come back 
from people who knew Jay. And then, we got cards and letters from people 
who didn't know Jay, but had heard about him and had heard about our 
family, and wanted to somehow try to connect and try and give some 
comfort to an individual family.
    Experiences like that continue to be repeated every day for the 
families who have been affected by September 11. As our Nation's 
leaders, you should know that at the family assistance unit of the fire 
department, we spent hours each day responding to letters and gifts from 
all over the country: from your States and your districts. And we 
respond to each one of them. We received cartons of letters from 
schools, camps, houses of worships, individual people from all over the 
country, teddy bears, quilts, pictures, books, offers of weekends away 
for family members, paintings, scholarships for children, songs, poems, 
prayers. Whatever it is that people have to give, they want to reach out 
to individual family members and somehow try and make a difference to 
each family.
    And these are the people who you represent. Please tell the men and 
the women and the families in your home districts and your States how 
much it means to us that so many Americans have offered us their 
generosity and their kindness.
    The events of September 11 were an attack on our Nation and they 
were attacks on individuals and individual families. Every one of the 
people who perished on that day was a husband, a father, a son, a wife, 
a mother, a daughter, a brother, a sister, a neighbor, a friend. Over 
2,800 individual people were lost on that day.
    And it's been remarkable to me how many Americans truly understand 
that each of us were real people, were real families who have 
experienced this enormous tragedy in very individual, very personal and 
very immediate ways.
    Every day the people who work for the City of New York go to 
enormous lengths to do whatever they can for us, for the families. The 
city, the State and the entire Nation have given us their support. Thank 
you.
    And when you go home, thank your constituents for their kindness, 
for their generosity and for never, ever letting anyone forget. Thank 
you.
    Mayor BLOOMBERG. Susan, thank you.
    And to you and to all the families, all we can really say is, 
``Those we lost are in our prayers and God bless.''
    For the terrorists, the attack on the World Trade Center, as 
devastating as it was, was a failure. It did not accomplish what they 
hoped it would. It did not weaken us. Instead, it united us. It brought 
us together as a Nation determined to defend our freedoms and to punish 
those responsible for this despicable act.
    Ordinary Americans showed the goodness in their hearts. They 
responded to 9/11 as if their own home communities had been attacked. An 
unprecedented outpouring of support flooded into New York from across 
the Nation.
    The following video you're about to see is our way of saying, 
``Thank you, America.''
    (Videotape presentation).
    Mayor BLOOMBERG. I want to thank the Interpublic Sports and 
Entertainment Group chairman, Mark Dowley, for producing that video and 
donating their services.
    The power, majesty and proud heritage of the United States are 
expressed in our national symbol, the American bald eagle. On behalf of 
the people of New York City, I am pleased to memorialize this historic 
joint session of Congress in our city by presenting a commemorative 
Steuben glass eagle to the House of Representatives.
    Minority Leader Gephardt.
    Thank you on behalf of all New Yorkers.
    Representative GEPHARDT. Thank you so much. I accept this on behalf 
of all of our Members. And, Charlie, I don't think you have an attitude 
at all.
    Thank you.
    Mayor BLOOMBERG. The city is also proud to present a commemorative 
eagle to the Senate. Minority Leader Lott, would you come up to the 
podium, please?
    On behalf of all New Yorkers, thank you, sir.
    Senator LOTT. Thank you very much, Mr. Mayor. On behalf of the U.S. 
Senate, we express to you our appreciation for all you've done, and for 
this. Senator Daschle and I will find a special place for this great 
eagle. Thank you.
    Mayor BLOOMBERG. Thank you.
    The SPEAKER. And Tom Daschle.
    Representative HASTERT. On behalf of the U.S. Congress, we have a 
unique gift: a token of that day, and a token of the strength of this 
Nation.
    Over the Capitol of the United States flew the flag of the United 
States of America. And on September 11, we took that flag down. We kept 
it. We weren't sure exactly how we were going to use that flag. But we 
think it's very appropriate today to give it to the City of New York as 
a memento of what this Congress believes in: the ability and strength of 
the people of New York. The spirit of the people of New York is truly 
the spirit of America. Thank you.
    Senator DASCHLE. On September 11, when the people of South Dakota 
saw what happened, they dropped everything. One ranch couple, themselves 
struggling right now, sold 100 head of cattle, and donated the proceeds 
to the victims and their families. A class of second graders collected 
pennies, thinking that they might be able to collect or raise a couple 
of hundred dollars. They raised $1,776.05.
    I'm sure you could find similar stories from Speaker Hastert's 
constituents in Illinois, Senator Lott's in Mississippi, Congressman 
Gephardt's in Missouri. But in reaching out to help the people of New 
York, we realized it was the people of New York who were helping us. 
Your courage helped steady a wounded Nation.
    So today, I join Speaker Hastert on behalf of all of those you 
inspired, to present you with this flag. We hope it'll find a home in 
the memorial you build to the victims of September 11, to let all New 
Yorkers know that they didn't just inspire a city, they inspired a 
nation.
    Mayor BLOOMBERG. Dick, would you come up? And, Trent, and if you 
could come up here as well.
    Thank you.
    Earlier, I proudly, perhaps boastfully but accurately, referred to 
New York City as the Nation's cultural capital. I will now demonstrate 
that this was not an idle boast. It is my great pleasure to introduce a 
great composer, arranger, conductor, musician, and in my book most 
importantly an educator. The winner of the Pulitzer Prize for music, and 
the artistic director of jazz at Lincoln Center, Winton Marsalis.
    (Musical presentation.)
    Mayor BLOOMBERG. As to my boast about culture, I will rest my case.
    Thank you.
    Well, thank you for joining us for this historic event. The Members 
of Congress will now exit en masse to visit Ground Zero and to pay their 
personal respects to the more than 2,800 people who died for freedom. 
Governor Pataki and I will go with them.
    But to facilitate their orderly departure, I would ask that all 
other guests please remain seated until the Members have left for the 
ballroom.
    Thank you for your cooperation. And thank you for showing your 
support for the greatest city on Earth.
                     In the House of Representatives

                          of the United States


                        Monday, September 9, 2002


                          Hon. Philip M. Crane


                               of illinois

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to join my colleagues in the House and 
Senate in commemorating the victims and heroes of September 11, 2001, 
during our special session of Congress held in Federal Hall in New York, 
NY.
  On the days following the attacks on September 11, Americans across 
the country came together to demonstrate the strength and resiliency of 
this great country. It is in that same spirit that we stand together 
today--both Republicans and Democrats--to reaffirm that strength and 
resiliency by showing a strong bipartisan expression that we are first 
and foremost Americans and are committed to protecting the freedoms and 
values that make this country great.
  As we go through this week and revisit some of the darkest moments in 
our Nation's history, we must remember that our Nation has always been 
one that has triumphed over adversity. At times of great despair, 
America has consistently risen to its greatest hours.
  In remembrance of those lives lost on September 11 and to heroes that 
emerged on that fateful day, I would like to close with some words from 
President Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address:

  that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause 
for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion--that we here 
highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this 
Nation shall have a new birth of freedom; and that this government of 
the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the 
Earth.

  May God bless America.


                           Hon. Bob Etheridge


                            of North Carolina

  Mr. Speaker, it's hard to believe that it's been almost a full year 
since that awful day. On September 11, 2001, all the world saw the very 
face of evil. And on that day and every day since, we have felt the 
heartbeat of America.
  For me, the most enduring image of 9/11 was the sight of the Pentagon 
on fire after the terrorists crashed American Airlines flight 77 into 
our Nation's military headquarters. A thick black smoky cloud oozed from 
the Pentagon and hung over the banks of the Potomac River. I will never 
forget seeing with my own eyes that proud building engulfed in flames. 
Then the whole world watched television in stunned disbelief as the Twin 
Towers of the World Trade Center came crumbling down in a fiery wreck of 
twisted steel.
  On that day, America was changed forever. But, the test in life is not 
whether or not you ever get knocked down. The true test is whether you 
have the courage, pride and determination to get back up again. Every 
day since September 11, the people of this country have gotten back up.
  We Americans from all walks of life have pulled together like never 
before. We have stood united to tell our enemies that the spirit of 
America will never be broken. We will not rest until we have eliminated 
Osama bin Laden and his terrorist network.
  In the year since 9/11, we have come to treasure the service and 
sacrifice of ordinary Americans as extraordinarily heroic. The selfless 
devotion of the firefighters, police, EMS and other public servants in 
New York City and the Pentagon have given us new appreciation for our 
hometown heroes whose everyday service does so much to strengthen our 
communities. The dedicated professionalism of our men and women in 
uniform renew our pride in our country and make us thankful for our 
many, many blessings. And the incredible story of the passengers of the 
hijacked plane who fought back and prevented the tragic events of that 
day from being even worse inspires us all to take charge and give back 
to our country.
   September 11 taught us anew the immeasurable strength of the uniquely 
American ideal of ``We, the people.'' As we memorialize the lives lost 1 
year ago, let us also celebrate the renewed spirit of America that has 
been reinvigorated by the service and sacrifice of so many ordinary 
citizens and inspirational heroes.


                          Hon. Robert A. Borski


                             of pennsylvania

  Mr. Speaker, and my fellow colleagues of the U.S. Congress, we are 
here in the City of New York as representatives of a United States that 
is bound together as never before. It is a tragic bond, as it came at a 
cost of immeasurable suffering to the people of this great city, and to 
those who lost their loved ones in the Pentagon or on flight 93 that 
ended in Shanksville, PA. Today we are gathered in remembrance of the 
events that pierced our hearts 1 year ago.
  On September 11, the terrible and violent acts perpetrated against our 
homeland took the lives of so many innocents. In the days after the 
attacks, the courage and strength of our rescue workers lifted the 
spirits of our Nation. In the weeks and months following, an outpouring 
of generosity from every corner of our Nation showed that we stand 
together. Thousands lined up to give blood in a gesture that Americans 
would share the essence of life with no regard for whom the recipient 
might be. The continuing work of the young men and women in our Armed 
Forces is a declaration that those responsible for such cowardly acts 
will not escape justice. Today, 1 year later, we can say that our wounds 
are healing. Our Nation has overcome a great deal, and it is unity that 
has helped us overcome our grief.
  We, as public servants, have come together to realize an even greater 
responsibility to our Nation. These memories are a reminder that we must 
remain vigilant while we rebuild and that we must never allow our 
greatest treasure, our liberty, to be vulnerable to the will of our 
enemies.
  We will never forget the innocent victims. We will never forget the 
heroes. It is with their memory in our hearts that we live each day with 
a greater sense of purpose and a deeper appreciation for the gifts that 
we in this Nation share.


                           Hon. Peter T. King


                               of new york

  Mr. Speaker, it is with great pride as an American and as a New Yorker 
that I commend my colleagues for taking part in this special joint 
meeting of Congress in historic Federal Hall.
  By meeting in this venerable hall in lower Manhattan--just blocks from 
where the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center were destroyed less than 
1 year ago--the U.S. Senate and House of Representatives have 
demonstrated our Government's lasting commitment to the people of New 
York. And by fighting back and emerging stronger than ever, New Yorkers 
have demonstrated their grit, their courage and their determination. On 
September 11, 2001, New York took our enemy's best shot and never 
wavered or faltered. The police officers, firefighters and all the 
rescue workers who raced into the inferno demonstrated unsurpassed 
courage and set the tone and standard for our Nation and the world. Just 
as significantly, the families of the brave men and women who were 
murdered that day just because they went to work in the World Trade 
Center have demonstrated a class and dignity that defy comprehension.
  None of us will ever forget where we were or what we were doing when 
we first heard the news of the terrorist attacks of September 11--the 
attack on the World Trade Center, the attack on the Pentagon and the 
bringing down of flight 93 in Pennsylvania by uncommonly heroic 
passengers. Nor will we forget how our Nation rallied behind President 
Bush as he commanded the war against international terrorism. That war 
will be waged on many battlefields and in many ways for many years to 
come. But we know that America will prevail. It will prevail in large 
part because of the fighting spirit that rose from the flames and smoke 
which engulfed lower Manhattan. And it is that spirit that the U.S. 
Congress has honored and acknowledged by holding this extraordinary 
session in Federal Hall. God bless America.


                           Hon. Tammy Baldwin


                              of wisconsin

  Mr. Speaker, today we gather here in Federal Hall to honor and 
recognize the courage and determination of the survivors of the horrible 
terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. It is fitting that we do so.
  It was here in Federal Hall that the new Congress of the United States 
first met in 1789 to govern our new Nation. It was here in New York that 
our Founding Fathers passed the laws that are the foundation for our 
democratic political system. From this solid foundation, our Nation has 
grown and prospered. Our people have excelled in science, in the 
humanities, in art and culture. We have grown to be a great Nation, home 
to a great people, with tremendous hopes and incredible dreams for the 
future. And it all began right here in Federal Hall.
  One year ago, terrorists attacked America. Their targets were not 
simply the buildings they destroyed and the people they murdered. They 
were attacking the very ideals that define what it means to be an 
American. They wanted to drive us apart and make us afraid.
  Mr. Speaker, I am proud to say that they failed.
  Faced with tragedy and destruction, the people of the United States, 
and particularly the people of New York, came together as one community. 
We gathered the emotional resources to survive and heal, and we pulled 
together the financial resources to rebuild. This has not been easy. It 
takes incredible courage to move forward after a tragedy like 9/11. But 
we did find that courage within ourselves.
  That is why it is so fitting that we are here in New York today. One 
year after September 11, we are rededicating our Nation. The terrorists 
have not won. They have lost. Our Nation is stronger and more united. 
Our freedom, our courage, our determination, our unity, our diversity, 
our charity and our democracy are our strengths. New York has exhibited 
all of these strengths in abundance in the last year. And these 
strengths are everywhere in America.


                           Hon. Jerrold Nadler


                               of new york

  Mr President, Mr. Speaker, today marks a historic occasion for New 
York and for the U.S. Congress. This is the first Congress that has 
convened here in New York since the First Congress convened here to 
watch President Washington take the oath of office and to pass the Bill 
of Rights.
  We join here today not as Republicans or Democrats, but as Americans. 
The symbolic gesture of our joint meeting is both solemn and 
celebratory.
  It is solemn because we come here today to honor a city devastated by 
the most terrible single attack on American soil in our history, and the 
thousands of innocent people lost in that attack. As the elected 
Representative for the area of New York most directly impacted by the 
attacks of September 11, 2001, I can tell you that my constituents are 
grateful for the act of solidarity with New York that we show here 
today. I can also tell you that they are even more grateful that 
Congress has rallied to help this city for the past year.
  Our joint meeting today is also celebratory. One year ago, a group of 
vicious and heartless terrorists sought to cripple this city and this 
country by obliterating one of its great landmarks. It was their hope 
that not only would thousands be rendered lifeless, but that our way of 
life, our democracy, would be extinguished. Today we celebrate the life 
and vibrancy of our democracy that still lives--and do so in a city that 
remains the most lively, diverse, and mighty on the face of the Earth, 
despite the worst efforts of those terrorists.
  It is only right that we seek out those who sought to destroy us. But 
bombs and bullets are merely the tools we use in our self-defense. 
Revenge against our foes will come not through bloodshed, but through 
acts defiant of their goals. For the last year, despite the aim of the 
terrorists to kill our national spirit, this Nation has proudly and 
defiantly displayed the flag from our homes, our cars, our community 
centers, and our houses of worship. Despite the murderous foes who 
sought to divide us, our people have joined in concerts celebrating our 
country and its ideals, and vigils marking our unity.
  Over two centuries ago, after stumbling through a government under the 
Articles of Confederation, with most of the world wishing to see our 
demise, we gathered here, defiant of the world and its wishes, resolved 
to make our great democratic experiment work. It is only fitting then, 
that we stand here again defiant of those who wish for our demise. Let 
there be no doubt, today we are telling the world that New York lives 
on, America lives on, and her ideals live on!


                     Hon. Randy ``Duke'' Cunningham


                              of california

  Mr. Speaker, 1 year ago, America watched with horror as the tragic 
events of September 11 unfolded here in New York City and in our 
Nation's Capital. On that morning, already aghast at the attack on the 
Twin Towers, I looked out the window of my Capitol Hill office and 
gasped in horror as I watched the black smoke billow out of the Pentagon 
and drift across the clear blue sky. Still stunned, I was quickly 
shuffled out of my office to safety.
  Today, as I reflect on the profound loss that our Nation faced in the 
midst of these horrific attacks, I am also heartened by the selfless 
acts of valor, community spirit, and national unity that have followed 
this tragedy. Despite the stresses that our Nation has experienced, the 
ties that bind our diverse country together are stronger than ever.
  Immediately following the terrorist attacks on America, President Bush 
called on all of us to volunteer to bring our country together and 
reestablish those local ties that oftentimes are neglected. Americans 
responded. The resurgence of commitment to community can be found in our 
homes, our houses of worship, our schools, and our workplaces. From New 
York City to San Diego, citizens responded with soup kitchens, mentoring 
programs and charitable donations of goods and time. And the proud men 
and women of the U.S. military responded, allowing our country to take 
an aggressive lead in the war on terrorism.
  I have heard many stories of outstanding individuals who have gone 
above and beyond this call to aid those in their community through 
extraordinary service and exemplary acts. While we reflect on the 
American spirit, it is also important to highlight the measures we have 
taken to prevent future attacks of this magnitude.
  The attacks on our Nation were motivated by intolerant and ignorant 
individuals seeking to forever change our way of life and destroy this 
great Nation. Much like Washington, Adams and Jefferson, we must seek to 
ensure that this country remains an example of democracy and freedom--we 
must be the patriots of today.
  Since September 11, 2001, all levels and branches of government have 
cooperated to strengthen aviation and border security, stockpile more 
medicines to defend against bioterrorism, improve information sharing 
among our intelligence agencies and deploy more resources and personnel 
to protect our critical infrastructure.
  At the same time, the changing nature of threats to our Nation 
requires a new and reformed government structure to protect against 
enemies who can strike at any time with any number of weapons. As I 
write this column, no single government agency has homeland security as 
its primary mission. In fact, responsibilities for homeland security are 
dispersed among more than 100 different government organizations. 
America needs a unified homeland security structure that will improve 
protection against today's threats and be flexible enough to help meet 
the unknown threats of the future.
  President Bush has proposed the most significant transformation of the 
U.S. Government in over a half century by consolidating the current 
confusing patchwork of government activities into a single department 
called the Department of Homeland Security. Changing threats require a 
new government structure to meet these threats. The Department of 
Homeland Security will have in one place all the resources needed to do 
what it takes to protect our country. The reorganization of America's 
homeland security infrastructure is crucial to overcoming the enormous 
threat we face today.
  The shocking and tragic events of September 11 reminded us of the 
frailty of life, but today's special session demonstrates our resilience 
and strength in the face of adversity. Thousands went to work on 
September 11 thinking about their jobs, their families, their friends--
most likely not contemplating their own mortality. Yet in an instant, 
death and injury met them face to face. We must never forget those who 
perished, and we honor them again today. We owe it to their memory to 
ensure that we never face such a loss again. Regrouping as individuals 
and as a nation, we must continue rebuilding, and working to defeat the 
terrorists by growing even stronger as a nation.


                        Hon. Constance A. Morella


                               of Maryland

  Mr. Speaker, a year ago, on September 11, 2001, Americans were faced 
with the horrible reality of that day's heinous attacks.
  As we gather here today, in the building that served as our Nation's 
first Capitol and witnessed the inauguration of our first President, our 
blessed Nation stands firm and it stands strong.
  Over the past year, Americans have shown those who wished to tear our 
country apart that their cowardly actions only brought our Nation closer 
together. Here in the place where our democracy was born, we say to the 
world that these States of America remain united. We are united by our 
values, our communities, and our freedoms. Just as we will never forget 
what makes this Nation great, we will never forget the hardships we have 
endured. We will always remember September 11.
  Even though America has had a year to mourn our losses, we still weep 
for the victims of that day. We continue to offer our prayers, our 
comfort, and our resolve to those who lost loved ones on that day.
  Without question, the attacks of September 11 were a strike against 
all nations that value freedom and democracy. It was an act of war, but 
we were not to be intimidated. As a Congress, we remain steadfast with 
our Nation in the fight against terrorism. American history has always 
been defined by the resiliency of our people, and I stand here today to 
repeat our solemn pledge to defend freedom and liberty and show that we 
will remain resilient no matter what the threat. The freedoms and values 
our forefathers gathered in this hall to protect are simply too 
sacrosanct to ever be compromised.


                     Hon. Juanita Millender-McDonald


                              of California

  Mr. Speaker, it is an honor for me as a Member of the U.S. Congress to 
convene here in New York today, September 6, 2002, on this historic 
occasion. It has been 1 year since the tragic terrorist attacks of 
September 11. It has been over 200 years since Congress convened here in 
New York at Federal Hall to elect the first President of the United 
States and to ratify the Bill of Rights.
  We applaud the people of this great city and State for their resolve 
in light of the devastation thrust upon them. It is a credit to their 
perseverance and their total commitment to freedom that the 107th 
Congress stands proud today. We reflect with remorse on the past year, 
but also look forward with hope and optimism as we proceed in the 
healing of our Nation. On this historic day, the Congress has convened 
to mourn the loss of families and friends during the September 11 
attacks, and to salute the heroism of our police officers, firefighters, 
and emergency responders who performed with unbridled bravery and gave 
so selflessly on that tragic day.
  As I reflect on the tragic events of a year ago, I am reminded of the 
heavy hearts of so many great Americans who have grappled with this 
cowardly act and of those who had loved ones who perished in New York, 
Pennsylvania and the Pentagon. For those who lost friends and coworkers 
and who must now try to go on with their lives, our prayers are offered 
to these families and their friends and to all America and other 
countries who experienced loss.
  Today we are expressing our gratitude to the firefighters, police 
officers, healthcare workers and those individuals who, on that fateful 
day, performed heroic deeds and helped their fellow citizens and 
neighbors without regard for their own welfare.
  During the recent year, my colleagues and I in Congress have actively 
engaged in debate about how to develop an agenda that addresses the new 
world in which we now live.
  Though our country and the world have been shaken, we continue to 
build bridges toward progress and strengthen the bond of patriotism and 
the spirit of hope. I cannot express how important it is to map out a 
course for our future that will sustain, inspire and protect our 
children. We must provide our children with a sense of optimism and 
hope.
  Our domestic efforts and grief over the tragic events of September 11 
have heightened our appreciation for the pain of others around the world 
who have been subjected to the brutality and inhumanness of terrorism. 
That is why we have supported liberation and democratization efforts in 
Afghanistan and seek to assist in the rehabilitation of those persecuted 
and those who are attempting to rebuild their lives and their country. 
We must complete our mission there.
  As we return to Washington, our Nation and its Congress will never 
forget the victims of September 11. On this occasion of reflection, 
recommitment and rededication to freedom and democracy, we are affirming 
our commitment to remember and honor the men and women who paid the 
ultimate price--their lives. They will always be a part of our history 
and our hearts. Our Nation shall continue to rise to meet the challenge 
of terrorism and the threats posed by terrorists who seek to derail 
freedom and a Nation of peace.

    RECOGNIZING THE HEROISM AND COURAGE DISPLAYED BY AIRLINE FLIGHT 
                           ATTENDANTS EACH DAY


                          Hon. Thomas E. Petri


                              of Wisconsin

  Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and agree to the concurrent 
resolution (H. Con. Res. 401) recognizing the heroism and courage 
displayed by airline flight attendants each day, as amended.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                            H. Con. Res. 401


  Whereas over 100,000 men and women serve as airline flight attendants 
in the United States;

  Whereas flight attendants dedicate themselves to serving and 
protecting their passengers;

  Whereas flight attendants are responsible for customer service aboard 
an aircraft;

  Whereas flight attendants react to dangerous situations as the first 
line of defense of airline passengers;

  Whereas safety and security are a flight attendant's primary concerns;

  Whereas flight attendants evacuate aircraft in emergency situations;

  Whereas flight attendants defend passengers against hijackers, 
terrorists, and abusive passengers;

  Whereas flight attendants handle in-flight medical emergencies;

  Whereas flight attendants perform routine safety and service duties on 
board an aircraft;

  Whereas 25 flight attendants lost their lives aboard 4 hijacked 
flights on September 11, 2001;

  Whereas 5 flight attendants helped prevent United Airlines Flight 93 
from reaching its intended target on September 11, 2001;

  Whereas flight attendants provided assistance to passengers across the 
United States who had their flights diverted on September 11, 2001;

  Whereas on December 22, 2001, flight attendants helped subdue 
attempted shoe bomber, Richard Reid, who attempted to kill all 185 
passengers and 12 crew members on board American Airlines Flight 63; and

  Whereas on February 7, 2002, flight attendants helped prevent Pablov 
Moreira, a Uruguayan citizen, from breaking into the cockpit during 
United Airlines Flight 855 from Miami to Buenos Aires: Now, therefore, 
be it

  Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That 
Congress--

  (1) expresses profound gratitude to airline flight attendants for 
their daily service to make air travel safe;

  (2) honors the courage and dedication of flight attendants;

  (3) expresses support for the flight attendants who displayed heroism 
on September 11, 2001, and to all flight attendants who continue to 
display heroism each day; and

  (4) directs the Clerk of the House of Representatives to send a copy 
of this resolution to a family member of each of the flight attendants 
killed on September 11, 2001.

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in strong support of H. Con. Res. 401, 
honoring the over 100,000 men and women who serve as flight attendants. 
As we near the final anniversary of the September 11 attacks, I think it 
is appropriate that we stop to recognize these everyday heroes.
  America's flight attendants dedicated their lives to ensuring the 
safety and the security of their passengers. There are over 20,000 
commercial airline flights each day, and on these flights, flight 
attendants put the well-being of each of their passengers ahead of their 
own. They are the first responders to all emergencies in the cabin of an 
aircraft. They provide in-flight medical assistance to passengers in 
need. They may be the only line of defense should terrorists once again 
attempt to take control of an airplane.
  It was the flight attendants who subdued attempted shoe bomber Richard 
Reid aboard American flight 63 last September. Last year, 25 flight 
attendants lost their lives aboard the 4 hijacked flights on September 
11. In recognition of their important role, the House overwhelmingly 
passed legislation that would significantly increase self-defense and 
situational training to aid flight attendants in the case of another 
terrorist hijacking.
  I would like to express my profound gratitude to all airline flight 
attendants for their daily service to make air travel safe and secure, 
and urge the passage of this resolution.


                         Hon. Elijah E. Cummings


                               of maryland

  Mr. Speaker, I, too, want to commend the subcommittee chairman, the 
gentleman from Florida (Mr. Mica), and the ranking member, the gentleman 
from Illinois (Mr. Lipinski), for their action on H. Con. Res. 401 that 
recognizes the largely unsung heroism that airline flight attendants 
display on a daily basis.
  On September 11 of last year, 25 flight attendants lost their lives as 
a result of terrorist attacks. When they left their homes and loved ones 
that morning, I am sure that none of them knew what tragic events would 
unfold before the day's end, and what role they would play in it. Five 
flight attendants working on United Airlines flight 93 helped prevent 
hijackers from reaching their intended target of Washington, DC. I am 
sure that many of us have to give credit to them for perhaps saving our 
lives.
  Every day a workforce of 100,000 flight attendants make it their 
mission to ensure the safety of passengers that rely on them. In the war 
on terrorism, they can be compared to ground soldiers. They are our 
front line of defense. Not only did flight attendants display acts of 
heroism on September 11, but they also have repeatedly reacted 
courageously to thwart acts of terrorism on American aircraft.
  Mr. Speaker, it is an honor to acknowledge the heroism and bravery of 
flight attendants. After September 11, when many were afraid to return 
to the air, these courageous workers devotedly returned to their jobs. I 
admire their sense of dedication and professional attitude. I urge my 
colleagues to support this very appropriate resolution.


                         Hon. Nick J. Rahall II


                            of west virginia

  Mr. Speaker, on behalf of West Virginians and Americans as a whole, I 
want to express our deep appreciation to the flight attendants who 
provide outstanding service while ensuring public safety for thousands 
of Americans on a daily basis. In addition, I want to commend our 
Nation's flight attendants for their acts of heroism. A considerable 
number of them demonstrated their great courage during the September 11 
attacks that occurred almost exactly 1 year ago today.
  It should not be overlooked that in the days, weeks, and months 
following that terrible day, America's flight attendants bravely resumed 
their duties serving our flying public. This contribution aided the 
almost immediate restoration of air service, and it provides a profound 
demonstration of this country's refusal to let the terrorists win. Our 
flight attendants, and by extension, all of us would not allow a few 
evil doers to destroy our daily activities and our unique way of life.
  As we approach the anniversary of September 11, we must remember the 
contributions of this group of individuals who have so ably demonstrated 
their importance to this country and to its citizens. They stand as an 
example for the brave efforts of all hard-working Americans as we cope 
with the events and the aftermath of that infamous day.


                            Hon. Rob Simmons


                             of Connecticut

  Mr. Speaker, a great many things changed on September 11, 2001. Among 
them, Americans began thinking differently about air travel, and we all 
gained a greater respect for those who are pledged to guarantee our 
safety as we fly.
  For its part, Congress has moved to make air travel safer, and I have 
no doubt we will do more. But one of the main lines of defense against 
events in the air rests with the pilots and flight crews.
  The professionalism, courage and common sense exhibited by these 
individuals is clearly exemplified in the actions of Madeline Amy Todd 
Sweeney, who was a flight attendant aboard American Airlines flight 11 
on September 11. That was the first aircraft to crash into the World 
Trade Center.
  Showing courage under pressure, Amy was one of the first individuals 
to use a cell phone and notify the world of the hijackings that were 
under way. Her last acts of bravery were critically important in 
identifying and exposing those terrorists who threatened our lives, our 
country and our values.
  Ms. Sweeney is a true American hero. She was many things to many 
wonderful people, a faithful wife, a loving mother, and a devoted 
daughter. But she will be remembered by most Americans for her 
extraordinary heroism and devotion to duty on a fateful day.
  Consider this--those who hijacked American Airlines flight 11 had 
years of training and preparation for their terrible mission. They had 
plenty of time to consider what they were going to do. But for Amy, the 
decisions of a lifetime were compressed into a few terrible minutes. Yet 
she responded with tremendous courage, calmness and common sense. She 
did her duty in the face of death. And at the last moment, she called 
out to God for salvation.
  I had the honor earlier this year to attend a ceremony in 
Massachusetts where she became the first individual to be awarded the 
``Madeline Amy Todd Sweeney Award for Civilian Bravery.'' It is in 
recognition of Amy Todd Sweeney's heroism and courageous spirit that 
this award was created.
  Future recipients--awarded annually on the anniversary of her death--
must demonstrate exceptional bravery, without regard for personal 
safety, in an effort to save the life or lives of another or others in 
actual or imminent danger. It is a fitting tribute to her conduct that 
this award has been established. There can be little doubt that many 
people are alive today because of her quick thinking and her heroism. 
Her actions remind us that courage is rightly esteemed as the first of 
human qualities because it is the quality that guarantees all others.
  And we should remember that courage does not mean an absence of fear, 
because without fear there can be no courage. Courage is doing the thing 
you think you cannot do.
  Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent to enter into the Record a recent 
article from the New London Day entitled, ``A Hero on Flight 11, She Put 
Her Job First: Madeline Amy Todd Sweeney.''
  May God bless and keep you, Madeline Amy Todd Sweeney, and may God 
bless America.

  A Hero on flight 11, She Put Her Job First: Madeline Amy Todd Sweeney

                        9-11: The Shadow Of A Day


                           (By Bethe Defresne)


  Once the extended family of Madeline Amy Todd Sweeney verified that 
she was aboard the flight, there was no waiting for a miracle. There was 
no use praying that the blond, blue-eyed young mother with the dazzling 
smile had been caught in some pocket of hope within the ashes of the 
World Trade Center, and that somehow she would rise up and come home to 
them.

  Relatives and friends of victims who worked in the towers would spend 
days or even weeks holding off the inevitable. But for Sweeney's loved 
ones, there was only the swift, burning onslaught of grief.

  She was a flight attendant on American Airlines flight 11, the plane 
that hit the North Tower at 8:48 a.m. on Sept. 11, when the world still 
thought it must have been some terrible accident.

  Sweeney's colleagues in air control back at Logan International 
Airport in Boston, where the flight had taken off that morning bound for 
Los Angeles, were among the few who knew better--because she had told 
them.

  Calmly, and with painstaking attention to detail, Sweeney had 
explained that the plane was being hijacked. What she said would later 
help Federal investigators reconstruct how the plane was taken over.

  Sweeney reported the seat numbers of the hijackers, including 
suspected ringleader Mohamed Atta, and the progress of their assault. 
She described the landscape below after the flight was diverted, right 
up until the shocking end.

  Her last words were, ``I see water and building. Oh my God! Oh my 
God!''

  Sweeney's father, William A. Todd of Norwich, expects that some day 
he'll listen to a tape of conversations from the airplane. But he's not 
ready.

  This Sept. 11, Todd will be in Boston, the point of Sweeney's 
departure, not New York, the site of her tragic end, to mark the 
anniversary of the terrorist attacks. There he will witness the 
presentation of the second annual Madeline Amy Todd Sweeney Award for 
Civilian Bravery, posthumously presented to her in February with her 
family in attendance.

  Sweeney lived in Acton, Mass., with her husband, Michael, and their 
two children, Anna, 6, and Jack, 5. The award, in the form of a 
medallion, is to be given each year to a Massachusetts resident who 
exemplifies the courage that Sweeney displayed.

  Her reports from the doomed airplane have been credited with helping 
officials make the crucial decision to ground all airplanes on Sept. 11, 
perhaps saving many lives.

  It's good, Todd acknowledged, to have something to do and somewhere to 
go on this grim anniversary. And he really didn't want to be in New 
York.

  ``It's too much,'' he says.

  Mike Sweeney, who could not be reached, is reportedly coping as best 
he can, and also plans to be at the presentation in Boston on Wednesday.

  Reflecting today on what enabled his 35-year-old daughter to show such 
remarkable strength under intense pressure, Todd draws upon an apt and 
familiar analogy, that of a soldier in battle. As an Army war veteran 
who saw combat in Korea, Todd, 65, says his daughter was doing what she 
was trained to do in a situation like that: focus not on yourself, but 
on your job.

  Todd treasures an American flag carried in Sweeney's honor aboard an 
F-16CG Falcon during a Jan. 26 combat mission over Afghanistan. The flag 
was sent to him along with a citation from the 332d Air Expedition 
Group, called ``The Tip of the Spear,'' certifying that the flag was 
carried ``In Memory of the Grace and Bravery of Madeline Amy Todd 
Sweeney, who lost her life to a terrorist attack on the WTC while 
serving on American Airlines flight 11 on Sept. 11, 2001.''

  Todd hasn't decided yet where to display the flag, which he handles 
reverently, like a flag that has been draped over a soldier's coffin. It 
was a nephew in the Air Force, Patrick Todd, who arranged through his 
commanding officer to have the flag carried and delivered.

  Sweeney came from a large extended family, with numerous aunts, uncles 
and cousins. She reveled in those myriad relationships, said Todd, and 
will be especially missed at the Sept. 28 wedding of her brother, 
William Todd III, who lives in Massachusetts. He was her only sibling.

  Sitting at the kitchen table in his home on Corning Road, Todd, who 
retired after 15 years as a welder at Electric Boat in Groton, appears 
to take some comfort in thinking about the lasting impression his 
daughter's life has made on others. But he is not a man given to 
displaying an excess of emotion.

  ``What can you say?'' he asks. ``Not a day goes by that I don't think 
of her.''

  Tears well up in his tired eyes, but he won't let them go. His wife of 
23 years, Doris, is more talkative and openly emotional. Sweeney was 
like a daughter to her, she says, although they only got together on 
visits, mostly during the summer. Todd and his first wife divorced when 
Sweeney was 10, and she continued to live with her mother in Nashua, 
N.H.

  It's not very difficult for family members to imagine what Sweeney, 
whom everyone called Amy, would have been doing this past year had she 
not been among the 3,008 victims of Sept. 11. She would have continued 
to love being a wife and mother, kept in close touch with her large 
circle of friends and family, and, of course, kept on flying.

  The 12-year veteran of American Airlines was at a point in life where, 
it seems, she had everything she wanted. ``She loved to fly, and she 
loved to travel,'' says Todd. She especially relished trips to the 
Caribbean.

  The flight to Los Angeles was also one of her favorites, Todd says, 
because she got a layover in California.

  After Sweeney graduated from high school, before she married and went 
to flight attendant school, she took a year off to live and travel in 
California, says Todd. This was her one real fling with being totally 
carefree.

  But shouldering responsibility was something Sweeney apparently did 
willingly, with a modest touch that endeared her to family, friends and 
colleagues, as well as passengers.

  She was ``a natural at being a flight attendant'' wrote one of her 
peers in a tribute booklet put out by American Airlines and given to all 
the families of those who died on flight 11. She was a genuine people 
person, it was said, always the first to volunteer when help was needed.

  In her heroic death, Sweeney is forever linked with one colleague in 
particular, fellow flight attendant Betty Ong. The two women worked as a 
team to alert ground officials about what was happening.

  The Todds have a tape of a ``Prime Time'' TV segment on the two women, 
hosted by Diane Sawyer. Sweeney's husband, Mike, is featured along with 
several members of Ong's family. So, too, are home videos of Sweeney 
playing and singing with her children.

  But most of the program is devoted to what happened on flight 11.

  Doris Todd cries softly, and her husband sits stoically upright in his 
chair, as a Logan flight manager who got the first call recounts his 
conversations with Sweeney. ``Amy, honey,'' he began, ``what's going 
on?''

  Everything after that was dark--throats slashed, orders from 
hijackers--but Sweeney remained purposeful and calm through it all.

  The Todds find this tape difficult to watch, but say they've looked at 
it several times. During the program, the Ong family reports that a bone 
and a flesh fragment from Betty Ong were recovered from the WTC site.

  ``Nothing was found of Amy,'' says Todd, not even a bit of DNA. But 
this is not something to dwell on, he says. He'd rather hold the flag 
that was carried over a battlefield in her honor, or point out the sign 
in her memory attached to his truck, the one he drove in the June parade 
for ``A Reason to Ride,'' an organization that raises funds for disabled 
and homeless veterans.

  There's been talk, Todd says, that Sweeney and some other Sept. 11 
heroes might be posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom. 
U.S. Rep. Rob Simmons, R-2d District, and Sen. Edward Kennedy of 
Massachusetts are among those who have proposed Sweeney for the 
prestigious award.

  The Todds haven't gotten involved in the debate over what kind of 
memorial should be erected at Ground Zero, but they do have two thoughts 
on the subject. ``It should be tall,'' they say. ``And it should have 
all the names, like the Vietnam War Memorial.''

  Sweeney didn't have enough information in that early hour of Sept. 11 
to go on the offensive, like the crew and passengers of United flight 
93, forced down in a field in Pennsylvania. But she died in service to 
her passengers and, it turned out, to her country.

  It's almost impossible to find a source of gratitude in the horror of 
Sept. 11. But the Todds say they're at least glad to know that almost to 
the last moment Madeline Amy Todd Sweeney was not living in terror, but 
helping others.

                PETER J. GANCI, JR. POST OFFICE BUILDING


                            Hon. Jo Ann Davis


                               of Virginia

  Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass the bill (H.R. 5336) 
to designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service located at 380 Main 
Street in Farmingdale, NY, as the ``Peter J. Ganci, Jr. Post Office 
Building.''
  The Clerk read as follows:

                                H.R. 5336


  Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled,

                    SECTION 1. PETER J. GANCI POST OFFICE BUILDING.


  (a) Designation.--The facility of the United States Postal Service 
located at 380 Main Street in Farmingdale, New York, shall be known and 
designated as the ``Peter J. Ganci, Jr. Post Office Building''.

  (b) References.--Any reference in a law, map, regulation, document, 
paper, or other record of the United States to the facility referred to 
in subsection (a) shall be deemed to be a reference to the Peter J. 
Ganci, Jr. Post Office Building.

  Mr. Speaker, H.R. 5336, introduced by our distinguished colleague from 
New York (Mr. King), designates a post office in Farmingdale, NY, as the 
Peter J. Ganci, Jr., Post Office Building. Members of the entire House 
delegation from the State of New York are cosponsors of this 
legislation.
  Mr. Speaker, on September 11, immediately after a jet struck the first 
tower at the World Trade Center, Peter Ganci, chief of department for 
the New York City Fire Department, rushed to the scene from his command 
post in downtown Brooklyn and started the rescue effort.
  He was in the basement of tower one when it collapsed. Miraculously, 
he survived, dug himself out of the rubble and went back to work.
  It then became apparent that the second tower would fall. Ganci, as 
the highest ranking uniformed officer on the scene, directed everyone to 
clear out of the area, but Ganci did not himself leave while his men 
were inside the tower. Ganci said, ``I'm not leaving my men,'' and 
advanced toward the towers to continue his life's work of saving and 
protecting others.
  Chief Ganci was in the basement of the second tower when it collapsed.
  Prior to joining the New York City Fire Department, Ganci served in 
the Farmingdale Fire Department as a volunteer and in the 82d Airborne 
Division. Ganci served in the New York Fire Department for 33 years and 
was decorated repeatedly for bravery.
  Ganci is survived by his wife, Kathleen; his sons, Christopher and 
Peter; and his daughter, Danielle. His son, Peter Ganci III, now serves 
with Ladder Company 111 of the New York City Fire Department.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge adoption of H.R. 5336.


                           Hon. Danny K. Davis


                               of Illinois

  As a member of the House Committee on Government Reform, I am pleased 
to join my colleague today in the consideration of two postal naming 
bills: H.R. 5336, introduced by the gentleman from New York (Mr. King), 
which names a post office in Farmingdale, NY, after Peter Ganci; and 
H.R. 4797, introduced by the gentleman from California (Mr. Becerra), 
which names a post office in Los Angeles, CA, after Nat King Cole. These 
measures have the support of their respective State congressional 
delegations to name U.S. postal facilities after very deserving 
individuals, and I urge their swift passage.
  H.R. 5336, to designate the facility of the U.S. Postal Service 
located at 380 Main Street in Farmingdale, NY, as the Peter J. Ganci, 
Jr., Post Office Building, was introduced by the gentleman from New York 
(Mr. King) on September 5, 2002.
  An American hero, Peter J. Ganci was the New York City Fire 
Department's highest ranking chief who died when the World Trade Center 
came down. Chief Ganci had been on the radio in front of the trade 
center directing the rescue efforts when the building collapsed.
  Who was Chief Ganci? He was 54 years old and a resident of Massapequa, 
NY; the chief of the department, one of the highest ranking uniformed 
officers in the fire department; husband to Kathleen; father to Peter 
III, Christopher and Danielle. He was also a 33-year-old veteran of the 
New York Fire Department, whose son Peter is a firefighter assigned to 
Ladder Company 111 in Brooklyn, NY, and Brooklyn, NY, is the place where 
Peter Ganci got his start in 1960.
  After serving in engine and ladder companies, Mr. Ganci rose to 
lieutenant, captain, battalion chief, deputy chief and then acting 
chief. He also ran the Bureau of Fire Investigation, and was appointed 
the chief of operations prior to becoming chief of the department.
  A hands-on man, Chief Ganci was doing his job, commanding the rescue 
operations at the New York World Trade Center.
  Accordingly, I urge swift passage of this bill and commend my 
colleague for seeking to honor Chief Peter J. Ganci, Jr., in this 
matter.


                           Hon. Peter T. King


                               of New York

  Mr. Speaker, I am privileged to rise today in support of this 
legislation. Pete Ganci was a constituent of mine. He was an individual 
who personified the leadership and the bravery which resulted last 
September 11 in the greatest rescue operation in the history of this 
country.
  Twenty-five thousand people were rescued that day, and it was done 
primarily through the efforts of the New York City Fire Department, and 
Chief Pete Ganci was the chief of the department, who was also the 
highest ranking uniformed officer ever to die in the line of duty, and 
as the gentlewoman pointed out, Chief Ganci was there that day with his 
men. Chief Ganci was there in the line of duty.
  Chief Ganci was there directing the operation against this horrific 
attack that was carried out against our country, and when the first 
tower fell, Chief Ganci barely escaped with his life, and when he saw 
the terrible carnage that resulted and saw the terrible danger which was 
still being faced by the North Tower, which had not yet fallen, Chief 
Ganci ordered the entire operation to be moved north.
  As the entire operation, including the mayor and other officials, went 
north, Pete Ganci went south to be with his men, and that personified 
the type of leadership which Pete Ganci gave in the New York City Fire 
Department. As the gentlewoman pointed out, he had been a member of the 
department more than 33 years, rising to the highest office in that 
department, chief of the department. Prior to that, he had been a 
paratrooper in the 82d Airborne, and until his death, he was an active 
member of the Farmingdale Volunteer Fire Department in New York.
  Mr. Speaker, at this point also, before I digress, though, I want to 
pay a special debt of thanks to Sal Pontillo, the Nassau County 
legislator who represents the district in which Mr. Ganci lived in 
Nassau County, and he has come to me with this request. We have worked 
closely on it, and he has also served as liaison with the Ganci family 
and helped to bring this about.
  Mr. Speaker, many of us look back on the date of September 11 and we 
realize what a turning point it was in the history of our country. It 
was a turning point for many reasons. The point I would like to focus on 
today is that after that attack, actually as the attack was going on, as 
the buildings were burning, as the buildings were coming down, as people 
were being killed, as people were being rescued, what the eyes of the 
world and the eyes of the country saw was the valor of the New York City 
firefighters and police officers, those who were carrying out this 
rescue operation under the most trying circumstances, and the person who 
was leading that operation was Chief Ganci. Just think what would have 
happened if he had not done what he did, if the firefighters had not 
responded the way they did, instead of running into the building, Chief 
Ganci had run out of the building and kept going. On the contrary, he 
went right back in the line of fire, the battlefield commander who died 
with his men. It was that type of courage that was shown that day, that 
type of heroism that was shown that day, that type of spirit that was 
shown that day which I think has inspired our country to fight back, to 
come back and to win this war against international terrorism, and even 
just as important, to show that America cannot be vanquished, that we 
can take the best shot of the enemy and come back stronger than ever.
  That is what Chief Ganci personified that day. In fact, it is the type 
of story that if somebody had produced a movie about it, it would not 
have been believed, for a person to be there when the first tower came 
down and somehow survive it and go back in and to be killed in the 
second tower, which to me is the type of courage that I cannot even 
begin to fathom.
  This was the first battle, Mr. Speaker, and the first great war of the 
21st century, and Chief Ganci died as a battlefield commander in that 
war, and for that, this country owes him its untiring thanks and 
gratitude for all that he has done.
  I want to say a special debt of thanks to his wife, Kathy, who has 
shown tremendous courage throughout this entire 363 days; his son, Pete, 
who is a member of the New York City Fire Department; his son, Chris; 
and his daughter, Danielle.
  I also want to thank the other 30 members of the New York delegation 
for unanimously supporting this resolution. To me, it is just another 
indication of the tremendous regard that all the men and women of the 
New York City Fire Department had for Chief Ganci and, indeed, all of 
the members of the New York delegation, everyone who had the opportunity 
to know Chief Ganci.
  I can say I was at his funeral last September 15. It was one of the 
most moving moments I have ever been involved in, to see the tremendous 
outpouring of support from his community in North Massapequa and 
Farmingdale, all of the surrounding community, by the thousands, coming 
out to join in this salute to Chief Pete Ganci.
  So, Mr. Speaker, with that I thank the gentlewoman for yielding me the 
time. I thank the House for considering this resolution today, and I 
extend my very best thoughts, prayers and gratitude to the Ganci family 
for all they have gone through.


                            Hon. Jo Ann Davis


                               of Virginia

  I thank my colleague for introducing this legislation to honor the 
chief of the New York City Fire Department. As the wife of a 
professional firefighter for almost 30 years, I know the bravery that 
these firefighters have, and I have had people tell me why they let 
chiefs send men in there to their deaths, and I have told them quite 
clearly, if he would not have sent them in, I know the firefighters 
would have gone in anyway. That is just the type of bravery they do 
have, and again, I thank my colleagues, and I urge adoption of this 
resolution.

  RECOGNIZING ROSELLE, MICHAEL HINGSON'S GUIDE DOG, FOR HER BRAVERY AT 
                   WORLD TRADE CENTER ON SEPTEMBER 11


                          Hon. Lynn C. Woolsey


                              of california

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor Roselle, a yellow Labrador dog, 
whose bravery on September 11 as she led her blind owner Michael Hingson 
from the World Trade Center is an inspiration.
  Michael and Roselle have become well known as representatives of the 
power of the human-animal bond to build a trust that can carry them 
through even the greatest tragedy.
  Michael was working on the 78th floor of the World Trade Center when 
the building was struck. After making sure everyone in the office was 
evacuated safely, Roselle and Michael began the long descent down the 
stairwell. Despite the heat and smoke, they calmly made their way from 
the building and started running for the subway as tower two began to 
collapse. In the subway, Roselle guided Michael and another woman down 
the stairs and led Michael to the home of a friend in mid-Manhattan.
  Michael has traveled with a dog from Guide Dogs for the Blind for 37 
years. Roselle's ability to lead, and Michael's to command, under such 
difficult circumstances embodies the success of the lifelong 
partnerships developed through this program.
  Mr. Speaker, Roselle's story demonstrates that there were many kinds 
of bravery on September 11, 2001. It is appropriate to honor the bond 
that enabled her to save the life of Michael Hingson.

                         REFLECTIONS ON AMERICA


                         Hon. Joseph M. Hoeffel


                             of pennsylvania

  Mr. Speaker, recently, as the 1-year anniversary of September 11 
approached, I looked back over the statement I released the day after 
the attacks occurred. As I read the statement that was issued even as 
the smoke and dust still billowed over lower Manhattan, the Pentagon and 
a field in rural Pennsylvania, I was struck by how easy it was to write 
some of the words and how difficult it was to write others.
  It was tremendously difficult to put into words my feelings of 
disbelief and anger over the insane acts of 19 individuals and their 
supporters. It still is. It was heartrending to try to voice the sorrow 
and sympathy I felt for the victims and their families. And that, too, 
is still difficult.
  It was not difficult, however to write the words of hope, pride and 
conviction I had for this country and its people on September 12. And, 
today, a year later, I am happy to report that the hope, pride and 
conviction were well-founded. On September 12, 2001 1 wrote, in part:

  As I walked to work across the Capitol grounds this morning, a day 
after the attacks, I was struck as I often am by the incredible beauty 
of the U.S. Capitol Building. The dome was shining a brilliant white 
against a clear blue sky on a beautiful late summer day. I realized that 
the glorious dome, such a symbol of the strength and stability of our 
country, might well have been the final target of the ill-fated fourth 
hijacked plane.

  The simple truth is that even if a terrorist act had destroyed the 
dome, or if a thousand terrorist acts had obliterated the entire 
Capital, America would still be standing firm as it is today.

  In the past year, we have cried and cursed. We have opened our hearts 
and our wallets. We have buried our dead and we continue to heal our 
wounded and sorrowful. We have cleared the debris and begun to rebuild. 
Our President has led, and Congress has indeed stood shoulder to 
shoulder with him in support. Our soldiers have fought bravely and we 
here at home have done what we do best--we went back to work.
  We will never again look at the world in the same way. We are sadder. 
We are wiser. We are closer. And, as I said a year ago, we are still 
standing firm. We've been through a lot. There will be tough times 
ahead, but today I have even a stronger feeling of hope, pride and 
conviction in our country and its people.
  God bless America.

   H. CON. RES. 401, RECOGNIZING THE HEROISM AND COURAGE DISPLAYED BY 
                   AIRLINE FLIGHT ATTENDANTS EACH DAY


                            Hon. Nancy Pelosi


                              of california

  Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H. Con. Res. 401, a resolution to 
recognize the heroism and courage displayed by airline flight attendants 
each day.
  The anniversary of the September 11 terrorist hijackings and attacks 
on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon is just 2 days away. All 
Americans remember and mourn the lives lost that tragic day.
  The world has changed for all of us. Before that time, flight 
attendants and their families and loved ones lived and worked with the 
knowledge that rare instances of mechanical failure or hijackers could 
endanger their lives. But no one imagined the dreadful assault of 
September 11, when terrorists turned four airborne planes into missiles 
used to attack thousands of Americans.
  That day, flight attendants again demonstrated their courage in the 
face of extreme danger. From all that we know of the final minutes on 
those flights, flight attendants worked to communicate with the ground, 
and in all likelihood helped prevent flight 93, which crashed in rural 
Pennsylvania, from taking many more lives.
  I would like to bring my colleagues' attention to the heroism of Betty 
Ong, a flight attendant on American Airlines flight 11, whose family 
lives in my district of San Francisco. On September 11, Betty called the 
airline reservations center from the plane to sound the alarm and 
provide information about the terrorists who had taken over the plane. I 
am aware of the enormous pain and suffering her family has been 
experiencing and extend them my deepest sympathy. It is an honor to pay 
tribute to Betty and express my appreciation for her life and bravery in 
the face of enormous danger.
  Now, even stepping onto an airplane is an act requiring will power and 
courage for many Americans. Yet flight attendants do it every day. 
Flight attendants deserve our respect, cooperation, courtesy, and 
commendation for their hard work and courage. I urge my colleagues to 
vote for this resolution.

 PRINTING OF PROCEEDINGS OF SPECIAL CEREMONIAL MEETING OF UNITED STATES 
    CONGRESS HELD IN FEDERAL HALL, NEW YORK, NY, ON SEPTEMBER 6, 2002


                          Hon. Richard K. Armey


                                of Texas

  Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that proceedings of the special 
ceremonial meeting of the U.S. Congress held in Federal Hall, New York, 
NY, on September 6, 2002, be printed in the Record, and that all Members 
have 5 legislative days to insert their remarks on the topic of the 
ceremonial meeting.


                       Tuesday, September 10, 2002

                     REMEMBERING SEPTEMBER 11, 2001


                             Hon. Mike Pence


                               of Indiana

  Madam Speaker, to state the obvious, tomorrow is September 11 again. 
Like many Americans, I will be home taking time with family and 
neighbors for a solemn reflection, remembrance and prayer, and so it 
should be for all Americans. But my earnest hope, Madam Speaker, is that 
September 11 of this year not be an anxious time; that in addition to 
remembering the lost, we actually, Madam Speaker, have much to 
commemorate.
  In the past 12 months, our people have responded with selfless actions 
of courage and generosity, our military has responded with valor, our 
President with moral clarity and purpose, and this Congress, Republicans 
and Democrats alike, have responded with resources and reform.
  America is better prepared and safer this September 11 than the last. 
Let us also be confident in this, that He who sets this pilgrim's dream 
on this wilderness shore still watches over us. And I say like Americans 
have said throughout generations, I lift up my eyes to the hills, and 
where does my help come from, my help comes from the Lord.

                AMERICANS URGED TO REMEMBER SEPTEMBER 11


                             Hon. Nick Smith


                               of Michigan

  Madam Speaker, this week it is important to remember those who lost 
their lives during the attack on America last year, as well as all of 
our first responders, our medics, our military personnel, and the people 
who volunteered and tried to help.
  I think our Founding Fathers would be very proud of our new diligence 
in our quest to preserve liberty and freedom in this country. President 
Bush has designated September 11 of each year to be Patriot Day, and 
calls on all Americans to observe it appropriately.
  I urge my Michigan citizens and all Americans to spend some time 
thinking about what we need to do to protect our liberty and freedom, 
and to pray for the families of those that died in the terrorist attack 
in Pennsylvania, Washington and New York. This Wednesday marks the 1-
year anniversary. Let us remember what our forefathers did, and what 
happened to us 1 year ago and our renewed vigor to make sure that we do 
what is important to sacrifice ourselves in the preservation of liberty 
and freedom.


                           Hon. Vito Fossella


                               of New york

  Every day and especially tomorrow, September 11, 2002, we honor the 
heroes and the victims who perished last year, our fellow American 
citizens, those who just want an ordinary way of life, a peaceful life, 
who sought to raise a family in this great Nation, who sought to do a 
job and do it right, and those valiant heroes from EMS and the police 
department and the port authority and especially the firefighters, 78 of 
whom were from Staten Island alone, and names like Egan and Olsen and 
Curatola and Esposito and Siller and Leahy and Doyle, and tragically 
thousands of others. They are names, yes, but they are families. They 
have left behind children, they have left behind wives, husbands, 
parents, and grandparents, and what they were seeking is all what I 
think we are all about, the right to live in freedom with liberty and in 
peace, and that was robbed from them. It was robbed from their families. 
And, yes, we are a stronger and better country, and we are fortunate to 
have brave men and women to wear the uniform to go get those people, 
wherever they may be across the globe, with the Commander in Chief, 
President Bush, leading the way.

             REMEMBERING THOSE KILLED ON SEPTEMBER 11, 2001


                         Hon. Sheila Jackson-Lee


                                of Texas

  Mr. Speaker, in a solemn way I recognize that this week will be a week 
that Americans turn toward each other seeking to embrace and seeking to 
love, mourning those whom we lost on September 11, 2001, and celebrating 
the unsung heroes and the families who have survived.
  I stand before this House today simply to offer my deepest sympathy 
and that of my constituents of the 18th Congressional District of the 
State of Texas to all of those who experience this great loss as we come 
upon September 11, 2002. It is my desire to offer these words of 
sympathy because I love you and appreciate the sacrifice you made for 
this Nation. I conclude by saying, The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not 
want.

                      PUBLIC BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS

  Under clause 2 of rule XII, public bills and resolutions were 
introduced and severally referred, as follows:

  By Mr. WILSON of South Carolina:

  H. Con. Res. 463. Concurrent resolution expressing the sense of the 
Congress that on September 11, 2002, the people of the United States 
should reaffirm the principles for which the Nation was founded so that 
freedom may ring from every community in the Nation and be heard around 
the world; to the Committee on Government Reform.

                RECOGNIZING LOCAL HEROES ON SEPTEMBER 11


                           Hon. Frank R. Wolf


                               of virginia

  Mr. Speaker, as our Nation approaches the 1-year anniversary of the 
unspeakable acts of terror against America on September 11, 2001, I join 
with my colleagues, Representative Tom Davis and Representative Jim 
Moran to recognize some of the people in the northern Virginia area who 
were among the first health care responders to the attack on the 
Pentagon.
  We attended on September 3 an event recognizing those associated with 
the Inova Health System for their heroic efforts on September 11, and I 
share today the remarks of Jolene Tornabeni, executive vice president 
and chief operating officer for Inova Health System, as well as a copy 
of a resolution adopted by the Virginia General Assembly commending 
Inova Health System.

                       Recognizing Inova's Heroes


                          (By Jolene Tornabeni)


  As we approach the anniversary of September 11, no doubt every one of 
us can remember where we were and what we were doing when the planes 
crashed in New York, Pennsylvania and the Pentagon. Throughout Inova 
Health System, the memories of that day remain fresh in our memories as 
well. At a time when most people wanted to be home with their families 
and loved ones, our staff showed its true strength of character. 
Hundreds of employees, nurses and physicians dropped what they were 
doing and volunteered to help. It was an immediate response that came 
from the heart.

  Today, I'd like to recognize just some of those people who are Inova's 
heroes.

  From Inova Alexandria Hospital.--Shortly after the American Airlines 
plane hit the Pentagon, hospital staff swung into gear readying beds, 
operating rooms and supplies. Inova Alexandria Hospital treated more 
patients from the Pentagon that day than any other Inova facility, 
caring for 24 people who were injured at the scene.

  Among the many heroes that day are Emergency Department chairman Dr. 
Marty Brown, vice chairman Dr. Tom Clark and the ER staff who were at 
the front end of caring for the patients as they arrived at the 
hospital. Dr. Clark cared for Virginia State Police Trooper Michael 
Middleton who sustained severe smoke inhalation while trying to rescue 
injured Pentagon workers. In addition, emergency nurse Sherry Hemby is 
also with us today.

  I'd like to recognize pulmonologist Dr. Tom Smirniotopolous and nurse 
Ellen Smith. They both cared for Trooper Middleton during his long 
recovery at Inova Alexandria Hospital.

  Also, emergency physician Dr. James Vafier. On September 11, he was 
working in his role as medical director for the Alexandria Fire 
Department at the Pentagon. On site, he was appointed the physician in 
charge of civilian medical response at the Pentagon.

  Keeping order that day at Inova Alexandria Hospital were Steve Fuoco, 
the director of engineering, who served the hospital's command center, 
and Greg Brison, director of security. I'd also like to recognize 
hospital administrator Ken Kozloff for all of his efforts and a job well 
done by his entire staff.

  All told, Inova treated 27 patients on September 11. Inova Mount 
Vernon hospital treated one injured civilian. Our thanks go out to 
hospital Emergency Department chairman Dr. Michael Shuster and hospital 
administrator Susan Herbert.

  Many thanks also go to the emergency department staffs at Inova 
HealthPlex in Springfield where two patients were treated, and the staff 
of Inova Fairfax Hospital. As the area's level I trauma center, Inova 
Fairfax Hospital freed up dozens of hospital beds and readied itself to 
handle many, many patients that day. Sadly, their services were not 
needed.

  Next, I'd like to recognize Dr. Dan Hanfling, the director of 
Emergency Management and Disaster Medicine for Inova Health System. On 
September 11, Dan was called to the Pentagon to assist in the search and 
rescue in his role as medical team manager of the Fairfax County Urban 
Search and Rescue team--which falls under the auspices of FEMA--the 
Federal Emergency Management Agency. Dan spent a week at the Pentagon 
helping coordinate the Federal response to the disaster. Since 9/11, Dan 
has helped spearhead and focus Inova's disaster preparations across our 
system of hospitals and emergency care centers.

  Dan also serves as the medical director of Inova AirCare, our medevac 
helicopter program which played a critical role at the Pentagon on 
September 11. Minutes after the Pentagon was hit, the helicopter flight 
crew of nurse Margie Roche, paramedic Chuck Crocker and pilot Pete 
Russet flew to the Pentagon to fly out the injured patients. That 
initial flight is memorialized forever in a well-publicized Reuters 
photo seen around the world in magazines and now a book. The photo 
depicts Inova AirCare against the backdrop of a burning Pentagon.

  The helicopter shuttled much needed supplies to the scene that day, 
and, at the request of military leaders on the scene, remained at the 
Pentagon throughout the night.

  As that day unfolded, the community's good will became abundantly 
evident as hundreds of people showed up at Inova Blood Donor Services' 
offices ready to roll up their sleeves and donate. Thanks to the 
leadership of medical director Dr. Jeanne Lumadue and administrative 
director Terri Craddock, Inova Blood Donor Services pulled in volunteers 
to help handle the onslaught and keep the offices open well past normal 
business hours. They collected more than 700 units of blood that day, 
which is just amazing. In all, they handled more than 2,000 donors and 
returned more than 5,000 calls from interested donors in the initial 
days after the attack.

  It was not long after September 11 that our country faced a second 
threat to our sense of security in the anthrax-laced letters mailed 
around the country. Inova Fairfax Hospital took center stage in this 
national drama after diagnosing two patients from the Brentwood Postal 
Facility in Washington, D.C., with inhalation anthrax.

  Emergency physicians Cecele Murphy and Denis Pauze relied on their 
instinct and medical training to make a diagnosis most doctors could not 
imagine making in their lifetimes. Thanks to them, and to physician 
assistant Ashna Nayyar and the entire ER staff, both men are alive 
today.

  All of these people mentioned today and, in fact, all of the 
physicians, employees and volunteers throughout Inova Health System, are 
our heroes for the work they did on September 11 and its aftermath.

  We also have heroes outside of our organization in the men and women 
of our community's police, fire and EMS agencies, particularly in 
Fairfax County and the City of Alexandria.

  Over the past year, we have been grateful for their continual support 
and advice on preparedness.


                                    H

                SENATE JOINT RESOLUTION NO. 275--ENROLLED

                     Commending Inova Health System

                 Agreed to by the Senate, March 6, 2002

           Agreed to by the House of Delegates, March 8, 2002


  Whereas, Inova Health System in Northern Virginia was deeply involved 
in the response to the attacks on September 11, 2001, and in the 
diagnosis and treatment of those exposed to anthrax in October of 2001; 
and

  Whereas, on September 11, Inova Health System treated 27 patients 
injured in the attack on the Pentagon at its Alexandria, Mount Vernon, 
and Franconia-Springfield facilities; and

  Whereas, within moments of the crash at the Pentagon, Inova AirCare 
was on the scene to transport patients, and AirCare 2, the system's 
back-up helicopter, transported needed supplies to the scene for use in 
patient triage; and

  Whereas, Inova Blood Donor Services collected more than 2,000 units of 
blood in the first week following the attacks, and a portion of the 
donations were sent to New York and New Jersey to help injured patients; 
and

  Whereas, the Inova Institute of Research and Education contacted the 
Food and Drug Administration to allow usage of a new drug--in its final 
phase of testing--in a successful attempt to save the life of Virginia 
State Police Trooper Michael Middleton; and

  Whereas, more than a month after the September 11 attacks, Inova 
Health System played a leading role in the initial diagnosis and 
treatment of patients exposed to anthrax at the Brentwood Postal 
Facility; and

  Whereas, Inova Fairfax Hospital emergency room physician Cecele Murphy 
diagnosed the first inhalation anthrax patient on October 19, 2001, 
before the source of the anthrax was known; and

  Whereas, within two days, the hospital diagnosed the second anthrax 
case, and Inova physicians soon developed protocols for hospitals to 
follow in screening postal workers and other potential inhalation 
anthrax cases; and

  Whereas, in collaboration with infectious disease specialists from 
Kaiser Permanente, Inova physicians published an anthrax case study in 
the Journal of the American Medical Association, an article that was 
published faster than any other case study in the journal's history; and

  Whereas, Inova Fairfax Hospital held three press conferences to 
educate the public on key anthrax information, including the fact that 
it is not contagious and that patients in and visitors to hospitals are 
safe; and

  Whereas, Inova Health System continued to take the lead in producing 
and distributing anthrax information to inform the public via 
information hotlines, websites, the press, and public meetings; and

  Whereas, throughout the turbulent Fall of 2001, the medical 
professionals and staff of Inova Health System responded to emergency 
situations with great dispatch, diligence, courage, and professionalism; 
now, therefore, be it

  Resolved by the Senate, the House of Delegates concurring, That the 
General Assembly hereby commend Inova Health System for its quick and 
effective response to the events of September 11 and the anthrax 
incidents in October 2001; and, be it

  Resolved further, That the Clerk of the Senate prepare a copy of this 
resolution for presentation to Inova Health System as an expression of 
the General Assembly's admiration and gratitude for its dedication to 
the health and welfare of the citizens of Northern Virginia.


                      Wednesday, September 11, 2002

                         SESSION BEGINS--PRAYER

  The House met at noon.
  The Chaplain, the Reverend Daniel P. Coughlin, offered the following 
prayer:
  Remembering the images of September 11 a year ago can still stun a 
nation. A reflection of that tragic day and the thousands who were taken 
from us can still take the breath away of some. Others feel nothing, 
only emptiness. Others have moved on and celebrate the distance. Today a 
moment of common silence can unite us all in a deeper sense of presence.
  Because words have their own spin to such an overwhelming story as 
this past year. Silence alone is free enough to embrace all traditions 
and all sentiments, drawing out a language of the heart.
  Only silence can interpret some of the most sacred moments of a 
lifetime. So let memories flow and prayers arise in the soul of America 
as we enter unafraid the mystery of what has happened to us in silence.
  Amen.

                         MESSAGE FROM THE SENATE

  A message from the Senate by Mr. Monahan, one of its clerks, announced 
that the Senate has passed without amendment a bill of the House of the 
following title:
  H.R. 3917. An Act to authorize a national memorial to commemorate the 
passengers and crew of Flight 93 who, on September 11, 2001, 
courageously gave their lives thereby thwarting a planned attack on our 
Nation's Capital, and for other purposes.
  The message also announced that the Senate has passed bills of the 
following titles in which the concurrence of the House is requested:
  S. 2136. An act to establish a memorial in the State of Pennsylvania 
to honor the passengers and crewmembers of Flight 93 who, on September 
11, 2001, gave their lives to prevent a planned attack on the Capital of 
the United States.

                        REMEMBERING SEPTEMBER 11


                      Hon. Rodney P. Frelinghuysen


                              of New Jersey

  Mr. Speaker, today as a Nation we are reunited by a sense of common 
grief. One year ago today, America witnessed the unspeakable when our 
Nation was attacked and more than 3,000 innocent lives were cruelly 
taken from us at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and in 
Pennsylvania. From my home State of New Jersey, we lost over 700 people, 
and God bless their families. It was also a day when horror was met by 
heroism and the worst of humanity was overshadowed by the best of 
America. In reflections on this day, we remember the bravery of those 
who responded on September 11, our police, firefighters, our first aid 
squads, people who never gave up hope and rallied our Nation. They who 
responded came from all over America and across the Hudson from New 
Jersey.
  We are grateful as well today for the service of our young men and 
women in uniform who, fighting in our war against terrorism, are 
resolved to bring justice to those who attacked us. They are fighting to 
right this terrible wrong in honor of the memory of those who perished 
and to protect our children and grandchildren, ensuring that they 
inherit a Nation free from further terror.

                   ON THE ANNIVERSARY OF SEPTEMBER 11


                         Hon. Michael R. McNulty


                               of New York

  Mr. Speaker, whenever I think of the enormity of what happened on 
September 11, 2001, words fail; and so I try to recall the words of our 
Commander in Chief on that fateful day. He basically made three 
suggestions. He said we should pray for all of the innocent victims and 
their families, and I try to remember to do that every day. He then said 
we should be grateful. And I will be perfectly honest, gratitude was not 
what was in my heart at that moment. But he went on to explain that we 
should be grateful to all the police officers, firefighters, and 
emergency personnel who, when others were running away from the 
buildings in terror, running for their lives, continued to run toward 
the buildings, into the buildings, up the stairs, many to their deaths. 
That was their job. And they did it well that day because they saved 
thousands of lives.
  Finally, he suggested that we unite as a Nation in our resolve to 
track down the terrorist cowards who committed those acts, bring them to 
justice, and take away their capabilities to ever do anything like that 
again either in the United States or anywhere else in the world.
  On this solemn anniversary may we continue to remember those three 
suggestions by our Commander in Chief.

          TO THE CHILDREN ACROSS AMERICA REGARDING SEPTEMBER 11


                            Hon. Nick Lampson


                                of Texas

  Mr. Speaker, usually when I stand here to address these 1-minutes, it 
is on the subject of missing children. Today I want to talk about kids 
who are missing mothers and fathers and sisters and brothers and friends 
and family because on September 11 of last year more than 2,000 children 
lost a parent. This may not be the kind of loss that I usually address, 
but it is a profound loss, nonetheless. I want to send a message to 
those kids today that this House is thinking about them and they are in 
our hearts and in our prayers.
  The children of this country also lost a sense of innocence and 
security. I want to encourage parents across the Nation to talk to their 
children about the tragic events of September 11 of last year to 
reassure them that we all want the best for them and will continue to 
work to keep their, our, country safe from harm.
  Mr. Speaker, on behalf of the Congressional Caucus on Missing and 
Exploited Children, I send our thoughts and prayers out to the children 
who lost somebody at the Pentagon, the World Trade Center, or in 
Shanksville, PA, and to the kids all across America who are learning to 
deal with a changed and unsettled world.
  God bless you and God bless America.

                ON REMEMBERING THE EVENTS OF SEPTEMBER 11


                        Hon. Anibal Acevedo-Vila


                             of Puerto Rico

  Mr. Speaker, on behalf of all Puerto Ricans, I want to express 
heartfelt sympathy for the families of the victims from the terrorist 
attacks against this great Nation 1 year ago. The impacts of these 
horrific events were immediately felt throughout Puerto Rico. Hundreds 
of Puerto Ricans were among the dead and Puerto Rican emergency crews 
were among the first to arrive to assist crews in New York and at the 
Pentagon. But had there been no direct tragic link to Puerto Rico 
through casualties or through the emergency workers, Puerto Ricans would 
nonetheless continue to walk in lockstep in the war against terror. Make 
no mistake about it, Puerto Ricans today, as throughout the last 100 
years, serve dutifully in all the branches of our armed services. Our 
common citizenship and common devotion toward democratic principles 
underscore our commitment to common defense. I stand before my 
colleagues today to let you all know that Puerto Rico will always be 
there in this effort. The cowardly acts of September 11 have caused 
great pain. Our suffering shall never be forgotten. But this Nation is 
today stronger and more committed to our principles of freedom and 
justice than ever before. United we stand, divided we fall. We stand 
together and will never, ever forget.

EXPRESSING THE SENSE OF CONGRESS ON THE ANNIVERSARY OF TERRORIST ATTACKS 
        LAUNCHED AGAINST THE UNITED STATES ON SEPTEMBER 11, 2001


                          Hon. Richard K. Armey


                                of Texas

  Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent for the immediate consideration 
of the concurrent resolution (H. Con. Res. 464) expressing the sense of 
the Congress on the anniversary of the terrorist attacks launched 
against the United States on September 11, 2001.
  The Clerk read the title of the concurrent resolution.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Simpson). Is there objection to the 
request of the gentleman from Texas?
  There was no objection.
  The Clerk read the concurrent resolution, as follows:

                            H. Con. Res. 464


  Whereas on September 11, 2001, while Americans were attending to their 
daily routines, terrorists hijacked and destroyed four civilian 
aircraft, crashing two of them into the towers of the World Trade Center 
in New York City, and a third into the Pentagon outside Washington, 
D.C.;

  Whereas the valor of the passengers and crew on the fourth aircraft 
prevented it from also being used as a weapon against America;

  Whereas thousands of innocent Americans were killed and injured as a 
result of these attacks, including the passengers and crew of the four 
aircraft, workers in the World Trade Center and in the Pentagon, rescue 
workers, and bystanders, making these attacks the deadliest terrorist 
attacks ever launched against the United States;

  Whereas when the gravest moments came, many regular Americans, relying 
on courage, instinct, and grace, rushed toward the flaming buildings in 
order to rescue or toward terrorist-controlled cockpits in order to 
resist;

  Whereas by targeting symbols of American strength and success, these 
attacks clearly were intended to assail the principles, values, and 
freedoms of the United States and the American people, intimidate the 
Nation, and weaken the national resolve;

  Whereas while the States of New York, Virginia, and Pennsylvania bore 
the brunt of the terrorist attacks, every State and Territory and all 
Americans were affected and mourned these tragic losses;

  Whereas Americans reached out to help strangers who had lost loved 
ones, colleagues, and their businesses;

  Whereas local, State, and Federal leaders set aside differences and 
worked together to provide for those who were attacked and to protect 
those who remained;

  Whereas Americans continue to repair damage to buildings and the 
economy, while relishing the freedoms they enjoy as Americans;

  Whereas on September 14, 2001, in Public Law 107-40, Congress 
authorized the use of ``all necessary and appropriate force'' against 
those responsible for the terrorist attacks;

  Whereas the United States Armed Forces subsequently moved swiftly 
against Al Qaeda and the Taliban regime in Afghanistan, whom the 
President and Congress had identified as enemies of America;

  Whereas, in so doing, brave servicemen and women left family and 
friends in order to defend the Nation;

  Whereas a year later, many servicemen and women remain abroad, 
shielding the Nation from further terrorist attacks;

  Whereas, while the passage of a year has not softened the memory of 
the American people, resolved their grief, or restored lost loved ones, 
it has shown that Americans will not bow to terrorists;

  Whereas the Congress has passed, and the President has signed, 
numerous laws providing additional resources for the overseas effort 
against terrorism, as well as additional tools for Federal, State, and 
local law enforcement and judicial systems to protect Americans at home; 
and

  Whereas the Government reexamined the need for domestic security and 
the Congress is currently considering legislation to create a Department 
of Homeland Security with the specific mission of preventing further 
attacks: Now, therefore, be it

  Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring), That 
Congress--

  (1) recognizes September 11 as both a day to remember those taken from 
their families, loved ones, and fellow citizens and a day for Americans 
to recommit to the Nation, to their freedoms, and to each other;

  (2) extends its deepest sympathies to the countless innocent victims 
of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, their families, friends, 
and loved ones;

  (3) honors the heroic actions of first responders, law enforcement 
personnel, State and local officials, volunteers, and others who aided 
the innocent victims and, in so doing, bravely risked their own lives 
and long-term health;

  (4) stands in great debt with the American people to the members of 
the Armed Forces serving both at home and abroad;

  (5) praises the people of the United States for their patriotism, 
compassion, prayers, and generosity in donating time and money to 
support the innocent victims of the September 11, 2001, terrorist 
attacks, their families, friends, and loved ones;

  (6) expresses thanks and gratitude to the foreign leaders and citizens 
of all nations who have assisted and continue to stand in solidarity 
with the United States against terrorism in the aftermath of the 
September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks;

  (7) discourages, in the strongest possible terms, any effort to 
confuse the war on terrorism with a war on any people or any faith;

  (8) commends the President and the brave servicemen and women of the 
United States Armed Forces in the successful effort to oust the Taliban 
from power;

  (9) remains resolved to pursue all those responsible for the terrorist 
attacks of September 11, 2001, and their sponsors until they are 
discovered and punished; and

  (10) reaffirms that Congress will honor the memory of those who lost 
their lives as a result of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks and 
will defend bravely the citizens of the United States in the face of all 
future challenges.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Texas (Mr. Armey) is 
recognized for 1 hour.
  Mr. ARMEY. Mr. Speaker, I yield the customary 30 minutes to the 
gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Gephardt), the Democrat leader and 
cosponsor of the resolution, pending which I yield myself such time as I 
may consume.


                        Hon. Richard A. Gephardt


                               of missouri

  Mr. Speaker, a year ago today the East Coast of this great land woke 
up to the first rays of morning sunshine. We woke up as a Nation, full 
of optimism, full of gratification, aware of our freedoms, but probably 
taking them for granted. We were concerned about the people we love, 
with the confidence they would all be there. We were excited about the 
business of the day with hopes of good outcomes, and dearly involved 
with our children with an understanding of their safety. We did not 
think about heinous deeds when we woke that morning. Our minds were busy 
with our plans and hopes, dreams and schemes; and we went about our 
day's work.
  Then, all of a sudden, out of the dark depths of the evil corners of 
the world, hatred, meanness, despair, jealousy, greed, whatever, rose to 
afflict this Nation.
  We were shocked at what we saw. First, most of us thought it was an 
accident and how tragic it was. But soon, we realized it was a vicious, 
premeditated attack on us as a Nation and on innocent civilians in this 
country.
  Those streaming rays of sunshine that came through those big buildings 
of New York City that stood as a monument to this thing we call the 
practical American genius, were shattered. That peaceful field in 
Pennsylvania, awake with morning dew, was smashed. Our Pentagon that 
stands for strength and freedom was assailed in a way that it has never 
been assailed. And, indeed, this very building on which we stand today 
was saved that morning by the first response to this vicious attack.
  We took the hurt and the losses, and they came early; but it did not 
take us long to collect our wits in this great country. Immediately upon 
understanding on flight 93 how vicious this was and how evil the intent, 
our American heroes fought back and this Nation was inspired by Todd 
Beamer who started the response with that phrase, ``Let's roll.''
  Our early responders in New York City, after the tragic loss of life 
following American flight 11, American flight 77, and in Northern 
Virginia after the horrible nightmare of United flight 175, our early 
responders came from our communities: firemen, policemen, and emergency 
workers of all types. They rushed to the danger and saved lives.
  We struggled through that day with doubt, uncertainty and fear. But as 
the day wore on, we became more a Nation of resolve and less a Nation of 
fear. We began to build our way back to confidence and optimism on that 
very same day. America had the unwelcome need to see its own heroes 
fight for survival and rescue on our own land, and our heroes rose to 
the occasion in a way that has inspired each and every one of us.
  In New York City and Pennsylvania and here in Northern Virginia, they 
did so no more nor any less than they would have in Kansas City, San 
Francisco, or Houston because they displayed the character of a free 
people who cherish their freedom and love their neighbors.
  Now we have been asked to go on with the task of ridding the world of 
the evil that struck that blow. We again call upon our heroes, now not 
so often, not so many civilians, but honorable men and women in uniform 
who have stood before the history of this great Nation's marvelous 
tradition of defending freedom, peace and respect and have said, ``I 
will volunteer to serve this Nation in its armed services.''
  These new young heroes, following generations of heroes past, are now 
being asked daily all across this globe to incur risks and hardship to 
find the evil ones and remove them.
  I believe the perpetrators of evil that launched this horrible attack 
have seen in ways they have never dared to imagine the character and 
strength of this great Nation. They now know the resolve of this great 
Nation. They all understand the courage of our heroes.
  Let me say again what I said at the time. This Nation has proven it 
will send its heroes. Our heroes have proven they will go when asked, 
they will volunteer, they will do their duty. But we do not send our 
heroes from this great Nation out of ambition for territorial expansion 
or out of a sense of revenge, but out of a requirement for a just world, 
a world in which people who will perpetrate evil against others will be 
found, and they will be prosecuted.
  Let me just say to those of you who are still out there plotting and 
scheming, do not underestimate our American heroes; they are young, they 
are bright, they are strong, they have courage, and they will in fact 
bring you down.
  Now we have come, Mr. Speaker, to this day a year later. The sun rose 
in the east today, and this great East Coast of this great land was the 
first to experience this morning. We woke a little wiser, a little more 
aware, a little sadder, but we awoke with optimism, love, resolve and 
courage, and we will be that way for so long as this great Nation shall 
endure.
  Mr. Speaker, I am honored to cosponsor this resolution with the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Armey) in the spirit of bipartisan unity on 
this difficult day for our wonderful and great Nation.
  We gather together today to remember the victims, honor our rescue 
workers, and cherish the values embraced by human beings across the 
globe. On this first anniversary of September 11, we recall the 
strength, the courage and the character of innocent people who lost 
their lives in this horrendous attack.
  To the families of September 11 victims, we say that we are with them 
as one. We honor the bravery they have demonstrated in the face of 
unspeakable suffering, and we honor the spirit of the American people, 
humanity at its best.
  Today, we recall that amid the chaos of September 11 our rescue 
workers gave the last full measure of devotion so others could live 
another day. Hundreds of people rushed into burning buildings to save 
others who they had never before even met. On one of our darkest days, 
they sent forth a defiant ray of hope, and words alone could never do 
justice to their sacrifice.
  Today, we also recognize this fundamental American truth: From the 
horror of September 11 has come incredible, unimaginable strength. Our 
Nation is still grieving, but make no mistake, we stand united.
  As I said Friday in New York at our joint session, in this great and 
faithful struggle, there are no Republicans, there are no Democrats; 
there are only Americans, and we will remain resolved with our President 
to defend all those who threaten the liberty, freedom and democracy that 
define our Nation.
  Today, as we pray for the victims' families, we also offer profound 
gratitude to the people who may well have saved our lives by fighting 
back on flight 93. This resolution is crafted in their spirit, with them 
as our inspiration and as our guide.
  This resolution honors people like the man who went to Ground Zero 
after the attacks and started digging through the rubble, searching for 
survivors, because, he said, we are ``digging for freedom.''
  It honors the woman whose legs were crushed by debris at the World 
Trade Center, who has been in the hospital every day for the past year.
  It honors the firefighters in New York who, ascending the stairs, 
calmly told civilians, ``Just keep going down, clear run. Keep going 
down, clear run.''
  It honors the doctors at the Pentagon who, rolling in water to ward 
off the flames, saved countless servicemen and women because of their 
raw courage.
  It honors the ironworkers, the construction workers, the engineers and 
others who worked around the clock for months to clear the debris at 
Ground Zero.
  It honors all the workers at the Pentagon who worked day and night to 
meet the schedule of having the Pentagon back in perfect condition 
before the 1-year anniversary of September 11.
  It honors our law enforcement personnel who are protecting our 
citizens on a daily basis here at home.
  It honors the members of our Armed Forces who have been fighting and 
are today fighting to defend our freedom and secure our Nation.
  And it honors people like those we had lunch with on Friday in New 
York who lost their spouses on September 11.
  In the face of the unthinkable, their courage, their simple courage to 
move to the future while they grieved about the past, was deeply moving 
and inspiring. They demonstrated a commitment to the values that all of 
us hold dear: Freedom, family, faith and friends.
  Let all these deeds in the past year, and more, stand as a lasting 
monument to the spirit of our great Nation.
  Today, we know that our most solemn obligation is to ensure that those 
who died on September 11 did not die in vain. In the days and weeks 
ahead, let us continue to work together with humility to protect our 
people, guard our freedoms, and report to the world that America will 
never be defeated.
  Let us move forward as one Nation, one people, for the sake of every 
single person who believes in freedom and believes in civilization and 
believes in humanity.
  Let me end with the words of an old hymn that I love so much. When we 
face the unexplainable, when we face evil, many of us turn to God. And, 
as we did 1 year ago, we ask again today for God's help.
  As the hymn says, ``And He will raise you up on eagles' wings, bear 
you on the breath of dawn, make you to shine like the sun, and hold you 
in the palm of His hand.''
  May God shed His grace on this great and wonderful country and all of 
our people.


                           Hon. Henry J. Hyde


                               of Illinois

  Mr. Speaker, it has been a year since the world watched the impossible 
happen, and yet it is difficult to believe that such a year has passed 
so quickly. The sense and feel of time have been altered, seemingly 
suspended even as the calendar's relentless progress has remained 
unaffected.
  On this first anniversary, we would only deceive ourselves if we were 
to believe that those events are now safely confined to the past. We 
will continue to live with them all our lives.
  Modern communications have brought us many new and wonderful things, 
but they have also made possible the communal experience of tragedy. In 
this new age, distance will no longer spare us, nor can an absence of 
ties insulate us from sorrow.
  All who witnessed the events of September 11 still bear the scars of 
seeing inconceivable images and impossible events unfold in real time. 
But our own experiences, however painful, cannot compare with that of 
the innocents who bore the horror directly, nor with that of their 
families and friends who were suddenly and violently severed from their 
former lives and from the touch of those deeply loved.
  We Americans are a practical people. Instead of resigning ourselves to 
the difficulties of life, we instinctively seek to identify problems in 
order to focus our efforts and move toward solutions. In the past year 
we have done this.
  We have come to know our enemies and direct our determination and 
resources to uncovering their hiding places and plans. We are now 
engaged in designing and implementing measures to resist their ability 
to harm us. The challenge is an entirely new one, but one which gains in 
clarity each day. I hope all of us are now aware that in addition to our 
successes, we must prepare ourselves for the likelihood of failures in a 
struggle that may have no end.
  By infusing purpose, action can thus fill many voids, but the need 
remains to understand what happened and to comprehend the meaning of the 
events of that day. Here words give way to silence, for deep reflection 
is the predicate to understanding. Our modern, rational world once 
promised in time to reveal all secrets to us, but can we still cling to 
that belief now that we have been confronted with things we thought long 
past, vanquished and erased from the world by reason and light?
  The modern world has seen many efforts to eliminate God from our 
lives, but we have not been able to eliminate evil. The last century was 
unparalleled in human history in its celebration of the savagery that 
human beings can wreak upon one another. We had hoped we might escape 
that fate in this century, but now we know that we will not.
  We have been forcibly awakened from our dreams of an earthly heaven by 
the bitter knowledge that evil still roams freely in the world. We 
cannot allow ourselves to be paralyzed with despair or fear, and neither 
can we permit our natural optimism to shield us from the realities of 
the world. If there is any useful thing to be drawn from this terrible 
experience, it is that we have been given an unmistakable warning that 
in this new century, unknown and fearsome challenges await us, 
challenges that will impose the severest test of our national character.
  Knowing this, we have a duty to prepare ourselves to defend not only 
our lives and those of our children, not only our beloved country, not 
only our freedoms, but civilization itself. We are Rome, beset by new 
barbarians who are savagely motivated by their immense hatred of us, of 
our happiness and our success, of the promise America represents for the 
world; for our enemies have no aim except destruction, nothing to offer 
but a forced march back to a bleak and dismal past. Theirs is a world 
without light; their all-encompassing hatred a repudiation of any saving 
grace.
  Their victory would impose a new Dark Age, but this time perhaps an 
endless one. They are enemies of the future itself.
  As we resolve ourselves to our task, as we grieve for all of those 
linked to us by tragedy, we may also see ourselves more truly and 
thereby understand that our great strengths are interwoven with many 
fragile things, and that being human, we have our faults and flaws to 
contend with as well. The threats we face have given us a greater sense 
of how rare and wonderful is the world we share and of our 
responsibility to protect it from the storms outside.
  It is for these reasons that we remember those 3,000 fellow citizens 
who, asking nothing other than to live their lives in peace, were 
brutally murdered by men without conscience or mercy. We know it is 
right to remember our dead and commend them to the mercy of God, because 
should we forget them, we would only invite new acts of terror. We 
remember because, to quote Lincoln's haunting phrase, ``the mystic 
chords of memory'' bind us to the victims and the heroes of September 
11.
  And we shall not break faith with their memory.
  May those who died in the attacks of September 11 rest in the mercy of 
God. May those of us who remain be steadfast, courageous, and live lives 
worthy of their great sacrifice.
  Mr. Speaker, H. Con. Res. 464 expresses our gratitude to our friends 
and underscores the Nation's resolve to meet the enemy and defeat them. 
I believe passage of this resolution will commemorate those heroic 
actions of last September 11 and stand as an important symbolic gesture 
which all Members should support.


                             Hon. Tom Lantos


                              of california

  Mr. Speaker, on this first anniversary of September 11, 2001, we mourn 
the victims, we honor the heroes, we contemplate the lessons, and we 
celebrate the unity of our Nation so proudly displayed since that 
fateful day. One year ago, we suffered a grievous wound. One year later, 
that wound has begun to heal and the scar it has left has toughened our 
skin, but it has not and will not harden our hearts or dampen our 
spirits. God bless this great Nation.


                           Hon. Porter J. Goss


                               of florida

  Mr. Speaker, I thank the distinguished chairman of the committee for 
yielding me this time. I am obviously here to join my colleagues in 
honoring the memory of those who died in the terrorist attacks of a year 
ago this day and to underscore with gratitude the amazing valor 
displayed by them.
  I am sure every American remembers where they were and what they were 
doing when these ignominious attacks occurred. For me, I recall finding 
Speaker Hastert in his office, urgently gazing out the window down the 
Mall, looking at the smoke coming from the Pentagon. I urged immediate 
evacuation, and the Speaker said, ``Stop. First, we must open the House 
and have a prayer.'' So part of my memory includes our short gathering 
in this Chamber and the earnest and moving prayer by the guest chaplain 
of that day, Reverend Gerald Creedon.
  I would like to begin my remarks this day recalling that prayer. He 
said, ``God of peace and life, send Your spirit to heal our country; 
bring consolation to all injured in today's tragedy in New York and 
Washington. Protect us and help our leaders to lead us out of this 
moment of crisis to a new day of peace. Amen.''
  What Reverend Creedon did not know, and what none of us knew here, was 
that more casualties were to come in a field in Pennsylvania shortly 
after his prayer and our very hasty adjournment that day. Actually, this 
was not Father Creedon's original prayer; he had prepared one on the 
topic of immigration. But realizing the gravity of the situation, he 
spontaneously gave us heartfelt, wonderful words which were suitable to 
the moment and which are posted on the wall of my office to this day as 
a daily reminder.
  To the more than 3,000 people who lost their lives that day at the 
World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and United flight 93, we owe 
continuing remembrance, deep thanks, and responsive action. A year ago 
today, terrorists attacked Americans and citizens of scores of other 
countries who were on our U.S. soil. We, along with a broad coalition of 
nations, have taken up the challenge of combating the scourge of global 
terrorism. It is serious business. President Bush has left no doubt 
about his commitment to have our Nation lead the way.
  Last year the fight came to the doorstep of each and every American 
citizen; and within the very first minutes of September 11, 2001, our 
Nation responded as one. I would like to dedicate my short time today to 
celebrating the men and women, ordinary Americans, who have fought back; 
the quiet heroes.
  Let me begin with Ceecee Lyles, a flight attendant of flight 93, who 
was a resident of my district of Southwest Florida. A former police 
patrol officer detective, she had spent 6 years risking her life to 
protect others in that service. In December 2000, mindful of her young 
children and looking for a less dangerous career, she enrolled as a 
flight attendant school candidate; and 6 weeks later she began flying 
for United Airlines out of Newark.
  At 9:58 on September 11, only 5 minutes after the House recessed for 
the day under the dire circumstances then apparent, Ceecee called her 
husband, Lorne, in Fort Myers, who is a police officer there, from her 
plane to tell him that her flight had been hijacked. Her words: ``I 
called to tell you I love you. Tell the kids I love them.'' Her last 
words that we know of were, ``I think they are going to do it. They are 
forcing their way into the cockpit.''
  And then the phone went dead.
  In this Chamber, we owe a particular debt of gratitude to CeeCee Lyles 
and her companions on flight 93, and we all know it. That flight may 
very well have been heading to Washington when it crashed into 
Shanksville, PA. Without prompting or training, the passengers and crew 
fought back, and in doing so, saved many additional lives; possibly, our 
lives right here in the Capitol, for as we now know, many believe, and 
there is some evidence, that the Capitol was the intended target of 
flight 93.
  FBI Director Mueller, speaking at the crash site in Pennsylvania, 
said, ``We believe that those passengers on that jet were absolute 
heroes.'' Wallace Miller, the coroner for the case, called the 
passengers citizen soldiers. He went on to ask: ``When can you think of, 
other than the Revolution or our Civil War or at Pearl Harbor, where 
American citizens died defending their home ground?''
  But let us reflect a moment on our history. While many would compare 
9/11 to the devastation of Pearl Harbor, there is a significant 
difference. Pearl Harbor was, after all, a military-against-military 
matter; 9/11 was a vicious attack on civilians and on freedom.
  It is obvious that all of us have had to deal with new restrictions on 
the way we live our lives; but we have also developed a sense of pride, 
patience, and individual responsibility as we go about our lives to 
bring us closer as Americans.
  The terrorists thought they would destroy our spirit; but instead, 
they renewed it. Destroying the will of the enemy to fight is the common 
measure of victory in war. Bin Laden and his depraved extremists fueled 
our resolve to wipe his brand of evil from a civilized world.
  In addition to people all over America who have stepped up to the 
plate, our government has also become more alert, more focused, and more 
vigilant. We all must recognize the dedication and sacrifice of the 
thousands of individuals in government service who are out there on the 
front lines. They are protecting you and me, and they are making us 
proud. They know we are counting on them at a time when it matters.
  Every new day as we wake up safe and sound in our homes here, I hope 
we remember to say just a little thank you to those out there for the 
work they are doing. Whether fighting Al Qaeda in Afghanistan and 
Pakistan, working the streets in Africa, Latin America, Europe, or Asia, 
perhaps working in a cubicle in the Washington, DC, area, or as part of 
the joint terrorism task force in a U.S. city, these are the 
intelligence officers, the military and civilian personnel who in all 
likelihood will not receive public recognition for the work they do; yet 
they do work long hours, often in places far from friends and family, 
and sometimes at very great personal risk. I regrettably acknowledge 
that sometimes they do not come home.
  Johnny Michael Spann was a CIA officer, a husband, and a father of 
three. He went into Afghanistan in an early phase of the war to collect 
information crucial to defeating the Taliban and to protecting Americans 
at home. He was killed last November during a prisoner uprising in 
Mazar-e-Sharif, which was particularly brutal, as we now know.
  Finally, I would like to recognize that since last September every 
American has been engaged in combating terrorism. We have been more 
vigilant, aware and alert, reporting leads to the police and FBI in 
record numbers. We have volunteered time and resources to our 
communities. We have been more patient as we have tried new security 
procedures at airports and public buildings, even though some of them 
have clearly turned out to be unworkable. We have maintained our basic 
freedoms and our democracy in the face of further terrorist threat. We 
still fly, we go to the mall, we cheer on our sports teams, we drive 
over bridges, we speak our minds, and we assemble where we choose.
  So on this September 11, let us rededicate ourselves to honoring the 
memory of those who died by continuing to stand up to terror and to 
fear. Then let us also look to the future and the young people who are 
preparing to join the fray. Our youth, who some thought might be 
becoming a bit apathetic, or were perhaps now taking this great country 
for granted, are now applying in record numbers to service academies, to 
police and fire departments, the military, the FBI, the CIA, and other 
government service. They are our future, and they are ready.
  September 11 will come again next year and every year thereafter. It 
is now part of who we are. Woe to those who would ever test us again.


                       Hon. Eleanor Holmes Norton


                         of District of Columbia

  September 11 will always be a day to remember; but for us, it must 
also be a day to consider how to go on. If one lives or works here, as 
Members do, we remember that no sooner had September 11 come than we had 
October and the anthrax tragedies that occurred, beginning in the 
Brentwood post office, and spread even to this very Congress.
  Yet, Mr. Speaker, though some may consider the capitol city a target 
city, I can come to the floor this afternoon and say I have never felt 
myself to be a target. That is probably because I am an American, and it 
may be in part because I was a small child in this city during World War 
II. Therefore, I am blessed and perhaps burdened by the notion of 
American invincibility. I do not believe that simply because of our 
military might. Somehow I believe that my country cannot and will not be 
defeated ever from within or without. It is simply part of the way I was 
raised, and it is part of the way we must raise our children.
  I know how one's spirit can be broken when one goes to the funerals of 
three small children and their teacher who went down in the plane at the 
Pentagon. It can try one's spirit. But the fact is, I regard those 
children as representatives of all who lost their lives in September and 
October of last year; and somehow or other, remembering September 11 and 
the October anthrax tragedies through the lives of these 11-year-old 
children and their teachers, random targets, has instructed me how to go 
on.
  I believe we will defeat terrorism. I tell you, it is part of my core 
belief. What I think we have to learn to do is to maintain an open 
society in the process. No society has ever faced what we have today. No 
society has ever had to face keeping itself wide open while 
understanding that terror lies within.
  I am a native Washingtonian, a fourth-generation Washingtonian. We 
live here and feel ourselves the stewards of the Nation's Capital. As 
such, we cannot stand by and see the Nation's Capital ever be closed, 
because if it is closed or seems to close down, the rest of America will 
believe it must follow behind.
  If this is to be an open and free society, it must begin with an open 
and free Washington, DC. I am proud of the Congress for keeping our 
Chambers open, for doing all we can to keep this city open, and for 
remembering that when we are open, the rest of the country will feel 
itself open. Finally we will, I believe, have the rest of the world 
believe they, too, must open their societies to us and to the rest of 
the world.
  Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for bringing this resolution to the 
floor.


                         Hon. Benjamin A. Gilman


                               of New York

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in strong support of H. Con. Res. 464, 
commemorating the tragic events of 9/11. I commend our distinguished 
majority leader, the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Armey); our distinguished 
Committee on International Relations chairman, the gentleman from 
Illinois (Mr. Hyde); and our ranking minority member, the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Lantos) for bringing this measure to the floor at this 
time.
  On that day, 1 year ago, our Nation was deliberately and barbarically 
attacked by terrorists at New York's World Trade Center, at the 
Pentagon, and on flight 93 over Pennsylvania. It is our solemn duty 
today to reflect on those terrorist events and to memorialize those who 
perished needlessly at the hands of those criminals.
  My 20th Congressional District in New York lost more than 90 innocent 
lives on that terrible day. We join in extending our condolences to all 
of the 9/11 victims, and to their families and to their loved ones, and 
at the same time, in reminding them of our Nation's unrelenting 
determination to bring to justice all those who carried out these evil 
acts.
  As our Nation stands together today honoring the innocent men and 
women who were taken from us on 9/11, we also pay tribute to our 
firefighters, to the police officers, to the rescue workers, and to all 
the citizens who bravely mounted the largest rescue operation in history 
under the most unthinkable conditions. Their countless heroic acts on 9/
11 mark it both as a day of tragedy as well as triumph.
  Let us also pause today to salute the men and women of our Armed 
Forces who are out there defending freedom and democracy on the front 
lines of our war on terrorism. Let us pray, too, for their safe return 
and their eventual triumph.
  As we reflect today upon our extensive losses on the anniversary of 
tragedy and horror, let us also remember the valor, the patriotism, and 
the unity of our Nation in its darkest hour. That date, 9/11, was not 
only a turning point in the history of our great Nation, but also the 
world. As we seek God's blessing for our Nation and for the victims and 
heroes of September 11, let us all pledge to work together to make our 
world a safer place in which to live.


                           Hon. Steny H. Hoyer


                               of Maryland

  I am pleased to join the gentleman from California (Mr. Lantos) and 
also my very close friend, the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Hyde), in 
recognizing and remembering. As well, I am pleased to follow the remarks 
of my friend, the gentleman from New York (Mr. Gilman). All three of 
these gentlemen, Mr. Speaker, have been in the forefront of focusing on 
the foreign policy of the United States. All three have focused on the 
extension of liberty and justice and freedom throughout this world. All 
three have focused on human rights and the recognition of the rights of 
individuals. How appropriate it is that these three leaders lead us in 
this remembrance.
  Mr. Speaker, none of us will forget where we were when we learned the 
news. None of us will forget those 84 minutes from 8:46 a.m. on 
September 11, 2001, when the North Tower was struck, to 84 minutes later 
when the crash of the jet from Pennsylvania precluded the success of the 
terrorists in striking this Capitol.
  None of us, Mr. Speaker, will ever forget. In an instant on that 
Tuesday morning, now known simply as 9/11, this generation of Americans 
suffered its Pearl Harbor. In an instant, or more accurately, I suppose, 
in 84 minutes, more than 3,000 innocent human beings, many of uncommon 
courage, were murdered by criminals of unbounded evil.
  Words, Mr. Speaker, cannot convey the depth of pain inflicted on this 
Nation and its people 1 year ago. The pain endures and will remain. 
Today we remember all those who were taken on that horrific day. Our 
thoughts and our prayers are with those who survived and those who lost 
loved ones, as well as with the brave men and women this very hour 
defending freedom here at home and abroad.
  In many ways, such unspeakable acts have clarified our purpose, 
steeled our resolve, and confirmed who we are.
  We are a peaceful, tolerant and compassionate people. The evidence of 
that, Mr. Speaker, lies throughout our great Nation.
  Since September 11 private charities have raised more than $2.4 
billion to assist survivors. Former President Clinton and former Senate 
Majority Leader Bob Dole joined to raise $105 million to pay for college 
for the children and spouses of those killed or disabled. More than 
3,000 people download applications for Americorps every week; more than 
76,000 have requested Peace Corps applications; and more than 48,000 
have signed up for Citizen Corps programs. Yes, Mr. Speaker, this is a 
generous, compassionate and giving Nation.
  Closer to home, Donn Marshall of Marbury, MD, refused to let the 
savagery of 9/11 define the life and loss of his beloved wife, Shelley. 
Shelley was an employee of the Defense Intelligence Agency and she was 
one of the 20 Fifth Congressional District residents and 53 Marylanders 
who were taken from their family and friends by the mindless acts of 
savagery on 9/11. Rather than give in, however, to unblinking but 
justified anger, Donn has given his sorrow meaning.
  In tribute to his wife, Shelley, he established the Shelley A. 
Marshall Foundation, an irrevocable trust that funds children's story 
hours at public libraries, creative writing contests at colleges, and 
tea parties at nursing homes that bring senior citizens and high school 
students together.
  The aftermath of 9/11 has seen countless other acts, Mr. Speaker, of 
generosity, community and courage, in your district, Mr. Speaker, in 
mine, and in the districts of every Member of this House, which is to 
say in every corner of this Nation. From the local police officers and 
firefighters who raced toward danger at the Pentagon and Ground Zero in 
New York City, to the Facchina Construction Company in my district and 
those employees who completed their reconstruction work at the Pentagon 
3\1/2\ months early, even after their La Plata headquarters was 
devastated and destroyed by a tornado just a few months ago, to the 
local artist in my district who raised $5,000 for the widows and 
children of firefighters from the sale of 9/11 T-shirts that he 
designed.
  Mr. Speaker, the terrorists who sought to break our spirit only 
fortified that spirit. Their barbarism reminded us of our inevitable 
vulnerability but also reminded us that we are a part of something much 
greater than ourselves. We are the land of the free because, Mr. 
Speaker, we are the home of the brave.
  More than 40 years ago President Kennedy stirred our Nation when he 
said, ``The energy, the faith, the devotion that we bring to this 
endeavor will light our country and all who serve it.'' And he correctly 
concluded that, ``The glow from that fire can truly light the world.''
  The fire of freedom, Mr. Speaker, forged the American character and it 
burns deep within our souls. The ashes of tragedy have rekindled that 
spirit; and 1 year later, the world must know freedom's light still 
burns brightly and its eternal truth shall never, never be extinguished. 
May God, Mr. Speaker, continue to bless and guide America as we continue 
our commitment to a just Nation and the defense and extension of 
freedom.


                             Hon. Zach Wamp


                              of Tennessee

  Mr. Speaker, this is a day of remembrance, a day of remembering over 
3,000 individual persons who died at the hands of people who were so 
deranged that they also died in their killings of innocents in America. 
A day of remembering 3,000 families that will never again be the same, 
but the families through their sacrifice have definitely contributed to 
a better America because of what they have given. A day of remembering 
the sacrifice and courage that was demonstrated, manifesting itself as 
love, immediately overtook hate, incredible love that sent warm feelings 
throughout the world toward the United States of America. It is a day of 
emotion.
  I was at the Pentagon this morning, as were many of my colleagues and 
our President and the Secretary of Defense. I was there last year right 
after the Pentagon was struck. The stench of war, death and destruction 
a year ago was replaced this morning by the smell of new construction, a 
breeze that blew up the dust of a construction site now complete, 
sparkling new windows, and a whole new day at the Pentagon. A day of 
sadness for great loss. A day of joy for the phoenix project and that 
new beginning. A day of humility.
  I continue to be in awe of this job, this country, and the people of 
America. A day of national pride as we stand together with our President 
and our leadership. A day of deep and abiding love for our fellow man of 
all denominations from all around the world. God created each of us. But 
a day of righteous anger for what has happened, and a desire for justice 
to be served, but for our country to never extract revenge.
  Mr. Speaker, today is a day of unity in this House and across this 
land. The Holy Scripture says that unity is a supernatural anointing of 
God. The words say, One can chase 1,000, in the Old Testament. Two can 
chase 10,000. What that means is whenever God's children get together 
with a common purpose, spirit of unity, God anoints that unity and 
supernatural things can happen. We have seen that in this country as we 
have come together. We need to do it more often. We need to continue the 
unity that this tragedy brought to this great Nation.
  Mr. Speaker, today is a day of resolve. We live in a new and difficult 
time. We stand today, my generation, on the shoulders of the greatest 
generation. A generation that I grew up admiring and continue to admire. 
The greatest generation rightly earned their place in our country's 
history because of their dedication and their sacrifice. My generation 
has been called the ``me generation.'' We are self-absorbed, self-
consuming, lazy, maybe not even capable of having what it takes. But I 
believe that in the last year, thanks to our domestic warriors, our 
first responders, our troops on the home front, our firefighters and law 
enforcement personnel and EMTs, and the bravery and courage that they 
have shown, this ``me generation'' may be becoming the ``we 
generation.'' More selflessness, more sacrifice, more courage than I 
have seen in my lifetime has been demonstrated in the last year.
  I even see the joy in the eyes of the greatest generation as they look 
in their later years at what has happened in the last year with some 
amazement and incredible pride to say to this generation, you have what 
it takes, too. And I am glad because the days ahead are uncertain, and 
challenges are many. We may have many difficult times that we must go 
through ahead; but, Mr. Speaker, we have what it takes because we 
inherited a legacy of courage and honor and valor and we must answer 
this call to courage because what is at stake is freedom.
  It is fragile. It is a powerful force much like unity and love, but it 
is fragile. We must not rest. We must not grow complacent over time. We 
must be vigilant. We must be willing to fight and to die to preserve 
freedom.


                         Hon. James R. Langevin


                             of Rhode Island

  Mr. Speaker, today I join millions of people in solemn reflection on 
the tragic events of September 11, 2001.
  One year has passed since that horrific day thrust the world into 
shock and sadness; and while some pain has subsided, our wounds have not 
entirely healed, particularly for those who lost loved ones in New York, 
Pennsylvania, and Washington. However, by responding to this tragedy 
with hope and determination, our Nation has grown stronger.
  As the initial confusion of the attacks subsided, we became familiar 
with some of the names and the faces of the victims. Rhode Island was 
touched personally by this tragedy through the loss of several who 
called our State home. David and Lynn Angell, Carol Bouchard, Renee 
Newell, Mark Charette, Michael Gould, Amy Jarret, Kathryn Laborie, Shawn 
Nassaney and Lynn Goodchild. We learned about these individuals, their 
interests and their lives. We have prayed for their families and loved 
ones and responded to their grief with compassion.
  As in the past, Americans offered sympathy and support to those 
touched by tragedy, reminding us that though the terrorists attacked our 
Nation, they did not and they cannot damage our spirit.
  On this solemn occasion I pay tribute to those who lost their lives, 
to their friends and families who continue to grieve, to the American 
heroes who dedicated themselves to rescue and recovery efforts, to our 
servicemen and women who are defending our Nation against the ongoing 
threat of terrorism and to the spirit of America which has helped us 
endure these difficult times and will grow stronger from our sacrifices.
  God bless America.


                         Hon. Michael N. Castle


                               of Delaware

  Today is a solemn day to reflect on the lives lost and the families 
who have been altered forever by the terrorist attacks last September 
11.
  In the aftermath of these devastating attacks, the American public and 
people around the world came to realize that thousands of innocent 
Americans and others from many nations and walks of life perished 
because evil forces wanted to strike at the heart of this great Nation.
  Today and forever we will grieve for all of the victims. We have 
listened to the reading of the names of those lost but who, more 
important, are the family, friends and loved ones of those who are still 
on this Earth and miss them today.
  September 11 will always be etched in the minds of all Americans and 
our families and friends throughout the world. Today we remember our 
heroes who gave their lives so others may live, our brave citizens, 
firefighters, police officers, and emergency personnel. The outpouring 
of emotion, generosity, and courageousness of mankind continues to touch 
us daily. Now is not only the time for remembrance of the past but also 
a time to look forward to living our lives with vigor and joy. We are a 
country that stands more united than ever before. Our diversity has 
strengthened us and our pride in America continues to grow. On this 
pain-filled first anniversary, we stand tall defending freedom, working 
for peace, and seeking justice. We must continue to support one another, 
and we must remain committed and united in the war against terrorism and 
use all of our might to bring to justice all of those involved with the 
attacks. Today we pledge to do everything in our power to defeat 
terrorism and to make our Nation stronger in every way that has made it 
a beacon of freedom and opportunity in the entire world.
  May God bless America.


                         Hon. Sheila Jackson-Lee


                                of Texas

  A year ago today, many of us as Americans might have been asking the 
question, Who are we? And the terrorists who attacked us might have 
thought in that horrific act of violence that who we were would crumble. 
They might have expected that because we came from all walks of life, 
spoke different languages when we first came to this Nation and enjoyed 
our respective cultures, that the coalition would disintegrate, that we 
would no longer be America, that we would begin to join places where we 
might have come from or our ancestors might have started and we might 
have gone at each other and might have accused each other.
  But we fooled them because America is a Nation of the free and the 
brave. It is in fact a very special place; and more than any time in our 
lifetime, Americans stood united. It frightened the rest of the world, I 
might imagine, those who wanted to perpetrate terrorism, undermine our 
democratic ideals, get us to attack our Constitution. We stood firm. As 
I sat there today at the Pentagon and I watched as our flag began to 
blow in the morning's wind, it reminded me of the words of Francis Scott 
Key, why he was so moved to write the ``Star Spangled Banner,'' for as 
he looked up as those bombs were bursting and that war was going on, he 
felt that there was a theme and a symbol that continued, and his words 
were:

                    ``Now it catches the gleam of the morning's fresh 
                      beam,

                    In full glory, reflected now shines on the stream;

                    'tis the star spangled banner. O, long may it wave

                    Over the land of the free and the home of the 
                      brave.''

  That is what we showed the world on September 11. We showed them that 
we could in fact survive. And today I take time to salute those first 
responders who helped us survive, the police, the firefighters, the 
paramedics, all the medical professionals, and just plain ordinary 
people, the volunteers, the men and women of the U.S. military who today 
stand at the front line of freedom and opportunity and justice, the 
unsung heroes, many of whom will not and did not live to tell their own 
story. We honor them, and yesterday belongs to the families of those who 
lost their lives and the families of survivors. We honor them and we 
thank them.
  I spoke today to a family member who lost his wife in Somerset, PA; 
and his words were chilling to me. It reminded me of the importance of 
the resolve of this Nation and of this government. He said simply, ``I 
do not understand. I'm still living through this. I do not know how I'm 
going to get through it.'' He, however, may take comfort in the way that 
America has come together, how we have comforted each other. He may take 
comfort in knowing that anytime we are attacked, we will stand unified 
together. Their stories may never be told, those who lost their lives, 
but we will stand arm in arm together.
  Might I say, Mr. Speaker, as I close, that the government came 
together, State and local officials. Might I also say that even though 
we were diverse, we did not use this time to attack any religious group, 
any believers of any faith, any distinctive ethnic group. We came 
together.
  I would simply say, Mr. Speaker, that this Nation is a Nation under 
God. I hold this Bible. I will not read it today, but I am proud as an 
American that if I chose, I could read this Bible because we do have the 
freedom which we fight for, and that is why I know in our hearts we will 
continue to wage this ongoing fight against terrorism; but we will do it 
by showing to the world our own values of democracy, freedom, justice 
and equality.
  I believe the ``Battle Hymn of the Republic'' says it well:

                    Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the 
                      Lord.

                    He is trampling out the vintage where the grapes of 
                      wrath are stored.

                    He has loosed the fateful lightning of His terrible 
                      swift sword.

                    His truth is marching on.

  The truth of this Nation continues to march, and we can do it in a way 
that understands freedom.
  God bless America and God bless its people, for the truth will 
continue to march on.


                          Hon. Saxby Chambliss


                               of Georgia

  Mr. Speaker, today I rise in strong support of this resolution. On the 
anniversary of September 11, we remember the innocent victims of last 
year's terrorist attack against our Nation and pay tribute to the heroes 
who risked their lives to save others.
  This day is indelibly marked in our Nation's memory. It is a day when 
our Nation changed, when we were savagely attacked by malicious enemies 
whose hatred of freedom and democracy runs so deep that they would 
murder innocent men, women and children.
  These attacks on our cherished principles, values and freedoms tried 
to weaken our Nation; but the tragic events of September 11, 2001, only 
strengthened the American resolve. The loss is overwhelming; but in the 
wake of this tragedy, we have witnessed many of the best aspects of 
America: the tremendous outpouring of patriotism, a common sense of 
grief and loss which touched every American, a bond of love and support 
among strangers from across the land, a renewed commitment to our 
respective religious beliefs, and a renewed national resolve to root out 
terrorism and act against the enemies of America.
  Today at the Pentagon ceremony, I visited with Pat Hogan, the widow of 
Maj. Cole Hogan of Macon, GA. Major Hogan was an Army Green Beret who 
served his country bravely here at home and around the world and was 
killed in the attack on the Pentagon. Our hearts, prayers, and thoughts 
are with the friends and families like Pat Hogan who suffered such a 
tremendous loss a year ago.
  Over the past year we have endured daunting challenges, and our lives 
have been forever changed by these terrorist acts and the threat that 
continues to confront us. We have made progress in making America a 
safer place and fighting the war on terrorism. More still needs to be 
done; but as we move forward, we have an opportunity to rededicate 
ourselves to do all we can to work together to preserve the memory of 
those who perished in making our Nation a better place, a safer place 
and to ensure that the spirit of freedom, democracy and our core 
American values continue to burn even brighter in our Nation and around 
the world.


                              Hon. Ron Kind


                              of Wisconsin

  Mr. Speaker, I too rise to remember the terrible events of September 
11, to honor the victims of the attack and their families and to let 
them know that especially today, they do not stand alone, and to pay 
tribute to the heroes of that day, the passengers of flight 93, the 
rescue efforts at the Pentagon and in New York City, the police 
officers, the firefighters, the first responders, emergency medical 
technicians and the health care providers.
  That day started with great shock and honor, Mr. Speaker; but it ended 
with incredible unity and a sense of resolve that those responsible 
would be held accountable. From the ashes of that attack arose a new 
sense of patriotism and a solemn pledge to never forget but to learn 
from that terrible day.
  We became unified in this Nation out of a sense of common values that 
we share: love of country, love of the freedom and liberties that we 
hold so dear, a shared sense of common vulnerability now that our 
splendid isolationism in the world and our sense of innocence was taken 
from us. That is perhaps what has made me most angry about the events of 
last September 11, the grief that we have to share with the families who 
lost loved ones, but the knowledge that my two little boys and all our 
children in our country will have to grow up in a 21st century with the 
specter of terrorism and that vulnerability hanging over their heads.
  I was heartbroken to have read the story of the two little boys who 
lost a father at the World Trade Center when they were at home, and they 
got all excited and started jumping up and down when they saw their 
dad's car being pulled into the driveway. They were screaming, ``Mommy, 
Mommy, Daddy's home, Daddy's home.'' She knew that could not be the 
case, and she looked out the window to only see a tow truck dropping off 
her husband's car in the family driveway and having to explain to her 
sons why their dad was never coming home again.
  Or the ``Nightline'' story of the retired firefighters living down in 
Florida who came back up to Ground Zero to sift through the wreckage in 
order to find the remains of bodies so they could be identified. They 
did it out of a sense of honor to their fallen comrades but also because 
they had lost their own sons, the next generation of firefighters who 
went into those burning buildings to save lives. One of the firefighters 
was interviewed by Ted Koppel, and he asked them, ``Why are you doing 
this day in and day out, from dawn to dusk every day?'' He responded, 
``When we signed up to be firefighters and when our sons signed up to be 
firefighters, we all knew there was a risk in this job, but everyone 
deserves a decent burial.''
  These are the memories that will live with us for the rest of our 
lives and why it is so heartbreaking.
  After one of our intelligence briefings, I was talking to one of the 
intelligence officers and commented to him how sophisticated this 
terrorist operation seemed, and he replied that it was not all that 
impressive. He said it was a low-tech operation. It is very easy to fly 
commercial airlines when they are already aflight. The hard part is 
landing them safely, and they never intended to land safely.
  That is the challenge that lies before our country today. We not only 
need to fly the ship of state safely, but we need to land the ship of 
state safely; and that is why I hope that we learn from this terrible 
event, but do not get too intoxicated with our own military power, which 
is considerable.
  I would hope that we realize we must maintain our good citizenship 
throughout the globe, that we are in this all together. This is not only 
about enhancing our own security interests in the United States and for 
our citizens abroad, but for all of the freedom-loving nations 
throughout the globe who have a common goal in defeating international 
terrorism.
  We cannot do this alone. We need the help of the international 
community.
  It is easy for our Nation, with the military power that we now 
possess, to accomplish so-called regime change. The hard part is nation-
building that comes after. And that is why it is vitally important, I 
believe, that we keep our eye on the ball; that we pursue the Al Qaeda 
organization wherever they have scattered, to the four winds, and that 
we do it with the cooperation and the help of the international 
community.
  I am confident with the deliberations in the days ahead that we will 
be guided with proper decisions. May God bless and may God continue to 
guide this great Nation.


                        Hon. Todd Russell Platts


                             of Pennsylvania

  Mr. Speaker, I appreciate the gentleman yielding me this time. One 
year ago today, the lives of all Americans were forever changed. For the 
terrorists, the story of the September 11 attacks is one of immense 
hate, a hatred for the principles of freedom, liberty, and equality for 
which our great Nation stands. For Americans, however, the story of 
September 11 is a story of immense love, a love of country, a love for 
human life.
  Firefighters, police officers, and everyday citizens were heroic in 
rescuing victims of the attacks, and later in recovering the remains so 
as to properly honor those lost. Countless other citizens volunteered to 
assist and encouraged relief workers. Across the country, flags waved, 
hands were clasped in historic unity, and voices joined in prayer and in 
patriotic song.
  In response to the attacks, America has been made stronger. Americans 
better appreciate the sacrifices that police officers, firefighters and 
emergency personnel make every day to ensure our safety. And we 
certainly have a much deeper admiration for the courageous devotion to 
duty of our servicemen and women, our men and women in uniform who fight 
to defend our precious freedoms throughout the world.
  President Bush so profoundly captured the enduring spirit of America 
when he stated last year, ``We will not tire. We will not falter. We 
will not fail. United we stand.''
  God bless those who lost loved ones in the attacks of September 11 and 
those who gave their lives seeking to save the lives of others, and 
certainly God bless the United States of America.


                        Hon. Charles W. Stenholm


                                of Texas

  Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding me this time. It has 
been said that ``Greater love hath no one than to lay down his life for 
a friend.'' Unless perhaps he or she lays down a life for a stranger. 
That is the love, the heroism, the patriotism that we pause today to 
remember and to honor. It is the love we witnessed on a large scale in 
New York, Pennsylvania and Washington 1 year ago. But it is also the 
love that is practiced daily in communities across this great land.
  In some ways, September 11, 2001, is so indelibly imprinted on our 
minds and souls that it is difficult to believe an entire year has 
passed. As we recall each detail personally experienced on that day, we 
remember the horror, the anguish, the sorrow, and the fear. Certainly 
these emotions remain fresh to all of those who lost a loved one. But 
even for citizens in other parts of the country hundreds of miles away, 
our connection as fellow Americans meant that we all felt deep grief.
  As John Donne wrote more than 300 years ago,

  No man is an island, entire of itself. Any man's death diminishes me 
because I am involved in mankind; and therefore never send to know for 
whom the bell tolls, it tolls for thee.

  In the weeks following September 11, as we heard the bells tolling or 
the bagpipes playing ``Amazing Grace'' in funeral after funeral, each 
one of us did feel that a part of us had died. And so today, as we 
remember, we feel sadness, we feel grief.
  For those of us who were not physically present at one of the attack 
sites, perhaps our greatest wound came from the fear that gripped our 
chests and our country. Suddenly our sense of safety, of 
invulnerability, of carefree security received a vicious slash from a 
cruel and unexpected attacker.
  As a Nation, we face the question, Will we be paralyzed by this fear 
or will we overcome it? The answer to that question is where the story 
brings us today. From biblical times until today humanity has discovered 
three things which overcome fear: love, faith and action.
  Some people are aware of that truth every day of their lives. Each 
community's firefighters, our police officers, our emergency and health 
care workers, our men and women in military uniform, every day these 
heroes set aside personal fear in order to do their job so that the rest 
of us might live safely. They risk the possibility of laying down their 
lives for both friend and stranger and in doing so they demonstrate some 
of the greatest examples of love in our society.
  The year that has passed since September 11 has also helped us find 
meaning in and through our grief. It has given us an ability to view 
both world events and our personal lives with a new perspective. And 
what we have seen is that one of the darkest days of our history gave 
birth to thousands of acts of goodness, creating perhaps one of our 
finest hours. Ordinary men and women across the country showed 
extraordinary bravery, kindness and compassion as we pulled together as 
one united Nation.
  As we look back, we learn that it was through our giving back that we 
are now able to move forward. So while we respect and honor those who 
lost their lives a year ago, and feel compassion for those who remain in 
grief, today is also a day of celebration. We celebrate the American 
spirit, the heroes who are gathered here today among us all over 
America, and the three antidotes to fear: love, faith and action.
  The marvelous thing is that every one of us has the capacity to bring 
to life these fear fighters. We cannot all rush into burning buildings 
or stop senseless acts of violence. Few of us may actually be faced with 
the opportunity to save another life. But we all can be heroes by 
loving, by believing, and by acting to strengthen our communities. As we 
honor our heroes, both living and dead, we are called to find the heroic 
urge inside ourselves.
  September 11 may have shown us the worst of humanity, but it also 
reminded us of the chance to become the best of humanity, by loving, 
believing and acting. May each of us today honor those who died by doing 
just that.


                         Hon. Michael Bilirakis


                               of Florida

  Mr. Speaker, exactly 1 year ago today, the lives of every American 
citizen were changed by the cowardly acts of terrorism committed against 
us on our own soil. Families were broken, loved ones were lost forever, 
and our sense of security was shaken.
  Yet even in the dark hours of September 11, 2001, hope remained. For 
within the hearts of Americans, we share a common bond as citizens of 
the greatest Nation on Earth. This bond prompts us to courage, to 
service, and to patriotism. This bond inspired Americans on the day of 
the attacks to rush to the aid of their fellow Americans without thought 
of possible consequences to themselves. This bond provides hope that our 
Nation will heal from our grief and conquer those who would threaten our 
liberty and our way of life.
  While we choose to honor the sacrifices and tragedy of September 11 
with solemnity today, we also celebrate who we are as a Nation. We 
celebrate our Republic, we celebrate freedom, we celebrate service, 
sacrifice and love for one another. We celebrate the heroic acts of 
ordinary citizens and commemorate the tragic events of September 11. 
From the soldier to the firefighter and policeman, to ordinary folks 
going about their daily lives, we salute you. Your sacrifices will not 
be in vain. A grateful Nation lives and hopes because of your love for 
this great country.
  I close today with Professor Al G. Wright's beautiful ode to our 
Nation, which celebrates our country with these words:

  I am an American. That is the way most of us put it, just matter-of-
factly. They are plain words, those four. You could write them on your 
thumbnail, or you could sweep them clear across this bright autumn sky. 
But remember, too, that they are more than words. They are a way of 
life. So whenever you speak them, speak them firmly, speak them proudly, 
speak them gratefully. I am an American.


                             Hon. Mike Ross


                               of Arkansas

  Mr. Speaker, September 11, 2001, is a day that none of us will ever 
forget. I was sitting in my office across from our Nation's Capitol, and 
from the window in my office, I literally saw smoke rise from the 
Pentagon. A few hours later, I would learn that a young Navy petty 
officer from our district named Nehamon Lyons would be among the 
casualties at the Pentagon. Picking up the phone and calling his mom, 
Mrs. Jewel Lyons, back in Pine Bluff, AR, was the most difficult call I 
have ever made.
  This morning, I joined with other Members of Congress and with our 
President, united, Democrat and Republican alike, united as one America, 
as we remembered in a special service at the Pentagon. We remembered 
those who lost their lives 1 year ago today at the Pentagon, at that 
pasture in Pennsylvania, and, yes, at the World Trade Center in New York 
City. After that ceremony I returned to my office and I called Mrs. 
Jewel Lyons in Pine Bluff, AR, to let her know what I had just 
experienced in that very special and moving service at the Pentagon and 
to let her know that America has not forgotten that young Navy petty 
officer, Nehamon Lyons, and his service to this great country.
  My grandfather taught me to always look for something good in 
everything bad. There was not anything good about September 11, but I do 
believe it has brought out the best in the American spirit. I see a 
country today that is more patriotic than perhaps ever in my lifetime. I 
see a country today with a greater appreciation for our veterans and our 
soldiers. And I see a country today that is praying a lot more. Bible 
sales are up, church attendance is up, and I know that means America is 
only getting stronger.


                           Hon. Doug Bereuter


                               of Nebraska

  Mr. Speaker, on the first anniversary of the tragic events that killed 
so many Americans at the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, it is 
natural for our thoughts to turn to the victims of that day. It was, of 
course, a world-changing event that will continue to affect all of us. 
Now we know, too, that an extraordinary debt of gratitude is owed to 
those brave passengers of United flight 93, which crashed in a 
Pennsylvania field. They fought the murderous hijackers in the cockpit 
and, thus, foiled the plot to crash that plane into the Capitol or White 
House.
  The families of the victims will continue to grieve their losses, but 
the commemoration around the Nation today should focus on reinforcing 
America's newly heightened unity and sense of resolve that we as a 
Nation will dramatically increase our effectiveness in protecting our 
homeland and our citizens abroad from terrorist attacks. We must remain 
committed to meet these challenges while at the same time preserving the 
freedom, civil liberties, and opportunities which make America the envy 
of the world.
  The period set aside for formally mourning our losses is long past. 
The victims and their families now are best served if all of us share 
and act upon a commitment to keep our Nation secure, strong, and a 
bastion of liberty. May God bless America.


                         Hon. James P. McGovern


                            of Massachusetts

  Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of this resolution. It is hard 
to believe that it has been exactly 1 year since that terrible September 
day, 1 year since our Nation experienced that devastating and profound 
loss. Words cannot begin to express the heartache that we felt that day, 
or the sympathy we continue to feel for those who were lost.
  Like many of my colleagues, I represented several of the victims of 
September 11; and I appreciate this opportunity to extend my deepest 
condolences and prayers to their loved ones.
  It has been a difficult, but necessary, week for all of us. From our 
session in New York City and visit to Ground Zero, to the ceremony at 
the Pentagon this morning, to the consideration of this resolution, 
Members of this House have had the opportunity to express our solidarity 
with the families and communities most deeply affected by September 11.
  Today is also an opportunity to pay tribute to the millions of 
Americans who reacted with such bravery and compassion in the aftermath 
of the terrorist attacks, the doctors and nurses who ministered to the 
injured; the firefighters, police officers, ironworkers and others who 
refused to leave the site of the World Trade Center until everyone was 
accounted for; the ordinary citizens from every corner of our country, 
every background and religion, who donated blood, money, or who provided 
a kind word or a prayer.
  Mr. Speaker, I also think it is important at this moment for us to 
express our gratitude to our men and women in our Armed Forces who, as 
we speak, continue to battle terrorists in Afghanistan. They serve our 
country with great distinction, and they are a credit to our country 
and, indeed, to the world.
  We have accomplished a great deal in the past year by working 
together, but I believe we have much more to do.
  Today we recall the solidarity and compassion shown our Nation and our 
people by other nations and other peoples around the world, and we can 
work with them to bring our most cherished values into reality.
  Mr. Speaker, we can, I believe, make this world less violent, more 
peaceful, more tolerant, and more secure. We have the ability to 
eradicate poverty, disease, hunger and hopelessness, the things that 
terrorists exploit to justify the unjustifiable. What we need is the 
will to make it happen. We need to lead the world in pursuit of these 
important goals. In doing so, I believe we will demonstrate the true and 
magnificent character of the United States of America.
  Mr. Speaker, in conclusion, it is my hope that as we remember the 
victims of September 11, as we offer our condolences to their families, 
and as we continue to bring the perpetrators to justice, that we 
rededicate ourselves to providing a better world for us all.


                          Hon. Christopher Cox


                              of California

  Mr. Speaker, today is Memorial Day for the victims and the heroes of 
September 11. It is a time to honor the people who have died and the 
people who still live. It is important as we grieve for the victims that 
we keep in mind how many people are alive today because of the efforts 
of those who helped them, many of them still alive.
  Today it was my honor, along with Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell of 
Colorado, to honor and recognize 11 members of our Park Police here in 
Washington, DC, who were heroes and first responders on that day. It was 
an interesting way to recognize them. There was a cross-country 
motorcycle ride organized by citizens from all of our districts and 
States across the country. It started out in Orange County, CA, went to 
San Diego, CA, 3,500 miles later it picked up hundreds of riders and 
came here to the Nation's Capital. Like Ben Campbell, I am a Harley 
rider and so I was happy to join them. That is why I found myself in a 
position to be able to bestow these glass plaques to our first 
responders.
  First, the riders themselves, our constituents. They raised $1 million 
for the World Trade Center Miracles Foundation just from among the 
riders. In that they were like the people who responded heroically on 
September 11. They put aside their concerns and put first the needs of 
others. That is what people all around our country are doing in response 
to September 11.
  Along their 3,500 mile route, they stopped in places like Wichita, KS, 
where they dedicated an evening to the family of Daniel Nolan. He 
perished in the World Trade Center. A few days later they were in 
Illinois at the Champaign County Fairgrounds celebrating the important 
work of first responders. Only yesterday, they traveled to Stoney Creek 
School in Shanksville, PA, where the students had built a memorial to 
the heroes of flight 93. At every step along the way, they honored the 
dead and the living, as we do today.
  This coast-to-coast effort culminated in the honoring of 11 heroes who 
live among us in Washington, DC, from the U.S. Park Police; and I would 
like to mention their names on the floor.
  First, two members of the motorcycle unit, Lt. George F. Wallace, 
commander, and Sgt. Daniel P. Beck, supervisor of the unit. They were in 
front of the Capitol today. They saw what had happened at the Pentagon 
from this side of the river, and they did what heroes do: they went 
right to the middle of that danger. They were two of the first uniformed 
police at the Pentagon on the scene. They assisted in the initial 
evacuation of the wounded. Their efforts helped ensure that those 
injured who were still alive received immediate care, and for that, 
obviously, those men and women, their families, and all of us are 
grateful.
  After the arrival of other local police and fire units, these officers 
continued to work. They cleared the vicinity and organized the 
evacuation of personnel from the monumental core area.
  There were nine others outside the Capitol who were similarly honored. 
The members of the U.S. Park Police Aviation Unit, Eagle One and Eagle 
Two. Eagle One includes Sgt. Ronald A. Galey, pilot; Sgt. John E. Marsh, 
rescue technician; and John J. Dillon, rescue team officer.
  Eagle Two includes Lt. Phillip W. Cholak, aviation unit commander; 
Sgt. Bernard T. Stasulli, assistant aviation unit commander; Sgt. Keith 
E. Bohn, pilot; Sgt. Kenneth S. Burchell, copilot; and physician 
assistant Keith Kettell and Jason Kepp, medic, of the Uniformed Services 
University.
  Here is what these people did on September 11. At approximately 9:40, 
the U.S. Park Police received an emergency call from Reagan National 
Airport tower notifying them that a plane had crashed in the vicinity of 
the Pentagon. They did not know yet what had happened. Members of Eagle 
One immediately lifted off, and they flew right into the center of the 
disaster, hovered right over the Pentagon, and they honored an FBI 
request and activated their microwave downlink and provided a live video 
feed of exactly what was going on at that moment.
  Just as Eagle One began to provide this live feed, personnel at Reagan 
National Airport abandoned the airport tower and said they could not see 
anything because of the smoke. They requested that these people, the 
names I just gave you, take over responsibility for all of the air 
space, and they did. They took control over all of the tower's 
responsibility.
  Even as Eagle One completed this assignment, Sergeant March requested 
helicopters from the Maryland State Police, MedStar and AirCare, and 
coordinated with ground units to establish a landing zone, honoring a 
request from the Arlington County Fire Department to transport patients 
to regional burn centers.
  Meanwhile, Eagle Two's crew responded to its call of duty and loaded 
the mass casualty kit and additional equipment on board their aircraft. 
They landed on the west side of the Pentagon and immediately began 
coordinating the transport of 11 priority-one burn patients. While Eagle 
One directed MedStar and AirCare aircraft into the landing zone to 
medevac additional patients, Eagle Two transported two of these patients 
to the Washington Hospital Center. Those people are alive and doing much 
better today as a result of these heroic efforts.
  As a lasting example of their heroic efforts, the U.S. Park Police 
Aviation Unit responded to a final request of the Arlington County Fire 
Department to transport a battalion chief of the Pentagon Fire Command 
Center for a 1-hour flight over the crash site because he was directing 
the firefighting efforts on the ground from their craft.
  Those are just some of the heroes of September 11. They live among us 
here. It was, as I said, my honor to present them with citations this 
morning. But as we honor these first responders, I think we have to 
remember that, as we draw inspiration from their work, they are still 
there every day protecting our neighborhoods. They are still there every 
day protecting us from threats, whether it be fire or a terrorist 
attack. Because of their bravery, which we take so much for granted, we 
have a wonderful future to look forward to in this country.
  I have no doubt that we will succeed in our efforts in the war on 
terror, and I have no doubt that we will owe a continuing and ever-
deeper debt of gratitude to these men and women to protect and defend 
our country. I am grateful for the opportunity to honor these men and 
women.


                             Hon. Lois Capps


                              of California

  Mr. Speaker, in communities across the land, we gather to commemorate 
the unspeakable attacks against our Nation 1 year ago today.
  Even with the passage of time, there are still no words to adequately 
describe our pain, sorrow, and our anger. Our hearts remain heavy with 
grief for the 3,000 souls who were lost, and we continue to mourn with 
their families and their loved ones.
  I feel especially heartbroken for all the children who lost their 
fathers and mothers on this terrible day, and for all of the babies who 
came into the world after their fathers were killed. These young lives 
have been permanently and senselessly altered by those who so 
erroneously believe that extremism and hate pave the road to salvation.
  Now it is our duty to help these children fulfill their dreams and 
understand that their parents died in an attack on the freedoms and 
values we hold to be self-evident.
  It is also important to pay tribute to the acts of courage and heroism 
carried out by so many people: the firefighters, police and rescue 
personnel, the passengers on the doomed aircraft, and by countless 
citizens who volunteered at the crash sites and around the Nation. Some 
of them included volunteers from my district on the Central Coast of 
California who lended their expertise and resources.
  Today is a day that we should honor all of the first responders who 
not only risked their lives on September 11, but who are also the first 
on the scenes of emergencies and disasters every day in communities 
across this country.
  I am so proud of their commitment and their determination to make our 
country, indeed the world, a safer place. These brave individuals 
deserve our highest respect on September 11 and on every day.
  It is also important to remember and honor the brave American 
servicemen and women who are defending our freedom around the globe, 
joined by defenders from other countries.
  They are defending the principles of democracy and security on which 
this country was founded, and we salute their tireless mission. This has 
been a year of great sorrow and mourning. But it has also been a time of 
great American unity, strength of spirit, and generosity.
  As one widow reflected, it is as though this entire year has been 
stuck on September 11. Now, perhaps, we can move on to September 12.
  Mr. Speaker, I hope and pray, and let us work toward the goal, that 
the coming year will bring peace to our families, our community, our 
Nation, and that the generosity of our people and the spirit of our 
democracy will be well known and well documented throughout the world.


                           Hon. Adam H. Putnam


                               of Florida

  Mr. Speaker, this is an emotional time for this country and an 
emotional time for this body. All of us have participated in events in 
our communities, tributes to the victims and their families in New York 
and the Pentagon, and that is right and proper. But I want to take this 
opportunity on this first Patriot Day to look forward, to remember and 
pause and reflect on why they envy us so, why the terrorists hate us so. 
What is it that would cause them to bring about the death and 
destruction of so many innocent lives, so many hopes and dreams 
shattered, so many communities that have lost church members, PTA 
officers, rotary club presidents, chamber directors, so many children 
who have lost a parent?
  They despise the fact that we stand for freedom; that we represent all 
that is great, all that is tolerant and hopeful and helpful and strong 
about communities.
  They misunderstood us. They thought we were no stronger than the 
celluloid films that come out of Hollywood; that we would buckle and 
cave, that we would wither up and shrink from the fight.
  What they did not understand was that we had an army of ordinary 
American citizens who would rally; who would stand in line for hours to 
give their blood; who would contribute their paychecks to strangers; 
whose children would go to schools and have penny drives and car washes 
and other fundraisers to send off to the victims, their families, and 
even the children in Afghanistan.
  They hate the fact that in America little girls have the same 
opportunities as little boys, to dream, to hope, to be whatever they 
want to be, from a teacher to a firefighter to a Member of Congress, to 
President of the United States. They are afforded equal opportunity.
  They resent the fact that different faiths have every opportunity to 
worship together, side by side, on the same city block, in peace.
  They resent the fact that we have heroic civil servants who deliver 
the mail, who put out fires, who comfort victims, who run into buildings 
from which everyone else is running out; that we have teachers who 
instill values and character into the next generation of Americans; that 
we have health care workers, doctors and nurses, who rally to the scene 
and give so much of their hearts and souls to putting lives and bodies 
back together.
  People still risk their lives to come to this country. People still 
see the United States as that shining city on a hill. They still risk 
their family's safety, they give up all of their worldly possessions to 
stow away in a tanker or to cobble together a rickety raft and brave the 
straits of Florida or the Atlantic, to become a part of this country 
that those terrorists tried to destroy.
  If given the opportunity, most free people, most thoughtful people, 
would choose that way of life, would choose that equality, that 
tolerance, that hope, that dream that is America.
  And while all of us fight on a regular basis in this Chamber over 
things great and small, we never question the legitimacy of the debate 
or the legitimacy of the leadership or of the system or of the 
institution. While we criticize the policies of our President or 
administration, we do not question his right to be there and be our 
leader.
  That is what they hated, that is what they envied, that is what they 
attempted to destroy, and they have succeeded only in bringing out the 
best in all Americans, leaving America today stronger than she was last 
September 11; a little closer together, still fairly complacent, still 
fairly naive about the dangers this world poses, but still very much in 
love with all things American, very much in love with our ability to 
debate on this floor, our ability to hope and dream and be whatever we 
want to be, and to instill that in our young people.
  America is stronger today than she was a year ago; a little bruised, 
very bloodied in some areas, but stronger.
  Mr. Speaker, God bless these United States of America.


                          Hon. Bernard Sanders


                               of Vermont

  Mr. Speaker, our Nation was changed forever on the morning of 
September 11. The goal of Osama bin Laden was to demoralize us, to 
create fear and uncertainty, to bring about instability in our country; 
and, obviously and thankfully, he has failed.
  Last week Congress met in New York City to pay tribute to those who 
were killed on September 11 in that city, and this morning we assembled 
at the Pentagon. At these events and similar events all over this 
country, we were reminded about our resiliency and how strong this 
Nation really is.
  Last September 11, we saw amazing displays of heroism and bravery. We 
saw what is extraordinary and best in the human spirit. None of us will 
ever forget the sight of firemen entering the World Trade Center, going 
up the stairs while other people were going down the stairs. And, as we 
know, most of those firemen never got out of that building alive.
  We also today remember the courage of the people at the Pentagon who 
saved lives there, and we honor the members of our Armed Forces who are 
fighting terrorism in Afghanistan and elsewhere.
  Mr. Speaker, we have also learned a great deal since September 11. We 
have learned, as we have never learned before, that we are a vulnerable 
Nation. Yes, we are the most powerful Nation on Earth, but what we 
learned on that day is that we could be attacked and that thousands of 
innocent men and women could be killed.
  We have also learned that we must lead an international coalition 
against bigoted, religious fanatics who believe that they have the right 
to kill innocent people in order to impose their reactionary ideology on 
others.
  Many of us have also learned that in order to maintain true American 
values, we must not undermine the principles and constitutional rights 
that make our country great and that this country was founded on.
  As an American and as a Vermonter I have been extraordinarily proud of 
how our people responded to this crisis in terms of blood donations and 
financial contributions, and how we came together as a community to 
support the victims of September 11 and to support each other. If there 
is something positive out of the horrors of September 11, it is that we 
as a Nation, all of us, despite our backgrounds, where we come from, our 
religious beliefs, must continue to show that same sense of community, 
that love for each other, that was demonstrated in the aftermath of the 
September 11 attacks.


                            Hon. John Linder


                               of Georgia

  Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of the resolution. Today is the 
1-year anniversary of the most horrific attack on American soil in our 
history. On September 11, 2001, freedom-hating terrorists took from all 
of us our sense of innocence. They took from all of us the idea that 
innocent men, women and children going about their daily lives are 
immune from the horrors of war. They took from all of us the sense of 
safety and security to which we had become accustomed.
  What they did not take from us and what they could not ever take from 
us, no matter how hard they tried a year ago, is our freedom and 
liberty, our way of life, our government of the people, by the people 
and for the people.
  New York Governor Pataki opened the memorial ceremony at Ground Zero 
this morning with the reading of the Gettysburg Address which President 
Lincoln delivered in 1863, barely 100 miles from where the passengers of 
United flight 93 heroically stopped terrorists from their attempt to, I 
believe, destroy this very building.
  Part of President Lincoln's address includes these words:

  that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause 
for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion--that we here 
highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this 
Nation shall have a new birth of freedom.

  We, too, are dedicated to a new birth of freedom here in this new 
century.
  The horrible events of last September 11 have reawakened in all 
Americans a new sense of patriotism; a strength, a resolve that had lain 
dormant for far too long. The flags we see flying in every neighborhood 
across America today were not put up this morning. They have been there 
for the last year. The support of the American people for our men and 
women fighting overseas has remained unwavering, and the kind words and 
deeds of our fellow man seem all the more common today, 1 year later.
  Eugene McCarthy once observed that America can choke on a gnat, but 
swallow tigers whole. This is a tiger that we as a Congress and as a 
Nation must deal with, and we will.
  There is no lack of resolution here. There is no rancor. We will 
continue to stand behind the President. We will continue to do what we 
must do to keep those who hate our values and ideals from committing 
evil acts against us ever again.
  Today let us honor and pay tribute to those who were taken from us 
before their time and resolve to remember them always. But let us also 
resolve that our commitment to the Republic that our Founders risked 
their own lives to create more than 200 years ago is stronger than ever. 
The foundation of our Nation is solid, and so is our dedication to her.
  Mr. Speaker, God bless America.


                           Hon. Adam B. Schiff


                              of California

  Mr. Speaker,

  The world must be made safe for democracy. Its peace must be planted 
upon the tested foundations of political liberty. We have no selfish 
ends to serve. We desire no conquest, no dominion. We seek no 
indemnities for ourselves, no material compensation for the sacrifices 
we shall freely make. We are but one of the champions of the rights of 
mankind.

  These were the words of President Woodrow Wilson in his war message to 
Congress April 2, 1917.
  This week, from Los Angeles to New York, from Fairbanks to Fort 
Lauderdale, and in 200 million households in between, a Nation struggles 
to come to grips with the most vicious attack on unarmed civilians in 
the Nation's history.
  We once again appreciate, with the force that sometimes only tragedy 
brings home, that we are one country. Differences of geography, 
language, income and ethnicity have faded away. There are no national 
divides, no partisan debates, no hometown rivalries, no baseball 
strikes, not on this day. For all too brief a time, we are simply 
Americans.
  And we are taking stock. Much has taken place since September 11, a 
date that may surpass the end of the last millennium as a turning point 
for the country.
  Some of that change has been extraordinarily positive for our own 
security and for the peace and prosperity of the world. The promise of 
mutually assured destruction that for decades we exchanged with the 
Soviets has been replaced with an unprecedented partnership with Russia. 
This is no detente, but a completely new realignment of interests, which 
has transformed the world landscape and dramatically reduced the 
possibility of nuclear catastrophe.
  For all that has changed in the last year and all that has transformed 
since the end of the cold war, we are still at risk. Our most immediate 
and tangible threat comes not from interlocking engagements with a 
Europe that cannot overcome its historic feuding, not from nation states 
that are amassing colossal military forces with an eye toward 
territorial aggrandizement or world domination. The threat is primarily 
asymmetrical now, from stateless terrorist organizations and the nations 
that support them; from murderous psychopaths that are bent on igniting 
a holy war and have a blood lust for the United States. Such depravity 
has always existed, but with the advent of weapons of mass destruction 
and their terrible availability, it no longer takes a national 
miscalculation to inflict misery on the world. And as the lone 
superpower in the world, America has a target on her back.
  The threat may come from new quarters, but we have one powerful bond 
with Americans from the beginning of the last century: This conflict is 
still about making the world safe for democracy.
  On September 11 we were not attacked because we sought to conquer or 
subjugate another people. We were not attacked over a territorial 
dispute or a clash of national ideologies. And, notwithstanding post-
attack propaganda from the terrorists, we were not attacked over our 
policy in the Middle East. Osama bin Laden and Al Qaeda never showed an 
interest in the Palestinian cause except in a post-attack effort to 
point their homicidal rage as a defense to the West's supposed hostility 
to Islam. We were attacked simply because we existed, simply because we 
represented and continue to represent the triumph of free institutions, 
a respect for the free exercise of religion, association, and 
expression. We were attacked because we are a democracy in a world very 
unsafe for democracies. And winning this war, and the long twilight 
struggle it has become, will require nothing less than a sustained, 
unswerving commitment to the propagation of freedoms around the world.
  We must root out Al Qaeda and terrorist organizations wherever they 
exist. We must take the fight to the enemy, as the President declares, 
and not wait defensively at home for the next attack. At the same time, 
we must open a completely new front in the war on terrorism: the battle 
for democracy. We must attack tyranny, despotism, and the trampling of 
human rights around the world. We must use every instrument of our 
national policy to support the growth and cultivation of free 
institutions, a respect for the free exercise of religion, the right to 
associate with whom one pleases, and the right to speak one's mind. We 
must encourage the growth of democracies in every corner of the globe 
and not simply in Europe or the Americas. Democracy must come to the 
Arab nations, to China, and to every corner of Africa, and not simply to 
our adversaries. Democracy, too, must come to our allies, to the Saudis, 
to the Egyptians, and to the Jordanians. Democracy, not oil, will be the 
ultimate guarantor of our security.
  This lofty ambition is not fanciful, not quaintly sympathetic, but 
practical. Democracies do not make needless war, democracies do not seek 
to terrorize or conquer, democracies do not serve as the breeding 
grounds for genocidal rage or terrorist madness. Democracies are better 
capable of eliminating the common scourges of mankind: poverty, disease, 
famine, and conflict. If we are to be partisans, let us be partisans of 
democracy.
  We may never ferret out every last terrorist; the germ of madness is 
difficult to eradicate completely. But our peace and prosperity lie as 
much in changing the soil. Peace, again, must be ``planted upon the 
tested foundations of political liberty,'' and a cardinal part of 
winning this war, as in the war to end all wars, will be our fortitude 
as one of the ``champions of the rights of mankind.''


                          Hon. Earl Blumenauer


                                of Oregon

  Mr. Speaker, at 8:46 this morning I came to this Chamber, where I was 
exactly 1 year ago, to reflect on the events that had transpired that 
terrible day and what has ensued since then. As we all shared a flood of 
remembrances in honor of the memory of the victims and the heroes of 
last September 11, Mr. Speaker, it is just as important for us to 
reflect on the progress of this past year. Because tragedy gave us an 
opportunity and a responsibility, not just to deal with additional 
threats to our families, but to use the vast wealth and power of the 
United States to be a leader and a partner around the world, while we 
fulfill the promise of America here at home.
  I thought about how much I have been inspired by the reactions of the 
American public at the time of the tragedy and of what we have seen 
throughout the year. But, Mr. Speaker, I wonder honestly what we think 
we have accomplished as a Congress in this last year. Immediately, we 
did do, as the resolution says: local, State, and Federal leaders set 
aside differences and worked together to provide for those who were 
attacked and to protect those who remain. But since then, is America 
really safer because of congressional action? Do the vast intelligence 
and security agencies now work together seamlessly? Have we made 
progress, not just against the Taliban and Al Qaeda, but to promote 
democracy and freedom, peace and prosperity around the globe? Is this 
Congress working together cooperatively on issues of peace, the 
environment, human health, and education?
  By any objective measure, we as elected officials have fallen short of 
that mark. We have yet as a body to provide voice, not just to the fears 
and frustrations, but to the hopes and aspirations of Americans that we 
will seize this moment.
  Now, I think people on both sides of the aisle will disagree as to why 
this is so, but I do not think anybody can argue that we have done all 
that we could, or even, frankly, that we have done all that much from 
airline security, to reducing energy dependence in the Middle East, to 
giving coherence to our policies in the Middle East and around the 
world. We have fallen short in doing all that we could for peace and 
democracy.
  As part of this solemn occasion, the most fitting tribute of all is 
not for us just to reaffirm, as the resolution suggests, an honoring of 
the memory of those who lost their lives and that we will bravely defend 
the citizens of the United States in the face of all future challenges. 
Part of what we need to do is to acknowledge where we have fallen short 
and to renew our commitment that in this next year, we in Congress will 
catch up to where the actions and the expectations of the American 
public are; that we will enter as Members of this Congress with a new 
spirit of cooperation and achievement, that we will take the actions 
that make achievements of our values real; that we will move toward 
making our communities and, indeed, the world more livable and our 
families safer, healthier, and more economically secure.


                            Hon. David Dreier


                              of California

  I would like to first express my appreciation to my good friend and 
fellow Californian (Mr. Lantos), as well as the gentleman from Nebraska 
(Mr. Bereuter) for moving this very important resolution and, like 
everyone else, I rise in strong support of it.
  We all know that today we mark this first anniversary of one of the 
most tragic days in America's history. As we think about the families of 
those victims, our thoughts and prayers go to all of them. We all have 
sort of mixed emotions on this day. We all, of course, recall exactly 
what it was like here in the Capitol a year ago today, and we think 
about the day first and foremost with sadness because, as I said, of all 
of those whose lives were lost. But we also think about today with a 
great deal of resolve and defiance. In some sort of strange way, we also 
celebrate the success that we have had in pushing back those, as the 
President calls them, ``evil doers,'' those who would, in fact, bring an 
end to our way of life.
  Just yesterday, here in the District of Columbia and in 12 other 
States, there was a great celebration in that we had elections where 
people were choosing their leaders. We are continuing with our work here 
in the U.S. Capitol right now. So that is why we all have mixed emotions 
as we deal with today.
  But it is also very important, Mr. Speaker, for us to take a few 
minutes to look at the history of what led up to September 11 and to 
realize that as we, with this resolution, are remembering and honoring 
those who were killed on September 11, it is also important for us to 
realize that this is an international war on terrorism, and it is not a 
war that began on September 11 of last year. It is a war which has been 
going on for decades.
  Just a few minutes ago I sat down with some of my staff members and 
started talking about some of the horribly tragic events that Osama bin 
Laden and his terrorist allies have perpetrated over the past couple of 
decades, and I thought it appropriate that we take a moment as we 
reaffirm our strong commitment, as the President has said, to win this 
war on terrorism, and look at what led up to that tragic day 1 year ago.
  On April 1, 1983, 63 were murdered and 120 injured when the U.S. 
Embassy in Beirut was bombed by the Islamic jihad. On October 23, 1983, 
we all remember the tragic Islamic jihad bombing of the Marine barracks 
when we lost 242 of our Marines. On June 14, 1985, Robert Stethem, the 
U.S. Navy sailor, was murdered and thrown from that TWA flight 847 which 
was hijacked by Hezbollah terrorists who also held 145 innocent 
passengers hostage for 17 days. On February 26, 1993, we all remember 
very well the World Trade Center bombing in which 6 were murdered and 
1,000 people injured. On June 25, 1996, 19 U.S. military personnel were 
killed and 240 injured when the Khobar Towers housing complex in 
Dhahran, Saudi Arabia was bombed by Osama bin Laden's allies. On August 
7, 1998, 12 Americans and hundreds of Kenyans and Tanzanians were 
murdered in the bombing of the U.S. embassies at Nairobi and Dar Es 
Salaam, directed, as we all know, by Osama bin Laden, and on October 12, 
2000, 17 sailors were murdered and 39 injured in the bombing of the USS 
Cole. That was a horrible, horrible day.
  These events, Mr. Speaker, underscore the fact that this is a war 
which has been going on now for decades.
  So when I think ahead to some of the challenges that we face as a 
Congress, we are going to be dealing with a resolution which will help 
us confront those who have in fact provided shelter and refuge to Al 
Qaeda and, of course, I am referring to Saddam Hussein and Iraq.
  So this war is one that really reaches all across our globe. It is one 
that I am happy to see our allies support, and it is one that will 
continue probably beyond our lifetimes.
  As I think about some of the very wonderful quotes throughout history 
that led to our dealing with these challenges, I am reminded of a 
couple. There is one that I like to recall. At the beginning of every 
one of Winston Churchill's volumes, he has what is called the moral of 
the work, which is basically four points. He says, ``In war, resolution; 
in defeat, defiance; in victory, magnanimity; in peace, good will.'' I 
think that underscores where it is that we are headed in dealing with 
this challenge, which is going to continue in the future.
  Shortly after September 11, President Bush delivered a speech in 
Cincinnati, OH. As I think back on many of the brilliant statements that 
have been made following September 11, one of the most poignant 
underscores the sacrifice that was made a year ago. President Bush said, 
``Terrorist attacks can shake the foundations of our biggest buildings, 
but they cannot touch the foundation of America.'' These attacks can 
shatter steel, but they cannot dent the steel of American resolve.
  So, Mr. Speaker, as we move ahead, I again would like to thank my 
colleagues, the gentleman from California (Mr. Lantos) and the gentleman 
from Nebraska (Mr. Bereuter), for this very important resolution, and 
provide strong support; and, as everyone is doing, extend my thoughts 
and prayers to the families of those who tragically lost their lives a 
year ago today.


                             Hon. Jay Inslee


                              of Washington

  Mr. Speaker, we are all united in every congressional district in 
coming together in America today. I would like to honor two 
contributions from the First District of the State of Washington.
  First, I would like to honor the life and heroism of Army Sergeant 
Larry Strickland, who lost his life while at his post on the second 
floor of the west wing of the Pentagon 1 year ago today.
  Army Sergeant Strickland was a native of Edmonds, WA, who served his 
country as a personnel manager and traveled to every post around the 
world to which he was assigned. He was a senior adviser to the Deputy 
Chief of Staff, and he earned the greatest title I think anyone in the 
American military could have. He was a good soldier.
  But he was also a good son to proud Americans Lee and Olga Strickland 
of Edmonds, WA; and a good husband to wife, Deborah; and a good father 
to Julia, Matthew, and Chris; and a good grandfather to Brendan.
  To those family members, we cannot ask to beguile them from their 
grief; but we hope that they are left with the cherished memory of the 
loved and lost, and the solemn pride that should be theirs for having 
left such a precious contribution at the altar of freedom. That family 
can be assured that we will keep Sergeant Strickland's memory alive as 
we go forward together in a unified way to preserve the freedoms for 
which he died.
  Second, Mr. Speaker, I would like to honor Molly Peebles, Chuck 
Oppermann, and Erik Lindbergh, who led the flight of 51 planes in the 
Flight Across America from every State in the Union that brought every 
State's flag and the U.S. flag to New York this morning, having begun 
flights all across this country on August 11 to bring a message of 
resolution and healing to this Nation.
  They spoke with the spirit of general aviation, which is important in 
this country for our freedoms and our economy. I hope their 
contributions send a statement that we have to honor general aviation so 
we can continue to have both security and a viable general aviation in 
this country.
  Mr. Speaker, America is proud of people in every district in this 
country, and I offer the gratitude of this Nation to these people from 
the First District of the State of Washington.


                            Hon. Jim Gibbons


                                of Nevada

  Mr. Speaker, today America remembers. America just 1 year ago 
witnessed three heinous and senseless terrorist attacks that will be 
forever etched in our minds and memorialized in our history. May I say 
that no American will ever forget the horrific images of September 11, 
2001, and no American will ever forget the thousands of innocent 
victims, or the hundreds of courageous heroes who will always have a 
place in our history and in our hearts.
  Yet since that fateful day, the American people have persevered and 
established a new sense of normalcy. May I say to the cowards who 
targeted our great country last year, let me recite that terrorism 
against the United States, our freedom, and our people will never be 
tolerated. The United States stands strong, and we will fight terrorism 
wherever it lurks. No corner of this world will be safe for them or 
those who want to attack freedom, destroy liberty, and instill fear.
  America's fight will not be won quickly or easily; however, it will be 
won. I have seen first-hand the bravery and the patriotism of the men 
and women in our Armed Forces, and may I say that they will not settle 
for anything less than victory. They are willing to make the ultimate 
sacrifice to protect our liberty. They deserve our strongest support and 
our deepest gratitude.
  Americans have answered the call to help their fellow man and to 
defend freedom and to serve their Nation. We will not retreat. We will 
not be intimidated. America is strong and her strength is in her people. 
It is the strength of the American people that will prevail over 
terrorism wherever it may hide.
  So on this 1-year anniversary of September 11, on this Patriot Day, 
may Americans again unite to remember our loss, to celebrate our 
freedom, and to defend liberty.
  May God bless this great country and its people.


                           Hon. Danny K. Davis


                               of Illinois

  Mr. Speaker, 1 year ago today, I was in Tel Aviv, Israel. So, Mr. 
Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to the over 3,000 victims who died 
in the September 11 attacks on America; and I wish to pay tribute to all 
the family members of those who perished, as well as to our public 
officials, businesses, and private citizens who have dedicated 
themselves to the rebuilding of a stronger Nation over the past 12 
months.
  In a recent special report about life after September 11 in America's 
tallest building, the Sears Tower, the Chicago Tribune observed that 
what happened was more complicated than fear. It was an awakening, then 
a reckoning, then a change in priorities and plans in the calculation of 
everyday decisions. This awakening and recalculation in our everyday 
lives has taken place not just among those in the Sears Tower and my 
home in Chicago, but across this great Nation. It is a new realization 
of how connected and responsible we are for the protection and well-
being of all our fellow citizens.
  In response to the devastation caused by the terrorists, the residents 
of Chicago have joined with millions of others in this country and 
around the world to donate millions of dollars and hours to the 
rebuilding efforts. Their material gifts, however, reveal an even deeper 
resolve to let the principles of freedom for which we stand ring loud 
and clear.
  As we contemplate the effects of September 11 and extend our deepest 
sympathy to those who lost their loved ones on that fateful day, let us 
resolve to build not just a more vigilant and stronger homeland defense, 
but a society that continues to protect our personal freedoms and would 
enable us to fulfill the American dream of liberty and justice for all.
  And in pursuit of this goal, let us, Mr. Speaker, continue to be able 
to sing:

  O beautiful for spacious skies, for amber waves of grain, for purple 
mountain majesties above the fruited plain. America, America, God shed 
His grace on thee, and crown thy good with brotherhood from sea to 
shining sea.

  God bless America.


                          Hon. Gregory W. Meeks


                               of New York

  Mr. Speaker, I woke up this morning not knowing, really, where was the 
appropriate place for me to be. Being a New Yorker, I did not know 
whether I should be at Ground Zero this morning, whether I should be in 
my community with many of my constituents, or whether I should be here 
in Washington, DC.
  I made the decision to try to do a little bit of both, so I spent this 
morning with my constituents in New York, but then felt that it was most 
important for me to come here to Washington as we reflect on what took 
place just a year ago today, as we memorialize the individuals who lost 
their lives a year ago today, as we sit with and hold hands with the 
family members of those who lost their lives.
  It is time for reflection; and as I reflect and think about last 
Friday, when Members of the U.S. Congress came to New York for the first 
time since 1789 and went to the original Federal Hall, it struck me 
about this great thing that we know called democracy, and why we have to 
stand and fight and make sure that democracy prevails.
  I think, in 1789, I as an African-American may not have been able to 
be part of that Congress. But democracy has prevailed, so that in 2002 I 
am a Member of this Congress; and we are here today where the 
Congressional Black Caucus is meeting.
  We must preserve that democracy. What happened on September 11 of last 
year threatens that democracy. We must let freedom ring.
  As I reflect, the words of Dr. King come back to me. In 1965, we were 
talking about freedom here on these shores. His words were,

  So let freedom ring from the prestigious hilltops of New Hampshire. 
Let freedom ring from the mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from 
the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania! Let freedom ring from the 
snow-capped Rockies of Colorado! Let freedom ring from the curvaceous 
peaks of California! But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone 
Mountain of Georgia! Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of 
Tennessee! Let freedom ring from every hill and every molehill of 
Mississippi! From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

  I think we need to add now: Let freedom ring from Afghanistan. Let 
freedom ring from Pakistan. Let freedom ring in Israel and Palestine. 
Let freedom ring in China and India. Let freedom ring in Zimbabwe and 
Nigeria.
  Let freedom ring in every country on every continent, because when 
freedom rings, in the words of Dr. King, when we let it ring, we will 
let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every State and 
every city in every nation. We will be able to hasten that day when all 
of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, 
Protestants and Catholics, Muslims and Buddhists, will be able to join 
hands and sing the words of the old Negro spiritual: ``Free at last, 
free at last, thank God Almighty, we are free at last.'' God bless 
America.


                         Hon. Benjamin L. Cardin


                               of Maryland

  None of us will ever forget where we were on September 11, 2001, when 
we first learned about the 8:46 attack on our Nation. It was a defining 
moment for our Nation like November 22, 1963, and December 7, 1941. Now 
we commemorate the first anniversary of September 11 and, quite frankly, 
Mr. Speaker, we are not sure what we should say or what we should do, 
but we want to join together as a community to show our solidarity.
  Today we honor our heroes. These are not our Presidents or our sports 
figures. These are ordinary Americans who performed extraordinary acts. 
Heroes by chance and heroes by choice. Like Todd Beamer on flight 93 who 
gave up his life to save many others. We now know that it was likely 
that the plane was headed here toward the Capitol. He may in fact have 
saved our lives. Heroes such as John Fischer, a New York City 
firefighter, who went into harm's way in order to save lives and lost 
his life on September 11. Heroes such as Lt. Darin Pontell, a naval 
officer, a young man whom I had the honor to appoint to the U.S. Naval 
Academy. He understood the risks of serving in our armed services, but 
he thought he would be safe in the Pentagon. He lost his life. Over 
3,000 of our fellow citizens lost their lives, casualties to our 
continuing effort as a Nation to maintain liberty, safety, and freedom 
for all of its citizens.
  Each of us was personally affected by September 11. We may not have 
known anyone personally who died, but we still grieve for them, and we 
hold the members of their families close to our hearts. We shall never 
forget September 11. Shortly after September 11, the Congress passed a 
law calling on the President to designate September 11 as Patriot Day in 
honor of the individuals who lost their lives as a result of the 
terrorist attacks against the United States that occurred on September 
11, 2001.
  Throughout America we join together as a community in solidarity to 
make it clear to the world that our Nation is united and resolved to 
defend freedom against all enemies, any enemies. We may be Democrats or 
Republicans, conservatives or liberals. We may differ in religion or 
ethnicity, but we are united as Americans. Terrorists destroyed the New 
York World Trade Center buildings, but they can never destroy the 
character, strength and values of the American people.
  Mr. Speaker, yesterday was an important day in Maryland. It was 
primary election day. Marylanders chose their leaders and 
representatives by the ballot box. Our enemies rule by fear, 
intimidation, and force. Because of America's leadership, freedom and 
democracy are winning in all corners of the world. As President Bush has 
said, ``We are a people dedicated to the triumph of freedom and 
democracy over evil and tyranny.''
  Today we thank millions of Americans who responded to the Nation's 
calls, our soldiers, our firemen, our police, our postal workers, and so 
many more who have been on the front line for the defense of our 
country.
  Ever since September 11, ``God Bless America,'' our hymn, has had a 
special meaning. One year ago this evening, we sang it on the steps of 
the Capitol to make it clear to the world that we would triumph. Tonight 
we will sing ``God Bless America'' on the steps of the Capitol to make 
it clear to the world that we will never forget September 11.
  Mr. Speaker, may God bless those who mourn, may God bless those who 
serve, and may God bless America and bring us peace.


                           Hon. Robert Wexler


                               of Florida

  Mr. Speaker, we are here at this somber occasion to recognize 
September 11 as a moment in history when American heroism and patriotism 
prevailed over terror, adversity, and hate. This resolution pays tribute 
to those families personally affected by the tragic events of September 
11 and honors the innocent victims of these horrific attacks.
  Today America is united, drawn together by overwhelming grief, a 
shared commitment to freedom and unwavering resolve. Our unity as a 
Nation sends an unequivocal message that despite the tragic events of 
September 11, the American spirit remains strong, that in the face of 
destruction and hate, democracy, justice, and hope will prevail.
  September 11 demonstrated that in a moment of unparalleled adversity 
and devastation, there exists an innate desire of Americans to help 
others that is unimaginably selfless and good.
  Never was this more clear than 1 year ago today in New York and 
Washington where hundreds of the world's bravest and finest, including 
firemen, policemen, and first responders rushed to assist the victims of 
these tragic attacks; or above Shanksville, PA, where passengers on 
flight 93 actually took a vote to sacrifice their own lives to preserve 
those of others and prevent a potential assault on the very Chamber in 
which we now stand.
  The vote on flight 93 to overtake the hijackers epitomizes American 
values, courage, and heroism at their very best. For in a moment of 
unprecedented darkness and despair these brave souls refused to sit idly 
by and bear witness to evil. They chose to take action after evoking the 
most basic American right and fundamental symbol of democracy that all 
of us hold dear.
  As we commemorate the tragic events of September 11 and honor the 
victims lost in New York, Washington, and aboard flight 93, we must 
remember the extraordinary acts of heroism that took place 1 year ago 
today. From Washington to every community across the United States, may 
we derive strength and courage from the bravery demonstrated on 
September 11 and commit ourselves to a future free from terror, 
intolerance and hate to one of understanding, freedom and, above all, 
peace.


                             Hon. Tom Lantos


                              of california

  Mr. Speaker, this has been a fine moment for the House of 
Representatives. We came together, not as Republicans or as Democrats, 
but as American citizens who are still so painfully aware of that 
horrible moment a year ago when lives were snuffed out, orphans were 
made, widows were made, family tragedies were made across this land. And 
the people who did it so totally and so profoundly misunderstand the 
nature of an open and free society. They sought to intimidate us. They 
sought to make us give up the good fight, but they have only succeeded 
in steeling our will and determination that the terrorists of this globe 
and the regimes that harbor them will not prevail.
  This struggle will go on for a long time. Al Qaeda may have been 
largely defeated in Afghanistan, but they are all over the world in 
scores of countries planning to perpetrate additional evil deeds. We are 
ready for them.
  Not since Pearl Harbor have the American people been as determined, as 
united, as committed to defending the values of our way of life, our 
Constitution, our pluralism, our acceptance of all religions, of all 
ethnic groups, of all forms of commitments to values that we so dearly 
cherish in this country.
  The terrorists may have succeeded in bringing down two magnificent 
buildings but they also succeeded, contrary to their hopes and 
aspirations, of steeling the determination of the American people to 
protect this free and open and magnificent society.
  As we recall the events of a year ago and as we plan the next action, 
it is important for us to realize that while not always will governments 
be with us, people who love freedom will be with us in every corner of 
the world.
  The President will be addressing the United Nations tomorrow. He will 
be speaking to all freedom-loving people on the face of this planet. He 
will be talking on behalf of all of us because we are determined in the 
21st century, as we were in earlier centuries, not only to preserve our 
way of life but to expand the arena of freedom for people everywhere.
  It is easy, Mr. Speaker, to become discouraged. When Pearl Harbor 
struck, many were pessimistic. When Hitler swept across Europe, many 
were pessimistic. But the indomitable spirit of men like Winston 
Churchill knew full well that free societies will prevail. The Osama bin 
Ladens of this world are simply incapable of comprehending how powerful 
the spirit of freedom is in open and democratic societies. We may suffer 
setbacks, we may suffer occasional defeat, but our goal of preserving 
this way of life for ourselves and making it available for others if 
they so choose cannot be defeated either by hijacking an aircraft, 
spreading biological or chemical weapons, or any such means. The spirits 
of free men and women will prevail. And there is no doubt in the minds 
of any of us in this body that however long this struggle will take 
against terrorism and countries that support terrorists, we will prevail 
in the long run as free men and women always have.
  The many ceremonies across this Nation, from New York to the Pentagon 
to Pennsylvania, to every town and hamlet in the United States, is proof 
that the American people have learned the lesson of a year ago. We may 
have lost our innocence but we have multiplied our resolve and 
determination. This Nation is united, strong, and conscious of the fact 
that our values, more than our physical capabilities, will result in our 
ultimate victory.
  I want to commend all of my friends and colleagues who have 
participated in this discussion. I trust the message that we sent with 
many voices, many phrases, different approaches, will not be lost on 
those who cynically or otherwise are doubting the resolve of the 
American people. This resolve is unshakeable, and this resolve will 
bring about ultimate victory over terrorism and totalitarian societies.


                           Hon. Doug Bereuter


                               of Nebraska

  Mr. Speaker, first of all, I would like to commend my colleague and 
friend, the gentleman from California (Mr. Lantos), for the very able 
way that he has handled this debate, this memorial, this commemoration, 
and for his cogent and insightful remarks. The gentleman suggests that, 
in fact, this has reignited or reawakened a powerful, diverse Nation. 
Indeed, that is the case. That was what the terrorists apparently did 
not expect.
  On a personal note, may I say that my wife and I are particularly 
grateful that her sister, an officer worker in the Twin Towers, survived 
the bombing attack in 1991 and again last year and was able to come down 
to safety with a lot of difficulty and a lot of courage; and all of 
those people who had that experience, of course, will have a commitment 
to make this country even better and even stronger than it had been. I 
believe that there is not a doubt in anyone's mind in this country that 
what happened on September 11 has only reinforced our strengths. It has, 
in fact, increased our unity and our resolve.
  The comments from my colleagues here today give us some very strong 
indication of the sentiment that their constituents feel and resolve 
that their constituents expressed to them in their districts. I commend 
all of my colleagues on both sides of the aisle for this remarkable 
experience and expression here today.


                     Hon. Juanita Millender-McDonald


                              of California

  Mr. Speaker, I submit this statement in the Record in support of this 
resolution and applaud all Americans for their resilience as we 
commemorate and reflect on last year's events.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise to express my support for H. Con. Res. 464 that 
expresses the sense of Congress on the anniversary of the horrible 
terrorist attacks launched against our country and our ideals of 
democracy.
  My heart is heavy as I reflect on the tragic events of a year ago. The 
past year has been especially difficult for the families, friends and 
coworkers of individuals who perished in New York, Pennsylvania, and 
Washington, DC. Our prayers are offered to the victims and their 
families.
  Today, in a small and symbolic way, we are expressing our gratitude to 
the firemen, policemen, health care workers and the individuals who, on 
that fateful day, performed heroic deeds and helped their fellow human 
beings without regard for their own welfare. We thank you profusely for 
your efforts. America owes you a debt that we can never repay. We salute 
you for your service and valor.
  We also salute those who have served our Nation so bravely overseas 
and all people of good will who personify humanitarian virtues during 
this tenuous and volatile time in the world.
  Today, we are united as a Nation to confront current world realities 
that have transformed the social, psychological and spiritual fabric of 
the world in which we coexist with our domestic and foreign neighbors.
  During the recent year, my colleagues and I have actively engaged in 
debate about how to formulate an agenda that addresses homeland 
security, national spiritual salvation, and political bridge building 
with our international friends.
  As we continue to make inroads toward progress, I cannot overemphasize 
how important it is to map out a course for our future that will 
sustain, inspire and protect our children. We must infuse them with a 
sense of optimism because the confidence in which we as Americans move 
around our country has been shaken. However, as Americans, we will not 
be deterred from experiencing the freedom we cherish.
  My colleagues and I on the Transportation Committee recognize the 
importance of protecting the confidence of America's traveling public. 
We have worked diligently to ensure that the security needs of the 
flying public are paramount. We will continue to pursue the course of 
protecting our transportation infrastructure, and we are committed to 
making sure that America continues to move passengers and cargo 
efficiently and safely.
  As ranking member of the Subcommittee on Workforce, Empowerment, and 
Government Programs, I recognize how small business owners around our 
Nation have been victimized economically and traumatized emotionally by 
the events of 9/11. Consequently, my colleagues and I on the Small 
Business Committee have worked to ensure that industries hit hard by the 
traumatic events of September 11, including the travel industry, are 
able to survive. We have held hearings and offered legislation that 
seeks to resuscitate small businesses throughout our Nation. Small 
businesses constitute the backbone of our country's economy, and with 
our help, they will not only survive, but flourish.
  Our domestic efforts and grief over the tragic events of September 11 
have heightened our appreciation for the pain of others around the world 
that have been subjected to the brutality and inhumanity of terrorism. 
And that is why we have supported liberation and democratization efforts 
in Afghanistan and sought to assist and rehabilitate the victims of 
persecution who are attempting to rebuild their lives and their country.
  On this occasion of reflection, recommitment and rededication to 
freedom, we are affirming our resolve to salute and honor the men and 
women who paid the ultimate price--their lives, just because they are 
Americans. They will never be forgotten and our Nation shall continue to 
rise to meet the challenge of terrorism and the threats posed by 
terrorists who seek to derail freedom and the good will of humanity.
  May God bless America and all people of good will.


                             Hon. Dan Miller


                               of Florida

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to remember those who lost their lives and 
the lives of loved ones on September 11, 2001. I also rise to submit an 
article which appeared in the National Journal on August 31, 2002, which 
recounts my experience on that fateful day:

  President Bush had scheduled a visit to Booker Elementary School in 
Sarasota to give a major speech on education on the morning of September 
11. I'd spent the weekend in Washington, but I flew down in order to be 
with the president and to fly back on Air Force One with him. The 
president was scheduled to arrive at Booker at 9 o'clock in the morning. 
I was told something had hit the World Trade Center, but I didn't think 
too much more about it. We all weren't focused on that.

  The classroom was small, so there were a limited number of people in 
that room besides the students. I went into the auditorium-type room and 
was awaiting the president's speech. The second plane hit at 9:05 or so. 
We all started to realize the magnitude of what was happening. We were 
just in a state of shock: ``This can't be true. This can't be true.''

  Matt Kirk, of the Legislative Liaison Office at the White House, was 
assigned to us, and he tried to keep us updated. Things were in a state 
of flux, and the Secret Service agents were moving around. There was a 
question about whether the president was going to make a speech to the 
nation from the school, or go over in front of Air Force One. The White 
House staff felt the quickest way was to just do that right there. We 
went out and got in our van in the motorcade. I had my BlackBerry with 
me and I would get some news, and Matt Kirk could get some news from his 
little pager, but it was limited. This was, say, 9:15 to 9:30. The 
president came out, got in his limousine, and then we just drove very 
rapidly over to the Sarasota-Bradenton Airport. The president got on the 
plane, and it took off about 10 o'clock. We were told to tighten up our 
seat belts very tight, because the plane has the ability to take off 
very steeply. When we took off, we were told there was no communication, 
because they didn't want anyone to know where Air Force One was, and the 
press was told that too.

  In many ways, for most of that day, I had far less news and 
information than most of the people around the world. It was 
frustrating. Air Force One did not have, at that time, the ability to 
pick up television. Matt Kirk would go up and try to talk to someone 
else and pick up some news. Somebody would come back and share some 
information. The president's political adviser, Karl Rove, came back a 
couple of times, just giving us an update. It was very tense with the 
staff, because there obviously was a great security concern by the 
Secret Service and the crew.

  Around 10 o'clock, we were heading due north. And then, you could 
sense a turn to the west. I would say 10:45, maybe 10:30 or so, the 
plane changed course. We were told we weren't going back to Washington. 
We didn't know where we were going. I remember looking out my window and 
looking down at that Gulf Coast of the Alabama-Mississippi-Florida area.

  We started to pick up some TV reception. We saw that the collapse of 
the towers had occurred. It was so surreal. I remember Karl Rove coming 
back and he said, ``There are 40,000 people who are working at the World 
Trade Center at this time.'' No one knew the magnitude could have been 
that high. And then, to hear about the Pentagon!

  About 11:30, we got called up to the president's office. The president 
was at his desk. There's a little sofa that can seat four or five 
people, and a chair where Andy Card sat. Behind us was this TV screen on 
the wall. I didn't even know it was there until I got a photograph, and 
you saw the World Trade Center, a fuzzy picture of it, right over our 
heads.

  The president was telling us that there were some other planes--six, 
maybe nine, planes--that were unaccounted for, and that a plane had 
crashed in Pennsylvania, so the decision was made not to return to 
Washington. He was very serious, very determined, very focused, and very 
collected. And I felt much more emotional at that moment than he was. 
You saw he was in control. I felt choked up. It was almost like you're 
speechless.

  He said he was determined to make sure that the people who were 
responsible for this would be identified and punished. There was 
speculation on the plane, but not with him, that it was bin Laden. The 
belief was, the only people capable of such an evil deed were either a 
government--and they didn't think it was any government behind this--or 
the bin Laden organization.

  The president was saying, ``We are going off to an undisclosed 
location.'' He was able to very calmly explain where we were and what we 
were getting ready to do. The only one speaking was the president. And I 
don't remember really even asking questions.

  I remember saying as we were leaving, ``God bless you, Mr. 
President.'' You could see the weight on his shoulders. He had been 
through a lot in those couple of hours. And he obviously knew a lot more 
than we knew. He talked about how he had given the order--he actually 
said it had been while he was driving over from the school to Air Force 
One--to bring all the planes down from the air. He was saying how we had 
an AWACS and six fighters surrounding us. He was saying we were going to 
land at an undisclosed location, and that we would be getting off the 
plane there, and he was going on to another undisclosed location.

  When we got to Barksdale Air Force Base, all you saw were just rows 
and rows of B-52 bombers. There was a van, a Humvee, there were people 
standing around with automatic weapons, which you don't see in the 
United States. We're seeing it today--but we did not see it until 
September 11. And you could see the president go out. We were left there 
on the plane. That's when we got good TV, from noon to 1:30. We could 
not have any contact--no cell phones or BlackBerrys. Then the president 
came back about 1:30. We exited the plane and stood there on the tarmac, 
and Air Force One took off.

  I was able to call my wife, who was at home on Capitol Hill. The White 
House had called her and told her I was on Air Force One. I said 
something like, ``Honey, I'm OK.'' I was able to tell her where I was 
and that there was another plane that was going to take us back to 
Washington. They flew us to Andrews Air Force Base, and I got home about 
6 o'clock. We have to be about the only plane in the air, with the 
exception of the fighter planes, because everyone was grounded, I guess. 
I'll never forget the landing. You saw the Pentagon smoke.

  I remember when I came home and walked in the house, it was very 
emotional. I hugged my wife. We just squeezed each other. It was hard to 
comprehend. I just didn't want to talk to anyone, besides my son and 
daughter, because it was still so emotional. I choke up sometimes just 
talking about it. It's just hard to comprehend that I was right there on 
Air Force One when this whole thing was evolving. This was obviously the 
most significant event during my congressional career. You realize that 
the U.S. is vulnerable--that we're not immune to some of the problems 
elsewhere around the world, and it makes you think that life is very 
precious. I didn't know anyone personally who perished that day, but it 
brought that home to me.


                         Hon. Elijah E. Cummings


                               of Maryland

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today as a cosponsor of this important resolution 
and to share in a day of grief and reflection with all Americans.
  One year ago today, the course of our Nation was forever changed. As 
we all know, on September 11, 2001, terrorists used hijacked airplanes 
to inflict catastrophic damage upon the United States, taking the lives 
of over 2,000 Americans. And while this day 1 year ago was marked by 
chaos, carnage, fear, and great loss, it also served to showcase the 
best we as Americans have to offer. In the year since, these qualities--
courage, innovation, idealism, hope--have enabled us to take great steps 
toward rebuilding this Nation.
  In many ways, the legacy of September 11, 2001, is a patchwork of 
personal stories. For many of us, the world has been changed forever in 
very personal and very painful ways. Each child who woke up on September 
12 without a parent--and each parent who suffered the unspeakable pain 
of awakening without their child--deserves our tireless pursuit of those 
responsible for these heinous crimes. All Americans deserve a country in 
which they feel safe.
  Each and every one of us has a connection to the destruction. Stepping 
out of my car that morning, I could feel the ground shake below me as 
the third hijacked airplane struck the Pentagon. I will never forget the 
uneasiness that I felt--I know that I will never be able to separate my 
personal attachment to that day with the larger infamy of September 11. 
While our individual struggles to come to terms with what occurred are 
often frightening and lonely, they are also what bind us together. I 
believe I speak for millions of Americans when I say that a piece of me 
died with each victim of the September 11 attacks.
  Mr. Speaker, I would be remiss if I did not mention a constituent in 
my district who also had a piece of him taken away that day. John 
Wesley's fiancee, Sarah, died on the plane that crashed into the 
Pentagon. John, like so many loved ones left behind, funnels his grief 
into a positive effort that is a testament to his fiancee--ensuring that 
her legacy will continue. I must also mention that despite his grief, 
John, such a positive person--is now committed to preserving Sarah's 
mission of exposing kids to different cultures. Mr. Speaker, there are 
so many John Wesley's in our Nation and I salute them for their courage.
  We are now at the 1-year anniversary of a day America will never 
forget. It is time to take a look at where we are. Already, we have 
waged our ``war on terrorism'' to Afghanistan with great success. Brave 
American servicemen and women have risked their lives halfway around the 
world to prevent further attacks, and bring those responsible for 
September 11 to justice. We have radically altered the way that we look 
at national security by undertaking the single greatest Federal 
Government reorganization in 50 years. We have taken unprecedented 
strides in revamping our transportation security infrastructure. We have 
been forced to reevaluate our aging systems of immigration and 
naturalization. We have cleared the tons of rubble of the two largest 
buildings in America's largest city. We have removed and rebuilt the 
nerve center of this Nation's defenses. And we are far from through.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today as a patriot and a legislator. I take both 
roles very seriously. Since the attacks of September 11, the American 
people have been reminded that freedom is not free. It takes courage to 
both survive in a dangerous world and retain our liberties. I will 
continue to work to give law enforcement the authority and resources it 
needs to attack terrorism, while standing sentry over the fairness, 
justice and constitutional rights of all Americans.
  I mourn the victims of September 11, and together with all Americans, 
I accept the challenges facing us as a truly united America. We will 
never forget. But we will not let the actions of a handful of zealots 
derail the hundreds of years of work we have put into this country--the 
freest, most successful, and most democratic Nation in the world.
  God bless America.


                             Hon. Tom Davis


                               of Virginia

  Mr. Speaker, September 11 will always remain a day of great grief and 
sadness, courage and hope. The sight of the destruction and evil filled 
us with disbelief, sadness, helplessness and anger. That day and every 
day since we have also been blessed to see the best of America.
  Throughout the last 12 months, we have seen the greatest of our 
national character in countless acts of sacrifice, courage and love. 
Police, firefighters and port authority officers rushed into the 
building with more concern for finding victims than for their own 
safety. Two office workers, finding a disabled stranger, carried her 
down 68 floors to safety. Rescuers worked past exhaustion to save lives 
after the collapse. The men and women of our Armed Forces, Federal law 
enforcement and intelligence community are now prosecuting the war on 
terrorism abroad. The men and women on flight 93, having spoken with 
loved ones on their cell phones and being told of the unfolding events, 
stormed the hijackers and took the plane down, saving thousands of lives 
on the ground. These acts showed the world what we have long known--that 
our fellow Americans are courageous, compassionate and brave. That the 
true strength of our Nation is in the souls of each of us, and that is 
something our enemies can never take from us and never defeat.
  Our Nation still grieves through our national tragedy and personal 
loss. To the children and parents and spouses and families and friends 
of the lost, we offer our deepest sympathy, our tears, our support and 
our love. None of us will ever forget the events of September 11, but we 
will continue our lives together, arm-in-arm, with a collective strength 
that can carry us all.
  Not only is our military winning the war on the ground, we are also 
winning the war in the hearts and minds of individuals across the world. 
The world is beginning to see exactly who America is and who our enemies 
are. Never has the difference been so clear. They wish to kill and 
destroy, we seek to assist and build. They work for division, we seek 
unity. They pray for and plot our failure, we hope and work for a better 
life for all.
  In 1 year's time, we have comforted those who lost loved ones, we have 
completed our cleanup at Ground Zero, rebuilt the Pentagon, rallied the 
civilized world against terrorism, renewed our friendship with our 
Muslim friends and Arab partners, destroyed terrorist training camps in 
Afghanistan, rid the world of thousands of terrorists, put others on the 
run who will soon understand there are no limits to American justice, 
and freed a people from an oppressive regime, restoring hope and 
opportunity. We're working with the new Afghan Government to lay the 
foundation for long-term stability and to reverse the conditions that 
allowed terrorist regimes to take root in the first place. This Congress 
has taken necessary actions to strengthen our homeland, assist the 
families and friends who lost loved ones, and worked to stem the 
economic downturn that resulted. There has been much good that has come 
out of that tragic day that shook us to our core, but strengthened our 
resolve and determination to rid the world of evil. And we still have 
much work to do. We did not ask for this mission, but we will fulfill it 
to ensure that freedom endures.
  We are now engaged in a struggle that we cannot and will not lose. We 
have come to a unique moment in history, and America must take its 
rightful place, leading the charge for the rights of men and the 
responsibility of government. Throughout our storied history, America 
has reaffirmed its commitment to freedom. Today, we find ourselves at 
the dawn of a new birth of freedom, not only for our Nation, but indeed 
for all of mankind. We have been given this enormous task, and we will 
undertake it as only America knows how--head on--and we will succeed. We 
will capture this opportunity for all of mankind and all time. We will 
continue to lead this Nation and world that we love, confident that the 
same God that watched over George Washington as he led our Revolutionary 
Army, over our Founding Fathers as they established our system of 
government, over Abraham Lincoln during the Civil War, and over our 
Armed Forces as they stormed the beaches at Normandy, is still watching 
over us today as we go forth to make the world safe for freedom and 
democracy.
  America was targeted by our enemies because we are the beacon for 
freedom and opportunity in the world. That light still shines brightly 
today. Peace and freedom will prevail. Hatred and evil are ephemeral, 
but love and goodness have no end. The greatest people in the history of 
mankind have been called to defend a great Nation and the greatest of 
ideas, and we will continue to succeed.
  As we pause to mark the first anniversary of one of the worst days in 
our Nation's history, we not only remember and pray for the loved and 
the lost, we also renew our commitment to honoring their memory by 
pursuing peace and justice, by upholding freedom and democracy, and by 
defending all that is good and just in the world.


                        Hon. Janice D. Schakowsky


                               of Illinois

  Mr. Speaker, today, as we remember the victims of 9/11 and pay tribute 
to the fallen heroes who sacrificed their lives to save others, our 
Nation offers gratitude, comfort and support to the families of those 
who perished on that tragic day. Our Nation is also reminded of the 
brave men and women who are standing guard here at home and abroad--
soldiers, police officers, firefighters, and first responders. We are 
grateful for their service. Time may heal wounds, but we will never 
forget.


                        Hon. Robert A. Underwood


                                 of Guam

  Mr. Speaker, it is with a most profound sense of remembrance that I 
rise in support of this resolution, which I am proud to cosponsor. 
Although Guam, the distant U.S. territory I have the privilege of 
representing in this body, is roughly some 10,000 miles away from the 
City of New York, Pennsylvania, and Northern Virginia, its people, my 
constituency, share in the sorrow and concern for those directly 
affected by the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on our Nation. Our 
geographic isolation and great distance from the mainland has not kept 
us from taking part in the healing process, in demonstrating our 
resolve, and in providing for the defense of our country. This past year 
has been a time of anguish and renewal for many. It has been a time of 
trepidation over our future in a world with division, unresolved 
differences and weapons of mass destruction. As we reflect on the events 
of 1 year ago, we are reminded of who we are as a people, of what we 
believe in as a Nation, and of the values that make our democracy 
strong.
  The people of Guam are a patriotic people whose loyalty to the United 
States has been tested in our most darkest hours of history. As many of 
my colleagues recall, concurrent with the attack on Pearl Harbor on 
December 7, 1941, Guam was also attacked, invaded and then occupied. 
During World War II, our island endured a 32-month brutal occupation. 
Survival during this daunting and difficult period emboldened the people 
of Guam and taught us to cherish freedom and democracy. It was with this 
experience etched in our memories, that we were confronted with the 
events surrounding the most devastating attacks on American civilians in 
our Nation's history on September 11, 2001. In the days that have 
followed, schoolchildren on Guam, like many across the country, have 
penned their thoughts on paper and creatively expressed their feelings 
in drawings and illustrations for the families, firefighters, police 
officers, rescue personnel, and others that were a part of this tragedy. 
On Guam, like everywhere else in the country, scores of American flags 
waved atop cars, trucks, and buses, on backpacks of schoolchildren and 
in front of homes. People filled the pews in the churches and places of 
worship to pray for those who lost their lives and for comfort, hope and 
peace. The people of Guam also donated blood, time and money in support 
of the rebuilding efforts. Memorial concerts, performances, and vigils 
have been held to bring recognition of the American heroism that was so 
courageously displayed in the aftermath of the attacks.
  Last November, I was able to travel to the New York City Office of 
Emergency Management where I witnessed first-hand the professional, 
compassionate work of the people of New York in the face of this 
tragedy. I was able to bring with me then hundreds of support and thank 
you letters and drawings from schoolchildren on Guam.
  To the families of those who lost loved ones, please know that the 
thoughts and prayers of the people of Guam are with you. To those first 
responders who aided in the rescue efforts and to those individuals who 
have committed themselves to the rebuilding efforts, please know that 
the people of Guam are grateful to you for your work and commitment. As 
we commemorate the tragic events of September 11, 2001, and pay tribute 
to all the goodness that has followed within the past year since that 
unforgettable day, let us never forget the sacrifice. The people of Guam 
stand in solidarity with the rest of our country. We continue to stand 
ready to do our part in this national crusade. As so often has happened 
in the past century, Guam is ready. We made our contributions in World 
War II and in the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. We will do our part, and 
more, again and again in this new century to defend our country, to 
preserve our democracy, and safeguard our values of freedom and liberty.


                          Hon. Michael M. Honda


                              of california

  Mr. Speaker, today marks the 1-year anniversary of one of the most 
tragic days in our country's history. I am proud of the way Americans 
have united following the horrific terrorist attacks on civilians. 
Neighbors who rarely spoke to each other, or people who did not even 
know each other shared their thoughts, compassion, and prayers for our 
fallen heroes. Our country is now stronger than ever.
  Understandably, a lot of Americans are outraged following the attacks. 
Let it be clear that we will continue to hunt down those responsible for 
the attacks of September 11, and those who may be foolish enough to plan 
to harm us again. We must also remember that we are not fighting a war 
with people of any specific ethnic group, nationality, or religion. We 
must be vigilant and wary of any efforts by the U.S. Government or 
members of our citizenry to racially profile innocent people, as we wage 
our war against terrorism. I repeat the poignant words of a famous 
philosopher who once said, ``Whoever fights monsters should see to it 
that in the process he doesn't become a monster.''
  As a child, I was a first-hand witness to civil injustice. My family 
and I were locked up in a U.S. internment camp during World War II only 
because we were of Japanese descent. There were many patriots during 
this war. Thousands of young Americans of Japanese ancestry fought and 
died for the very country that imprisoned their families. However, their 
loyalty to America never wavered.
  Our war against terror is going to be a long-term engagement. Along 
the way we will need to be thoughtful and critical of many different 
courses of action. It will be more important than ever to ensure that we 
all have the freedom to ask tough questions of our government officials, 
cultural institutions, and citizenry. The declaration of war against 
terrorism, in itself, is not sufficient justification for the passage of 
invasive and constitutionally suspect government powers, or calls for 
military action against nations. A true patriot will ensure that the 
actions of our government are just and reasonable.
  Our Constitution is rarely tested in times of tranquility, but is 
severely tested in times of tension, turmoil, and tragedy. We must 
remember to embrace the principles of our Constitution--our contract for 
democracy and freedom--which others seek to destroy. They shall not 
succeed. My heart and prayers go out to all those who lost someone dear 
to them. Know that I share your pain, and that I will never forget the 
sacrifice your families made in the name of America.


                             Hon. Tom Udall


                              of New Mexico

  Mr. Speaker, a year has passed since 3,000 innocent men, women and 
children tragically lost their lives in a brutal and cowardly attack on 
our country.
  While we have had a year to come to terms with the enormous tragedy of 
September 11, the sense of loss remains overwhelming.
  On that somber day, we all watched in disbelief as terrorists hijacked 
planes to attack buildings that symbolized our strength and power. We 
will never forget that day or the people whose lives were unexpectedly 
taken from them.
  New Mexico's families felt the pain of losing friends and loved ones. 
No one who knew Alamogordo's Alfred Marchand can ever forget this man 
who proudly served his community in the Alamogordo Department of Public 
Safety. After a stellar 21-year career, he followed his heart and became 
a flight attendant. While living his dream, he perished on United 
Airlines flight 175 fighting against the terrorists.
  We must also remember Senior Airman Jason Cunningham who grew up in 
Carlsbad. Jason died on a mission in Afghanistan while trying to save 
another serviceman. Albuquerque's Sgt. First Class Christopher James 
Speer also died in an Afghanistan fire fight with suspected terrorists. 
He made the absolute sacrifice to protect us from terror.
  Remembering the 3,000 lives taken from us reminds us that, though we 
continue to move forward with our own lives, we do so in a world that 
has been profoundly affected by the events of September 11.
  As we search for ways to deal with the unspeakable horror of this 
tragedy, we can take guidance from the words of Robert F. Kennedy. Amid 
the grief and rage that followed the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther 
King, Jr., RFK said, ``In this difficult time for the United States, it 
is perhaps well to ask what kind of Nation we are and what direction we 
want to move in.''
  These questions are still appropriate today. What kind of Nation are 
we? What direction do we want to move in? I would answer that America 
remains a great Nation and I would challenge us all to move in a 
direction that even more closely embraces the virtues and values that 
make us great.
  September 11 has tested--and will continue to test--the resolve and 
the resilience of all Americans. It will test our commitment to the 
virtues and values on which this Nation is built: democracy, diversity, 
liberty and justice for all. Our response to September 11 must be to 
become even more passionate in our commitment to these virtues and 
values: to embrace and support democracy around the world; to celebrate 
our national mosaic of races and religions; and to shine the light of 
liberty even more brightly into every corner of the Earth.
  America is involved. We give of ourselves--as service members, 
teachers, law enforcement officials, emergency workers, and volunteers 
for causes great and small.
  Today, public service is more important than ever. Tragedy reminds us 
we must come together to create an America that is even more just, more 
democratic and more secure.
  America is a great Nation. Let us look back on September 11, 2001, 
with sadness and respect, grieve for those we lost, and honor those who 
showed the courage that makes us all proud. Let us emerge from this 
tragedy a stronger and wiser great Nation.


                           Hon. Karen McCarthy


                               of Missouri

  I rise today to commemorate the anniversary of the September 11 
attacks on our Nation. As I reflect on this first anniversary of the 
tragic attacks on our Nation I am overcome with sadness and hope. That 
we as a Nation have come together in a spirit of reflection, resiliency 
and continued renewal is a testament to the enduring greatness of the 
American spirit.
  Though we are pausing throughout the day to remember those we lost, 
our resolve to protect our freedom is unyielding. Our Nation is strong 
and once again America and our values have persevered. Friday's special 
session of Congress in New York's Federal Hall invoked the history of 
the first Congress convened in 1789 and represented a strong message to 
the world that as Americans we stand together in our fight against 
terrorism.
  Last year when I visited Ground Zero I saw evil in the devastation 
present. Last week at Ground Zero I saw the continuing of our healing 
process and the unlimited hope of the American spirit. Throughout the 
past year I have been working with community leaders in my congressional 
district to both cope with the aggression forced upon us and assess the 
level of preparedness in our region should another incident occur.
  We need to be sure our everyday heroes: our police, fire, ambulance, 
and medical personnel have the adequate resources, training, supplies, 
materials, and equipment they need to protect our community. These brave 
men and women are a critical component of our homeland security for they 
are our front line. Because of their valor and commitment to service we 
are safer than we were a year ago.
  As we remember the attacks on our Nation in New York, at the Pentagon, 
and in Pennsylvania we are reminded of the promise and the hope that has 
risen from the ashes of that dreadful day. From Independence to Lee's 
Summit to Kansas City, the people in the heart of our Nation are joining 
in numerous events commemorating the 9/11 anniversary. One such event, 
the interfaith observance, ``Remembering 9/11: A Day of Hope'' reflects 
the uniqueness of Kansas City as a place known for its river and 
fountains. Water gathered from the Missouri River and many of the area's 
fountains will be mixed with water gathered from rivers all over the 
world, including Tibet and Egypt. The water will be distributed to 
participants in the observance to be used at other events later in the 
day symbolically connecting all those present to a spirit of renewal and 
healing, regardless of religion or creed.
  Another common theme throughout the Kansas City area remembrances is 
the number 3,000 approximating the number of victims in the September 11 
attacks: 3,000 flags are to hang at the Kansas City Middle School of the 
Arts, 3,000 memorial candles are to be lighted at Temple B'nai Jehudah, 
3,000 names are to be read at the bell tower at Rockhurst University.
  Mr. Speaker, I join my colleagues in support of H. Con. Res. 464 and 
echo the sentiments of Margaret Truman, daughter of President Harry S. 
Truman and native of Independence, MO, that ``in years to come we will 
see September 11 as a turning point in our history as a people, a day of 
grief and glory that created a new dimension in the soul of America.''


                            Hon. Dave Weldon


                               of Florida

  Mr. Speaker, on this 1-year anniversary, I extend my deepest 
sympathies to the families of the countless number of innocent victims 
of the September 11 terrorist attacks on the Pentagon, the World Trade 
Center, and in a desolate field in Pennsylvania.
  Nothing will ever repair the losses we suffered as a Nation 1 year ago 
today. The history of the United States changed forever when 19 
terrorists hijacked 4 planes and killed 3,000 Americans.
  While the events of that morning will forever play in our mind's eye, 
we endure and we are moving forward. As a united America, we have taken 
the needed steps to rebuild, to heal, to pursue justice, and to secure 
our borders.
  Since that time, I have been proud to vote for legislation to make our 
communities safer and our military stronger as we face the challenges of 
the new century. I commend President Bush for his leadership and I 
commend the brave men and women of the U.S. Armed Forces in the 
successful effort to oust the Taliban from power and hunt down those 
terrorists who perpetrated these acts of evil. I applaud those in our 
Armed Forces for their continued commitment to pursue those responsible 
for the attacks.
  The words spoken so long ago by President Lincoln seem to fit so 
eloquently at this moment in history.

  It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the 
unfinished work which they have, thus far, so nobly carried on. It is 
rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before 
us--that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that 
cause for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion--that 
we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that 
this Nation shall have a new birth of freedom; and that this government 
of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the 
Earth.

  As we humble ourselves before Him and pray for His guidance, may God 
continue to bless this great Nation.


                           Hon. Ted Strickland


                                 of Ohio

  We all carry with us memories of September 11, 2001. It was a 
profoundly personal day for all of us. No matter what happens in our 
lives, each of us will forever carry the horror we felt as we watched 
the unbelievable images on television unfold that fateful day. Even if 
we had no family or friends who were directly involved, as Americans we 
were deeply touched by those unspeakable events.
  One year later, we observe a day of remembrance. Not an anniversary, 
but a guidepost: a mark against which we measure how far our Nation has 
come since that horrific day 1 year ago.
  That day, we witnessed the courage of hundreds of heroes who 
sacrificed themselves in an effort to save others. We felt rage and 
despair that a few evil men could purposefully steal so many lives, and 
at the same time we felt deep pride in the courage of our fellow 
Americans. We witnessed the best and worst of humanity. We dealt with 
our sorrow by caring for each other.
  What began as one of the darkest days in our Nation's history will 
long be remembered as one of America's finest hours.
  One year later, I see a new America. We have not experienced the 
enormous sea change many predicted, but we greet each day with a greater 
sense of responsibility to our families, our communities and our Nation. 
We also know that from now on we will be asked to sacrifice convenience 
for safety. We now know how vulnerable our freedom makes us.
  But we also have a newfound appreciation for those freedoms and a 
renewed sense of the strength that our liberty gives us. We have been 
reminded that America's strength as a Nation comes not only from its 
military might, but from the tightly woven fabric of the American 
family, symbolized in the stars and stripes of our flag. It is the 
solidarity of our national family that I hope will once again bring 
comfort to the families and friends of those who lost their lives on 
that fateful day.
  We should also remember the thousands of Americans who are nobly 
risking their lives in foreign lands in the effort to wipe out 
terrorism. This war will continue to be time consuming and costly. But 
we Americans are a strong and resolute people. We have lived through the 
dark days of wars past.
  As FDR said following the attack on Pearl Harbor,

  No matter how long it may take us to overcome this premeditated 
invasion, the American people in their righteous might will win through 
to absolute victory . . . With confidence in our Armed Forces, with the 
unbounding determination of our people, we will gain the inevitable 
triumph. So help us God.

  May God place his blessing on you and yours, and may God continue to 
bless the United States of America.
  The following is a statement by Alan Wallace. Alan was a firefighter 
from my district who was stationed on the helipad outside the Pentagon 
on September 11, 2001. For his bravery that day, Alan was a corecipient 
of the Department of Defense Fire Fighter Heroism Award. The following 
is his account of the events that day.

  On the morning of September 11, 2001, I was assigned to the heliport 
station at the Pentagon. I was assigned there the day before as well. I 
should have been assigned to the Pentagon fire station all that week.

  Fort Myer firefighters were taking a weeklong class on air field 
firefighting, given at the Classrooms Building 219. Mark Skipper, Dennis 
Young and I had already had the training. Mike Thayer, John Pine and 
Ronnie Willett also had had the training. Thayer, Pine and Willett were 
scheduled off on 9/11. Chief George Thompson was off because his wife 
was ill.

  Mark Skipper, Dennis Young and I were the three crew members assigned 
to the Pentagon fire station on the morning of 9/11. We arrived there 
about 0730. The fire station was new and we had only been using it since 
January or February 2001. We also had a new crash truck assigned there, 
an Emergency One Titan 3000. It carries 1,500 gallons of water and 200 
gallons of 3 percent foam. Our first helicopter flight was around 10 am. 
But we were expecting President George W. Bush to land in Marine One 
around 12 noon, returning from Jacksonville, FL. (He had actually left 
from the Pentagon the day before.) Needless to say, neither flight 
arrived at the Pentagon that day because of the terrorist attacks.

  Mark, Dennis, and I had our turnout gear either on the crash truck or 
in the station. About 0830 I decided to pull the crash truck outside of 
the fire station and place it in a position more accessible to the 
heliport landing site. The truck was then parked perpendicular to the 
Pentagon, with the rear of the truck 15-20 feet from the west wall of 
the Pentagon, and the truck facing west, toward the heliport pad. The 
right side of the truck was approximately 30 feet from the fire 
station's apparatus door opening. (I forget to mention the Ford van we 
normally use for transport between Fort Myer and the Pentagon. It is a 
15 passenger vehicle which was parked west of the fire station facing 
north, with its rear about 10 feet north of the apparatus end of the 
fire station and approximately 6 feet from the side of the fire 
station.)

  The fire station is approximately 75 feet long, 35 feet wide and 16 
feet tall. The flight control tower sits above the fire station. There 
were two other individuals at the heliport site: Sean Berger (U.S. Army 
Personnel) and Jackie Kidd, both active duty Army.

  As I said, we were expecting President Bush about noon, which would be 
a Code One Standby. In such situations, one of the problems I see at the 
heliport is that there are too many people there. Plus there are many 
vehicles, including Secret Service, Pentagon SWAT, U.S. Park Police, 
Washington, D.C., cops on motorcycles, and the two Presidential 
limousines. And some of these vehicles even park in front of the fire 
station apparatus door, blocking the fire truck from exiting the 
building! That is why I wanted the crash truck out of the station and 
parked in a good location, for easy access to the heliport in the case 
of an emergency.

  After checking out the fire truck, eating a bowl of cornflakes, and 
cleaning the station and apparatus area, I sat in my favorite chair in 
the apparatus area to read a book about opera. About 0900 Mark and 
Dennis were inside the fire station in the day room. Mark came out to 
tell me that an airplane had just crashed into the World Trade Center. I 
then got up and went into the day room to watch the television coverage 
from New York City. While we three were watching, a second aircraft 
struck the second tower. I think we watched the TV for about 10 minutes 
or so.

  I then went back outside. I was soon joined by Mark. We both began to 
work around the crash truck and were talking about the events in New 
York. About 0920, Chief Charlie Campbell called the Pentagon fire 
station to inform us of the attacks on the WTC in New York. He actually 
talked to all three of us: first Dennis, then me and then Skip. He 
wanted to be sure we were aware of the WTC disaster and that is was 
definitely a terrorist attack. He wanted to be sure we were aware of 
everything going on around the fire station. He also said Washington, 
D.C., could very well be a target and if that happened, our fire truck 
could be dispatched to an incident.

  Let me say this. After the NYC attack, I began to have ``second 
thoughts'' about having the fire truck parked where it was. Would it be 
better for the time being to return it to the fire station until around 
1100 or so? But I decided not to move it.

  Mark and I continued to mess around the fire truck. The last minute or 
two before the plane hit the Pentagon, Mark and I were working in the 
right rear compartment where the foam metering valves are located. Mark 
told me how, if you had to, you could get as much as 50 percent foam 
solution out of the roof turret and discharges. We laughed about 
cheating the government out of some foam! Mark and I then walked toward 
the right front corner of the truck. We were side-by-side, always within 
an arm's reach of each other. We had walked past the right front corner 
of the crash truck (foam 161) and were maybe 10-15 feet in front of the 
truck when I looked up toward my left side. I saw a large frame 
commercial airplane crossing Washington Blvd., heading toward the west 
side of the Pentagon! The plane had two big engines, appeared to be in 
level flight, and was only approximately 25 feet off the ground, and 
only about 200 yards from our location. I later said the plane 
approached the Pentagon at about a 45-degree angle but later drawings 
showed it was closer to 60 degrees. The airplane appeared to be a Boeing 
757 or an Air Bus 320--white, with blue and orange stripes. Mark later 
recalled the plane was silver and even identified that it was American 
Airlines.

  So many people think Mark and I watched the plane hit the building. We 
did not. We only saw it approach for an instant, I would estimate not 
longer than half a second. Others didn't understand why we didn't hear 
it sooner. We did not hear it until right after we saw it. I estimate 
that the plane hit the building only 1-2 seconds after we saw it.

  What I am saying is, immediately after we saw it we heard the noise, 
the engines, I'm sure. I described that as a terrible noise--loud, 
scary, and horrible. At the time we saw the plane, I said ``LET'S GO!'' 
and Mark and I ran away from the area. I turned and ran to my right, 
going north. (I do not remember which way Mark went, since I did not see 
him until I crawled out from under the Ford van.)

  As I recall, I had several clear thoughts and feelings as I was 
running: (1) the noise from the engines of the airplane; (2) awareness 
that now WE are being attacked; (3) planning to run until I catch on 
fire, then maybe dive to the ground and then figure out what to do; (4) 
hearing the sound of the plane crashing into the Pentagon, which I later 
described as a ``crunch''; (5) sensation of a lot of pressure; (6) 
feeling very, very hot very quickly; (7) ``we're certainly not going to 
burn up!''

  Later that morning when I began to look at the distances of everything 
from the fire truck, I thought the plane hit the building 200 feet south 
of the front of the fire truck. I had only apparently run about 20 feet 
when the plane hit the building. I ran another 30 feet or so until I 
felt I was on fire. I thought I had done everything I could do for 
myself. I decided to get down below the fire and fireball. So I dove 
face first to the blacktop. At this time, it just happened that I was 
right beside the left rear tire of the Ford van. (I presume that the 
debris from the Pentagon and airplane was being propelled away from the 
impact site.) I immediately crawled very quickly under the van for cover 
and safety.

  At this time, I noticed a lot of heat and decided to crawl to the end 
of the van. Very soon the heat was unbearable and I decided to get out 
from under the van and get farther away from the impact site. It was 
then that I saw Mark Skipper to my left--out in the field 50-75 feet 
away. He was standing, looking back to the impact site and seemed to be 
swinging his arms. I immediately ran over to him to ask if he was OK. He 
said he was, and then said, ``I'm glad you saw that airplane!'' I said, 
``Get your gear on--we have a lot of work to do; I'm going to the fire 
truck.''

  It was probably at this time that I first noticed the damage to the 
Pentagon and the crash truck. A lot of smoke was in the sky above the 
Pentagon. The rear of the crash truck was on fire with a large blaze. 
But most noticeable was that everything around the fire truck on the 
ground was on fire. Also the west side of the Pentagon was on fire, all 
the way from the first to the fifth (top) floor.

  I ran about 30 yards back to the damaged crash truck, stepping 
carefully, not to slip on the burning debris covering the ground. I 
arrived at the right cab door, opened it and climbed in. I grabbed the 
radio and put the headset on, then jumped over the radios into the 
driver's seat. I immediately pushed the two engine start buttons and to 
my amazement the engine started. I thought if I could pull the fire 
truck away from the Pentagon and put it in a left turn, I could direct 
the roof turret nozzle into the impact site using the foam and water on 
board the truck. I then pushed off the emergency brake and pulled the 
transmission selector into the drive range and tramped on the 
accelerator. (I still couldn't believe the engine had started.) However, 
the accelerator would not make the engine run any faster and the truck 
would not move. (I later found out from Mark that whenever I tramped on 
the accelerator, the flames on the back of the truck would flare up.) 
The window in the left door was open and I had left the right cab door 
open as I entered the truck. There was a lot of smoke coming up along 
the left side of the truck, and blowing through this open window and 
filling the cab with smoke, as well as exiting the right door. There was 
a fire in the left side of the driver's seat back. That must have 
produced a lot of the smoke in the cab as well. At some point when I was 
in the cab, I looked to my right and saw Dennis Young walking through 
the apparatus area, so I knew he was OK. At another point, I called Fort 
Myer Fire Dispatch on the fire radio and gave the following message: 
``Foam 61 to Fort Myer: we have had a commercial airliner crash into the 
west side of the Pentagon at the heliport, Washington Blvd. side. We are 
OK with minor injuries. Aircraft was a Boeing 757 or Air Bus 320.'' It 
also seemed like I mumbled something else before I removed the headset, 
shut off the truck engine and began to egress the vehicle.

  The fire station was to my right and I noticed it was trashed and 
there was burning material inside the apparatus area. I saw Mark outside 
the right cab door signaling me to shut off the engine.

  (Note: I feel I had the fire truck engine running in 20 seconds after 
the plane hit the building. This time included running, crawling, 
checking on Mark and running back to the burning crash truck.)

  Just as I was about to get out of the wrecked truck, someone appeared 
at the cab door asking for a breathing apparatus. He may have been a 
Pentagon cop. So I handed him one of the S.C.B.A.'s and then handed 
another one to Mark. Before getting out of the cab. I grabbed my helmet, 
radio and facepiece (for my S.C.B.A.). I carried these items over to the 
rear of the van, an area I thought would be out of the traffic and easy 
to find later. Dennis was attempting to use a fire extinguisher on the 
truck. Mark was removing some of the EMS equipment from the truck. At 
this time, we all probably thought the truck would be consumed by the 
damaging fire.

  At this point, I went into the fire station through the open apparatus 
door area and attempted to get dressed in my turnout gear (coat, pants, 
boots and helmet.) I noticed my boots and pants were covered with 
debris, with numerous wood, rock and metal fragments filling the boots. 
One of my elastic suspenders was on fire, which I stamped out (or so I 
thought). When I was considering how best to empty the debris from my 
boots, I heard a voice back outside saying ``we need help here.'' I 
think it was at this time that Dennis, Mark and I began to assemble at 
the first floor windows of the Pentagon (behind the crash truck).

  I was later told by a civilian rescuer that I helped him climb into 
the window of the Pentagon where most of the victims exited the 
building. I don't remember helping him up. But I definitely remember him 
being there. I feel he was instrumental in organizing the rescue effort 
at this area of the Pentagon. At the time, I described him as a civilian 
35-40 years old wearing black jeans and a black polo shirt with a red 
logo on the shirt.

  In April 2002, I learned that the identity of this ``civilian'' was 
Blair Bozek. He turns out to be a retired lieutenant colonel from the 
U.S. Air Force. He was one of the SR71 spy plane pilots. Mark and I 
always felt 10-15 people may have exited the Pentagon at our location. 
All were terrified, most were burned. They had had varying amounts of 
clothing burned from their bodies, and some were missing shoes. We were 
assisted in rescuing them by several civilians as well as Armed Forces 
people who, having been uninjured in the attack, had come to aid their 
fellow employees.

  I would like to describe how very hostile the working environment was 
following the airplane attack. We were directly up against the Pentagon 
building, which was on fire with smoke pouring heavily from all of the 
windows. The ground was burning all around us. A magnolia tree was 
burning, which gave a strange sensation of flaming ``things'' floating 
in the air--I later realized they were magnolia leaves. There were 
several times the heat was so intense that I thought my pants were on 
fire. It was especially difficult to breathe because of the smoke and 
fumes. These conditions definitely limited how long we could assist in 
the rescue.

  I do remember helping three men carry an unconscious man all the way 
out to the guard rail beside Washington Blvd. While carrying him, I 
noticed the 4-inch firehose from our Fort Myer Rescue Engine 161. That 
meant our fellow firefighters were on the scene. This was a relief, 
because after I called them on the radio, I was certain it would be 
difficult for them to get to the Pentagon because of traffic. But I 
learned later that RE 161, RE 162 and the assistant chief did not have 
difficulty getting to the Pentagon.

  A further comment about my radio message: I should have followed it up 
with a call from one of the portable radios or possibly a phone call to 
Fort Myer from the heliport station phone (had it been in service). I 
had not waited for a reply from Dispatcher Bob Connelly (more on this 
subject later).

  Unknown to me, before my radio message, Arlington Dispatch was 
receiving numerous 911 calls from all around the county. Reports were 
varied: helicopter crash into east side of the Pentagon, tractor trailer 
on fire on Washington Blvd., possible airplane crash on or near the 14th 
Street Bridge. Many of the 911 callers could see smoke but could not 
determine its source. Some likely saw a low-flying aircraft or heard the 
impact of the crash. Arlington Dispatch advised all listening stations 
about some of these reports, but of course couldn't confirm the exact 
location, etc. In fact, it is quite possible that one of these callers, 
recalling the flight 90 crash into the Potomac River many years ago, was 
instrumental in causing National Airport to dispatch the first big crash 
truck. According to the firefighters from the classroom at Fort Myer, 
immediately after the communication from Arlington, they heard my radio 
message. Therefore apparently my message was successful in informing my 
fellow firefighters of the exact location. After victims stopped 
appearing at the Pentagon windows, Mark, Dennis and I began assisting 
the arriving Fort Myer companies on the fire ground. My next task was to 
get into my ``fire turn gear.'' Returning to the rescue site behind the 
crash truck, again I looked at my fire boots and pants. They were still 
full of debris, but now the left suspender had completely burned off 
down to the end where it had been attached to my pants! I picked up my 
gear and dumped out the rocks, etc., stepped into my boots and pulled up 
the fire pants. With only one suspender, I must have looked like Jethro 
Bodine from the Beverly Hillbillies. I also got on my nylon sock-hood 
and fire coat. I grabbed a big lantern and two fire extinguishers (one 
CO2 and the other 20# PurpleK, potassium bicarbonate).

  I pulled the safety pin on the CO2 and placed the lantern 
under my left arm, walked around the burning end of the crash truck, 
sprayed some of the CO2 on it and under it. The extinguisher 
seemed only about half full, so it was quickly discharged and I threw it 
aside.

  Pulling the pin on the PurpleK bottle, I walked behind the truck and 
into the Pentagon. Holding the illuminated lantern in my left hand, I 
immediately notice how poor the visibility was. Keep in mind I still had 
no gloves, no helmet and no S.C.B.A. I do not think I went into the 
building any further than 20 feet. I would see fire and spray the 
extinguisher on it. It makes a very loud noise when being discharged and 
I did so several times. Out of nowhere, I heard the clear voice of a 
woman yell ``hey!'' She had heard the sound of the fire extinguisher and 
realized she was near another person. She did not sound panicked. I 
yelled back ``I can't see you'' and she clapped her hands. I was waving 
my flashlight. I did not go after her, and later I questioned my courage 
about why I hadn't.

  Several days later, I noticed an article in the Washington Post which 
mentioned me. It also described a woman, Sheila Moody, who heard the 
swoosh of a fire extinguisher from someone, called out, and was answered 
by and rescued by a firefighter. I do not remember making contact with 
her. I believe it was my fire extinguisher she heard, but I also believe 
she was intercepted by another firefighter. But had I not had the fire 
extinguisher but had taken the garden hose attached to the fire station, 
she might not have known she was very near the outside of the building 
and near rescuers.

  I then began to assist the firefighting crews. I got a larger nozzle 
tip for the attack team and got 50 feet of 4-inch hose off Engine 161 so 
we could move the deluge gun closer to the Pentagon. Another project I 
undertook was to begin removing all the equipment off the crash truck: 
the third S.C.B.A., all the extra air bottles, power cords, floodlights, 
all the 1\3/4\-inch hose (200 feet of it), tools, and fire 
extinguishers. At this point, the truck was still on fire and a lot of 
fire was right behind the truck in the Pentagon. I also noticed that the 
two personnel vehicles that had been parked near the impact site, 
belonging to the two Army flight control tower personnel. Both had been 
completely destroyed by flying debris and fire.

  About this time hose line crews from Fort Myer were entering the 
building with a 2\1/2\-inch hose with a



1\1/4\-inch solid nozzle. We added 50 feet of 4-inch hose to the deluge 
gun. Capt. Dennis Gilroy noticed the first collapse of a cornice above 
the fifth floor windows, just above the impact site. Dennis Young and I 
were at the deluge gun and were told to pull back and allow the deluge 
gun to operate unmanned.


  About the time Gilroy ordered our people to get out of the building, 
there was a report of another hijacked airliner, allegedly heading 
toward Washington, DC. During this period of waiting, Capt. Gilroy was 
assigning firefighters to hand line teams to attack the fire, which was 
beginning to spread to the third and fourth floors of the Pentagon.

  By now, I was feeling the effects of exhaustion from the frantic pace 
and severe shortness of breath from the lack of air at the impact site 
where we had assisted victims. I thought Mark and Dennis were in the 
same shape. Mark and I both told Gilroy not to count on us for the hand 
line crew. Our fellow Fort Myer firefighters had become aware of our 
injuries and Gilroy called an EMS crew to tend to us.

  Our injuries were primarily second degree burns on our necks and 
forearms. In addition, Mark had a laceration on his hand, Dennis had a 
sprained ankle, and I had left shoulder pain. (Note: Mark, Dennis and I 
were only wearing T-shirts, work trousers and boots or heavy shoes at 
the time of the attack.) A medic unit arrived, Arlington, I believe. 
They bandaged our burns with wet dressings and wrapped them with gauze. 
I was given oxygen to breathe; the others weren't experiencing 
difficulty breathing. We were delivered to the triage area at 
approximately 1100.

  There, we three saw Jackie Kidd and Sean Berger from the control 
tower. They looked to be OK. Jackie was really shaking and Sean had his 
forearms wrapped, much like us. When I saw them, I realized I had not 
thought once about them after the attack. I felt bad about this. Later I 
thought I would have at least told Dennis Young to ``check on the people 
in the tower'' but I guess there was just far too much to think about in 
the immediate response to the attack.

  Sean and Jackie were both given a ride home by a nurse-bystander named 
Victoria Brunner, who had been working in triage. (She now works at Fort 
Myer Radar Clinic as a counselor.)

  Mark, Dennis and I had a welcome opportunity to rest in the triage 
area, and were given water, bananas, apples and plums. There were 
probably 50 health care people there. Triage was located in the tunnel 
under Washington Blvd. on Columbia Pike.

  By now, word of our experience had spread to the FBI who interviewed 
us, as well as Kidd and Berger, while we were in triage. After our 
interview, I wanted to return to the fire ground to see all the people 
from Fort Myer. We did so and spent about half an hour there. Mark, 
Dennis and I stayed around triage for about 2 hours. During this time, I 
had a chance to use a cell phone to call my mother in Ohio. She was very 
relieved to learn I was OK. I also called Donna Houle at the Women's 
Memorial in Arlington Cemetery and asked her to contact some of my 
friends. In the next few days, I think I called everyone in my address 
book.

  After all the other victims had been removed to hospitals, Mark and I 
were taken via ambulance to Arlington Hospital by Army Chase-Bethesda 
Rescue Squad 1. A young medic trainee named Sandra Melnick drove the 
medic unit. There were 6 to 8 people in the back of the squad, with one 
patient placed on a cardiac monitor. I sat in the front with her to give 
directions to the hospital.

  After being released from the hospital, I contacted one of the 
hospital security officers to request a ride back to Fort Myer. He 
provided a driver within 5 minutes. Just as we were leaving the 
hospital, we were questioned by one of the local TV news channels, Fox, 
I believe. We told them about seeing the airplane approach in time to 
run away from the Pentagon building.

  Our driver took us as far as the Iwo Jima Memorial, just 200 yards 
from one of the gates into Fort Myer. Of course by now security had been 
increased significantly since my arrival there at 0530 earlier in the 
day. (The MPs had shoulder arms and a vehicle with a machine gun mounted 
on top was nearby.) I was wearing a hospital gown, my fire boots and 
carried my fire pants in a plastic bag and had no I.D. But fortunately 
one of the MPs recognized me and allowed us to pass. (Mark did have some 
I.D.)

  As soon as we were allowed to pass through the gate, an Air Force 
Major gave us a ride back to the fire station in his Jaguar. We were 
home!

  We immediately began to tell our story and help out at the fire 
station. Dennis was there when we arrived. Soon after, Howard Kelly gave 
Mark a ride home. Dennis drove himself to his West Virginia home. I 
stayed at the firehouse that night.

  I enjoyed being back with my fellow firefighters and helping get the 
equipment back on the truck. Our people were exhausted and some were 
still frightened. I think all were glad they were working that day.

  Remember the three firefighters who were scheduled off the day of 9/
11? Willett, Pine and Thayer all came back in when they heard the news. 
Thayer told me later ``from 25 miles from the Pentagon, I could see 
smoke, and I knew you three must be dead.'' He also said he felt bad 
because he was the person who had assigned us to the Pentagon heliport.

  I was grateful--and am now amazed--that my injuries were minor. The 
burns on my forearms and neck healed quickly. My shoulder pain persisted 
and ultimately required surgery in November 2001. The surgery went well 
and the surgeon and I were pleased with my recovery from it.

  I returned back to work in February 2002, glad to have a good job. I 
am very proud of Dennis, Mark and myself. I am SO grateful that none of 
our firefighters were seriously injured or killed.


                        Hon. Lincoln Diaz-Balart


                               of Florida

  Mr. Speaker, today we remember.
  The pain has not subsided. The memories of those lost will not be 
forgotten. Today we honor their lives and their sacrifice.
  The terrorists have failed. Blinded by their hatred, the true result 
of the attacks on September 11 were things they could never have 
anticipated. America responded with courage--not fear. America responded 
with love--demonstrated by the thousands of rescue workers. America 
responded with resolve--as we continue to hunt evil doers around the 
globe.
  We must pay our highest tribute to the unsung heroes who have labored 
this past year--our first responders, our men and women in the armed 
services. I also would like to thank our President for showing true 
leadership in the face of this challenge thrust upon us.
  Our job is not completed. While we have responded to the events of 
September 11 we have not taken the final step to ensure Americans are 
safe. We are faced with great decisions. But we do so with great 
resolve.
  We will continue to show that the values and principles America stands 
for--the values and principles our brave Americans died for--will 
overcome those who would kill innocent civilians.
  God bless and keep those who were lost 1 year ago today. God bless 
America--beacon of freedom.


                          Hon. James H. Maloney


                             of Connecticut

  Mr. Speaker, a year ago today our Nation was brutally attacked, and 
thousands of Americans were murdered. Earlier today, I shared a moment 
of silence with the people of Connecticut's Fifth District, in New 
Milford, Sandy Hook and Waterbury, to honor the heroes and remember the 
victims of that tragic day.
  On this day, the people of Connecticut's Fifth District honor the 
brave firefighters from the Danbury Volunteer Fire Department and the 
Southbury Volunteer Fire Department. Each engine crew performed search 
and rescue in the hostile and dangerous environment of the devastated 
World Trade Center. On behalf of the people of Connecticut's Fifth 
District, I wish to express my deepest thanks to these heroic 
individuals. The contributions they made to our community and country at 
the risk of their own peril cannot be measured.
  The families and friends of those who perished have endured a year of 
unbearable loss. They have my deepest sympathy. Rarely have we felt 
hatred of terrorism perpetrated on our shores, and our response has 
shown the strength of character of the American people. The sadness that 
we all felt that day, and in the days since, has hardened into a resolve 
to honor the memories of those who perished, to heal our wounds so that 
our Nation is even stronger than before, and to bring righteous justice 
to those who perpetrated the attacks.


                            Hon. Jeff Miller


                               of Florida

  Mr. Speaker, today marks the 1-year anniversary of the most horrendous 
act of terrorism ever perpetrated against any country. Our Nation will 
never be the same after 19 terrorists took thousands of American lives 
and declared war on our great Nation.
  Since the infamous day last fall, an outpouring of patriotism and love 
for this country can be felt in cities and towns from coast to coast. 
The symbol of America, our flag, can still be seen flying with dignity 
and honor outside homes and businesses, displaying the true pride this 
Nation has in its freedoms and unwavering principles.
  As we look back at the tragedy of that day, I know that everyone will 
remember where he or she was on September 11, 2001. I am sure we have 
all contemplated the frailty of life and that God has never promised 
anyone a set number of days. It is my hope that the citizens of the 
United States will use this time in our history as a catalyst to advance 
the Nation and to return to the roots to which it was established; faith 
in God, democracy and patriotism.
  Terrorism is still a threat to the civilized world and must be 
destroyed before it spreads. The primary weapons of terrorism are 
violence and fear. Those who have no respect for human life and seek 
terror through these means have no place in civilized society, and must 
be eliminated.
  As President Reagan has said, ``We will always remember. We will 
always be proud. We will always be prepared, so we may always be free.'' 
Let us keep the families who lost loved ones in our prayers and continue 
to support our deployed military personnel who courageously protect our 
liberties and freedoms. They are the true patriots.
  I praise my colleagues and the President for the courage and resolve 
they have displayed during these trying and difficult times. May God 
grant us the wisdom to lead this country forward in a manner that would 
please Him and may He look favorably upon our great Nation.


                         Hon. Jerry F. Costello


                               of illinois

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today as a cosponsor of the Patriot Day 
resolution, which fittingly expresses the sentiments of this body on the 
anniversary of perhaps the worst day in U.S. history. In many ways it is 
hard to believe it has been a year since that awful day--the memories 
are so fresh, so vivid. I visited the site of the WTC 1 week after it 
happened and spent time talking with survivors and rescue workers. That 
memory is just as fresh as those of last Friday, when we returned to New 
York City to participate in a wreath laying ceremony at the World Trade 
Center site, and those of this morning, when we attended the ceremony at 
the Pentagon to remember the victims and families. America will never 
forget.
  September 11, 2001, has left an indelible mark on the American 
landscape and on our national consciousness. We will never forget the 
events of that terrible morning, nor will we forget how America 
responded. We continue to be inspired by the heroism of firefighters, 
police officers and emergency first responders, our military men and 
women and other ordinary Americans who have answered the call for 
freedom.
  The attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon were an attack 
on all of us--our people, our Nation, our spirit, our way of life, our 
liberty and freedom. The terrorists intended to bring down and destroy 
the World Trade Center, the Pentagon and other targets--and the people 
in them. Their real goal was to instill fear, bring about disruption and 
to bring down and destroy our spirit. But as Rev. Billy Graham observed 
at a service at the National Cathedral shortly after the attacks--Their 
actions have done just the opposite. The terrorist attacks of September 
11 could have torn our Nation apart--but they have brought us together--
we have become a family.
  Mr. Speaker, the United States is the greatest country in the world! 
We have been tested before and we will be tested again. Those we lost 
last September 11 will hold a special place in the history of our great 
country. As we gather together today in communities, churches and other 
places throughout our great land we remain one Nation under God, 
indivisible with liberty and justice for all! I urge all of my 
colleagues to support the resolution, and God bless the United States of 
America.


                         Hon. Carolyn B. Maloney


                               of New York

  Mr. Speaker, it is an honor to serve in the people's House as a 
representative of New York City, the greatest city in the world.
  For the Nation, today is a day of solemn reflection and remembrance. 
We have all tried to mark this day in our own personal ways. I have just 
returned from a memorial service at Ground Zero, a sacred place for us 
all. My thoughts and prayers over this year have been for my beloved 
city whose residents have been fundamentally affected by 9/11.
  Just a year ago, our country witnessed the evil actions of cowards 
that resulted in more than 3,000 people tragically dead and 2,000 
children without a parent.
  Mr. Speaker, there may not be another Member of Congress who lost more 
constituents in the September 11 attack on the World Trade Center than I 
did. I applaud the House for introducing this resolution celebrating 
America's resolve and commemorating the lives of those we lost. This 
resolution, in a small way, can help to continue the process of national 
healing and renewal.
  We will never forget the hundreds of New York City firefighters, law 
enforcement officers, and EMS who responded to the attacks, and 
valiantly fought through the terrible conditions to rescue victims and 
to provide emergency care to the injured immediately after the attack. 
Tragically, the World Trade Center towers collapsed while these heroes 
were attempting to save innocent lives--343 firefighters and paramedics 
and 60 police officers made the ultimate sacrifice.
  Over these past 12 months, we have witnessed countless selfless acts 
by public servants and private citizens, by our friends and neighbors. 
It is this wonderful spirit embodied by our city and our great Nation 
that gives us hope.


                             Hon. Nick Smith


                               of Michigan

  Mr. Speaker, I remember speaking on the House floor the day after the 
attacks. I asked, ``Will we forget? Will this sick, sinking feeling 
fade? Will we fail to follow through on these promises or will we 
demonstrate unfaltering resolve?'' I am proud to say, 1 year later, that 
the American people remain determined to fight the war on terror, and 
though the road ahead will continue to be hard, we will prevail.
  We should reflect for a moment on the lessons in the attacks. In my 
view, there are three. First, America has enemies who resent our freedom 
and way of life. These enemies are determined and are ignored at our 
peril. Second, the oceans do not provide as much protection as they did 
in the past. We have to be aware that threats can come from anywhere. 
Third, as with Pearl Harbor, first punches can be devastating. We must 
not allow ourselves to be taken by surprise again.
  Even though we have had a year to reflect since last September, it is 
still hard to comprehend the magnitude of the terrorist attacks and the 
historic turn of events that they triggered. In our 226-year history, 
America has never known an assault on our homeland such as that 
terrorist attack.
  As horrific and sickening as the attacks were, however, they brought 
out the best in us as Americans. They reminded us that despite all our 
differences, we are one--a united America. Not only a Nation of 
unprecedented strength, but also a Nation that exhibits great tolerance 
and respect for the rights of its citizens as well as those of other 
nations--a Nation of unshaken spirit, a Nation bound by our shared faith 
in the founding principles of liberty and freedom.
  America was best exemplified by the actions of our first responders 
after the attacks. On that warm autumn day, the New York City fireman 
became the symbol of American freedom and American bravery to millions 
around the world. I believe it is really the one silver lining that 
shines through the cloud of horror that surrounds 9/11.
  It is our job in Congress to honor those who protect us--our defense 
forces abroad and our first responders here in America--by fully 
providing the resources and guidance that they need. As President Bush 
said at the annual fire services dinner in Washington last spring. 
``There is no substitute for the raw courage of the firefighter.'' And 
we must never forget those Americans who made the ultimate sacrifice in 
saving the lives of others on September 11.


                            Hon. Jim Matheson


                                 of Utah

  Mr. Speaker, when we evacuated our office a year ago, and I could see 
the black smoke rising above the Pentagon, I knew our country was under 
attack. The inconceivable was taking place.
  The passing days brought more heartache than many of us thought we 
could bear. The hijackings and plane crashes took the lives of three 
Utahns--two who were on board the plane that hit the North Tower of the 
World Trade Center and one who was on duty at the Pentagon.
  Mary Alice Wahlstrom, of Kaysville, UT, and her daughter Carolyn, died 
together--two talented musicians whose families still grieve for the 
loss of their wives and mothers. Brady Howell of Centerville, UT, died--
along with 188 others--when hijackers struck the Pentagon. His family--
including his wife Liz--had to endure 1 agonizing week before learning 
his fate. A year of sorrowful birthdays and holidays has gone by, with a 
much-loved husband and wife, brother and sister, son and daughter, 
missing from the family pictures. Their names and their lives will 
always remind us of the goodness that is America--goodness that the 
terrorists sought to destroy. But we know that the terrorists will not 
succeed. Their cowardly attack took the lives of 343 members of the New 
York City Fire Department, but not the determination of 62 search and 
rescue team members from Salt Lake County. They rushed to New York, 
working 12-hour shifts, searching the rubble at Ground Zero for more 
than a week.
  The terrorist attacks left many children without parents--but couldn't 
destroy their future, as Americans rallied to support a $100 million 
scholarship fund to someday send these children to college. We stand for 
everything that the terrorists hate--courage, freedom, compassion, 
democracy and hope. Even as our memorials and reconstructed buildings 
rise from the devastation of that day, those values emerge unscathed. We 
have suffered a loss, but not a defeat. We still mourn, but our faith 
has not faltered. The wounds are still fresh but the spirit that is 
America shines through--a beacon of hope for better days ahead.


                             Hon. Tom DeLay


                                of Texas

  Mr. Speaker, we gather today within this citadel of freedom. This room 
is where America unites in defense of enlightened self-government. From 
this place our Nation draws from the strength and wisdom of our 
Founders.
  For this reason, the terrorists targeted this temple to justice as 
they set out to strike a blow against self-government. And, as the 
terrorists attacked symbols of might and prosperity, they attacked the 
spirit of this building. In this way, the Capitol, the Pentagon, and the 
World Trade Center were all one and the same. This is where the American 
people exercise the fullest measure of freedom. So, we come together in 
this hallowed chamber to honor the brave Americans of September 11. As 
their Representatives, and on their behalf, we launch the debates that 
chart the course for this country. And, make no mistake, it was the 
exercise of freedom that terrorists wished to extinguish a year ago.
  The terrorists failed. And, if their objective was to compel us into 
abandoning our principles, there may have been no more spectacular a 
failure in recorded history.
  My friends, the flame of American freedom is burning brighter and 
hotter on September 11, 2002, than at any moment in our history. And 
that flame is sustained by the magnificent heroism in Manhattan, in 
Virginia, and in the air over Pennsylvania. Freedom continues unabated 
in many countries around the world. Americans are doing extraordinary 
things in dangerous places that are known and some that we can't talk 
about. But when we speak of the men and women defending us at this 
moment, we can say this for certain: The present generation of Americans 
stands shoulder to shoulder with our proudest generations. And we saw, 
in Pennsylvania, a stirring example of what it means to be an American: 
Out of many, one.
  Strangers, thrown together by providence, facing certain death, 
refused to yield in the face of raw evil. Their courage, in the moment 
of maximum danger, is the essence of what it means to be an American. 
That's why anyone in the world can become an American. All it takes is a 
willingness to subordinate our own individual interests to the greater 
good of the United States. It's a proud tradition of love, tolerance, 
pluralism, and determination. But we would do a great disservice to the 
legacy of America's September 11 heroes by casually accepting the 
passive posture of complacency in the face of danger.
  The great lesson from 9/11 is the moral imperative to address dangers 
before they claim the lives of additional Americans. For that reason, we 
must stand with President Bush as he marshals freedom-loving people to 
confront gathering evils. We must actively deny the aspirations of evil 
groups and dangerous regimes. We must bring justice to the most remote 
caves where terrorists plot. We must protect America by striking our 
enemies before they can carry out their schemes within our borders.
  This is the great decision before the Congress. This is the defining 
measure of our future security. And on this question, all of us will be 
accountable to the people.
  Mr. Speaker, we offer our deepest sorrow and solidarity to the 
families of those who lost loved ones at the hands of evil, 1 year ago. 
Those who now struggle with grief and loss should know, above all, that 
they do not stand alone. They should take heart because every American 
stands beside them. We offer our love and gratitude for the sacrifices 
and unknown acts of heroism carried out by their relatives and friends. 
We'll never forget them or what they did for our country.
  Thank you and God bless America.


                             Hon. Tim Roemer


                               of Indiana

  Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support and as a proud cosponsor of H. 
Con. Res. 464 expressing the sense of the Congress on the anniversary of 
the terrorist attacks launched against the United States on September 
11, 2001.
  Nearly 3,000 American lives were lost exactly 1 year ago today when 
the United States was suddenly and deliberately attacked by Al Qaeda 
terrorists bent on suicide and destruction of human life. By targeting 
symbols of American strength and success, these attacks clearly were 
also intended to assail the principles, values, and freedoms of the 
United States and the American people, intimidate the Nation, and weaken 
the national resolve. Although New York, Virginia, and Pennsylvania 
suffered the overwhelming burden of the terrorist attacks, every State 
and all Americans were affected and continue to mourn that day. We are 
united by the events of September 11, 2001, and while passage of 1 year 
has not softened our memory, resolved our grief, or restored lost loved 
ones, it has clearly demonstrated that Americans will not succumb to 
terrorists.
  We observe September 11 not only to recognize the tragic deaths of the 
innocent souls who perished or who were gravely injured in lower 
Manhattan, Shanksville, PA, or at the Pentagon, but we also recognize 
this date to honor the firefighters, police officers, rescue workers and 
those intrepid eyewitnesses of this tragedy who selflessly faced grave 
danger in order to aid the wounded and dying in the immediate aftermath 
of the attacks. As the gravest moments came, many Americans, relying on 
courage, instinct, and grace, rushed toward the flaming buildings in 
order to rescue people or toward terrorist-controlled cockpits in order 
to resist their destructive plan. Today we honor the sacrifices and 
continuing heroism demonstrated by our brave servicemen and women who 
left family and friends in order to defend our Nation. A year later, 
many servicemen and women remain abroad, shielding the homeland from 
further terrorist attacks.
  As a member of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, I 
am proud to serve on the ongoing congressional joint inquiry. My 
distinguished colleagues and I have spent considerable time reviewing 
the material and circumstances relating to the events surrounding last 
year's attacks. However, many important questions about September 11, 
2001, remain unanswered. That is why I support the establishment of an 
independent, blue-ribbon commission to conduct a thorough investigation 
and to make recommendations based on its findings so that we never again 
experience another staggering loss of life on U.S. soil. The American 
people deserve a more thoughtful investigation and the families of the 
victims of September 11 are entitled to answers about exactly what went 
wrong and why.


                           Hon. James P. Moran


                               of Virginia

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today on the first anniversary of 9/11, a day 
which changed America's history.
  For the past 12 months, this Nation has collectively experienced a 
full range of emotion, from the initial fear and uncertainty of that 
fateful day, to anger and outrage at the loss of American life and the 
violation of two of our Nation's most recognizable symbols. We have 
mourned and continue to mourn for the victims of this horrible attack. 
Their families and friends are constantly in our thoughts and prayers. 
Embedded firmly in my mind is the image of streams of people who came to 
the ridge overlooking the Pentagon to pay their respects and sanctified 
that hill with flowers, candles and notes of remembrance.
  Yet, in the midst of all the sadness, Americans have sought an outlet 
for their grief by renewing their sense of community service and 
patriotic pride. Our country, which has a strong history of bridging 
many differences, has become one. In Northern Virginia alone, we 
witnessed friends, neighbors and colleagues coming together to help 
rebuild and unite. With the round-the-clock dedication of the Pentagon 
renovation team, the revival of the Pentagon has served as the 
quintessential symbol of our country's resilience and renewal. A special 
debt of gratitude goes to those workers and planners who orchestrated 
this rebuilding.
  As we bear witness to the powerful images and experiences of the past 
year, we are proudly reminded of what it means to be an American. The 
heroic acts of the firefighters, police officers and emergency 
responders who rushed into the inferno of the Pentagon and World Trade 
Center towers to save lives, touches a special place in all our hearts. 
It is a place where love of country and for our fellow man is second 
nature. This unique American spirit is what wills us to go the extra 
mile and put our lives on the line for what we know is right.
  So, Mr. Speaker, on the 1-year anniversary of September 11, let us 
honor the many sacrifices that have been made by our police, 
firefighters, emergency responders and our men and women in uniform. 
Their efforts to heal, protect and preserve this great Nation deserve 
the utmost respect and admiration.


                          Hon. Carolyn McCarthy


                               of New York

  Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of H. Con. Res. 464, a resolution to 
commemorate the passing of 1 year since the cowardly, brutal attacks of 
September 11. I would also like to express my condolences to the 
families who lost a loved one, along with my reverence for the heroism 
of New Yorkers, and the American people.
  On September 11, as the horrific events unfolded, I watched brave 
firefighters, law enforcement and rescue personnel from New York and 
around the country risk their lives to save others. I watched hospitals 
prepare for the wounded and our Armed Forces go on high alert. I watched 
a stricken Nation respond by rushing to donate blood and volunteer their 
time to help the injured. These are acts of honor and bravery that no 
barbaric act of violence can penetrate. The citizens of New York, and 
all of America did everything within their power to respond unselfishly 
and effectively to the attacks. More often than not, the very last fiber 
of human strength was tested. New Yorkers and all Americans rose to the 
daunting challenge as one proud, resolute Nation.
  Throughout the past year we have witnessed the rebirth of a new 
America. A stronger, more resilient Nation is determined to eradicate 
all forms of terrorism. Those who oppose our way of life may try to 
destroy our buildings, but they will never destroy the sense of pride 
and love for this country cherished by Americans.
  Although the tragic events of September 11 will forever bring sorrow 
to the families who lost loved ones, they will also serve as a reminder 
of how Americans unite during difficult times. This resolution reminds 
us all how difficult it is to kill the American spirit. Honoring the 
lives lost, as well as thousands of rescue workers who worked tirelessly 
and bravely throughout this difficult time, is a fitting reminder of 
what this country stands for. We never forget our own, and we will 
always fight to continue our way of life.


                           Hon. Heather Wilson


                              of New Mexico

  Mr. Speaker, I would like to offer my support for the concurrent 
resolution in honor of Patriot Day under consideration by the House 
today.
  On this solemn day of remembrance, it is important to gather with our 
families, our friends, and our communities to reaffirm our love of 
country and our dedication to upholding the values of freedom and 
democracy that we hold so dear.
  Today, in Albuquerque and across the Nation, we will take the time to 
honor those who faced danger bravely to save others: firefighters, 
police officers, and our soldiers overseas who now risk their lives to 
protect the freedom we enjoy.
  In this spirit, I will be in Albuquerque on September 11 with my 
family and neighbors to honor the heroes, to pray for those lost and 
their families, to comfort the hurting and to reassure the children.


                              Hon. David Wu


                                of oregon

  Mr. Speaker, our Nation was irrevocably changed that Tuesday morning, 
a year ago today. The past year has not been an easy one, but the 
American spirit has carried us through, and our democracy stands strong.
  Whether it's Bunker Hill, Pearl Harbor, or September 11, Americans 
have a tradition of turning disasters into launch points for a better 
future. The response of Americans and Oregonians on September 11 
underscores the strength of our democracy and our commitment to 
community and freedom. One thousand Oregonians went to NYC soon after 
September 11 to show that we stand shoulder to shoulder. Hundreds of 
Oregonians are there today.
  Our Nation has endured, and will, in spite of everything, thrive. 
Today, as we look back and remember who and what we have lost, we feel 
keenly the sense of security that we no longer take for granted. But we 
will not trade freedom for security. We will move forward together and 
build a future worthy of our courageous forebears, and all that they did 
to bring us to where we are today.


                           Hon. Cliff Stearns


                               of florida

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today not only to commemorate the lives lost 
September 11, 2001, but also to celebrate the indomitable American 
spirit that has been displayed since, and finally to remind our enemies 
that we are not finished with them. It has been a year to the date since 
an organization of men decided to test the resolve of the American 
people. With blind faith, unabashed cowardice, and intentions of terror, 
these men, these terrorists took the lives of over 3,000 men, women, and 
children. Through this evil act these men hoped to strike deep at our 
security, to impact the very fiber of our country's spirit. But as the 
towers fell, American flags rose, defying those who would attempt to 
shake the balance of freedom and power that we enjoy in this country. On 
that day the most diverse country on the planet was attacked, and from 
the twisted and smoldering wreckage arose the bond that has connected us 
all.
  Many claimed that we would never be the same; that an inescapable 
change had come over our country. On the contrary, I feel that we have 
changed for the better. We are a stronger country, united in the face of 
tragedy. The terrorists failed to realize that there is no changing the 
American spirit, only revealing it. After the 11th, the spirit of 
America revealed itself all across this country. From the thousands who 
donated blood, to the thousands more who donated time, resources and 
love to the task of not only repairing buildings but also repairing the 
hearts of those who lost loved ones on that tragic day. In the few days 
following 9/11 we wondered how we would respond to these cowardly acts. 
It has now been a year since that day, and I feel we have responded 
quickly and accurately. In the past year we have been able to witness as 
a country the power and resourcefulness of our armed services. Combining 
both new and old world tactics we have seen Special Forces mounted on 
horseback calling in the amazing payload of a B-1 bomber. In a foreign 
and alien terrain we have seen the men and women of our armed services 
perform and adapt in outstanding fashion. Mr. Speaker, as cochairman of 
the Air Force Caucus I realize the increasing importance of our Air 
Force in current and future campaigns. Nowhere has this importance been 
more felt than in the precision strikes made in Afghanistan in our war 
against terror. As we continue to hunt down those responsible, we also 
continue the rebuilding process both home and abroad. As voices rise 
today in freedom from the sites of these grizzly attacks, soon also 
shall memorials rise, as a continual reminder of that day and the way in 
which we, as Americans have reacted in the year since.
  And, as America has reacted this year, we have struggled with the 
tender balance between security and freedom. While we of course must 
gird our Nation for safety, are we eroding freedom and curtailing civil 
liberties and privacy in the process? Our Federal buildings, once the 
most open of any nation, are becoming barricaded fortresses, with 
streets closed for blocks around, and loss of access. Airport travelers 
shed clothing, common tools in their toiletry kit, and their patience in 
the name of passenger screening. Future airport security measures may 
chillingly include smart-technology that scans a traveler's 
identification or body feature, and searches a database including 
information as personal as financial stability or neighborhood 
involvement, in the name of determining who is a trusted traveler. State 
legislatures ponder the Model State Emergency Powers Act, wherein a 
Governor might be granted powers to quarantine citizens, force 
immunizations, and seize medical records, in the name of public health. 
I hope that as we strengthen our Nation, we keep sight of the sublime 
principle of liberty on which the Nation was founded, and think about 
the overreaching consequences of binding the cords too tightly. The 
terrorists attacked our freedom; we should not attack our own freedoms.
  Turning from thoughts of ourselves to those of our aggressors, I 
remind my colleagues that we are facing an enemy who despises our very 
existence. They are consumed by a hate of a country that, despite its 
faults, is open to all people regardless race or religion. We operate 
under principles of freedom, the ability to pursue life, liberty and 
happiness. As such, our country is fighting with hope against terror, 
and freedom against oppression. Our enemies will never know freedom, 
because they are imprisoned by hate, and for that, they have already 
lost. Former U.S. Secretary of Defense Casper Weinberger stated that 
``The will of the American people once aroused . . . is capable of 
accomplishing all the things that have to be done.'' As long as we 
continue to maintain a moral high ground in this campaign and take the 
appropriate and precise responsive measures, the will of the people of 
this county will know no bounds.
  Much has been said and will be said today about what happened a year 
ago. As observers, we have an obligation to the families and the 
victims. We must remember our fellow sufferers; that is the salve we 
offer the families. We also must remember those who terrorize us, as it 
is judgment on our enemies. Do not forget: It was a massacre--a cold-
blooded, well-organized, well-executed, carefully plotted massacre of 
thousands of Americans. It was perversion--of a faith that preaches 
peace and tolerance. It was a message--delivered by maniacal men in 
possession of a perverse theocratic ideology. It was a crime--that must 
be paid for. It was an invasion--which damaged every sense of safety in 
every person who tried to sleep that night. For all the many things it 
was, it was also the beginning of a war that is not yet over.
  And as much as there is to say about this day, one thing we have 
learned is painfully simple. We have learned that whatever false sense 
of isolation we felt was an illusion. We must remain vigilant and 
remember that ``freedom is not free.''
  I conclude that we have learned that our lives are but a breath. That 
our families are more important to us than we ever knew and that 
protection of our lives and our families may cost us dearly. But we are 
Americans, and we will prevail.


                              Hon. Joe Baca


                              of California

  Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of this resolution. Today, we mourn, 
cry, and with clenched fists restrain the raw emotions that are pulsing 
through our hearts. We look to the ground in sorrow and to the sky in 
prayer, trying to understand this senseless tragedy. More times than I 
can remember, I have bowed my head and prayed, asking our Heavenly 
Father for spiritual and emotional comfort, for those of us that still 
cannot understand why. We know the names and details of the actions of 
those terrorists, but that still does not fill the void in our hearts. 
To the families of those who died last year I can only say, you have the 
heartfelt sympathy of an entire Nation. And, to our Heavenly Father I 
would ask to please guard the souls of the dead and let the comfort of 
His love ease the pain in the hearts of the living.
  Mr. Speaker, I am proud to cosponsor this resolution because it 
accurately captures the emotions in our hearts. We all desperately wish 
it could be September 10, forever. Yet, I take solace in knowing that 
nothing endures but change. Things will get better. We have punished 
those responsible and exacted that punishment with judicious caution, 
and not unmeasured rage. America has proven that power in defense of 
freedom is greater than power on behalf of tyranny and oppression. We 
have demonstrated that power with spirit and resolve.
  One year ago, for the second time in our modern history, our Nation 
was attacked. War was thrust upon us. Undoubtedly, this day will forever 
live in our memories. Three of my constituents lost their lives on 
September 11, and my community will never forget their sacrifice: Cora 
Holland, mother of three and grandmother; Rhonnda Sue Rasmusen, who died 
at the Pentagon; and Navy Yeoman Second Class Melissa Rose Barnes, who 
remains unaccounted for at the Pentagon. We as a Nation have pulled 
together to build our courage and strength, for we are united and our 
faith will guide us.
  I salute those brave individuals, police, firefighters, emergency 
medical personnel and others who sacrificed of themselves for their 
fellow Americans.
  Mr. Speaker, I ask for the prayers of the American people for those 
whose lives have been lost. May God grant us the wisdom to continue to 
steer our great Nation.
  God bless America!
  On behalf of the people of the Inland Empire of California, I join my 
colleagues in full support of this resolution.


                         Hon. Michael E. Capuano


                            of Massachusetts

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in remembrance of those who perished as a 
result of the terrorist attack on September 11. It is impossible to 
forget the events of that dark day and difficult to comprehend the grief 
of the families who lost loved ones in an instant. My deepest sympathies 
are with them on this first anniversary of the attacks. The loss of so 
many innocent lives and the bravery of the rescuers will never be 
forgotten.
  Since September 11, Americans have adapted to a new reality--a reality 
with additional security, higher unemployment, economic insecurity, 
anthrax and the ongoing war on terrorism. But with this new reality we 
are also witnessing renewed sense of American pride. September 11 
reminded us all to treasure our freedom. American flags fill our 
streets. Patriotic anthems play on the radio and in stadiums from coast 
to coast. The principles upon which this country was founded brought us 
together and the strength and spirit of our Nation will endure this 
challenge.
  Today, in every corner of this great country, vigils, prayer services 
and memorials will be held to honor the victims of the attacks. As we 
reflect on the events of a year ago, let us honor the emergency workers, 
firefighters, police officers, hospital employees and grief counselors 
who went above and beyond the call of duty that September morning and 
during the months that followed. We must also remember the airline 
employees and postal workers whose jobs were changed forever on 
September 11. Finally, our hearts should also go out to the thousands of 
children and families in New York, Virginia, and in communities across 
the Nation and around the world who lost mothers, fathers, brothers and 
sisters on that tragic day.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in remembrance of all those who sacrificed 
their lives on September 11, 2001, and I honor their memory.


                             Hon. Ken Lucas


                               of Kentucky

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to reflect on the events of the past year. 
As I do so, I am reminded that the spirit of America is unbreakable, 
unwavering, and unshakable. September 11 and the actions that followed 
have affected all of us. As a Nation, I see we are strong--if not 
stronger--since that great tragedy struck our homeland. The terrorist 
tried to break the spirit of America but they failed. As Americans, we 
are united and we will work together to fight the war on terrorism, to 
improve our lives, and the lives of our neighbors.
  We will always remember the casualties of September 11, the brave 
firefighters, police officers, and civilians that fought to save the 
lives of so many Americans. They were the first casualties in the war on 
terrorism. The heroes of September 11 are not just located in New York, 
Washington, DC, and Pennsylvania, but all over this great Nation and in 
the military serving our country overseas. For the Americans that 
donated time, blood, money, and prayers, they are also the heroes of 
September 11. These deeds and sacrifices will not be forgotten.
  I recently had the opportunity to visit our troops in Afghanistan and 
I am more confident than ever that we are in capable hands. There is no 
doubt that we have the best and most professional military in the world. 
And last week, I participated in a joint session of Congress in New York 
to honor those who lost their lives on September 11. During our visit we 
laid a wreath at Ground Zero. From my perspective, both events clearly 
demonstrated America's renewed sense of solidarity, patriotism and 
pride.
  Although September 11 will be a difficult reminder for all Americans, 
this is also an opportunity for the Nation to show its strength and its 
unity. God bless America.


                           Hon. Ruben Hinojosa


                                of Texas

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of this resolution honoring the 
patriots of September 11, 2001. A year ago, our Nation suffered a 
terrible blow. Thousands of our friends and neighbors were lost in an 
attack by terrorists who despise America and all it represents.
  This morning, many of us in Washington came together at the Pentagon 
observance to comfort and pray for all of those who are experiencing 
renewed memories of the pain and anguish of that tragic day.
  This afternoon, we come to reaffirm our resolve to stand strong for 
the ideals of liberty and unity.
  September 11, 2001, was one of the worst days in our history. It was 
also one of our finest hours. That day, America showed the world that, 
through the spirit and courage of the American people, this great Nation 
did not and will not crumble despite those who try to tear it down.
  Many people were heroes that day. Some of their stories have been 
told, but many acts of courage will never be known. Emergency responders 
braved fire and flames to climb the stairways of the World Trade Centers 
in New York City to help people evacuate. Ordinary office workers 
carried strangers down hundreds of stairs to safety.
  At the Pentagon in Washington, DC, military and civilian personnel 
went into the inferno over and over again to rescue their coworkers who 
were trapped.
  Heroic passengers abroad flight 93 sacrificed their lives on a field 
in Pennsylvania to prevent the deaths of hundreds more of their fellow 
Americans.
  Yet even while the Pentagon burned and the World Trade Center towers 
fell, we were already preparing our response to this act of war. On the 
other side of the Pentagon, the military was making its plans. Within an 
incredibly short time, Congress came together in a bipartisan manner and 
quickly passed historic legislation to secure our homeland and our 
skies.
  Many of our allies pledged to stand with the U.S.A. in our war against 
terrorists. We will always remember those nations who have fought by our 
side in this war.
  A year later, we have accomplished much. The Pentagon has been made 
whole. The rubble at Ground Zero has been cleared. Al Qaeda has been 
defeated and stripped of its power base in Afghanistan. Our brave 
servicemen and women, together with Allied Forces, are far from home, 
but are proudly carrying out their mission of destroying what's left of 
Al Qaeda's terrorists.
  Today, as we remember the patriots of September 11 and mourn their 
loss, let us never compromise the ideals of liberty for which they, like 
so many Americans before them, have died. Let us honor them by remaining 
strong in our unity and in our diversity. Let us always remember that 
good overcomes evil and darkness is always followed by light.
  The American flag represents freedom and still proudly waves. With our 
strength and resolve, we shall remain united in freedom . . . ``one 
Nation, under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.''


                         Hon. Bill Pascrell, Jr.


                              of new jersey

  Mr. Speaker, today, all across this great land, we honor the memory of 
those who lost their lives as a result of the terrorist attacks of 
September 11, 2001.
  We honor those who were taken from us by cowardly murderers, the very 
worst of human kind, simply because we are a free people. This 1-year 
anniversary is indeed a day of deep reflection and remembrance. I am not 
sure if the American family will ever come to terms with the visions of 
our brothers and sisters, our sons and daughters, our mothers and 
fathers, being victimized by the despicable acts perpetrated by the evil 
and the cowardly. But I am sure that our love of country and our love of 
each other will help us continue to recover and respond.
  We remember and we mourn today. Those we lost will forever be in our 
hearts and minds. Our lives now are about making sure theirs were not 
lost in vain, about ensuring their values, their ideals, and their 
spirit always endure. We will also never forget what we saw in the 
immediate aftermath of the attacks. We saw--amid the carnage, amongst 
the destruction--the amazing heights of benevolence and decency and 
courage that mankind can offer.
  What we saw was America.
  Within moments of the first attacks, our first responders entered 
buildings without reservation in an attempt to save others--and they did 
so knowing full well that they themselves might never exit. Everyday 
Americans became extraordinary heroes to people they had never met 
before. Our eternal gratitude will also be extended to the passengers of 
United flight 93 who prevented it from being used as a weapon against 
America.
  As we mourn the victims and honor the heroes of September 11, we must 
be resolute in our efforts to ensure that we protect and defend this 
Nation against all those who would do us harm. And we must never forget 
what it means to be an American--to cherish the principles of freedom, 
democracy, and human rights for all. It is what separates us from them.
  Across our Nation, in synagogues, Roman Catholic churches, 
Presbyterian chapels, Baptist meeting houses and mosques, words of 
comfort, hope and grief will echo from pulpits. At dinner tables across 
this Nation, families will grieve, and they will love each other. It is 
what we should do on this day.
  America is vast and diverse, but today we are united as never before 
in our history. The victims of September 11 came from 735 towns and 
cities in 40 different States, all members of one American family. My 
district lost wonderful people, brothers and sisters, fathers and 
mothers, dear friends. As our Nation pays tribute today, I think it is 
appropriate to enter the names of the 54 individuals from my district 
who died a year ago today.
  You will never be forgotten.

  Daniel Affilito, John Candella, Lt. Robert Cirri, Caleb Dack, 
Antoinette Duger, Edgar Emery, Barry Glick, Emeric Harvey, Howard 
Kestenbaum, David Lee, Ming Hao Liu, Robert Murach, Eshtesham Raja, 
Linda Rosenbaum, John Skala, Jorge Velazquez, Leah Oliver, Paul 
Lasczynski.

  Cesar Alviar, Kyung Cho, Robert Coll, Robert Deraney, Luke Dudek, 
William Erwin, Tim Graziozo, Zhutu Ibis, Lauren Kestenbaum, Craig 
Lilore, Joseph McDonald, Ed Murphy, Steven Roach, Daniel Rosetti, 
Michael Stewart, Douglas MacMillan, Dorota Kopiczko, Catherine Nardella.

  Paul Aquaviva, Kirsten Christophe, Michael Collins, Georgette Deraney, 
John Eichler, Christopher Faughnan, John Graziozo, Donald Jones II, 
Franco Lalama, Ken Lira, Craig Montano, David Pruim, Leo Roberts, Norman 
Roosinow, Francis Trombino, Marsha Rodriguez, Robert Cordice, Linda 
Walker.


                          Hon. Edward J. Markey


                            of Massachusetts

  Mr. Speaker, I rise as one of the hundreds of cosponsors of this 
resolution today to commemorate the victims of the terrorist attacks on 
September 11, 2001, and to honor the families who grieve and the heroes 
who served on that terrible day in American history.
  American Airlines flight 11 and United Airlines flight 175 took off 
for the West Coast early in the morning from Logan Airport in Boston. 
The Al Qaeda terrorists hijacked and redirected these planes into the 
Twin Towers of the World Trade Center, a crossroads of international 
trade and commerce.
  In Newark, NJ, and in Washington, DC, similar teams of terrorists 
aimed flight 77 toward the symbol of American strength, the Pentagon, 
and took flight 93 toward the symbol of American democracy, the Capitol 
dome.
  We remember and honor the brave men and women aboard flight 93, who 
overwhelmed the Al Qaeda operatives of flight 93 to prevent a 
devastating fourth blow to America--an attack on this very Capitol 
Building. Instead, they crashed that plane into a field in Pennsylvania 
and saved thousands of others from the tragedy that was visited upon the 
Pentagon and the Twin Towers.
  The resolution we will pass today commemorates this day in American 
history and the more than 3,000 lives lost--some 93 from the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts alone. But the resolution also honors all 
those who became America's new heroes--the policemen, firemen, rescue 
workers, medics and volunteers who toiled that day and days afterward to 
pull victims out of the wreckage.
  President John F. Kennedy said at his inauguration, ``In the long 
history of the world, generations have been granted the role of 
defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger. I do not shrink from 
this responsibility--I welcome it! I do not believe that any of us would 
change places with any other people of any other generation. The energy, 
the faith; the devotion which we bring to this endeavor will light our 
country and all who serve it and the glow from that fire can truly light 
the world.''
  Our new American mission is clear--we must never forget those who died 
a year ago today on September 11. We must not rest until those who 
committed these terrorist acts are brought to justice. And we must 
protect our country, all its citizens, from all that threatens democracy 
and freedom--for these are the fires that have lit the world.


                           Hon. Jack Kingston


                               of Georgia

  Mr.  Speaker,  on  this  day  I  believe  we  have the duty to 
remember all the ones who died on 9/11 and all the ones who have died in 
Afghanistan and elsewhere as a result of this war on terrorism.
  As one stares at Ground Zero today, it looks like any other large 
building construction site in any other large city in America. There is 
raw dirt, a fenced perimeter, earth-moving equipment going about and 
hard hat workers milling to and fro, and if you didn't know better you'd 
keep driving by. But upon close inspection, you notice all the buildings 
around it have brand new facades, you notice also a new bike path, you 
notice the road has been redone and much of the surrounding 
infrastructure. Then you notice another building, a historic building, 
that was located right next door; it's covered with soot, its windows 
are cracked and it's still boarded up. This building makes a quiet but 
solemn statement that sets the tone because as you look at this site you 
know that it's not just any other construction site, there is an eerie 
stillness about it. Rudy Giuliani has called it a cemetery but it's more 
than that; it's a battleground, just like Manassas or Gettysburg. A 
great battle has been fought here and the feeling of reverence one gets 
is universal.
  Like all Americans, I remember that morning's events. I was in 
Washington, DC. As we watched in disbelief the horror of New York City, 
we were soon disrupted by an explosion at the Pentagon. We evacuated our 
building, and went onto a chaotic street scene, where we were told that 
the Capitol was under attack, that the Mall area had been hit, the State 
Department and the Sears Tower. Later that night, Congress gathered on 
the steps of the Capitol and sang ``God Bless America.'' It was a moving 
American moment. Later in the week, Congress attended a church service 
at the National Cathedral with Presidents Carter, Ford, Bush, and 
Clinton. President George W. Bush spoke, as did Billy Graham. Then, on 
September 20, President Bush addressed the Nation. The sense of 
Americanism had never been stronger.
  But of all these moments and all these experiences, none struck me, 
nor it seems anyone else in America, as deeply as the photos and images 
of the firefighters and policemen rushing up the steps of the World 
Trade Center at 9:30 the morning of the attack. It was there and then at 
that moment that Osama Bin Laden was defeated. He had underestimated the 
American spirit as these brave men rushed to rescue people that they did 
not know, people who they did not see socially, people who probably 
would not even eat lunch with them, and yet they were Americans, and 
that was all that counted to the hundreds of firefighters, police 
officers and public safety workers who put their lives on the line.
  Of the hundreds who died, many people don't know that 60 of them were 
off duty. One such fireman had a 9 o'clock tee time on the golf course. 
He was already on the golf course, in anticipation of a joyful day of 
golf, when he heard the news. Without even calling in, he threw the 
clubs in the trunk of his car and drove to the precinct to report. His 
body was found at 4 o'clock that afternoon.
  At another fire station, six men were getting off duty having pulled 
an all-night shift. Their fresh replacements were just finishing up with 
breakfast when the alarm sounded. The 6 new ones and the 6 off duty all 
jumped on board the fire truck and, of the 12 of them, not 1 made it 
back. Such was the spirit of volunteerism that day. In fact, one 
precinct asked the mayor's office to quit sending the call for more 
recruits since they were already too crowded with men and women who had 
stepped forward to answer the call.
  On this day of observance, we should remember this lesson about being 
on and off duty. For freedom does not wait for the on duty only. If you 
and I are to preserve and protect freedom for the generations to come we 
must do it 24 hours a day 7 days a week. That is the best way to 
commemorate those who died on September 11, and our soldiers who have 
died in Afghanistan and everyone else who has suffered and sacrificed 
for this great land of liberty.


                          Hon. Darrell E. Issa


                              of California

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to thank the city of Leidschendam-Voorburg 
in the Netherlands for their act of friendship toward their sister city, 
Temecula, CA.
  As a way to express their sentiments of sorrow and sympathy for the 
events that occurred on September 11, the citizens of Voorburg have 
graciously donated the statue ``Singing in the Rain'' by Frans Kokshoorn 
to the city of Temecula. The residents of Voorburg donated thousands of 
dollars to have this statue built and shipped to Temecula for its 
installation on this day of remembrance.
  Mr. Speaker as we reflect on the events of 1 year ago, I would like to 
join the city of Temecula in thanking the city and citizens of 
Leidschendam-Voorburg for this genuine gesture of kindness during a 
difficult time for every American.


                            Hon. Greg Walden


                                of Oregon

  Mr. Speaker, today we gather together as one people united in 
observance of the greatest tragedy in American history. We do so 
mournful of the staggering loss of life we suffered that terrible day 1 
year ago and humbled by the heroes whose courage lifted the spirit of a 
grieving Nation.
  The attacks of September 11 offered us a grim view of the evil 
capacity of mankind, just as it showed us the triumph of the human 
spirit and the resilience of the American people. In the heroism of the 
firemen and policemen of New York, who rushed into burning buildings 
without regard to their own lives, we saw barbarism met with humanity. 
In the bravery of Pentagon personnel, who pulled their wounded comrades 
from the fiery ruins, we saw wickedness met with honor. And in the 
defiance of the passengers of flight 93, who sacrificed their lives to 
deny victory to murderers, we saw cowardice met with valor.
  While a year has passed since the Twin Towers fell and the symbol of 
America's military strength was breached, we remain numb to the 
magnitude of the suffering wrought by evil men. And while our grief 
subsides with time, it never leaves us completely. The emotions that 
swept over us that awful day--horror, sadness, fear, and anger--still 
come creeping back to remind us that the scars of September 11 will 
never fully heal.
  But just as the terrorists dealt us a grievous wound, they also 
succeeded in uniting the American people like never before. We have 
renewed our faith in our system of government and reaffirmed our 
commitment to the spread of freedom and justice around the globe. And we 
have been reminded that whatever differences separate us, we remain a 
profoundly unified people.
  Mr. Speaker, in the years ahead, the attacks of September 11 will be 
remembered not merely as an unspeakable tragedy, but as a date that 
triggered a renewal of the American spirit. As we move forward in our 
battle against the perpetrators of evil, we will proceed with the 
unshakable certainty that America's brightest days lie ahead. God bless 
you, and God bless America.


                            Hon. Bud Shuster


                             of Pennsylvania

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to share with you and all of my colleagues a 
poem written by Mr. Bruce Starr of Warfordsburg, PA, in remembrance of 
the tragic events of September 11. Mr. Starr's poem eloquently speaks of 
the spirit and the sense of unity that is America.

                              I Am America


                           (By Bruce A. Starr)

                    I AM a most magnificent land of dreams with wondrous 
                      opportunity of fabulous wealth.

                    I AM holding a vision for all of happiness and 
                      radiant health.

                    I AM loving and caring for children of God 
                      everywhere, and my generous sharing is beyond 
                      compare.

                    I AM bringing hope and courage to many for a really 
                      fresh, new start.

                    I AM the joy of freedom that beats from my heart.

                    I AM a powerful light of spirit which gloriously 
                      illumines the earth.

                    To peace in the valley, I am graciously giving 
                      birth.

                    I AM patiently awaiting everyone's communion, for 
                      our gentleness and strength abides in union.

                    I AM the truth and beauty that sets souls free, and

                    I AM guarding and protecting your God-given right to 
                      be!

                    For after all, ``I AM America!''

                             Hon. Jim Davis


                               of Florida

  Mr. Speaker, I rise in honor of the Bayshore Patriots, a group of four 
proud Americans from Tampa whose patriotism inspired thousands of people 
from across Tampa Bay to join together this morning for ``Flags Along 
Bayshore: Tampa Remembers 9/11,'' an event to remember those lost in the 
September 11 attacks and honor those who protect and serve our Nation 
every day.
  The Bayshore Patriots--Linda Alfonso, Julie Sargent, Julie Whitney, 
and Bill Hamblin--have gathered every Friday afternoon since September 
11 to wave flags on Bayshore Boulevard in Tampa, a major route for 
servicemen and women who work on MacDill Air Force Base. Through their 
simple act--the waving of a flag--this group has shown their support for 
troops in the Tampa Bay area and sent a message that terrorism will not 
destroy Americans' love of country. The Bayshore Patriots' spirit and 
dedication has invigorated the Tampa Bay community as more and more flag 
wavers join the group each week and passing motorists honk their horns 
in support. Gen. Tommy Franks, Commander in Chief of U.S. Central 
Command, based at MacDill, has seen the group on this way to work and 
stopped to show his appreciation for the group's efforts.
  When the Patriots decided to organize a September 11 tribute, with the 
hopes of having all 4.5 miles of Bayshore Boulevard lined with Tampa 
residents all waving flags, they were overwhelmed with support. Local 
businesses volunteered time, money and services to make the event 
possible, and people from every corner of our community signed up to 
wave flags and participate in the event, which was scheduled to include 
a keynote address by General Franks, patriotic songs, and remembrances. 
A steady downpour may have interrupted the program, but nothing could 
have dampened the resolve of the participants.
  The Bayshore Patriots have taught us that we all can make a difference 
in the war on terrorism. They started as just a few voices calling out 
in patriotism and support for those impacted by September 11, but today, 
they were joined by a giant chorus of voices--men, women, and children 
from all walks of life singing in harmony. On behalf of the Tampa Bay 
community, I thank Linda Alfonso, Julie Sargent, Julie Whitney, and Bill 
Hamblin for their inspiration.


                          Hon. Rosa L. DeLauro


                             of Connecticut

  Mr. Speaker, I rise in the strongest support of this resolution. Our 
Nation has endured so much pain--so much hardship and grief since we 
were attacked a year ago. Simply put, our world changed irrevocably. 
More than 3,000 lives were lost, and today, America remembers their 
powerful legacy of courage.
  Today, there remains a profound sadness in America, a sadness that 
will surely endure as spouses, parents, and friends across the Nation 
continue to mourn their unfathomable loss. But in these last 12 months, 
Americans have begun the healing process--a process that continues to 
this day, inch by inch, hour by hour. That resilience is, perhaps, the 
ultimate symbol of the indomitable strength of the American spirit.
  All of us were touched by the tragedy of September 11, including so 
many from my home state of Connecticut. It was something that once again 
hit home for me 2 days ago, when I attended a ceremony dedicating a 
garden to the memory of three brave men from Milford, CT, who perished 
in the World Trade Center. The ceremony was particularly moving because, 
in the World Trade Center bombing of 1993, one of these men, Seth 
Morris, had carried a pregnant woman 103 floors to safety. His was the 
kind of bravery we now understand is at the core of what it means to be 
American. It was the same heroism we saw in the firefighters and police 
officers who ran into the burning buildings while others ran out, and in 
the heroes on flight 93 who made the ultimate sacrifice to save others. 
These personal stories are now a part of our ongoing national story.
  The anniversary of September 11 serves as a reminder to all Americans 
that our Nation has changed forever. We are now so much more aware of 
our freedoms and liberties, our strength of diversity and collective 
purpose. Our commitment to freedom and our strength as a Nation has 
never been on fuller, broader display.
  As our world has changed, so too have the workings of this great body 
in the last year. When it comes to protecting our people, Congress has 
spoken with one voice--powerful, determined and compassionate. Many here 
will remember when this body joined on the steps of the Capitol to 
spontaneously sing ``God Bless America'' on this day a year ago. Then, 
we said to those who had attacked us, ``You will not dampen our spirits, 
you will not break our will.''
  And now, after a year of grief, unbearable sadness and the beginnings 
of the healing process, we have a similar message to share with the 
whole world: our spirits have not been dampened, and our will will never 
be broken.
  That is what this resolution is about--reaffirming that commitment to 
protecting our American way of life and our dedication to making our 
Nation not only safer, but stronger. For representatives of the American 
people, there truly is no higher calling.


                            Hon. Barbara Lee


                              of California

  Mr. Speaker, as we pause to remember the horrific and tragic events of 
September 11, 2001, let us honor the memory of the innocent men, women, 
and children whose lives were lost on that fateful day. The families, 
victims, and survivors are in our hearts and prayers as we support 
efforts to rebuild and recover from such senseless, inhumane, and 
inconceivable attacks.
  We are filled with admiration for those who willingly rushed into 
danger to try to save others--the firefighters, police officers, rescue 
workers, and ordinary Americans who proved to be most extraordinary. 
They raced up stairs, they ran into burning buildings, and they brought 
down a plane to save others.
  We pray that our young men and women in our Armed Forces who are 
putting themselves in harm's way will return safely to their families 
and friends. In the last year, they have stood watch to keep us safe, 
and we are profoundly grateful.
  To say America suffered a terrible blow is an understatement. Since 
that terrible day we have slowly been recovering from our profound sense 
of shock. The walls of the Pentagon have been reconstructed. The 
terrible devastation at the World Trade Center has been gradually, 
painstakingly cleared away.
  Out of the ashes of loss, we must reshape a future, a world free from 
horror and hatred, one that offers security for our children and future 
generations. To shape the future, this better world, let us recommit 
ourselves to justice and peace. As we rebuild the Pentagon, memorialize 
the World Trade Center, and journey to a pasture in rural Pennsylvania 
where the men and women of flight 93 gave their lives so that others 
might live, let us emerge more dedicated to peace, more aware of the 
world around us, and more secure.
  Let us maintain the spirit of unity, of neighborly concern, of 
friendliness toward others, and of service that was so profoundly 
displayed in the aftermath of 9/11, and keep it alive and well. Let us 
hold on to the spirit that led us to stand in line for hours in order to 
donate blood because we so wanted to help. Those values exemplify true 
patriotism and demonstrate what is best about America.
  I am reminded of the words of a song which has been sung so often, by 
so many, which begins, ``Let there be peace on Earth and let it begin 
with me. Let there be peace on Earth, the peace that was meant to be.''
  Let us remember that hymn as we remember those we lost. Let us keep 
them as a constant reminder to be our own best selves, to stand up for 
democratic ideals, to work for peace, disarmament, and security, and to 
continue to display the love and courage that they shared with us 1 year 
ago.


                             Hon. Lane Evans


                               of Illinois

  Mr. Speaker, the devastating acts committed against the United States 
on September 11 will never be forgotten. Today we remember those who 
perished in the attacks and extend our continuing support to their 
families. We honor and thank thousands of individuals--doctors and 
nurses, police and firefighters, military personnel, volunteers and 
blood donors and others--for their incredible acts of valor and courage 
and service to our Nation. We salute postal workers and letter carriers 
who were threatened and felled by a threat they never saw. They, too, 
were innocent victims of these horrific acts.
  Our thoughts this day are with the men and women in uniform half a 
world away. They are on duty to preserve and defend our Nation against 
the scourge of terrorism. We honor their service and thank them from the 
bottom of our hearts.
  Since September 11, our country has stood united in its resolve to 
overcome these horrific acts. I and fellow Members of Congress have 
joined together and supported President Bush in the war against 
terrorism. We have taken steps to make our country safer, assist those 
who have been affected by these acts of terrorism, and give law 
enforcement and the military the resources necessary to protect us from 
further acts of violence.
  Those who carried out these acts can try to attack our way of life and 
democracy, but they cannot and will not defeat it or destroy it. We will 
continue to work together to ensure that these acts will never be 
perpetrated again.
  Terrorism can never undermine our national spirit and character. We 
are a great Nation. We are brave and courageous people. The values that 
guide us remain unbent and unbroken. They will endure.
  Throughout our history, we have met great challenges. In every 
instance, we have overcome every test, every danger. And each time we 
have moved forward a stronger, greater Nation with a brighter future.
  This solemn anniversary reminds us of a great tragedy. But it also 
helps reinforce our national strength and what it means to be an 
American. Our purpose and resolve are undeterred.


                            Hon. Bill Luther


                              of Minnesota

  Mr. Speaker, the tragedy of September 11 is a stark reminder of the 
dangerous world in which we live and the risks faced by people who are 
firmly committed to democracy, freedom and opportunity for all, as we 
Americans are.
  As we recognize the 1-year anniversary of these attacks, it is 
important to remember and honor the victims and survivors, their 
families and loved ones. But we should also remember the amazing acts of 
bravery, kindness and self-sacrifice that took place on September 11: 
citizens helped each other, firefighters risked their lives to save 
those of others, Americans participated in food and blood drives and 
other efforts across the country.
  The day was one of unspeakable horror, but also one of triumph. We 
Americans committed ourselves to gaining from this tragedy. As difficult 
as the time was, we resolved to work together to become stronger as a 
Nation.
  Events of this past year since the attacks remind us that we can 
easily lose the spirit of September 11 as we go about our daily 
business. At times we may have forgotten the feelings of national unity 
and pride that came in the immediate aftermath of September 11. But in 
order to continue America's mission in the world, we must continue in 
that spirit and work together as Americans every day.
  I, along with my family and staff, join all Americans in remembering 
the loss of that day and in thanking Americans for their many 
contributions in the face of tragedy. To truly honor them and the Nation 
we love, we must continue in the spirit that followed September 11 and 
work together to ensure peace, justice and prosperity for all.


                           Hon. Robert W. Ney


                                 of Ohio

  Mr. Speaker, whereas, September 11 was a day that impacted everyone in 
the United States of America in a shocking and terrible way; and,
  Whereas, September 11 also became a pivotal event that unified all 
Americans, strengthening our communities and Nation in amazing and 
inspiring ways; and,
  Whereas, the committee of Phil Wallace, Marian Klier, Dorothy Powell, 
and Marian Martin are to be commended along with the community of 
Martin's Ferry for seeking to honor and remember those who lost their 
lives that day; and,
  Whereas, this anniversary of September 11 calls for solemn 
remembrance, gratitude, patriotism, and most importantly a celebration 
of the indelible American spirit;
  Therefore, I join with the residents of Martin's Ferry and the entire 
18th Congressional District of Ohio in remembering those who died and 
thanking those who became heroes with perseverance and American pride.


                           Hon. James P. Moran


                               of Virginia

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today on the first anniversary of 9/11, a day 
which changed America's history.
  For the past 12 months, this Nation has collectively experienced a 
full range of emotion, from the initial fear and uncertainty of that 
fateful day, to anger and outrage at the loss of American life and the 
violation of two of our Nation's most recognizable symbols. We have 
mourned and continue to mourn for the victims of this horrible attack. 
Their families and friends are constantly in our thoughts and prayers. 
Embedded firmly in my mind is the image of streams of people who came to 
the ridge overlooking the Pentagon to pay their respects and sanctified 
that hill with flowers, candles and notes of remembrance.
  Yet, in the midst of all the sadness, Americans have sought an outlet 
for their grief by renewing their sense of community service and 
patriotic pride. Our country, which has a strong history of bridging 
many differences, has become one. In Northern Virginia alone, we 
witnessed friends, neighbors and colleagues coming together to help 
rebuild and unite. With the round-the-clock dedication of the Pentagon 
renovation team, the revival of the Pentagon has served as the 
quintessential symbol of our country's resilience and renewal. A special 
debt of gratitude goes to those workers and planners who orchestrated 
this rebuilding.
  As we bear witness to the powerful images and experiences of the past 
year, we are proudly reminded of what it means to be an American. The 
heroic acts of the firefighters, police officers and emergency 
responders who rushed into the inferno of the Pentagon and World Trade 
Center towers to save lives, touches a special place in all our hearts. 
It is a place where love of country and for our fellow man is second 
nature. This unique American spirit is what wills us to go the extra 
mile and put our lives on the line for what we know is right.
  So, Mr. Speaker, on the 1-year anniversary of September 11, let us 
honor the many sacrifices that have been made by our police, 
firefighters, emergency responders and our men and women in uniform. 
Their efforts to heal, protect and preserve this great Nation deserve 
the utmost respect and admiration.


                       Hon. Eni F.H. Faleomavaega


                            of American Samoa

  Mr. Speaker, although the scope and severity of the terrorist attacks 
on America make it difficult to know how best to memorialize those who 
were lost on September 11, 2001, I rise today to pay tribute to the 
passengers of United flight 93 who courageously thwarted an attack on 
our Nation's Capital.
  To the firefighters of New York City who gave their lives to rescue 
others, I join with my colleagues in saying that you will always be our 
heroes. To the World Trade Center victims, we mourn your passing. To 
those who died at the Pentagon, we will not forget you. To every man and 
woman serving in the U.S. Armed Forces, we stand by you. To our friends 
and neighbors across the globe, we thank you for supporting us in a time 
of need. For every American who has made the ultimate sacrifice and 
those who continue to risk their lives in order to save others, our 
Nation stands forever grateful.
  We are one Nation, under God, united in our resolve to defend freedom 
in the aftermath of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks on 
America. As President Franklin Roosevelt said, ``We will not only defend 
ourselves to the uttermost but will make very certain that this form of 
treachery shall never endanger us again. With confidence in our Armed 
Forces, with the unbound determination of our people, we will gain the 
inevitable triumph, so help us God.''
  Mr. Speaker, I commend President George W. Bush for his leadership in 
securing our homeland and strengthening America's resolve to triumph 
over terrorism. I also commend the Honorable Colin L. Powell, U.S. 
Secretary of State, for his untold achievement in strengthening our 
alliances. I commend the Honorable Donald H. Rumsfeld, Secretary of 
Defense, for mobilizing our troops and protecting U.S. interests 
overseas. I commend the Secretary of Transportation, the Honorable 
Norman Y. Mineta, for his decisive action to ground all planes and avoid 
further tragedy on September 11, 2001.
  I also commend my colleagues in both the House and Senate. I commend 
both Republicans and Democrats. I commend all Americans united in their 
resolve to end the threat of terrorism for future generations.
  On behalf of the people of American Samoa, I rise today to say that we 
will always remember the heroic actions of those who gave their lives so 
that we might live. We stand united in our resolve to defend freedom. 
Like all Americans, we join in prayer and proclaim September 11, 2002, 
as a day of solemn observance.
  I commend the Honorable Tauese Sunia, Governor of American Samoa, for 
proclaiming Wednesday, September 11, 2002, to be a day of solemn 
observance throughout the territory. All flags will be flown at 
halfmast. Memorial services will start in the territory at sundown on 
Tuesday, September 5, 2002, and will end with the last service set for 6 
p.m. on September 11, 2002.
  During this time, American Samoa will participate in a worldwide 
choral event. Choirs in every zone around the world will perform 
Mozart's ``Requiem'' at 8:46 a.m., the exact time of the first terrorist 
attack on America. American Samoa will represent the last time zone on 
the globe and the American Samoa Community College Choir will be the 
last choir on Earth to sing Mozart's ``Requiem'' during this worldwide, 
commemorative service.
  I applaud the volunteers from the Seattle Symphony Chorale who 
organized this worldwide event to pay homage to the victims, survivors, 
and heroes of September 11, 2001. I also commend the students, staff, 
and faculty members at the American Samoa Community College for 
representing American Samoa on this historic and solemn occasion.
  I also express my deepest gratitude for those serving in the U.S. 
Armed Forces during this critical time in our Nation's history. I am 
pleased to say that the sons and daughters of American Samoa serve 
proudly in the U.S. military and, per capita, there are probably more 
soldiers in the U.S. Army from American Samoa than any other State or 
U.S. territory.
  I thank the sons and daughters of American Samoa for answering the 
call to serve. I pray for them. I pray for their families. I am 
painfully aware of the sacrifices they are making. I am very mindful of 
the dangers they are facing. Some 30 years ago, I served in the Vietnam 
war. As a Vietnam veteran, I remember all too well what it is like to be 
separated from loved ones. Each day, I wondered if I would ever see my 
loved ones again or if I would be among the thousands to return home in 
a body bag.
  By the grace of God, I returned home safely. I now pray that the Good 
Lord will watch over the brave men and women of American Samoa who are 
also willing to pay the ultimate sacrifice so that future generations 
may live in peace.
  On this day of solemn observance, in this somber time of remembrance, 
my thoughts and prayers also go to all those whose lives have been 
changed by the tragic events of September 11, 2001. May we always stand 
together in the defense of freedom and may God bless America.


                           Hon. Hilda L. Solis


                              of California

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in remembrance of one of the most horrific 
events in our Nation's history.
  Today we honor the thousands of innocent people who lost their lives 
in the World Trade Center, at the Pentagon and aboard flight 93 a year 
ago and salute with great pride the many rescue workers, medical 
personnel, and firefighters who risked their own lives to save the lives 
of others.
  September 11 is a very emotional day for Americans of all walks of 
life and it is especially difficult for those who were directly impacted 
in one way, shape or form. My heart goes out to the survivors, their 
families and all who were affected--emotionally or physically--by this 
event. I know it has not been an easy pain to bear.
  Last year's terrorist attacks shook the sense of security we have come 
to take for granted in our daily lives. Although our country will never 
be the same, we have a renewed sense of commitment and are dedicated 
now, more than ever, to upholding our freedoms and liberties. Our 
country, with all its diversity, stands united to prevent such a tragedy 
from happening again.
  Mr. Speaker, I ask for a moment of silence in remembrance of those who 
were lost. May God bless America today and ever more.


                     Hon. Louise McIntosh Slaughter


                               of New York

  Mr. Speaker, I rise to join my colleagues in remembering the terrorist 
attacks of a year ago and paying tribute to the victims, the survivors, 
and the American spirit.
  One year ago today, almost 3,000 Americans lost their lives in a 
series of despicable attacks. These acts were carried out by a group of 
people who hated everything our Nation stands for, and who sought to 
destroy the symbols of our freedom and prosperity.
  Despite the destruction they were able to inflict, these terrorists 
actually achieved the opposite of their intended goal. Instead of 
dividing us, they united us as never before. The evil of a few was met 
by the courage of thousands, and the generosity of millions.
  The day of the attacks witnessed countless instances of unflinching, 
selfless courage at the sites in New York, Pennsylvania, and the 
Pentagon. Workers in the towers and at the Pentagon helped each other 
through the evacuation. Firefighters, law enforcement officers, and 
emergency personnel rushed to the scene, heedless of the danger to 
themselves. Teachers shepherded children to safety; not a single child 
at the World Trade Center or Pentagon day care centers was harmed. And 
no one will ever forget the heroism of the passengers who crashed flight 
93 rather than allow it to continue to its intended target. The world 
watched in humbled awe as ordinary Americans performed extraordinary 
acts.
  The following days and weeks saw another quintessential American trait 
expressed: our generosity. Millions of Americans contributed goods, 
services, and funds for the rescue effort. Equipment, food, and supplies 
poured into the City of New York. Over a few short weeks, millions of 
dollars were donated to the families of the victims of the attacks. 
Children held penny drives and car washes; businesses had fundraisers; 
corporations opened their coffers. No sooner was any need made known 
than it was met, often to overflowing.
  The trials of September 11 proved that our Nation's motto still holds 
true--``E pluribus unum.'' From many, one. From many individuals, many 
cultures, and many ideals we stand together as a single Nation, united 
in purpose and resolve. Like steel tempered in fire, the challenges of 
this ordeal have made us stronger.
  Today, we pay tribute to all those who were lost a year ago, and to 
those they left behind. My district of Monroe County, NY, bears its 
share of the collective grief. Pittsford businessman Thomas Duffy was at 
an early morning meeting in the towers and perished. The Vincent family 
lost their 24-year-old daughter, Melissa, who had just begun a career 
with Alliance Consulting. Several other constituents lost children, 
brothers, and sisters. Many lost friends and loved ones. None of these 
families will ever be the same again.
  The best homage we can pay is to ensure that these people did not die 
in vain. We have already taken significant steps by removing the Taliban 
regime in Afghanistan, pursuing terrorists across the globe, and 
improving homeland security. But we can and must do much more.
  Many vital security needs still must be addressed. We must pursue a 
long-term strategy for rooting out terrorism and eliminating the 
conditions that allow it to thrive. Our public health infrastructure 
must be rebuilt and strengthened. Perhaps most of all, however, we must 
rededicate ourselves to principles of freedom and democracy. Our 
precious liberty can never be taken for granted. We must find the 
delicate balance between protecting our security and preserving our 
freedom.
  Finally, we must pay special attention to the needs of our children in 
these difficult times. Too many of our children across the Nation were 
traumatized by the terrorist attacks, and many remain anxious and 
fearful. These events must not be allowed to poison an entire 
generation. We must ensure that our children receive the aid they need 
to face the future happy, healthy, and secure. Terror is indiscriminate, 
and the young are especially vulnerable.
  I join my colleagues in paying tribute to all the heroes of September 
11. Our honored dead will not be forgotten. Their families shall not be 
alone. We, the survivors, will carry their memories in our hearts and 
live their legacy through our actions.


                         Hon. Gerald D. Kleczka


                              of Wisconsin

  Mr. Speaker, it was 1 year ago that we first shared that sense of 
inimitable sadness upon learning that thousands of our fellow Americans 
were suddenly and unexpectedly lost to us forever. They met their ends 
in the fields of Western Pennsylvania; at our national military 
headquarters in Washington, DC; in two of the world's tallest office 
buildings in New York City. Some were sitting down for work, or simply 
taking a plane trip when the unthinkable occurred. Hundreds of others, 
heroes, were taken from us as they selflessly struggled to bring others 
to safety.
  We came together today to honor their memory. In churches, synagogues, 
mosques, schools, homes, and workplaces across the land and around the 
world, people will observe moments of silence in solemn remembrance. We 
pray for those left behind, whose lives are scarred forever with the 
loss of loved ones. We ask God for healing for them and for our country.
  We also gather as a Nation to lift our voices in song. While uniting 
us across the miles, our shared music today not only pays homage to the 
lives lost, but reaches out to embrace the grieving. The songs give us a 
shared strength by allowing us to publicly reaffirm the triumphs of our 
humanity over terror, of community over hatred, of rebuilding over 
destruction.
  May today's remembrances bring honor to the memory of those who died 1 
year ago, healing to the wounded of body and spirit, and the blessings 
of courage and strength for all who remember.


                          Hon. Melissa A. Hart


                             of Pennsylvania

  Mr. Speaker, on this fateful day last year, the cowardly acts of 
terrorists tried to divide this Nation and destroy the American way of 
life. Instead they united us, and Americans rose above the ashes to show 
the indomitable spirit that makes this Nation so great.
  Thousands of lives were lost that day, but millions of us answered the 
call of a Nation under attack. The volunteers who helped the victims and 
families, the outpouring of donations--these are the shining examples of 
what we are capable of when our country needs us most.
  President Bush asks us to honor the memory of those lost ``by pursuing 
peace and justice in the world and security at home.'' While September 
11 was a tragic day, we must also acknowledge the historic outpouring of 
charity and sacrifice by all Americans to those in need.
  The war on terrorism is not concluding; it has only just begun. 
President Bush made it very clear that whenever there is terrorism in 
the world, the United States cannot rest. This is a war that we must 
remain united in--united and prepared for the challenge to defeat those 
who use terror and fear to oppress and destroy.
  Those who perished on September 11 will forever remain in our memories 
and in our hearts. It is up to us to protect liberty and freedom for all 
future generations.
  God bless America.


                          Hon. David D. Phelps


                               of Illinois

  Mr. Speaker, on the night of 9/11/2001, when all the Members of the 
House and Senate gathered for that historic press conference to assure 
the American people that we had not run from the terrorists and were 
doing the business on behalf of the American people, that which we were 
elected to do, I was inspired to write these words and set them to 
music.
  I believe my song expresses much of the sentiments of the American 
people that we will and must respond when threatened or harmed. We will 
defend the deepest principles of freedom and our Nation's heritage.
  Especially on behalf of those brave people, our heroes: the firemen, 
policemen, emergency medical teams, our postal workers, the Pentagon 
workers, and those who were aboard the hijacked planes, Here We Come! 
With you in our minds, and in our hearts, and for everything which this 
country stands!

                           Here Comes America!


The greatest of all nations, where freedom was born

through wars and sacrifices tested, tried and weary worn.

We stand for truth and justice, and our aim is strong and

    sure.

The red, white and blue waves on for freedom we shall endure

Here comes America on strong.

God bless America's her song.

United more than ever now.

In prayer to God we humbly bow

for freedom's cause we will not fail.

Over fear we shall prevail.

Let Old Glory wave.

HERE COMES AMERICA.

When liberty is threatened, we'll defend the people's will.

Though heroes have fallen, our resolve we shall fulfill.

A forgiving, loving people, pursuing peace and happiness

but if harmed or terrorized, comes the eagle from her nest.


                             Hon. Sam Graves


                               of missouri

  Mr. Speaker, on September 11, 2001, America awoke to the worst 
terrorist attack in history. As we went to work and school, we left with 
a feeling of security that we have long since forgotten. By the time we 
returned to our families, our lives and our Nation had forever changed. 
It had been many years since America felt so insecure, so vulnerable. On 
that morning, the American people's resolve was put to the ultimate 
test. Everything appeared to be so uncertain that day. Who would do such 
a thing? Why would they do it? Is there more to come? How can I protect 
my family?
  But there was much that was certain that day. America made a promise 
to the victims and their families, to future generations of Americans, 
and to the world. The American people promised that this action would 
not go unanswered. We promised that this action would only strengthen 
and unite us, not divide us. We would respond forcefully to those who 
were responsible while tending to our neighbors, our fellow countrymen. 
Together, you and people across Northwest Missouri and our Nation 
donated blood for the victims, and donated money for their families. 
Together, we prayed for those who lost so much that day. We prayed for 
our soldiers who stood ready--preparing to defend our freedom.
  As we stop to remember that terrible day, some of the pain and fear 
has subsided. But our determination to defeat those who seek to 
terrorize us must never fall victim to the passage of time. In the 
coming months, the American people will face a choice: live up to our 
responsibility by making tough choices and sacrifices to continue our 
assault on terrorism, or quit now and hope that they choose to stop 
planning future attacks. The American people should never have to endure 
such a tragedy again. As we have learned over the past year, we can do 
something about it. We must never mislead ourselves that we have to wait 
to be attacked again to continue our defense from terrorism. The more 
than 3,000 lives lost is all the justification we need to have to defend 
against a certain threat of terrorism. The United States must remain 
vigilant and prepared so that we remain forever free.


                             Hon. Mike Pence


                               of Indiana

  Mr. Speaker, the United States of America is founded on the 
fundamental principle that all citizens have the inalienable right to 
life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.
  The United States of America stands as a beacon of freedom and 
opportunity for everyone regardless of race, creed or religious belief.
  The strength and vitality of the United States of America is in the 
diversity of its people, the diversity of its ideas, the freedom to 
express those ideas and the opportunity to achieve one's potential and 
direct one's destiny.
  Mr. Speaker, these ideals and principles are absolute and will not be 
surrendered or weakened by the cowardly acts of terrorists who fear the 
sunshine of freedom and the responsibility it brings.
  Let us forever remember that the date September 11 reaffirms the 
principles for which the United States of America was founded and that 
on this day each year freedom shall ring from every community in this 
great land and the voice of America will be heard around the world.


                           Hon. Xavier Becerra


                              of California

  Mr. Speaker, a year ago I stood on this same floor of the people's 
House as the ruins still smoldered, the families still prayed and hoped, 
and all of us searched for ways to explain and prepare for the events 
that were to unfold. I will never forget that feeling of collective will 
which permeated this Congress to act to bring to justice those who 
committed these heinous crimes.
  America will never forget September 11, 2001. In its tragedy, in its 
despicability, and in its lessons and impact on our way of life, it 
represents a singular moment of history. But what really do we remember 
about this event? And for today, the first anniversary of 9/11, perhaps 
the best question is: What should we remember?
  Mr. Speaker, my answer to that is: Let us remember the mothers and 
sons, the brothers and sisters, who perished on September 11, by 
remembering, today, to touch our own mother or son, our brother, our 
sister.
  We will never forget the firefighters, police officers, and 
volunteers--the heroes of September 11. Let's prove that by not 
forgetting to extend a hand to our heroes in uniform, who protect us 
today.
  And let us commemorate 9/11 and honor our fallen by forever defending 
and living up to the ideals embodied in our Constitution. Our way of 
life may have been challenged, but it has not been compromised. We can 
prove to the world that in triumph or tragedy, we shall be a Nation of 
laws.
  As I stood on the floor of the House a year ago I asked: How do we 
explain this barbarous act of terrorism to our children? I did not 
believe then, nor do I believe now, that it is possible to really 
explain--to make sense of what happened--to our little ones. But I 
remember my words that followed and they ring so very true to me today: 
``From my words and my deeds, from the way our country prosecutes this 
unconscionable crime, I hope [our children] will learn and they will 
remember how this country lives and breathes its freedom and relentless 
search for justice. Perhaps, then, as our children grow older and wiser, 
they will be better prepared to preserve life and defend America's 
values.''
  So, Mr. Speaker, as we move forward to complete the unfinished 
business of 9/11, let us remember our fallen, let us reflect on our 
tenacity and perseverance, and let us be the heroes in life that the 
victims of that day are in death.
  I remember that feeling of hope and justice back then, and I believe 
it will guide us through our mission now. May God bless America.


                            Hon. Jane Harman


                              of California

  Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of the commemorative resolution 
honoring those who died last September 11, those who came to the rescue, 
and those who served, and continue to serve, in the fight against 
terrorism.
  Our minds are still seared with the images of last year's tragedy. 
Members knew some of the individuals who died in the attacks. In 
California's 36th District, where LAX--the destination of three of the 
four hijacked planes--is located, four of my constituents were killed.
  They are: Anna Alison of Torrance, Chandler ``Chad'' Keller of 
Manhattan Beach, Stanley Hall of Rancho Palos Verdes, and John Wenckus 
of Torrance.
  Today, we remember these individuals and join with their families in 
commemorating their lives and their contribution to our community and 
Nation.
  We also remember several other individuals who worked in the 36th 
District but lived elsewhere. Their coworkers remember them fondly: 
Ruben Ornedo, who worked at Boeing; and Peter Gay, who worked for 
Raytheon Electronics and commuted to El Segundo weekly from the East 
Coast.
  Mr. Speaker, our hearts are still broken and we continue to grieve. 
The remembrance ceremonies I attended--last week at Ground Zero and this 
morning at the Pentagon--were incredibly moving and heartfelt.
  But as we work together to rebuild the lives shattered by the events 
of September 11, we also look to identify the actions we need to take at 
all levels of government to ensure maximum preparedness and protection 
against this threat--beginning with a reorganization of our government's 
resources.
  We have learned from this horrific experience.
  Sadder, but wiser and stronger, we are aided in our efforts this past 
year by the testimonies of those who walked through hell and by those 
who are prepared to do the same.
  I am reminded of the words of Tennyson--

                    Tho' much is taken, much abides; and tho'

                    We are not now that strength which in old days

                    Moved Earth and heaven, that which we are, we are--

                    One equal temper of heroic hearts,

                    Made weak by time and fate, but strong in will

                    To strive, to seek, to find, and not to yield.

  New Yorkers, the workers at the Pentagon and the passengers and crew 
aboard American flight 77 did not yield.
  Nor will America.


                          Hon. Solomon P. Ortiz


                                of Texas

  Mr. Speaker, September 11, 2001, is a day you will always remember 
where you were, who you were with, and what you were doing. My personal 
experiences that day are vivid: going to a press conference in the 
Capitol at 9:30, moving fast to get out when we saw the reports of smoke 
at the Pentagon and seeing the monitor in the House radio-TV gallery 
flash, ``White House being evacuated.'' Nothing can describe the feeling 
of rushing out of the building you love, hearing the attack was not 
concluded and seeing the smoke from the Pentagon rising behind the 
building in which my congressional office is located.
  I went to the Pentagon 2 days later to thank the emergency workers and 
was struck by the smells that were still so strong there, the stench of 
the burning building and literally the smell of death. I'd been to that 
building so many times and it seemed so impenetrable. This attack served 
to illustrate how vulnerable we are in this country. We live in a wildly 
dangerous world; the security increases we see here now have been the 
norm in Europe and around the Middle East for decades. Our world is 
dangerous. We live in this world; now we appreciate that danger every 
day.
  Our Nation was founded on the belief that God is great, that He is 
watching out for us. While the fear and hurt was apparent that day and 
the days that followed, so too, was the strength and courage of men and 
women who risked their own lives for their country and their American 
family that day. The passengers in the plane that crashed in 
Pennsylvania jumped into action, fighting a battle that eventually saved 
a Washington-area target, quite possibly the building where Congress 
meets.
  Our legacy, our duty today is to ensure that those who died on the 
planes, in the buildings, and on the battlefield, did not die in vain. 
Our respect for their memory must be to recommit ourselves to our 
Nation, our freedom and each other. Today we mourn anew the lives lost 
in the attack 1 year ago, and the lives lost in battle since then and we 
offer our sympathies again to those they leave behind. We also honor the 
police, firefighters and rescue personnel who risked their lives to help 
those hurt in the attacks.
  Our challenges are huge. Many people in this world carry evil in their 
hearts and minds. We can never change the hearts of humans, but great 
American men and women are doing their best every day to prevent that 
evil from finding its way here to our shores again. The United States is 
a beacon of light around the world. There are thousands of freedoms and 
privileges in this country that we enjoy every day but those privileges 
come at a cost, at a sacrifice. Our way forward will not be easy, for 
this is not over.
  Ask God for wisdom and strength to protect us here at home and those 
around the world who love freedom and democracy. Always remember those 
servicemen and women serving in the military. They are doing difficult, 
dangerous work on our behalf, and on behalf of freedom and democracy. 
Our test is to be united at this hour of crisis in our Nation and in our 
world. Congress will honor the memories of all those we have lost to the 
war on terror by defending the United States in the face of future 
attacks.


                     Hon. George R. Nethercutt, Jr.


                              of Washington

  Mr. Speaker, 1 year ago on September 11, our country suffered 
unexpected and unjustified attacks that killed and injured innocent 
people from many nations of the world. While the attacks occurred in the 
City of New York, a peaceful field in Pennsylvania and at the Pentagon 
in Virginia, the effects of terrorism were felt in every corner of 
America and throughout the world of nations that shared our sorrow.
  The resulting war on terrorism has called together the people of 
America to unite behind a commitment to defend our homeland and preserve 
our way of life against all enemies of freedom and liberty. In doing so, 
America has witnessed a heartening resurgence of patriotism, a deep 
appreciation for the ordinary heroes among us, a fervent call to prayer, 
and a thankful devotion to the simple blessings of family, community, 
faith and friendship. We are indeed a blessed people, committed to 
liberty for individuals and nations everywhere, but mindful that freedom 
too often comes with great sacrifice.
  Who can doubt our American faithfulness and resolve as we grieve for 
those who lost life on September 11, applaud the brave government 
servants and military might of our great Nation, strive for economic 
stability and quietly pray for a peaceful world free of tyrants and 
violence.
  The United States is no stranger to evil--our forefathers have 
overcome it through 225 years of proud but difficult history. The 
challenge for this and future generations will be to never succumb to 
the temptation of withdrawing from our national obligation to resist 
evil and fight for freedom for future generations of Americans. The war 
against terrorism, memorialized in those who died 1 year ago, is only 
the latest test of our national resolve. In lasting memory of September 
11, let the legacy of this new century be one of victory for mankind as 
the United States of America leads the world to liberty and justice for 
all.


                           Hon. John B. Larson


                             of Connecticut

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today, 1 year after the terrorist attacks on our 
Nation, as we collectively pause to reflect, remember, and memorialize 
those who lost their lives on September 11, 2001. We proudly remember 
those heroic acts of bravery and courage selflessly performed by 
citizens that day. It was a day when ordinary people performed 
extraordinary deeds.
  The Nation was struck by terror, but responded with the courage and 
the conviction that makes us free. As we pause to recognize our precious 
freedoms, we will never forget September 11 and what happened in New 
York City, the Pentagon or in the fields of Pennsylvania.
  The terrorists failed in their attempts to bring down this Nation 
because the United States responded with love of country and the resolve 
to bring them to justice, ensuring that those who gave their lives will 
not have perished in vain.
  With great compassion and understanding, our hearts go out to the 
families of those who lost their loved ones, knowing life will never be 
normal for them. As we pause today in remembrance, we are resolved to go 
forward protecting and cherishing the freedoms that sustain us all.
  Mr. Speaker, H. Con. Res. 464 appropriately recognizes the 1-year 
anniversary of September 11 and I urge my colleagues to unanimously 
support this resolution. God bless America.


                     Hon. Randy ``Duke'' Cunningham


                              of california

  Mr. Speaker, a year ago today our Nation was attacked by terrorists 
intent on destroying the most enduring symbols of our success and our 
way of life. On this solemn occasion, the anniversary of those horrific 
attacks, I rise in strong support of the resolution recognizing 
September 11 as a national day of remembrance.
  On this day, we mourn the loss of thousands of innocent lives, we 
honor the selfless acts of those who came to the victims' aid, and we 
pay tribute to those who willingly put their lives on the line to stop 
the terrorists from wreaking further destruction on our land.
  September 11 will forever be remembered as one of the darkest days in 
our Nation's history. Today the horror of that event is still fresh, and 
the pain is still raw. And just as it is today, it will always be one 
for sadness and reflection. But the response it inspired in our Nation 
was uplifting. As we shudder at the recognition of devastation on this 
day, we can also take heart in the greatness and strength it inspired.
  Time will ease our sorrow, and we will continue to prosper as a 
Nation. But we must never forget the lesson we were forced to relearn on 
September 11, 2001: there are those who are threatened by our strength, 
our freedoms and our way of life, and they want to destroy our Nation. 
We must remain united in our commitment to pursue those who threaten us, 
to ensure our way of life and to uphold the hope of freedom around the 
globe.


                            Hon. Rob Simmons


                             of Connecticut

  Mr. Speaker, 1 year ago today our Nation endured an attack by a 
dedicated and dangerous enemy. Since that day we have seen that the 
principles and ideals that are the foundation of America are far 
stronger than any of the steel and concrete that fell that day.
  We are gathered to remember the innocent lives that were taken. The 
district that I represent, the Second District of Connecticut, lost a 
number of wonderful people on September 11. The names of some of them 
follow:
  Josh Piver, of my hometown of Stonington, worked at Cantor Fitzgerald 
on the 105th floor of the World Trade Center. Josh loved jazz, loved 
living in New York City and had an exuberant passion for life. He was a 
fine young man with a bright future.
  Madeline Amy Sweeney, a flight attendant for American Airlines flight 
11, the first jet to strike the World Trade Center. Displaying a courage 
while under tremendous pressure, she proved that on that day a loving 
wife, and a caring mother and daughter, could also be a hero. She used 
her cell phone to report what was happening and the information she 
provided helped us identify the attackers. She jump-started our 
investigation. Her parents live in Norwich, CT.
  Ruth McCourt, a homemaker from New London, CT, and her 4-year-old 
daughter, Juliana, were on United Airlines flight 175 bound for Los 
Angeles. They were on their way to enjoy a vacation at Disneyland. Their 
jet crashed into the South Tower of the World Trade Center.
  James Greenleaf, Jr., a 32-year-old history buff, was a football star 
in high school. He worked on the 92d floor of the World Trade Center. 
His friends said he was the type of individual who would spend a week's 
vacation helping an old friend build a new house.
  Ed Calderon, 43, was a security guard for the Port Authority of New 
York and New Jersey. He loved to dance and especially loved the salsa. 
He had worked at the World Trade Center for 22 years and was last seen 
running toward the North Tower after helping dozens of workers reach 
safety. He was hoping to help a few more people just before the building 
collapsed.
  Bruce Eagleson, 53, a vice president of the Westfield Group, was at a 
meeting on the 17th floor of the World Trade Center when a jet struck 
the building. His oldest son called after the first plane hit and urged 
him to leave. He told his son he was helping to evacuate people and 
promised he would get out. Mr. Eagleson had hoped to retire within 7 
years. He loved fishing and golf.
  Eric Thorpe, 35, was the star quarterback of his undefeated high 
school football team. He was one of the top salesmen at Keefe, Bruyette 
and Woods. But he kept success in the business world in perspective. He 
helped run a soup kitchen during college, worked as a Big Brother and 
participated in Hands Together, an antipoverty program in Haiti. His 
friends knew him for his nonstop sense of humor.
  Eric Evans, 31, was an easygoing individual who was determined to 
succeed in business. He also loved to garden and enjoyed tending his 
tomato and basil plants. His friends said he loved animals, except for 
the squirrels that would get into his tomatoes.
  These fine people, and all the others who were taken from us on 
September 11, 2001, leave behind families and friends and lives that 
were full of the promise of tomorrow. Today it is appropriate that we 
honor their memory.
  But this is more than a day of remembrance. This is a day to recommit 
ourselves to the values that are the foundation of America. Freedom, 
justice, honor and an unwavering belief in self-government--those are 
the values we believe in and they are the values that those we remember 
today believed in as well.
  This is a day to keep in mind that there is a great and profound 
difference between the use of force to liberate and the use of force to 
enslave.
  And this is a day to recommit ourselves to our love of our country. 
Let us join together and appreciate America's history and stand firm in 
support of our institutions and the duties of citizenship. This is a day 
to look to the future.
  A great deal of learning in our Nation has traditionally taken place 
when families gather around the kitchen table at mealtime. I hope that 
beginning tonight all American families will take time to discuss 
today's events around the dinner table. Talk together about what it 
means to be a citizen of this great Nation. Share your thoughts with 
each other about what the events of today mean to you, your family and 
friends.
  John Winthrop, one of the Pilgrims who came to this new world, 
described it as a ``shining city upon a hill.''
  Today, with our prayers, we remember those who are gone. Let us also 
direct our efforts to ensure, for our sake and for the sake of those yet 
to come, that this shining city on a hill will remain a beacon of 
freedom and hope that will forever reach out to embrace the aspirations 
and dreams of all the people of the world.


                            Hon. Jo Ann Davis


                               of Virginia

  Mr. Speaker, a year ago today, a radical, Islamic terrorist group 
seized four aircraft, turning them into deadly weapons and killing 
thousands of defenseless people. Today, we continue to mourn the loss of 
those victims, and honor those who, with great bravery and instilled 
sense of duty, risked their lives to protect our people.
  Yet while we reflect on this day, 1 year ago, we cannot look back. 
Throughout the history of America, we have been a forward-looking 
Nation, striving for excellence and finding strength in our love of 
country. America is a God-fearing land, and because of this, our Nation 
has been blessed mightily.
  These attacks have been compared to December 7, 1941, when Pearl 
Harbor was also struck from the sky. At the end of that day, America was 
devastated and struck with the great sorrow of this tragedy. Yet as 
history so aptly tells us, America's resurgence brought forth the 
liberation of the world, and global peace for decades.
  Today, as we look out across our land, we will see America at its most 
glorious hour. We will see the spirit of America at every ceremony, in 
every city and on the face of all Americans. It was the spirit of 
America that got us through that fateful day 1 year ago, and it will be 
this spirit that will carry us through for years to come.
  It is contagious, this American spirit. Last year, as our 
firefighters, police officers and rescue workers sacrificed to save 
lives, the American spirit shined. As our military men and women headed 
overseas to defend our country, the American spirit shined. As Americans 
across our land joined together in unity and with a renewed sense of 
patriotism, the American spirit shined.
  This is America, and faith and freedom will always be our call. That 
is what makes us unique. That is what makes us a people of great pride 
and resiliency. And that is what makes us a target. Yet in the end, 
America endures.
  Today the war on terrorism is progressing, but it will take time. As 
the President has said many times--this is a faceless enemy that we 
fight, and determination and perseverance will be our keys to victory. 
In the end our victory will once again bring about global peace.
  So as we reflect on that tragic day, 1 year ago, and mourn the loss of 
so many of our fellow Americans, rest assured that our brave military 
men and women overseas are getting the job done, and making America 
proud.
  I commend and thank our military men and women for their sacrifices 
and bravery as they protect the homeland. They are picking up where the 
heroes of September 11 left off--defending America, and fighting for the 
freedoms that we are willing to die for. The terrorists who attack us 
operate out of hatred--hatred of our freedom, hatred of our faith, and 
hatred of our liberty. Yet in the end, it will be our faith, freedom and 
love of liberty that will ultimately defeat them.
  May God bless the United States.


                          Hon. Dana Rohrabacher


                              of california

  Mr. Speaker, today America is reflecting on the events of 9/11, as we 
should; and it is a time to remember. It is a time to remember those who 
lost their lives and to remember those, like the firemen and the police, 
who gave their lives trying to save others. It is a time for rage, as we 
have heard, and a time for reflection, a time for pride and a time for 
anger. What it is not, however, is a time for mourning. That time is 
over.
  Today, I join with all of those who solemnly commemorate this 
anniversary. Heartfelt commemoration, I suggest, is not enough. We must 
consider not just what happened a year ago, as we have been hearing for 
the last hour; but instead we must find and discover and talk about and 
we must make determinations about why 9/11 happened.
  As a Nation, we are now engaged in a historic global conflict with a 
vile enemy who slaughters innocent people by the thousands and then 
makes sanctimonious references to God. Talk about blasphemy. I do not 
know if bin Laden is dead or alive; but I do know that when he dies he 
will burn in hell, and it is our job to get him there as quickly as 
possible.
  Our President laid down a battle plan that brought the liberation of 
Afghanistan and will soon rid the world of threats like that of Saddam 
Hussein. This is a result of 9/11 one year ago, but it did not start one 
year ago.
  The first order of business is for us to recognize that the murderous 
attack on us in New York and at the Pentagon was not an act of God, nor 
was it a natural phenomenon. It did not just happen; nor, let me add, 
was it just a case of bad luck.
  The slaughter of our fellow citizens need not have happened. It was 
something that would not have happened had certain people done things 
differently, had certain government policies been different, had certain 
Federal agencies and departments been given different marching orders. 
In short, 9/11 need not have happened, and it is imperative that the 
American people look closely at the policies, the systems, and yes, the 
people which led to 9/11 to ensure that something like this never 
happens again.
  What policies am I talking about? Let us start with the fundamentals 
or, if you will, the fundamentalists. Of the 19 hijackers on 9/11, 16 
were Saudis or held Saudi passports. America's relationship with Saudi 
Arabia is complex but not as unfathomable as some would have us believe.
  In the cold war, we worked closely with the Saudi royal family; and to 
be fair, they were our loyal allies. They helped us finance anti-
Communist projects that were of immense importance to our national 
security in the days when the Soviet Union was spending billions of 
dollars to bury us. Saudi help was vital on a number of fronts; and, 
yes, there is reason today for us to be grateful.
  What they did to help us in the past, however, does not excuse what 
they are doing today that threatens us. Times have changed, and 
dramatically so. If our policy toward Saudi Arabia does not change 
significantly, there will be a heavy price to pay in the future, if we 
have not already paid enough.
  Relying on low oil prices and on Saudi largesse for special cold war 
projects left us dependent upon them, and who is them, who are we 
talking about? We are talking about the royal family, the royal family 
of Saudi Arabia that is autocratic and over the years has become fat and 
incompetent and in many ways cowardly. However, again, they helped us 
defeat an enemy intent on destroying us, communism. So we paid special 
attention to the Saudis.
  Instead of pushing for democratic reform and human rights, we let the 
Saudis, and because of their influence, much of the Muslim world in 
general, we let them off the hook in our push for democracy and human 
rights.
  In the short term, it makes sense. In the long term, it has had a 
dramatically bad impact, negative impact. Young people in that part of 
the world have suffered under despots and crooks; yet we Americans 
continually talk about stability in that part of the world, when what we 
should be pushing for is democratic reform and the opening of closed 
societies.
  Entrenched regimes, royal and secular, have been brutal and corrupt. 
Is it any wonder that young people in a large chunk of the world turn to 
Islamic fundamentalism as their idealistic alternative? In their corrupt 
world, radical Muslims have been the only ones offering a morally based 
alternative, but radical Islam is not a positive force. It is 
tyrannical, arrogant and malevolent.
  Right here we should note that most forms of religious extremism are 
equally reprehensible and that radical Islam should not be singled out. 
Although limited to a few loud voices, a drumbeat started right at 
September 11 to paint all Muslims as the enemy of the United States and 
of the West. That drumbeat started the moment those planes hit the World 
Trade towers; but thanks to our wise President, we did not succumb to a 
strategy of hate.
  Bin Laden wanted us to retaliate against Muslims in general, which 
would have polarized hundreds of millions of people against us, many of 
whom would have ended up supporting bin Laden and his terrorists as 
their saviors. As I say, we did not fall into that trap.
  By the way, just to put things in perspective, in the decade leading 
up to 9/11, Muslim people saw their fellow Muslims being ethnically 
cleansed, raped and murdered in Bosnia by thugs calling themselves 
Christians. They saw their fellow Muslims repressed and murdered by the 
tens of thousands in Kashmir by people who called themselves Hindus and 
were cut down in the Middle East by the Israeli Army. Hundreds of 
thousands of non-combatant Muslims have lost their lives due to the 
actions of governments controlled by people of other faiths. So from 
their perspective, Islamic people are no more terrorists than others.
  In the West, all we see is the frightening picture of planes flying 
into buildings and suicide bombers blowing up Pizza Huts in Israel. So 
the first policy we need to change is that which has us tolerating 
dictatorship and corrupt governments in Muslim countries in order to 
maintain stability. Working with Russia, which is now our friend, and 
trying to build a democratic society, let us break our dependency on oil 
from unfriendly and democratic and undemocratic anti-Western 
governments. Let us seek out reformers in the Arab and Muslim world. Let 
us demand free elections and freedom of speech and press as well as 
religious tolerance in those Muslim countries.
  Over the last 2 decades, the Saudi establishment has dealt with the 
rise of their homegrown religious extremists by ignoring them, giving 
them a free hand overseas and by sending them to Afghanistan.
  Their extremists are called Wahabis. Those folks are on the outer 
limits of Islam. They are the ones who insist that women must cover 
themselves from head to foot. Now, that is okay if women voluntarily 
accept this religious mandate. Instead, however, the Wahabis act as if 
they have the right to control everybody, even those who do not accept 
their particular view, claiming to have an infallible insight about the 
wishes of God. They beat women with sticks if so much as their ankles 
are showing. They feel free to commit violence against people of other 
faiths and to prevent anyone with a different belief in God, even other 
Muslims, from worshipping and living their lives as they see fit.
  These are the most radical of all Muslim sects. Instead of standing up 
to this religious gangsterism, the Saudi royal family allowed them to 
establish their base of operations in Saudi Arabia and to export Wahabi 
radicalism throughout the world, with the help, of course, of billions 
of petrol dollars.
  One of the places not just influenced but under the control of the 
Wahabis was Afghanistan. The Taliban was not an indigenous religious 
sect of Afghanistan. That is the mistake so many people make. They 
represented a transplanted Wahabism. Transplanted from? Where else. 
Saudi Arabia.
  These crazies did not represent the character and/or the values of the 
Afghan people. The Afghan people are devout in their faith but they are 
not fanatic. They pray and are grateful to God, but they do not feel 
compelled to have everyone else pray, much less feel compelled to make 
everyone else pray just like they pray.
  I have seen this tolerance first-hand, even in the most desolate 
regions of that distant land. Years ago, 14 or 15 years ago, actually, I 
was in Afghanistan with a mujahedin unit, the mujahedin being the 
fighters against the Soviet occupation. During long treks across the 
desert, the small group of mujahedin fighters I was with would stop and 
pray five times a day. They would get on their knees and they would 
pray, and they would thank God for everything that they had. I might add 
that they had little. We did not even have a good clean glass of water, 
much less the provisions of food that could keep people healthy. Yet 
these people were grateful for everything.
  It caused me reason to pause and think that here in the United States 
we have so much and how rarely people think about how grateful they 
should be for what we have. But here were these people, under attack by 
the Soviets, on their knees praying. But there were many other people in 
the surrounding area and with our group. About half of them were not 
part of the praying during those prayer sessions. They stood there.
  What impressed me is that those who were praying felt perfectly 
comfortable. They were fulfilling their obligations to God but did not 
feel threatened by these others who were not praying and who were not 
compelled to participate. That was the essence of the Afghans--grateful 
to God, devoted to God, but not fanatics who were trying to suppress 
other people into some sort of religious dictatorship.
  The attitude of the Taliban in Afghanistan, of course, was totally 
different from the type of attitude I am talking about. And it was not a 
result of the susceptibility of the people to the Taliban's form of 
Islam as much as it was a result, meaning the Taliban's ascension to 
power, of what is naturally in the Afghan people's hearts. Instead, I 
believe, it was the result of a deal between Saudi Arabia, Pakistan, 
and, unfortunately, the United States.
  It, of course, goes back to the cold war, when the United States was 
helping the Afghan freedom fighters in their struggle against the Soviet 
army that occupied their country. The Saudis were helping, too. Now we 
helped, and we can be proud of that. The Saudis were also helping, but 
as I discovered, it was not quite that simple.
  As I was hiking through Afghanistan with that mujahedin unit heading 
toward the battle of Jalalabad, which was one of the last battles the 
Soviets participated in in Afghanistan, we came across an encampment of 
white tents. These were very expensive tents. There were off-road 
vehicles there. The people were well fed, well clothed. And I was told 
by my mujahedin fellow freedom fighters to keep my mouth shut and to 
speak no English because this was an encampment of a crazy psychopathic 
killer, a Saudi named bin Laden, and bin Laden would kill all of us if 
he knew there was an American with the group because he hated America as 
much as he hated the Communists.
  And much of the support that the Saudis gave to the Afghan freedom 
fighters was right there. It was actually bin Laden and his group there 
fighting against the Russians. And that was their contribution to 
Afghanistan in the fight against the Soviets.
  Well, after the Soviets withdrew from Afghanistan, after the mujahedin 
victory, we can be proud we helped them fight off the Soviets by giving 
them the weapon systems they needed, but we did not help them at that 
point rebuild their country. In fact, America simply walked away and let 
them sleep in the rubble. We did not even help them dig up the land 
mines that we had given them to defeat the Soviet army. And so young 
kids, little kids from Afghanistan have been blowing off their legs ever 
since. And they cannot even treat their young people. They do not have 
the medicines to do so because we have not been there to help.
  There was an agreement, however, as we left. It was probably not a 
formal agreement; probably just an understanding to let Saudi Arabia and 
Pakistan oversee that region. So we walked away from Afghanistan and the 
entire region. Instead of insisting on a government that reflected the 
will and values of the Afghan people, we left them in the hands of the 
Saudis and the Pakistanis.
  For several years, there was chaos and fighting. Not as bad as before, 
but there was fighting that continued, and the Saudis then unleashed 
their ace in the hole. We had left, but the Saudis had been preparing 
for this eventuality. The term taliban means student and refers to those 
who spent most of the war against Soviet occupation not fighting the 
Russians. That was a whole different group of guys. That was the 
mujahedin. No, the Taliban were in schools, so-called religious schools, 
in Pakistan. Later, they emerged from these schools seemingly out of 
nowhere, but in fact were trained, armed and financed by Saudi Arabia 
and Pakistan.
  Within 6 months, they had conquered over two-thirds of the country, 
including Kabul, the capital city. But just as it was in Orwell's Animal 
Farm, vicious dogs were surreptitiously nurtured and then suddenly 
unleashed to do the bidding of pigs.
  Just a reminder: Many pundits fail to understand the difference 
between the mujahedin and the Taliban. The former fought the war against 
Soviet occupation troops. That was the mujahedin. The latter, the 
Taliban, arrived on the scene much later. And in the end, the same 
mujahedin who helped defeat the Soviets were our allies in this last 
year in driving the Taliban out of power. The mujahedin, the good people 
of Afghanistan, have stood with us twice. Let us pledge that we will not 
walk away from them again. Let us help them rebuild their country.
  Let the Record show that I had spent a year trying to prevent the 
Taliban from coming to power at that time. My goal right after the end 
of the war with the Soviets was to try to bring the old King Zahir Shah 
back from his exile in Rome. Zahir Shah was one of the most beloved and 
pro-Western of his people. He was anxious to serve as a transition 
leader that would lead his country to a new political system that was 
based on democratic elections; on ballots instead of bullets. As I say, 
he was an honest, kind man, with a good heart, and respected by all the 
people of Afghanistan.
  Instead, the King was pushed aside, or should I say he was kept on the 
sidelines. And I might add that our own State Department played a major 
role in ensuring that this positive alternative did not come to power. 
Instead, the Taliban assumed power with the acquiescence if not the 
support of the Clinton administration. Knowing there was nothing more I 
could do, I hoped for the best. I tried my best to prevent the Taliban 
from getting into power. Now they were there, and our government seemed 
to be going along with it, so all I could do is hope for the best.
  However, within a month or so, the tyrannical ways of these religious 
kooks made it clear to me and to everyone that they had to go. Yes, it 
was clear to me, but I take that back, it was not clear to everyone, 
because the Clinton administration could never seem to come to that 
conclusion, that the Taliban had to go. In understanding who should be 
accountable for 9/11, we must understand that the State Department, 
under President Clinton, was never anti-Taliban. Our State Department, 
probably under the President's direction, undermined those efforts aimed 
at undermining the Taliban. So those of us who were anti-Taliban found 
ourselves the target of the State Department rather than having the 
State Department target the Taliban for their misdeeds.
  In several personal instances I was involved with helping obtain 
medical and humanitarian support for people in the areas of Afghanistan 
that was not yet under Taliban control. I was thwarted by our own 
government. I was thwarted by our own State Department. NGOs with aid 
for Afghans who were in areas that were controlled by the Taliban, on 
the other hand, had no trouble with our government. They had some other 
troubles that, of course, the Taliban gave them themselves, but our 
government was perfectly happy to have NGOs operating in Taliban-
controlled areas but stopping people like myself who were trying to help 
those people in areas that were opposed to the Taliban.
  In mid-1988, however, even with this tacit support from the Clinton 
administration, the Taliban were incredibly vulnerable. They had 
overextended themselves in an invasion of the northern part of 
Afghanistan, and many of their best, if not most of their best, fighters 
were captured, along with huge amounts of war supplies. The road to 
Kabul was open. And who interceded to prevent the collapse of the 
Taliban at this pivotal moment? Who pulled their chestnuts out of the 
fire? President Clinton, personally.
  At this moment of maximum Taliban vulnerability, the White House 
dispatched Assistant Secretary of State Rick Inderfurth and Bill 
Richardson, then our U.N. ambassador. They flew to northern Afghanistan 
and convinced the anti-Taliban forces not to attack and not to retake 
Kabul, but, instead, to accept a cease-fire and an arms embargo.
  This is the moment, and I cannot stress this more forcefully, it was a 
pivotal moment. The Taliban could easily have been defeated. The 
Northern Alliance was willing to accept a return of King Zahir Shah to 
lead a transition government. Instead, under the direction of the 
Clinton White House, these two top U.S. Government officials, Assistant 
Secretary of State Rick Inderfurth and U.N. Ambassador Bill Richardson, 
arrived on the scene to convince the anti-Taliban forces to stand back. 
And we thus saved this fanatical, anti-Western regime from being 
destroyed and being defeated.
  This later led to a dramatic defeat of the anti-Taliban forces. The 
cease-fire lasted only long enough for the Saudis and the Pakistanis to 
fully rearm the Taliban. And the arms embargo that Bill Richardson and 
Rick Inderfurth talked about was only effective against the anti-Taliban 
forces, which are the people called the Northern Alliance. Think about 
that. We talked them into a cease-fire, which lasted only long enough 
for the Taliban to rearm. We talked them into an arms embargo, which was 
only an arms embargo against them.
  Again, this was one of the major turning points that led to 9/11. 
Later, the Taliban, with their supplies replenished, went on the 
offensive and turned their country into a staging area for terrorism. So 
the Taliban ended up, somewhat with the Clinton administration's 
blessings, of taking over all but a sliver of Afghanistan. That portion, 
of course, that little sliver, was under the command of Commander 
Massoud, who stood alone in the Panjir Valley, a hero against the war on 
the Soviets. Now he was all that was left to resist the tyranny of the 
Taliban.
  This is where bin Laden makes his official entrance. Behind the 
scenes, his foreigners, his radicals, had been there and been the 
Taliban shock troops for a long time. They murdered anyone and everyone 
who got in the way and ran roughshod over people all over Afghanistan. 
Bin Laden had already declared war on the United States, and had already 
killed military personnel and bombed U.S. embassies. The Taliban 
permitted them to use their country as a base of operations.
  Yes, the Clinton administration repeatedly demanded that bin Laden be 
given up or at least kicked out of Afghanistan. They were using all of 
these words making demands, yet they never seemed to care enough to help 
Massoud or help any of the others who wanted to resist the Taliban.
  So what was the Taliban leadership to think? Well, of course they 
thought that the U.S. Government really did not mean what it was saying. 
They believed it was simply posturing for domestic political 
consideration. This is like when the Clinton administration went to 
China and demanded human rights reform and then never put any type of 
force behind that demand.
  So our government made it clear to the Taliban by our inaction to 
support anyone who was opposing the Taliban that our demands on them 
actually were just made for public consumption here, and that we were 
actually more concerned with our deal, whatever that deal was, with 
Pakistan and Saudi Arabia and that we were more concerned with that than 
anything going on within Afghanistan, including bin Laden. Why would the 
tough guys in the Taliban think that we cared about human rights abuses, 
about their treating women like cattle, about their harboring of 
terrorists like bin Laden, and about their rejection of even a 
consideration of free elections of any kind when we were not doing 
anything about it? We did not, as I say, support Massoud; and, in fact, 
when several of us tried to help those resisting the Taliban, it was our 
government, the State Department, that got in our way.
  Let us be fair about it. If that is the impression the Taliban got, we 
should admit it. Our government at that time was not serious about 
democracy, human rights and such in Afghanistan. We were not serious 
about their form of government or even their harboring of bin Laden 
because our government in that administration did nothing.
  What all this means is that if we stray too far from our basic 
principles as a country, it is going to end up hurting us. If we stray 
too far from the fundamental principles that make us Americans, a love 
of liberty and justice, a belief in the democratic procedures to guide 
men, and permit people to guide their own destinies and secure their own 
destinies through election processes, if we ignore these principles, it 
will come back to hurt the United States of America.
  Over the years, I complained over and over again; and I will submit 
for the Record quotes of mine that warned America that we must act 
against the Taliban. I did this for years.
  Well, obviously there was another policy. I am just a lone 
Congressman. I do not make policy. I try to influence policymakers. But 
my warnings, repeated warnings, were not heeded.
  Well, who was responsible for the policies that left the Taliban free 
from domestic rivals, the policy that left them free from outside 
opposition, that left them free from the pressure to democratize and 
respect human rights? Who was responsible for these policies? How about 
Madeleine Albright? How about President Clinton? They could not get 
themselves to endorse any meaningful action against the Taliban even 
after we had been attacked in Saudi Arabia, seen in the blowing up of 
our military bases there, our military installations, our living 
quarters there, or the blowing up of U.S. embassies in Africa.
  Furthermore, there is ample evidence that in the last administration 
they passed up promising opportunities to take out bin Laden. I, for 
example, several years ago during the Clinton administration contacted 
the CIA to let them know that I had an informant who knew exactly where 
bin Laden was, that he was out of Afghanistan, and that he was willing 
to pinpoint bin Laden for them. I gave them my contact's phone number. 
They never called. After a week, I called my friend back and asked, 
``Did the CIA get with you?'' His answer was ``no.''
  I went to the CIA again and explained that this person had impeccable 
credentials of knowing what was going on in Afghanistan. They said they 
would get to him, but they did not. A week later they still had not 
called. Then I complained to the chairman of the Permanent Select 
Committee on Intelligence, the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Goss), whom I 
respect; and I told him what happened.
  The next day he had a meeting in this building with representatives of 
the NSA, the CIA, and the FBI. It was the bin Laden task force. I told 
them what had happened and that my friend could pinpoint bin Laden, and 
that he had been ignored for 2 weeks. They would get to it.
  Guess what, a week later my friend still had not been contacted. By 
then the trail was cold. But when I went to the gentleman from Florida 
(Mr. Goss), it got action and my friend was called. He said it was a 
lackadaisical call. It looked like it was a pro forma call.
  Does that sound like an administration committed to getting bin Laden? 
No. Let the Record show there were numerous opportunities to get bin 
Laden and not one was exploited. The Government of Sudan tried to give 
the United States a complete file on bin Laden and his whole gang. 
Madeleine Albright personally turned that down.
  I know of a situation at the Defense Intelligence Agency where a young 
analyst felt there was a lack of information about Afghanistan and that 
lack of information was threatening to our national security. She wanted 
to get the information. She wanted to go up to Massoud's territory and 
find out what was going on because we did not know what was happening in 
Afghanistan. She was denied, and she had the gall on her own time, on 
her own vacation time, to go there to Massoud's stronghold to try to get 
that information. I think someone like that should get a medal. Instead, 
she was fired.
  I personally asked the general who then headed up the DIA not to fire 
her. She got the ax anyway. By the way, there is no indication that the 
DIA, the Defense Intelligence Agency, warned anybody about the attack on 
9/11, even though the murder of Commander Massoud 2 days prior to the 
attack in New York should have set off alarm bells. Of course they had 
fired the one person who was conscientious about Afghanistan. They had 
fired that person for being too conscientious, over the objection of a 
Member of Congress who pleaded that that was the type of responsible 
behavior we needed.
  I say this because the death of Commander Massoud had a special 
significance to me. I had known Commander Massoud for many years, even 
before I went to Afghanistan in 1988. During my time in the White House, 
he sent his brother to me; and we continued a communication through 
third parties over the years. He was a man I deeply respected. He was a 
hero; not to say he did not make mistakes. Certainly he made mistakes, 
and he did some things wrong. But over years of fighting, everybody 
makes mistakes. But Massoud was a hero. He was a giant of a man.
  Mr. Speaker, 2 days before they attacked us, they murdered Massoud. It 
took the wind right out of my sails. I had been to his stronghold 5 
years before. I visited him in the mountains of Afghanistan. Our 
friendship was close, and I respected him. We worked out an agreement 
that would have King Zahir Shah return and Massoud would support that if 
the King would lead a transition government and have honest elections 2 
years later. He was willing to support that, and then the Taliban killed 
him.
  After I had gotten myself together after his death, I knew that it 
must be because they are going to attack the United States. That is why 
the Taliban killed him, so we could not have anyone to turn to, to rally 
behind in our counterattack. So the next day I called the White House. I 
asked to speak to Condoleezza Rice, and I wanted a meeting with her and 
the National Security Council because there was an attack that would 
soon befall the United States of America.
  They got back to me, and said, Congressman, we take your opinions on 
Afghanistan and elsewhere very seriously, but we are very busy. Can you 
come tomorrow? The earliest we can fit you in is 2 tomorrow. I woke up 
on 9/11 expecting to have a meeting with Condoleezza Rice and the 
National Security Council at the White House to warn them that there was 
an imminent attack planned on the United States and to take seriously 
any possible threat that they saw. Unfortunately, at 8:45, the planes 
began crashing into the buildings in New York.
  So here we are. One year ago our country was blindsided, attacked 
without warning, resulting in the slaughter of 3,000 Americans. As I 
have just discussed, this represents a failure of policy and a failure 
of the people behind that policy, primarily those in the Clinton 
administration, not because of politics, but because they happened to be 
there at the time. Who knows what would have happened if it would have 
been a Republican administration. It was George Bush who walked away 
originally and left the Pakistanis and the Saudis in charge of that 
region. But it was during the Clinton administration that the Taliban 
took over, consolidated their power in Afghanistan, and turned that 
country into a base of operations for anti-American terrorists. The 
American response is undermining those who oppose the Taliban.
  This leads me to my conclusion that our policy was part of an 
agreement with the Saudis and the Pakistanis to keep the Taliban in 
power. The attack, however, reflects more than a failure of policy. It 
reflects more than just that policy. The attack was carried out by a 
terrorist organization that we had been told over and over again was the 
number one target of U.S. intelligence. That organization was able to 
launch an attack of this scope and of this magnitude requiring millions 
of dollars and the coordination of hundreds of people against the United 
States. The number one target of U.S. intelligence was able to slaughter 
3,000 Americans, to blindside us. This represents a catastrophic failure 
of America's intelligence system; it is a failure of the DIA, the CIA, 
the NSA, the FBI, and the rest of the intelligence alphabet soup here in 
Washington, DC.
  We spend tens of billions of dollars every year, and the number one 
target of American intelligence is able to organize and pull off an 
operation of this scale. The magnitude of the screw-up boggles my mind.
  Now we know there were warnings. The BBC is reporting that just 2 
months before 9/11, the foreign minister of the Taliban was so upset 
about the terrorist plot that he had heard of that he sent an emissary 
to an American consulate in nearby Pakistan to warn the United States of 
a pending attack.
  But no one listened to him. Then we know of FBI field agents who were 
pleading that attention be paid to the terrorist ties of certain 
students who were being trained to fly airplanes. These FBI agents were 
chastised for going around channels. They had to go through channels, 
but they were so concerned that the people in front of them were not 
acting, they tried to get the attention of Washington but were chastised 
for not going through channels and they were ignored. The list of 
failures goes on and on.
  I will just say on 9/11, that something like that happened to me 
indicates the type of mindset we are dealing with, even after the 
attack. On 9/11, when the planes had already crashed into the buildings, 
I realized, everyone realized it was an attack from Afghanistan, based 
on the terrorists based in Afghanistan, and I called the King of 
Afghanistan. I wanted to know if there was anyone there protecting him.
  ``Do you have any police there protecting you?''
  ``No.''
  Remember, the King of Afghanistan is in Rome, exiled in Rome. ``Are 
there any policemen outside your door?''
  ``No, there aren't.''
  ``Are there any people inside your compound with you protecting you?''
  ``No.''
  I said, ``Is there anyone there with a gun to protect you?''
  He said, ``no.''
  I thought, Oh, my gosh, our number one asset, the one man who the 
people of Afghanistan could rally behind now that they have killed 
Massoud, only the King, Zahir Shah, was someone we could rally the 
people behind to counterattack against the Taliban, and he was hanging 
out there in the wind. He was totally exposed.
  So I talked to a very high official in one of our intelligence 
agencies. He said he realized the importance of Zahir Shah and he was 
totally exposed, and he was vulnerable. And, guess what? Five hours 
later I happened to talk to that same high-level official again. I can 
tell you when I asked him about Zahir Shah, whether he was under guard 
now, his response to me was, ``You don't expect us to act that fast, do 
you?''
  Give me a break. Of course we expect our people to act that fast. You 
are within a phone call's distance of the Marine guards who guard our 
embassy in Rome. Our ambassador, or whoever was there, could have gone 
over and picked up the King or sent Marines over to protect him, or the 
agency has people in Rome, and so forth.
  Instead, 5 hours later, after 3,000 of our people, at that time we 
thought it was 20,000 people had been slaughtered, but you do not expect 
us to act that fast, do you?
  The people in our intelligence community are, by and large, fine and 
dedicated people. I will tell you that right now. I respect them, but 
those individuals who may have my respect as people of good hearts and 
are patriots, they are now part of a bureaucratic behemoth.
  We are relying on what has become organizationally incompetent, a 
system in which individuals get fired for showing initiative, like that 
young analyst at the DIA, or they get reprimanded, like those FBI field 
agents, for begging attention on some pressing threat.
  We need to reform the system and make it better. To do so we need to 
hold those accountable who made errors and to change the structure and 
mindset. Most important, we need to change the structure and the mindset 
of our intelligence organizations. We cannot let the cloak of secrecy be 
used to shield the consequences of failure and incompetence.
  For that reason I voted for an investigation of 9/11, not just that it 
be done by our congressional oversight committees. And I have great 
respect for those leading those committees and members of those 
committees, but I believe that it should also be the responsibility of 
an independent commission on the level of the Warren Commission and 
perhaps the commission we established after Pearl Harbor to get all the 
facts about this historical failure of U.S. intelligence.
  Let me stress again that I have tremendous respect for and trust for 
the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Goss) and the others in the Permanent 
Select Committee on Intelligence here in the House, but a redundancy 
like we are calling for with an independent commission looking into the 
problem as well cannot in any way hurt. An independent commission could 
do nothing but contribute to the understanding of the idea pool that is 
needed to reform and to fix the system.
  This anniversary is with us today. We must commit ourselves to see 
that such surprise attacks will never again be successfully launched 
against the United States. We will accomplish this by making the changes 
in policy and the changes in personnel that are needed to keep our 
country secure.
  We must change the way we deal with Saudi Arabia. We must evaluate how 
we dealt with Afghanistan and admit that it was horrendously wrong. The 
people behind those policies, especially those people who are still in 
influential positions in the State Department and elsewhere, must 
understand that they bear a significant share of the responsibility for 
the death and destruction that fell on America 1 year ago today.
  The arrogant so-called experts, for example, who shoved aside exiled 
King Zahir Shah for years, they shoved him aside for 2 decades, claiming 
that he was too old to play a positive role in bringing about a better 
Afghanistan and peace in Afghanistan. They were so absolutely wrong. 
People in the State Department should find out who it was who pushed 
this idea that Zahir Shah could not participate, and those people should 
be talked to, and those people should look in the mirror and think very 
seriously about what they did to contribute to this loss of American 
life.
  In essence, they kept the Taliban in power, because they prevented us 
from getting behind a positive alternative, whether it was Massoud or 
the others fighting the Taliban, or whether it was Zahir Shah. In 
essence, they kept the Taliban in power until 3,000 Americans were 
slaughtered by an attack that was launched from Taliban-controlled 
territory.
  We were attacked a year ago today, and over these last 12 months our 
military has been able to launch a counterattack that has dislodged the 
Taliban and sent them, along with their terrorist allies, the Al Qaeda, 
running for cover and running to hide their heads.
  Our military has done a tremendous job. They did this in a landlocked 
country halfway around the world. This has been a magnificent victory 
for our country and for its military. To the degree that we sort of have 
questions about the need to restructure our intelligence system, we need 
to praise our military and make sure that we build upon their success. 
They need certain changes, too, but we need to do that with the 
military. We can see the positive things they have done and build upon 
that.
  This has been a magnificent victory. If bin Laden is alive today, he 
is in hiding and he is spending all of his hours not trying to launch 
some attack on us, but instead he is spending his time trying not to be 
captured. He could be spending his time mapping out attacks on the 
United States. Instead, thanks to the expertise and bravery and courage 
and great job our military has done, we have bin Laden and his likes in 
hiding, looking over their shoulders, freezing their assets, not able to 
launch another attack of the magnitude that we suffered 1 year ago 
today.
  We have accomplished all of this, a tremendous accomplishment in a 
country on the other side of the world, landlocked. We did this with 
fewer than 50 American combat deaths. We dislodged the Taliban 
government from power, we destroyed the regime, we dislodged the 
terrorists, all with fewer than 50 American combat deaths.
  Yes, there have been some mistakes, and in every combat situation 
there are. If accidentally a house or area is bombed, if we bombed some 
of our friends accidentally, which has happened, we just need to admit 
that it was a mistake and help those people rebuild. They will 
understand, because the Afghan people are praising us as their 
liberators. We have fought beside the mujahedin again, the freedom 
fighters of Afghanistan, to free their land from the Taliban tyranny. As 
I say, there have been mistakes, but compared to what has been 
accomplished, this mission gets an A.
  Let me note that I have two complaints. They are small complaints and 
the Afghan people will put up with them for now, but I think that we 
need to pay attention.
  Number one, I do not believe Karzai was the right guy to pick. He does 
not have a wide base of support in Afghanistan. When the loya jirga was 
held, we should have permitted the King to emerge, as would have 
naturally happened. I think there was some wheeling and dealing going on 
that led to Karzai's ascension, and the King could have been there. He 
was the natural choice.
  But I believe the Afghan people have good hearts and understanding. 
They know we are there to help them. They know there are political 
considerations. But they are demanding free elections in 2 years, and 
that is what we should be doing, making sure that we keep that pledge 
and that there are free elections. And if they want to elect anybody, 
whether it is Karzai or a member of the royal family or whoever it is, 
they should have a right to do so. We should work with them and help 
rebuild their country, and that will be one way to really defeat the 
Taliban and really defeat Al Qaeda. The people of Afghanistan have 
looked to us as liberators.
  The other concern is about drugs. We have not eliminated the drug 
production in Afghanistan. The poppy crop was not destroyed. We have got 
to do so next year. That commitment has to be there. That drug money 
goes into bad hands.
  Finally, let us take a look at the challenge we have today and look 
ahead a year. The President has wisely suggested that now is the time 
for us to eliminate that threat that hangs over us and has hung over us 
for 10 years. We did not complete the job in the gulf war. We left 
Saddam Hussein in power. That was the gift that George Bush, Sr., gave 
to us. George Bush, Jr., is going to make up for that. He has committed 
us to eliminating the dictatorial, fascistic regime of Saddam Hussein.
  We should not be weary of this. In fact, we should know that Saddam 
Hussein has less support in Iraq than the Taliban had support in 
Afghanistan. Our strategy should be to help the people of Iraq liberate 
themselves from this monstrous regime headed by Saddam Hussein. The 
people of Iraq will be waving American flags and dancing in the street 
because we will help them build a democratic society. We can do so with 
the same strategy as we did in Afghanistan, work with Special Forces 
teams and air support. We can support those people who want to fight for 
their own freedom. It worked in Afghanistan, it will work in Iraq. We 
should not have fear and trepidation about getting rid of this threat of 
Saddam Hussein. He is, as George Shultz suggested, a rattlesnake in our 
front yard, and we should not wait until he bites us to cut off its 
head.
  Now we can move forward in Iraq and eliminate that threat, as we have 
eliminated the Taliban threat, and we can do so not by sending huge 
numbers of American forces, but by helping the people in Iraq, as we did 
in Afghanistan, to liberate themselves. That is the challenge the 
President is giving us. That is why we as Americans should always stand 
for those people who want to live in a free society and are willing with 
their courage and blood to fight for their freedom, but need our help 
logistically, need our air support, perhaps need our advice from our 
Special Forces teams.
  So, as we remember 9/11, let us never repeat that, by being proactive 
in the future. Where there are dictatorships and fascist regimes like 
the Taliban, and if they threaten the West and the United States, we do 
not have to do this with all regimes that are dictatorial, but if they 
threaten us, let us work with the people who suffer with a boot on their 
face and with an iron grip around their necks. Let us work with those 
people to help them free themselves.
  We have on the floor of the House of Representatives two pictures, one 
of George Washington, a great painting of George Washington, and a 
painting of Lafayette. Lafayette came here during the American 
Revolution to help us win our freedom. Let us not forget the French 
helped us win our freedom, and that people like Lafayette were heroes to 
early Americans.
  We must serve that same role that Lafayette served for us. We must 
serve that role for those people overseas who long for liberty and 
justice. If we do so, we will be the light of the world. We will be the 
hope of all the young people in the Muslim countries who are looking for 
some people who believe in something, rather than people who are talking 
about stability and keeping the status quo.
  We need to be the ones who offer moral alternatives, and the morality 
we offer is democratic government and a respect for human rights, 
treating people decently. Our flag should stand for justice and hope. If 
we do, rather than the type of things we were doing in the 1990s with 
Communist China and the Taliban and all of these regimes, where we were 
not doing anything to make it clear that we honestly and sincerely 
believed these founding principles of our society, we will be free and 
we will be safe.
  There is a dynamic in this world between peace and freedom. Freedom 
tomorrow will bring peace. Just as we lived under the threat of some 
sort of war with the Soviet Union, the Soviet people, the Russian people 
were never our enemies. It was that system. As soon as we made it a 
fight between communism and democracy and stopped just supporting any 
dictatorship that was against the Communists, the Communist system 
itself began to crumble in Moscow, and no one was more heroic in that 
fight against the Soviet dictatorship than the people of Afghanistan. 
They fought and they bled and they gave us a more peaceful and freer 
world.
  We did not do what was right by them. We did not help them rebuild 
their country at that time; we did not stick with them. We left it up to 
the Saudis and the Pakistanis. We have a chance now to make up for that. 
But we must persevere in helping them rebuild their country; and that 
will cement peace in that region, because people will believe in us 
again. We need, again, to make sure that we become the force for liberty 
and justice and decent treatment for people all over the world, and that 
is where we will find America's security. Let us have the courage to do 
so. Our President has charted a wise course, and we should have the 
tenacity and the courage to follow this through now that we have learned 
after 9/11 that there are consequences to pay when we do not.

         IN SUPPORT OF H. CON. RES. 464, PATRIOT DAY RESOLUTION


                            Hon. Ken Bentsen


                                of texas

  Mr. Speaker, I rise in support today of H. Con. Res. 464, 
commemorating the solemn occasion of the first anniversary of September 
11, 2001, and the vicious attack on the United States and its people 
that day.
  September 11 will long be remembered not just for the death and 
destruction brought upon America and too many of our people, but also 
for the day in which innocence was lost. The hijacking of civilian 
aircraft and the taking of thousands of innocent bystanders' lives will 
forever be among the most heinous of crimes against humanity. Yet, while 
the attacks, designed to shake our Nation to its deepest roots and break 
our spirit to be a leader of the free world, they only served to 
strengthen our resolve and show the world that the American sense of 
kindness and community could not be broken even by the most awful of 
acts.
  In the midst of a living hell only Dante could describe, Americans 
rose to respond, first by the police, firefighters, and emergency 
medical personnel who poured into burning buildings which had become 
infernos, risking life and limb to save a fellow citizen and later by 
military force. As we now know, many made the ultimate sacrifice. Yet, 
rather than create panic and chaos, the attacks by the terrorists only 
served to underscore our resolve. Clearly, in the early hours following 
the attacks, the actions of otherwise ordinary Americans proved beyond a 
reasonable doubt that the terrorists failed in their ultimate goal. 
While they were able to cause pain and suffering and shatter a sense of 
security felt here at home, they failed in destroying the spirit which 
is America. And, in causing the death and destruction, they exposed the 
world to their own twisted ideology of anger and hate and a lack of 
respect for freedom and human life.
  Mr. Speaker, in the intervening months, America, with our allies, has 
proven militarily that we can and will respond to defend ourselves and 
our freedom throughout the world. But even as important as it has been 
to respond swiftly and forcefully, it is now clear that the actions of 
those Americans who gave their lives on September 11, 2001, and those 
who responded to help them, and the faith that they inspired in the rest 
of us, resulted in a victory over the terrorists that very day.
  Now, we must continue to battle for freedom and democracy throughout 
the world, not only for our own defense, but also in the memory of those 
who first gave their lives for the cause on September 11, 2001.

                 GOOD WILL OF UKRAINE HELPS AMERICA HEAL


                            Hon. Bob Schaffer


                               of Colorado

  Mr. Speaker, this hallowed day, the anniversary of the terrible 
terrorist attacks upon the United States, is one that is observed 
throughout America. The eloquence of our colleagues in this House has 
stirred our hearts, described our attitudes, and revealed the Nation's 
character. America's tragedy is mourned this day throughout the world, 
too.
  It is important for Americans to understand and appreciate the 
outpouring of support, the gestures of solidarity, and the prayers of 
the faithful bestowed upon us by the people of the world. As cochairman 
of the Congressional Ukrainian Caucus, I rise today to speak about one 
country's good will toward the American people in commemoration of the 
September 11, 2001, terrorist attack.
  Throughout my tenure in Congress, I have always been an ardent 
supporter of democratic development in Ukraine. The full commercial and 
strategic potential of a democratic Ukraine is staggering and the desire 
for freedom is deeply rooted in the American psyche.
  Mr. Speaker, in the House the days and the weeks following the 
attacks, the Ukrainian people grieved with America and the rest of the 
world. The sentiments of the Ukrainian people were echoed in a letter 
from Bishop Stanislaw Shyrokoradiuk of the Roman Catholic Diocese of 
Kyiv-Zhytomyr. Here is what the bishop wrote:

  I would like to present to all American people, our condolences 
because of the terrible tragedy that has stricken the whole world.

  We have been deeply shaken to know about the series of acts of 
terrorism that happened in the United States of America yesterday.

  It has been an awful blow by its cruelty and scale that struck not 
only the U.S.A., but all humanity. I received this notice during 
spiritual retreats in our Higher Spiritual Seminary in Vorzel, where all 
priests of our Diocese came. As a sign of our unity and sympathy in your 
grief, we celebrated Holy Mass for the souls of the departed and prayed 
for all victims. May the Lord strengthen them by His grace that they may 
outlive this horrible disaster.

  There are Divine Services and prayers said for the souls of the 
departed victims, and for all of those who have suffered, in all of our 
churches.

  These days our hearts and prayers are with you and your people.

    Sincerely Yours,


                                         Bishop Stanislaw Shyrokoradiuk,


                             the Vicar General of Kyiv Zhytomyr Diocese.

  Bishop Shyrokoradiuk in Ukraine sent that the day after.
  As a country, Ukraine immediately declared its solidarity with the 
United States, offering its support morally, technically, militarily and 
with the capabilities of its infrastructure. Ukraine's stance clearly 
demonstrated its friendship with the United States and the forces of 
freedom.
  Most helpful has been Ukraine's clearance of airspace for nearly 5,000 
aircraft flying in from Afghanistan and aid in transporting allied 
troops and materiel by air and train. Ukraine also provided planes and 
crews in order to provide transportation for coalition forces and 
humanitarian missions over Iran.
  Ukrainian security forces have been cooperating with Americans 
offering intelligence regarding the fighting in Afghanistan and other 
security concerns. Ukraine's international efforts in leading the 
Georgia, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Azerbaijan, and Georgia Group, called 
GUUAM, to secure strategic transport corridors from terrorist activity 
have helped secure the entire regional community. Ukraine has cooperated 
with us in blocking and investigating the financial transactions and 
accounts of suspected terrorists.
  Just today, Mr. Speaker, Ukraine's Parliament, the Verkhovna (Supreme) 
Rada, unanimously passed three resolutions in support of America. One 
extends Ukraine's profound sympathy to the families and friends of 
victims. The other directs the Cabinet of Ministers of Ukraine to 
establish a memorial at the World Trade Center in New York to the 
Ukrainians who perished there. The third resolution outlines Ukraine's 
commitment to the future of freedom and reaffirms Ukraine's solidarity 
in the war on terrorism and its commitment to strengthening 
international peace and security.
  This latter resolution lucidly addresses issues of global concern, 
including environmental problems and global health issues. Currently, 
Ukraine is preparing to send two IL-76 cargo planes loaded with small 
arms, ammunitions, and other military equipment to outfit the Afghan 
National Army.
  This morning, the President of Ukraine, Leonid Kuchma, met with our 
Ambassador, Carlos Pascual. The President pledged his country's 
continued support for Operation Enduring Freedom and expressed his 
regret for the loss of lives in America 1 year ago.
  This afternoon, Ukraine's Ambassador Kostyantyn Gryshchenko visited me 
in my office here in Washington, DC, and extended his country's 
condolences, support, and solidarity. He asked me to express to the 
House Ukraine's commitment to America's war on terrorism. He assured me 
that the prayers of countless Ukrainians are for the souls of the 
victims.
  At this moment in Kyiv, Mr. Speaker, Ukrainians are paying their 
respects as they observe a large photo collage of Ground Zero. The 
display honors  the  emergency  workers  and  heroes  of 9/11. There is 
a similar exhibit at the Ukrainian National Gallery; and on Friday, they 
will hold a commemorative concert at the National Opera.
  Ukraine's condemnation of international terrorism, its much 
appreciated support on the war on terrorism, its tough, newly enacted 
laws to combat terrorism and its commitment to fight at the side of the 
United States and its allies for civil society and democracy clearly 
demonstrates the role Ukraine and her people intend to play. Ukraine's 
support for America is deeply appreciated.
  Mr. Speaker, I thank the people of Ukraine for their condolences and 
camaraderie and commend Ukraine's leaders for standing shoulder to 
shoulder with the United States. I will submit for the Record at this 
time the resolution that was adopted this morning by Ukraine's 
Parliament.

           The Lessons of the Tragedy Are Not To Be Forgotten

   Statement by the Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine on the occasion of the 
  anniversary of the events in the United States on September 11, 2001


  The year that passed after the tragedy in the United States of America 
did not assuage anger and indignation at malevolent actions of 
terrorists, pain and bitterness over the loss of thousands of innocent 
people who died in the airplanes, skyscrapers of the World Trade Center 
in New York, and offices of the Pentagon. Paying homage to their memory 
we express once again our sympathy with families and loved ones of the 
victims.

  Last year's tragedy has taught mankind many lessons. First of all it 
demonstrated that neither financial and economic power, nor possession 
of unprecedented arsenals of modern arms can guarantee security even for 
the most powerful state of the world. It has become even more obvious 
that only with united and coordinated actions can mankind overcome 
international terrorism and religious fundamentalism.

  Realization of that led to creation of the anti-terrorist coalition 
that included dozens of countries. An important role within the 
coalition belongs to Ukraine, whose foreign policy major goals are 
strengthening of the international peace and security, maintaining 
peaceful, equitable, and mutually beneficial cooperation with members of 
the international community consonant with the generally accepted 
principles and norms of the international law.

  The Verkhovna Rada of Ukraine considers it exceptionally important to 
apply the experience of the anti-terrorist coalition to strengthening 
cooperation of members of the international community in overcoming such 
global challenges as the deepening gap between a handful of the richest 
countries and numerous less developed nations and countries in 
transition; catastrophic impoverishment of hundreds of millions of 
people; spread of drug abuse, infectious disease, corruption and 
organized crime; depletion of water and other natural resources; 
pollution; dangerous accumulation of nuclear, chemical, and other 
weapons of mass destruction; and attempts to use objective processes of 
globalization and internationalization in the selfish interests of one 
state or a group of states.

  United, mankind is capable of ensuring protection of the environment 
and biodiversity, acceleration of economic and social growth of every 
member of the international community. We consistently support the 
increasing role of the United Nations in resolving international 
problems, strict compliance with requirements of the U.N. Charter on 
conflict resolution and prevention of threats to peace and security of 
the nations.

  The documents of the World Summit on Sustainable Development held 
recently in Johannesburg attracted attention in the Ukrainian society. 
By taking unprecedented decisions to voluntarily renounce the third 
largest nuclear arsenal and close up the Chernobyl nuclear power 
station, Ukraine, having been left alone with these very complicated 
problems, demonstrated to the world its devotion to the cause of peace 
and international security and adherence to its international 
commitments.

  Reflecting on the lessons of last year's September tragedy, we 
consider it our duty to draw once again the attention of the 
international community to the above issues and call on all the nations 
to consolidate and multiply their efforts to overcome global challenges 
facing mankind in the 21st century.

                 AMERICANS STAND TALL AGAINST TERRORISM


                             Hon. Jim Turner


                                of Texas

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today on this September 11, the 1-year anniversary 
of the greatest tragedy on American soil in our history, with a heavy 
heart, as I know is shared by all Americans, because it was on this day 
1 year ago when almost 3,000 Americans lost their lives at the hands of 
evil terrorists who sought to destroy our Nation, who seek to destroy 
our way of life.
  We know from that experience that all Americans must stand tall 
against the threat of international terrorism. We know as Americans that 
we never, never, never want to experience that tragedy again. As a part 
of our history, we will always remember September 11 of last year.
  I come to the floor today to call upon the House to pass legislation 
entitled the National Memorial to the Victims of Terrorism Act. This 
legislation would memorialize all victims of terrorism, both those who 
have lost their lives on September 11, as well as those who have been 
victims of terrorism in previous times, as well as those who have died 
in the cause since.
  Since September 11 of last year, we have engaged in a battle in 
Afghanistan where 51 Americans have lost their lives. We know from 
experience that the war against terrorism will not be won quickly and 
that perhaps we may face this challenge for many years ahead.
  In many ways on September 11, the American people recognized for the 
first time that we were in fact engaged in a war against terrorism, even 
though we have had ample opportunity to define those events that 
occurred in previous years--taking the lives of American citizens and 
American soldiers--as a war. We understand that this legislation we have 
introduced will memorialize those who lost their lives to terrorism. It 
was introduced by me and by the gentleman from Utah (Mr. Hansen). It is 
a bipartisan piece of legislation that enjoys the support of Members on 
both sides of the aisle.
  The legislation would create a 13-member Victims of Terrorism Memorial 
Advisory Board appointed by the President in consultation with the 
Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of Defense. Members of the 
advisory board would include appointees from organizations dedicated to 
assisting the victims of terrorism and their families. The board would 
begin the process of establishing a memorial not later than 1 year after 
the date of enactment of this legislation. The advisory board would have 
the responsibility of raising the necessary funds from private sources 
to pay for this national memorial.
  Those who came and testified on behalf of this legislation in the 
committee last May spoke very eloquently about the importance of this 
national memorial. We had testimony from Lisa Beamer, the widow of Todd 
Beamer, who joined those brave passengers on flight 93 and fought off 
the terrorists and saved this Capitol and many people who were in this 
building.
  We had testimony from Col. Ted Anderson, who saved many victims when 
the Pentagon was struck by the aircraft on that fateful day.
  We had testimony from Joe Finley, a New York firefighter who worked 
hard and dedicated his efforts on that fateful day to saving the lives 
of those who were struck in the World Trade Center.
  We also had testimony from Liz Howell, a staffer on the Committee on 
Resources staff who heard of this bill who lost her husband at the 
Pentagon on September 11.
  Each of these individuals shared heartfelt testimony as to why it is 
important for Americans to mark this event with a national memorial, and 
why it is also important to reflect in this memorial the memory of all 
who have lost their lives to terrorism.
  The war on terrorism is indeed the first war of the 21st century. It 
will not be one marked by any one geographic location. It is a global 
war. It is a global war that will be fought both at home and abroad. 
Though they have lost their lives in places far and near over a span of 
time that includes the past, the present and perhaps the future, the 
victims of terrorism, both civilian and military, deserve solemn 
tribute, for they died at the hands of the enemies of America simply 
because they were Americans.
  I call upon the leadership of this Congress to promptly set this bill 
for hearing in order that we may act promptly and pass the National 
Memorial to the Victims of Terrorism Act.

                       THE MEANING OF SEPTEMBER 11


                         Hon. Frank Pallone, Jr.


                              of New Jersey

  I wanted to take to the floor on the evening of September 11 to talk 
about the meaning of September 11 to me and particularly to my 
constituents in New Jersey. I wanted to particularly make reference to 
two events that I participated in in the last 24 hours.
  Last evening, after the House adjourned during the day for votes, I 
went up to Middletown, NJ, which is a town in my district, in Monmouth 
County, that suffered more deaths in the World Trade Center building 
during the attack on September 11 than any other town in New Jersey or 
maybe in the whole metropolitan area. There was a memorial service, a 
dedication of a garden in memory of the 36 residents of Middletown who 
died on September 11. It was a very moving ceremony. We had relatives of 
the victims who made speeches. I would like to talk about it a little 
more.
  The other event I went to this morning was at my own high school in 
Long Branch, NJ, where the entire student body from kindergarten, I 
believe, all the way to 12th grade, to the graduating seniors, showed up 
at the football stadium for a service. I think we must have had probably 
over 4,000 people there this morning. It also was very moving. I would 
like to comment on both of those ceremonies in light of what happened 
last year.
  Mr. Speaker, last September 11 I actually was in the Capitol. Many of 
us know that on Mondays and Tuesdays we schedule at 9 a.m. what we call 
morning hour, which is very similar to the special orders that we have 
at the end of the day. It is an opportunity between 9 and 10 a.m. for 
Members of Congress to come down and give 5-minute speeches on whatever 
topic they desire. It is not part of the votes of the House. It is an 
opportunity to talk about issues or really any kind of event that you 
want to talk about that day.
  Before morning hour on the Democratic side we have a meeting, what we 
call a message meeting in the morning that I chair, along with the 
gentlewoman from Connecticut (Ms. DeLauro), and that usually starts at 
8:30 in the morning. So on that morning of September 11 last year we 
started at 8:30, maybe it was a little later, with a message meeting, 
and then we came up to the floor, some of us, including myself, to do 
the 5 minutes for morning hour.
  I do not know exactly what time it was, probably maybe about 9:15 or 
9:20, when I finished my 5-minute speech for morning hour that I walked 
out of this Chamber and walked over to the leader's office, the office 
of the gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Gephardt), and discovered that the 
World Trade Center had been attacked. It was on the television.
  The only reason I bring this up is because over the weekend there was 
a report in the news media about how certain informers for Al Qaeda and 
the Taliban had indicated that the plane that went down in Pennsylvania 
on September 11 last year was actually headed for the Capitol, for the 
U.S. Capitol.
  This morning when I was at the ceremony at Long Branch High School, 
the superintendent of schools, who was the MC for the ceremony, Mr. 
Joseph Ferraina, mentioned in his opening remarks that the people who 
died on September 11 basically gave their lives so that others might 
live.
  I thought about that statement this morning, and, of course, it has a 
tremendous symbolic meaning, but it also had a literal meaning in a 
sense for me, because it is very likely that if those brave Americans 
who had decided to try to fight the terrorists and bring down that plane 
into a field in Pennsylvania had not made the decision to try to 
struggle and overcome the terrorists, that that plane would have headed 
for the Capitol and I would have been right here on the House floor and 
probably died as a result of that attack. So those people literally were 
giving their lives so that Members of Congress like myself and my 
colleagues could live.
  It is an amazing thing to think about, that they were willing to 
sacrifice so that that plane would not come here and hit the United 
States Capitol.
  But I also thought this morning that they were not only giving their 
lives for other Americans, possibly myself and my colleagues, but they 
were also sacrificing their lives, they were essentially martyrs for the 
cause of America in a more symbolic way. When I say the cause of 
America, what do I mean? I mean democracy. I mean the freedom of speech, 
the freedom to assemble, the freedom of religion that we find so sacred.
  My wife mentioned to me this morning that the Americans who were on 
that plane who ended up crashing in Pennsylvania were in contact with 
others on the ground using cell phones. They found out that the World 
Trade Center had been attacked, that the Pentagon had been attacked. 
They decided they would take a vote among themselves on the plane as to 
whether they would try to overcome the terrorists in order to veer the 
plane away from, in this case, the Capitol or whatever other landmark 
they thought it might be used by the terrorists to attack.
  I thought it was terribly significant that they voted, because here we 
are this morning in Long Branch, yesterday in Middletown, today on the 
floor in Washington, talking about the meaning of democracy and how the 
people who lost their lives were really martyrs for the American way for 
democracy. Lo and behold, they were taking a vote to decide whether to 
overcome the terrorists, which is probably, I guess, the most basic 
manifestation of what democracy is about, taking a vote.
  I am sure the terrorists who hijacked the plane were not taking any 
votes because, unlike the Americans who were willing to give their lives 
on that plane, they did not believe in a democratic process. They did 
not believe in the American way, the values that we believe in. They 
basically had a very different ideology, and their ideology, whatever it 
was, said that it was okay for them to hijack the plane, to kill 
innocent civilians for what would appear to be some sort of 
Fundamentalist religious cause.
  I think that we cannot forget that so many Americans lost their lives 
on September 11, including the 36 in Middletown, the town that I went to 
last night in my district. Even though they were giving their lives for 
the American way, for American values, that the effect on their 
families, the effect on their relatives, is devastating.
  It is nice to say that someone is a martyr. It is a glorious thing. 
But, at the same time, it is very hard to be the relative of the martyr, 
because your husband or your wife or your daughter or your son is no 
longer there. There is the huge void, if you will, that lingers. I am 
sure it lingers a year later or lingers 10 years later. It is never 
really filled.
  Mr. Speaker, I will introduce into the Record an article that was in 
the New York Times, I think it was on September 7, just a couple of days 
ago, that talks about Middletown, NJ, and the grief and the difficulty 
that the relatives and the survivors of the victims of September 11 have 
been going through.
  I put it in the Record, Mr. Speaker, not because I want to dwell on 
the grief. The title of the article in the New York Times is ``Emerging 
From [the] Cocoon of Grief,'' but because I think it is important for us 
to understand that as much as we talk about these heroes and their 
families, they gave so much yet they still were people whose families 
now are having problems because of a void that has been left behind. I 
think this article sums up their courage and what they had to face, but 
also sums up what they face in the future.


                           Hon. Maxine Waters


                              of california

  Mr. Speaker, I would like to thank my colleague for yielding to me and 
giving me an opportunity to voice my support for H. Con. Res. 464. I was 
not here when the vote was taken. I was on a plane coming from Los 
Angeles. I had to stay in the district to take care of some very 
important problems there. I tried very hard to get from the airport here 
to the House floor so that I might take that vote, because I think it is 
so important for all of us to show that we really do care and we really 
do honor the memory of those who lost their lives and for those families 
who are making sacrifices, even today, because of the devastation that 
they are experiencing in their families and in their homes and in their 
lives. So I would like it to be known that had I been present for the 
vote on H. Con. Res. 464, Roll Call No. 384, I certainly would have 
voted yes.
  Again, I want to thank the gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Pallone) for 
taking extra time on the floor. Having done what we all should have 
done, and that is voted, the gentleman has remained here, because he had 
something additional that he wanted to say to the families, friends, 
neighborhoods and communities.
  Just as I walked in, the gentleman was talking about what happened on 
that airplane in Pennsylvania when a decision was made by a vote ``to 
roll,'' to try and take the plane away from the hijackers, in an effort 
perhaps to prevent them from coming to this Capitol or to the White 
House.
  The gentleman is absolutely correct, we should never forget that, and 
we should all know and feel that we are very blessed because there were 
very brave people who decided to take a courageous action in the 
interest of saving lives. So I thank the gentleman for the extra time 
that he is putting into this.


                         Hon. Frank Pallone, Jr.


                              of New Jersey

  I just wanted to talk a little bit more about the Long Branch ceremony 
this morning and Middletown last night, if I could.
  I was really happy this morning in Long Branch because there were so 
many young people there, about 4,000 people, as I said, maybe from 
kindergarten all the way to 12th grade from my home community. I think 
they were listening very attentively to the various speeches being made 
and they understood that the people who lost their lives on September 11 
really were heroes to the American way.
  The most important thing I think we need to do is continue to 
commemorate September 11. In Long Branch they said they plan on doing 
the ceremony every September 11 because they wanted to teach, if you 
will, the students and the young people about the significance of 
September 11. It is important that from now on, not only today, but in 
the future, that we continue to commemorate the day and we continue to 
commemorate those people who lost their lives and the heroes who tried 
to help the victims, the firefighters, the police. If we forget it, then 
we are not paying proper respect to them, and we must continue to point 
out that this democracy that we live in and the freedoms that we so 
cherish are not easy to come by, that people continue to sacrifice for 
them.
  Obviously we must continue to do what we can here in Congress with the 
President and Congress working together to make sure that the terrorists 
do not have the opportunity to do this type of terrible act again.
  As I said, there were 36 Middletown men and women who lost their lives 
in the World Trade Center on September 11. I mentioned the article that 
was in the New York Times, and there were a lot of news stories and 
national attention that was focused on Middletown over the last year 
because so many people died proportionately for the size of the town. 
But in all the descriptions in the news media about the suffering, about 
the people who died and their families, there was also much said about 
the pride of the community, the fact that the community came together in 
untold ways. Residents were helping each other in time of need, and the 
community banded together not only to help the families of people who 
died but also to send firefighters and police to help the efforts on 
September 11 and in the aftermath. I just wanted to say this evening how 
proud I was last night to be able to say that I represent a community 
like Middletown and to also have the opportunity to participate in the 
groundbreaking for another wonderful community effort there, the 
Middletown Memorial Garden.
  Last night each of the elected representatives spoke briefly; they had 
relatives of the victims who spoke; and then they proceeded over to the 
new memorial garden where each of the relatives had an opportunity to to 
shovel some of the dirt before the garden started to be put together. 
Every speaker was overwhelming in terms of what they said and the 
significance of what they said. In particular I remember a little girl, 
about 9 or 10 years old, who reminded me of my own daughter. I have one 
daughter who is 9 years old. And she spoke about her father. She 
basically read a letter, I guess in a sense she was writing a letter to 
dad, and it was such a moving experience. And after that about 170 or so 
relatives that proceeded over to the garden to the groundbreaking, and 
there were little kids 2 years old, 3 years old, all the way up to 
teenagers. It was such an overwhelming experience.
  I want to say in conclusion before I yield to my colleagues, the loss 
is always going to be there. There is no way to get away from the loss 
for all these relatives of what they lost on September 11, but I think 
if we do not forget the people who gave their lives, if we continue to 
commemorate their activities, if we do things like the Middletown 
Memorial Garden or the ceremonies like that were held at Long Branch 
High School this morning, then we are doing what is necessary to make 
sure that we never forget what happened and the significance of what 
happened. We need to be reminded ultimately that this battle against 
those who would defy America and defy America's values is never-ending 
and that we have to be constantly vigilant in order to protect our 
democracy and our freedoms. And that is why I think today was so 
significant to me, not only to the two ceremonies that I attended over 
the last 24 hours, but because I feel in general that people after a 
year really understand the significance of what happened on September 11 
and are determined to keep in mind the lessons of that day.


                           Hon. Eliot L. Engel


                               of New York

  I am very grateful that we are able to speak on the floor about 
September 11 today because I have just gotten back from New York and 
spent my morning at Ground Zero at the World Trade Center site where we 
had extremely moving events. I was just out in front of the Capitol 
where I sang ``God Bless America'' with so many of our colleagues, and 
for me being in two places the same day, Ground Zero, the World Trade 
Center, and at the Capitol where we now know that the doomed flight from 
Pennsylvania was heading. It has been a very emotional roller coaster 
for me to be in both cities one day. Flying the shuttle, it was 
practically empty. A lot of people were obviously not flying today. But 
I am just so proud the way this Congress and the American people are 
handling the anniversary of the tragedy that happened 1 year ago today.
  I saw, as I have seen in my city since September 11, just an 
outpouring of good will, of people just hugging each other and banding 
together and taking pride in being New Yorkers and taking pride in being 
Americans and just wanting to help each other, care about each other, be 
concerned with each other. We saw that again when I drove down this 
morning. The first thing we saw when we got near Ground Zero were people 
with American flags signaling victory signs and thumbs up signs and just 
hugging each other. When we actually got to the event, there was a 
platform and we started with different famous speeches that were made, 
and then at the exact times that the planes hit both towers at the World 
Trade Center, there were moments of silence, and then at the exact times 
that the buildings crumbled a year ago, there were bells tolling and 
moments of silence, and the names of all the victims of the September 11 
tragedy at the World Trade Center were read from A to Z, and it was 
very, very moving. I was given a list of names to read to be part of the 
procedure, and I realized that someone had come in who was a family 
member of someone who had died at the World Trade Center and he had no 
names to read, and I gave him my list to read because it was just enough 
for me to be there. And I will tell my colleagues, it was a very windy 
day in New York City today, and it was almost as if one could just feel 
the spirit lifting everybody who was there. I do not think I have ever 
experienced anything that has been as emotional or as emotionally 
uplifting. It was sad, very, very sad, but at the same time it made us 
feel like we were all together as Americans and as New Yorkers. There 
were thousands upon thousands of people. There were family members 
making their way down to the exact spot of Ground Zero.
  Last night at about 1 o'clock in the morning, there were processions, 
actually marches, of people from all five boroughs. New York City, of 
course, has five boroughs--the Bronx, where I am from; Brooklyn; 
Manhattan; Queens; and Staten Island. And people started from the 
farthest reaches of the city, from the farthest points of the five 
boroughs and all converged at Ground Zero. As the names were being read 
out, family members marched down. Yo Yo Ma was playing as he does so 
well, and it was just a very moving experience.
  After touring the site with the President 3 days after September 11 
last year, I said that I was never more proud to be an American and 
never more proud to be a New Yorker, and I feel that way again today. I 
do hope that every September 11 we can all come together. I hope we can 
do it 365 days of the year, but I think that September 11 is a day that 
we really always need to reflect and always need to understand how proud 
we are to be Americans, how proud we are to be New Yorkers. The 
terrorists think that they can destroy our way of life, but they cannot. 
Quite the opposite. Because what I see is a resolve among Americans, 
among people in this country like I have never seen before. It is almost 
as if a sleeping giant has awakened, and we are going to ensure that the 
evil of terrorism is eradicated all over the world wherever it rears its 
ugly head, and this country will always be in the forefront of fighting 
evil. We understand what it means to be an American, and we understand 
why it is so important that we all band together and help each other 
because that really gives us the meaning of what life is all about.
  Those people who died on September 11 did not perish in vain because 
they will always be in our minds; they will always be in our hearts. The 
heroism that we saw from the first responders to everybody else, the 
untold acts of heroism that we will never know about are an inspiration 
to all of us.


                            Hon. Nancy Pelosi


                              of California

  Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding and for having this 
very important special order this evening on this day that is etched in 
the hearts and minds of all Americans.
  I want to commend the gentleman, my colleague from New York (Mr. 
Engel), and extend to him and the members of the New York delegation, 
especially the dean, the gentleman from New York (Mr. Rangel), for the 
magnificent hospitality extended to the Congress. Over 300 Members of 
Congress traveled to New York on Friday to the place where George 
Washington took the oath of office as our first President of the United 
States. What more suitable place could there be than for us to express 
our grief to all those who personally suffered on September 11 and, 
indeed, to our entire country which shares in that grief?
  New York took a hit and all those from surrounding areas, as the 
gentleman said, many from New Jersey, certainly those in the plane in 
Pennsylvania and those at the Pentagon. In every venue the spirit of the 
families who suffered the loss and the spirit of the communities that 
were involved have lifted up our country.
  This has been quite a day for our country, all over America, and in my 
district in San Francisco. We started at 5 o'clock this morning because 
it is three hours earlier, to be ready to commemorate at the exact 
moment the sad tragedy that our country experienced last year. But some 
of us were in the National Cathedral at that precise time when the great 
bell of the cathedral rang to observe again that sad time and to join in 
mourning. It is a day of mourning and memories, and it is a day to pay 
tribute and give thanks certainly to the New York delegation for the 
wonderful venue they provided for us to mourn, commiserate, and they 
provided us a great memory for which we are all grateful.
  With the resolution that we approved today in the Congress, we 
expressed our utmost appreciation to those brave and courageous young 
men and women in uniform who are fighting the battle to root out 
terrorism wherever it exists. Today we remember the victims of September 
11. We also remember and pay tribute to Johnny Michael Spann, the CIA 
officer who in November became the first American killed in combat. We 
honored him earlier in this Congress with his family in the gallery. His 
name and the names of thousands of other Americans, too many Americans, 
are now etched as permanently in our history as they are in the minds of 
their families. As the poet laureate of the United States said in New 
York, there are too many names for even the walls of our hearts to 
contain.
  For some of the families of the victims, the sound of a plane flying 
overhead fills them with fear. Indeed, the warning of any possible 
terrorist act intensifies their grief, and for them and for all 
Americans we must do everything in our power to reduce risk to the 
American people. Yet as we continue to grieve, we take pride in knowing 
that the unspeakable events of September 11 have brought Americans 
closer together than ever. The gentleman from New York (Mr. Engel) 
referred to that, as did the gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Pallone). We 
have joined together as a community; we rush to give blood, money, and 
volunteer time to become more patriotic, to appreciate our freedom.
  Today's resolution honored all of those affected by September 11 from 
whom we have learned what it means to be a member of the American 
family. From our first responders, our firefighters, and police 
officers, we have learned to be an American is to be selfless, to put 
honor above personal safety and the lives of strangers above your own. 
From cell phone calls made from crumbling buildings, we learned that to 
be an American is to love family with a power and a force that 
transcends even death. From a group of passengers in a hijacked plane 
over Pennsylvania, we learned that to be an American is to be brave in 
the face of hopelessness and to do good for others while evil is being 
done to oneself. And from workers at the Pentagon who went to work that 
day and every day, we learned that to be an American is to love freedom 
and to show that love everyday by serving our great country.
  This morning we also went to the Pentagon and shared some sympathies 
with the families of those who lost their loved ones. One young man 
showed me the flag that was given to him in memory and honor of his 
father who perished that day. We also honored the workers in hardhats 
who rebuilt the Pentagon so that here today on that 1-year anniversary 
we could visit a Pentagon that was restored, a sign of confidence and 
pride in our country.
  With these lessons in mind, we can rest assured that the assault in 
our heart, the heart of our Nation, will only make it beat more 
strongly. That strength will allow us to triumph over terror militarily, 
and that strength will allow us to triumph over terror in spirit. We 
will cherish our freedoms now more than ever and recognize, as was said 
at the National Cathedral this morning, that there is a high cost to 
freedom.
  We will draw our loved ones closer and reach out further toward peace 
with our adversaries.
  With that, I would like to once again express gratitude to all who 
have helped us all grieve. I hope it is a comfort to those who lost 
their loved ones that so many people throughout the world, and indeed, 
intensely in our own country, share their grief and are praying for them 
at this sad time.
  I would also like to thank the gentleman from Illinois (Speaker 
Hastert) and our leader, the gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Gephardt), for 
making it possible for us to travel to New York, because it was a place 
we had to visit. We went to the heart, to where our country began, to 
renew ourselves and to be ready for this very, very sad day, but in a 
spirit of renewal and pride in our great country. God bless America.


                           Hon. Eliot L. Engel


                               of New York

  I want to add, Mr. Speaker, that the gentleman pointed out that so 
many people from New York City and the suburbs of New York lost their 
lives. Both Senators from New Jersey were there today at Ground Zero, as 
were the New Jersey Governor, both Senators from New York, and the New 
York Governor.
  In my district in Rockland County and Westchester County, the suburbs 
of New York City, so many people lost their lives: firemen, policemen, 
and average citizens who went to work. So this is truly a regional 
feeling, and absolutely a national feeling; but of course, in the New 
York City metropolitan area, it is a regional feeling as well. I thank 
the gentleman for mentioning that.


                         Hon. Frank Pallone, Jr.


                              of New Jersey

  I thank the gentleman for adding that. He is right, that we can even 
go beyond that. My understanding was that the plane that went down in 
Pennsylvania was originally headed for California, so there were 
probably some constituents on that plane from the district of the 
gentlewoman from California (Ms. Pelosi).
  We know there were even foreign nationals who perished in the World 
Trade Center, so the tragedy was truly not only American but included 
people from other parts of the world.
  Mr. Speaker, I include for the Record the article from the New York 
Times of September 9, 2002.
  The article referred to follows:

                [From the New York Times, Sept. 9, 2002]

                      Emerging From Cocoon of Grief


                           (By Andrew Jacobs)


  Middletown, N.J., Sept. 6.--Even now, a year after her husband, Louis, 
disappeared at the World Trade Center, Barbara Minervino struggles with 
the competing pulls of rejoining the living or remaining curled up in 
the shelter of her cream yellow ranch home with its comforting memories 
and distracting mounds of 9/11-related paperwork.

  A photographic shrine to her husband still dominates the living room 
and she refuses to touch the Yankee ticket stubs and the $15 he left on 
a nightstand the final evening of his life. But she is also increasingly 
drawn into the world, both by necessity, and in recent months, the 
realization that she can survive as a 54-year-old widow with limited 
skills. ``It devastates me that I was able to live without Lou for the 
last year,'' she said, sitting in Redheads, a strip-mall restaurant 
where hundreds of mourners gathered last year after her husband's 
memorial service. ``I didn't change a light bulb for 29 years. I didn't 
buy a bedspread without consulting him.''

  In contrast to the unrelieved grimness of the past months, there is 
now a hint of levity in her voice when she talks about the road ahead. 
``I still don't know where I'm going, but I feel like I'm a butterfly 
about to come out of the cocoon,'' she said. ``With the grace that God 
gives me, I look forward to October and what my place is in the world.''

  Since losing 36 residents on Sept. 11, this centerless hodgepodge of 
look-alike ranch homes and waterfront estates has become a national 
symbol of devastating loss and communal caretaking. Over the past year, 
Vanity Fair, ``Dateline NBC'' and a score of newspapers discovered that 
tragedy had transformed this anonymous, disjointed suburb into a model 
of selfless do-goodism. Local volunteers distributed more than $700,000 
in cash and services to the stricken families, and many neighbors, once 
strangers, delivered home-cooked meals to make sure no grieving survivor 
would have to cook during those first terrible months. Lawn services, 
mechanics and plumbers donated their time, ensuring that no one would 
have to worry about the mundane aspects of suburban living. In a way, 
this community has discovered itself in its grief. But as it crosses the 
first anniversary, Middletown, like Mrs. Minervino, is struggling with 
opposing impulses: the urge to move past the trauma of last September 
and the need to remember.

  And while both impulses have enormous force, both the individuals and 
the town seem intent, finally, on moving on. ``Some days, I just want a 
normal life like other women,'' said Kristen Breitweiser, who lost her 
husband, Ronald. ``I want to go food shopping. I want to bake an apple 
pie. I don't want to be a 9/11 widow for the rest of my life.'' Of 
course, Sept. 11 this year will be more about looking back than looking 
forward. By 8:46 on Wednesday morning, when the bells begin to toll at 
St. Mary's Roman Catholic Church, the camera crews from MSNBC, CBS and 
Australian television will already be broadcasting live, showcasing this 
township's resilience in the face of excruciating loss. Shopping malls 
will fly their flags at half-staff, police officers will shroud their 
badges in black and residents will gather for commemorative events at a 
fishing pier, a half-dozen churches and the Middletown train station, 
where township officials will break ground on a four-acre park honoring 
the local residents who died.

  ``Not an hour goes by when you don't think about it,'' said the police 
chief, John Pollinger, choking on emotion as he pulled his car into a 
drive-through teller. ``I think all of us here have been changed, 
changed forever.''

  But neither patriotism nor civic boosterism can stop the intrusions of 
daily life. Mounting job losses have taken a toll on many families. The 
battle over a proposed megamall, dormant in the first few months after 
the terror attacks, has reignited with more fury than before. And 
although a tentative contract agreement reached Thursday means schools 
opened without labor strife, there is lingering bitterness from an ugly 
strike in December that sent 228 instructors to jail. Since then, more 
than 100 teachers, about one-eighth of the district's total, have left 
the community for other jobs or early retirement. The district's 
embattled superintendent moved on as well. ``There are deep and painful 
wounds that no glossing over, no platitudes, can undo,'' said the 
union's president, Diane Swaim, a middle school teacher who has lived 
here most of her life.

  While many families say the public outpouring of kindness helped them 
endure a nightmarish year, they recognize that the unlimited benevolence 
cannot last forever. The meals stopped coming with the onset of summer, 
when many families went away on vacation, and several women said they 
have sensed a waning tolerance for outward displays of grief. ``After a 
very long year, people expect us to move on, to get on, to try to live 
life,'' Mrs. Minervino said.

  To many family members, moving forward remains painful. Brittany 
Chevalier, 16, who lost her 26-year-old brother, Swede, worries that 
school administrators and teachers will no longer make allowances for 
the days she is too distraught to come to school or too upset to 
complete an assignment. ``They were understanding on the six-month 
anniversary, and they'll understand if I don't come to school on Sept. 
11,'' she said, ``but they'll start to think I'm being ridiculous when 
the year-and-a-half anniversary arrives. I guess I'm afraid people are 
just going to forget and that the world will just go back to normal.''

  But the pull toward moving on is the dominant impulse, even for the 
bereaved. During the past year, Patricia Wotton was so distracted by 
grief she became emotionally detached from her two children, Dorothea, 
nearly 3, and Rod, who is named for his father, who died a week before 
he was born. ``It was too painful interacting with them,'' she said, 
``It reminded me of what I lost. Besides, I was so focused on 
breathing.''

  Over time, Dorothea began to act out aggressively, much of it directed 
at her fragile brother, who was born prematurely and spent his first 
month in intensive care. Last month, Dorothea's therapist warned that 
Ms. Wotton's inattention was compounding her daughter's trauma. It was 
those blunt words, Ms. Wotton said, that helped her cross an invisible 
line.

  In a burst of activity, she opened her backyard swimming pool, planted 
some tomato plants in the garden that was once her husband's domain and 
started to talk baby talk to her son. She even visited ground zero, 
which helped her realize that her husband was really, truly gone. ``I 
saw where the south tower was and finally understood he couldn't have 
survived such hatred,'' she said.

  In an outgrowth of her newfound strength, she has begun a campaign 
aimed at winning extended health coverage from her husband's former 
employer, Fiduciary Trust, which plans to cut off all medical benefits 
in December. Last month she appeared with Diane Sawyer on ABC's 
``Primetime Thursday,'' and now other networks are clamoring for an 
appearance. ``I have this big open wound, but it's starting to form a 
tiny scab,'' she said. ``I still feel the pain, but I'm doing what my 
husband would have expected of me.''

  For Elaine Chevalier, Brittany's mother, the journey back to everyday 
life has been powered by the earthly distractions of work and the 
spiritual nourishment that comes from intense faith. Those first 
catatonic months have given way to busy days managing commercial real 
estate in and around Middletown. But Ms. Chevalier says her true 
salvation has been her church and its support group. The crystallizing 
moment came one night last year in a dream, which featured Swede, the 
angel Raphael and her son's yellow Labrador retriever, Holly, who had 
also just died. ``I'm trying to heal by thinking about my son in a 
different way, trying to think of him as a spiritual being,'' she said, 
sitting in the family's soaring great room with Brittany by her side. 
``Sometimes it works, but sometimes it doesn't cut it.''

  As she crosses the one-year mark, Ms. Chevalier believes she is 
entering a new phase of her life, one marked by self-reliance. (She is 
also seeking a divorce from her husband of 30 years). ``The community 
has been so wonderful to us,'' she said, ``but people can't feel sorry 
for us and cater to us forever.''

  It has been a busy year for the dozens of volunteers who came together 
to spoil the grieving families of Middletown. Besides raising $200,000 
in cash, the group, Favor, made sure every family received overflowing 
gift baskets to mark Thanksgiving, Christmas, the depths of winter and 
the beginning of summer.

  In June, the group decided it had done its job, and announced that it 
would disband. Several of the organizers, who set aside work and the 
demands of family, said it was time to return to their former lives. But 
Favor will not be fading away any time soon. The renewed flood of news 
media attention that began in recent weeks has sparked a fresh round of 
philanthropy, including that of a Texas millionaire who has offered 
scholarships to the 61 children who lost a parent last September.

  At the very least, Allyson Gilbert, the group's executive director, 
said she and others have decided to put together one more gift basket, 
something small and simple, perhaps a tray of home-baked cookies crowned 
by a teddy bear. The baskets, she said, will probably arrive a week or 
two after Sept. 11, when the commemorative events and televised 
anniversary specials are through.

  ``They don't need us to deliver these huge food baskets or big checks 
anymore,'' she said. ``I think they just need a reminder that we're 
thinking about them, that we have not forgotten, and that we're not 
going to go away.''

                         MESSAGE FROM THE SENATE

  A message from the Senate by Mr. Lundregan, one of its clerks, 
announced that the Senate has passed without amendment a concurrent 
resolution of the House of the following title:

  H. Con. Res. 464. Concurrent resolution expressing the sense of the 
Congress on the anniversary of the terrorist attacks launched against 
the United States on September 11, 2001.

      PAYING TRIBUTE TO AMANDA DAVIO AND ST. MARTHA CATHOLIC SCHOOL


                            Hon. Mike Rogers


                               of michigan

  Mr. Speaker, I rise to honor Amanda Davio and her classmates at St. 
Martha Catholic School in Okemos, MI, for their special efforts to thank 
the thousands of volunteers and emergency workers who responded to the 
September 11, 2001, attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City 
and the Pentagon here in Washington, DC.
  Last year, soon after those tragic attacks, I asked children 
throughout Michigan's Eighth Congressional District to write letters and 
cards to the military men and women who were preparing for the war 
against terrorism. St. Martha students responded to that request along 
with hundreds of other students. Several of the schools, like St. Martha 
and Amanda Davio's kindergarten class, also sent along letters and cards 
for the workers at the attack sites.
  These were forwarded to the Red Cross and eventually Amanda's card 
made it into the hands of New York City police officer Steve Tarricone. 
Officer Tarricone contacted the school, eventually traveled there to 
meet the students, especially Amanda, whose greeting has inspired him at 
a time when his spirits were very low.
  Since then, the Davio family has visited New York and the two families 
have become good friends, developing a special bond born out of the 
shared experience of dealing with the aftermath of the tragedy of 
September 11, 2001.
  The remarkable story of this new friendship is best told in the words 
of Amanda's father, Christopher Davio, who wrote:

  With the approach of the anniversary of the tragic events of September 
11, 2001, I'd like to relate an uplifting side to the story and how, out 
of such horrific happenings; blessings and new relationships can grow.

  Shortly after 9/11/01, U.S. Representative Mike Rogers sent out a 
request to the schoolchildren of his district to write cards and letters 
to the rescue workers at Ground Zero, the Pentagon and in Pennsylvania. 
My daughters' school, St. Martha Catholic School in Okemos, like I'm 
sure many other schools in the area, answered the call and each class 
composed cards which were delivered to Mr. Rogers for forwarding to the 
workers.

  The cards followed a circuitous route and my daughter Amanda Davio's 
(age 5 and in kindergarten at the time) card ended up posted in a Red 
Cross tent at the Staten Island landfill, along with hundreds of other 
cards and notes. There in early March of this year, the construction 
paper card caught the eye of an NYPD officer, Steven Tarricone. The 
card, with a 5-year-old's rendition of the American flag and the words 
``Thank You'' on the cover had a simple but profound message inside, 
``You Make Me Feel Proud.'' Officer Torricone saw that the card, signed 
Amanda Davio, was stamped with the school's name and address on the back 
and wishing to express his gratitude for the support and comfort that 
the card and all the other cards and notes had given him, placed it in 
his pocket and took it home.

  Steve showed the card to his wife and his partner. He had to put in 
long days and was drawing extra shifts while the city still struggled 
with the aftermath of the devastating attack. After a few weeks, he put 
together a package and sent it to the St. Martha School. Inside the 
package was a thank you card in which he wrote a little about himself 
and his job. He described the day he found Amanda's card, he was 
assigned to the Staten Island landfill and as he said, ``My job for the 
day was to sift through the debris to try to find anything that would 
bring closure to the family members of victims of the World Trade 
Center.'' He thanked Amanda, her classmates and the staff at St. Martha 
School for their support and for taking the time out of their day to 
thank all the rescue workers. Steve included in the package five 
pictures he took on the days immediately following the disaster and took 
the time to describe on the back of each picture what was shown. He also 
sent along an NYPD cap, arm patch and ID cards with the request that 
they be given to Amanda.

  Mrs. Helen Hillman, principal of St. Martha, related to me how moved 
she was as she opened the package and after discussing the contents with 
other staff members, Amanda's teacher, Kara Lampke, suggested she 
present the items to Amanda at the upcoming spring program that the 
schoolchildren were to perform the next week. When next she saw me at 
the school, Mrs. Hillman told me to be sure and have my camera ready at 
the end of the program as Amanda was going to be presented with 
something. Being the proud parents that we are, my wife and I videoed 
and photographed throughout the show and when the time came for Mrs. 
Hillman to present the items and relate the story, sat there stunned by 
the thoughtfulness of Steve's reply. For him to express his gratitude in 
such a way and to know that someone took the time to show all the 
children how important their support was to the workers and victims of 
September 11 was one of the most significant events in my life.

  A few days later, Officer Tarricone called the school to see if they 
had received the package and talked to Mrs. Hillman at length about what 
the cards had meant to him and other workers at the sites. He said he 
was amazed at the outpouring of support shown by the entire county and 
was moved by the fact that Amanda's card had come from a kindergarten 
from halfway across the county.

  My wife and I began to put together a few things to send back to 
Officer Tarricone and his family and after videoing greetings from 
Amanda and her sister Angela (8) and Alissa (14), included the tape of 
the presentation and the school program along with other cards, photos 
and expressions of thanks.

  When Steve got that package, he called to share his excitement with us 
and told ``in the past 24 hours, I've watched the tape at least 25 
times.'' He had shown it to his mother and sister and they were all so 
happy about our reaction to his reply.

  We kept in contact over the next few weeks and Steve told us that he 
had gone to the Policemen's Benevolent Association for permission to 
have Amanda named an honorary NYPD officer. After receiving permission, 
he had a plaque made and sent it along with more photos, commemorative 
pins and the arm patches from each of the units of the NYPD to Amanda.

  In the meantime, Mrs. Hillman called our local papers and news outlets 
and a story was run on the front page of the Community News as well as a 
news segment on WLAJ which was aired as a local connection to the 
official closing of the cleanup effort at Ground Zero.

  Since then, Mrs. Hillman has traveled to New York on a trip that she 
had planned long before all this developed. Steve met her at the airport 
with a red rose and welcomed her and her family. He arranged a visit to 
police headquarters and Ground Zero for all of them.

  We took our family to New York at the end of August to meet Steve and 
his family (wife Michelle and daughter Ashley). Upon our arrival at a 
nearby hotel Wednesday, August 28, we called Steve and he immediately 
came to meet us. Greeting him for the first time was like seeing a close 
family member after a long absence. Amanda ran into his arms and the 
smiles lit up the whole lobby of the hotel. Steve took us to his house 
and we met Michelle and Ashley. Steve had a shirt made for Amanda in the 
style of his uniform, complete with her name and honorary badge number 
as well as NYPD arm patches and badge insignia.

  We saw Steve again the next day at his house and met with a reporter 
and photographer from the Long Island Catholic, a diocese newspaper who 
had heard of the story from one of their staffers with family here in 
Okemos. After visiting with the representatives from the paper, we did a 
little touring locally then went to dinner with Steve and his family.

  On Friday, Steve and Michelle met us at our hotel and took us into 
Manhattan. He had arranged a tour similar to the one given to Mrs. 
Hillman on her trip earlier in the month. We got to lower Manhattan 
about an hour before our appointment at One Police Plaza and while 
driving near Ground Zero, saw a fire station at the corner of Water and 
Wall Streets. Steve asked us to wait in the car while he went in and 
talked to the firemen on duty. The firemen, after hearing the story from 
Steve, welcomed us into the station, gave us a tour of the fire trucks 
and equipment and posed for pictures with the girls in fire suits and 
helmets. We paid our respects to the fallen members of the station at a 
memorial on the sidewalk in front of the firehouse, thanked the two 
firemen for the tour and their welcome, and went on to our appointment 
at police headquarters.

  Pulling up to One Police Plaza was like entering a military post. 
Concrete barriers are placed so that only one vehicle can enter or leave 
the lot at a time and a large sanitation truck blocks the opening, 
pulling away to allow access after getting clearance from the guard 
post, then moving back to block the entrance. Security was tight! Upon 
entering the building, we passed through metal detectors and were 
photographed and given passes to wear on our outermost clothing.

  We were all escorted to the Division of Community Affairs where we met 
Detective John Rowen and his daughter Ashleen. Detective Rowen took us 
to a conference room where we also met Detective Eugene Canapi. Gene had 
heard the story and came in on his day off to show us a presentation 
that the department had put together as a historical documentary on the 
events of September 11, 2001. Both men expressed their welcomes to us 
and told us how much the cards and letters from across the Nation had 
meant to them. John said that of all the cards he had seen, it never 
occurred to him to answer back and he was glad that Steve had shown such 
thoughtfulness to reply to Amanda.

  After the presentation, reporters from the New York Post and Newsday 
interviewed us and took photos of Steve and Amanda in their 
``uniforms!'' We met Deputy Commissioner Patrick (Division of Community 
Affairs) and were greeted and treated like VIPs by everyone.

  Detective Rowen and his daughter took us all down to the waterfront 
near Battery Park where we boarded a Police Harbor Patrol boat and were 
given a tour of the area from the water. We rode under the Brooklyn 
Bridge, out to Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty. I'm not usually 
an emotionally demonstrative person but I had tears in my eyes when I 
saw the statue. It was my first visit to New York City and I had never 
seen it before. I remember thinking back to 9/11/01 and hearing the 
threats made to her after the horrible attacks. I was sure at that time 
that I'd never see it in person and was truly overcome at seeing her 
from the boat. I imagine that is how my ancestors felt coming over from 
Italy at the turn of the last century.

  While on the harbor patrol boat, I talked with one of the officers 
that made up the crew of three. He had no idea who we were and when I 
told him the story he told me how glad he was that Steve had replied in 
the way that he had. He described the events of that day and how they 
ferried survivors and rescue workers to the site and told me how much 
they all appreciated the support shown by the rest of the country after 
the attack. He said that the Red Cross had given him a box of cookies 
sent by some schoolchildren from New Jersey and that he still kept the 
note that they had enclosed in his wallet, nearly a year afterward.

  After the harbor tour, we returned to One Police Plaza and were told 
that Police Commissioner Ray Kelly would like to meet Amanda. We were 
absolutely floored! Steve was really nervous as we waited to be escorted 
into the Commissioner's office, as he had never met him before either. 
Detective Rowen remarked that he doubted that many officers with Steve's 
experience (he's been on the force for 7 years) had been invited to meet 
the Commissioner in his office. Commissioner Kelly greeted us warmly and 
posed for pictures with Amanda and Steve and a group photo with all of 
us. He gave us a brief tour of his office and explained that his desk 
was Teddy Roosevelt's from his tour as Commissioner in the late 1800s.

  After leaving the Commissioner's office, Detective Rowen took us to 
see Ground Zero. After seeing it so often in news coverage, it was an 
uncanny feeling to actually be at the site. I said a quiet prayer for 
the victims and listened while Detective Rowen related his memories from 
the day of the attack. He was at the command center when the first plane 
hit and was helping victims at the foot of the buildings when the first 
tower fell. There is a brief shot of him running up the street in one of 
the CNN videos as the cloud of debris follows behind. He said it was 
like a wall of water, he ducked into a side street and the wave of dirt 
followed him around the corner. A nearby visitor asked what is was like 
to be surrounded by the smoke and he said it wasn't smoke, it was more 
like dirt and fine particles of concrete dust that followed him and 
eventually covered him like so many of the photos we all saw from the 
news that day.

  The site now looks more like a construction site and an individual 
happening along on it today would probably wonder what was going to be 
built there. The sides of the hole go straight down for probably five or 
six stories and you can see each level of the substructure of the 
underground areas across the way. We could see where the subway tunnel 
was going north from the site. For someone who had never seen the World 
Trade Center, it was hard to imagine just how tall it was. Standing at 
Ground Zero now, you are surrounded by skyscrapers, the tallest of which 
is 54 stories. I tried to explain to my daughters that if they took that 
building and placed another one just like it on top that would have been 
about the same height as the 110 stories of the Twin Towers. Many of the 
buildings still show damage from the attack and collapse of WTC. Still 
the cleanup has been a heroic effort in and of itself.

  My family thanked Detective Rowen as we left and my middle daughter, 
Angela (8) exchanged e-mail addresses with Ashleen planning to stay in 
contact. As we drove back to Long Island we all were just amazed at the 
events of the day. Reflecting on the tragedy of last year and 
remembering the expressions of welcome and gratitude from each and every 
person we met.

  When we had first discussed going to New York City to meet Steve and 
his family, he had told us that when we got there he was going to throw 
a big party. As the plans for the trip grew, we found out that his 
daughter Ashley's second birthday (September 1) would be celebrated on 
Saturday, August 31 and that he was having his whole family over. We 
picked that weekend to go so that we could meet all of them and make 
sure that they knew just how special we thought that Steve and Michelle 
were. Saturday dawned with a story in the New York Post about Amanda and 
Steve and how a small thank you card and its magnificent reply reached 
halfway across the country to bring them together. As we arrived at 
Steve and Michelle's, we were welcomed by all of their family and 
friends as a new part of the family. Steve's mother Linda had gifts for 
each of our girls, as did his Aunt Val & Uncle Len. We got to meet his 
partner and other friends form the force. About halfway through the 
party, we all heard the sound of bagpipes tuning up. Steve had told me 
that there was another surprise coming and as he called us all to the 
patio, he announced his lieutenant and other members of the Emerald 
Society, NYPD's pipe and drum corps. They gave a short concert for all 
of us in honor of Ashley's birthday and Amanda's visit. Once again the 
emotions overflowed to hear the patriotic medleys and other songs from 
the bagpipes and drum. It was a great way to cap off another 
extraordinary day.

  Our last full day in New York was spent touring the city like normal 
visitors. We left Steven and his family to give them a chance to spend 
Ashley's birthday alone while we went to the observation deck of the 
Empire State Building, drove down Broadway and explored Manhattan by 
ourselves. For visitors coming to New York for the first time, you're 
struck by the size of all the buildings, the number of people and you 
quickly come to see that there is no place like it in the country. I've 
had the privilege of visiting 46 of the 48 contiguous United States as 
well as Hawaii and Puerto Rico. Truly New York City has no equal.

  After having dinner with Steve, Michelle, Ashley, and Steve's sister 
Lisa's family, we headed back to our hotel and the next morning left for 
home. Our trip to New York City was way more memorable than we could 
ever have imagined. It gave my children an experience that they will 
never forget. Steve and his family are in the process of planning a trip 
here for a visit to St. Martha School in early November. We are all 
looking forward to seeing them again. The police officers and 
firefighters of New York showed the rest of the Nation that heroes arise 
from adversity. My family has been fortunate to meet one of those heroes 
and to get to know him as a good friend. People like Steve Tarricone are 
around us every day, and sometimes the small gestures, like a thank you 
card sent by a kindergartener can bring them into our lives. The next 
time your child comes home from school and says that they sent cards to 
someone, be it at a local nursing home, or to the President of the 
United States, I hope that you will recognize the importance of those 
messages to all who see them.

  Mr. Speaker, Christopher Davio is right. Small gifts of kindness can 
have immeasurable benefits. Today, we wish to extend our appreciation to 
Amanda Davio and her family, Officer Steve Tarricone and his family and 
colleagues, and all the students from the Eighth District who helped our 
Nation begin its recovery. I now ask that our colleagues in the U.S. 
House of Representatives join us in recognizing this remarkable American 
story.

        TRIBUTE TO THE HEROES OF THE 14TH CONGRESSIONAL DISTRICT


                           Hon. Anna G. Eshoo


                              of california

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the extraordinary women and men of 
the distinguished 14th Congressional District for their heroic responses 
to the tragic events of a year ago.
  On the first anniversary of the attacks on our Nation, we reaffirm our 
commitment to the ideals that have made the United States of America the 
greatest Nation on Earth. We have grieved for our lost loved ones, and 
now we continue the work of a freedom-loving Nation. We take pride in 
and are in awe of what the American people have done in response to the 
attack on our Nation. They have been brave and generous and the entire 
world has witnessed the strength and the decency of our people. 
Americans respond with open, brave and generous hands and hearts to 
those who are in need.
  Mr. Speaker, the 14th Congressional District lost two extraordinary 
people, Naomi Solomon and Andrew Garcia, who enriched the lives of 
everyone they knew and loved.
  I ask my colleagues to join me in once again offering our deepest 
sympathy and that of our entire Nation to the Solomon and Garcia 
families.
  This Nation had many heroes on September 11, 2001. We all know of the 
supreme sacrifice made by so many firefighters, police officers and 
others in their response to the attacks on the World Trade Center and 
the Pentagon. We know of the heroism of those on the hijacked planes who 
prevented even more calamitous attacks on our Nation's Capital. We've 
learned of the heroism of people all over our country who pitched in to 
give service to others.
  Mr. Speaker, it is with a great sense of honor and pride that I ask my 
colleagues to join me in paying tribute to all who have emerged from the 
tragedies of that fateful day to embody what it means to be true 
American heroes by giving so much of their time, talents and resources 
to heal the wounds of September 11, 2001. There are too many 
individuals, organizations and companies to name each separately, but 
I'd like to honor in our Nation's Record a few examples of some of the 
many people of the 14th Congressional District who rose to the occasion 
in extraordinarily generous ways:

  The Town of Woodside Firefighters--held a ``Fill the Boot'' fundraiser 
on September 30 for the New York Fire 9/11 Relief Fund.

  YWCA and the Mountain View City Human Relations Commission--held a 
``Building Community, Understanding and Respect'' forum and dialog in 
response to September 11.

  The Menlo Park Community Chorus and the Foothill Orchestra--organized 
a program of patriotic and inspirational music on December 15 which 
benefited the ``victims and heroes'' of September 11.

  Banks, financial institutions and credit unions including San Mateo 
Credit Union and Stanford Credit Union--maintained and kept open their 
financial networks for their customers despite the resulting chaos of 
the attacks; and organized fundraising campaigns among their employees 
and customers to benefit the families affected by September 11.

  Gallery Europa in Palo Alto owners Louise Erricson and David 
Himmelberger organized a special exhibit in which the sale proceeds were 
donated to families of victims of September 11.

  Hyland Hogan and Lane Lees of the Half Moon Bay Fire District--
following September 11, they boarded a plane and were adopted by NYFD 
Ladder Company 3 where they helped the company after it lost 12 of its 
members and assisted the families of lost firefighters. In May, the 
district presented the New York company with a memorial handmade case 
holding an ax recovered by 1 of the firefighters and pictures of the 12 
who perished.

  All the teachers and school administrators (like Jill Ballard and 
Sherry Fulton who teach American Literature and Studies at Half Moon Bay 
High School)--who changed their curricula and schedules to help students 
understand and cope with the events of September 11.

  Law enforcement agencies and organizations like the Santa Clara County 
Sheriff's Office and the San Mateo County Deputy Sheriff's Association--
set up funds to help the families of police officers killed in the 
September 11 attacks.

  California Task Force 3 Urban Search and Rescue--deployed local 
firefighters and other task force members to New York to assist at 
Ground Zero.

                    Harold Schapelhouman, Menlo Park Fire District

                    Randall Shurson, Menlo Park Fire District

                    Paul Cole, Half Moon Bay Fire District

                    Gerald Kohlmann, San Jose Fire Department

                    Phil White, South San Francisco Fire Department

                    Troy Holt, Menlo Park Fire District

                    Brian Beadnell, Menlo Park Fire District

                    Ben Marra, Menlo Park Fire District

                    Carl Kustin, San Mateo Fire Department

                    Rexford Ianson, Menlo Park Fire District

                    John Preston, NASA Ames DART

                    Bill Trolan, Physician

                    Jared Strote, Physician

                    George Berry, Civilian--Communications Specialist

                    David Larton, Civilian--Communications Specialist

                    Martin Mijangos, Civilian--Technical Information 
                      Specialist

                    Mike Bavister, Civilian--Technical Information 
                      Specialist

                    Gordon Coe, Menlo Park Fire District

                    Hollice Stonc, Civilian--Logistics Specialist

                    Mark Meyers, Civilian--Logistics Officer

                    Paul Brown, NASA Ames DART

                    Joe Zsutty, Structural Engineer

                    Raymond Lui, Structural Engineer

                    Harry Jackson, San Jose Fire Department

                    Kelly Kasser, NASA Ames DART

                    Crane Rigger, San Mateo County CDF

                    Robert Simmons, Civilian

                    James Stevens, Menlo Park Fire District--Medic

                    Kenneth Oliver, Menlo Park Fire District--Medic

                    Eric Haslam, South San Francisco Fire Department--
                      Medic

                    Kevin Banks, Santa Clara Fire Department--Medic

                    John Wurdinger, Menlo Park Fire District--Technical 
                      Search Specialist

                    Roger Miller, NASA Ames DART--Technical Search 
                      Specialist K-9

                    Shirley Hammond, California OES, K-9

                    Jeff Place, California OES, K-9

                    Patricia Grant, California OES, K-9

                    Carol Herse, California OES, K-9

                    Tom Marinkovich, Menlo Park Fire District

                    Philip Snyder, NASA Ames DART

                    Don Chesney, Burlingame Fire Department

                    Michael Shaffer, Menlo Park Fire District

                    Rodney Brovelli, Menlo Park Fire District

                    Keith Slade, Menlo Park Fire District

                    Charles Sturtevant, Menlo Park Fire District

                    Jeff Schreiber, Menlo Park Fire District

                    Bill McFarland, Menlo Park Fire District

                    Mark Tagney, NASA Ames DART

                    Jeffrey Maxwell, Milpitas Fire Department

                    Chris De La Osa, Mountain View Fire Department

                    Daniel Horton, Redwood City Fire Department

                    Gerald Pera, Redwood City Fire Department

                    Steve Ehlers, Burlingame Fire Department

                    Bruce Barron, Burlingame Fire Department

                    Patrick Brown, Santa Clara Fire Department

                    Rod Villa, San Jose Fire Department

                    David Lerma, San Jose Fire Department

                    Greg Campbell, San Mateo Fire Department

                    Dave Rovetti, San Mateo Fire Department

                    Jesus Magallanes, South San Francisco Fire 
                      Department

                    Chris Campagna, South San Francisco Fire Department

                    Thomas Calvert, Menlo Park Fire District


    

                    Alex Leman, Civilian--Incident Support Team

                    Frank Fraone, Menlo Park Fire District--Incident 
                      Support Team

                    BK Cooper, Civilian--Incident Support Team

                    David Hammond, Civilian--Incident Support Team

                    John Osteraas, Civilian--Incident Support Team


  The children of the Payvand Cultural School of Cupertino, an Iranian 
community-based school--filmed a special video after 9/11 to spread the 
message of tolerance and peace. The video is named ``Hand in Hand'' and 
it was sent to President Bush.

  Local media--reporters like Mark Simon and Tom Abate with the San 
Francisco Chronicle, Loretta Green, Leigh Weimers and Jim Puzzanghera 
with the San Jose Mercury News, Don Kazak, Palo Alto Weekly, Dave Price 
with the Palo Alto Daily. Reporters from The Almanac, Half Moon Bay 
Review/Pescadero Pebble, San Mateo County Times, Redwood City 
Independent, Los Altos Town Crier, Mountain View Voice, Silicon Valley 
Business Journal, Gentry, San Jose Magazine, Sunnyvale Sun, Cupertino 
Courier all provided critical information, told our collective stories, 
shared our thoughts and helped to underscore a message of hope and 
tolerance.

  Silicon Valley companies and businesses--Silicon Valley companies came 
together with their employees immediately after 9/11 to raise millions 
of dollars for charitable organizations. Many of the contributions made 
by companies were matched by employees, which brought aid to the 
affected families including those of firefighters and police officers. 
The senior executives at Sun Microsystems raised $1 million and the 
company matched dollar per dollar all employee contributions. That 
effort raised an additional $500,000. Sun Microsystems, like many 
Silicon Valley companies also participated in Ebay's Auction for 
America, donating over 1.3 million dollar's worth of products. Hewlett-
Packard employees gave $1 million to support relief efforts. HP itself 
contributed $2 million, and matched its employees' gifts with another $1 
million. In addition, HP like many other Silicon Valley companies, 
donated equipment to assist in the September 11 relief efforts. 
Companies like National Semiconductor not only made monetary 
contributions but also organized employee blood drives. Paypal through 
their members helped raise $2.35 million for the National Disaster 
Relief Fund of the American Red Cross. Cadence, under the leadership of 
CEO Ray Bingham, raised over $1.6 million in contributions to the 
American Red Cross and to the New York Firefighters' 9/11 Disaster 
Relief Fund. Cadence and its employees also held a special flag raising 
ceremony commemorating the tragic events of 9/11. Apple too went above 
and beyond to assist the victims. In addition to financial contributions 
to the Red Cross, Apple donated iBooks to the children of the rescue 
workers who lost their lives in the line of duty. These are but a few 
examples of the many contributions made by the employers and employees 
of the 14th Congressional District.

  CHUMS--Children United Morally and Spiritually--designed an interfaith 
holiday card which they sold and donated the proceeds to victims of 9/
11.

  VA Palo Alto National Center for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder 
(NCPTSD) staff including Director Fred Gusman, Gregory Leskin, Robyn 
Walser, Sherry Riney, and Ken Drescher--who traveled to the Pentagon to 
provide the Department of Defense guidance and assistance for the 
psychological response efforts following 9/11.

  The men and women of the California Highway Patrol--whose continuing 
vigilance helps ensure the safety of our bridges, airports, and other 
infrastructure.

  The members of the Reserves and California National Guard who have 
been mobilized and their families--many of these dedicated individuals 
have taken deep pay cuts and will endure long separations from their 
families to prosecute the war on terror.

  Palo Alto Medical Foundation and Stanford University (particularly 
Eric Weiss, MD and Lou Saksen)--formed a bioterrorism preparedness group 
to respond immediately and appropriately to any suspected cases of 
bioterrorism.

  USPS--dealt with the aftermath of the anthrax attacks and continued to 
provide excellent service by delivering mail and keeping their offices 
open to the public.

  American Red Cross Palo Alto Area Chapter--Deployed September 11 
volunteers: The chapter was second in the State of California for 
percentage of response based on chapter population and serves 250,000 
people in Palo Alto, Mountain View, Los Altos, Los Altos Hills, at 
Stanford University and Moffett Federal Airfield. The following Red 
Cross-trained volunteers and staff were deployed for assignments which 
lasted up to 3 weeks at a time following the September 11 attacks:


                    Ginny Anderson, WTC New Jersey, Disaster Mental 
                      Health

                    Vinnie Biberdorf, WTC New Jersey, Local Chapter 
                      Liaison

                    Ruth Anderson, WTC New York, Disaster Mental Health

                    Judy Boore, WTC New York, Disaster Mental Health

                    Rita Castro-Hawkins, WTC New York, Voluntary Agency 
                      Liaison

                    Don DeJongh, WTC New York, Family Services

                    Miriam DeJongh, WTC New York, Family Services

                    Ted Easley, WTC New York, Staffing for Disaster 
                      Services

                    Paige Filomeo, WTC New York, Disaster Mental Health

                    Adriana Flores, WTC New York, Disaster Volunteers

                    Lynne McCreight, WTC New York, Records and Reports

                    Edwin Ou, WTC New York, Logistics

                    Laura Quilici, WTC New York, Disaster Mental Health

                    Peggy Rogers, WTC New York, Disaster Mental Health

                    Richard Wing, WTC New York, Disaster Mental Health

                    Ann Ziman, WTC FMA Center, Family Services

                    Geoff Ziman, WTC FMA Center, Family Services

                    Karen Duncan, WTC NHQ Support, Public Affairs

  American Red Cross Palo Alto Chapter (locally): Palo Alto Area Red 
Cross Chapter led by Executive Director Patricia J. Bubenik, staff 
members and volunteers assisted four local families with issues related 
to the September 11 disaster, including counseling the family of a 
victim of the Pennsylvania air crash. Mental health disaster volunteers 
went to schools, PTAs, and church groups requesting help in the 
aftermath. Volunteers delivered materials to schools to assist with the 
conversations with children, teachers and parents.

  The chapter staff also processed a total of $1,168,737 in donations 
designated for the National Red Cross (between September 11, 2001, and 
June 30, 2002).

  At the same time, the chapter continued to respond to an increased 
interest in first aid and CPR classes and trained an increased number of 
disaster service volunteers who came in response to the September 11 
tragedies. They also registered and placed an unprecedented number of 
volunteers who wanted to be of service within the community.

CENTRAL NEW JERSEY SHARES A POEM ON FREEDOM BY WORLD TRADE CENTER VICTIM 
                           DAVID SCOTT SUAREZ


                            Hon. Rush D. Holt


                              of new jersey

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to share with you excerpts from a story that 
World Trade Center victim David Scott Suarez wrote about two hiking 
trips he had taken several years apart, and a poem he wrote about 
climbing as a metaphor for life and for freedom. David writes about 
freedom, both in terms of the struggle to attain it and the unparalleled 
joy of having it. In a sense, David's story reminds us that freedom is 
not free. It requires hard work and undaunting perseverance. Freedom can 
only be attained when people work together with others, exerting all of 
the collective strength of the unified group, to ascend its peak. One 
could interpret David's story to say that freedom is not even a choice, 
but rather a requirement for the realization of human potential, and 
that freedom should be our example to the world that we shout from the 
mountaintops.
  David's parents, Ted and Carol Suarez, have so far had his poem 
translated into over 90 languages, including 3 of the major languages 
spoken in Afghanistan. They offer their son's story and poem in hopes 
that they will show all of the people of the world how much they have in 
common, so that we will always choose to communicate with each other 
rather than fight, and so that their son's death and the death of so 
many others on September 11 will not have been in vain. The following 
are excerpts from ``Return to Freedom,'' by David Suarez.

  My legs burned. My heart pounded. A bead of sweat ran down my forehead 
to the tip of my nose. I wiped it off with the back of my dirty arm just 
before it dripped to the ground. The air was cool and the wind grew 
fiercer the higher into the atmosphere we climbed. It froze sweat to my 
skin and blew my hair every which way, occasionally stinging my eyes. I 
looked up past Bob, who was directly in front of me, but I could not see 
our destination. The peak was covered in clouds . . . . Hail pelted my 
raincoat. The trail we'd been hiking quickly turned to a swiftly flowing 
stream. The sky lit up. Thunder cracked simultaneously. I began to hear 
the slow cracking of, not thunder but wood. We all turned abruptly. A 
tree fell across the path 50 yards behind us, its top shattered and 
smoking.

  Only nine miles to go, but the weather showed no signs of letting up. 
At night we were going to make camp on top of Mount Philip at 11,711 
feet . . . . It was thirteen miles away and a strenuous climb from where 
we broke camp in the morning. Unfortunately, that day was worse than any 
other had been. Like myself, the other guys in the expedition were 
pretty melancholy . . . . All I could think about was the 40 pound pack 
and the ice covered ground that kept me from moving forward with any 
sort of speed . . . . It continued to storm.

  I trudged on. Stepping one foot in front of the other . . . . If I'd 
had a choice I'd have stopped, but there was no choice. Stopping meant 
hypothermia, which was worse than walking. Hours later, we reached the 
top. My hands were red. The tips of my fingers were almost white; they 
were completely numb. The clouds were so thick I couldn't see more than 
a few feet ahead. Everyone else was in the same condition, some worse . 
. . . There were fourteen of us, only six were able to pitch tents . . . 
. We pitched one after another. I thought each one along the way would 
be my last. Finally we finished and everyone was safe. Then, 
miraculously, the moment our tent was ready for sleep the clouds blew 
away and the warm sun came out . . . .

  That was it, I was the last man standing. I was so excited I started 
to run to the peak . . . . I reached it minutes later . . . . I leaned 
back against the flagpole that stood higher than everything else. A 
smile of contentment crossed my face. I shut my eyes and fell asleep to 
the sound of the American Flag snapping in the wind. I was free.

  Three thousand miles and five years later I was feeling the same 
thing. Freedom, what a strong word it is. Millions of people had died in 
its name. Do people fully understand and appreciate this single word? Do 
I? A month earlier I sat out on the lawn under the shade of a tall oak 
attending my Asian philosophy class. After class I walked past a 
preacher yelling that all of my peers (and myself) were doomed to hell. 
I walked farther and saw a stand with pictures of marijuana leaves all 
around, apparently fighting for its legality. I sat down and watched a 
couple walk past hand in hand and smiling. It was July 3. The impact of 
what was occurring before me hit me like a blow. I was living the dream 
that so many had died for. I belonged to a select group of people that 
could enjoy life as it should be enjoyed. In day to day life I often 
didn't realize that . . . . My mind and my talents marked the limits of 
where I could go. No one else dictated them.

  Those thoughts reentered my mind as I climbed to the top of Sugarbush 
Mountain in central Maine. Climbing became a metaphor for life. We were 
almost at the top and the wind was blowing fiercely. We had entered the 
clouds and couldn't see a thing. At one point I opened my jacket and 
leaned into the wind. It supported my weight for awhile. Together we 
reached the top. We raised our hands and screamed loudly for the world 
to hear. We'd conquered this mountain. Although the steep slopes tried 
to keep us down, they couldn't. Although our lives threatened to trap us 
in dull routine, we escaped. We were in charge of our destinies, only 
us. For a moment the clouds cleared. It seemed as if we could see the 
entire world at once. In silence we watched. We were free.


                                    H

                              You Are Free


                          (By David S. Suarez)

                    The air is cool, the sky is dark, your muscles 
                      relax, while nature's breath fills your lungs

                    You have accomplished your tasks, felt the pain, and 
                      endured the pressure, a pressure so immense that 
                      you lived to escape


    

                    You have climbed to the very peak of the mountain 
                      and now relax on a rock, high above the trees 
                      while others sleep

                    You are enveloped by nature's beauty for just a 
                      moment you abandon your incarcerated body wholly 
                      relinquishing your ties to human nature and for 
                      only an instant, you become part of God you are 
                      free

               THE CRANBURY LIONS CLUB MARKS SEPTEMBER 11


                            Hon. Rush D. Holt


                              of new jersey

  Mr. Speaker, Wednesday, September 11, 2002, marks the 1st anniversary 
of the heinous attack on the United States of America by terrorists. On 
Saturday, September 14, 2002, the Cranbury Lions Club will remember the 
heroic actions on September 11 of a Cranbury, NJ, resident, Mr. Todd 
Beamer, with the dedication of a memorial in the township's Heritage 
Park. Mr. Beamer was aboard flight 93 on September 11, 2001, when it was 
hijacked by terrorists and crashed in Western Pennsylvania.
  The memorial honors the uncommon service of Todd Beamer and his fellow 
flight 93 passengers whose selfless acts of courage saved countless 
lives and helped reunite our country. It also provides a permanent 
symbol to underscore the invaluable role of all citizens in protecting 
our unalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.
  The Todd Beamer Memorial contains two symbols of strength, a boulder 
and an oak tree. On the boulder is a plaque that reads:

                             ``Let's Roll''


  These are the memorable words spoken by Todd Beamer, a Cranbury 
resident, who was aboard United Flight 93, when it was hijacked by 
terrorists on September 11, 2001, as he joined with his fellow 
passengers in a final act of resistance, sacrificing their lives to save 
countless others.

  A man described as ordinary to the world, extraordinary to his family, 
he shall forever be remembered for his uncommon act of bravery. This 
memorial celebrates the faith and heroism of Todd Beamer--husband, 
father, son, brother, friend, civilian--an American.

  Americans have read or heard about the heroic actions of Todd Beamer, 
and will always remember his simple, inspiring words: ``Let's roll.'' As 
we memorialize his actions and words, it is equally important that we 
reflect on the life of Todd Beamer.
  A native of Illinois, Mr. Beamer was born in Glen Ellyn, the middle 
child of David and Peggy Beamer, and spent his young adulthood in this 
suburb of Chicago. He was raised in a caring environment where value was 
placed on family, hard work, strength of character, and faith in God. In 
high school, he starred in soccer, basketball and baseball, serving as a 
team captain. Mr. Beamer continued to excel in athletics at Wheaton 
College where he earned a degree in business in 1991. He was later 
awarded an MBA from DePaul University.
  In 1993, Mr. Beamer married Lisa Brosious, and they moved to Central 
New Jersey, soon settling in Cranbury to start their family. His prior 
success in athletics and academics was mirrored in his professional 
pursuits on behalf of Oracle Corporation.
  Mr. Beamer's faith and commitment to his church was always evident. He 
was a member of the Princeton Alliance Church in Plainsboro. He served 
as a Sunday school teacher, participated on the church softball team, 
and mentored young adults.
  Admired and loved by family, friends, and colleagues, the legacy of 
Todd Beamer will be his unwavering commitment to serving God and his 
fellow man. On behalf of all Americans, we extend our deepest gratitude 
to Todd Beamer's parents, David and Peggy; his wife, Lisa; his three 
children, David, Drew, and Morgan; and his two sisters, Melissa and 
Michelle.
  Todd Beamer was a special man who made the supreme sacrifice for his 
country, and left a lasting mark on the people whom he touched. The Todd 
M. Beamer Foundation will ensure that his selfless act of giving to 
others in need continues in the future. He will be remembered by all.

  CENTRAL NEW JERSEY SHARES THE ACCOUNT OF TRADE CENTER VICTIM FAMILY 
                         MEMBER SARAH VAN AUKEN


                            Hon. Rush D. Holt


                              of new jersey

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to share with you an article written by 
Sarah Van Auken, 13-year-old daughter of World Trade Center victim 
Kenneth Van Auken. It was published last week in her local newspaper, 
and it presents a straightforward account of how the nightmare of 
September 11 unfolded before the eyes of a young person who found 
herself thrust suddenly onto the front lines of a war she didn't even 
know was taking place. It shows us not just how deeply painful and 
terrifying it is for a child to lose a parent, but also how this young 
woman's own feelings of fear, confusion and uncertainty as the day 
unfolded were magnified by the fact that she saw just the same feelings 
among the adults around her. Sarah Van Auken's life since that day 
became a swirling tapestry of endless tears, helpless longing for her 
father, and newfound celebrity born of the worst set of circumstances 
she could possibly have imagined. Out of her pain, she wrote a song in 
honor and memory of her father. The song paints a picture that perhaps 
we all might see ourselves within. A picture of a person, standing, 
quietly, waiting, listening for the faintest sound on the wind of the 
guiding hand that will come back and show us show how to get through 
this, the guiding hand that we can grasp so that we'll find ourselves 
together again, safely, home. This has been a year of deep searching and 
painful discovery for us all, and I would like to share Sarah Van 
Auken's account of it with you.

  This past year has been very hard for me. You see, my father, Kenneth 
Van Auken, was in the World Trade Center on September 11, 2001. No, he 
did not escape--but he did leave a message saying, ``I love you. I'm in 
the World Trade Center. The building was hit by something. I don't know 
if I'm going to get out but I love you very much. I--I hope I'll see you 
later. Bye.'' That was the single most horrible thing I had ever heard 
in my life. He was trying to stay calm for us--trying to let his last 
words be ``I love you.'' Somehow, I wish I could go back in time and 
erase all that happened. Maybe even stop him from going to work. I wish 
I could have one last goodbye. But I guess it's too much to ask.

  You're most likely wondering how I found out. Well, I was having a 
regular day at school. You know, boring--yet I was with my friends. 
Anyway, I was in study hall minding my own business when someone yelled 
out, ``Is it true that a plane crashed into the World Trade Center?'' 
Knowing my dad worked there, I wrote a note to my friend next to me 
saying, ``If that's true, my dad would be dead!'' I didn't believe what 
he said because the teacher acted like nothing happened. Also, I 
wouldn't trust that kid. So as the day went on, I felt weird. You know 
like when you know that something is wrong, but you really don't think 
about it? At eighth period, around 1:30 p.m., an announcement came on 
saying there is a ``little accident'' in New York--and if we get home 
and one of our parents is not there, we should not worry. If you get 
scared, we should call 911 or talk to the police. That's when I got 
scared. When I was walking down the hallway, I almost started crying, 
but held back my tears. When I got in the car to go home, my neighbor 
who drives me tried to get one of my classmates to stop talking about 
the announcement. She was obviously trying to stay away from the 
subject. Then, when we got to that boy's house, his dad started talking 
about it. He didn't say what happened, but gave me a weird look. I got 
home and saw my grandparents' car. I knew they weren't supposed to be 
there. I saw my mom with a tear-stained face, and I ran up to her and 
she didn't have to tell me. I just cried.

  From that day on, nothing has been the same. Nobody has treated me the 
same. Nobody wanted to talk about it--yet they couldn't help asking me 
questions about what had happened, and how I was doing. When I knew for 
sure, after 3 days, that my father was dead, I cried harder than I have 
ever cried in my life. My father, my superman, was dead. We had a 
memorial, and went on ``Oprah.'' I wouldn't eat. I couldn't sleep in my 
own bed. I would cry about the smallest things. I was wearing one of his 
shirts to feel close to him. I was looking at family pictures. Of course 
I was still crying. I couldn't figure out what would make me stop being 
so depressed and irritable. I had to get it out. I wanted to scream, 
run, jump--but I couldn't. I just didn't have the strength. I cried too 
much.

  So, I did what I usually did to get out my feelings: I wrote a song. I 
sang it to my mom and she called my godmother, who called her brother-
in-law, who told me to record myself singing and send it to him. Exactly 
a month after September 11, I recorded it in a studio. The song titled 
``Daddy's Little Girl'' was on a local radio station twice, once in 
California and on ``Larry King Weekend.'' I always wanted publicity 
because I wanted to be famous--but not this way. Today I am still crying 
when nobody's around. I think about what happened constantly, but can't 
really talk about it. And though I may sound selfish, somehow I think 
nobody knows how I really feel. My life is turned upside down. The 
things I used to do I either can't do anymore, or I've lost interest, or 
they seem so much harder. I'm trying to ``move on,'' but I don't want 
to. My mind has accepted that he's dead, but my heart hasn't. And 
somehow, I don't think my heart will. Because I'll never stop crying, 
not in a million years.

  Sometimes, it will hit me that he's gone forever--that he's never 
coming home. I recently had a bat mitzvah. It was very hard, just like 
the 11th of every month is hard, and Father's day, my mom's birthday, my 
brother's birthday, my birthday, my dad's birthday, and most of all next 
week's September 11 anniversary. I know most of the teens that are 
reading this might often think about what it would be like if you lost a 
parent. I used to wonder too. Except now I don't wonder. I know.

                           Daddy's Little Girl


                          (By Sarah Van Auken)

                    Standing-daddy's little girl (just); Standing 
                      (yeah)-daddy's little girl . . . .

                    I wonder, wonder through the trees, blow the wind, 
                      blow the wind to me. Control, controlling my 
                      fears, somewhere, behind these tears. And may, 
                      maybe you'll appear, somehow whisper in my ear (my 
                      ear, my ear!)


    

                                 chorus

                    If you were just standing here, I could erase these 
                      tears of mine! And all these words would 
                      disappear, oh! Standing-daddy's little girl 
                      (just); Standing (yeah)-daddy's little girl . . . 
                      .

                    Can it, can it be, that the wind is guiding me! 
                      Daddy are you there? 'cause I've, I've looked 
                      everywhere I need, I need you! What should, what 
                      should I do! And may, maybe you'll appear, somehow 
                      whisper in my ear (my ear, my ear!)


    

                                 chorus

                    If you were just standing here, I could erase these 
                      tears of mine! And all these words would 
                      disappear! I just want to find you, but there's 
                      nothing I can do. Where do you roam? I just want 
                      you home!!!!


    

                    Standing-daddy's little girl (just); Standing 
                      (yeah)-daddy's little girl . . . .

EXPRESSING THE SENSE OF CONGRESS ON THE ANNIVERSARY OF TERRORIST ATTACKS 
        LAUNCHED AGAINST THE UNITED STATES ON SEPTEMBER 11, 2001


                           Hon. Deborah Pryce


                                 of ohio

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today on the anniversary of the day our great 
Nation was forever changed when terrorists attacked and killed thousands 
of Americans simply because they were American.
  Today, first and foremost, our Nation pays respect to the victims and 
their families. We stand united and remind them that 1 year has passed 
and still, we will never forget September 11.
  What happened to the United States on that infamous day brought out 
the best of the American spirit.
  The enemies who struck us grossly miscalculated the strength and 
resolve of the American people.
  They didn't know that our bonds of liberty, our bonds of freedom, and 
our bonds of democracy are stronger and run deeper than any individual, 
than any building, than any monument.
  As President Bush said,

  This country will define our times, not be defined by them. As long as 
the United States of America is determined and strong, this will not be 
an age of terror; this will be an age of liberty, here and across the 
world.

  During this unprecedented time of great challenge, there will be no 
corner of the Earth where the demons of September 11 will be safe from 
justice.
  America will continue to fight for the security of our great Nation, 
and for peace in the world.
  We will never forget every firefighter, flight attendant, father and 
friend that died that infamous day. May God watch over their families 
and continue to bless America.


                        Hon. William O. Lipinski


                               of illinois

  Mr. Speaker, December 7, 1941, is the worst day in the history of our 
Republic in the 20th century, and September 11, 2001, is the worst day 
in the history of our land of liberty in the 21st century. Both days 
cost this Nation thousands of lives; mothers, fathers, daughters, sons, 
grandmothers, grandfathers, aunts and uncles perished on these days 
because they were Americans. Their families and friends left behind have 
never been the same--nor will they ever be the same--and the same can be 
said for our Nation.
  On both occasions these victims were victims because of what America 
stands for: liberty, freedom, justice, human rights, opportunity, and a 
faith in a caring and loving God. But out of this criminal act 
perpetrated upon the citizens of this Nation and on this fortress of 
freedom that we call the United States of America, a fierce 
determination arose to destroy those forces of evil that without cause 
or warning attacked the United States. We brought those who attacked us 
on December 7, 1941, to justice, and we are well on our way to bringing 
those who attacked us a year ago to the same fate. But today, September 
11, 2002, we stop to remember in a formal way the victims and their 
families who perished on these very, very dark days in our Nation's 
history. Today we stop to honor them, remember them, pray for them, and 
rededicate ourselves to seeing to it that this never happens again in 
America or anyplace else in the world.


                          Hon. Stephen F. Lynch


                            of massachusetts

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to recognize and pay tribute to the victims 
of the tragic events of 1 year ago. Last year on September 11, Americans 
awoke to a brutal attack on our country on its own soil. Throughout the 
course of this one tragic day, something that at once seemed 
inconceivable became a horrific reality. No one feels the pain of this 
day more acutely than the families and friends of the more than 3,000 
people who lost their lives at the Pentagon, the World Trade Center and 
in Shanksville, PA. All of these people and their families are in our 
thoughts and prayers on this somber occasion.
  Although there is little that we in Congress can do to ease those 
families' suffering, by adopting this resolution, we are reaffirming our 
commitment to honor the memory of the people who were lost that day, 
while also paying tribute to those individuals who unselfishly risked 
their own lives to protect others.
  Mr. Speaker, September 11 was one of the most difficult days in 
American history. But in the darkness of that day, an incredible spirit 
of bravery and hope emerged. Hundreds of emergency rescue personnel 
descended upon the scene at both the World Trade Center and the Pentagon 
with the sole purpose of assisting others. At the same time, ordinary 
people demonstrated amazing courage by trying to help others escape 
while putting themselves in peril and in fighting back against the 
terrorists on United flight 93. It is truly remarkable how many people 
gave their lives trying to protect others. The bravery and generosity of 
these people is a lasting mark of September 11.
  In responding to these extraordinarily trying times, the true fabric 
of American society was illustrated to the world. Americans around the 
world came together and generously gave of themselves in a myriad of 
ways. Rescue workers spent countless hours at Ground Zero searching for 
survivors and then shuffling through the debris. Construction workers, 
ironworkers and other personnel tirelessly worked their way through the 
wreckage in an effort to clean up the site. Their important task would 
not be interrupted by exhaustion, injury or inclement weather. However, 
far away from Ground Zero, and across the globe, people generously gave 
their time, energy, money and caring to help support the loved ones of 
the lost victims. Today, we honor these selfless contributions.
  As we gather now, 1 year later, it is my hope that we never forget the 
spirit that pervaded this country in the weeks and months following the 
attacks. As we continue to rebuild and to heal, we will need to draw 
upon that strength. The American people demonstrated amazing resolve and 
resilience in the last year, and it is a resolve that we must continue 
to maintain, day by day, week by week, this year and for many years, 
that we will preserve our freedoms, protect our families, and work to 
cleanse the world of the scourge of terrorism.
  Mr. Speaker, in the wake of September 11, Congress rallied in a strong 
bipartisan manner to quickly pass legislative measures to protect our 
country. It was this remarkable unity of purpose that most struck me 
when I was sworn into this body in October of last year. Over time, this 
unity has dissipated some, but our goal should remain clear. We in 
Congress owe it to the American people to do all that we can to make 
sure that the necessary resources are available to protect our country. 
This is a serious responsibility and not one that should be burdened by 
partisan debate. In the coming months, we must act responsibly and 
decisively to ensure that the people of the United States once again 
feel safe in their own cities and towns. I commend the leadership of 
both the Republican and Democratic parties for recognizing this 
important anniversary and for introducing this thoughtful resolution.


                           Hon. Edolphus Towns


                               of new york

  Mr. Speaker, we are commemorating the terrible attack on America on 
September 11 last year. This was an event in which about 3,000 people 
lost their lives. A year later, they are in our prayers.
  Also in our prayers are the other victims--those who were subjected to 
violent, unfair attacks in the aftermath of September 11. One of these 
was Balbir Singh Sodhi, a gasoline station owner from Arizona. He was 
murdered at his gas station by someone who apparently mistook him for a 
follower of Osama bin Laden. His brother, Sukhpal Singh Sodhi, a cab 
driver in the San Francisco Bay area, was recently killed in his 
taxicab. I am sure that we would all like to extend our sympathies to 
the Sodhi family.
  No one should be killed because of his religion. Even if Mr. Sodhi had 
been a Muslim and a follower of bin Laden, that would not justify 
murdering him. But what makes this crime even more disturbing is that 
this perception was a mistake. Mr. Sodhi was a Sikh, not a Muslim.
  Sikhism is an independent, monotheistic, revealed religion that 
believes in the equality of all people, including gender equality. It is 
not part of either Hinduism or Islam, yet because of the turbans they 
wear, which are required by their religion, Sikhs are sometimes mistaken 
for Muslim followers of bin Laden.
  The violence has mostly ended, but unfortunately, there are still some 
unrelated violent incidents. I call for an end to all these attacks and 
for full and prompt prosecution of all the people responsible.
  Mr. Speaker, I would like to place the Council of Khalistan's recent 
press release on the anniversary of September 11 into the Record at this 
time.

    In Memory of Those Killed in Last Year's Attack on United States

Sikhs Suffered the Most After the Attacks; Council of Khalistan Condemns 
          Attacks, Calls for End to Violence Against Minorities


  Washington, D.C., September 11, 2002.--Dr. Gurmit Singh Aulakh, 
President of the Council of Khalistan, today remembered the attacks on 
America a year ago that killed almost 3,000 Americans. He also condemned 
the violence against Sikh Americans and other minorities that broke out 
in the wake of the September 11 attacks.

  ``On behalf of the 21-million strong Sikh Nation and especially on 
behalf of more than 500,000 Sikh Americans, we remember with sadness and 
outrage the attacks on America a year ago and offer our prayers and 
sympathies on this sad anniversary to the people of the United States 
for the terrible attack on the United States and for the loss of life it 
entails,'' Dr. Aulakh said. ``We especially pray for the families of 
those who have departed.''

  ``America must do what it can to eradicate terrorism from the world,'' 
Dr. Aulakh said. ``We support all the efforts to do so and we must do 
our part as American citizens,'' he said. ``This sad anniversary reminds 
us that we stand together as a nation. We must show unity on this 
occasion.''

  ``We also condemn the violence against Sikhs and other minorities that 
took place last year after the September 11 attacks,'' Dr. Aulakh said. 
``Sikhs suffered the most in the post-September 11 violence,'' he said. 
``The very first victim of this violence was Balbir Singh Sodhi, a Sikh 
gasoline station owner from the Phoenix area,'' he noted. ``Recently, 
his brother was killed in his taxicab. All this violence must stop,'' 
Dr. Aulakh said.

  ``Nobody should be killed for his or her religion, whether Sikh, 
Muslim, Christian, Jewish, Hindu, or whatever religion one may follow,'' 
Dr. Aulakh said. ``But it is important to note that Sikhs are not 
Muslims nor followers of bin Laden. ``We condemn bin Laden,'' he said. 
``Unfortunately, because of the turbans we are required to wear, many 
people mistake Sikhs for bin Laden followers,'' he said. ``The Sikh 
religion is an independent, monotheistic, sovereign religion that 
believes in the equality of the whole human race, including gender 
equality,'' he said. ``Daily we pray for the well-being of the whole 
human race.''

  In the wake of the September 11 attacks, a couple of young Sikhs were 
attacked in Brooklyn. Sikh businesses have been stoned and cars have 
been burned. A Sikh boy was even shot in New York. Many Muslims and 
other minorities were also subjected to violent attacks.

  ``We hope that there will not be any more of these incidents in 
connection with the anniversary of the attacks. ``Violence against 
innocent people of any religion or ethnicity is unacceptable,'' said Dr. 
Aulakh. ``It must be condemned and the violence must be ended.''


                            Hon. Bart Stupak


                               of michigan

  Mr. Speaker, I wish to add my voice to the multitude of Members 
honoring our Nation and its heroes on September 11, 2002.
  Mr. Speaker, although I was back in my district taking part in events 
commemorating the impact September 11 has had on all of us, I would have 
voted ``yes'' on passage of H. Con. Res. 464. Due to a technicality, my 
name was not added as a cosponsor of this worthy bill, and I wish to 
state my intention here that I fully support this resolution and its 
sentiments.
  As a former law enforcement officer, I know too well the toll such 
tragedy takes on individuals--their lives, their families, their 
future--and I know too well how difficult, yet how necessary it is to 
ensure like-minded individuals are prevented from carrying out further 
attacks.
  This resolution makes it clear that while the passage of a year has 
not softened our memories, it has shown that we will not bow down to 
terrorism.
  We must find those responsible for the deaths of so many--including my 
constituent Army Major Kip Taylor who perished in the Pentagon on that 
day a year ago--and ensure they face the consequences of their actions.
   September 11 brought out the worst in our enemies. Yet it also 
brought out the best in our citizens. That is what we are honoring 
today.


                          Hon. Philip M. Crane


                               of illinois

  Mr. Speaker, Last week it was my high honor and privilege to join my 
colleagues in the House and Senate for a commemorative joint session of 
Congress in New York City to honor the victims and heroes of September 
11.
  While we Members of Congress are often engaged in abrasive 
confrontation, today I look around and see total unity, total 
recognition that whether Republican or Democrat, we are first and 
foremost Americans, and the common values we share far outweigh those we 
do not.
  This is the same expression of unity demonstrated by Americans across 
the country on the days following the terrorist attacks on September 11. 
I find comfort in the knowledge that it represents a promise that we 
will not back down from preserving our freedoms and protecting our 
homeland from those who wish to destroy our way of life.
  And as we revisit some of the darkest moments in our Nation's history, 
we must remember that our Nation has always been one that has triumphed 
over adversity. Indeed, I think it is fair to say that at times of great 
despair, America has consistently risen to its greatest hours.
  So in remembrance of those lives lost on September 11, I would like to 
conclude with some words from President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address:

  that from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause 
for which they here gave the last full measure of devotion--that we here 
highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this 
Nation shall have a new birth of freedom; and that this government of 
the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the 
Earth.


                           Hon. Betty McCollum


                              of minnesota

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in memory of the events of September 11.
  One year ago America suffered a horrible act of terrorism in New York, 
at the Pentagon and in Pennsylvania. Four planes, filled with innocent 
Americans, were turned into weapons at the hands of men filled with 
anger and hate, intent on bringing death and destruction to our great 
country. It is a day none of us will ever forget.
  As the United States moves forward, we must remember those who died on 
September 11, as well as the acts of heroism, valor and courage 
displayed on that day and the weeks and months that followed. I continue 
to find inspiration in the efforts of all Americans who risked their 
lives to save and heal their neighbors, coworkers, and strangers in 
need.
  Let us also not forget the men and women in our Armed Forces who today 
are engaged in a campaign against terrorism, fighting to protect our 
freedom and seeking justice against those who attacked us. Their valor 
is a testament to the will and resolve of our great Nation.
  We will continue to pray for the victims and their families as we 
rebuild the communities affected by those terrible acts of violence. 
Today, 1 year after this horrific act of terrorism, we, as Americans, 
reaffirm our highest beliefs in freedom, democracy and justice.


                             Hon. Dave Camp


                               of michigan

  Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of this joint resolution and in doing 
so, I stand in solemn remembrance of the tragic events of a year ago and 
a pride in America's response.
  While the loss of life was immense, and the impact of the terrorist 
attacks was felt far from New York, Washington, DC, and Pennsylvania, 
the terrorists failed. The group of men, and the larger organization 
they represented, wanted to break the will of a proud and strong 
country. The world stands in witness to their failure.
  Instead of falling apart, our country united. Our brave first 
responders worked tirelessly to help survivors; we saw ordinary citizens 
involved in heroic efforts; and all across the country Americans joined 
together to offer assistance.
  The outpouring of support and unity could be seen in every flag that 
was flown with pride across this country. The United States of America 
rose to the challenge presented to it with a resolve that was felt 
around the world.
  Now, on our first Patriot Day, when we see our flag at half-mast, let 
us not only remember the tragic events of a year ago, but also the 
strength exhibited by all Americans. I urge my colleagues to join me in 
supporting this resolution by expressing solidarity on this day of 
remembrance.

                      PUBLIC BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS

  Under clause 2 of rule XII, public bills and resolutions were 
introduced and severally referred, as follows:

  By Mr. ARMEY (for himself, Mr. Gephardt, Mr. Hastert, Mr. Barton of 
Texas, Mr. Bereuter, Mr. Bilirakis, Mr. Bonilla, Mr. Boozman, Mr. Brown 
of South Carolina, Mr. Buyer, Mr. Cannon, Mr. Cox, Mr. Crenshaw, Mrs. 
Cubin, Mr. Cunningham, Mr. Tom Davis of Virginia, Ms. Dunn, Mr. 
Fletcher, Mr. Forbes, Mr. Gibbons, Mr. Gilman, Mr. Goss, Mr. Graham, Mr. 
Green of Wisconsin, Mr. Hayworth, Mr. Hilleary, Mr. Hoekstra, Mr. Horn, 
Mr. Jenkins, Mr. Sam Johnson of Texas, Mrs. Kelly, Mr. Kerns, Mr. 
Kingston, Mr. Kirk, Mr. LaHood, Mr. McHugh, Mr. McInnis, Mrs. Morella, 
Mr. Ose, Mr. Pickering, Mr. Petri, Mr. Portman, Ms. Pryce of Ohio, Mr. 
Putnam, Mr. Riley, Mr. Schrock, Mr. Sherwood, Mr. Simmons, Mr. Simpson, 
Mr. Smith of Michigan, Mr. Taylor of North Carolina, Mr. Toomey, Mr. 
Walsh, Mr. Wamp, Mr. Watkins, Mr. Watts of Oklahoma, Mr. Weller, Mr. 
Wicker, Mr. Wilson of South Carolina, Mr. Wolf, Mr. Young of Florida, 
Mr. Goodlatte, Mrs. Emerson, Mr. LaTourette, Mr. Ramstad, Mr. 
Rohrabacher, Mr. Shays, Mr. Saxton, Mr. Rogers of Kentucky, Mr. 
Fossella, Mr. Ballenger, Mr. Royce, Mr. Reynolds, Mr. Walden of Oregon, 
Mr. Linder, Mr. Mica, Mr. Castle, Mr. Stearns, Mr. Calvert, Mr. Thomas, 
Mr. Dan Miller of Florida, Mr. Gutknecht, Mr. Blunt, Mr. Rehberg, Mr. 
Nethercutt, Mr. Ehlers, Mr. Brady of Texas, Mr. Hobson, Mr. LoBiondo, 
Ms. Pelosi, Mr. Frost, Mr. Menendez, Ms. DeLauro, Mr. Holden, Mr. 
Cramer, Mr. Turner, Mr. Hoyer, Mr. Hastings of Florida, Mr. Thompson of 
Mississippi, Ms. Harman, Mr. Holt, Mr. Wexler, Mr. Markey, Ms. 
Velazquez, Mr. Green of Texas, Mr. Barcia, Ms. Norton, Mr. Wu, Mr. 
McDermott, Mr. Phelps, Mr. Acevedo-Vila, Mr. Blumenauer, Mr. Tanner, Mr. 
Hinojosa, Mr. Pallone, Mr. Underwood, Mr. Meeks of New York, Mr. 
Crowley, Ms. Kilpatrick, Mr. Ackerman, Ms. Hooley of Oregon, Mr. Davis 
of Illinois, Mrs. McCarthy of New York, Mr. Gutierrez, Mr. Borski, Mr. 
Bishop, Mr. Jackson of Illinois, Mr. McGovern, Mr. Berry, Ms. McCollum, 
Mr. Lynch, Mr. Ross, Mrs. Napolitano, Mr. Weiner, Mr. Blagojevich, Mr. 
Lantos, Mr. Pascrell, Mr. Filner, Mr. Waxman, Mr. Peterson of Minnesota, 
Mr. LaFalce, Ms. Carson of Indiana, Mr. Ford, Mr. Moran of Virginia, Mr. 
Matsui, Mr. Berman, Ms. Millender-McDonald, Mr. Olver, Mr. McNulty, Mr. 
Oberstar, Mrs. Maloney of New York, Ms. Watson, Mr. Lucas of Kentucky, 
Ms. Rivers, Mr. Costello, Mrs. Capps, Mr. Sabo, Mr. Meehan, Mr. Capuano, 
Ms. Kaptur, Mr. Boyd, Mr. Larson of Connecticut, Mr. Baca, Ms. 
Schakowsky, Mr. Kanjorski, Mr. Hall of Texas, Ms. McCarthy of Missouri, 
Mrs. Meek of Florida, Mr. Cummings, Mr. Pomeroy, Ms. DeGette, Mr. 
Barrett, Mr. Doyle, Mr. George Miller of California, Mr. Lipinski, Ms. 
Roybal-Allard, Mr. Sanders, Mr. Rangel, Mr. Shows, Mr. Wynn, Mr. Baird, 
Mr. Schiff, Mr. Boucher, Mr. Murtha, Mr. Spratt, Mr. Deutsch, Mr. 
Kildee, Mr. Farr of California, Mr. Luther, Mr. Tierney, Mr. Clay, Mr. 
Engel, Mr. Gonzalez, Mr. Honda, Mr. Becerra, Ms. Jackson-Lee of Texas, 
Mr. Inslee, Ms. Slaughter, Mr. Ortiz, Mr. Serrano, Mr. Davis of Florida, 
Mr. Israel, Mr. Smith of Washington, Mr. Rothman, Mr. Osborne, Mr. 
Gekas, Mr. Thornberry, Mr. Hill, Mr. Stenholm, Mr. Baldacci, Mr. Rahall, 
Mr. Watt of North Carolina, Mr. McIntyre, Ms. Lofgren, Mr. Hoeffel, Mr. 
Maloney of Connecticut, Mrs. Jones of Ohio, Mr. Sawyer, Ms. Solis, Mr. 
Dooley of California, Ms. Baldwin, Mr. Nadler, Mr. Kind, Mr. Kleczka, 
Mr. Sandlin, Mr. Boswell, Mr. Coyne, Mr. Udall of Colorado, Ms. Berkley, 
Mr. Kennedy of Rhode Island, Mr. DeFazio, Mr. Moore, Ms. Eshoo, Mrs. 
Wilson of New Mexico, Mr. Cooksey, Mr. Tancredo, Mr. Barr of Georgia, 
Mr. Kolbe, Mr. Moran of Kansas, Mr. Johnson of Illinois, Mr. Ferguson, 
Mr. Culberson, Mr. Baker, Mr. Ryun of Kansas, Mr. Ehrlich, Mr. Peterson 
of Pennsylvania, Mr. Radanovich, Mr. Foley, Mr. Duncan, Mrs. Biggert, 
Mr. Pastor, Mr. Dingell, Mr. Thompson of California, Mr. Gordon, Mr. 
Cardin, Mr. Roemer, and Ms. Eddie Bernice Johnson of Texas):

  H. Con. Res. 464. Concurrent resolution expressing the sense of the 
Congress on the anniversary of the terrorist attacks launched against 
the United States on September 11, 2001; considered and agreed to.


                      Thursday, September 12, 2002

          HONORING CONGRESSIONAL STAFF AND GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES


                            Hon. Brian Baird


                              of Washington

  Mr. Speaker, yesterday our Nation and this House paid a fitting 
tribute to those who lost their lives on September 11, to the heroic 
rescuers, and to their families.
  Today, I would like to take just a moment to honor another group of 
people who serve this Nation in a less dramatic way, but who are heroes 
in their own right and in their own quiet ways.
  Last year, just 1 day after our Nation came under attack, and this 
very building was among the targets, the men and women who work here in 
this building, in our offices and in countless other government offices 
throughout this land, came right back in to work to serve this great 
Nation. When they came in to work on that September 12 morning, they 
knew then and they have known each and every day since then that they 
work in a potential target.
  Scarcely a month later, they then faced a new challenge when anthrax 
entered our buildings, and for some of our staff, entered their bodies. 
The Capitol Police, the janitors and maintenance workers, the grounds 
crews, the people who serve food, the secretaries, the Parliamentarians, 
the clerks, the young pages, our legislative and our committee staff, 
our field and caseworkers, and all the other dedicated and courageous 
people who make this place and our government run all deserve our thanks 
and our praise.
  With tears in their eyes, with sadness and with fear in their hearts, 
but with indomitable courage they came right back to work to serve this 
country we all love.
  A year has passed now, and the immediate danger may have been 
diminished; but it remains in our awareness. Still, our staffs and the 
rest of the employees come to work, and in doing so, they serve our 
country.
  In these times, this takes courage. So, and for that courage, I am 
grateful and this country is deeply fortunate.

                    LESSONS LEARNED FROM SEPTEMBER 11


                             Hon. Mark Foley


                               of Florida

  Mr. Speaker, as we continue our reflection on September 11, I wanted 
to take a moment to enter into the Record a piece written by the 
majority leader, Speaker pro tempore of the Florida House of 
Representatives, Sandra Murman from Tampa, FL:

  When I hear the date September 11, images immediately flood my mind. I 
see the plane hit the second tower. I see the Pentagon on fire and I can 
hear the sickening crunch as the towers fall while throngs of people run 
to escape the thick gray cloud. I also remember the utter horror I felt 
when I realized this was not simply one plane off course but rather a 
planned attack. This was our generation's Pearl Harbor. But unlike Pearl 
Harbor, terrorists hijacked planes full of innocent civilians and 
crashed those planes into buildings filled with more innocent civilians. 
On that day we saw the face and felt the hand of evil, but we also saw 
extraordinary goodness through the lives of heroic Americans in 
Washington, New York, and a Pennsylvania field.

  As we gather here to mark the 1-year anniversary of the attack, I 
would like to share my thoughts on what I have learned since last 
September.

  Lesson one: I have been reminded that life is short and precious. That 
argument with a spouse, the concern over which car to purchase on 
September 10, suddenly seemed so petty after the attacks. As I evaluated 
my own life, I realized what mattered most was my relationship with God, 
my family, loved ones and community. Everything I do now needs to have 
meaning, purpose, and positively impact those around me.

  Lesson two: Before September 11 we knew we had enemies and lived in a 
dangerous world, but September 11 we discovered that organized groups of 
terrorists had both the desire and the ability to create devastation 
within our country. We can no longer take this security for granted. 
There is our new reality.

  Lesson three: On September 11 America showed that we are still a 
Nation of heroes. Incredible courage was shown by the New York City 
firefighters who slapped on their gear and charged into the burning 
buildings to help victims escape. New York lost 343 of its finest that 
day. Hundreds of workers in the World Trade Center helped one another 
escape. I remembered hearing the story of one man who, instead of 
escaping Tower Two, chose to remain behind with a disabled colleague who 
could not make it down the stairs. They both perished that day. And, of 
course, we all heard the story of flight 93, those extraordinary men and 
women who said their goodbyes to their loved ones, prayed the Lord's 
Prayer, and with the words of ``Let's roll,'' charged the cockpit to 
save countless lives in Washington, D.C.

  In an instant these ordinary Americans became legends. All the 
sacrifices on September 11 have left us speechless with gratitude.

  Lesson four: We have the responsibility to ensure that the lives lost 
on September 11 were not lost in vain. We were attacked because of who 
we are. The principles on which our country was founded, freedom, 
equality and the dignity of the individual, are a threat to Islamic 
extremists. They view open, democratic societies as the enemy and want 
to create a society where there is no religious freedom and no civil 
liberty. As defenders of liberty we stand in their way.

  At this very moment our servicemen and women are defending the cause 
of freedom throughout the world. Here on the home front, we, too, have a 
responsibility. Our defense involves upholding the values of America. We 
have a civic duty to participate in our democratic institutions. We have 
a responsibility to instill in our children a love of liberty, a love of 
country, the difference between right and wrong and the willingness to 
make sacrifices in this ongoing struggle between freedom and tyranny.

  Let me close by reading President Bush's September 20 speech to the 
Nation:

  ``Great harm has been done to us. We have suffered great loss. And in 
our grief and anger we have found our mission and our moment. Freedom 
and fear are at war. The advance of human freedom, the great achievement 
of our time, and the great hope of every time, now depends on us. Our 
Nation, this generation, will lift the dark threat of violence from our 
people and our future. We will rally the world to this cause by our 
efforts, by our courage. We will not tire. We will not falter. We will 
not fail.''

  Thank you. May God bless you all.

                    HONORING MR. ERIC MORELAND JONES


                            Hon. Barbara Lee


                              of california

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor and commend bravery and dedication 
demonstrated by my constituent, Mr. Jones, who was a first responder at 
the attack on the Pentagon on September 11, 2001.
  The memories of the horrific terrorist attacks will remain with us 
forever. Yet, through the pain and adversity of these tragedies, heroes 
were also born.
  We witnessed the attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City, 
we learned of the terrible airline crash in the Pennsylvania 
countryside, and we witnessed what was once an unfathomed attack on our 
Nation's center of defense, the Pentagon.
  I have known Mr. Jones' family for many years. In the footsteps of his 
parents, he carries on a legacy of commitment to humanity though public 
service. On September 11, Eric was driving by the Pentagon when it was 
hit by American Airline flight 77. He immediately went to the Pentagon 
site and quickly began to aid in evacuating injured and dying personnel 
from the building; he carried and helped people to safety and medical 
triage. Eric remained at his volunteer post for more than 72 hours.
  On July 15, 2002, Mr. Jones was one of two people to receive the 
Office of the Secretary of Defense Medal of Valor for his actions. As we 
commemorate the anniversary of the 9/11 attacks, we also pay tribute to 
thousands of first responders and volunteers like Mr. Jones who risked 
their own lives to ensure that others were saved.
  I am deeply moved by Eric's heroism and want to extend my sincere 
appreciation to him. As we take time to reflect on the events of 9/11 on 
this anniversary day, we must also resolve and recommit ourselves to 
peace and security.

  H. RES. 5367--TO NAME THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS OUTPATIENT 
 CLINIC IN HORSHAM, PA, THE ``VICTOR J. SARACINI DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS 
                       AFFAIRS OUTPATIENT CLINIC''


                         Hon. Joseph M. Hoeffel


                             of pennsylvania

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in strong support of the resolution that 
Representative Greenwood and I introduced yesterday, which will name the 
new veterans clinic in Horsham, PA, after Victor J. Saracini, a 
distinguished veteran and victim of the attacks on September 11.
  Victor J. Saracini served his country with great pride as an exemplary 
technical coordinator aboard S-3A fighter jets on the USS Saratoga. He 
served in the Naval Reserve at the Naval Air Station Joint Reserve Base, 
Willow Grove, PA, until his honorable discharge as lieutenant in 1985. 
Victor Saracini was the recipient of the National Defense Service Medal, 
the Navy E Ribbon, and the Expert Marksmanship Ribbon.
  On the morning of September 11, 2001, terrorists hijacked the Los 
Angeles-bound airplane that Captain Saracini was piloting, and reset 
course for the South Tower of the World Trade Center, killing everyone 
on board and murdering hundreds of other innocent civilians inside the 
building. These innocent victims, Mr. Saracini included, represent our 
Nation's first casualties in this war on terror.
  To honor the life of Victor Saracini, devoted aviator, distinguished 
veteran, and proud defender of America's freedom, is to honor all 
victims of September 11 and their families. I urge my colleagues to 
support this resolution, and I call on the House Veterans' Affairs 
Committee to pass this resolution and bring it to the floor of the House 
of Representatives as soon as possible.


                           Hon. Vito Fossella


                               of new york

  Mr. Speaker, I am not recorded on roll call No. 384, Expressing the 
Sense of the Congress on the Anniversary of the Terrorist Attacks 
Launched Against the United States on September 11, 2001. I was with my 
constituents of Staten Island and Brooklyn on this sad anniversary. Had 
I been present, I would have voted ``aye.''
  For the past year, our Nation has grieved over the loss of nearly 
3,000 brave men and women who were cruelly and unfairly taken from God's 
Earth much too soon. These past 365 days have been a time of immense 
sadness for our Nation. We have buried too many innocent souls--too many 
mothers, too many fathers, too many sons and too many daughters.
  Today is officially known as Patriot Day as a result of legislation 
that I introduced in Congress. I chose this name because I thought it 
best described the victims of September 11--men and women who loved 
their country and who died in its name. While they were not soldiers, 
they certainly were patriots.
  Indeed, no one among us will ever forget the indelible images of brave 
firefighters, police officers and other emergency services personnel 
entering the burning towers bound by honor, duty and courage. Or the 
pictures of ordinary Americans leading their friends, coworkers and even 
strangers out of the rubble because they were taught to help those in 
need. In an age when the word heroism is bandied about much too often, 
we watched true heroes in action.
  And so today, we remember these patriots--recall their smile, their 
laugh, their kindness. Their loss is an injustice to humanity. And while 
they can never be replaced, they must be remembered and honored for 
making the greatest of all sacrifices.
  The American story is far from finished. Indeed, the best chapters are 
yet to come. We must believe that, for I know in my heart that it is our 
destiny.
  We also must believe that there is a just God directing our people in 
a just cause of liberty. That cause, like others before, which crushed 
fascism and communism, is now to forbid the tyranny of terrorism. The 
terrorists sought to destroy America by crushing brick and twisting 
steel. They didn't understand that the source of America's strength is 
its people, and that its people embody a spirit of optimism and hope 
that can never be destroyed. Our hearts may still be heavy, but our soul 
is stronger and more vibrant than ever. The values of America will 
forever stand firm and resolute.
  My prayers go to every family that lost a loved one on September 11. 
My words cannot ease your suffering, so I simply tell you that you 
remain in my thoughts. God bless you and God bless America.
  I ask unanimous consent that this statement be printed in the 
appropriate part of the Congressional Record.

DEDICATION OF THE SEPTEMBER 11 MEMORIAL IN ORADELL, NJ, AND PRESENTATION 
                          TO MRS. TRACY WOODALL


                           Hon. Marge Roukema


                              of new jersey

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to call to the attention of my colleagues 
the dedication of a memorial in Oradell, NJ, to honor and commemorate 
those who lost their lives in the tragic events of September 11, 2001.
  Let me say, Mr. Speaker, that I have been deeply moved by the 
outpouring of support and dedication that we all have seen throughout 
our Nation over the past year. In the days and weeks after the tragic 
events of September 11, we heard and read the stories of countless 
family members, neighbors, and friends who went to work on that day and 
never came home.
  In my own district, our Bergen County community was particularly hard 
hit. We all know someone who was lost. Their stories are heart wrenching 
. . . and still remain nearly unbearable in their sadness.
  Over the past year, I have spoken to many families in my district in 
an attempt to bring them some consolation. Even though there are no 
words to relieve their anguish, I have told each family that they should 
take some comfort in the knowledge that the hearts and prayers of the 
entire Nation were with them.
  As we dedicate this memorial in Oradell this evening to all of those 
who lost their lives on that tragic day, we pause to remember each of 
the men and women whose lives were so tragically cut short by a brutal 
and senseless act of terrorism.
  In particular, we commemorate the tragic loss of one of Oradell's own 
residents, Brent Woodall.
  In their deaths, the victims of the World Trade Center attack have 
come to symbolize all that we love in America. The terrorists attacked 
the towers because they represented America's democracy, freedom, 
diversity, and economic prosperity.
  Brent Woodall embodied these ideals in his work and in his life. 
Whether in his work in the stock market--the nerve center of America's 
economic freedom--or as a talented athlete, or simply as a man deeply 
devoted to friends, family, and those whom he loved, Brent's life 
exemplified the American values which have made our country great.
  The loss of every life that day was tragic. The loss of Brent touches 
each of us, as he and Tracy were just beginning so much of their life 
together. They had just bought a home, and were beginning a family 
together.
  I did not know Brent personally, so I will not presume to elaborate 
upon his life and times beyond that. But as I have come to know the 
nearly 100 residents of my congressional district who never came home on 
September 11, so I have come to know Brent Woodall.
  In every way, Brent's life was a life that is easy to celebrate.
  This evening we will commemorate our losses and send a message of 
heartfelt sympathy and support to Brent's family and friends, 
particularly his wife, Tracy, and their son, Pierce Ashley, who came 
into this world on April 22, 2002, only a few short months after his 
father had perished. How proud Brent would have been of his son . . . 
and how proud Pierce will someday be of his father, whose good nature, 
humor, and zest for life live on in him.
  At tonight's memorial, I will be honored to present to Tracy Woodall 
an American flag that was flown over the U.S. Capitol in Brent's honor.
  Our flag has long stood as the symbol of our core values of freedom 
and liberty. It now stands also as a symbol of our national resolve to 
bring those responsible for this atrocity to justice, and, tonight, as a 
tribute to Brent, and all of those who lost their lives in one of 
America's darkest hours. Let it serve also to let Tracy, Pierce, and all 
of their family know that the support of extended family, friends, 
community, and the Nation, are with them now and always.
  Mr. Speaker, I ask my colleagues to join me in asking that God bless 
Tracy and Pierce Woodall, the rest of their family, and all those who 
lost friends, family, or loved ones in this national tragedy. And, as 
Brent Woodall would have wanted, we ask that God bless the United States 
of America.

 CONGRATULATING H. BYRON MASTERSON ELEMENTARY SCHOOL OF KENNETT, MO, ON 
WINNING THE KIDS ARE AUTHORS CONTEST FOR ``SEPTEMBER 12TH . . . WE KNEW 
                     EVERYTHING WOULD BE ALL RIGHT''


                           Hon. Jo Ann Emerson


                               of missouri

  Mr. Speaker, I come to the House floor today with the memories of 
September 11 forever etched on my mind. I remember thinking that the 
world would never be the same again after that fateful day. I was right. 
Now, 1 year later, I am touched and moved by the courage, compassion and 
character that people across our Nation have shown in the days and 
months since the attack on America.
  I am nearly moved beyond words by the ways our children have responded 
to the new challenges facing our Nation. Immediately following September 
11 I visited classrooms all over the Eighth Congressional District. I 
listened and spoke with students, teachers and parents and felt--for the 
first time I can remember--a bond and sense of purpose that was somehow 
missing in the days before.
  I have never been as proud to be an American as I was when I visited 
with the children at those schools in my district. To be honest, I 
wasn't sure exactly how to talk about the tragic events of September 11, 
because I wasn't sure how much they understood about why this tragedy 
happened to us. Instead of comforting them, they comforted me. Instead 
of me telling them what happened, through their patriotic songs, 
intelligent questions, cheers of pride, patriotic bulletin boards, and 
their hugs and tears, they shared what they had learned and seen.
  One of those schools was H. Byron Masterson Elementary School in 
Kennett, MO. The students shared their feelings, but they did more than 
that. They took action. And this week, a year later, the results of 
their actions were heard and seen in New York City. The message from the 
children is one of comfort. Their story is summarized in a story 
reported by the Associated Press and I would like to share it with all 
of you.

  Darlene Robertson says that on some days, the rut is the best place to 
be. On Sept. 12th, it was the daily rut of life in Robertson's southeast 
Missouri town that provided the stability her first-grade students 
needed in that insecure time after the terrorist attacks. ``September 11 
upset the routine of America, and these little children felt it,'' 
Robertson said. ``That's why the rut was so important for us that day.'' 
Those students, now second-graders at H. Byron Masterson Elementary 
School, wrote about their experience in a book entitled, September 12th 
. . . We knew Everything Would be All Right. The book, which the 
children also illustrated, won the Kids Are Authors contest sponsored by 
Scholastic Books. Now Scholastic is publishing the book and distributing 
it nationwide.

  When Robertson first heard of the contest, she began talking with her 
husband about topics for a book her students could write. They knew that 
a lot of children would be writing about the terrorist attacks of 
September 11, so her husband suggested September 12 as a topic. So the 
idea for the book was born, and in March, Robertson and her students 
began to recall what September 11 and 12 were like--how they had 
discussed what they saw on television, and how she assured them they 
were safe inside their classroom. ``September 11 shook us all up. As a 
faculty, we had to be careful not to show our true feelings about the 
day. We had to do things just like we had been doing the day before. It 
gave the kids security.'' The book takes readers through the day after 
the attacks and how the students' daily routine was a comfort to them: 
``The sun rose again, and the students traveled to school as usual. They 
still had homework. And two plus two still added up to four,'' they 
wrote in the book. ``On September 12, our parents still tucked us in our 
warm, safe beds,'' they wrote. ``We knew we would be all right because 
our parents said they loved us.''

  My favorite quote from the book is one that I used recently in my 
weekly column about September 11. The children wrote, ``We knew 
everything would be all right because the stars and moon came out and 
America went to sleep. And the next morning the sun came up again.''

  The students, together with their parents, were recognized for their 
achievement. They along with teacher, Darlene Robertson and her husband, 
Dennis, and Masterson Principal Elsie Heller, left for New York City 
early Monday morning, September 9.

  The group of approximately 40 spent three days in the Big Apple 
including the 1-year anniversary of September 11. The trip, sponsored by 
NASDAQ, ended with the group taking part in the ceremonial opening and 
ringing of the bell at the NASDAQ market on September 11. During their 
stay in NYC, the group visited various sights including every child's 
dream, Toys R Us, New York. They also toured the Empire State Building 
and the New York Public Library. And they took a trip to the company, 
Scholastic, whose contest made all of this possible.

  Scholastic will be at H. Byron Masterson Elementary School on 
September 12th for a banquet, where they will present the students with 
medals. The school also will receive 100 copies of the book and an 
autographed copy of the book will be sent to President Bush.

  As their teacher Mrs. Robertson said ``We're just a little small town 
of 11,000 in the Bootheel of Missouri but here we are . . . It is an 
honor to be chosen.''

  It is an honor for me to represent these children and their families 
in Congress. Congratulations on this remarkable and special milestone in 
your lives. You children have inspired me. You have shown your 
compassion for others. You have displayed the true character of America. 
You have shown me and other parents and adults your maturity and depth 
of understanding about our great Nation. You have given us resolve. You 
have given us courage. And you will help us show the world that no act 
of terror will ever bring us to our knees. We will be stronger than ever 
in the face of adversity. We will be one. We will be tougher. We will 
prevail.

                  CONGRATULATIONS TO LEAH A. CUNNINGHAM


                            Hon. Rob Simmons


                             of connecticut

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to congratulate Leah A. Cunningham of 
Niantic, CT. Leah Cunningham was named a national winner in the 2002 
Voice of Democracy Program and received the $1,500 Department of 
Colorado and Auxiliary Award. Leah was sponsored by VFW Post 5849 and 
its Ladies Auxiliary in East Lyme, CT.
  I applaud the achievements of Leah Cunningham and ask that her award-
winning essay be submitted into the Congressional Record.

     [From the 2001-2002 VFW Voice of Democracy Scholarship Contest]

                    Reaching Out to America's Future


                          (By Leah Cunningham)


  Yiyia, what is your advice for me and my role in helping America to 
have a better future?

  ``I came to this country at only 12 years old, alone and frightened of 
the unraveling journey ahead. I emigrated from Greece, but I soon became 
a loving citizen of this great land called America. I have learned that 
for America to have a better future, we must trust and learn from the 
issues of the past.''

  And then, my Yiyia (which is Greek for grandma) would smile in her 
strong oak rocking chair, gazing out the window of her apartment. Yiyia 
would have faith in the youth of America and their love for a country. 
She had seen the beginning stages of World War I as torpedoes were 
launched at her boat; she had watched America slowly enter World War II, 
and thankfully, she died before her eyes would witness the devastation 
of the worst terrorist act to ever assault American soil: The 
destruction of the New York trade center towers by two hijacked 
airplanes.

  These horrific events of September 11 have sparked a new found 
interest in our past and pride. Have we perhaps become more aware of our 
duty to create a peaceful life for our youth? The idea is to reach out 
to America's future, enabling our children to create a better world, 
providing them with knowledge, insight. Someday as a grandmother, I hope 
to share with my grandchildren the knowledge with which a nation has 
touched my existence. I will reach out to America's youth--empowered in 
good faith to help America's future.

  Our Nation has indeed suffered tragedy but at the same time, we have 
been blessed by devoted American citizens striving toward a common goal: 
to make America a peaceful nation. Firemen, Red Cross volunteers, 
policemen, and average American citizens are diligently working in New 
York City to defy evil and restore the site of utter human devastation. 
We have refocused our priorities, acknowledging kindness, not only 
kindness for our friends and relatives, but a rejuvenated sense of 
benevolence toward strangers and fellow Americans. I see a confident 
nation, converging together, providing that we will not fall, we will 
not falter, we will not fail in a time of unforeseen cruelty toward our 
freedom land. We are reaching out to America's future in quiet and bold 
ways. I even see a rebirth of historical values and national pride.

  President George Washington wrote in his 1796 farewell address: ``The 
unity of government which constitutes you one people is also now dear to 
you. It is justly so, for it is a main pillar in the edifice of your 
real independence, the support of your tranquility at home, your peace 
abroad; of your safety; of your prosperity; of that very liberty which 
you so highly prize . . .'' Washington's words ring across more than 200 
years to reach America today and in the future. The future of America 
depends on our ability to secure unity and influence the well-being of 
active American citizens. Simply requiring a civics or history course 
for high school graduation is not enough. We should urge our youth to 
become involved in the social fabric of the community. The little things 
truly aid in reaching out to America's future: encouraging youth to 
register for voting, involving teenagers in mock political systems, 
having children understand the American flag, and ensuring appreciation 
toward war veterans and their roles in providing long-standing freedom 
in America.

  I have come to think of it as my responsibility, my mission, to in 
some way reach out to America's future. My grandparents remember where 
they were when Pearl Harbor was attacked by the Japanese. My parents 
remember where they were when John F. Kennedy was assassinated. And, I 
will forever remember exactly where I was on September 11, 2001, when 
terrorists attacked our Nation, killing thousands. My greatest 
achievement will be if a defining moment of my grandchildren's life is 
not a catastrophic preempt to war, or a brutal disheartening 
assassination of a loved President, or an act of horrific human 
destruction. But rather, their moment of true American unity and love 
for a nation will be when their grandmother reaches out to their curious 
eyes and big hearts, and tells them of her experiences as an American 
and what they must do to hopefully follow in her patriotic footsteps.

  As Thomas Jefferson suggested in his first Inaugural Speech, our 
principles for peace in the future depend on the ability to historically 
look back in order to look forward. Jefferson states, ``. . . Let us 
hasten to retrace our steps and to regain the road which alone leads to 
peace, liberty, and safety.'' The youth of America will bloom with 
bright hearts and clear visions if they are mindful of America's 
pursuits and ``retrace their footsteps'' of answers.

  America is living and breathing, and within this country there is 
embedded a recipe for survival and for peace. Our youth need the support 
and encouragement of patriotic citizens. We must trust in the goodness 
of people, and work toward a humane world, with the youth of America as 
leaders toward peace and justice. We must start with the seeds of 
tomorrow, the children of America's future, to not only establish a 
long-term remedy for terrorism, but to maintain strength, pursue unity, 
and forever sustain national loyalty.


                       Tuesday, September 17, 2002

IN REMEMBRANCE OF THE VICTIMS OF THE KATYN FOREST MASSACRE AND THE WORLD 
                          TRADE CENTER ATTACKS


                          Hon. Robert Menendez


                              of new jersey

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the victims of senseless and 
unspeakable atrocities. The New Jersey Division of the Polish American 
Congress sponsored a memorial service to remember those who lost their 
lives during the tragic Katyn Forest Massacre 62 years ago, and those 
killed during the attack on America, September 11, 2001. The service was 
held at the Katyn Monument site in Jersey City, NJ, on September 15, 
2002.
  After Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union maliciously invaded Poland in 
1939, the Polish citizenry fought bravely against both adversaries on 
two fronts. Unfortunately, in the process of valiantly defending their 
homeland, over 15,000 Polish soldiers, officers, intellectual leaders, 
prisoners of war, and other Polish citizens were brutally murdered. 
Perhaps one of the most unforgettable acts committed by the Soviet Union 
against Poland was later uncovered with the discovery of 4,500 bodies 
found in a single mass grave at the Katyn Forest, near Smolensk in the 
Soviet Union. This horrendous discovery became known as the Katyn Forest 
Massacre.
  And in an egregious attack against humanity, over 3,000 Americans and 
citizens representing more than 80 nationalities were lost at the World 
Trade Center, the Pentagon, and the fields of Somerset County, PA, on 
September 11, 2001. The heinous attacks on American soil reaffirmed our 
commitment to democracy in defense of a free and open society, 
threatened by evil, injustice, hatred, and tyranny.
  Today, I ask my colleagues to join me in honoring the lives lost in 
these tragedies. We shall never forget these acts of barbarism. And we 
shall never forget the innocent lives lost as we strive, as a people, to 
create a peaceful world.

                   SEPTEMBER 6, 2002: A TIME TO MOURN


                             Hon. Mike Pence


                               of indiana

  Mr. Speaker, the Good Book tells us that there is a time for every 
purpose under heaven. There is a time to weep and a time to mourn. On 
September 6 I joined some 250 of my colleagues in this body as we 
traveled to Federal Hall in New York City to do just that.
  We gathered at a place in which this Congress met and even adopted the 
Bill of Rights in 1789. We mourned with those who mourn and we wept with 
those who weep regarding the September 11 tragedy. The last time I was 
in New York City was September 21, 2001. I stood in the ashes and on the 
periphery of the devastation at Ground Zero.
  As we join to pray, Mr. Speaker, let us ever remember that we are also 
told that there is a time for peace and there is a time for war. As we 
pray for the bereaved let us also pray for wisdom for our President and 
our leadership in this institution as we choose the times and the days 
ahead for war.

                      IN MEMORY OF ADEL A. ZAKHARY


                          Hon. Robert Menendez


                              of new jersey

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to remember Adel A. Zakhary, a friend and 
neighbor to many, who lost his life in the World Trade Center tragedy on 
September 11, 2001. A memorial service took place in his honor on 
Saturday, September 14, 2002, at Saint George Catholic Orthodox Church 
in Jersey City.
  An immigrant from Egypt, Adel lived the American dream, making America 
his home with his wife, Nagat, son, George, and daughter, Mariam. He was 
dedicated and tireless in his work, and in providing for his family. On 
September 11, he went to work on the 92d floor of tower one of the World 
Trade Center, as he had for 18 years.
  In one of the most unforgivable acts against humanity, over 3,000 
people were lost at the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and the fields 
of Somerset County, PA, on September 11, 2001. Adel was among those 
individuals who were tragically lost. The horrific attacks have 
strengthened us in our resolve to fight evil and intolerance in pursuit 
of freedom, justice, and democracy.
  Today I ask my colleagues to join me in remembering Adel A. Zakhary, a 
loving husband and father, who will never be forgotten. Let us join 
together not only to grieve this tremendous loss, but also to celebrate 
the remarkable accomplishments in his life. I extend my deepest 
sympathies to the family and friends of Adel.

                  SEPTEMBER 11, 2002: TRIBUTE TO FREEDOM


                             Hon. Mike Pence


                               of indiana

  Mr. Speaker, the United States of America is founded on the 
fundamental principle that all citizens have the inalienable right to 
life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.
  The United States of America stands as a beacon of freedom and 
opportunity for everyone regardless of race, creed or religious belief.
  The strength and vitality of the United States of America is in the 
diversity of its people, the diversity of its ideas, the freedom to 
express those ideas and the opportunity to achieve one's potential and 
direct one's destiny.
  Mr. Speaker, these ideals and principles are absolute and will not be 
surrendered or weakened by the cowardly acts of terrorists who fear the 
sunshine of freedom and the responsibility it brings.
  Let us forever remember that the date September 11 reaffirms the 
principles for which the United States of America was founded and that 
on this day each year freedom shall ring from every community in this 
great land and the voice of America will be heard around the world.

           IN MEMORY OF SEPTEMBER 11 AND ITS FORGOTTEN VICTIMS


                             Hon. Dan Burton


                               of indiana

  Mr. Speaker, we are commemorating the terrible attack on America on 
September 11 last year. This was an event in which about 3,000 people 
lost their lives. A year later, they are in our prayers.
  Also in our prayers are the other victims--those who were subjected to 
violent, unfair attacks in the aftermath of September 11. One of these 
was Balbir Singh Sodhi, a gasoline station owner from Arizona. He was 
murdered at his gas station by someone who apparently mistook him for a 
follower of Osama bin Laden. His brother, Sukhpal Singh Sodhi, a cab 
driver in the San Francisco Bay area, was recently killed in his 
taxicab. I am sure that we would all like to extend our sympathies to 
the Sodhi family.
  No one should be killed because of his religion. Even if Mr. Sodhi had 
been a Muslim and a follower of bin Laden, that would not justify 
murdering him. But what makes this crime even more disturbing is that 
this perception was a mistake. Mr. Sodhi was a Sikh, not a Muslim.
  Sikhism is an independent, monotheistic, revealed religion that 
believes in the equality of all people, including gender equality. It is 
not part of either Hinduism or Islam, yet because of the turbans they 
wear, which are required by their religion, Sikhs are sometimes mistaken 
for Muslim followers of bin Laden.
  The violence has mostly ended, but unfortunately, there are still some 
unrelated violent incidents. I call for an end to all these attacks and 
for full and prompt prosecution of all the people responsible.
  Mr. Speaker, I would like to place the Council of Khalistan's recent 
press release on the anniversary of September 11 into the Record at this 
time.

    In Memory of Those Killed in Last Year's Attack on United States

Sikhs Suffered the Most After the Attacks; Council of Khalistan Condemns 
          Attacks, Calls for End to Violence Against Minorities


  Washington, D.C., September 11, 2002.--Dr. Gurmit Singh Aulakh, 
President of the Council of Khalistan, today remembered the attacks on 
America a year ago that killed almost 3,000 Americans. He also condemned 
the violence against Sikh Americans and other minorities that broke out 
in the wake of the September 11 attacks.

  ``On behalf of the 21-million strong Sikh Nation and especially on 
behalf of more than 500,000 Sikh Americans, we remember with sadness and 
outrage the attacks on America a year ago and offer our prayers and 
sympathies on this sad anniversary to the people of the United States 
for the terrible attack on the United States and for the loss of life it 
entails,'' Dr. Aulakh said. ``We especially pray for the families of 
those who have departed.''

  ``America must do what it can to eradicate terrorism from the world,'' 
Dr. Aulakh said. ``We support all the efforts to do so and we must do 
our part as American citizens,'' he said. ``This sad anniversary reminds 
us that we stand together as a nation. We must show unity on this 
occasion.''

  ``We also condemn the violence against Sikhs and other minorities that 
took place last year after the September 11 attacks,'' Dr. Aulakh said. 
``Sikhs suffered the most in the post-September 11 violence,'' he said. 
``The very first victim of this violence was Balbir Singh Sodhi, a Sikh 
gasoline station owner from the Phoenix area,'' he noted. ``Recently, 
his brother was killed in his taxicab. All this violence must stop,'' 
Dr. Aulakh said.

  ``Nobody should be killed for his or her religion, whether Sikh, 
Muslim, Christian, Jewish, Hindu, or whatever religion one may follow,'' 
Dr. Aulakh said. ``But it is important to note that Sikhs are not 
Muslims nor followers of bin Laden. ``We condemn bin Laden,'' he said. 
``Unfortunately, because of the turbans we are required to wear, many 
people mistake Sikhs for bin Laden followers,'' he said. ``The Sikh 
religion is an independent, monotheistic, sovereign religion that 
believes in the equality of the whole human race, including gender 
equality,'' he said. ``Daily we pray for the well-being of the whole 
human race.''

  In the wake of the September 11 attacks, a couple of young Sikhs were 
attacked in Brooklyn. Sikh businesses have been stoned and cars have 
been burned. A Sikh boy was even shot in New York. Many Muslims and 
other minorities were also subjected to violent attacks.

  ``We hope that there will not be any more of these incidents in 
connection with the anniversary of the attacks. ``Violence against 
innocent people of any religion or ethnicity is unacceptable,'' said Dr. 
Aulakh. ``It must be condemned and the violence must be ended.''

                           FOSELLA-WATT MOTION


                         Hon. Carolyn B. Maloney


                               of new york

  Mr. Speaker, as we continue our war on terrorism, we must remain 
vigilant in our efforts to decimate the terrorists who are threatening 
our very existence and have singled out Americans who represent freedom 
and democracy, so cherished by our citizens.
  I strongly support the Fossella-Watt motion, which will finally allow 
American victims of international terrorism to receive compensation from 
blocked assets--judgments they were already awarded.
  Last week, we commemorated the anniversary of 9/11, a day that marked 
the most devastating acts ever committed on U.S. soil.
  There may not be another Member of Congress who lost more constituents 
in the September 11 attacks on the World Trade Center than I did.
  I knew countless numbers of victims and their families. One year 
later, the pain and hardship go on. No amount of money can bring back 
our loved ones, but this motion can work to prevent future tragic acts 
of terrorism.
  The Fossella-Watt motion paralyzes the financial resources of those 
terrorist organizations and increases our ability to go after the 
sources of funding for these organizations and cells. It sends a message 
to terrorists that we will not stand for the murder of innocent 
Americans. And those who target Americans will be punished.
  The United States must use every tool in its arsenal--military, 
diplomatic, and legal--to protect Americans and other innocent parties 
against these random acts of terror.
  The Fossella-Watt motion is a tool to weaken the terrorist grip.
  I urge my colleagues to retain this provision in the final version of 
the terrorism insurance bill.


                      Thursday, September 19, 2002

                     IN MEMORY OF META FULLER WALLER


                           Hon. James P. Moran


                               of virginia

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the memory of Meta Fuller Waller, a 
dear friend to many, a dedicated public servant, and athletic team 
captain who tragically lost her life in the Pentagon on September 11, 
2001.
  Born into a family steeped in the civil rights movement, Meta Waller 
learned at a very young age an appreciation for the arts and the value 
of a good education. Her two famous grandparents, Meta Warrick Fuller, 
an African-American sculptor and Solomon Carter Fuller, the first 
African-American psychiatrist in the United States, inspired Meta to 
pursue her dreams regardless of what stood in her path. These instilled 
values guided Meta throughout life, especially during the sorrowful loss 
of some of her closest family members.
  With a bachelor's degree from the University of Michigan and a 
master's degree from the prestigious Harvard Kennedy School of 
Government in 1982, Meta worked hard to meet the many challenges she 
faced as the Special Programs Manager for the Administrative Assistant 
to the Secretary of the Army. In her 12 years at the Pentagon, Meta was 
heavily involved in the Combined Federal Campaign (CFC), the annual 
fundraising drive conducted by Federal employees on behalf of numerous 
non-profit charities. She diligently served as the Army CFC 
administrator for 14 years and helped raise in excess of $30 million to 
benefit the least fortunate in our society.
  An avid writer and poet, Meta charmed those fortunate enough to 
witness her literary talent. Meta's active imagination made her a gifted 
storyteller whose vividly refreshing tales could keep an audience 
spellbound for hours. Always in search of new challenges, Meta picked up 
the game of tennis much later in life than most. Despite a lack of past 
exposure to the sport, she rose to become captain of her women's tennis 
team, holding the position for 3 years.
  Ever conscientious and adventure seeking, Meta's passions led her to 
travel the world often. Her most recent trip took her to Durban, South 
Africa, for the World Conference on Racism. Traveling with a group of 
schoolchildren, Meta gained a first-hand knowledge of the continuing 
struggle to end racism across the globe. Upon returning home, Meta told 
family members that the experience had changed her life.
  Mr. Speaker, Meta's life serves as a testament to us all that with 
love and determination we can overcome any odds and lead inspired lives. 
Everyone misses her dearly but the memory of her indomitable spirit will 
never be forgotten.

                 TERRORIST ATTACKS OF SEPTEMBER 11, 2001


                         Hon. Timothy V. Johnson


                               of illinois

  Mr. Speaker, last Wednesday our Nation commemorated the terrorist 
attacks of September 11, 2001. While these attacks were committed on the 
World Trade Center and the Pentagon, they were in fact directed at our 
Nation as a whole. Our freedom, our way of life, the very foundations of 
our great democracy, were ruthlessly targeted by an unprecedented force 
of evil. Now, 1 year later, our Nation is stronger and more unified than 
ever to rid the world of terrorism in all of its forms, as well as its 
root causes including poverty, injustice, and despair. It is my sincere 
hope that America never forgets the terrible atrocities committed within 
our borders. These acts were a direct attack upon freedom-loving people 
everywhere and we have a duty to ensure that freedom and democracy 
prevail in this struggle against tyranny and oppression.

                            RACING REMEMBERS


                           Hon. Ernie Fletcher


                               of kentucky

  Mr. Speaker, it is an honor for me to recognize the American racing 
industry for its response to the terrible tragedies our Nation suffered 
a year ago. I am deeply gratified to note that the Nation's horseracing 
industry, which is of such great importance to the Commonwealth of 
Kentucky, shared in our Nation's ceremonies of remembrance on September 
11. Yesterday, all across the country, our racetracks, owners, trainers 
and jockeys all stood together to remember what happened a year ago and 
to honor those who were lost and those who showed such great courage in 
the aftermath of the terrorist attacks.
  The National Thoroughbred Racing Association requested that all 
racetracks operating on September 11 cease normal business operations to 
share in a 10-minute, nationally simulcast observance at 4:10 p.m. 
eastern time. All across the country, there was no racing or related 
activity at any NTRA-member facilities during the brief, dignified and 
patriotic service which included a flag ceremony, a moment of silence, 
the singing of the national anthem and a video tribute.
  The nationwide ceremony allowed racing and its fans to remember 
September 11 together, even though they were at many different 
locations, because the observance was broadcast via simulcast to many 
different facilities from Del Mar Thoroughbred Track in California. It 
was hosted by Emmy Award-winning broadcaster Dick Enberg.
  This observance was the culmination of a year-long effort by the 
racing industry to raise funds for individuals and families devastated 
by the attacks. Over the past year, members of the international 
thoroughbred horseracing community, including tracks, horse owners, 
trainers, grooms, jockeys and veterinarians, have contributed more than 
$12 million to assist the families of those lost on September 11.
  I am proud that the American racing and breeding industry has 
responded so patriotically to our Nation's ordeal and assisted so many 
Americans hurt by those tragic attacks.

                       IN HONOR OF FRANKIE M. MENO


                        Hon. Robert A. Underwood


                                 of guam

  Mr. Speaker, today I share with you an open letter written to the 
American public by my constituent, Frankie Michael Meno. This letter was 
composed to recognize the losses of September 11, 2001, on the 1-year 
anniversary of the terror attacks against America. Mr. Meno's letter was 
accompanied by a CD containing a song, ``America,'' which he wrote, and 
performed in the company of his stepchildren, nieces and nephews: 
Jessica, Sarah, and Mason Inder, and Shay, Daverin, and Davin Diaz.
  Mr. Meno, a resident of lnarajan, GU, began writing songs in 2000. He 
finds the process simple as the melody and words come to him almost 
automatically. His song ``America'' was inspired by the pride he felt 
watching the closing ceremonies of the Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake 
City, UT, where people of all nationalities, languages, and colors came 
together as one. Mr. Meno hopes ``America's message of peace and freedom 
can be extended to all corners of the world.''
  In speaking of Mr. Meno, I wish to convey to you his pride in America 
and his 16 years of service with the U.S. Marines, his love of his 
family and children Christelle, Joseph, Antonia, and Jessica, and his 
grandchildren Isaiah and Jaythan, and his desire to use his songmaking 
abilities to help the victims of the terrorist attacks and to assist 
rebuilding Guam's educational system. Mr. Meno's song is one patriotic 
American's expression of our Nation's feelings of loss, recognition of 
our citizens' heroism, and the ultimate hope that America's freedom can 
be shared with the world. These sentiments are held by all of us, and I 
am glad to be able to share this letter with you today.


                                                      September 11, 2002

  Dear Fellow Americans, on this day, we join you in remembering your 
loved ones who left us on September 11, 2001. We would like to join with 
you in recognizing and remembering the brave men and women of the New 
York Fire Department, the New York Police Department, and the other 
heroes who sacrificed their lives to save another's. It is these 
extraordinary deeds from ordinary people that make us all proud to call 
ourselves Americans; your voices and deeds will never be forgotten.

  My family and the people of Guam salute and embrace the American 
people and the noble ideas they stand for. I dedicate this song to the 
mothers and fathers, the sons and daughters, and the men and women who 
made the ultimate sacrifice to bring freedom and democracy to the island 
of Guam during World War II. I would also like to dedicate it to the 
American servicemen and to the people all over the world who long for 
freedom and democracy. I dream of the day when all the children of the 
world will be able to enjoy liberty's blessings. God bless Guam, God 
bless America, and God bless the world.

    Semper Fidelis,


                                                   Frankie Michael Meno.


                       Tuesday, September 24, 2002

   HONORING HEROISM AND COURAGE DISPLAYED BY AIRLINE FLIGHT ATTENDANTS


                            Hon. John L. Mica


                               of Florida

  Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and concur in the Senate 
concurrent resolution (S. Con. Res. 110) honoring the heroism and 
courage displayed by airline flight attendants on a daily basis.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                            S. Con. Res. 110


  Whereas over 100,000 men and women in the United States serve as 
flight attendants;

  Whereas flight attendants dedicate themselves to serving and 
protecting their passengers;

  Whereas flight attendants react to dangerous situations as the first 
line of defense of airline passengers;

  Whereas safety and security are the primary concerns of flight 
attendants;

  Whereas flight attendants evacuate passengers from an airplane in 
emergency situations;

  Whereas flight attendants defend passengers against hijackers, 
terrorists, and abusive passengers;

  Whereas flight attendants handle in-flight medical emergencies;

  Whereas flight attendants perform routine safety and service duties on 
board the aircraft;

  Whereas 25 flight attendants lost their lives aboard 4 hijacked 
flights on September 11, 2001;

  Whereas 5 flight attendants helped to prevent United Flight 93 from 
reaching its intended target on September 11, 2001;

  Whereas flight attendants provided assistance to passengers across the 
United States who had their flights diverted on September 11, 2001;

  Whereas flight attendants on American Airlines Flight 63 helped to 
subdue Richard Reid on December 22, 2001, thereby preventing him from 
detonating an explosive device in his shoe intended to bring down the 
airplane and kill all 185 passengers and 12 crew members on board; and

  Whereas flight attendants helped to prevent Pablo Moreira, a Uruguayan 
citizen, from breaking into the cockpit on February 7, 2002, during 
United Flight 855 from Miami to Buenos Aires: Now therefore be it

  Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives concurring), That 
Congress--

  (1) expresses its profound gratitude for the faithful service provided 
by flight attendants to make air travel safe;

  (2) honors the courage and dedication of flight attendants;

  (3) supports all the flight attendants who continue to display heroism 
on a daily basis, as they had been doing before, during, and after 
September 11, 2001; and

  (4) shall send a copy of this resolution to a family member of each of 
the flight attendants killed on September 11, 2001.

  Mr. Speaker, this afternoon we take up as a body S. Con. Res. 110. 
That resolution addresses a long overdue requirement of this House, and 
that is to honor the heroism and also the courage displayed by our 
flight attendants not only on September 11 but on a daily basis.
  Mr. Speaker, on September 11, 2001, more than 3,000 innocent people 
lost their lives. This devastating number includes some 25 flight 
attendants who were on board the four hijacked aircraft on that day. As 
a result of the tragic events of that fateful day, the vital role that 
these men and women play as a very first line of defense became 
painfully evident. Flight attendants react and they also provide 
essential guidance to passengers during emergency situations. Flight 
attendants are in fact responsible and primarily concerned with 
passenger safety. Once the aircraft door is closed, they not only 
provide safety for the traveling public but also become our very first 
line of defense in aircraft security. They also guarantee that there are 
in fact additional eyes and ears on guard for suspicious and threatening 
behavior.
  Examples of their acts of heroism and service include the actions of 
the 25 flight attendants who lost their lives on September 11 in the 4 
aircraft that were hijacked that day. Mr. Speaker, we have honored 
firefighters, police, pilots, and ordinary citizens. Today it is fitting 
that we take some time to recognize those flight attendants who served 
both the aviation industry, the public, and America so well. It is also 
important to note that we also have the remarkable assistance that these 
flight attendants provide every day and particularly on the day that 
those flights around the Nation and around the world were diverted.
  The flight attendants on American Airlines flight 63 last December 
recognized the terrible threat that that aircraft faced. It was not 
security guards. It was not air marshals. It was not a large force. It 
was flight attendants who helped subdue the attempted and now somewhat 
infamous shoe bomber, Richard Reid. They acted. They saved the lives of 
countless passengers on that aircraft. We are indebted to those flight 
attendants.
  Also flight attendants helped prevent another tragedy on a flight. 
United flight 855 in February of this year, a deranged individual 
attempted to break into a cockpit. I believe that was on a flight from 
South America to Miami. They also acted with heroism.
  In recognition of their vital role as a first line of defense, the 
House voted in July to strengthen the flight attendant training program, 
and those reforms are long overdue because sometimes these flight 
attendants are left at bay to fight these terrorist acts and other 
disruptions on aircraft. H.R. 4635, which is primarily devoted to arming 
pilots and allowing pilots to defend themselves, also requires that 
flight attendants receive much needed hands-on training in self-defense 
so they too can defend themselves, the passengers, the aircraft, and 
again serve as a first line of defense.
  As H.R. 4635 demonstrates, the House supports these brave men and 
women and wants to ensure their safety and their security along with 
that of the flying public.
  So today we are considering S. Con. Res. 110. The House passed a 
similar version of this concurrent resolution earlier this month. The 
concurrent resolution recognizes the over 100,000 airline flight 
attendants who have dedicated themselves to serving and protecting our 
passengers, the flying public, on a daily basis. It also recognizes the 
courage and heroism of those who lost their lives on September 11. It 
expresses Congress' profound gratitude to airline flight attendants and 
it rightfully honors their courage and dedication. For all these reasons 
and many more, I encourage my colleagues in the House to pass the Senate 
concurrent resolution so rightfully honoring our flight attendants.


                            Hon. Jim Matheson


                                 of Utah

  I want to thank the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Mica), our 
subcommittee chairman. I have enjoyed serving on the Subcommittee on 
Aviation under his leadership, and I appreciate his leadership on this 
bill today.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of S. Con. Res. 110. It is such an 
appropriate thing for us to be doing in terms of recognizing the service 
and honor and courage of over 100,000 flight attendants that fly in the 
skies above this country. It is important that we acknowledge their 
service. And something that has helped us focus on this service is the 
actions that took place on September 11 and actions that took place 
subsequent to September 11.
  As was mentioned, 25 flight attendants lost their lives that day. That 
same day let us not forget that all the other planes that were up in the 
sky were ordered down on the ground by the FAA and a number of flight 
attendants on all those flights on that day faced some real challenges. 
They faced the fear that we all felt that day, but they also faced the 
job of having to work with a number of passengers on all those airplanes 
that were being diverted and asked to land on emergency notice, and the 
flight attendants in this country served us well that day in terms of 
dealing with that difficult situation, and that applies to the days 
following September 11. We had a public that was nervous, and the flight 
attendants represented the face of courage. They were the first line of 
defense, quite frankly, in maintaining security on those airplanes.
  We know the stories about how they caught the shoe bomber, Richard 
Reid. We know that the flight attendants are keeping their eyes open.
  So it is appropriate that we honor them in this context, but we ought 
to honor them also for all the work they have done. Let us face it. When 
they get on that airplane, they are the face of the airline for which 
they work. The traveling public at times experiences some frustrations 
maybe through delays, maybe through the weather or what not. Sometimes 
those frustrations are unfairly directed toward flight attendants 
because they are the ones who are there interacting with the public, and 
I think that as a profession they deal with that situation so well and 
they certainly deserve our gratitude and our respect.
  It is important that we do not forget the folks who lost their lives 
September 11, those 25 flight attendants, and we owe them a lot. We owe 
them this resolution today to honor what they have done but we owe them 
more. We owe them the commitment that we are going to continue to move 
forward and try to encourage as good a security situation as we can get 
in our aviation industry. That is the commitment we need to make to the 
flight attendants as well. They are on the front lines, and we are going 
to do whatever we can do to back them up to make sure this is a secure 
situation in our aviation industry.
  So it is with great pleasure that I advocate support of S. Con. Res. 
110.


                          Hon. Carolyn McCarthy


                               of New York

  Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of S. Con. Res. 110. The women and men 
who make up America's flight attendant workforce deserve recognition for 
their role as safety professionals. As the eyes and ears of the aircraft 
cabin, flight attendants have historically provided detailed information 
on countless safety issues.
  Flight attendants are a highly trained, highly skilled workforce, 
charged with the safety and security of passengers, other crewmembers, 
and the aircraft itself.
  On September 11, 2001, 25 flight attendants on board the 4 hijacked 
flights provided the government with vital information, and with little 
more than their own ingenuity and bravery, fought the armed hijackers 
and performed their duties as safety professionals to the end.
  Since that day, safety in the air is of paramount concern to millions. 
We now understand the vulnerability that flight crews have felt for 
years. But today, more than 12 months after the attacks on our Nation, 
flight attendants are no more prepared to defend the flying public today 
than they were on the morning of September 11, 2001.
  Air Tran flight attendant Susan Cosby began developing her airline's 
voluntary defense training program within days of September 11. In a 
visit to my office, Cosby posed this question, ``Flight attendants have 
always been expected to save lives in emergencies. Why should defending 
the flying public from the threat of terrorism be any different?''
  Now more than ever, it is crucial for us to recognize the importance 
of flight attendants. It is my hope of America's 100,000 flight 
attendants, that the Congress will quickly pass meaningful security 
training legislation.

                VICTIMS OF TERRORIST ATTACKS MEMORIAL ACT


                          Hon. James V. Hansen


                                 of Utah

  Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass the bill (H.R. 2982) 
to authorize the establishment of a memorial within the area in the 
District of Columbia referred to in the Commemorative Works Act as 
``Area I'' or ``Area II'' to the victims of terrorist attacks on the 
United States, to provide for the design and construction of such a 
memorial, and for other purposes, as amended.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                                H.R. 2982


  Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled,

                    SECTION 1. AUTHORIZATION OF MEMORIAL.


  (a) In General.--The Advisory Board established in section 2(a) is 
authorized to establish a memorial (referred to hereafter in this Act as 
the ``Memorial'') in accordance with this Act on Federal lands 
administered by the National Park Service in the District of Columbia 
and its environs (as defined in section 2(e) of the Commemorative Works 
Act (40 U.S.C. 1002(e)) to victims who died as a result of terrorist 
acts against the United States or its people, at home or abroad, except 
those individuals identified by the Attorney General of the United 
States as participating or conspiring in terrorist-related activities.

  (b) Detail of Employees.--The Secretary of the Interior (referred to 
hereafter in this Act as the ``Secretary'') shall detail to the Advisory 
Board such support staff as are necessary to assist the members of the 
Advisory Board in carrying out its responsibilities.

  (c) Relationship to the Commemorative Works Act.--The Commemorative 
Works Act (40 U.S.C. 1001 et seq.) shall apply to the Memorial, with the 
exception of section 3(c) of that Act which shall not apply to the 
Memorial.

                    SEC. 2. ADVISORY BOARD.


  (a) Establishment.--There is established an advisory board to be known 
as the ``Victims of Terrorism Memorial Advisory Board'' (referred to 
hereafter in this Act as the ``Advisory Board'').

  (b) Members.--The Advisory Board shall consist of 13 members who shall 
be appointed, not later than 3 months after the date of the enactment of 
this Act, by the President (in consultation with the Secretary of the 
Interior and the Secretary of Defense) from interested persons, 
including representatives of organizations dedicated to assisting 
victims of terrorism and their families.

  (c) Chairperson.--The Chairperson of the Advisory Board shall be one 
of its Members elected by a majority of the Members at the first meeting 
of the Advisory Board.

  (d) Terms; Vacancies.--Members of the Advisory Board shall serve for 
the life of the Advisory Board. The President shall make appointments to 
fill any vacancies that occur.

  (e) Duties.--The Advisory Board shall--

  (1) raise necessary funds to establish, design, construct, and 
maintain the Memorial; and

  (2) begin consultation under section 7 of the Commemorative Works Act 
not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act.

  (f) Donations.--The Advisory Board may accept donations on behalf of 
the United States for the establishment, design, construction, and 
maintenance of the Memorial.

  (g) Termination.--The Advisory Board shall terminate not later than 
120 days after completion of the Memorial.

  (h) FACA.--The Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) shall 
not apply to the Advisory Board.

                    SEC. 3. DEPOSIT OF EXCESS FUNDS.


  If, upon payment of all expenses of the establishment of the Memorial 
(including the maintenance and preservation amount provided for in 
section 8(b) of the Commemorative Works Act), or upon expiration of the 
authority for the Memorial under section 10(b) of that Act, there 
remains a balance in the funds received under section 3(f) for 
maintenance of the Memorial, the Chairperson of the Advisory Board shall 
transfer the amount of the balance to the Secretary of the Treasury for 
deposit in the account provided for in section 8(b)(1) of that Act.

  H.R. 2982, introduced by the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Turner), who 
has worked so tirelessly on this legislation, and sponsored by myself 
and over 121 Members of the House of Representatives, would establish a 
memorial to the victims who died as a result of terrorist acts against 
the United States or its people.
  The gentleman from Texas (Mr. Turner) went out of his way to do an 
exceptionally fine job on this legislation. One of the most interesting 
hearings we have had in the Committee on Resources was put on by him. It 
included Lisa Beamer whose husband Todd was part of flight 93 that 
crashed in Pennsylvania and coined that phrase, ``Let's roll,'' with the 
President standing there in front of the Chair where he sat.
  Mr. Brady Howell, whose wife, Liz, works for us in the Committee on 
Resources. Brady was the all-American boy. He was an Eagle Scout. He was 
a 4.0 student. He was the quarterback. He was the student body 
president. He was a missionary for his church. He did everything one can 
imagine and had a great sense of humor.
  Mr. Joe Finley, a New York firefighter, who most of his squadron was 
killed on that tragic day.
  Lt. Col. Terry Andersen, who went into the Pentagon and saved many 
people and worked diligently.
  So many illustrations of honor.
  This bill would authorize a memorial to victims who died as a result 
of terrorism against the United States or its people at home or abroad, 
except those individuals identified as participating or conspiring on 
terrorist-related activities.
  Mr. Speaker, the great memorials that dot the landscape of our 
Nation's Capital reflect the course of American history and are a 
constant reminder of our commitment to freedom, justice and democracy. 
We see these shared values in our monuments to great leaders, and we see 
them in our memorials to the soldiers who died in great wars fought in 
Europe, in the Pacific, in Korea and in Vietnam.
  The new war of the 21st century, this war on terrorism, will not be 
marked by one geographic location. It is a global war that has been, is, 
and will be fought at home and abroad. Already thousands of people have 
lost their lives to terrorist attacks on the United States. These 
victims of terrorist attacks deserve solemn tribute, for they died at 
the hands of enemies of America simply because they were Americans.
  Mr. Speaker, H.R. 2982 would authorize the establishment of an 
advisory board to raise funds for the design, construction, and 
maintenance of a living memorial, and to work with the National Capital 
Memorial Commission and the Secretary of the Interior on the placement 
of the memorial.
  H.R. 2982 will honor those Americans whose lives have been lost to 
terrorism and will symbolize the great struggle in which we are now 
engaged. Someday this memorial will mark the time and the course of 
history when freedom and respect for the dignity of man overcame tyranny 
and hate and evil. Indeed, it will stand for the age when America faced 
its greatest challenge.
  I urge my colleagues to support H.R. 2982, as amended.


                             Hon. Jim Turner


                                of Texas

  Two weeks ago we observed the 1-year anniversary of the September 11 
attacks on our Nation. It was on that date in 2001 that our Nation was 
made acutely aware of the threats posed by those who seek to destroy our 
way of life.
  Since then we have come together as a Nation and remembered those who 
lost their lives and we have pledged jointly an unwavering resolve to 
win the war on terrorism no matter what the cost and no matter how long 
it takes. This legislation, which was introduced by the gentleman from 
Utah (Mr. Hansen) and me, would authorize the establishment of a 
national memorial to all the victims of terrorism in attacks against the 
United States or its people including those who died on September 11.
  It has been said that the war on terrorism may be known as the first 
war of the 21st century. It will not be marked by any specific 
geographic location because it is global. It has been and will be fought 
at home and abroad. This national memorial created by this bill will be 
dedicated to the memory of those victims who lose their lives and have 
lost their lives at the hands of terrorists. The memorial will reflect, 
in my view, the history of the struggle in which we are engaged, and 
will remind future generations of the challenges that we faced and the 
challenges that we have overcome through courage and bravery of the 
American people.
  As the gentleman from Utah (Mr. Hansen) mentioned, this legislation 
creates a 13-member advisory board appointed by the President and 
includes representatives from organizations dedicated to assisting the 
victims of terrorism. The advisory board is charged with the duty of 
raising the funds from private sources to establish, design, construct 
and maintain this memorial. In accordance with the Commemorative Works 
Act, the advisory board will consult with the appropriate commissions 
already provided by existing law regarding the site selection and design 
of this memorial.
  When the House Committee on Resources held its hearing on this bill, 
we were honored, as the gentleman from Utah (Mr. Hansen) mentioned, to 
hear from several outstanding Americans whose lives, like so many 
Americans, were personally and forever changed on September 11. Their 
testimony spoke eloquently of the significance of a national memorial to 
the victims of terrorism.
  Liz Howell, who is on the staff of the Committee on Resources, whose 
husband, Brady, died at the Pentagon, said so eloquently ``I believe a 
national monument to terrorism would become a hallowed place for the 
people of this generation to remember and grieve. Perhaps even more 
important, it will teach future generations about the heroism, the 
sacrifice, and the patriotism that surrounded the deaths of people who 
simply died because they were Americans.''
  That quote from Liz Howell represents, I think, so very eloquently the 
purposes embodied in this legislation.
  We heard from Lisa Beamer, whose husband Todd was among the heroes of 
flight 93. We heard from Joe Finley, a New York firefighter, who 
testified on behalf of this legislation, that he lost many in his 
firehouse who sacrificed their lives at the World Trade Center. Lt. Col. 
Ted Anderson, who rushed into the fiery flames of the Pentagon, saving 
many of his friends and colleagues there, spoke of a need for a national 
memorial. They all shared their hopes that this memorial would not only 
be a tribute to those who lost their lives but a constant reminder to 
the American people of the importance of courage, bravery, and 
patriotism.
  It is my hope that at some point in the future this memorial will mark 
a time in the course of our history when freedom and respect for the 
dignity of man overcame hate and evil. It will stand for the period in 
our history when our country stood tall, persevered and protected peace 
and civility for all mankind.
  Mr. Speaker, we hope that the House will join us in unanimously 
supporting this legislation to create this memorial to the victims of 
terrorism.


                         Hon. Nick J. Rahall II


                            of west virginia

  Mr. Speaker, while the text of this legislation refers to a memorial 
intended to honor anyone who has ever been the victim of a terrorist 
attack on the United States, our hearings on this measure focused on the 
victims of the September 11 hijackings and attacks on the World Trade 
Center and the Pentagon. Those events are the catalysts for this 
legislation.
  While it has been said often, it cannot be said often enough: our 
thoughts and prayers continue to go to those affected by the events of 
that awful day. While we as a Nation have attempted to go on with our 
lives, the tragedy and loss of that day are never far from our hearts or 
minds.
  The scope and severity of that terrible tragedy make it difficult to 
know how best to memorialize those who were lost.
  Mr. Turner's bill is one approach and we will support it, but there 
may be others.
  It is our hope that, over time, we may all gain the wisdom and 
perspective to devise a memorial, or series of memorials, that will tell 
the story of these attacks, the people who were lost, their families and 
our resulting efforts to end the threat of terrorism, in such a way that 
future generations will never forget these events.
  Better yet, if we do it right, perhaps such a memorial could, in some 
small way, reduce the chance that a future generation will have to 
endure such a tragedy.


                       Hon. Eleanor Holmes Norton


                         of District of Columbia

  Memorializing the victims of the war on terrorism is the least we can 
do.
  I am going to support this bill with some reservation because it 
continues to violate the 25-year rule. I want to give Members some 
context for that. A bill was brought forward early in this Congress to 
establish a Ronald Reagan memorial on the mall. The Bush administration 
did not support it because it did not want to set that precedent and it 
is sufficient to say did not support violating the 25-year rule. Nobody 
who remembers the tenure of Ronald Reagan both in this city and out of 
the country can doubt that his legacy will withstand the 25-year rule. 
The World War II memorial is going up now, more than 25 years after 
World War II. No one has pressed forward an Oklahoma City memorial 
though that was one of America's great tragedies of the 20th century. 
The Martin Luther King memorial could not be built until 25 years after 
his death.
  I say all this because the House needs to understand the context and 
why it is this way. We lost a number of residents in 9/11. A number of 
those working in the Pentagon came right from the District of Columbia. 
The most visible ones were three children and their three teachers. I 
certainly want to see them memorialized on the mall. The context, 
though, we have to understand is what is happening to the mall. We 
literally are in danger in one generation of using up virtually all the 
prime space of the mall. Yet the mall was meant for eternity. That is 
why there is a 25-year rule. We must not get to where London is now. 
London is having to tear down memorials in order to allow memorials to 
go up. That is not the only reason that the Commemorative Works Act has 
a 25-year rule that says to Congress, step back, and the reason that 
Congress has stepped back in each and every occasion, the pain of a 
memorial may be fresh, the reputation of a personage needs time to gel. 
History needs to inform us and see in context what it is we want to do.
  We know that memorials are best when there is a nationwide 
competition, when people who have looked at memorials over time can 
bring their expertise to bear, and that is going to happen here. We know 
that we cannot sit here and say where a memorial should be built, that 
we have got to trust those with whom we have delegated this 
responsibility. That is gone.
  I will submit for the Record the letter of Mr. Cogbill so that the 
Record can be fully informed with respect to the problems that the 
initial bill has.
  Mr. Speaker, I want to once again express my appreciation to the 
gentleman from Utah (Mr. Hansen) and certainly to the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Turner) for the great sensitivity they both have shown in 
designing this bill. I support the bill with the reservations I have 
noted.
  The letter previously referred to follows:


                                    National Capital Planning Commission


                                         Washington, DC, March 19, 2002.

                    Hon. James V. Hansen, chairman,

                    Committee on Resources,

                    House of Representatives, Washington, DC.

Re Terrorism Memorial

  Dear Chairman Hansen: I am writing to express the concerns of the 
National Capital Planning Commission with regard to H.R. 2982, a bill 
that would authorize a memorial in Washington, DC, to victims of 
terrorist attacks on the United States.

  The Commission mourns the tragic loss of life resulting from terrorist 
attacks on the United States, including the atrocities committed on 
September 11, when terrorists orchestrated the most devastating attack 
on American soil in our Nation's history. We share the desire to find 
appropriate ways to remember and honor the victims, but we urge that, 
consistent with the Commemorative Works Act (CWA), sufficient time be 
allowed to pass so that these tragic events are put in proper historical 
perspective before commencing the process of locating and designing such 
an important national memorial.

  As you are aware, the process for establishing memorials in the 
Nation's Capital is governed by the CWA. By setting forth criteria for 
the subject matter, location, and design of memorials, the CWA is 
intended to preserve the integrity of the L'Enfant and McMillan Plans 
for the Nation's Capital, while protecting and maintaining the limited 
amount of open space available on and around the Mall.

  The Commission is concerned that H.R. 2982 circumvents one of the key 
provisions of the CWA--the 25-year waiting period for the authorization 
of new memorials in the Nation's Capital. The purpose of this provision, 
which states that a memorial ``shall not be authorized'' by Congress 
until at least 25 years after the death of the individual or event, is 
to ensure that enough time passes following an event for policymakers 
and historians to gain an appropriate historical perspective before 
establishing a permanent memorial in the Nation's Capital.

  Just as with other tragedies in American history--from Gettysburg to 
Pearl Harbor to Oklahoma City--a more meaningful and appropriate place 
to honor victims at this time might be at the sites of the tragedies 
themselves. Congress has already authorized legislation for a memorial 
at the Pentagon, and permanent memorials at the World Trade Center and 
at the Pennsylvania crash site are currently being considered.

  Other provisions of H.R. 2982 are also inconsistent with the CWA. In 
order to help preserve the limited number of sites available in area I 
(sites on or near the Mall), the CWA requires passage of a separate act 
of Congress, following a recommendation by the National Capital Memorial 
Commission, before locating a memorial in this prominent area. Yet this 
bill directly authorizes the memorial to locate in area I, overriding 
the requirement for a second round of consideration by Congress. In 
addition, the bill suggests that any specific location for the memorial 
be ``approved by the Congress,'' again contrary to the CWA, which 
delegates to the Federal land-holding and review agencies decisions as 
to the specific location and design of new memorials.

  The Monumental Core of our Nation's Capital has evolved over the 
centuries into a powerful expression of our Nation's values, 
achievements, losses, and challenges. By respecting the process 
established by the CWA, we can ensure that the victims of terrorist acts 
against our country are properly memorialized and, at the same time, the 
historical integrity of our grand Monumental Core is preserved.

    Sincerely,


                                                   John V. Cogbill, III,


                                                               Chairman.


                         Hon. Benjamin A. Gilman


                               of New York

  Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of H.R. 2982, the Victims of 
Terrorist Attacks Memorial Act, which will establish a memorial in 
Washington, DC, to honor those Americans whose lives were tragically 
taken as a result of terrorism.
  At the Murrah Building in Oklahoma, the World Trade Center, the 
Pentagon, and in the fields of Pennsylvania, our Nation has witnessed 
the best and the worst of humanity. These despicable and cowardly 
terrorist acts were valiantly countered with the incredible heroism and 
courage of not only our firefighters, law enforcement officers, and 
emergency personnel but also our fellow citizens.
  Accordingly, it is incumbent upon our Nation to honor those departed 
heroes. Establishing a memorial in honor of those deserving men and 
women will be a fitting tribute to their memory and their contribution 
to our Nation's freedom. Moreover, it will act as a permanent reminder 
to our Nation and the world that our Nation is engaged in an ongoing 
battle in the name of those who were taken from us to rid the world of 
these most heinous of crimes. Accordingly, I urge my colleagues to 
support this important measure.


                            Hon. Steve Israel


                               of new york

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in strong support of H.R. 2982. This 
legislation will authorize a memorial in Washington, DC, to commemorate 
American victims of terrorist attacks. The desire to memorialize the 
victims of the September 11 terrorist attacks was the driving force 
behind this bill, and as an original cosponsor, I applaud my colleagues 
bringing this bill to the floor today.
  I have met with families in my district who lost loved ones in the 
attack on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, and I have tried to 
help them with legislation that will ease their financial burden. I am 
hopeful that this bill will help them in a different way. I want them to 
know that the American people support them, and this memorial will show 
them that their husbands, wives, sons, daughters, brothers and sisters 
will never be forgotten.
  This memorial, however, is not only for the victims of terrorist 
attacks and their families. It is a memorial for every person in our 
Nation. It will give the people of the United States a site to pay their 
respects to the victims. It will serve as an area for mourning. It will 
also be a place to remember. I am hopeful that the memorial will also be 
a space where people can see the American spirit, which cannot be 
defeated, to take comfort in America's resolve and the inevitable 
triumph of freedom.
  The September 11, 2001, attacks changed every American life. It was 
the saddest and most enraging day in many of our lives. It is 
appropriate that we build this memorial to commemorate not the attacks, 
not response, not the war, but the victims of the attacks.

                            WAGING THE PEACE


                           Hon. Major R. Owens


                               of new york

  One letter I submit for the Record is not so simple, but it is written 
by one of my constituents, and obviously she has given a great deal of 
thought to this letter, and I appreciate the thinking here. I want my 
colleagues to hear the connection here with September 11 and how she 
weaves all of this together and understands very clearly the mood of 
America. The mood of America is anger; the mood of America is hurt; the 
mood of America is fear. But we should not let the mood of anger, hurt, 
and fear drive us into reckless actions that will make matters worse.


                                                           Brooklyn, NY,


                                                         August 9, 2002.

                    Rep. Major Owens,

                     House of Representatives,

                    Brooklyn, NY.

  Dear Rep. Owens: I am writing to you, because I feel so helpless to 
stop what seems to be inevitable--War with Iraq.

  Like you and every New Yorker, I tasted war on September 11. It wasn't 
pleasant and I'm not eager to experience it again. For hours I couldn't 
find my husband who worked across the street from 1 World Trade Center. 
Fortunately he returned home safely after witnessing unspeakable 
carnage, but many of our friends and neighbors weren't so lucky. That 
evening, I walked down 7th Avenue in Park Slope, Brooklyn, to get a 
handle on the losses. The stench from burning buildings, computers, and 
bodies was pervasive and the smoke cast an eerie haze over our little 
community. Everywhere I went I learned of more losses--12 firemen from 
Squad 1 on my block, loved ones of students and a teacher at the Park 
Slope Dance Studio, parents with kids at 321, Berkeley Carroll, and St. 
Ann's, members from church, a former colleague, and many of our 
neighbors were all among the missing. At 7 p.m. that day, we foolishly 
held out hope that some would be found in area hospitals, but 
unfortunately they weren't.

  Weeks later I attended the memorial service for my friend, Jeff Hardy, 
who was killed because he happened to be working on the 101st floor of 
Tower 1. Hours after I attended Jeff's service, a woman at 7th Avenue 
and Carroll approached me and asked me to sign a petition opposing the 
war in Afghanistan. I refused. I supported the war in Afghanistan and 
have been grateful that our allies have worked with us to round up 
terrorists worldwide.

  However, I have seen absolutely no evidence that Iraq had anything to 
do with this attack. The rumor that Mohamed Atta met with an Iraqi 
intelligence agent has been denied by the Czech government. I am not 
aware of one Iraqi who fought with the Taliban, although I know the 
citizens of many of our allies fought with the Taliban, are members of 
Al Qaeda, were on those planes September 11, and continue to threaten 
Americans and other foreigners every day, particularly in Pakistan.

  My hope is to destroy Al Qaeda and stop the spread of Islamic 
religious fundamentalism and hatred for the United States, Christians, 
and Jews. To fight the Islamists, we need the cooperation of all of our 
allies and all countries in the Middle East. I am afraid that this 
fragile alliance will dissolve if we attack Iraq without provocation and 
we may not get the help we need. Invading Iraq will only inflame anti-
American rhetoric and could even jeopardize our allies in the Middle 
East. I'm deeply worried about the welfare of President Musharraf and 
concerned that if anything happens to him, religious fanatics could take 
control of Pakistan, which we know has both nuclear weapons and Al Qaeda 
members. Musharraf is already under attack in his country because of his 
support of the U.S. and the New Yorker reported this week that a recent 
car bomb that killed 12 people was intended for him. I truly think 
declaring war on Iraq will put more U.S. citizens in harm's way than 
containment.

  To me this administration's warmongering is further evidence of the 
``Kremlinization'' of Washington under Bush. This administration thrives 
on secrecy. In the beginning of the term we saw cronyism and secret 
agreements among the elites in government and business. Now there is 
lavish Federal spending in Florida where the President's brother happens 
to be running for reelection. According to a recent New Republic 
article, even questionable SBA loans are being made in Florida at a time 
when several businesses with which I have worked that were located at or 
near Ground Zero have been denied SBA assistance.

  After September 11, we had secret arrests and detentions of more than 
1,000 individuals. Even Reagan-appointed, Federal judges have been 
appalled by this. We have seen civil rights being applied arbitrarily 
with some American citizens who happen to be poor and of color like Jose 
Padilla being denied the right to legal counsel and the American justice 
system, while prosperous Americans like John Walker Lindh, who actually 
fought American soldiers, received them. No investigation has been 
allowed into the intelligence failures before September 11. Time 
magazine this week has a scathing article about how this administration 
ignored terrorist threats prior to the attacks, but we can't examine 
this. Free speech has been chilled because any elected official who 
dares criticize or stand in the way of the administration has been 
called unpatriotic and obstructionist and in some cases compared to 
Saddam Hussein in newspaper ads. The government is asking ordinary 
citizens to spy on one another, reminiscent of something out of a 
Solzhenitsyn novel. The attorney general has ignored the Supreme Court's 
1939 opinion on the Second Amendment and has decided to apply his own, 
wildly different interpretation and also won't allow gun checks on 
suspected terrorists. I won't even get into what started all of this, 
the election of 2000 and how the voter registration lists were 
``scrubbed'' and the failure of the Supreme Court to honor a 
Presidential candidate's request to count votes as allowed under Florida 
law. Now this administration is invading countries without adequate 
discussion or support.

  Following the tragedies of September 11, we were a city in mourning. 
We spent months going to funerals and neighborhoods completely shut down 
when funerals for firefighters were held. The physical and emotional 
damage contributed to economic downturn here. I run a small, but 
successful public relations firm and I booked 93 percent of my revenues 
in 2001 on projects completed before September 11 and only 7 percent 
after September 11. My situation was not unusual. Small businesses--
graphic designers, contractors, beauticians, photographers, etc.--
everywhere in the metropolitan area suffered the same fate. Large 
companies like my husband's were evacuated from lower Manhattan never to 
return. His company had to rebuild complete systems within days to be 
able to compete when the markets opened the following Monday and use AOL 
or other carriers to communicate by e-mail because the company's servers 
were destroyed. We all limped along. Our woeful city tax revenues are 
enduring evidence of the economic damage we experienced.

  This country and especially this city have not yet digested the 
economic and emotional fallout from September 11. New York City is still 
struggling to get back on its feet and continues to get hammered by low 
tax revenues, the recession, stock market volatility, and corporate 
scandals. The economy can't take another shock like a war with Iraq and 
its unknown consequences.

  We have so much unfinished international business that to go forward 
with a war with Iraq right now would be irresponsible. I share the same 
concerns that King Abdullah of Jordan has that invading Iraq could lead 
to a further destabilization of the Middle East, including possibly a 
civil war, at a time when we need to be rebuilding Afghanistan and 
seeking a solution to the Israeli/Palestinian War. Even the Kurds are 
begging us not to invade. We still haven't found Osama bin Laden and 
Mullah Omar yet, how are we going to round up Saddam Hussein and his 
secret weapons, particularly without the support of our allies? It's 
suicidal. I'm reminded of our many unsuccessful attempts to oust Fidel 
Castro. Besides the economic and diplomatic problems of a war with Iraq, 
I have a serious moral problem with killing innocent people in the 
country. I know what it feels like when innocent lives are lost. Even 
Rep. Dick Armey was quoted today in the Times as saying that an 
unprovoked attack would violate international law. However, this 
administration will not listen to its allies and is only fueling anti-
Americanism worldwide.

  I am a conservative Democrat and was highly supportive of President 
Clinton and particularly his economic policies because he gave everyone 
a seat at the table of opportunity, cut budget deficits, and supported 
free trade. (Unlike Bush who has caved to special political interests on 
steel, the farm bill, tax cuts, energy, the environment, etc.) I don't 
trust these people in the White House now. Unfortunately, they seem to 
be unstoppable. Please help stop them.

  Sincerely,


                                                           Gail Donovan.

                     REMEMBERING SEPTEMBER 11, 2002


                           Hon. Ralph M. Hall


                                of texas

  Mr. Speaker, as we reflect on the tragic attacks on America on 
September 11, 2001, and the remarkable heroism of those who responded 
selflessly to those attacks, the weapon we need now more than any time 
in the history of the Republic is prayer.
  We need prayer for our brave men and women in the military who are 
fighting the war on terrorism and for those who will go, prayer for our 
President and our leaders as they chart our Nation's course, prayer for 
the families and friends of the more than 3,000 citizens who lost their 
lives in New York City, on the place that crashed in Pennsylvania and at 
the Pentagon, and prayer for the safety and security of our Nation.
  We need prayer as well for the selfless and hard-working members of 
our police, firefighter and emergency response teams. The harsh reality 
of the danger of their jobs came crashing down on America on September 
11 when 343 firefighters, 23 police officers and 37 port authority 
officers in New York City lost their lives at the World Trade Center.
  With a year to ponder the terrible losses suffered that day and the 
threat of terrorism and evil still looming over our Nation, we realize 
now more than ever the debt of gratitude that we owe to those who place 
themselves in harm's way to protect our Nation and our citizens.
   September 11 unified America and reawakened a spirit of determination 
and patriotism not seen since World War II. On that day we were reminded 
that freedom is not free--that there is a price that must be extracted 
to defeat tyranny and terrorism and to preserve the precious freedoms 
for which previous generations of heroes have fought so valiantly.
  The war on terrorism will be a long war--but it is a war that we can 
and will win. So as we remember those who paid the ultimate sacrifice 
for their country and those still on the front lines in the battle for 
freedom, we are filled with renewed resolve that those who perpetrated 
these terrible acts will be brought to justice and that such a tragedy 
will never happen again in America.
  May God bless the families of the victims of September 11, and may God 
continue to bless America.

                                H.R. 2982


                         Hon. Jerry F. Costello


                               of illinois

  Mr. Speaker, H.R. 2982 authorizes the establishment of a memorial 
within the District of Columbia to the victims of terrorist attacks on 
the United States.
  Words are generally inadequate to give voice to the loss we suffered 
on September 11, 2001. Today, we will try to leave a more worthy token.
  The enormity of what happened last year is still difficult to grasp, 
especially to those of us in the communities most directly affected. The 
scope of the casualty list is particularly overwhelming when considering 
each individual that was taken from us. Each had a name, a face, a 
family, a personality, a legacy that they have left behind.
  Susan Conlon said goodbye to her 6-year-old daughter, Kimberly, before 
going to work that day in the World Trade Center, in an office she had 
occupied for less than 3 months. Robert Curatolo was a newlywed who 
charged into danger as one of all too many firemen who never returned 
that day. Vassill Haramis was a hero of the 1993 WTC bombing, an 
engineer who loved working there as he had since the 1970s, not long 
after coming to this country.
  These stories, times a thousand and more, can only begin to trace the 
outline of the victims of the 9/11 attacks. I offer them as examples 
from my own district of heartbreaking losses.
  I believe what we are proposing today will be an eloquent testament to 
the memory of the victims. By acting today, while the memory of that 
terrible day has not yet faded, we can be sure future generations will 
have a better understanding of the victims and heroes of September 11, 
and their legacies will never be forgotten.


                      Wednesday, September 25, 2002

                  WE ARE ``GREAT BECAUSE WE ARE GOOD''


                             Hon. Zach Wamp


                              of tennessee

  Mr. Speaker, as we observe the remembrance of September 11, it is my 
hope that the citizens of the United States will honor the legacy of 
those who lost their lives and pay tribute to their survivors in time-
honored American ways . . . like helping others in need, saying a kind 
word to a stranger, volunteering at a homeless shelter or sending relief 
to people around the world who we may never even meet. After all, our 
country is not great because of our military strength, our free 
enterprise system or even our right to vote (as awesome as these 
qualities are!). America is great as we give more than we take and as we 
are willing to serve and sacrifice for others.
  We now know countless stories of heroism and remarkable bravery--
passengers on flight 93 that had the courage to stand up to terrorists 
giving their lives to protect hundreds of others, a lieutenant colonel 
who died trying to get his coworkers to safety or a firefighter who ran 
up the stairs of a building that was coming down on top of him. Although 
they didn't sign up to fight in the trenches of the war on terrorism, 
firefighters, EMTs, law enforcement officers, medical professionals and 
even airline passengers were willing to lay down their lives for people 
they had never even met.
  The sacrifice and courage of our first responders on September 11 
caused a swell of pride in all Americans of every generation. What we 
witnessed when America came under attack was comparable to the noble 
actions of the ``greatest generation''; veterans on D-day when they 
stormed the beaches of Normandy or in the lonely courage of American 
heroes in the jungles of Vietnam.
  The United States of America is at her best not when the Dow Jones 
average is above 10,000 points, or when we land on the Moon, but when 
our citizens are willing to sacrifice themselves so that others might be 
secure.
  I participated in a historic joint session of Congress at Federal Hall 
in New York City, laid a wreath at Ground Zero and spoke at a memorial 
service in a Brooklyn church. On Wednesday, September 11, I attended the 
National Memorial Service at the Pentagon with President George W. Bush 
and Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld. That evening I listened with the 
rest of the world to President Bush speak about this past year and 
America's security in an unstable world.
  As we bow our heads in respect, let us all be committed to honoring 
our country and those who have gone before us by giving of ourselves to 
help others. After all, every day of life is a gift from God and none of 
us know which might be our last. Let us stay united and make the most of 
every day!

    REMARKS DELIVERED ON THE FIRST ANNIVERSARY OF SEPTEMBER 11, 2002


                         Hon. Steven R. Rothman


                              of new jersey

  Mr. Speaker, we come here today, as one community, to reflect on the 
events of September 11, 2001. On that terrible day, a group of evil men 
murdered more than 3,000 innocent American men, women, and children--
here on American soil--as their coconspirators attempted to kill 
thousands more.
  Today, we still mourn the loss of our fellow citizens: those trying to 
reach safety and those who deliberately placed themselves in harm's way, 
who saved literally tens of thousands of their fellow Americans in the 
process. We will also never forget those who were injured and who are 
still suffering from the wounds, physical and emotional, that were 
inflicted upon them. We will never forget the heroism and sacrifice of 
those--many of whom are with us today--who responded immediately and 
selflessly, who prevented a terrible ordeal from being even worse.
  While we will always continue to remember what happened, we must also 
continue our Nation's effort to bring to justice and punish those who 
perpetrated these terrible acts and those who are planning new ones. 
Government's first priority is, after all, to protect the people, and as 
your Representative in Congress, I assure you that Congress is working 
to see that our government meets our country's needs for our homeland 
security and for our national defense: from strengthening our borders, 
to improving law enforcement and intelligence capabilities, to ensuring 
that our military is fighting with superior forces and weapons. We never 
forget that we Americans depend on our government to protect us.
  We are forever grateful to the men and women in law enforcement and in 
our Armed Forces, here and around the world, who put their lives at risk 
so that we may keep our country and her people safe and free.
  Is America a perfect nation? Are we as individuals perfect people? No, 
America is not perfect, and none of us has ever met a perfect person. 
But what we have in America is the greatest nation the world has ever 
known--a country committed to freedom, democracy, and equal justice 
under the law. We are an imperfect country, but one whose principles of 
freedom of speech and expression allow us and even demand us to 
continually seek to make our Nation more perfect in its realization of 
our founding principles. We are still the shining beacon of hope and 
liberty for every nation in the world and every man, woman, and child on 
this planet.
  Finally, we must always remember that in our 226-year history, America 
has prevailed over many more powerful enemies than the ones we face 
today. It took the lives and sacrifices of countless numbers of 
Americans. It took money. It took time. It took patience. And it took 
perseverance. But we prevailed. Make no mistake about it, my fellow 
Americans, America will prevail again today.
  God bless you, my friends, and God bless the United States of America.

                   COMMEMORATION OF SEPTEMBER 11, 2001


                         Hon. Nick J. Rahall II


                            of west virginia

  Mr. Speaker, ``We must consider that we shall be as a city upon a 
hill,'' the Puritan preacher John Winthrop proclaimed, as he and his 
followers sailed for America and freedom. ``The eyes of all people are 
upon us.'' And so they have remained for nearly four centuries. Many 
have looked to us in awe, inspired by a Nation rooted in liberty. Others 
have hated the ideal we embody, and wished us ill. But none can remove 
us from their gaze.
  Today America's economic prosperity, military power, and technological 
advancement are without peer. Our daily comforts and conveniences exceed 
those available to most of the six billion people who inhabit the Earth. 
But the ease of our lives does not render us soft, or reluctant to 
retaliate when attacked. A year ago, all the world watched in horror as 
a small gang of wicked men took 3,000 innocent lives in New York, 
Washington, and Pennsylvania.
  Since the moment the first airplane struck the first tower, Americans 
have shown, both on the battlefield and at home, the strength of our 
spirit, the mettle of our souls, and the force of our arms. From the 
firefighters climbing to their deaths, to the airline passengers who 
battled back, to the precious West Virginia sons and daughters who gave 
their lives in Afghanistan, the world has witnessed acts of American 
selflessness and bravery that rival the most revered in the annals of 
human history.
  Just as Winthrop defined America's place in the world, he described 
how we must live to maintain it. ``We must delight in each other,'' he 
instructed. ``Make others' conditions our own; rejoice together; mourn 
together; labor and suffer together.'' Our whole Nation suffered the 
same grievous wound on September 11. Those who delivered the blow hoped 
it would inaugurate our destruction. Instead, they inspired America's 
return to the community values and mutual commitment upon which our 
country was built.
  The attacks, the ongoing war, and the continuing threats spur us to 
embrace again our founding ideas: that all men and women are created 
equal; that America's destiny is the world's destiny--to secure life, 
liberty, and the pursuit of happiness; that we cannot allow the 
centuries-old, worldwide fight for freedom to falter. This recollection 
of our original rights and responsibilities is a fitting tribute, is an 
apt memorial, to the lives that were lost and devastated on that sad 
September day.


                        Hon. Henry E. Brown, Jr.


                            of south carolina

  Mr. Speaker, I will never forget the tragic events of September 11, 
2001. Although this unprovoked attack on our Nation by faceless cowards 
sought to damage American will, there can be no doubt that we are more 
determined than ever to fight for our freedom and preserve our way of 
life. We have sent our sons and daughters into battle in Central Asia 
and throughout this world to bring the perpetrators to justice and to 
eradicate the scourge of terrorism from the face of the Earth. I know 
that we will succeed.
  During the past year, we have pulled together as Americans with a 
renewed sense of patriotism and pride in all of our institutions. Each 
of us has made a tremendous difference in so many ways like donating 
blood or food to relief efforts and flying the American flag outside our 
homes as a sign of solidarity. In the Congress, members of both parties 
worked together in a bipartisan fashion like never before to demonstrate 
our resolve to the world community and to care for the victims and their 
families. When we sang ``God Bless America'' on the Capitol steps that 
same night, it was an incredibly emotional moment that truly touched my 
soul.
  It was a true honor to be in New York City at the special joint 
session of Congress. A couple of weeks after the attacks, I went to 
Ground Zero with other Members to witness first-hand the devastation 
that had been wrought. The heroic determination of the firefighters, 
police officers and rescue workers will be etched into my mind for the 
rest of my life. When I returned to New York City, I was amazed at the 
progress that the people of this great city have made in the area where 
the Twin Towers once stood. It is truly a testament to the strength and 
heart of the citizens of New York and all Americans. It makes me proud 
to serve in the Congress.
  Like so many other Members of Congress, constituents from the First 
District of South Carolina and their families were among the victims on 
that tragic day. They will be sorely missed, but we will never forget 
them. As we commemorate the unity of this great Nation on the first 
anniversary of these terrorist attacks, I pray for these families and 
for all Americans. The foundation of this great land is strong, and we 
will never waiver from our cause. God bless America.

                              SEPTEMBER 11


                          Hon. John F. Tierney


                            of massachusetts

  Mr. Speaker, On this somber anniversary of the terrible attacks on our 
country last September, we pause in remembrance of all those who died, 
and we stand in solidarity with the many families here in our 
communities and elsewhere who continue to live every day with the grief 
and pain of their unspeakable loss. Their lives and ours will never be 
the same, but we come together today in communities large and small 
across our Nation not only to comfort one another and remember but to 
proclaim anew our values as Americans--values that we as a Nation have 
rediscovered in ourselves and each other since last September 11; values 
that challenge us to live better, nurture our relationships, and serve 
our community; values that command us to respond to tragedy as all of 
these brave families have--with courage and resolve, undaunted by acts 
of cowardice and hatred.
  This gathering today is yet another step that we as a community, 
indeed we as a nation, are taking together to win this battle against 
the assault on innocent civilians living in a free society. While we 
continue to experience competing emotions of sorrow, anger and 
frustration, we refuse to allow these acts to rob us of our values and 
our spirit.
  My colleagues and I will continue to work together with the President 
to bring about the end of terrorism. We have the ability and the 
wherewithal to confront this challenge as we have met so many others in 
the past so that when future generations pause in remembrance of this 
day in our history, they will do so in the shelter of a just and free 
and united country.


                          Hon. John E. Peterson


                             of pennsylvania

  Mr. Speaker, 1 year ago, our Nation was attacked by terrorists who 
believed that by taking innocent life, they could destroy our spirit and 
tear down the principles, values, and freedoms that we hold dear. 
Despite our initial shock and horror on that fateful September morning, 
Americans from all walks of life proved the terrorists wrong by 
immediately joining hands to search for survivors, comfort those who 
lost loved ones, and bring about healing and renewal. There has never 
been a time when the world witnessed greater heroism, compassion and 
unity.
  Under the leadership of President Bush, our Nation has made great 
strides to bring justice to those who perpetrated this evil and improve 
our Nation's defenses against future terrorist attacks. Our men and 
women in uniform responded valiantly, toppling the Taliban regime and 
bringing freedom to a Nation that had served for many years as a haven 
for terrorism and oppression. The effort to protect our Nation from 
terrorism is ongoing, and patience will be necessary as we work to 
establish a permanent Department of Homeland Security and thwart the 
continued efforts of those who seek to kill innocent Americans in order 
to advance their political agenda.
  Looking back over the past year, it is clear that the events of 
September 11 have strengthened our Nation and given us a greater 
appreciation for freedom. Americans have demonstrated that we are 
committed to working together to preserve our freedom so that we will 
continue to be a beacon of hope to freedom-loving people around the 
world.


                      Thursday, September 26, 2002

             IN MEMORY OF THE TRAGEDY OF SEPTEMBER 11, 2001


                           Hon. Deborah Pryce


                                 of ohio

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today, just over 1 year after the tragic events 
that touched the life of every American, to give solemn remembrance to 
that darkest of days.
  As do all Americans, my heart continues to ache when I think about the 
countless victims and families struck by the sad and shocking attacks of 
September 11, 2001. But there is also pride in my heart for our great 
Nation and the men and women who have responded so resolutely and 
valiantly to this challenge to our very way of life.
  The stories of tragedy, and the compelling stories of heroism that 
emerged from the smoke and shattered buildings will forever be a part of 
our memory that day.
  When I rose to the House floor 1 year ago filled with so many deep and 
powerful emotions, I pledged that we would not let the days that 
followed be remembered just for our sadness and anger, but for our 
national resolve. As a nation, we have pulled together in so many ways 
to overcome the vicious attempt to break our national spirit.
  We are living in historic times, and I have been so proud of the 
American people. New York City has been the personification of American 
strength and resiliency.
  I have also been proud of our work here in Congress to put aside 
politics to provide our Armed Forces and law enforcement officers with 
the resources and tools they need to fight the war on terrorism, and to 
make this Nation safer than it was on September 10, 2001. This war is 
not an issue of politics, it is an issue of patriotism.
  Those responsible for last year's horrific events seriously 
miscalculated the strength and resolve of Americans. Our sense of 
security may have been temporarily unsteadied, but our unity is 
unwavering. Our bonds of liberty, our bonds of freedom, our bonds of 
democracy are stronger and run deeper than any individual, than any 
building, than any monument. No act of violence, no sharpened razor, can 
sever them.
  America has been committed through this last year to the difficult 
realities of living in the shadows of war. We have gone on living our 
lives because to do otherwise would be giving in to the evil behind 
September 11. But there should be no doubt that we will remain committed 
until those responsible learn the steep cost of taking innocent lives--
innocent American lives--on American soil. We will never stop working to 
make America safe and secure.
  The flame of liberty remains bright and will continue to shine upon 
the world, casting deep into the dark shadows of violence, intolerance, 
and extremism. This is a time of remembrance. But it is also a time to 
renew our dedication to fighting until America is free from the threat 
of terrorism.


                        Hon. John Elias Baldacci


                                of maine

  Mr. Speaker, like every American, I will always remember September 11. 
Today we gather to mourn our Nation's losses and to demonstrate our 
resolve that America will not be slowed or diminished by terrorist 
attacks.
  September 11 was an unsettling day for each of us, wherever we were. 
Nearly 3,000 Americans lost their lives that day. All of us lost the 
sense of security that we as Americans had long taken for granted.
  The victims came from all across the country and every walk of life. 
They had one thing in common--they were simply going about their 
business. It was a crisp, clear, sunny morning. I will never forget the 
contrast between the beautiful weather and the acrid smoke, dust and 
rubble at each of the impact sites.
  Each of us shares the grief of families who lost loved ones. Each of 
us mourns the loss of innocence that resulted from the attacks.
  Even in those darkest hours, however, America's light shined through. 
Millions of us joined together to donate blood and money to help the 
victims and their families. I visited the Pentagon to encourage rescue 
workers, and worked with the FAA to ensure that medical supplies would 
continue to arrive at Maine hospitals during the shutdown of airline 
service. Maine businesses and individuals donated food and supplies for 
workers and for displaced families.
  The great irony of September 11 is that the terrorists sought to drive 
America apart, but instead brought us together as a nation. Our people 
have once again shown an incredible resilience and an ability to come 
together in times of need. America is, indeed, one Nation, under God, 
indivisible.
  The acts of terrorism perpetrated against our country have reminded us 
of the precarious nature of life and of the lives of those around us. We 
will always carry in our hearts the memories of those who were lost on 
September 11. May we also always remember the patriotism and unity that 
we have experienced in its aftermath.
  We stand together today as Americans, united in mourning and also in 
our resolve to triumph over factions that would tear us apart. Together, 
we will ensure that hope, freedom and justice will prevail.

                     THE WILL OF THE AMERICAN PEOPLE


                           Hon. Cliff Stearns


                               of florida

  Mr. Speaker, recently I came across an e-mail that had been circulated 
last year shortly after the September 11 attacks. It was sent by a 
former military professor in which he stated that the will of the 
American people is the fulcrum of this Nation's war on terrorism. He 
stated that the terrorists who attacked on 9/11 counted on a ``soft and 
spoiled'' America, who would eventually quit if retaliation did not 
result in immediate success.
  What the author of the e-mail discovered was an outpouring of ``what 
can I do'' to help in response. And I believe this amply illustrates 
what we continue to see across the United States. What the terrorists 
actually demonstrated with their attacks on 9/11 was their profound 
ignorance of the American people and of history.
  Military theorist Clausewitz terms war a ``remarkable trinity composed 
of the primordial passions of the people, the rational policies of the 
state, and the combination of incidents in battle.''
  The ``passions of the people'' were awakened after Pearl Harbor and 
again were awakened after 9/11. One year later, the passions are still 
high. Americans are aware that what we are facing is that which America 
has never seen up close. We were attacked on our own soil by an 
organization of individuals bent--not on removing our presence from 
certain parts of the world--but on our utter destruction.
  We are facing an enemy who despises our very existence. They are 
consumed by hatred for the United States, that despite its faults, is 
open to all people regardless of race or religion. We operate under 
principles of freedom, the ability to pursue life, liberty and 
happiness. As such, our country is fighting with hope against terror and 
freedom against oppression. Our enemies will never know freedom, because 
they are imprisoned by hate; and for that they have already lost.
  Former U.S. Defense Secretary, Caspar Weinberger, stated ``The will of 
the American people once aroused . . . is capable of accomplishing all 
the things that have to be done.'' As long as we continue to maintain a 
moral high ground in this campaign against terrorism and its supporters 
and take the appropriate and precise responsive measures, the will of 
the people of this county will know no bounds.

         TRIBUTE TO THE VICTIMS AND HEROES OF SEPTEMBER 11, 2001


                            Hon. Ken Calvert


                              of california

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor and pay tribute to the victims and 
heroes of September 11, 2001. Over the past year, this country has tried 
to come to terms with the tragedy we experienced on September 11. 
Although I have written or spoken about that day many times, I have 
found that words often fail to describe the magnitude of that day. There 
are the haunting stories of loss and grief as well as stories of heroism 
and triumph. We learned about ourselves and our country that day and 
while we grieved for those we lost; we also cultivated a new sense of 
unity and patriotism. As a Nation we renewed our belief in the American 
spirit and in the bravery of fellow Americans who would willingly risk 
their lives for a stranger. The stories of what ordinary men and women 
did under extraordinary circumstances continue to amaze me.
  As we remember September 11, 2001, let us remember all the brave men 
and women who not only saved lives but saved our sense of brotherhood. 
Let us extend our prayers to all our brave men and women in the Armed 
Forces who right now are protecting our way of life and let us extend 
our deepest gratitude to our fire and police forces who have redefined 
the word ``sacrifice.''


                         Hon. Dennis R. Rehberg


                               of montana

  Mr. Speaker, Americans should be proud of how they've handled the past 
12 months. Yes, September 11 changed America forever, but not in the way 
the terrorists anticipated.
  Those who committed this horrible act of war were intent on destroying 
America and our way of life--but they failed miserably. They tried to 
make us question our dedication to democracy but they only increased our 
resolve in preserving the greatest form of government the world has ever 
known. They tried to destroy our economy--but the whole world knows 
America is still open for business, for farming, for travel. And they 
tried to extinguish the flame of liberty and hope in our country, but 
they only made it burn brighter. Yes, America has changed--we're 
stronger than ever.


                             Hon. Sam Graves


                               of missouri

  Mr. Speaker, on September 11, 2001, America awoke to the worst 
terrorist attack in history. As we went to work and school, we left with 
a feeling of security that we have long since forgotten. By the time we 
returned to our families, our lives and our Nation had forever changed. 
It had been many years since America felt so insecure, so vulnerable. On 
that morning, the American people's resolve was put to the ultimate 
test. Everything appeared to be so uncertain that day. Who would do such 
a thing? Why would they do it? Is there more to come? How can I protect 
my family?
  But there was much that was certain that day. America made a promise 
to the victims and their families, to future generations of Americans, 
and to the world. The American people promised that this action would 
not go unanswered. We promised that this action would only strengthen 
and unite us, not divide us. We would respond forcefully to those who 
were responsible while tending to our neighbors, our fellow countrymen. 
Together, you and people across Northwest Missouri and our Nation 
donated blood for the victims, and donated money for their families. 
Together, we prayed for those who lost so much that day. We prayed for 
our soldiers who stood ready--preparing to defend our freedom.
  As we stop to remember that terrible day, some of the pain and fear 
has subsided. But our determination to defeat those who seek to 
terrorize us must never fall victim to the passage of time. In the 
coming months, the American people will face a choice: Live up to our 
responsibility by making tough choices and sacrifices to continue our 
assault on terrorism, or quit now and hope that they choose to stop 
planning future attacks. The American people should never have to endure 
such a tragedy again. As we have learned over the past year, we can do 
something about it. We must never mislead ourselves that we have to wait 
to be attacked again to continue our defense from terrorism. The more 
than 3,000 lives lost is all the justification we need to have to defend 
against a certain threat of terrorism. The United States must remain 
vigilant and prepared, so that we remain forever free.


                    Hon. F. James Sensenbrenner, Jr.


                              of wisconsin

  Mr. Speaker, since September 11 last year, life has taken on new 
meaning. For some, that day's devastation has caused them to become more 
cynical, changed by the events of a few hours. For others, each day 
since then has taken on more significance as they realize what it means 
when people say that you can't take life for granted. But for all of us 
the memories of that day will live on as we not only think about the 
people trapped in the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and the hijacked 
planes, but also remember their loved ones who were helpless to prevent 
the tragedies. As the President said in his proclamation earlier this 
month, ``Those whom we lost last September 11 will forever hold a 
cherished place in our hearts and in the history of our Nation. As we 
mark the first anniversary of that tragic day, we remember their 
sacrifice; and we commit ourselves to honoring their memory by pursuing 
peace and justice in the world and security at home.''
  Life after September 11 took on new meaning for Members of Congress 
too. We reacted by changing our priorities, and began work on 
legislation to respond to that day's horrific events. One of the first 
things we did was pass legislation authorizing the use of U.S. Armed 
Forces against those responsible for the attacks. Since then, Congress 
passed numerous bills dealing with the issues that are widely believed 
to have allowed the events of September 11 to occur. They include: 
strengthening airline security and our Nation's borders, restructuring 
the Immigration and Naturalization Service to make it a more efficient 
agency, and passing the Patriot Act to improve information sharing 
between law enforcement and intelligence communities. More recently, the 
House passed legislation to create a new Department of Homeland Security 
in response to the President's request for a flexible, effective 
department, with the singular mission of protecting our Nation. 
Financially, we have also passed legislation to provide the Department 
of Defense with the resources it will need to address the new challenges 
that now face the Nation.
  Many individuals have changed their priorities too. Spurred by our war 
against terrorism and the words of the administration and various law 
enforcement agencies, Americans have begun to pay more attention to 
their surroundings and take better note of anything that appears out of 
the ordinary, particularly in airports. Gone are the days when one can 
easily dismiss peoples' errant behavior as harmless without making sure 
that that is indeed the case. As we learned, the price to pay for not 
checking can be awfully steep.
  After the events of that Tuesday, life in Washington, DC, returned to 
some semblance of normalcy. Yet, a year later, although life appears the 
same as always, there is a difference. Certainly, Congress is in the 
middle of its appropriations debates as it almost always is this time of 
year and Republicans and Democrats are embroiled in many of the same 
arguments that typically take place around now. However, there is now an 
underlying sense of wariness in our Nation that didn't exist before--but 
this is good, as it shows that we have learned from last year's events. 
It demonstrates that as a nation, we have grown. September 11, 2001, 
wasn't that long ago, but America has lived a lifetime in the year since 
that fateful day.

   SPECIAL JOINT MEETING OF CONGRESS IN NEW YORK ON SEPTEMBER 6, 2002


                          Hon. James H. Maloney


                             of connecticut

  Mr. Speaker, it was a historic experience to join with my colleagues 
in the special joint meeting of Congress held in New York City. I have 
visited New York many times since the terrorist attacks on September 11, 
2001. It is a city that has recovered from, but not forgotten, the 
events of that tragic day.
  The families and friends of those who perished have endured a year of 
unbearable loss. They have my deepest sympathy. Rarely have we felt vile 
acts of terrorism perpetrated on our shores, and never on the scale of 
September 11, 2001. Our response has shown the strength of character of 
the American people. The sadness that we all felt that day, and in the 
days since, has hardened into a resolve to honor the memories of those 
who perished, to heal our wounds so that our Nation is even stronger 
than before, and to bring righteous justice to those who perpetrated the 
attacks.
  The congressional session in New York was a fitting salute to that 
great metropolis, and a dramatic affirmation that all Americans stand 
united with the people of New York as we move forward to root out 
terrorism and build a free and secure world community.


                           Hon. Nita M. Lowey


                               of new york

  Mr. Speaker, today I rise in recognition of the 1-year anniversary of 
the tragic events of September 11, 2001.
  Last September, the lives of all Americans were forever changed. Loved 
ones have been lost, and the grief we feel is as sharp now as it was 1 
year ago. There is an emptiness in families, in offices, in communities, 
where sons and daughters, husbands and wives, parents, siblings and 
friends once were.
  Our country has changed. We have focused intently on the task of 
ensuring our homeland security--a term seldom heard before this past 
year. We have invested billions of dollars in securing our ports and 
borders, water and food, and airways. We have enhanced the strength of 
our military and intelligence capacities, undertaking an unprecedented 
campaign to end the threat of international terrorism. We have a new 
appreciation for the hard work of our men and women in uniform--whether 
they are soldiers, police officers, emergency medical technicians, or 
firefighters.
  We joined together with the President, the Governor, and former Mayor 
Giuliani in passing an emergency spending bill which provided $21 
billion to fund the rescue and recovery efforts at the World Trade 
Center site and cleanup in lower Manhattan. This funding has also helped 
alleviate some of the economic ramifications of the terrorist attacks, 
provide counseling to New York schoolchildren affected by 9/11, and it 
is now being used to modernize the transportation systems that were 
devastated by the towers' collapse. The wounds remain, but our community 
has shown extraordinary courage in dealing with the challenges before 
us. We will never forget, but we will recover.
  Shattering as this ordeal has been, the fundamental character of 
America has remained the same. And for this we should all be proud. We 
are still a strong and diverse nation, focused on the pleasures and 
challenges of everyday life, caught up in the struggle to provide good 
homes for our children, achieve meaning in our lives, and leave this 
world a better place after we've gone. We still believe in the 
importance of our democratic ideals--the foundation on which our country 
was built, and continues to thrive.
  As a Nation, we have joined together to provide support for our 
neighbors, friends, coworkers and fellow Americans. As I have traveled 
around New York, I have seen remarkable displays of the resilience of 
the American spirit as we have worked in the recovery effort, giving 
from both our hearts and our wallets. The tragedy of September 11 was 
once unimaginable as were the courage and empathy that were displayed 
that terrible day. Now, it is this strength and this concern for our 
fellow citizens that redefine us as Americans.
  This is what gives us hope. And this is what gives us confidence that, 
despite the dangers of the world and the challenges our country faces, 
we will prevail in perpetuating the values we hold dear. I am humbled 
and honored to stand before you today in remembrance of the tragedy of 
September 11 and the heroism and patriotism of New Yorkers and all 
Americans over the past year.


                          Hon. Bernard Sanders


                               of vermont

  Mr. Speaker, our Nation was forever changed on the morning of 
September 11. The goal of Osama bin Laden was to demoralize us, create 
fear, uncertainty and instability in our country--he failed. Last week 
Congress met in New York to pay tribute to those who were killed, and I 
was reminded how strong and resilient our country truly is. Last 
September 11 we saw amazing displays of heroism and bravery. I will 
never forget the sight of firemen entering the World Trade Center 
risking their lives to save others.
  We have also learned a great deal since September 11. We've learned 
that we are a vulnerable nation, and that we must lead an international 
coalition against bigoted, religious fanatics who believe they have the 
right to kill in order to impose their reactionary ideology on others. 
Many of us also have learned that in order to be true to American 
values, we must not undermine the fundamental principles and 
constitutional rights that our country was founded on.
  As an American and a Vermonter, I was enormously proud of how our 
people responded to this crisis in terms of blood donations, financial 
contributions and coming together as a community to support the victims 
and each other. It is my hope that we will continue to show that same 
sense of community that we demonstrated in the aftermath of the 
September 11 attacks.


                         Hon. Michael R. McNulty


                               of new york

  Mr. Speaker, on Friday, September 6, of this year, a special joint 
session of the U.S. Congress convened in New York City to reflect on the 
terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. This most rare and somber 
session served as a necessary reminder of the human loss and heroism 
that the City and State of New York, our Nation, and our world 
experienced on that fateful day. I am proud and blessed--as an American, 
and as a New Yorker--to have been able to take part.
  We met at Federal Hall, the very same site where the First Congress 
met over two centuries ago. We met just blocks from where the World 
Trade Center towers once pierced the city's majestic skyline.
  Mr. Speaker, most important, we remembered the almost 3,000 innocent 
civilians who died and their families. We prayed then--and we should 
pray now--for all of the victims of this most heinous terrorist act. 
Though a year has passed, the loss of every single person who perished 
that day is still felt by all those who loved them. The sons and 
daughters, the brothers and sisters, the mothers and fathers lost that 
day will never be replaced. We simply hope that the pain will subside, 
and that the memories will remain strong and vibrant.
  Mr. Speaker, we also expressed our deepest gratitude to the 
firefighters, police officers and emergency personnel who served on that 
fateful day and in the weeks and months that followed. These brave men 
and women, and their peers across the country, put their lives on the 
line--day in and day out--to ensure the safety and well-being of the 
citizens of our communities. Recognition of the heroism and service of 
our first responders is overdue and well deserved. We must continue to 
acknowledge their bravery and sacrifice. And we in Congress must resolve 
to provide them with the support they need to continue to excel in their 
chosen duty--to save lives.
  Finally, Mr. Speaker, we reaffirmed our commitment, as a Congress and 
as a Nation, to eradicate the ability of terrorists to ever again carry 
out such a horrific and offensive act--against us or against other 
innocent people around the world. We reaffirmed our promise to bring 
these cowards to justice. A terrorist is, by definition, a coward. It is 
a person who cannot get what he wants by the power of persuasion, and 
therefore resorts to the killing of innocent men, women and children.
  Mr. Speaker, the American men and women in our Armed Forces are now 
dispersed throughout the world, seeking out these cowards and 
introducing them to the might of a Nation that finds its heart bruised 
but its strength renewed. Freedom is not free. We have paid a tremendous 
price for it. We must not forget those before us who gave their lives, 
or those who put their lives on the line today, to allow us the 
privilege of living in the freest and most open democracy on the face of 
the Earth. Our patriots fight for the cause of freedom, and we shall 
support them every step of the way.
  The events of September 11, 2001, were basic violations of the 
fundamental principle that life is to give--not to take. I am proud that 
this Congress gathered on September 6, in the shadow of Ground Zero, to 
remember and honor both the victims and the heroes--and to remind the 
world that the forces of evil shall never prevail.


                       Monday, September 30, 2002

                         SEPTEMBER 11 ANNIVERSARY


                            Hon. David Vitter


                              of louisiana

  Mr. Speaker, on September 11, 2001, our people, our democracy, and our 
values were attacked in a cowardly and reprehensible way. I visited the 
Pentagon 2 days after the attacks, and the sheer devastation viewed in 
person was beyond the imagination.
  When I made it back home to Louisiana, I hugged my wife and kids and 
could not help but think of the people who never returned home on 
September 11. That fateful day introduced us to hundreds of heroes. And 
it reintroduced us to the wonderful spirit of our Nation.
  I visited Ground Zero for the commemorative joint meeting of Congress 
1 year later and visited the Pentagon on the anniversary of the attacks. 
These sites--along with the Pennsylvania crash site--stand as reminders 
of the devastation our country suffered, but they also remind us that 
America is not devastated.
  We are unified in the knowledge that democracy and freedom will 
prevail. People across the country have, over the last year, 
demonstrated to the world that terrorism can never destroy our way of 
life. And I am proud of our country, proud of my fellow citizens for the 
patriotism, spirit, and strength they have shown over the last year.
  It is a great honor to serve in Congress at this time, and I take very 
seriously my pledge to protect and defend the United States of America.
  May God bless us all, and may He continue to bless our great Nation.


                        Tuesday, October 1, 2002

    EXPRESSING SUPPORT FOR GOALS AND IDEAS OF DAY OF TRIBUTE TO ALL 
                              FIREFIGHTERS


                             Hon. Nick Smith


                               of Michigan

  In 1992, Congress created the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation 
to lead a nationwide effort to remember our fallen heroes of these first 
responders. The Foundation has successfully met this challenge, 
providing a variety of supporting activities to surviving family 
members, including emotional support, awards, scholarships for surviving 
spouses and children, and the establishment of the national park in 
Emmitsburg, MD, to memorialize the fallen firefighters.
  Madam Speaker, this Sunday the Foundation will honor 446 firefighters 
who lost their lives in the line of duty at an annual ceremony usually 
held in Emmitsburg, but this year will be held here in Washington. The 
Foundation is expecting over 20,000 people to attend this year's 
memorial weekend, a record number. Many of these people will be spouses 
and children of the 343 firefighters that perished September 11.
  On that warm September morning in 2001, the firefighters of the New 
York City Fire Department reported to work as they did every day, ready 
to respond to whatever emergency situation might occur. But that morning 
was different. The 110-story World Trade Centers that were both 
literally and symbolically the center of world commerce were hit by two 
hijacked 747s.
  The firefighters of the New York Fire Department received the most 
terrifying and overwhelming emergency call that this Nation has ever 
known. Still, they responded with true bravery, rushing into that 
burning building without hesitation. They helped evacuate 25,000 people, 
the largest evacuation in the history of the world, and certainly they 
struggled until the last possible moments to free those who were 
trapped. Three hundred forty-three of them lost their lives in doing so. 
It was on that September day that the American firefighter became the 
symbol of American freedom and American bravery to not only those of us 
in the United States, but certainly to millions around the world.
  In addition to the heroism displayed on 9/11, we know that first 
responders all over the country display similar heroism every day, not 
just when major disaster strikes, but every day, as full-timers and 
volunteers often risk their lives to protect the lives and property of 
people around the country.
  Fire and emergency service personnel respond to over 16 million calls 
annually. In addition to the 343 heroes who gave their lives in New York 
City on 9/11, last year we lost another 99 volunteers and full-time 
firefighters working in the line of duty to save property and lives.
  I think we all agree that it is our job as Americans and as Members of 
Congress to never forget the sacrifices of those who protect us, and I 
commend the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation for its exceptional 
efforts in leading this charge. I offer my strongest support to this 
resolution, and certainly invite my colleagues to attend this Sunday's 
tribute.


                            Hon. Curt Weldon


                             of Pennsylvania

  Madam Speaker, As my colleagues know, I would not be in public life 
were it not for the fire service, having grown up in a fire service 
family. The earliest recollections of spending time with my father was 
at the firehouse with him and with my six older brothers. It was only 
natural that when I became 18 I joined the department and eventually 
worked up to becoming president and chief. I then went back to school 
while teaching during the day to get a degree in fire protection. So all 
of my life has been devoted to these outstanding men and women who 
protect us in 32,000 departments and consist of 1.2 million men and 
women.
  Madam Speaker, this resolution as has been outlined by my colleagues 
recognizes America's domestic defenders. These are the people who 
protect our country every day of the year and have been doing so for 350 
years, longer than the country has been a country. Because when Ben 
Franklin started the first fire department in Philadelphia, it was an 
all-volunteer group, and it was in fact started before America became a 
Nation. They have been our domestic defenders ever since. In fact, I 
call them our first responders. Much like our military protects us 
against threats from outside of our country, our domestic defenders 
protect us from those threats within America. And in fact they are being 
asked to do more and more as we face the threats of terrorism on our 
soil.
  Madam Speaker, each year we have in fact acknowledged those who have 
lost their lives. We average about 100 deaths a year at Emmitsburg, the 
National Fallen Firefighters Memorial. I have made that trip at least 
three times since I have been in Congress, and I can tell you there is 
no more memorable event than to spend time with those families of brave 
Americans who pay the ultimate price.
  Madam Speaker, as founder and original chairman of the Congressional 
Fire and EMS Caucus, which now has 340 members of the House and Senate, 
I have traveled to every disaster we have had in the country in the past 
16 years. From the wild lands fires in the western part of the country, 
in California, in the north, in Yellowstone Park, to the hurricanes down 
in the South, Andrew and Hugo, the Murrah Building bombing down in 
Oklahoma City, the Northridge and Loma Prieta earthquake. I was up at 
the World Trade Center in 1993 and back 2 days after September 11.
  Madam Speaker, when I went up to the Trade Center in 1993, I was 
escorted through that building, that bombed-out parking garage, by a 
rising young emerging chief of the New York City Fire Department. He and 
I became good friends, and we traveled around the country over the past 
9 years talking about the need to understand the first responders and 
provide support for them.
  At 2 o'clock on September 11, I got a frantic phone call on my cell 
phone from my friends in New York that my good friend who had taken me 
through the Trade Center in 1993 was killed when the buildings 
collapsed.
  Ray Downing was the chief of all rescue operations for New York City 
on September 11. He was the guy who was overseeing the bulk of the 343 
New York City firefighters who were going up in the buildings when the 
buildings were coming down. Ray Downing left behind a wife and five kids 
and grandkids. In fact, 1 month after September 11, I brought them all 
down to my district. We had a parade with 40,000 people to honor Ray 
Downing as an American hero.
  Perhaps one of the most emotional days I have had during my tenure in 
Congress was when I went to Ground Zero and spent 12 hours there 2 days 
after it occurred with my friends of the New York City Fire Department. 
We went around the back of what used to be one of the huge towers, which 
is now a seven-story pile of rubble; and I saw two firefighters in their 
turnout gear among thousands who were collecting rubble. And I looked on 
the back of their turnout gear and on the bottom were the names Downing 
and Downing, because Ray Downing's two sons are officers in the New York 
City Fire Department. One is a captain; one is a lieutenant.
  They were looking for the remains of their dad. We did not find the 
remains of Ray Downing until 3 months ago. It went through DNA sampling. 
We were able to determine that Ray in fact had been accounted for.
  Madam Speaker, this coming Sunday we will honor these brave 
firefighters, the 343 from New York and the others that combined for a 
total of 442 brave Americans. Anytime this country has gone to war and 
lost 442 of our sons and daughters, we have mourned as a Nation. Well, 
this past year we have lost 442 brave Americans. They were not soldiers 
on the battlefield overseas. They were our defenders here at home. And 
it is certainly fitting and proper that we set aside a day to honor 
them, that we have turnout, as I will be in attendance on Sunday, to pay 
our respects at the MCI Center here in Washington.
  It is my fervent hope that all Americans pause as we begin to 
celebrate the national week of recognition for the fire service, always 
the first week in October, and pay tribute to our true American heroes.
  As I have said time and time around the country, the firefighter is 
more than just a person who puts out the fires. It is the person you 
call upon to handle the hazmat incidents, the fires, and the 
conflagrations, the floods, the tornados, the earthquakes, the terrorist 
bombings. They are the people you call when the cat is in the tree, when 
the cellar has been flooded. They are the first group you call to 
organize a search party to find your lost child.
  In many of our small towns, the firehouse is where you vote on 
election day. It is the organization that hosts the July 4 and Memorial 
Day parades. It is the organization where the Boy Scout troops and Girl 
Scout troops meet. It is the organization that makes our towns what they 
are. It really is, in my opinion, the heart and soul of America. I can 
think of no better group that represents what America is all about.
  Amazingly, 85 percent of these people are volunteers. What other group 
in America has their volunteers killed each year in protecting the 
community while going out and raising the money to buy those fire trucks 
which cost from $400,000 to $600,000, by having chicken dinners and tag 
days? Imagine having our police departments or trash departments out 
raising the money to buy the trash trucks and the police cars.
  In every fire department in America, in all of our districts, there 
are volunteers out there just doing that. In fact, this past Labor Day 
at Jerry Lewis' annual telethon, as has been the case every year, the 
IAFF Fire Fighters Union was the largest contributor to the fight 
against muscular dystrophy, the number one group in the country in 
reaching out to help other people.
  These truly are the heroes of our country. They are the people who 
time and again have allowed us to understand what America is all about, 
by offering selfless service to help others. And as our friend, the 
gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Smith), said, we lost 343 at the Trade 
Center; but the real story is the success they had in rescuing tens of 
thousands of people that are today united with their families.
  So I ask all of my colleagues to join with us in supporting this 
resolution and paying tribute to America's heroes.


                        Hon. Felix J. Grucci, Jr.


                               of new york

  Madam Speaker, I would first like to thank my colleague Congressman 
Weldon for his tireless efforts on behalf of America's firefighters, and 
for bringing this measure to the floor today.
  Few images throughout history more clearly illustrate heroism better 
than the images of brave firefighters entering the World Trade Center--
knowing they very well may never return--with one selfless goal in mind: 
to save lives.
  On that tragic day--September 11, 2001--347 firefighters died in the 
line of duty, several from my own district on Long Island.
  While the heroic efforts of these brave men and women may be more 
clear on that day there isn't a day that passes when firefighters do not 
risk their own lives to save others.
  Last year alone, 442 firefighters sacrificed their lives in order to 
save the lives of innocent victims of fire and other emergencies.
  Later this week, the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation will 
honor these firefighters and their families for the sacrifices made over 
the last year. We will remember the impact these brave firefighters have 
made in towns and communities throughout America and the heroism that 
has saved countless lives.
  On behalf of the First Congressional District of New York--home to 
several fallen firefighters--I join my colleagues in support of H. Con. 
Res. 476.


                          Hon. George W. Gekas


                             of pennsylvania

  Madam Speaker, I rise today in strong support of H. Con. Res. 476 and 
urge my colleagues to support this important piece of legislation as 
well.
  Our firefighters protect us every day and sometimes give up their own 
lives to protect and serve their communities and their fellow man. This 
was never more evident than on September 11, 2001. On that day, as 
frightened and wounded civilians ran from the World Trade Center, brave 
firefighters rushed in, in a determined effort to save others. These 
brave individuals risked everything in an effort to render aid and 
evacuate the people trapped in the towers. This effort cost many 
firefighters their lives. The September 11, 2001, attacks highlighted 
the spirit and courage of firefighters across the Nation. Mostly 
volunteers, these men and women protect our lives and property, and 
while they never boast of their heroic deeds, they are truly heroes.
  H. Con. Res. 476 reaffirms that Congress supports the goals and ideas 
of a day of tribute to all firefighters who have died in the line of 
duty and recognizes the important mission of the National Fallen 
Firefighters Foundation in assisting family members to overcome the loss 
of their fallen heroes. I am thankful to be able to rise today and 
proclaim support of H. Con. Res. 476 on behalf of every firefighter in 
Pennsylvania's 17th Congressional District.
  Madam Speaker, this is the very least we can do. I salute Congressman 
Weldon for sponsoring this resolution and would like to thank him for 
his leadership on the Congressional Fire Services Caucus, of which I am 
a member. The firefighters of the United States should know that the 
Congressional Fire Services Caucus is continually striving to respond to 
their needs and to deliver to them the equipment and resources they need 
to do their job in a safe and effective manner.
  Firefighting will never be a safe endeavor but we in Congress must do 
all we can to help our firefighters. No matter what we provide to our 
firefighters we will never equal the sacrifices they make for us. 
Collectively, we in Congress thank you and the passage of H. Con. Res. 
476 is just a small token of appreciation. We will never be able to 
thank you enough.
  Madam Speaker, I reaffirm my support of H. Con. Res. 476 and of the 
firefighters of Pennsylvania's 17th Congressional District.


                        Hon. Sherwood L. Boehlert


                               of new york

  Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of H. Con. Res. 476, recognizing 
the goals and ideas of a day of tribute for fallen firefighters, and 
supporting the important mission of the National Fallen Firefighters 
Foundation.
  Congress created this non-profit foundation 10 years ago to lead a 
national effort to honor firefighters who have died in the line of duty 
and to assist surviving firefighters and family members in rebuilding 
their lives.
  The Foundation has been steadily expanding its activities. In addition 
to providing emotional support services to survivors and scholarship 
awards for surviving spouses and children, the Foundation is now 
creating the first National Park to memorialize fallen firefighters in 
Emmitsburg, MD. And this Sunday, October 6th, the Foundation will 
sponsor a memorial weekend to honor the commitment, bravery and 
sacrifice of the 446 firefighters who died in the line of duty in the 
past year, 343 whose lives were taken on September 11, 2001.
  No one could have anticipated the magnitude of destruction and loss of 
life that occurred last September. In the wake of those tragic events, 
the value and contributions of the National Fallen Firefighters 
Foundation became unmistakably clear.
  At the request of the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the 
National Fallen Firefighters Foundation sent support staff to Ground 
Zero within days of the attacks, working around the clock to coordinate 
chaplain support services, survivor support services, as well as 
logistical and administrative support association with the loss of the 
firefighters.
  The Foundation's efforts in New York City during its time of greatest 
need were truly invaluable, and I proudly support its cause, as well as 
this resolution recognizing its importance.

       RECOGNITION OF ``TOWERS OF LIGHT'' BY DOROTHY DIEMER HENDRY


                    Hon. Robert E. (Bud) Cramer, Jr.


                               of alabama

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to share with the House of Representatives a 
poem written by one of my constituents, Dorothy Diemer Hendry of 
Huntsville, AL. The poem, ``Towers of Light,'' was written at the time 
of the 1-year anniversary of September 11 and provides us with hope and 
encouragement that we can become towers of light in this world. I am 
pleased to share this poem with you today.

                             Towers of Light


                       (By Dorothy Diemer Hendry)

                    Two shafts of light

                    stream down through clouds

                    to bedrock of a crater

                    cleared of rubble and bones.

    

                    We look up, up, up

                    these twin towers of light

                    until we must shield our eyes

                    from their source, more luminous

                    than sun and moon and stars.

    

                    What is the source?

                    Not firestorm of planes

                    commandeered and exploded

                    in misbegotten piety and hate.

                    Not savage burning of

                    ``heathen''; temples or churches,

                    mosques or synagogues.

                    Not merciless holocaust

                    of ``enemy''; fields and forests,

                    schools and homes and people.

    

                    The source of light may

                    go by different names in

                    your religion and mine,

                    yet somehow the twin towers

                    remind us of two neighbors filled

                    with the radiance of the Golden Rule.

    

                    Neighbor from anywhere,

                    let us not quarrel about

                    holy names and ancient cruelties.

                    Let us fill the crater with loam

                    and plant a new garden on Earth.

                    In honor of heroes and loved ones,

                    let us summon the courage, wisdom,

                    and kindness to dwell in mutual peace.

                    Can we not become towers of light?

  RECOGNIZING THE WORK OF THE AMERICAN CANINE ASSOCIATION'S SEARCH AND 
                 RESCUE TEAMS AT GROUND ZERO IN NEW YORK


                          Hon. Joseph R. Pitts


                             of pennsylvania

  Mr. Speaker, I would like to extend my gratitude and appreciation to 
the Search and Rescue Teams of the American Canine Association, ACA, 
who, for 8 weeks following the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, 
tirelessly and selflessly served at Ground Zero in New York City. 
Following the devastating attacks on our country and our very way of 
life, handlers Robert Yarnall, Jr., Susan Yarnall, Heather Nothstein, 
Michael Glass, Avi Thol, Travis Hayden, Sean Hayden, and Amy Dinardi, 
along with canines Gus, Nela, Nala, Samson, and Duchess, came to the aid 
of a grieving Nation and endured tremendous personal difficulty to 
assist in finding survivors of the Twin Towers.
  In the year since September 11, we have come to a new appreciation of 
the heroes who live among us, those who volunteer their time, ability, 
and talent, without thought of recognition. The actions of these 
handlers and canines represent the true values of America--generosity, 
compassion, and service to community--that have made us great. I am 
proud to have had these extraordinary people and canines represent 
Chester County and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The ACA deserves 
our thanks and our commendation for a job well done.

  COMMEMORATING SEPTEMBER 11, 2001, AND ON THE OCCASION OF THE SPECIAL 
       JOINT MEETING OF CONGRESSS IN NEW YORK ON SEPTEMBER 6, 2002


                           Hon. Bob Goodlatte


                               of virginia

  Mr. Speaker, 1 year ago, Americans looked on in horror as the events 
of September 11 unfolded. At the end of the day the skyline of one of 
our greatest cities was forever changed, the Pentagon, a symbol of 
America's military might was still smoldering, and a previously 
indistinguishable field in Western Pennsylvania had suddenly and 
terribly become an unmarked grave for America's newest heroes.
  In the aftermath of the Challenger space disaster, when seeking to 
comfort a shocked and hurting country, President Reagan told us that 
``The future doesn't belong to the fainthearted; it belongs to the 
brave.'' Overwhelmed by grief, and reeling from a devastating attack, 
some nations would have been crippled to the point of inaction. Our 
enemies perceived us as weak, soft, unwilling or unable to respond. It 
is obviously an understatement to say they miscalculated.
  In a tribute to the excellence of our Armed Forces and to the 
leadership of President Bush, we succeeded in swiftly toppling the 
Taliban, thereby liberating the people of Afghanistan. In this volatile 
region of the world, America's national security is directly at stake, 
for when regimes that tolerate terror and disrespect human life are left 
to their own devices, they export hatred and murder.
  On the home front we moved swiftly to protect against future attacks. 
Congress gave law enforcement new tools, restructured the beleaguered 
INS, and took steps to establish a Department of Homeland Security.
  Recently, I traveled to New York City for a commemorative joint 
meeting of the U.S. Congress, which was held at Federal Hall, just 
blocks from where the Twin Towers once stood. Federal Hall also served 
as the site of George Washington's swearing in, the location where the 
Bill of Rights was drafted and the setting of the first meeting of the 
U.S. Congress. In an era when historical significance is often missed 
and sentimentality is at times scoffed at, the symbolism of this meeting 
must not be overlooked.
  Democracy is alive and flourishing and despite the best efforts of 
those who would seek to destroy us, we remain the ``shining city on a 
hill''--envisioned by our Founders--as can be attested to by the 
resilience, courage and selfless sacrifice, which has characterized our 
national response.
  On the anniversary of this day, which has been eternally seared into 
our national conscience, our thoughts and prayers go to those Americans 
whose lives have been forever changed by the loss of a loved one.
  Winston Churchill once said, ``The price of greatness is 
responsibility.'' This September as we mourn the loss and commemorate 
the lives of our fallen countrymen, we must not forget the raw emotions 
that marked that day, for they underscore our responsibility and will 
give us the impetus to continue in the unfinished task before us.

                     SEPTEMBER 11--FIRST ANNIVERSARY


                            Hon. Joel Hefley


                               of colorado

  Mr. Speaker, America will never be the same as a result of September 
11, 2001. The horrific events of that day dramatically changed the 
landscape of not only New York City and Washington, DC, but also the 
entire civilized world. The images of commercial airliners plunging into 
symbols of American enterprise, economy and security will forever be 
seared on our individual and national memories. But also vivid are the 
images of Americans' spirit of community, gratitude and generosity that 
have been demonstrated these past 12 months.
  Through our heartache and sorrow, Americans joined together this year 
in an unprecedented show of strength and unity. The outpouring of 
patriotism and pride across the country is displaying itself in every 
conceivable way. The American flag is flying: large and small; cloth and 
paper; store-bought and handmade; the red, white and blue is everywhere. 
Americans opened their homes and wallets to care for the victims. Goods 
and services were donated to the victims and rescue workers at an almost 
unmanageable pace. Restaurants in New York and Washington opened their 
doors to feed the rescuers, people stood on street corners and handed 
food to passing firemen and companies donated pillows and blankets for 
weary workers.
  The morning after the attack, a column appeared in the Miami Herald 
that spread across the Internet because it captured the thoughts and 
feelings of our Nation so aptly. In it, the columnist described the 
``vast and quarrelsome'' American family, one ``rent by racial, social, 
political and class division, but a family nonetheless.'' If the tragedy 
proved anything, it is that the American family is one that reaches out 
its hand to help another in need.
  The tragedy also redefined the American hero and turned ordinary 
people into extraordinary Americans. After the first assault on the 
World Trade Center, New York City firefighters and policemen rushed into 
the building and began saving lives--even as the buildings were 
collapsing. Yes, it was the job of firefighters to go into the 
buildings, but they could have reasoned that the buildings were going to 
collapse anyway, so why try. When the victims rushed out, they rushed 
in, and became heroes in the process--343 firefighters sacrificed their 
lives to save more than 25,000.
  Our Nation has had a resurgence of faith and spirituality. The tragedy 
caused people to reevaluate their core values and cling to their 
traditions. In one day, everything that we thought was meaningful and 
important slid to the wayside and we rediscovered fundamental beliefs 
about faith, family and freedom. If the terrorists had hoped to break 
the American spirit, they failed spectacularly.
  We are now engaged in a war on terrorism and it is a war we will win. 
This is a struggle that concerns the whole of the democratic and 
civilized and free world. We will bring to account those responsible, 
and we will dismantle the apparatus of terror and eradicate the evil of 
mass terrorism in our world.
  The cause that we are fighting is just and it is decent. No citizen, 
in any country, should live in fear of senseless terrorist attacks. On 
September 11, 2002, thousands of American civilians gave their lives for 
a cause they did not know. An attack against civilian targets of women 
and children, mothers and fathers, peaceful and without prejudice, is 
beyond comprehension in our modern, civilized world.
  America responded to this crisis and emerged from the tragedy stronger 
and more determined. The course and duration of the conflict is unknown, 
but its outcome is not. America will prevail and remain the greatest 
Nation in the world.

    EXPRESSING SUPPORT FOR GOALS AND IDEAS OF DAY OF TRIBUTE TO ALL 
                              FIREFIGHTERS


                        Hon. Christopher H. Smith


                              of new jersey

  Madam Speaker, I rise in strong support of H. Con. Res. 476 and all of 
America's firefighters, especially those who have died in the line of 
duty.
  As a proud Member of the Congressional Fire Services Caucus, I think 
it is fitting and appropriate that we set aside time to pay tribute to 
our Nation's firefighters, men and women who have dedicated their lives 
so that the rest of us can sleep in peace. The threat of fire and the 
calamity an actual fire often creates is a day-to-day concern for all 
our communities, not to mention the added threats of terrorism now 
confronting us.
  In 1992, on behalf of the more than 1 million firefighters in over 
32,000 fire departments nationally, Congress rightly created the 
National Fallen Firefighters Foundation to lead a nationwide effort to 
remember our Nation's fallen firefighters and their families. Since its 
creation, this foundation has assisted many family members, helping them 
overcome the loss of their fallen champions. Within hours of the 
September 11 tragedy, the foundation established a process that used 
resources from across the country to provide the critical support that 
members of the Fire Department of New York City and their families 
needed.
  This weekend the National Fallen Firefighters Foundation will honor 
the 442 firefighters who made the ultimate sacrifice in service to their 
communities last year, including those lost in the World Trade Center's 
disaster. Also to be honored are five firefighters from my State of New 
Jersey who served with pride and honor and who dedicated their lives to 
protect others in their communities. Willie Barns, George ``June'' 
Danielson, Jr., James T. Heenan, Alberto Tirado, and Lawrence James Webb 
are New Jersey's fallen heroes. They will be honored for their ultimate 
acts of valor this weekend. My prayers and the prayers of New Jerseyans 
everywhere will be with them and their families.
  Madam Speaker, our firefighters and emergency personnel who stand at 
the ready to protect and help us around the clock deserve our support 
and dedication.


                        Thursday, October 3, 2002

               HONORING AIR FORCE MAJOR JAMES G. CUSIC III


                         Hon. Jerry F. Costello


                               of illinois

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to ask my colleagues to join me in 
recognizing Air Force Maj. James G. Cusic III, a constituent of mine 
from Fairview Heights, IL.
  Major Cusic is receiving a Certificate of Merit from the American Red 
Cross for his actions on September 11, 2001. This is the highest award 
the organization gives for someone who saves or sustains a life with 
skills that were learned in an American Red Cross safety course.
  The attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 
11, 2001, made this perhaps the most tragic day in our Nation's history. 
However, the day could have been even more catastrophic if it were not 
for the efforts of men and women such as Major Cusic.
  On the morning of September 11, Major Cusic saw the news of the 
attacks on the World Trade Center from his Pentagon office. As he 
watched, he began to feel the floor shake below him, and the television 
reported that a third plane had been used as a weapon. This time, the 
target was the Pentagon. A voice came on the Pentagon intercom with a 
message to evacuate the building.
  As the news came that a second hijacked plane might be headed toward 
Washington, Major Cusic cleared all the rooms in his area of the 
building to make sure everyone had exited. Next, he assisted five of the 
approximately 65 patients who were being treated at the Air Force 
Pararescue triage site.
  Major Cusic volunteered to reenter the building as 1 of 5 leaders of a 
20-person team to provide medical treatment for survivors in the 
building. He was responsible for providing treatment for life-
threatening injuries. Major Cusic aided one man who had a severe scalp 
laceration and a spinal injury. He assisted another man who suffered 
from severe burns on his face and neck and was experiencing difficulty 
breathing.
  Later in the evening, Major Cusic's heroic actions were needed once 
again. A firefighter who had entered the building as part of the rescue 
effort collapsed from heat exhaustion and an erratic pulse. Once again, 
Major Cusic provided the treatment necessary under extreme 
circumstances.
  Major Cusic maintained clarity of mind throughout the day on September 
11 and should be commended for his actions in the face of adversity. At 
the end of the day, he was directly involved in saving three lives and 
in caring for two more people with severe injuries. In addition, he 
provided invaluable encouragement to other survivors and those involved 
with the rescue effort.
  Mr. Speaker, I ask my colleagues to join me in honoring Major Cusic 
and to wish him all the best in the future for him and his family.


                         Monday, October 7, 2002

  EXPRESSING APPRECIATION FOR PRIME MINISTER OF GREAT BRITAIN FOR HIS 
LOYAL SUPPORT AND LEADERSHIP IN WAR ON TERRORISM AND REAFFIRMING STRONG 
     RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN PEOPLE OF UNITED STATES AND GREAT BRITAIN


                         Hon. Benjamin A. Gilman


                               of New York

  Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and agree to the resolution 
(H. Res. 549) expressing appreciation for the Prime Minister of Great 
Britain for his loyal support and leadership in the war on terrorism and 
reaffirming the strong relationship between the people of the United 
States and Great Britain.
  The Clerk read as follows:

                               H. Res. 549


  Whereas the people of the United States and Great Britain have a 
history of shared values and mutual respect for one another;

  Whereas the Governments of the United States and Great Britain are 
close allies and share a deep and abiding friendship based on a shared 
commitment to democratic values;

  Whereas the United States and Great Britain understand the commitment 
to defend freedom and democracy regardless of the costs involved;

  Whereas British Prime Minister Tony Blair has displayed exceptional 
leadership in the war on terrorism; and

  Whereas the United States and Great Britain have been provoked into a 
war on terrorism that threatens the security of both nations: Now, 
therefore, be it

  Resolved, That the House of Representatives--

  (1) expresses sincere appreciation for Prime Minister Tony Blair for 
his leadership in the war on terrorism;

  (2) expresses its deepest sympathy to British victims of terrorism and 
their families, including the 67 British citizens who were victims of 
the terrorist attack on September 11, 2001;

  (3) commends the efforts of British intelligence and defense agencies 
for their continued efforts in the war on terrorism; and

  (4) reaffirms the strong and special relationship between the people 
of the United States and Great Britain.


                           Hon. Eliot L. Engel


                               of New York

  Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of this resolution. I would like 
to commend my colleague, the gentleman from Missouri (Mr. Graves), for 
introducing such a timely resolution.
  Mr. Speaker, a Nation discovers its true friends in times of crisis. 
Since the tragedy of September 11, America has found that it has many 
friends around the globe. Mr. Speaker, we have seen that the United 
States has a tremendous friend and ally in the war on terrorism in Great 
Britain. No head of state has been more supportive of the United States 
in this battle than British Prime Minister Tony Blair.
  Since September 11, British troops fought alongside U.S. forces to 
liberate Afghanistan and to root out terrorists. Britain acted as the 
lead Nation for the international security assistance force in 
Afghanistan until the mission was turned over to Turkey. Humanitarian 
aid has flowed from Britain to Afghanistan, and the British Government 
has enacted new counterterrorism legislation.
  In short, Mr. Speaker, the United Kingdom has stood shoulder to 
shoulder with the United States in the war on terrorism. In the 
horrendous terrorist attacks of September 11, Britain lost 67 of its 
citizens. The United States has expressed its sympathies to the families 
of these British victims.
  Mr. Speaker, British Prime Minister Tony Blair has shown extraordinary 
leadership in the war on terrorism. This resolution recognizes his 
leadership and expresses the appreciation of the Congress and the 
American people. I urge my colleagues to support this resolution.


                        Tuesday, October 8, 2002

                       HONORING MARILYN A. NGUYEN


                            Hon. Jerry Weller


                               of illinois

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor Marilyn A. Nguyen of Bourbonnais, 
IL. Marilyn was one of over 85,000 secondary school students who 
participated in a contest through the Veterans of Foreign Wars of the 
United States and its Ladies Auxiliary (VFW). Each year the VFW conducts 
a Voice of Democracy audioessay competition designed to give high school 
students the opportunity to voice their opinion on their responsibility 
to our county. The contest theme was ``Reaching Out to America's 
Future.'' Marilyn A. Nguyen was chosen as the 2002 Voice of Democracy 
broadcast scriptwriting winner this year. Following is Marilyn's winning 
script.

                    Reaching Out to America's Future


                         (By Marilyn A. Nguyen)


  The harmony of an industrious city is disrupted by a deafeningly 
explosive crash. There is confusion. There are wailing sirens. In 
another city, the same confusion spreads like wildfire. Lives are 
forever changed as events unfold and buildings collapse. The horror is 
almost too much to bear. On September 11, 2001, the gruesome hand of 
terrorism attempted to reach out and grasp America's future. 
Fortunately, its grip was too slippery to conquer the heart and soul 
that is the United States of America.

  Over two centuries ago the Founding Fathers of this country left 
England envisioning better lives for themselves and their posterity. 
They reached out mentally and physically to find America's future full 
of promise and patriotism. As this country continues to blossom and 
mature we must accept the task of reaching out to America's future no 
matter the cost or hardship.

  America is a union for all nationalities. It reaches out to immigrants 
of all lands. My parents were among these immigrants. As their daughter 
I especially feel a unique bond to America. I feel that it is my duty to 
reach out to America's future with my own actions.

  But, what does it mean to reach out to America's future? Already, it 
may seem to some that our future is uncertain because of the terrorist 
attacks. But, these tragedies only remind us that the time to reach out 
to America's future is now. We need to rise to the challenge as we have 
never done before to stand firm as a nation and as human beings to reach 
forward into the future.

  The task at hand is not an easy one. Reaching out to America's future 
must begin with the individual who believes that America's future is not 
an abstract idea: it is comprised of neighbors, friends, mothers and 
fathers, brothers and sisters and especially individuals. America's 
future depends on what happens today in the lives of ordinary Americans 
living ordinary lives. It calls for the erasure of color, race and 
religion. It begins when one person extends respect and acceptance to 
another person regardless of their background.

  Reaching out to America's future as a teenager is not much different 
from extending a hand as an adult. As a teen, perhaps it may be a 
difficult step but one which lays the foundations for adulthood. At a 
time when personal opinions are being formed, it can be easy to declare 
``it's not my job'' to reach out but that is where we are wrong. I am 
the future of America. It starts with me. I am the voice of influence 
over my friends and the younger members of my community. Using that 
influence to promote understanding and cooperation among my peers, 
family, and community are what I, as a teen individual, can do to reach 
out to America's future.

  It is important to begin with our everyday routines because this is 
where the impact will be most felt. I must encourage others to talk with 
friends and family about what it means to be a contribution to America's 
future. Teach younger children in middle school, neighbors, or even 
peers in high school that it is wrong to hate and discriminate. I have a 
responsibility to open my mind to the differences that make us unique 
and vital components of the future instead of searching for ways to 
divide. The example I put forth into the world should be one of love and 
acceptance.

  The teenager's job in reaching out to America's future lies in the 
education of himself and his surroundings. His call to help build 
America's future is still strong. This Nation has no future without the 
work of those who believe in its potential for goodness.

  Reaching out to America's future can seem like a faraway goal. But, in 
reality, the future is at our fingertips. We as people of this majestic 
empire must adopt the task set before us over 200 years ago. Reaching 
out to the future begins with the person who hears these words. It is he 
who must first take action. The perfect example of reaching out to 
America's future is the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor. She is the 
example for one and all. Her extended arm holding the torch as a guiding 
light beckons us to follow her into the future. With her unfailing 
devotion to the preservation of this land, she reminds us that the 
future's brightness depends solely on those willing to bear the torch.

  Mr. Speaker, I urge this body to identify and recognize others in 
their own districts whose actions have so greatly benefited and 
strengthened America's communities.

                        REMEMBERING SEPTEMBER 11


                            Hon. Steve Israel


                               of new york

  Mr. Speaker, on September 11 I joined with the students, teachers, 
administrators and parents of the Idle Hour Elementary School in Oakdale 
for a profound commemoration of those lost in the attacks on America. I 
know that our colleagues will be as moved as I was to hear the essays of 
three sixth graders: Emily Pertz, Justin Rigas and April LaValle. I am 
honored to share them with the entire Congress today:

                               September 11


                            (By Emily Pertz)


   September 11 was a painful and tragic event. It changed the lives of 
millions forever.

  I don't know anybody who died in my family because of the attack, but 
knowing that a lot of kids became parentless that day is enough to make 
my family and I upset. Whenever we go over the bridge I see many 
buildings and then a big gap where the towers once stood. To me it is 
very upsetting to see. My family is more cautious than ever.

  I think the attacks have changed both our country and our world. The 
United States became more united. The world together is fighting 
terrorism. But on the other hand, many people lost loved ones, and the 
world's tallest towers were destroyed. Many people are still mourning 
and are still heartbroken.

  Our school has done many great things to remember the victims. We 
raised a lot of money to plant a memorial garden to honor the lives lost 
from our neighborhood. We made red, white and blue chains that connected 
every classroom to show we are united. Each student colored in two 
flags, one to take home and one to hang up in school. The day after the 
attack our school had a moment of silence. It really made me think and 
made me a little depressed.

  The United States went through a lot, but no matter what we will 
always be united.


                                    H

                             America Changes


                            (By Justin Rigas)


  The terrorist attack made by Osama bin Laden and the Taliban on the 
Twin Towers, landmarks of our New York City skyline, was a great 
tragedy. Thousands of innocent people died terribly as the buildings 
melted and crumbled to the ground. Children are left without their 
mothers and fathers, families without sisters, brothers, dear friends. 
Families are left without jobs, without their income, possibly unable to 
pay their bills and keep their house.

  But America has stood together strong. In this moment of sadness and 
tragedy millions have come together with help and support. People all 
over our country, not just New York, have sent donations of food, money 
and clothing to help those families that have lost those dear to them.

  The events of September 11, 2001, have changed the attitudes of my 
family as well as millions of Americans. We all miss those we know and 
loved that are gone. The Americans' innocence may never again be the 
same, not able to totally trust the safety we've somehow always felt. 
Many people hesitate to travel on airplanes which means less people are 
visiting places where the people there count on them to spend their 
money. It could hurt business in hotels, restaurants and stores.

  We always need to be on guard that something terrible could happen 
again. Our government cannot sleep, it must always be searching for the 
next thing to happen.

  During the months following September 11, my school painted pictures 
of the Twin Towers and memories of that day. We made a tree of buttons 
representing the people that died that day on the wall in our hallway. 
Collections of food and money were presented to the Red Cross and a 
garden in the form of our flag was planted at school.

  At Dowling College, a memorial garden was planted to be kept forever 
funded by a dinner our school held.

  People everywhere still fly their American flags at their homes and, 
in their cars.

  In the meantime we will rebuild our city and the towers that will 
again stand, this time as a huge memoriam of 9/11 and those lost. The 
day that changed America.


                                    H

                            September 11, 2001


                           (By April Lavalle)


  9/11 was a day of mixed emotions, sadness, anger and determination. 
Even though many innocent people were killed, never will the people of 
America stop the deeds, kind donations and prayers for all who have 
passed away. Some people were lucky not to know anyone who was in the 
Twin Towers. But I knew my personal life would never be the same. I took 
so many things for granted.

  I now think about the desperate families of the innocent people who 
have died. Even though people try to do all they can to make families 
who lost loved ones feel better, nothing can serve as compensation for 
those who left us on September 11. America now has to prove to the world 
that we are a strong Nation and will fight for what we need. The world 
is no longer a peaceful place for us and no longer united. A gray sky 
will stay in our minds until we find peace and our sun will again shine 
through.

  Our community hung flags, made donations and I bet you that everyone 
prayed. We are a proud and patriotic nation. Don't think 9/11 made us a 
weaker country; it made us a stronger America.


                       Wednesday, October 9, 2002

  EXPRESSING SUPPORT OF OFFICIAL RECOGNITION FOR THE HEROES OF UNITED 
                           AIRLINES FLIGHT 93


                            Hon. Mac Collins


                               of georgia

  Mr. Speaker, I call to your attention a letter I received from David 
and Gretchen Nagy and Donald Evans, Jr., of Burke, VA. The letter, 
addressed to President George W. Bush, urges our government to 
officially recognize the heroic men and women of United Airlines flight 
93 for their actions on the morning of September 11, 2001. These 
ordinary people aboard flight 93 were thrown into an extraordinary and 
tragic situation. When their plane was highjacked by Al Qaeda 
terrorists, these brave souls made a choice to fight back against 
terror. The citizens on flight 93 became soldiers, and in so doing 
denied the terrorists of their chosen target, perhaps saving our 
cherished Capitol from the same fate as the World Trade Center. Mr. 
Speaker, in support of this letter, I submit it for the Record. It reads 
as follows:

                    President George W. Bush,

                    The White House,

                    Washington, DC.

  Dear Mr. President: We write as ordinary citizens to ask that you lead 
our Nation in bestowing some measure of official honor upon a tiny band 
of extraordinary citizens--the ones who stood up and charged the 
hijackers of UAL flight 93 over Pennsylvania on 9/11.

  There seems little doubt that these heroes spared America another 
devastating blow with their magnificent stand, possibly even a blow to 
the Capitol or the White House itself. Thanks to you and others, 
everyone now knows their rallying cry, ``Let's roll!'' Surely, everyone 
with a heart shivered when they heard it, and the story behind it.

  And now, Mr. President, how many even remember their names?

  According to press reports, they were Todd Beamer, Jeremy Glick, Mark 
Bingham and Lou Nacke--ordinary yet rare men with the guts to act when 
most would be paralyzed by fear. Perhaps investigators have identified 
others who joined their uprising. If so, they remain anonymous and 
unacknowledged. All the sadder.

  In a sense, sir, weren't these men the first combat casualties in our 
new war against terrorism? The first to go hand-to-hand--and unarmed--
against our attackers? They knew they were doomed. (``I'm not going to 
get out of this,'' Beamer told a cell phone operator.) They could have 
curled up and gone passively. But they also knew they could thwart evil 
and spare many on the ground if they went down fighting.

  We respectfully suggest, Mr. President, that valor of this sort is in 
the grandest traditions of American heroism--something very special, on 
the order of that which gains our military heroes the Medal of Honor. 
Yet if anyone has proposed that this Nation extend these men some 
tangible form of gratitude, something solid their loved ones could touch 
and treasure, we haven't heard of it. So we are asking you, sir, to 
consider bestowing such an honor at a fitting, proper ceremony. Perhaps 
the Presidential Medal of Freedom would be appropriate, perhaps some 
other award for ultimate service and valor.

  We still hope we are merely adding our letter to a growing stack.

  God bless you, Mr. President.


                                                David and Gretchen Nagy,

                                                    Donald C. Evans, Jr.


                       Thursday, October 10, 2002

                        IN HONOR OF TED MALIARIS


                             Hon. Jim Davis


                               of florida

  Mr. Speaker, I rise in honor of Ted Maliaris, a devoted American who 
is following his heart and sharing his love for our Nation through his 
passionate music. Through his ``A Tribute to America Tour,'' Ted is 
lifting the spirits of Americans across the Nation while teaching 
children the importance of American values.
  Ted was born in South Florida, and thanks to the encouragement of his 
grandparents, who were both musicians, Ted soon discovered his true love 
for music. During his years working on the family farm, Ted honed his 
musical talents and soon decided to follow his dream of sharing his 
music with others. He recently recorded his first album with the London 
Symphony Orchestra, where he honored the immigrant farm laborers who 
worked alongside him during his career on the farm.
  After the tragic events of September 11, Ted's mother, Ann S. Miller 
composed ``A Tribute to America--A 21st Century Anthem'' to honor the 
men and women in the Armed Forces. The song inspired Ted to organize the 
``Tribute to America Tour,'' which features his performance of his 
mother's song and performances by various children's groups around the 
country. Hoping to show children the patriotism and pride that lies in 
our country, America's Life Line Association is planning a special 
recording of 50,000 children singing the anthem together.
  On behalf of the people of Tampa Bay, I would like to extend my 
gratitude to Ted for his dedication to our country and this important 
cause.

               IN RECOGNITION OF REV. C.C. CAMPBELL GILLON


                            Hon. Ken Bentsen


                                of texas

  Mr. Speaker, I rise to honor Rev. C.C. Campbell Gillon, on the 
occasion of his retirement from his pastoral duties at the Presbyterian 
Congregation in Georgetown located in Washington, DC, where he has 
faithfully served his congregation for more than 23 years. His 
retirement comes at the end of 50 years in the ministry.
  The Presbyterian Congregation in Georgetown has over 200 years of 
distinguished history, beginning in 1780, under the eminent Stephen 
Bloomer Balch, pupil of religious leader John Witherspoon and soldier of 
the Revolution. The church serves as the first Presbyterian Church in 
what was to become modern-day Washington, DC, and the oldest church of 
any denomination with an unbroken ministry. A rare charter, still in 
effect, was granted in 1806 to ``the Presbyterian Congregation in George 
Town'' by an act of Congress signed by President Thomas Jefferson. The 
Presbyterian Congregation in Georgetown, pioneered in both the religious 
and cultural life of the community, has served as a cornerstone of faith 
in our Nation's Capital, attracting a wide variety of worshipers from 
political leaders to those seeking spiritual direction.
  Rev. Campbell Gillon was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, into a family 
immersed in the Christian spirit. Both his father and uncles preceded 
him as ministers of the Church of Scotland. After 3 years of Army 
service at the end of World War II, he graduated with a master of arts 
degree from the University of Glasgow before studying theology at 
Trinity College, Glasgow, under the tutelage of Professor William 
Barclay, the noted Scottish New Testament scholar. In 1952, Reverend 
Gillon began an exceptional career that has spanned 50 years, with his 
first appointment to the historic Buittle Parish in southwest Scotland. 
The rest of his 27-year ministry in the Church of Scotland was spent in 
Glasgow, where he presided over the Milton Saint Stephen's Church. Under 
his extraordinary leadership, Reverend Gillon's beloved church was 
united with the noted Renfield Church Center, and was expanded to 
include a public restaurant, concert hall, and other community oriented 
facilities. In 1978, Reverend Gillon and his wife Audrey visited the 
Presbyterian Congregation in Georgetown on a 6-week work exchange, not 
knowing how their lives would forever be changed. Soon after his short 
stay, he returned to his 800-year-old parish, the prestigious Cathcart 
Old Parish, only to receive a call from the Presbyterian Congregation in 
Georgetown with an offer to join their church family as the senior 
minister.
  Reverend Gillon has earned a reputation of being one of the most 
thoughtful and provocative interpreters of Christian experience, and has 
shared his insight and experiences with those who seek knowledge and 
guidance. He has published Words of Trust, a book of sermons produced in 
both the United States and the United Kingdom. As a testament to his 
leadership and wisdom, excerpts from Reverend Gillon's sermons have been 
featured in newspapers, magazines, and Christian publications around the 
world.
  While Reverend Gillon's religious and spiritual obligations to his 
growing congregation have always been paramount, as a community leader 
he has shared his faith and free time as chaplain of the Saint Andrew's 
Society of Washington, DC, a charitable and social organization of men 
of Scottish birth or ancestry.
  Mr. Speaker, at a time when our Nation and many across the world were 
seeking explanations and direction following the horrific attacks of 
September 11, terrorism, and war, Reverend Gillon provided comfort after 
the storm with his prayer before the House of Representatives and a 
moving sermon before his congregation. He reminded us that suffering is 
only temporary, and God's love is forever. Deeply rooted in the 
traditions of Scotland and the Scottish preachers that preceded him, 
Reverend Gillon has dedicated himself to the principles of the 
Presbyterian faith, his congregation and his family.
  In his own words, Reverend Gillon captured the sentiments of the 
entire congregation, ``never does the heart wish a good relationship to 
end.'' I want to thank Campbell for his leadership, spiritual guidance 
and devotion to the Presbyterian Congregation in Georgetown, the 
Washington, DC, community, and the many lives he and his wife Audrey 
have touched throughout his career. He leaves a legacy of good work and 
grace that will be missed.

                    TRIBUTE TO CHARLES ROONEY MILLER


                          Hon. James E. Clyburn


                            of south carolina

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to pay tribute to a fellow South Carolinian 
and college classmate, Charles Rooney Miller, a good friend, a master 
teacher, and a survivor of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.
  Mr. Miller was born on August 11, 1939, in Clover, SC, in York County. 
He was the first of two children born to Andrew Charles Miller and Emily 
Lee (Allison) Miller. After his parents separated, he lived with his 
grandmother, aunts, uncles and other relatives--he was truly a 
community-raised child in a Christian environment. From a young age, he 
attended Clover Chapel Methodist Church Sunday Bible School and later 
joined Flat Rock Baptist Church where he was baptized. At the age of 11, 
he became the Sunday School teacher for his age group.
  Mr. Miller was an excellent student throughout grammar school and high 
school. He graduated from Roosevelt High School in May 1956, as 
valedictorian of his class. From there he went to South Carolina State 
College (now University), where I had the pleasure of meeting him and 
beginning a lifelong friendship. We were both active in the civil rights 
activities on campus and participated in a number of marches and other 
activities. Rooney graduated from South Carolina State in 1962 and moved 
to Stamford, CT, where he was later joined by his wife and children.
  In Connecticut, Mr. Miller worked two jobs to support his family; at 
Chemtross, a film developing business, and at Stamford Chemicals, a dry 
cleaning production business, where his work is associated with the 
invention of a number of products that are still used in today's dry 
cleaning industry. Mr. Miller later became a teacher and worked for a 
short time in South Carolina, Stamford, and in the Norwalk, CT, public 
school systems.
  In 1968, Mr. Miller began a career with the New York City Department 
of Social Services and worked there until 1994 when he retired as a 
supervisor with the Bureau of Social Services for Children. His 
retirement was not long and he returned to work in 1997 as a consultant 
with PSI International in Fairfax, VA, and was assigned as a conversion 
specialist for his old office, the New York City Department of Social 
Services. He worked there until September 11, 2001.
  On the morning of September 11, Mr. Miller arrived at work early and 
spoke to several colleagues on his floor. He thought about how much he 
enjoyed his post-retirement work as a consultant and his ability to set 
his own schedule. In the midst of his musings, he heard a loud noise but 
first thought the sound came from normal truck traffic outside. But this 
window-rattling occurrence was different. He was astonished when he went 
to the window and saw the World Trade Center tower on fire and a trail 
of fluid pouring down the side of the building with fire leaping behind 
it. He heard other loud explosions and coworkers on his floor began to 
scream, cry and pray. The radios began broadcasting reports of the fire 
but no one was sure what was happening. As Mr. Miller and his coworkers 
continued to watch the building burn he saw people jumping from the 
windows, some holding hands. They watched as the second plane crashed 
into the other tower. They knew then they were in the midst of a planned 
attack, and pandemonium broke out. Finally, they received instructions 
to leave their building and head down to the South Street Seaport where 
they thought it would be safer by the water. They were given surgical 
masks to cover their noses and mouths and instructed to put a moist 
towel under the mask to help prevent inhalation of smoke, chemicals and 
other foreign particles. They left the darkened building with smoke and 
objects flying through the air.
  As people were screaming and running out of the building, Miller was 
knocked to the ground and run over by several people before he could get 
back to his feet. He thought he would be okay once he caught his breath. 
He was eventually assisted by a worker from a nearby polling place and 
taken to a triage location. The medics realized that Miller was 
suffering from a heart attack and he was then rushed by ambulance to New 
York Hospital's downtown emergency room. He was hospitalized for 5 days 
and unable to contact his family. After subsequent angioplasty surgery 
and treatments for the back injury he received, he is now mending well.
  He's still active in his church, Cathedral Baptist, where he serves as 
chairman of the deacon's board, chairman of the men's department, vice 
president of the board of directors, a teacher in the Bible Institute 
and the Adult Sunday School class. He is also a member of South Carolina 
State University Alumni Chapter of New York.
  Mr. Speaker, I ask you and my colleagues to join me in honoring 
Charles Rooney Miller, a man whose contributions to his community, his 
friends, and his family will leave lasting impressions on the numerous 
lives he has touched. As the homecoming celebrations begin at our alma 
mater, South Carolina State University, I wish him continued success and 
Godspeed.

               SPECIAL JOINT SESSION OF THE U.S. CONGRESS


                         Hon. Sue Wilkins Myrick


                               of new york

  Mr. Speaker, on Friday, September 6 of this year, a special joint 
session of the U.S. Congress gathered in New York City to remember the 
terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. This special session reminded 
us of the lives that were lost and the heroes that were found all across 
this country on that terrible day. I am honored to have taken part in 
this unique session.
  We convened at Federal Hall, where the First Congress met over two 
centuries ago, and a few blocks from where the World Trade Center towers 
once stood proud and tall.
  Mr. Speaker, we met to remember the thousands of lives that ended so 
abruptly that day. We prayed for the families of those that were lost. 
We prayed for the families who had to say goodbye before they were 
ready. The wound that America suffered on that day will always be 
remembered.
  We also expressed our most sincere thanks to the firefighters, police 
officers, emergency personnel, and all others who risked and gave their 
lives on that day. These brave men and women, along with their peers 
across the country, risk their lives every day to protect those around 
them. Expressing our thanks to them is a long overdue action.
  Finally, Mr. Speaker, we recommit ourselves to eradicating terrorism 
from the world and to making sure that those responsible for this 
horrible attack on America are brought to justice. American soldiers are 
now stationed across the globe, helping to create a world where those 
who live in freedom can also live free of the fear of terrorism. America 
and the world owe these soldiers a debt of gratitude.
  I am proud to have joined Congress on September 6, to remember the 
lives that were lost and to show those who would harm America that we 
will not forget, but we will overcome.

                Disposing of Various Legislative Measures

H. Res. 571, honoring the life of David O. ``Doc'' Cooke, the ``Mayor of 
                             the Pentagon''

                               H. Res. 571


  Whereas for 44 years, David O. ``Doc'' Cooke's tireless dedication, 
skill, and involvement in Department of Defense management issues earned 
him the respect of his colleagues and distinction as a Pentagon 
institution;

  Whereas as the quintessential civil servant, Doc Cooke rose to become 
the highest ranking career civil servant within the Department of 
Defense;

  Whereas in his jobs as the Director of Administration and Management 
for the Office of the Secretary of Defense, and Director of Washington 
Headquarters Services, Doc Cooke was responsible for maintenance, 
operation, and security of buildings of the Department of Defense in the 
Washington, D.C. area, including the Pentagon Reservation;

  Whereas because of his propensity to make things happen, Doc Cooke was 
respectfully known as the ``Mayor of the Pentagon'';

  Whereas Doc Cooke was born in 1920 in Buffalo, New York, and went on 
to earn a bachelor's degree in education from the State Teachers College 
at Buffalo in 1941, a master's degree in political science from the New 
York State College for Teachers in 1942, and a law degree in 1950 from 
George Washington University, where he was a member of the Law Review;

  Whereas Doc Cooke served in the Navy during World War II as an officer 
on the USS Pennsylvania; returned to active duty during the Korean war, 
during which time he served as an instructor in the School of Naval 
Justice; and retired in 1968 as a Navy captain;

  Whereas Doc Cooke served on Defense Secretary Neil McElroy's task 
force on Department of Defense reorganization in 1958; worked for 
Defense Secretary Robert McNamara, as Director of the Office of 
Organizational and Management Planning, implementing changes in 
Department of Defense organization; and worked for every other Secretary 
of Defense since then;

  Whereas during the late 1980s and early 1990s, Doc Cooke was a strong 
advocate for renovation of the Pentagon;

  Whereas many of the construction specifications supported by Doc Cooke 
helped to save lives during the terrorist attack on the Pentagon on 
September 11, 2001;

  Whereas Doc Cooke could be seen assisting in the response to the 
terrorist attack on the Pentagon on September 11, 2001;

  Whereas throughout the Department of Defense, Doc Cooke was noted for 
his strong support of equal employment opportunity for minorities, 
women, and individuals with disabilities;

  Whereas Doc Cooke was instrumental in establishing a Public Service 
Academy at Anacostia High School in the District of Columbia, which has 
helped to increase the graduation rate of students;

  Whereas Doc Cooke served as a member of the seven-member Governance 
Committee of United Way of the National Capital Area's September 11 
Fund, deciding how to distribute disaster relief funds collected after 
September 11;

  Whereas Doc Cooke has been recognized for his extraordinary 
performance through numerous awards, including the Department of Defense 
Medal for Distinguished Civilian Service (the Department's highest 
department career award) seven times; the Department of Defense Medal 
for Outstanding Public Service; the Department of Defense Medal for 
Distinguished Public Service twice; the Roger W. Jones Award for 
Executive Leadership from American University (1983); the NAACP Benjamin 
L. Hooks Distinguished Service Award (1994); the Presidential 
Meritorious Rank Award (1994); the Government Executive Leadership Award 
(1995); a Presidential Distinguished Rank Award (1995); a National 
Public Service Award (1997); the President's Award for Distinguished 
Federal Civilian Service (1998), the highest Government service award; 
the John O. Marsh Public Service Award (2000); the Senior Executives 
Association Board of Directors Award (2001); the Nelson A. Rockefeller 
College of Public Affairs and Policy Distinguished Alumnus Award (2001); 
an award from the University at Albany Alumni Association for 
``Recognition for Outstanding Service'' (2001); and the American Society 
of Public Administration Elmer B. Staats Lifetime Achievement Award for 
Distinguished Service (2002); and

  Whereas on June 22, 2002, Doc Cooke died as the result of injuries 
sustained in an automobile accident, after a long and distinguished 
career in government, in which he became the model for civil servants: 
Now, therefore, be it:

  Resolved, That the House of Representatives--

  (1) recognizes David O. ``Doc'' Cooke's legendary professionalism as a 
model civil servant;

  (2) honors Doc Cooke's life; and

  (3) extends its condolences to the Cooke family and the Department of 
Defense community on the death of an extraordinary human being.

  discharged from the committee on house administration, amended, and 
                                agreed to

  H. Con. Res. 487, authorizing the printing as a House document of a 
volume consisting of the transcripts of the ceremonial meeting of the 
House of Representatives and Senate in New York City on September 6, 
2002, and a collection of statements by Members of the House of 
Representatives and Senate from the Congressional Record on the 
terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

                            H. Con. Res. 487


  Resolved by the House of Representatives (the Senate concurring),

                    SECTION 1. AUTHORIZING PRINTING OF VOLUME OF 
                      TRANSCRIPTS OF NEW YORK CITY MEETING AND 
                      STATEMENTS OF TERRORIST ATTACKS OF SEPTEMBER 11.


  (a) In General.--A volume consisting of the transcripts of the 
ceremonial meeting of the House of Representatives and Senate in New 
York City on September 6, 2002, and a collection of statements by 
Members of the House of Representatives and Senators on the terrorist 
attacks of September 11, 2001, shall be printed as a House document 
under the direction of the Joint Committee on Printing, with suitable 
binding.

  (b) Statements To Be Included in Volume.--A statement by a Member of 
the House of Representatives or a Senator on the terrorist attacks of 
September 11, 2001, shall be included in the volume printed under 
subsection (a) if the statement--

  (1) was printed in the Congressional Record prior to the most recent 
date on which the House of Representatives adjourned prior to the date 
of the regularly scheduled general election in November 2002; and

  (2) is approved for inclusion in the volume by the Committee on House 
Administration of the House of Representatives (in the case of a 
statement by a Member of the House), or the Committee on Rules and 
Administration of the Senate (in the case of a statement by a Senator).

                    SEC. 2. NUMBER OF COPIES.


  The number of copies of the document printed under section 1 shall be 
15,000 casebound copies, of which--

  (1) 15 shall be provided to each Member of the House of 
Representatives;

  (2) 25 shall be provided to each Senator; and

  (3) the balance shall be distributed by the Joint Committee on 
Printing to Members of the House of Representatives and Senators, based 
on requests submitted to the Joint Committee by Members and Senators.

                    SEC. 3. MEMBER DEFINED.


  In this concurrent resolution, the term ``Member of the House of 
Representatives'' includes a Delegate or Resident Commissioner to the 
Congress.

                amended by committee amendment and passed


                       Wednesday, October 16, 2002

     TRIBUTE TO CPT. KATHY MAZZA OF PORT AUTHORITY POLICE DEPARTMENT


                           Hon. Peter T. King


                               of new york

  Mr. Speaker, I am proud to rise today to pay tribute to Cpt. Kathy 
Mazza of the Port Authority Police Department who died heroically at the 
World Trade Center on September 11, 2001.
  This past Monday, October 14, 2002, I was privileged to take part in a 
very moving ceremony which designated North Suffolk Avenue in North 
Massapequa as Cpt. Kathy Mazza Way. The ceremony, which was held 
directly across from the home where Captain Mazza grew up, was attended 
by her husband, Chris Delosh, who is a member of the New York City 
Police Department; her parents, Rose and John Mazza; her three brothers; 
and many of her countless friends. The ceremony was conducted by Hon. 
John Venditto, the supervisor of the town of Oyster Bay.
  There were many heroes on September 11 but no one was more heroic than 
Kathy Mazza. On the morning of September 11, Captain Mazza was in New 
Jersey, serving as the commanding officer of the Port Authority Police 
Academy. Immediately upon learning of the attack on the Twin Towers, 
however, Captain Mazza raced to the World Trade Center in lower 
Manhattan and entered the North Tower where she proceeded to take a 
leadership role in the rescue effort--at one point reaching the 22d 
floor.
  What set Captain Mazza apart from all others is that she was 
personally responsible for evacuating hundreds of people. She did this 
by having the presence of mind to use her service revolver to shoot out 
floor-to-ceiling glass walls on the mezzanine level of tower one 
enabling so many trapped people to escape. Shortly after, at 10:29 a.m., 
Captain Mazza was killed when tower one collapsed.
  This extraordinary heroism and dedication to duty characterized Kathy 
Mazza's entire life. Prior to becoming a police officer she had been a 
cardiothoracic operating nurse at St. Francis Hospital in Roslyn, NY. As 
a police officer she was instrumental in launching the port authority's 
portable heart defibrillator program at the metropolitan airports. And 
as commanding officer of the Police Academy she achieved a record of 
unsurpassed excellence and achievement.
   September 11, 2001, was a day of brutality, horror and terror. But it 
was also a day when brave Americans such as Cpt. Kathy Mazza 
demonstrated a bravery and courage which will be remembered throughout 
the history of our Nation. For that and for so much more, we will always 
be in her debt.
  May she rest in peace.

                        REMEMBERING SEPTEMBER 11


                          Hon. Robert Menendez


                              of new jersey

  Mr. Speaker, September 11, 2001, hit our New Jersey community hard. We 
lost neighbors and friends, mothers and fathers and children, sisters 
and brothers--people who left their homes that fateful day, and crossed 
the Hudson River, never to return.
  The Twin Towers that were once visible from our waterfront stand no 
more. The skyline has forever changed.
  But the people who were lost that day, while leaving an unspeakable 
void in our lives, still live on in our hearts and our minds. They are 
our heroes: everyday heroes who were providing for their families, 
contributing to their communities; everyday heroes who lost their lives 
in their dedication to protect others. Everyday heroes. The most 
incredible kind of heroes. American heroes. They may not be here, but 
they do live on, and they will never be forgotten.
  We honor them by showing our patriotism; by flying our flag; by 
fighting terrorism wherever we find its scourge growing; by coming 
together as one great people and one great Nation; and even by finding 
the faith and the strength to carry on with our lives, raising our 
children, building our communities, and moving forward with this 
wonderful creation of democracy and freedom called America.
  Yes, September 11 hit our New Jersey community and indeed our Nation 
hard. But we remember. We persevere. We move forward. And we are 
stronger and more united than ever before. God Bless America.

  HONORING RON JAMES, MARINE VETERAN AND OUR INTREPID DEFENDER OF THE 
                              AMERICAN FLAG


                         Hon. Benjamin A. Gilman


                               of new york

  Mr. Speaker, as the 107th Congress draws to a close, I would like to 
take this opportunity to recognize a great friend of the American 
people, a Marine veteran, and our Nation's intrepid defender of the 
American flag, Mr. Ron James.
  Mr. James, who we also know as Mr. Ronald M. Sorenson, a Marine 
veteran of the Korean war era, and a great friend is a true American 
patriot. Ron has dedicated his life to preserving the core values of 
what our great Nation stands for and for more than two decades has 
educated our Nation on flag etiquette, while paving the way and leading 
our Nation in seeking a constitutional amendment prohibiting the 
desecration of our flag, the symbol of our great Nation.
  Ron is a familiar face in the Halls of Congress where he regularly 
visits our offices to seek our support for his noble endeavors. In 
addition to fighting for our flag, Ron also fights for the rights of our 
veterans and is active in numerous veterans organizations and assists 
patients in our VA hospitals. Over the past 20 years, Ron has walked 
thousands and thousands of miles carrying our flag, to garner support 
for not only a constitutional amendment protecting it from desecration, 
but also to raise awareness of its importance to our Nation's youth.
  Following the horrific events of barbarity perpetrated against our 
Nation by forces of true evil on September 11, 2001, Ron met with me to 
discuss legislation that would benefit the families of our everyday 
American heroes. On March 14, 2002, I sponsored H.R. 3968, the Fallen 
Heroes Flag Act of 2002, which provides a flag flown over the U.S. 
Capitol to the immediate family of our Nation's brave firefighters, law 
enforcement officers, emergency medical technicians (EMT) and to other 
relief and rescue workers whose lives are lost in the line of duty. This 
important legislation ensures that our future generations of public 
servants who may pay the ultimate price for their service to our Nation 
and to our communities are accorded the respect and honor that they 
deserve.
  Mr. Speaker, I ask my colleagues to join me in recognizing Ron's hard 
work and dedication that enabled us to turn an idea into a reality with 
our ``Fallen Heroes Flag Act of 2002.'' This is yet another selfless act 
of patriotism by Ron James, a true friend and a great American who lives 
his life to serve our Nation, our veterans, and our flag.

  RECOGNIZING THE WORK OF THE STUDENTS AT VETERANS MEMORIAL ELEMENTARY 
                      SCHOOL IN BRICK TOWNSHIP, NJ


                        Hon. Christopher H. Smith


                              of new jersey

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the hard work and community service 
exhibited during the past school year by the students of Veterans 
Memorial Elementary School in Brick Township, NJ. It is my honor and 
privilege of representing these students, and their parents and teachers 
in Congress.
  During this past year, the students invested many hours of service in 
projects to help make life better for their school and greater 
community. For example, in the aftermath of the September 11 terrorist 
attacks, the students honored local firefighters who participated in 
rescue and recovery operations at Ground Zero. They also sent thank you 
notes to New York City police and firefighters, and wrote letters to a 
local serviceman stationed overseas.
  It is important to note, Mr. Speaker, that the students' community 
service did not just begin, nor will it end, with their outstanding 
efforts related to September 11.
  To highlight the importance of a clean and safe environment, the 
students commemorated Earth Day by decorating grocery bags with 
environment-friendly messages. These bags were then used by patrons of a 
local supermarket so they could take home the students'messages about 
how we must protect for our environment.
  They also implemented a schoolwide paper recycling program, and worked 
to beautify the school's grounds.
  To enhance their own understanding of the challenges that older 
Americans face, the students visit with senior citizens in their 
community, exchanging ideas, and striking up new friendships. They make 
special holiday gifts for the seniors and also put on concerts, 
including one full of patriotic songs. It's the students' way of 
thanking America's ``greatest generation''; a generation that risked all 
to secure freedom at home and abroad. As chairman of the House Committee 
on Veterans' Affairs, I am especially grateful for the outreach our 
students have initiated with seniors and veterans--the namesakes of 
their school.
  When a peer's house tragically burned to the ground, the students of 
Veterans Memorial Elementary School responded by holding an emergency 
fundraiser. They also collected warm winter coats for students in need 
and helped their school buy new books and playground equipment.
  While this is only a small sampling of community service activities 
performed by the students of Veterans Elementary, it is clear that these 
children, while learning the subjects and skills they need to succeed in 
academia, are also learning the generosity, compassion, and service 
needed to be outstanding members of their community.
  I am proud to congratulate the students of Veterans Elementary School. 
Their leader and my friend, Principal Joe Vicari also deserves our 
thanks for his many years of hard work and generosity and the dedicated 
teachers and support staff at Veterans Elementary School also deserve 
high praise and recognition. I wish them all the very best of success 
for another year of outstanding community service, and I look forward to 
working with them in their endeavors in the years to come.


                       Thursday, October 17, 2002

                        A TRIBUTE TO MR. IAN GRAY


                       Hon. Robert L. Ehrlich, Jr.


                               of Maryland

  Mr. Speaker, I would like to take this opportunity to pay tribute to a 
humanitarian, Mr. Ian Gray, who tragically passed away on September 11, 
2001.
  Ian Gray worked for Baltimore Medical System (BMS) as part of his 
personal mission to ensure quality health care access for the 
underserved in the Baltimore area. He helped to build a health care 
system which serves over 30,000 patients throughout Maryland. He touched 
many lives in unseen ways through his commitment to BMS.
  Mr. Gray died during the tragic events of September 11, 2001, as he 
was a passenger on flight 77, which crashed into the Pentagon. His death 
serves as a reminder to all of us to continue the work he began. While 
his life was cut short, I know that his many coworkers, friends, and 
family members continue the noble mission of helping those in need by 
providing high quality health care.
  In recognition of the 1-year anniversary of the attacks on our Nation 
last month, BMS launched a capital fund drive, named for Ian Gray, to 
raise money for the health care needs of Baltimore's residents.
  Ian Gray's dream of improving health care is something we all share. 
His work was noble and improved the lives of countless Marylanders. I 
would like to take this opportunity to extend my best wishes to Ian's 
wife, Ana, and their children and family members. Ian's commitment to 
the health care of Marylanders lives on through the dedication of a fund 
to assist Baltimore Medical System to help those in need.
  Over 1 year after the tragic attacks on our Nation, we remember and 
celebrate the life of Ian Gray and continue his important work.


                      Wednesday, November 13, 2002

                      PUBLIC BILLS AND RESOLUTIONS

  Under clause 2 of rule XII, public bills and resolutions were 
introduced and severally referred, as follows:

  By Mr. NADLER:

  H.R. 5725. A bill to authorize a national memorial at, or proximate 
to, the World Trade Center site to commemorate the tragic events of 
September 11, 2001, to establish the World Trade Center Memorial 
Advisory Board, and for other purposes; to the Committee on Resources.

                      RECOGNIZING DAVE L. McDONALD


                         Hon. George Radanovich


                              of California

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in recognition of Dave McDonald upon his 
receipt of Central Valley Muscular Dystrophy Association's Humanitarian 
of the Year Award in Fresno, CA, on November 7, 2002. Mr. McDonald is 
being recognized for his leadership, humanitarian efforts, and 
dedication to the community.
  Mr. McDonald is the president and CEO of PELCO, the world's largest 
producer of video security systems, as well as Central California's 
largest manufacturing employer. PELCO produces 3,500 different products 
which are sold through 5,000 authorized dealers in the United States and 
abroad. Since its beginning, the company has grown 30-fold under Mr. 
McDonald's supervision.
  Following the disastrous events of September 11, 2001, Mr. McDonald 
and PELCO assisted the NYPD in its recovery efforts at the World Trade 
Center site by donating specialized camera equipment and personnel. 
Additionally, the company's warehouse in Orangeburg, NY, was converted 
into a distribution center for relief supplies. In November 2001, PELCO 
created the California Memorial in Clovis as a permanent tribute to the 
victims and fallen heroes from September 11. The memorial contains 
hundreds of items donated by the City of New York in remembrance of the 
events of September 11.
  In March 2002, Mr. McDonald was honored by the New York City Fire 
Department as the Grand Marshall for the St. Patrick's Day Parade. In 
May 2002, Mr. McDonald also received the Excellence in Business Award 
from the Fresno Hall of Fame in recognition of his dedication to local 
businesses and his community.
  Mr. Speaker, I want to congratulate Dave McDonald for his 
contributions to the many people in need, not only locally but 
nationally. I urge my colleagues to join me in wishing Dave McDonald 
many more years of continued success.

      TRIBUTE TO COMANCHE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL OF SHAWNEE MISSION, KS


                            Hon. Dennis Moore


                                of Kansas

  Mr. Speaker, I want to take this opportunity to recognize and commend 
the students of Marilyn Tieszen, a kindergarten teacher at Comanche 
Elementary School of Shawnee Mission, KS, which is located in the Third 
Congressional District of Kansas.
  Following the tragic terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, Ms. 
Tieszen had her students create an American flag, using a white sheet, 
and dipping their hands in red and blue paint to make the stripes and 
the blue background for the stars. The flag was presented to U.S. Army 
Capt. John Townsend, who has two children who are students at the 
school. Captain Townsend is the executive officer of the School of 
Advanced Military Studies at Fort Leavenworth's U.S. Army Command and 
General Staff College.
  After receiving the flag, Captain Townsend hung it in Eisenhower Hall 
at Fort Leavenworth, KS, for a few weeks, where, in his words, ``it got 
rave reviews and many people commented that it was unfortunate that all 
service members would not be able to appreciate it.'' As a result of the 
very positive reception it received at the fort, the flag was then 
mailed to an Army infantry unit conducting a peacekeeping mission in 
Kosovo. It arrived a few days before Christmas and hung at several of 
their sites through the new year. From there, it was taken to an 
airborne unit that ``jumped'' it into Tunisia, North Africa. Next it was 
displayed on the aircraft carrier USS John C. Stennis, which was 
supporting Operation Enduring Freedom in the Persian Gulf.
  Following the display on the USS Stennis, the Comanche Elementary 
School flag was flown to an Army explosive ordnance unit in Afghanistan 
which had just lost two soldiers, one being from Kansas. After that, the 
flag went to the Pentagon where it hung for 3 weeks in the reconstructed 
part of the building that had been attacked on September 11. As Captain 
Townsend told me, ``few people could pass it without stopping and 
appreciating the spirit and patriotism it displayed.'' The flag then was 
displayed at the U.S. Supreme Court and the U.S. Capitol, before being 
returned home to Comanche Elementary School, where it is now being 
displayed.
  Mr. Speaker, a book that logged its travels accompanied the flag 
everywhere it went. At each stop the unit took pictures of its visit and 
then sent them on with the flag so its travels are well documented. In 
most cases the unit sent a letter or e-mail praising the students' 
patriotism. At Comanche Elementary School the students and faculty have 
created a large display in the foyer just inside the front door so that 
everyone who comes into the building can see it: a large map with the 
visited areas highlighted, including pictures from those locations.
  As Captain Townsend told me, ``I receive e-mails almost daily from 
soldiers and civilians around the world that have seen this flag and 
were thankful that they got to see it. In most cases it brought tears to 
their eyes. In some cases it brought a ray of hope to people that were 
down from losing friends and comrades and for others it was a sign of 
support from a community half way around the world.''
  I am very proud of the patriotism and creativity of Marilyn Tieszen's 
kindergarten class at Comanche Elementary School, who worked together to 
create a wonderful symbol of America during our ongoing time of great 
challenge. Mr. Speaker, I hope that you and all Members of this House 
will join with me in commending their spirit and thanking them for the 
inspirational symbol they created for display around the world.

                      HOMELAND SECURITY ACT OF 2002


                            Hon. Rob Portman


                                 of Ohio

  Mr. Speaker, I thank the chairman for yielding me this time. His 
passion and his persistence are the reason that we are here tonight to 
do this important work, and I appreciate the role he played in moving 
this legislation through the system as chair of the Select Committee on 
Homeland Security.
  Mr. Speaker, there is an old saying that goes ``Times change and we 
change with them too.'' Times have changed and it is imperative to the 
security of our country, security of our families that our government 
change as well.
  On September 11, 2001, the terrorists who struck our homeland killed 
more civilians than all our foreign enemies combined. We all woke up to 
the fact that the threats we face now are very different from the ones 
we faced in the past. During the cold war, we adapted our government 
structure to better utilize the resources we had to fight then a 
superpower. Today we face a more unpredictable and a more agile enemy 
and a very deadly enemy, and today we must reorganize our government 
again so we can stop that enemy before it strikes again, and we are not 
ready. There are over 100 departments and agencies with some involvement 
in homeland security, and when every one is in charge, no one is in 
charge. There is no accountability in the current system.
  Last summer President Bush presented to the Congress a very ambitious 
and visionary plan to merge and consolidate responsibilities in a new 
Department of Homeland Security, similar to what Senator Lieberman had 
proposed and what various commissions had proposed. He laid out three 
strategic objectives: First, prevention of attacks; second, minimizing 
our vulnerabilities; and third, minimizing the damage and maximizing 
recovery should an attack occur. These three pillars provided us with a 
clear framework to align our resources, people and capital, and to align 
responsibility and accountability. This single unified structure will 
make us more efficient and effective in the fight against terrorism. It 
will not make us immune, but it will make us safer.
  I strongly believe in what we are doing tonight, not because we are 
creating a new department but because we are doing it the right way. We 
are giving this President and future Presidents the flexibility they 
will need to make it work. That is budget flexibility; it is 
organizational flexibility; and, yes, it is personnel flexibility to be 
sure the right people are in the right place at the right time to 
protect us. The 21st century threats that we now meet head on cannot be 
handled by early 20th century civil service rules and bureaucracy. So, 
yes, the President and the new Secretary of Homeland Security will have 
the flexibility to design a new human resources management system, but 
it is one that will preserve fundamental civil service and worker 
protections while at the same time building a team atmosphere that is 
absolutely crucial by rewarding and promoting excellence and ensuring 
that we can do all we can to recruit the best people to this task.
  We have before us, Mr. Speaker, a bill that will both protect the 
homeland and protect workers' rights. It is the right balance.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to 
strongly support this legislation before us tonight. It represents an 
agreement between the House and the Senate and the White House, and by 
joining together we will send a strong message to the American people 
and to the other body that we are committed to doing all we can to 
protect our families and our country.


                           Hon. Deborah Pryce


                                 of Ohio

  Mr. Speaker, it has been nearly 5 months since the President called 
upon Congress to create a new Department of Homeland Security, and 
nearly 4 months since the House first took up that task. This 
legislation has been through a long journey, full of procedural and 
partisan roadblocks, weighed down by special interests, and slowed by a 
storm of misdirection.
  I could not be more pleased that we are here today with this 
compromise legislation that will finally allow us to move the bill to 
the President's desk. This is a historic achievement.
  In recent days, Members of the House and Senate have been through a 
thoughtful, thorough, and cooperative process. Every effort was made to 
address each concern while maintaining a basic framework that creates an 
effective department.
  This legislation will give the new Department of Homeland Security the 
tools it needs to succeed in its mission. And this, in my mind, is the 
key, because the new department's most basic and core mission will be to 
secure America from terrorist attack.
  On September 11, 2001, the streets of New York and Northern Virginia 
were turned to ash, while a grassy field in Pennsylvania played quiet 
witness to the final act of a heroic group of Americans. Creation of the 
Department of Homeland Security is the bold and necessary next step we 
must a take to ensure that this dark day is never repeated.
  We are not creating new government, we are creating better government. 
We are not legislating new bureaucracy, we are streamlining to face a 
new threat. We are making government smarter, more flexible, and 
ultimately, better able to secure America.
  The perpetrators of terrorism are shadowy and agile, and they target 
us like predators without distinction between military target and 
ordinary citizen. They are a 21st century enemy with an agelessly 
corrupt goal--destruction of life, elimination of liberty, and 
restriction of human freedom.
  Our enemy has recognized that our greatest strength--the open society 
in which we live--also makes us vulnerable to their attacks. We fight 
this enemy not just on battlefields abroad, but in our very cities and 
towns. We must be able to respond at home in a strong, coordinated and 
agile way.
  The new Cabinet-level department is only one part of our national 
response, but it is an essential part. The new department will 
consolidate the vital preparedness, intelligence analysis, law 
enforcement, and emergency response functions that are currently 
dangerously dispersed among numerous Federal departments and agencies. 
And in the process, the legislation balances the need to protect America 
with the need to preserve the American way of life that we are 
protecting.
  Thus far, the government has shown immense resolve and dedication, 
going to extraordinary lengths to respond to the terrorist threat. We 
are safer than we were on September 10, 1 year ago. But as the 
government's efforts reach the limits of their bureaucracies, we must 
rethink our government structure so that our Nation can be even 
stronger, smarter, and better prepared.
  One of our revolutionary forefathers, George Mason, once said, 
``Government is, or ought to be, instituted for the common benefit, 
protection and security of the people, nation or community.''
  Make no mistake--our work today undertakes this very core function of 
government to secure the American people. I urge all of my colleagues to 
take measure of the task before us, and to support this fair rule and 
the underlying bill.
  It has been a long journey, but this legislation, and the American 
people, are all the better for it.


                           Hon. Marge Roukema


                              of New Jersey

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in strong support of H.R. 5710, the Homeland 
Security Act of 2002.
  At last, Members of both parties and the administration have put their 
differences aside and agreed on a strong bill that will make America 
safer by creating a Cabinet-level Department of Homeland Security to 
unite essential agencies in our fight against terrorism here at home and 
abroad.
  On the morning of September 11, 2001, a new enemy brought war to our 
shores. An enemy that considers any innocent man, woman, or child that 
cherishes freedom a target. An enemy that does not necessarily call any 
nation home. And an enemy that can hide for years in plain sight and in 
our own neighborhoods.
  This new kind of war, that makes where we live and work a potential 
battleground, calls for a new response. The United States is a nation at 
risk of terrorist attacks and it will remain so for the foreseeable 
future. We need to strengthen our efforts to protect America, and the 
current governmental structure limits our ability to do so.
  When President Bush established the Office of Homeland Security in 
October 2001, its fundamental mission would be to prevent terrorist 
attacks within the United States, reduce America's vulnerability to 
terrorism, and minimize the damage and recovery from attacks that do 
occur. Mr. Speaker, I believe this new bill will achieve this mission.
  The new department will combine 170,000 workers from 22 agencies, 
including the ATF, Border Patrol, Coast Guard and Customs Service, into 
a Department of Homeland Security with a $37 billion budget. It balances 
concerns of Federal workers with the need of the President to make 
personnel decisions in the interest of national security. It brings all 
immigration responsibilities under the Secretary of Homeland Security. 
Immigration services will be kept separate from enforcement functions 
within the department. This will provide the INS the leadership, 
direction, and focus that I have been advocating for years.
  Now all the necessary functions of government to keep our Nation safe 
at home will fall under one department--where they should be. And that 
department will be part of the President's Cabinet--and that is where it 
should be.
  Let me add, Mr. Speaker, that leading a massive new Federal department 
that is charged with protecting the homeland during such dangerous times 
is a herculean task. There is no one in the Nation more capable and 
prepared to provide that leadership than our former colleague Tom Ridge. 
Governor Ridge was called on by the President shortly after the tragic 
attacks on our Nation and stepped into the breach to provide leadership 
on homeland security. This is not the first time he has answered his 
Nation's call in time of war.
  His leadership over the past year has prepared our Nation and our 
government for the task ahead. Governor Ridge will succeed and I wish 
him well.
  Finally, Mr. Speaker, passage of this bill is the last of the profound 
accomplishments that this Congress has achieved since September 11, 
2001. I am proud of the wise and prudent decisions we have made. Even 
though many on both sides have disagreed over details and those details 
have taken longer to work out than I would have liked, we have never 
disagreed on the goal of our actions. That goal is to protect and defend 
our Nation in this new and awful era of war.
  We may suffer another dastardly attack on our shores--given the 
diabolic treachery in which our enemy deals, it is probably certain they 
will attempt to attack us again. But we will endure, care for our own, 
and stand taller than before. As always, we did not ask for this war, 
especially one that attacks us at home. But we will fight it. And with 
the help of this legislation--we will win it.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge all Members to support this legislation. God bless 
America.


                       Thursday, November 14, 2002

                     FURTHER MESSAGE FROM THE SENATE

  A further message from the Senate by Mr. Monahan, one of its clerks, 
announced that the Senate has passed without amendment bills and 
concurrent resolutions of the House of the following titles:

  H. Con. Res. 487. Concurrent resolution authorizing the printing as a 
House document of a volume consisting of the transcripts of the 
ceremonial meeting of the House of Representatives and Senate in New 
York City on September 6, 2002, and a collection of statements by 
Members of the House of Representatives and Senate from the 
Congressional Record on the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

                                MEMORIALS

  Under clause 3 of rule XII, memorials were presented and referred as 
follows:

  422. The SPEAKER presented a memorial of the House of Representatives 
of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, relative to House Resolution No. 
685 memorializing the Congress of the United States to declare September 
11 as ``National Day of Life Appreciation and Freedom''; to the 
Committee on Government Reform.

  429. Also, a memorial of the Legislature of the State of California, 
relative to Assembly Joint Resolution No. 52 memorializing the Congress 
and President of the United States to enact H.R. 3917 to designate a 
National Memorial at the crash site of Flight 93 in Somerset County, 
Pennsylvania to pay tribute to and honor the true heroes of this nation; 
to the Committee on Resources.

 IN PRAISE OF THE LUTHERAN FELLOWSHIP ASSOCIATION OF THE SAGINAW VALLEY


                          Hon. James A. Barcia


                               of Michigan

  Mr. Speaker, I rise today to honor the Lutheran Fellowship Association 
of the Saginaw Valley as it celebrates 45 years of dedicated service. 
Over the years, members have made numerous and significant contributions 
to Lutheran families and to the citizens of many communities in Bay 
County and elsewhere. They deserve our gratitude and praise.
  In Bay County, the Lutheran Fellowship Association began when a 
handful of faithful Lutherans with a vision of creating a gathering 
place for families and friends joined together to open a fellowship 
hall. Since then, the group has grown to include more than 250 members 
and their families, serving the needs of thousands of Lutherans and 
others.
  The LFA Hall has been a center of Lutheran life in our community for 
generations. Under the guidance of President Earl Wegener and other 
leaders past and present, it has continued to fulfill its mission as a 
venue for individuals, families, groups and organizations to enjoy 
fraternal, social, educational, recreational and family events of all 
kinds at a reasonable cost.
  It is not a stretch to say that a large percentage of mid-Michigan's 
Lutheran community has likely attended one or more events at the hall 
during their lifetime, including wedding receptions, confirmation 
celebrations, anniversaries and a host of other activities. Many 
marriages have gotten off to a beautiful start with a reception at the 
LFA Hall and years later an untold number of couples have returned to 
the hall to commemorate their anniversary with family and friends.
  In addition, LFA members have always put a high premium on charitable 
donations. Last year, they pooled financial resources to make a 
contribution to the victims of the September 11, 2001 terrorist attack 
in New York City. In other years, they have provided assistance to 
disadvantaged children or those afflicted with serious illnesses.
  Finally, Mr. Speaker, I ask my colleagues to join me in praising the 
members of the Lutheran Fellowship Association for all that they do to 
meet the needs of the Lutheran community. Fellowship is an integral 
element in the Lutheran faith and the LFA has served a useful and vital 
role in fulfilling that need in Bay County. I am confident the LFA will 
continue to serve its members, their families, our community and our 
Lord well into the future.

                  IN CELEBRATION OF NATIONAL BIBLE WEEK


                           Hon. Bob Etheridge


                            of North Carolina

  Mr. Speaker, I am honored and pleased to serve as congressional 
cochair for National Bible Week, November 24 to December 1, 2002. 
National Bible Week has been an annual observance in this country since 
1941 when the Nation turned to the Holy Bible for strength, comfort, and 
guidance. On September 11, 2001, when terrorists destroyed the World 
Trade Center towers in New York and attacked the Pentagon, another ``day 
of infamy'' took place in our Nation's history. President Bush 
immediately called Americans to prayer, saying, ``Our purpose as a 
Nation is firm, yet our wounds as a people are recent and unhealed and 
lead us to pray. . . . We ask almighty God to watch over our Nation.'' I 
strongly believe that one contribution every American can make in these 
troubling times is to pray for our Nation, its leaders, and its people.
  National Bible Week is celebrated every year from Sunday to Sunday 
during the week of Thanksgiving. It is a time of prayer, a time to 
confirm our values and a time to strengthen national resolve. As we 
gather at our dinner tables in remembrance, let us be thankful to be 
living in a country where our Constitution guarantees freedom of 
worship. I commend the National Bible Association for its leadership in 
promoting this worthy endeavor.

                          NATIONAL GUARD TROOPS


                           Hon. Gil Gutknecht


                              of Minnesota

  Mr. Speaker, on September 11, 2001, our generation met its challenge. 
The attacks against innocent Americans were acts of war. We are still 
fighting that war. Carl von Clausewitz said that the goal of any 
military encounter is to destroy the enemy's will to fight. We still 
have work to do.
  But at home we have come far. We have buried our dead. We have 
comforted our wounded. We have rebuilt the Pentagon. New York is being 
rebuilt. We have gained a resolve and determination to go on. We will 
continue to be the shining beacon of liberty. We are willing to bear the 
price of defending the principles of freedom, justice and honor. We are 
Americans, and proud to be so.
  Generations of Americans have followed the wisdom of President 
Theodore Roosevelt when he said, ``In any moment of decision, the best 
thing you can do is the right thing. The worst thing you can do is 
nothing.''
  From the Barbary Coast to the streets of Kabul, Americans have always 
sought to do what is right. We have never given way to despots and 
madmen in the name of artificial peace. More than 48 million men and 
women have served in our Armed Forces to do the right thing.
  The sacrifice of Americans who left their homes and lives for the 
cause of justice across the globe is a testament to what is good and 
right about our great Nation. Because of Americans, Europe was liberated 
from a madman. Because of Americans, communism is left to the ash heap 
of history. Because of Americans, little girls are going to school in 
Afghanistan.
  Today I honor those Americans who stepped in to secure our domestic 
defenses during a time of great uncertainty. The brave men and women of 
the National Guard. As active duty troops were deployed, the men and 
women of the National Guard dropped what they were doing and answered 
their call to duty. Careers were put on hold, families parted with loved 
ones, sacrifices were made to secure our Nation.
  Guard members from Minnesota have served in every major conflict since 
its inception more than 360 years ago. More than 150 Minnesota National 
Guard soldiers were called to duty following the September 11 attacks.
  I am especially grateful to the National Guard soldiers of Company B, 
Second Battalion of the 135th Infantry. These soldiers performed special 
duties at the Rochester International Airport. During a time of crisis, 
they stepped up to join that long grey line. That line that has never 
failed us.
  Thank you First Sergeant Thomas L. Butterfield, Sergeant Samuel M. 
Adjei, Sergeant First Class Jason R. Schweitzer, Specialist Jason A. 
Cox, Specialist Benjamin R. Jech, Specialist Jacob R. King, Staff 
Sergeant Troy D. Landsverk, Sergeant William M. Olson, Sergeant Timothy 
A. Patterson, Sergeant Daniel J. Prescher, Specialist Brandon L. Riggs, 
Sergeant Scott J. Saltou, Sergeant Matthew Swiger, and Specialist 
Benjamin W. Teed.
  These soldiers deserve our respect and our gratitude.
  As William Jennings Bryan said, ``Destiny is not a matter of chance, 
it is a matter of choice. It is not a thing to be waited for, it is a 
thing to be achieved.'' Americans have a history of choosing their 
destiny. We will continue to do so, because that is who we are.
  We must, and we will, continue to achieve this victory for the people 
of the United States and for all civilized, peace-loving people around 
the world. There will be a price. The blood and treasure of our Nation 
will be invested. The leadership, resources and unwavering courage of 
the United States are critical in this struggle. We shall not falter, we 
will rise to the challenges. And, in the end, we will leave to future 
generations a safer planet because we never failed to defend the freedom 
we cherish. We will continue to practice what we preach.
  God Bless America.
                   In the Senate of the United States


                        Monday, September 9, 2002

                         REMEMBERING ALAN BEAVEN


                          Hon. Dianne Feinstein


                              of California

  Madam President, I come to the floor today to honor the heroism of 
Alan Beaven--a Californian aboard flight 93 who helped prevent the 
terrorists from crashing another airplane into its intended target on 
September 11, 2001.
  As we approach the 1-year anniversary of that horrible day, our 
thoughts turn to the heroes like Alan who gave their lives to save 
others.
  To honor the courageous passengers of flight 93, I joined Senator 
Specter to cosponsor the ``Flight 93 National Memorial Act,'' which I 
believe the Senate will pass today to establish a memorial at the crash 
site in Pennsylvania. This legislation will also establish a Flight 93 
Advisory Commission to recommend planning, design, construction, and 
long-term management of the memorial.
  I believe it is important to pass this legislation before the 
anniversary of September 11 to appropriately recognize the heroism of 
Alan Beaven and the other flight 93 passengers.
  I would like to take a few moments to tell the world about Alan and 
his family.
  Alan Beaven wasn't supposed to be on flight 93 that tragic day. On 
Monday, September 10, Alan and his wife Kimberly were in New York 
planning for a year-long sabbatical in India to work for a humanitarian 
foundation. Alan was a top environmental lawyer in San Francisco who 
planned to volunteer his services in India.
  Alan was headed east, not west, but there was one last case involving 
pollution in the American River near Sacramento and settlement talks had 
broken down that Monday. Alan had to head back.
  Tuesday morning Alan drove to Newark, NJ, to catch a flight to the 
West Coast. Flight 93 was 40 minutes late that day--giving passengers on 
board time to learn about the planes that had crashed into the World 
Trade Center and the Pentagon. A few called home on cell phones to 
express their love and say that a group of passengers were determined to 
fight back against the hijackers--Alan Beaven was one of those brave 
men.
  No one knows for sure what happened aboard that airplane, but we do 
know countless lives were saved when that plane was diverted from its 
intended target.
  Even though Alan's seat was in the back of the airplane, his remains 
were found in the cockpit at the crash site in Pennsylvania. The Beaven 
family has also heard Alan on the cockpit voice recorder, so it is clear 
that Alan, standing 6 feet 3 inches tall and weighing over 200 pounds, 
fought with the hijackers.
  I will enter two letters I have received from the Beaven family into 
the Record. Alan's wife, Kimberly, and his son, Chris, wrote to me about 
what they heard on the cockpit voice recorder in April when the families 
of the passengers of flight 93 were allowed to listen to the struggle 
aboard the aircraft.
  My heart goes out to Alan's wife, Kimberly, and his three children, 
John, Chris, and Sonali. John earned a biology degree at UC San Diego 
where he was captain of the baseball team and an Olympic torch bearer 
when the torch went through Sacramento on its way to Salt Lake City this 
past winter. John's brother Chris attends Loyola Marymount University 
and sister Sonali is 5 years old.
  Alan's great joy was his family. He spent hours reading to Sonali, 
scuba diving with Chris, and playing catch with John.
  In fact, John's early memories of his father were of the two of them 
playing catch for hours on end. When John was 5, the family moved from 
London to New York and before they could drop off their luggage, young 
John made Alan play catch in Central Park.
  In a tribute to Alan, the Beaven family decided not to have a funeral, 
but instead a ``Thanksgiving for the life of Alan Anthony Beaven.''
  And what a life it was.
  Alan was born in New Zealand on October 15, 1952. He worked as an 
attorney in New Zealand, England, New York, and California. As a top 
environmental lawyer, Alan worked on over 100 clean water cases in just 
10 years in California.
  Friends and family of Alan say they are not surprised that Alan risked 
his own life so selflessly to save others.
  The day after the terrorist attacks on our Nation, Alan's secretary 
went into his office and found a single piece of paper tacked up at eye 
level on the wall in front of his desk. It was a quote he heard that 
week which summed up how he lived his life, and how he ended it when he 
joined others to fight back against the terrorists. Alan wrote, ``Fear, 
who cares?'' And these words adequately describe his actions aboard 
flight 93.
  I did not know Alan Beaven, but this quote tells me all I need to know 
about him--that he was a fearless, loving, and devoted man.
  One year later, it is clear that our Nation has lost a superstar 
environmental lawyer, a loving father and husband, and a true hero--Alan 
Beaven.
  I ask unanimous consent to print the two letters to which I referred 
in the Record.
  There being no objection, the letters were ordered to be printed in 
the Record, as follows:

                                                         August 9, 2002.

                    Hon. Dianne Feinstein,

                    U.S. Senator,

                    Hart Senate Office Building, Washington, DC.

  Dear Senator Feinstein: My father, Alan Beaven, was among those 33 
passengers of United Airlines flight 93. Their hurried steps toward the 
cockpit were the first in an international campaign against the threat 
of fanatical hostility. For this they should be celebrated.

  My dad played a central role in the deposing of his flight's 
assailants. Not only did he cooperate in an organized effort but he 
commanded it as well. For this effort he should be particularly 
acknowledged.

  The cockpit recorder (C.V.R.) substantiates my claim of his 
exceptional heroism. At a private listening in Princeton, NJ, I twice 
heard his accented words. His final phrase, ``Turn up!'' was shouted at 
10:02:17.3 on the official C.V.R transcript. Given the range of 
sensitivity of the cockpit microphones and my father's seating placement 
in the rear of the plane I reasonably believe that these findings 
indicate my dad's extraordinary actions.

  Secondly, my father's remains were recovered in the front of the 
aircraft. Authorities confirmed that D.N.A. testing placed him in the 
cockpit at the time of impact. Again, given his seating placement, this 
evidence undoubtedly proves his centrality in the effort to regain 
custody of United's flight 93.

  Though my father did not place a telephone call in his final hour, 
other such correspondences indicate his exceptional involvement. Reports 
were made of great men well above the height of six feet leading the 
passengers toward the captured cockpit. My dad, 63" and 215 lbs., was 
one of few men who met this description.

  Finally, the assumption of his extraordinary bravery in death is 
founded on the thematic valiance of his life. Whether in his 
professional or personal activities he met opposition with strength and 
spirit. It is understood by all who knew him that he continued this 
trend in passing.

  In conclusion, I concede that assumptions based on the thematic 
valiance of his life do not warrant superlative public recognition. 
However, his stature and his physical placement at impact beg it. 
Finally, the cockpit voice recording demands it. I ask you to do all in 
your power to issue due credit to my father. He led a group that led a 
nation that led an international campaign against the threat of 
fanatical hostility. My father is a hero.

  Sincerely,


                                                           Chris Beaven.


                                    H

                                                         August 1, 2002.

                    Hon. Dianne Feinstein,

                    U.S. Senate, Hart Senate Office Building, 
                      Washington, DC.

  Dear Senator Feinstein: On April 18, 2002, in Princeton, NJ, I heard 
the voice of my husband, Alan Beaven, on the cockpit voice recorder of 
United Airlines flight 93 that crashed in Shanksville, PA, on September 
11, 2001.

  I know without a doubt that I heard Alan's voice shout ``Turn up!'' at 
the time on the tape's clock of 10:02:17.3. My stepson, Chris Beaven, 
who was listening to the VCR at the same time, independently made note 
of the exact same words and time.

  There are at least two other occasions that I am very confident that 
Alan's voice was recorded. These additional times were of shouting and 
``aargh'' noises, familiar to us as Alan often ``wrestled'' playfully 
with his sons. The distinct sounds were very similar. The times I noted 
for these sounds were 9:38:36.3 and 9:40:17.7.

  As you know, Alan's physical remains were found in the cockpit area of 
the plane. Alan was a 6 foot 3 inch, 205 lb powerful man. A brilliant 
litigator who made his life's work fighting for justice. I, and all who 
knew Alan, know he was an active participant that fateful day.

  Please ensure that Alan Beaven and all the passengers of flight 93 are 
duly honored for their heroic actions in preventing the terrorists from 
destroying their intended target in Washington, DC.

  Sincerely,


                                                   Mrs. Kimberly Beaven.

                 HONORING NEW YORK CITY'S COURT OFFICERS


                       Hon. Hillary Rodham Clinton


                               of new york

  Madam President, as we approached the 1-year anniversary of 9/11, I 
rise today to again honor all of the public safety officers whose 
courageous and heroic acts saved thousands of lives at the World Trade 
Center. In particular, I want to highlight a group of public safety 
officers who deserve to be honored for their heroism. The New York City 
court officers risked their lives and contributed immensely to the 
rescue and recovery operations at Ground Zero.
  I especially would like to honor three court officers who gave the 
ultimate sacrifice--their lives. Their heroic deeds have earned them the 
nomination for the Public Safety Officer Medal of Valor--a testament to 
true American heroes.
  I would like to say a little bit on each officer.
  Cpt. William ``Harry'' Thompson, of the Bronx, was widely respected 
and beloved by all 1,600 court officers in New York City as senior 
instructor at the New York State Court Officers Academy. A 27-year 
veteran, he was the father of two adult sons and was the sole supporter 
for his widowed mother. All who knew Captain Thompson considered him a 
``spit and polish'' type of officer. Captain Thompson was proud of his 
profession and New York is so very lucky that he devoted his life to 
public service.
  Senior court officer Thomas Jurgens was part of a family who believed 
in giving back to one's city and country. Senior court officer Jurgens 
was the son of a firefighter, and was a volunteer fireman from Lawrence, 
Long Island. He made all of us proud by serving his country in the 
Persian Gulf war as an Army combat paramedic. Senior court officer 
Jurgens was a 4-year veteran at the Manhattan Supreme Court, and he was 
married in June 2001.
  Senior court officer Mitchel Wallace, of Mineloa, Long Island, worked 
at the Manhattan Supreme Court for 2 years. Before September 11, the New 
York State Court of Appeals Chief Judge Judith Kaye honored him for 
resuscitating a man who had collapsed from cardiac arrest aboard a Long 
Island railroad train. Senior Court Officer Wallace planned to marry 
Noreen McDonough in October, and he called her ``Cinderella.''
  In addition to these brave heroes who were lost, 22 other court 
officers risked their lives to save others at the World Trade Center. 
These men and women have been honored for their bravery on September 11. 
They are: Deputy Chief Joseph Baccellieri, Jr., Officer Tyree Bacon, 
Sgt. Frances Barry, Cpt. John Civelia, Sgt. Gerard Davis, Officer 
William Faulkner, Officer Gerard Grant, Officer Edwin Kennedy, Officer 
Elayne Kittel, Officer William Kuhrt, Officer Theodore Leoutsakos, 
Officer Craig Lovich, Sgt. Patricia Maiorino, Major Reginald V. Mebane, 
Sgt. Al Moscola, Sgt. Kathryn Negron, Officer Joseph Ranauro, Sgt. 
Albert Romanelli, Sgt. Richard Rosenfeld, Officer Andrew Scagnelli, 
Officer Mahindra Seobarrat, and Sgt. Andrew Wender.
  Hundreds of court officers volunteered to work on recovery efforts at 
Ground Zero. After working full shifts at the courthouse, these officers 
would then work a full shift at Ground Zero. They would return home, 
clean the dust and debris from their hands, and return to their jobs at 
the courthouse. Through valor, duty, and commitment, they did all that 
they could to assist in the rescue and recovery operations.
  On behalf of the American people, I express my thanks and appreciation 
for these public safety officers whose dedication and patriotism 
strengthen the resolve of our Nation. These officers went above and 
beyond the call of duty, sacrificing their lives in order to save 
others, not because it was their job, but because it was their sense of 
duty of pride. These officers represent the very best in America.


                       Tuesday, September 10, 2002

                          MENTAL ILLNESS PARITY


                         Hon. Paul D. Wellstone


                              of minnesota

  As we look back toward September 11, and commemorate this tragic day 
in America's history, we can be proud of the way in which the American 
people rallied to support those who suffered such unspeakable losses in 
their lives. Many of us still feel the shock and the fear of that day, 
and while we can take great pride in the ways in which our country has 
recovered, we know that for many, the grief and the trauma is still 
sharp and constant. We know more about how such events can leave scars 
on the psyche of a country, as well as individuals. We know that many 
who had suffered from mental illness prior to September 11 may find they 
need treatment again. We know that many in New York and other parts of 
our country are suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. We show 
our strength as Americans when we respond not only with our strength and 
outrage toward the perpetrators of this horror, but also with compassion 
and support toward the victims.

        CONGRESSIONAL MEDALS FOR CREW AND PASSENGERS OF FLIGHT 93


                           Hon. Arlen Specter


                             of pennsylvania

  Mr. President, I have sought recognition to proceed as if in morning 
business to discuss legislation I have pending, S. 1434, a bill which 
has 69 cosponsors, which would give the Congressional Medal to all of 
the crew and passengers on flight 93 that crashed in Shanksville, PA, on 
September 11, 2001.
  As we know from cell phone conversations from passengers on that 
plane, the passengers took over the plane from the terrorists, at least 
to the extent of depriving the terrorists control where the terrorists, 
as was widely suspected, were headed for the Capitol of the United 
States. And the plane crashed in Shanksville, PA, killing all of those 
on board.
  It seems to me this is a unique place for the Congressional Gold 
Medal, because those passengers saved the Congress. Had that plane 
reached the Capitol, this Chamber would not now be in existence, nor the 
Rotunda, nor the House of Representatives. It is hard to say in the 
morning, perhaps midmorning, how many Members of the Congress of the 
United States and staff would not be here today. In seeking this 
recognition, it is a very unique opportunity to acknowledge those 
passengers.
  This bill has languished because it has gotten tied up, as it is not 
uncommon for legislation to be tied up for a variety of other reasons. 
There are some who want to give medals to everyone who died on September 
11, which I think is a fine idea. There are some who want to give medals 
to all of those who were in the rescue squads from the police precincts 
or fire stations or the port authority. And there, again, I think that 
is a commendable idea. And all the ideas to recognize other people may 
be fine, but they can take their turn on legislation.
  But this legislation ought to be enacted before sunset tomorrow, 
before September 11, 2002, expires. I am now working with some of my 
colleagues in the Senate to accomplish that. If we cannot accomplish 
that, then I am going to ask unanimous consent to call up S. 1434, which 
has 69 cosponsors. It should have been discharged from committee a long 
time ago. With 69 cosponsors, that is 18 more votes than necessary to 
pass legislation in the Senate.
  There is a bill in the House of Representatives which approaches the 
issue slightly differently. The proposal in the House is to leave the 
decision up to the Attorney General of the United States. Well, that 
might be a good idea if there was something for the Attorney General to 
determine that we do not now know. But all of the knowable facts as to 
what happened on flight 93 are now known.
  The Attorney General cannot conduct an investigation and pinpoint any 
specific individuals. And it is doubtless true that some individuals 
were more responsible for taking control of the plane away from the 
terrorists than others. But all were present. And all of those who were 
present were accessories to heroism. They lent their support by their 
presence. Of course, they could not go anywhere else, but the passengers 
brought down the plane. And the passengers saved the Capitol of the 
United States.
  Interestingly, just yesterday, the New York Times published a release 
which contains confirmation from key Al Qaeda operatives that flight 93 
was, in fact, headed for the Capitol. That has been a fairly accepted 
conclusion, but this is what the New York Times story of yesterday, 
September 9, says:
  Yosri Fouda, correspondent for the satellite station Al-Jazeera, told 
the Associated Press that he was taken, blindfolded, to a secret 
location in Pakistan to meet Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and Ramzi Binalshibh 
in a June interview arranged by Al Qaeda operatives.
  The thrust of the story is that the Al Qaeda operatives said that 
flight 93 was headed for the Capitol. So, in essence, I think we have 
waited long enough. I think this action ought to be completed before 
sunset on September 11, 2002. And I hope we can work out an 
accommodation from the Members who are now with varying points of view. 
But, as I say, I will ask unanimous consent that the bill be acted upon 
before sunset tomorrow.
  Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the full text of this New 
York Times report identifying from Al Qaeda operatives the fact that 
this plane, flight 93, was headed for the Capitol, be printed in the 
Record.
  There being no objection, the article was ordered to be printed in the 
Record, as follows:

                [From the New York Times, Sept. 9, 2002]

                    Report: Congress Was on 9/11 List


                        (By the Associated Press)


  Dubai, United Arab Emirates--The U.S. Congress was the fourth American 
landmark on Al Qaeda's Sept. 11 hit list and the terror group also 
considered striking U.S. nuclear facilities, according to a purported 
interview with two Al Qaeda fugitives wanted in the terrorist attack.

  Yosri Fouda, correspondent for the satellite station Al-Jazeera, told 
The Associated Press that he was taken, blindfolded, to a secret 
location in Pakistan to meet Khalid Shaikh Mohammed and Ramzi Binalshibh 
in a June interview arranged by Al Qaeda operatives.

  Founda said he has waited until now to air the audiotaped interview--
it is scheduled to be broadcast Thursday on the pan-Arab satellite 
station--because he wanted to include it in a documentary marking the 
first anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks.

  In an article in London's Sunday Times, Fouda wrote that he learned 
during the interviews that the U.S. Congress had been Al Qaeda's fourth 
Sept. 11 target. Two hijacked planes slammed into the World Trade 
Center, another into the Pentagon, and a fourth went down in a 
Pennsylvanian field.

  U.S. counterterrorism officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, 
said many of Mohammed's statements about the origins of the Sept. 11 
plot are plausible, but they have no information that would verify those 
claims.

  The officials could not corroborate Mohammed's statements that the 
U.S. Capitol was the intended target of the fourth plane or that nuclear 
power plants had also been considered as potential targets for the Sept. 
11 attacks.

  Abu Zubaydah, a top Al Qaeda leader in U.S. custody since March, told 
interrogators that the White House was the fourth plane's target, U.S. 
officials have said.

  U.S. officials regard Mohammed as one of the highest-ranking Al Qaeda 
leaders still at large and believe he is still planning attacks against 
U.S. interests. U.S. officials say Binalshibh belonged to a Hamburg-
based cell led by Mohammed Atta, an Egyptian suspected of leading the 
Sept. 11 hijackers.

  ``I am the head of the Al Qaeda military committee and Ramzi 
(Binalshibh) is the coordinator of the `Holy Tuesday' operation,'' Fouda 
quoted Mohammed as saying. Sept. 11, 2001 fell on a Tuesday.

  Mohammed said planning for the attacks began 2\1/2\ years before Sept. 
11 and that the first targets considered were nuclear facilities.

  We ``decided against it for fear it would go out of control,'' Fouda 
quoted Mohammed as saying. ``You do not need to know more than that at 
this stage, and anyway it was eventually decided to leave out nuclear 
targets--for now.''

  Fouda, an Egyptian reporter and host of al-Jazeera's investigative 
program ``Top Secret,'' said he flew to Islamabad, the Pakistani 
capital, and from there to Karachi on Al Qaeda instructions. In Karachi, 
he was taken blindfolded and via a complicated route to an apartment 
where he met the two men.

  Fouda, speaking by telephone from London, said Al Qaeda operatives 
told him not to bring any electronic equipment--including a camera or 
recorder--to the interview. The Al Qaeda members videotaped the 
interview but instead of sending a copy of the video as promised, sent 
him only the audiotape, he said.

  At one point while being led to the meeting, Fouda said he thought he 
was going to meet bin Laden. Speculation has been rife that the Al Qaeda 
leader may be in Pakistan after fleeing U.S. attempts to kill or catch 
him in neighboring Afghanistan.

  Fouda said during the two days he spent talking to the two, Mohammed 
once referred to bin Laden in the past tense, leading him to believe bin 
Laden could be dead.

  The U.S. officials said they do not consider Mohammed's use of the 
past tense to refer to bin Laden as any sort of definitive evidence that 
he is dead.

  Fouda said he also learned that Atta, the chief hijacker, had been a 
sleeper operative in Germany since 1992 and started detailed planning 
with a 1999 meeting in Afghanistan with other sleepers.

  Once in America, Atta communicated with higher ranking Al Qaeda 
officials via e-mail, Fouda wrote. But when he had determined everything 
was ready, he telephoned Binalshibh in Germany to tell him the date, 
using a riddle that referred to the shapes of the numbers 9 and 11.

  Al-Jazeera, the Qatar-based satellite broadcaster, has drawn world 
attention with its broadcast of interviews with and statements by bin 
Laden and his top lieutenants.

                     SEPTEMBER 11, 2001, ANNIVERSARY


                        Hon. Christopher J. Dodd


                             of Connecticut

  Mr. DODD. Mr. President, I rise this afternoon to share a few thoughts 
on the eve of tomorrow's anniversary of the terrorist attack, September 
11, 2001. Tomorrow, a lot of our colleagues, both in this Chamber and 
the other body, will be expressing themselves, with many Members 
attending memorial services at the Pentagon. The Senate, as a body, 
plans to come together late tomorrow morning to meet as a body and to 
share our thoughts with the country about the events of a year ago. I 
take this opportunity to remember and to honor the nearly 3,000 of our 
fellow citizens and others who had come to this country to work--not all 
were Americans; the majority were--but lost their lives 1 year ago 
tomorrow in one of America's darkest of days.
  I also join all of America in paying tribute once again to the 
countless men and women whose acts of bravery and heroism that so 
inspired us on that day and the days that followed the tragedy of 
September 11, and continue to serve as a solemn reminder that the 
American spirit shines as bright as ever despite the events of that day, 
that horrible day 1 year ago.
  Thousands of families across this great country of ours, including 
families in my home State of Connecticut--families in my State lost some 
149 people, most of whom lost their lives in the World Trade Center--
these families and their loved ones have endured a year of unimaginable 
grief at the expense of unimaginable bravery. Every American grieves 
with them as many of our fellow citizens the world over from around the 
globe have shared with us the sense of grief and horror of a year ago 
and have continued to relate to us and to share their thoughts and 
prayers with all Americans as a result of our commemoration of the 
events of 12 months ago.
  Over the past 12 months, I have heard countless stories, tragedies 
that were once unthinkable. In Connecticut, I know of a man who lost 
both his wife and his only child on that day a year ago; of parents who 
lost their young children in their twenties, just beginning their lives 
as young adults with professional careers; of wives who had received the 
last phone calls from their husbands before the Twin Towers fell.
  Every American will always remember where they were when the Twin 
Towers were attacked and collapsed. Every American will always remember 
where they were when they heard a hijacked plane had crashed into the 
Pentagon, only a few blocks from where I am sharing these thoughts this 
afternoon. Every American will always remember how they felt upon 
learning that a group of passengers fought back against the terrorists 
who hijacked their plane before it crashed in the field of Pennsylvania. 
September 11, 2001, is a day that will be etched in all of our memories 
for the rest of our lives and etched in history forever.
  Although all Americans went through that day together, we will always 
share its memory. Last September 11 was also a deeply personal day for 
each and every one of us. We each had our own highly personal 
experiences during those horrid hours that began in the early morning--
that wonderful clear, bright, cloudless sky over the eastern part of our 
country.
  For me, the hours and days and weeks following the terrorist attacks 
were filled with immensely mixed emotions, as most of my colleagues 
know. I see my friend and colleague from Texas on the floor. We shared 
the great joy last year of having children come into our lives. My first 
child, my daughter Grace, was born just 48 hours after the attacks, born 
on September 13, at a hospital right across the river in Virginia. From 
the window of the maternity ward, my wife Jackie and I watched the smoke 
rising from the still-burning Pentagon as we held our newborn child in 
our hands.
  I can still vividly recall trying to balance my feelings of 
incredible, intense joy with this new beautiful life, mixed with the 
powerful feelings of horror and trepidation over what kind of a world my 
daughter Grace would grow up in, in the 21st century.
  Something heartened me that day. I have told this story on numerous 
occasions. In the hospital as my wife held our newborn daughter, many of 
the doctors and nurses, several of them who held her shortly after she 
was born, came from places outside of America to become citizens. Three 
of them came from Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Lebanon. Here we are, 48 
hours after the events, those countries had been the places of refuge 
for those engaged in the attacks on our country, and here were people 
from that very part of the world, U.S. citizens today, nurturing and 
caring for my newborn daughter.
  That was all the evidence I needed at that particular moment that 
America was attacked not for who we are, but for what we stand for: 
freedom, liberty, and community. And we shared something very powerful 
in common: We were devastated over the attacks, and we were never 
prouder to be Americans, almost simultaneously.
  Word was already out that the terrorist attacks were the work of Al 
Qaeda, a fanatical group which hijacked planes, but also an otherwise 
peaceful religion, Islam, to perform their evil deeds.
  Word was out that Osama bin Laden and his minions of hate thought that 
by attacking us, our buildings, our Pentagon, and our planes, they could 
somehow divide our great Nation and somehow weaken our resolve to be a 
global power, to be a force for freedom and democracy around the globe.
  Word was out that those who hate the United States simply for who we 
are, for our freedoms, our prosperity, and our diversity, thought that 
by murdering thousands of innocent Americans and shattering the lives of 
thousands of families, our Nation would somehow lose its ability to 
function as a great democracy.
  They were wrong. We are today stronger, I argue, than ever.
  September 11 changed America forever. At one level, the attacks made 
us aware of our vulnerabilities and forced us to realize there is no 
such thing as the unthinkable. Yet at another level, the way in which 
the entire Nation came together, in the days and weeks and months after 
the attacks, has served as a profound and inspirational reminder to 
strengthen the American people and the breadth and depth of the American 
spirit.
  So as we mark this historic day, a day of sadness, we look back and 
remember September 11, not just for the tragedy it evokes but also in 
renewing our faith in the greatness of the wonderfulness of our Nation, 
in which we are charged temporarily to be custodians, as Members of this 
body, to see that that daughter of mine and the children of our 
colleague from Texas grow up in a world far safer than what we witnessed 
a year ago. That becomes our collective responsibility as public 
officials: To put aside differences and, wherever we can, to work 
together as one people to make our country stronger and better, to 
achieve that sense of perfection that the Founders of our Nation 
envisioned more than 200 years ago.
  With those thoughts in mind, I extend my deepest sympathies, my 
thoughts, and prayers to the families in my State and across our Nation 
who still grieve terribly for the loss they suffered a year ago.

               IN MEMORY OF THE CALIFORNIA VICTIMS OF 9/11


                           Hon. Barbara Boxer


                              of california

  Mr. President, I am here in a very somber mood. We are approximately 
15 hours away from the very moment 1 year ago that our Nation was hit, 
and I want to take just a moment of the Senate's time--maybe 15 
minutes--to reflect on that day and, most of all, to remember the 
Californians we lost that day, numbering 54.
  For me, and perhaps for you and many Americans, September has really 
been a month of excitement and anticipation. I have always loved 
September. It is the end of the summer, the beginning of a beautiful 
fall with the changing of the leaves, back to school, and perhaps a 
little quicker pace, a faster step. September, for most of us, never 
reminds us of loss, of fear, of shock, of the horrors born of an 
extreme, unbridled, blind hatred.
  In September, we found out about those things. We also found out as a 
Nation what heroism truly is, how strong and united we can be, how we 
can set aside differences for the greater good and work together.
  The images of September 11 are deep in our minds and deep in our 
souls. The pain is there, just under the surface. For some of us in 
America, it is on the surface, and it will always be on the surface for 
the families who grieve, for the children who will never know a parent--
thousands of them--for communities that were decimated.
  Today I want to remember those in my State who died on that day. Each 
was unique. Every one of those planes on that fated day was headed to 
California. So even though my State was 3,000 miles away from Ground 
Zero, from the World Trade Center or the Pentagon, we were linked in our 
sorrow, and we were linked in our outrage.
  I am going to read the 54 names, and then I am going to talk a little 
more about some of the people whose families wanted me to just say a 
little more about them and show their picture to you.
  David Angell; Lynn Angell; David Aoyama; Melissa Barnes; Alan Beaven; 
Berry Berenson; Dr. Yen Betru; Carol Beug, and her mother Mary Alice 
Wahlstrom died together on flight 93. Mary Alice is from Utah.
  Mark Bingham; Deora Bodley; Touri Bolourchi; Daniel Brandworst, Ronald 
Gamboa, and their adopted son, David Brandhorst. He was 3 years old.
  Charles ``Chic'' Burlingame, the captain of American Airlines flight 
No. 77. Technically, he was from McLean, VA, but his family is from 
California, and they considered him a Californian, and they said he 
considered himself a Californian.
  Thomas Burnett; Suzanne Calley; Jeffrey Collman; Dorothy deAraujo; 
Lisa Frost; Andrew Garcia; Edmund Glazer; Lauren Grandcolas; Andrew 
Curry Green; Richard Guadagno; Stanley Hall; Gerald Hardacre; John Hart; 
John Hofer; Melissa Hughes; Barbara Keating; Chad Keller; Christopher 
Larrabee; Daniel Lee; Dong Lee; Joe Lopez; Hilda Marcin; Dean Mattson; 
Dora Menchaca; Nicole Miller; Laurie Neira; Ruben Ornedo; Marie 
Pappalardo; Jerrold Paskins; Thomas Pecorelli; Robin Penninger; Marie-
Rae Sopper; Xavier Suarez; Alicia Titus; Otis Tolbert; Pendyala 
Vamsikrashna; Timothy Ward; Christopher Wemmers; John Wenckus.
  Mr. President, I want these names to be memorialized again today.
  There is a beautiful song called ``Try to Remember,'' and one of the 
lines is: ``Try to remember the kind of September when no one wept 
except the willow.''
  Sadly, those of us who lived through September 11, 2001, will weep for 
our lost brothers and sisters, but we will always remember our country, 
our embrace of freedom, and our democracy. And we will always cling 
closer to our loved ones. This place, this great democracy, America, 
will endure.
  Now I am going to tell you a little bit more about a few of the people 
we lost in California. Many people noted that the New York Times has run 
an ongoing biography of the people who were lost on that day. I was 
talking to Bob Kerrey, the former Senator from Nebraska, and he said 
this to a group of us: When you read those memorials, what you realize 
is how wonderful and important each of these people was and what 
wonderful stories were related from their families, their friends, and 
their coworkers. What really emerged is why this is such a great 
country. These people do not get in the news. They get up and go about 
their lives. That is what you are going to find out as I read about 
these people and show these pictures in memoriam.

  Lauren Grandcolas.--Mrs. Lauren Grandcolas was a 38-year-old 
advertising sales consultant when the flight she was on, United flight 
93, was hijacked by terrorists. As we all know, that plane crashed in a 
Pennsylvania field killing everyone on board. We also know of the 
heroism of the passengers on that plane.
  Mrs. Grandcolas was born in Bloomington, IN, and attended the 
University of Texas at Austin where she met her husband, Jack 
Grandcolas. After graduation, she worked as a marketing director for a 
law firm and then for Price waterhouse Coopers.
  At the time of her tragic death, Mrs. Grandcolas was working as an 
advertising sales consultant at Good Housekeeping magazine and was 
researching and writing a nonfiction book to help women boost their 
self-esteem.
  Lauren had enthusiasm and passion for life, loved the outdoors and was 
devoted to physical fitness. She hiked, jogged, kayaked, and enjoyed 
inline skating around her neighborhood. Her energy was boundless. She 
took classes in cooking and gardening, scuba diving, and wine 
appreciation. Lauren was active with the United Way, March of Dimes, 
Project Open Hand, Juvenile Diabetes Foundation, Breast Cancer 
Awareness, and Glide Memorial.
  Her husband Jack recalls she had a heart the size of Texas. Knowing 
her flight had been hijacked, Lauren left her husband a message on their 
home answering machine and then loaned her cell phone to another 
passenger to call loved ones.
  The joy Lauren felt pursuing new interests and developing new skills 
was being interwoven in the book she was writing for women. Jack 
recalls:

  She made a point to do things that were good for her, and she thought 
she could extend what she had learned to help other adult women gain 
confidence. Her sister and I will fulfill her dream by completing the 
book.

  Lauren Grandcolas is missed deeply by her family.
  I wanted to take a moment to tell you a little bit more about her.

  Nicole Carol Miller.--This next picture in memoriam is of Nicole Carol 
Miller. I want to start out by reading a poem that was dedicated to 
Nicole that was written by her father, David James Miller. It was 
written last September 11. If I cannot get through this, I will put it 
in the Record. My daughter's name is Nicole. This is the poem.

                    How I love thee My Nicole.

                    When the thoughts of you come into my mind

                    It's as if a breeze has passed through our rose 
                      garden and the sweet savory I smell

                    The taste of roses upon my tongue brings the 
                      sweetness of your memory to my mind

                    It comes upon me as the morning dew weighs the roses 
                      down

                    Smooth and pleasant are the thoughts of you, as the 
                      petals of a rose

                    And once again I am nourished with your love.

  Nicole Carol was a lovely 21-year-old college student when the flight 
she was on, United flight 93, was hijacked by the terrorists. That was 
the plane that was brought down by the passengers in Pennsylvania.
  Nicole's memory lives on in the hearts of those she loved. She took 
great joy in life and exemplified this with her wonderful outlook and 
her tenacious personality. Nicole's radiant smile, which we can see in 
this photo, could light up the room as she energized those around her. 
She knew how to be an outstanding friend. She was blessed with two 
families, her father and stepmother, David and Catherine Miller of 
Chico, CA, and her mother and stepfather, Cathy and Wayne Stefani, Sr., 
of San Jose, CA.
  In her father's words:

  She had that sweet baby quality. She could make you smile and forget 
your troubles for a little bit.

  Friend Heidi Barnes describes Nicole as very friendly and welcoming. 
She had a big heart, and it was open to everyone.
  Nicole lived in San Jose, CA, with her mother and stepfather. She 
attended local schools and graduated from Pioneer High School in 1998. A 
talented softball player during all 4 years of high school, Nicole won a 
college softball scholarship during her senior year. Even though she had 
never been a competitive swimmer, she tried out for the Pioneer High 
swim team as a freshman and made the team. At the time of her tragic 
death, she was a dean's list student at West Valley College in Saratoga 
working part time and weighing whether to transfer to California State 
University at Chico or San Jose State University.
  I offer this tribute to Nicole.

  Hilda Marcin.--I would like to take this opportunity to share with the 
Senate the memory of one of my constituents, Hilda Marcin, who lost her 
life on September 11, 2001. Mrs. Marcin was 79 years old when the flight 
she was on, United Airlines flight 93, was hijacked by terrorists. As we 
all know, that plane crashed in a Pennsylvania field, killing everyone 
on board.
  Mrs. Marcin was born in Schwedelbach, Germany. When she was 7 years 
old, her family emigrated to the United States to escape oppression. 
Like many immigrants, her family left all possessions behind and came 
only with the clothes on their backs.
  Her family settled in Irvington, NJ, where she attended local schools. 
She worked 7 days a week in the payroll department of the New Jersey 
shipyards during World War II.
  A friend arranged a blind date with Edward Marcin and they were 
married on February 13, 1943. They had two daughters, Elizabeth and 
Carole. The Marcin family enjoyed participating in school functions, 
class trips, the PTA, and various church activities. Mr. and Mrs. Marcin 
were also socially and politically active in Irvington. Mrs. Marcin 
later worked as a special education teacher's aide.
  Hilda Marcin embraced life with enthusiasm and made the most of every 
minute. She adored her family and her granddaughter, Melissa Kemmerer 
Lata. She was an inspiration to those she touched, including the special 
needs children in the school where she worked. Her friends admired her 
positive attitude and her desire and ability to continue working during 
the later years of her life. Mrs. Marcin treasured freedom and 
democracy, and her American citizenship.
  At the time of her death, Mrs. Marcin was flying to San Francisco to 
live with her younger daughter, Carole O'Hare. She is survived by her 
daughter, Elizabeth Kemmerer and son-in-law Raymond Kemmerer; daughter 
Carole O'Hare and son-in-law Thomas O'Hare; and granddaughter Melissa 
Lata and Melissa's husband, Edward Lata. I offer this tribute to her.

  Daniel Lee.--Daniel Lee lost his life on September 11, 2001. Mr. Lee 
was 34 years old when the plane he was on, American Airlines flight 11, 
was hijacked by terrorists. As we all know, that plane crashed into the 
World Trade Center, killing everyone on board.
  Daniel Lee grew up in Palm Desert, CA. He was a carpenter and a 
drummer in a local southern California band. He met his wife, Kellie, in 
1991 at a rock concert in which he was playing the drums. They were 
married October 7, 1995, and their first child, Amanda Beth, was born 
December 11, 1998.
  Mr. Lee was a dedicated and successful set carpenter in the music 
industry, known to work 20-hour days when necessary. He worked with many 
talented musicians including Neil Diamond, Barbara Streisand, N'Sync, 
Aerosmith and Yanni. He was touring with the Backstreet Boys when, on 
September 11, 2001, he left to fly home to be with his wife as she was 
about to give birth to their second child. Allison Danielle Lee was born 
September 13, 2001.
  Kellie Lee recalls Dan's bright, relaxed and charming smile. ``He was 
caring, loving, funny and romantic. He loved being a Dad and was so 
excited about having another child on the way,'' she says. ``One of his 
special joys was getting friends together for barbeques and pool 
parties,'' Kellie remembers.
  Dan Lee is survived by his wife, Kellie Lee, his daughters, Amanda and 
Allison, mother and stepfather Elaine and John Sussino, brothers Jack 
Fleishman and Stuart Lee and sister, Randi Kaye. I offer this tribute to 
Daniel Lee.

  Mari-Rae Sopper.--Mr. President, I take this opportunity to share with 
the Senate the memory of one of my constituents, Mari-Rae Sopper, who 
lost her life on September 11, 2001. Ms. Sopper was a 35-year-old lawyer 
and gymnastics coach when the flight she was on, American Airlines 
flight 77, was hijacked by terrorists. As we all know, that plane 
crashed into the Pentagon, killing everyone on board.
  Ms. Sopper was a native of Inverness, IL, and attended William Fremd 
High School in Palatine, IL. At the age of 15 she set the goal of 
becoming a champion gymnast. She succeeded, becoming all-American in 
four events, the school's athlete of the year and the State's 
outstanding senior gymnast of the year.
  Larry Petrillo, her high school gymnastics coach, remembers her as 
brash and committed. ``One thing she taught me is, you never settle for 
less than you are capable of. We should never accept limits. We should 
always fight the good fight. She was a staunch supporter of gymnastics 
and what's right,'' he recalls.
  Upon graduating from Iowa State University with a degree in exercise 
science, Ms. Sopper earned a master's degree in athletics administration 
from the University of North Texas and a law degree from the University 
of Denver. Ms. Sopper was an accomplished dancer and choreographer and 
continued to coach at gymnastics clubs.
  Ms. Sopper practiced law as a Lieutenant in the Navy's JAG Corps, 
focusing on defense and appellate defense. She had left the Navy JAG 
Corps and was an associate with the law firm Schmeltzer, Aptaker & 
Sheperd, P.C. when she found her dream job: to coach the women's 
gymnastics team at the University of California at Santa Barbara.
  It was a 1-year appointment and Ms. Sopper was looking forward to the 
challenge. Her mother, Marion Kminek, says Mari-Rae was excited about 
the opportunity. ``I said go for it. Life is too short. It was something 
she had always wanted to do and she was so happy and excited,'' recalls 
Kminek.
  At the time of her death, Ms. Sopper was moving to Santa Barbara to 
begin her appointment. Her close friend, Mike Jacki, recalls ``This was 
to be a new adventure for Mari-Rae, and an opportunity to get back into 
the sport she loved. We have lost a very special person. She was 
prepared to make her dream come true, and in an instant it was gone.''
  Mari-Rae Sopper is remembered for her loyalty, strong values, 
excellent work ethic and spirit for life. She is survived by her mother, 
Marion Kminek, and stepfather, Frank Kminek, her father Bill Sopper, 
sister Tammy and many loving friends.

  Deora Bodley.--Mr. President, the last story I share with the Senate 
is the memory of one of my young constituents, Deora Bodley, who lost 
her life on September 11, 2001. Ms. Bodley was a 20-year-old college 
student when the flight she was on, United Airlines flight 93, was 
hijacked by terrorists. As we all know, that plane crashed in a 
Pennsylvania field, killing everyone on board.
  Ms. Bodley grew up in San Diego, CA. As a high school student, she 
visited local high schools to discuss HIV/AIDS with her peers. She 
volunteered with the Special Olympics and a local animal shelter. Chris 
Schuck, her English teacher at La Jolla Country Day School, recalls, 
``Deora was always thinking big and going after big game.''
  At the time of her death, Ms. Bodley was studying psychology at Santa 
Clara University. She coordinated volunteers in a literacy program for 
elementary school students. Kathy Almazol, principal at St. Clare 
Catholic Elementary, recalls Ms. Bodley had ``a phenomenal ability to 
work with people, including the children she read to, her peer 
volunteers, the school administrators and teachers. We have 68 kids who 
had a personal association with Deora.''
  In the words of her mother, Deborah Borza, ``Deora has always been 
about peace.'' At the tender age of 11 years, Deora wrote in her 
journal, ``People ask who, what, where, when, why, how. I ask peace.'' A 
warm and generous person, Deora was a gifted student and a wonderful 
friend. Wherever she went, her light shined brightly.
  Deora's father, Derrill Bodley, of Stockton, CA, feels her life was 
about ``getting along'' and sharing a message of peace. Her 11-year-old 
sister, Murial, recalls Deora taught her many things and says, ``Most of 
all she taught me to be kind to other people and animals. I cherish the 
memories of my sister and plan to work hard in school and in everything 
I do so she can be proud of me like I was of her.''

  Mr. President, none of us is untouched by the terror of September 11, 
and many Californians were part of each tragic moment of that tragic 
day. Some were trapped in the World Trade Center towers. Some were at 
work in the Pentagon. And the fates of some were sealed as they boarded 
planes bound for San Francisco or Los Angeles.
  So I am honored and very moved to have had this chance to put into the 
Record today the names of these more than 50 Californians, every one now 
a bright and shining star in the sky. Their memories will live on and 
their legacies will live on, as will the memories and legacies of every 
American and every person, every innocent victim, who was cut down in 
the most hateful way on that tragic day.

                     FLIGHT 93 NATIONAL MEMORIAL ACT


                             Hon. Harry Reid


                                of nevada

  Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the Energy and Natural 
Resources Committee be discharged from consideration of H.R. 3917 and 
the Senate now proceed to its consideration.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The clerk will report the bill by title.
  The assistant legislative clerk read as follows:

  A bill (H.R. 3917) to authorize a national memorial to commemorate the 
passengers and crew of Flight 39, who, on September 11, 2001, 
courageously gave their lives thereby thwarting a planned attack on our 
Nation's Capital, and for other purposes.

  There being no objection, the Senate proceeded to consider the bill.
  Mr. REID. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the bill be read 
three times, passed, the motion to reconsider be laid on the table, and 
that any statements relating thereto be printed in the Record as if 
read, with no intervening action or debate.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The bill (H.R. 3917) was read the third time and passed.
  Mr. REID. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the Energy 
Committee be discharged from further consideration of S. 2136, and the 
Senate now proceed to its consideration.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The clerk will state the bill by title.
  The legislative clerk read as follows:

  A bill (S. 2136) to establish a memorial in the State of Pennsylvania 
to honor the passengers and crew members of Flight 93, who, on September 
11, 2001, gave their lives to prevent a planned attack on the Capital of 
the United States.

  There being no objection, the Senate proceeded to consider the bill.
  Mr. REID. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the bill be read 
the third time and passed, the motion to reconsider be laid upon the 
table, and that any statements thereon be printed in the Record.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The bill (S. 2136) was passed, as follows:

                                 S. 2136


  Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United 
States of America in Congress assembled,

                    SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.


  This Act may be cited as the ``Flight 93 National Memorial Act''.

                    SEC. 2. FINDINGS AND PURPOSES.


  (a) Findings.--Congress finds that--

  (1) on September 11, 2001, passengers and crewmembers of United 
Airlines Flight 93 courageously gave their lives to prevent a planned 
attack on the Capital of the United States;

  (2) thousands of people have visited the crash site since September 
11, 2001, drawn by the heroic action and sacrifice of the passengers and 
crewmembers aboard Flight 93;

  (3) many people in the United States are concerned about the future 
disposition of the crash site, including--

  (A) grieving families of the passengers and crewmembers;

  (B) the people of the region where the crash site is located; and

  (C) citizens throughout the United States;

  (4) many of those people are involved in the formation of the Flight 
93 Task Force, a broad, inclusive organization established to provide a 
voice for all parties interested in and concerned about the crash site;

  (5) the crash site commemorates Flight 93 and is a profound symbol of 
American patriotism and spontaneous leadership by citizens of the United 
States;

  (6) a memorial of the crash site should--

  (A) recognize the victims of the crash in an appropriate manner; and

  (B) address the interests and concerns of interested parties; and

  (7) it is appropriate that the crash site of Flight 93 be designated 
as a unit of the National Park System.

  (b) Purposes.--The purposes of this Act are--

  (1) to establish a memorial to honor the passengers and crewmembers 
aboard United Airlines Flight 93 on September 11, 2001;

  (2) to establish the Flight 93 Advisory Commission to assist in the 
formulation of plans for the memorial, including the nature, design, and 
construction of the memorial; and

  (3) to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to administer the 
memorial, coordinate and facilitate the activities of the Flight 93 
Advisory Commission, and provide technical and financial assistance to 
the Flight 93 Task Force.

                    SEC. 3. DEFINITIONS.


  In this Act:

  (1) Commission.--The term ``Commission'' means the Flight 93 Advisory 
Commission established by section (4)(b).

  (2) Crash site.--The term ``crash site'' means the site in Stonycreek 
Township, Somerset County, Pennsylvania, where United Airlines Flight 93 
crashed on September 11, 2001.

  (3) Memorial.--The term ``Memorial'' means the memorial to the 
passengers and crewmembers of United Airlines Flight 93 established by 
section 4(a).

  (4) Passenger or crewmember.--

  (a) In general.--The term ``passenger or crewmember'' means a 
passenger or crewmember aboard United Airlines Flight 93 on September 
11, 2001.

  (B) Exclusions.--The term ``passenger or crewmember'' does not include 
a terrorist aboard United Airlines Flight 93 on September 11, 2001.

  (5) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary of the 
Interior.

  (6) Task force.--The term ``Task Force'' means the Flight 93 Task 
Force.

                    SEC. 4. MEMORIAL TO HONOR THE PASSENGERS AND 
                      CREWMEMBERS OF FLIGHT 93.


  (a) Establishment.--There is established as a unit of the National 
Park System a memorial at the crash site to honor the passengers and 
crewmembers of Flight 93.

  (b) Advisory Commission.--

  (1) Establishment.--There is established a commission to be known as 
the ``Flight 93 Advisory Commission''.

  (2) Membership.--The Commission shall be composed of--

  (A) the Director of the National Park Service; and

  (B) 14 members, appointed by the Secretary, from among persons 
recommended by the Task Force.

  (3) Term; vacancies.--

  (A) Term.--A member of the Commission shall be appointed for the life 
of the Commission.

  (B) Vacancies.--A vacancy on the Commission--

  (i) shall not affect the powers of the Commission; and

  (ii) shall be filled in the same manner as the original appointment 
was made.

  (4) Meetings.--

  (A) In general.--The Commission shall meet at the call of the 
Chairperson or a majority of the members.

  (B) Frequency.--The Commission shall meet not less than quarterly.

  (C) Notice.--Notice of meetings and the agenda for the meetings shall 
be published in--

  (i) newspapers in and around Somerset County, Pennsylvania; and

  (ii) the Federal Register.

  (D) Open meetings.--Meetings of the Commission shall be subject to 
section 552b of title 5, United States Code.

  (5) Quorum.--A majority of the members of the Commission shall 
constitute a quorum.

  (6) Chairperson.--The Commission shall select a Chairperson from among 
the members of the Commission.

  (7) Duties.--The Commission shall--

  (A) not later than 3 years after the date of enactment of this Act, 
submit to the Secretary and Congress a report that contains 
recommendations for the planning, design, construction, and long-term 
management of the memorial;

  (B) advise the Secretary on--

  (i) the boundaries of the memorial; and

  (ii) the development of a management plan for the memorial;

  (C) consult with the Task Force, the State of Pennsylvania, and other 
interested parties, as appropriate;

  (D) support the efforts of the Task Force; and

  (E) involve the public in the planning and design of the memorial.

  (8) Powers.--The Commission may--

  (A) make expenditures for services and materials appropriate to carry 
out the purposes of this section;

  (B) accept donations for use in carrying out this section and for 
other expenses associated with the memorial, including the construction 
of the memorial;

  (C) hold hearings and enter into contracts, including contracts for 
personal services;

  (D) by a vote of the majority of the Commission, delegate any duties 
that the Commission determines to be appropriate to employees of the 
National Park Service; and

  (E) conduct any other activities necessary to carry out this Act.

  (9) Compensation.--A member of the Commission shall serve without 
compensation, but may be reimbursed for expenses incurred in carrying 
out the duties of the Commission.

  (10) Termination.--The Commission shall terminate on the dedication of 
the memorial.

  (c) Duties of the Secretary.--The Secretary shall--

  (1) administer the memorial as a unit of the National Park Service in 
accordance with--

  (A) this Act; and

  (B) the laws generally applicable to units of the National Park 
System;

  (2) provide advice to the Commission on the collection, storage, and 
archiving of information and materials relating to the crash or the 
crash site;

  (3) consult with and assist the Commission in--

  (A) providing information to the public;

  (B) interpreting any information relating to the crash or the crash 
site;

  (C) conducting oral history interviews; and

  (D) conducting public meetings and forums;

  (4) participate in the development of plans for the design and 
construction of the memorial;

  (5) provide to the Commission--

  (A) assistance in designing and managing exhibits, collections, or 
activities at the memorial;

  (B) project management assistance for design and construction 
activities; and

  (C) staff and other forms of administrative support;

  (6) acquire from willing sellers the land or interests in land for the 
memorial by donation, purchase with donated or appropriated funds, or 
exchange; and

  (7) provide the Commission any other assistance that the Commission 
may require to carry out this Act.


                      Wednesday, September 11, 2002

  The Senate met at 11 a.m. and was called to order by the Honorable Tim 
Johnson, a Senator from the State of South Dakota.
  The Chaplain, Dr. Lloyd John Ogilvie, offered the following prayer:
  Almighty God, on this day of remembrance and resolve, we praise You 
for the way You brought us through those dark hours of September 11 a 
year ago. You were our refuge and strength, a very present help in 
trouble. We relive the anxious memories of that infamous day of attacks 
of terrorism on the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and the airliner 
crashed in Pennsylvania. Today, as a Nation, we mourn for those who lost 
their lives as a result of these violent acts of treachery against our 
Nation. We deepen our ongoing intercession for their loved ones. 
Continue to comfort them, help them to endure the loneliness of grief, 
and grant them Your peace. Particularly, we pray for the families of the 
firefighters, police officers, and military personnel who died seeking 
to save others. We pray for the thousands of children who lost a parent 
in these catastrophes.
  When we turned over to You our anger, dismay, and grief, you gave us 
the courage to press on. Thank You for the strong, unified leadership of 
the President and this Senate in the aftermath of 9/11 and for the 
decisive engagement of the insidious enemy of terrorism throughout the 
world. May this be a day of renewed resolve to press on. Protect us from 
further attacks. Quiet our fears as we reaffirm our trust in You. You 
are our Lord and Saviour. Amen.

                                SCHEDULE

  Mr. REID. Mr. President, there will be, as the Chair has announced, 
morning business basically all day. At noon, there will be a moment of 
silence in recognition of the events of September 11. Both leaders have 
asked that those Senators who are here and have not gone home to their 
States try to be in the Chamber for the moment of silence. I hope all 
Senators will be here.
  I also announce that the two leaders are going to speak prior to the 
noon moment of silence. The minority leader is going to speak at 20 till 
the hour, and the majority leader will speak at 10 till the hour.

                  IN REMEMBRANCE OF SEPTEMBER 11, 2001


                             Hon. Harry Reid


                                of nevada

  Mr. President, we all have been touched by the events at the Pentagon 
this morning. As I walked in, there was a woman whom I do not know, but 
she is symbolic of the sacrifices that people have made. Her face had 
been burned very badly, she had no hands, and her arms had been burned. 
This is what the terrorist activity is all about.
  This innocent woman, who never did anything to anyone, has been 
subjected to this physical torture. It goes without saying that she has 
gone through and will go through many skin grafts and other such 
procedures so that she can learn to use her prosthetic hands, which she 
does not have yet.
  It used to be when a building was constructed, they had a ceremony on 
every major construction, called the laying of the chief cornerstone. 
What does that mean? It means that the final stone in the foundation of 
that building will be laid.
  Why did people celebrate that event? They celebrated because they knew 
if that building had a strong foundation, it would be fine.
  In our life in America, that foundation, that chief cornerstone is the 
Constitution of the United States. That little document that people 
speak about in this Chamber--discussion led by, more than anyone else, 
Senator Byrd--is the chief cornerstone of this great democracy.
  As we are forced to remember these events of September 11--because it 
is easy not to put unpleasant thoughts in our minds--as we are forced to 
remember these events, and rightfully so, we have to remember that this 
country has a firm foundation because the chief cornerstone of the 
foundation of this country is our Constitution.
  Today, of course, is the first anniversary of the September 11 
terrorist attacks on America. On this day we remember, as we will do 
every year on September 11, those tragic events that our Nation 
experienced on September 11, 2001.
  What happened in New York, at the Pentagon, and in Pennsylvania has 
left many of us--in fact, all of us--with memories and strong emotions. 
I know that Nevadans were deeply affected by the terrorist attacks in 
the aftermath, and I feel good about how people in Nevada have reacted.
  We were hurt very badly. Our No. 1 business is tourism, and tourism 
took a terrible blow. But those business entrepreneurs, people who 
worked for those large corporations, and the people who worked for the 
small businesses recognized that time would solve the problems, that 
time would heal a lot of the tourism problems, and it has. We are not 
back to where we were, but we are OK. I am proud of how the people of 
the State of Nevada have reacted.
  We also have had from the State of Nevada a pouring out of sympathy, 
comfort, and consolation for those who were killed and hurt. We lost a 
teacher in the terrorism attacks, a teacher at Palo Verde High School. 
We lost two soldiers who were killed in action. So we will always 
remember what happened.
  As individuals and in private, we will often reflect on this national 
tragedy. We cannot confine our memories to a single day or be guided by 
the calendar, but September 11 will forever be the day that we 
collectively, as a Nation, as a people, as America remember. We remember 
those whose lives were ended so suddenly and violently, not knowing what 
happened.
  We remember the firefighters. We remember the police officers--the 
firefighters are New York's bravest, the police officers are New York's 
finest--and all other emergency and rescue workers who accepted the 
risks in rushing into burning buildings giving their lives, suffering 
physical and mental injury to help save the lives of people they did not 
know.
  We remember the sacrifice, the selflessness, the heroism, and the 
courage of all of those who offered aid. We must remember those who 
survived and the thousands who did not. We must remember the parents, 
grandparents, children, sisters, brothers, wives, husbands, partners, 
and friends who have been robbed of not a weekend, not a week, not a 
month, not a year, but they have been robbed of their loved ones 
forever.
  From the stories they have shared, we remember not only the deaths but 
the lives of their loved ones, remember their loss, and their struggle 
to heal. We remember our personal losses, our pain, even our anger, and, 
of course, our tears.
  We remember the shock of seeing massive metal towers collapse as if 
they were erector sets that our grandchildren constructed. We have seen 
these massive metal towers reduced to rubble. We all remember the fire 
and the smoke.
  I will never forget leaving room 219, after Senator Daschle told us we 
had to evacuate the building, looking out the window and seeing the 
smoke billowing out of the Pentagon where we were this morning. We 
remember, though, the effort to rebuild the Pentagon. We remember the 
generosity and spirit of Americans coming together to offer kindness, 
money, compassion, and consolation. We remember the sympathy expressed 
by foreign governments. As the President expressed this morning, some 90 
foreign governments--I think it was the President; maybe it was 
Secretary Rumsfeld--are helping us in our battle in Afghanistan.
  We remember that individuals all over the world opened their arms and 
their hearts to America. We remember the gruesome images so vivid that 
they are etched in our minds, and we remember how the spirit of our 
Nation was awakened, how Americans demonstrated resilience and resolve. 
We remember how the country united to support the war on terrorism. We 
remember the soldiers who were killed as part of our military efforts in 
Afghanistan. We remember, and we must always remember, the firm 
foundation of our country. We are a country guided by the Constitution 
of the United States, which separates us from the rest of the world. 
That is why we have remained a strong, vibrant democracy for more than 
200 years.


                            Hon. George Allen


                               of Virginia

  Mr. President, I rise today to offer my thoughts on this very solemn 
day of remembrance as we all return from a magnificent ceremony at the 
Pentagon observing all that is strong and good and awesome about our 
country.
  I thank the Senator from Nevada for his very poignant words of 
empathy, as well as his understanding of the foundations of our country. 
Nevada, as all States, was hit hard.
  We saw the outpouring of compassion all over this country, and I will 
share some of those stories. I recall in August driving across a lonely 
two-lane road in South Dakota, which would eventually get to the 
Badlands. There was a big bale of hay on the side of the road which had 
painted on it the American flag. It showed the spirit of that farm. We 
did not see any people, but we knew the sentiment of the folks who lived 
on that farm and in that region.
   September 11, 9/11, just those words evoke sentiments and memories of 
where we were and what we did on that day of tragedy. As we remember 
those vile terrorist attacks of 1 year ago, for many of us the emotions 
and shock, the disbelief and horror that we experienced individually and 
as a people and a Nation are still fresh. Those memories, however, 
continue to strengthen our resolve in the same way that our Nation was 
forged together after those vile attacks a year ago.
  Today, we view our Nation in a fundamentally new light. We have a 
greater understanding of the freedoms we enjoy and how vital it is that 
they be guarded, preserved, and even fought for, if necessary. We have a 
greater appreciation for a country that respects people of diverse 
backgrounds, cultures, and religious beliefs. We have poured out our 
hearts and our assistance to those who were injured and the families of 
those who lost a dear one. We view firefighters, police officers, first 
responders, with much greater appreciation, whether they are the brave 
men and women of the battalions in New York City or northern Virginia or 
in communities large and small all across our United States of America. 
These men and women were transformed on that day into our heroes. We 
will forever remember the thousands of innocent men, women, and children 
who were killed at the World Trade Center and in a field in Somerset 
County, PA.
  This Senator will remember the 184 patriots at the Pentagon and on 
American Airlines flight 77 who lost their lives on Virginia soil. It is 
indeed the heroes and the innocent patriotic victims we will remember 
the most. The images of flags raised, the solemn salute of rescuers to 
their fallen comrades, and people who were rushing into burning 
buildings on the verge of collapsing hoping to just save one more life.
  They and the freedom-loving patriots across our great Nation stand in 
stark contrast to those who only know hate, destruction, and oppression.
  We also see that in a time of trial, ordinary people of all walks of 
life perform with extraordinary courage and dignity. We remember people 
such as Ltc. Ted Anderson, who carried two of the injured from the 
burning Pentagon and reentered through a broken window to drag out two 
more, one whose clothes were on fire; 1SG Rick Keevill and Virginia 
State Troopers Mike Middleton and Myrlin Wimbish, who entered the 
Pentagon three separate times looking for victims; LCDR David Tarantino, 
who moved a pile of rubble enough to pull a man from the Pentagon just 
before the roof collapsed; other Pentagon heroes such as SSG Christopher 
Braman; Ltc. Victor Correa; Sgt. Roxane Cruz-Cortes; Maj. John Grote; 
Ltc. Robert Grunewald; Col. Philip McNair; Cpt. Darrell Oliver; SP 
Michael Petrovich; SGM Tony Rose; Ltc. Marilyn Wills; and Cpt. David 
Thomas.
  The Senator from Nevada, Mr. Reid, mentioned a woman who I think was 
Mrs. Kurtz at the Pentagon. Mrs. Louise Kurtz, though severely burned 
herself, valiantly tended to the needs of others around her. I am 
introducing legislation that will change current law so that 
individuals--such as Mrs. Kurtz, and those in her situation--can 
contribute to her retirement and so they will be able to afford to 
return to work after a very lengthy period of recuperation.
  We also remember people such as Barbara Olson, a passenger on flight 
77 who had the presence of mind to call loved ones on the ground to 
alert them of the hijacking.
  We remember Cpt. ``Chic'' Burlingame of flight 77 who died fighting 
off hijackers who commandeered his plane and who is now properly buried 
at Arlington National Cemetery. These people have all touched our lives.
  In talking to Mr. Burlingame's brothers and sister and wife, I find it 
noteworthy that at the Arlington National Cemetery his grave is on the 
tour and people in the tradition of those of the Jewish faith will put 
rocks on his headstone. That is very touching to the family and shows 
the unity and appreciation of a grateful Nation.
  We also remember the survivors, survivors such as Stephen Push, whose 
wife Lisa Raines perished in the Pentagon and who has become a forceful 
and articulate spokesman for victims and families.
  I will always remember, and thought of it last night while driving 
home, a young boy, a neighbor, a friend of my children whose name is 
Nick Jacoby. He lost his father on flight 77.
  There are stories all over our communities and Nation. We also, of 
course, remember the quiet dignity of people such as Lisa Beamer who 
helped keep their loved ones very much alive for all of us. Her husband 
Todd, who said, ``Let's roll,'' led an uprising with several other 
patriots against the hijackers of flight 93 and saved hundreds, if not 
thousands, of lives at the Capitol and in the Washington, DC, area. 
Recent reports recognize their likely target was this building.
  We will remember countless others whose courageous efforts saved lives 
and provided comfort. We will remember and we will thank them for their 
extraordinary, inspirational dignity and their character. We will also 
remember the construction workers, the hard-hat patriots of the phoenix 
project who worked around the clock in their inspiring efforts to 
rebuild the Pentagon in plenty of time for employees to move in before 
the 1-year anniversary.
  We will remember folks from a church that made quilts, the Christ 
Baptist Church from Prince William in Manassas, a magnificent quilt with 
the names of all who died. Also, we will remember the International 
House of Pancakes in Bristol, VA, an IHOP owned by an American who came 
here from Lebanon. I asked him a few months later how his business was. 
He said right after the attacks, for a few weeks, there were hardly any 
customers. But then a Methodist Church in Bristol, on the Virginia-
Tennessee line, brought up the situation, and everyone from that church 
on that Sunday went in with their families and filled up the IHOP. Since 
then, others were coming back. That is a sign of the decency and the 
care of communities across the Nation.
  Five days ago, in New York City, I had the opportunity to speak to a 
group of 70 mothers who were pregnant last September 11, and who were 
made widows on that terrible day. It has been said that suffering makes 
kinsmen of us all. While those mothers no longer have the physical and 
emotional support of their husbands, and the fathers of their children, 
they are now a part of our greater American family. In those babies, all 
under 1 year, the spirit and blood of their fathers live on. We want the 
babies to grow up with the optimism of liberty and opportunity and hope 
that is the spirit of America. These young children represent not just a 
birth but a rebirth, a rebirth and a rededication of the strength and 
unity of our Nation and her great, caring people as we move forward. 
Indeed, our Nation will be changed for generations by the tragic events 
of a single day and all those that followed September 11. We pray for 
the souls of all that we lost that day and their surviving families as 
well.
  As a Senator from Virginia, for the permanent Record of our Republic, 
I ask unanimous consent to have printed the names of all the men, women, 
and children who perished in that attack on Virginia soil.
  There being no objection, the material was ordered to be printed in 
the Record, as follows:

   The 184 Victims Who Perished at the Pentagon on September 11, 2001


  Paul W. Ambrose, Specialist Craig S. Amundson, Yeoman 3d Class Melissa 
Rose Barnes, Master Sgt. Max J. Beilke, Yeneneh Betru, Information 
Systems Technician 2d Class Kris Romeo Bishundat, Carrie R. Blagburn, 
Col. Canfield D. Boone, Mary Jane Booth, Donna M. Bowen

  Allen P. Boyle, Bernard C. Brown II, Electronics Technician 3d Class 
Christopher L. Burford, Capt. Charles F. Burlingame III, Electronic 
Technician 3d Class Daniel M. Caballero, Sgt. 1st Class Jose O. 
Calderon-Olmedo, Suzanne M. Calley

  Angelene C. Carter, Sharon A. Carver, William E. Caswell, Sgt. 1st 
Class John J. Chada, Rosa Maria Chapa, David M. Charlebois, Sara M. 
Clark, Julian T. Cooper, Asia S. Cotton, Lt. Commander Eric A. Cranford, 
Ada M. Davis, James D. Debeuneure, Capt. Gerald F. Deconto

  Rodney Dickens, Lt. Commander Jerry D. Dickerson, Eddie A. Dillard, 
Information Systems Technician 1st Class Johnnie Doctor, Jr., Capt. 
Robert E. Dolan, Jr., Commander William H. Donovan, Lt. Commander 
Charles A. Droz III, Commander Patrick Dunn, Aerographer's Mate 1st 
Class Edward T. Earhart, Barbara G. Edwards, Lt. Commander Robert R. 
Elseth

  Charles S. Falkenberg, Leslie A. Whittington, Dana Falkenberg, Zoe 
Falkenberg, Store Keeper 3d Class Jamie L. Fallon, J. Joseph Ferguson, 
Amelia V. Fields, Gerald P. Fisher, Darlene E. Flagg, Rear Adm. Wilson 
F. Flagg, Aerographer's Mate 2d Class Matthew M. Flocco, Sandra N. 
Foster, 1st Lt. Richard P. Gabriel, Capt. Lawrence D. Getzfred

  Cortez Ghee, Brenda C. Gibson, Col. Ronald F. Golinski, Ian J. Gray, 
Diane Hale-McKinzy, Stanley R. Hall, Carolyn B. Halmon, Michele M. 
Heidenberger, Sheila M.S. Hein, Electronics Technician 1st Class Ronald 
J. Hemenway, Maj. Wallace Cole Hogan, Jr., Staff Sgt. Jimmie I. Holley

  Angela M. Houtz, Brady Kay Howell, Peggie M. Hurt, Lt. Col. Stephen N. 
Hyland, Jr., Lt. Col. Robert J. Hymel, Sgt. Maj. Lacey B. Ivory, Bryan 
C. Jack, Steven D. Jacoby, Lt. Col. Dennis M. Johnson, Judith L. Jones, 
Ann C. Judge, Brenda Kegler, Chandler R. Keller, Yvonne E. Kennedy, 
Norma Cruz Khan, Karen Ann Kincaid, Lt. Michael S. Lamana, David W. 
Laychak

  Dong Chul Lee, Jennifer Lewis, Kenneth E. Lewis, Sammantha L. 
Lightbourn-Allen, Maj. Stephen V. Long, James T. Lynch, Jr., Terrace M. 
Lynch, Operations Specialist 2d Class Nehamon Lyons IV, Shelley A. 
Marshall, Teresa M. Martin, Ada L. Mason-Acker, Lt. Col. Dean E. 
Mattson, Lt. Gen. Timothy J. Maude

  Robert J. Maxwell, Renee A. May, Molly L. McKenzie, Dora Marie 
Menchaca, Patricia E. Mickley, Maj. Ronald D. Milam, Gerald P. Moran, 
Jr., Odessa V. Morris, Electronics Technician 1st Class Brian A. Moss, 
Teddington H. Moy, Lt. Commander Patrick J. Murphy, Christopher C. 
Newton, Khang Ngoc Nguyen, Illustrator-Draftsman 2d Class Michael A. 
Noeth

  Barbara K. Olson, Ruben S. Ornedo, Diana B. Padro, Lt. Jonas M. Panik, 
Maj. Clifford L. Patterson, Jr., Robert Penninger, Robert R. Ploger III, 
Zandra F. Ploger, Capt. Jack D. Punches, Aviation Anti-Submarine Warfare 
Operator 1st Class Joseph J. Pycior, Jr., Lisa J. Raines, Deborah A. 
Ramsaur

  Rhonda Sue Rasmussen, Information Systems Technician 1st Class Marsha 
D. Ratchford, Martha M. Reszke, Todd H. Reuben, Cecelia E. (Lawson) 
Richard, Edward V. Rowenhorst, Judy Rowlett, Sgt. Maj. Robert E. 
Russell, Chief Warrant Officer 4th Class William R. Ruth, Charles E. 
Sabin, Sr., Majorie C. Salamone, John P. Sammartino, Col. David M. 
Scales, Commander Robert A. Schlegel

  Janice M. Scott, Lt. Col. Michael L. Selves, Marian H. Serva, 
Commander Dan F. Shanower, Antionette M. Sherman, Diane M. Simmons, 
George W. Simmons, Donald D. Simmons, Cheryle D. Sincock, Information 
Systems Technician Chief Gregg H. Smallwood, Lt. Col. Gary F. Smith, 
Mari-Rae Sopper, Robert Speisman, Lt. Darin H. Pontell, Scott Powell, 
Patricia J. Statz

  Edna L. Stephens, Norma Lang Steuerle, Sgt. Maj. Larry L. Strickland, 
Hilda E. Taylor, Lt. Col. Kip P. Taylor, Leonard E. Taylor, Sandra C. 
Taylor, Sandra D. Teague, Lt. Col. Karl W. Teepe, Sgt. Tamara C. 
Thurman, Lt. Commander Otis V. Tolbert, Staff Sgt. Willie Q. Troy, Lt. 
Commander Ronald J. Vauk, Lt. Commander Karen J. Wagner, Meta L. 
(Fuller) Waller, Specialist Chin Sun Pak Wells, Staff Sgt. Maudlyn A. 
White

  Sandra L. White, Ernest M. Willcher, Lt. Commander David L. Williams, 
Maj. Dwayne Williams, Radioman Chief Marvin Roger Woods, Capt. John D. 
Yamnicky, Sr., Vicki Yancey, Information Systems Technician 2d Class 
Kevin W. Yokum, Information Systems Technician Chief Donald M. Young, 
Edmond G. Young, Jr., Lisa L. Young, Shuyin Yang, Yuguang Zheng

  Mr. ALLEN. I add in closing, the Burlingame family, wife and surviving 
brother and sister, gave me a replica of one of the few things found 
from Captain Burlingame, other than his wedding ring. He had a picture 
of his mother and a prayer. They gave this to me a couple hours ago at 
the ceremony at the Pentagon.
  I share it with my colleagues and Americans.

                              I Did Not Die


                             (By Mary Frye)

                    Do not stand at my grave and weep;

                    I am not there, I do not sleep.

                    I am a thousand winds that blow.

                    I am the diamond glints on snow.

                    I am the sunlight on ripened grain.

                    I am the gentle autumn rain.

                    When you awaken in the morning's hush

                    I am the swift uplifting rush

                    Of quiet birds in circled flight.

                    I'm the soft stars that shine at night.

                    Do not stand at my grave and cry;

                    I am not there, I did not die.

  Never forget. We will never forget. We will always remember this day 
that forged America together. These horrific events have strengthened 
our unity of purpose and resolve as Americans, that we stand strong 
together for liberty. I hope and pray that as long as God continues to 
bless our United States and indeed blesses the entire world with people 
of such courage, integrity, and character, that liberty and justice will 
endure and prevail.


                        Hon. Russell D. Feingold


                              of Wisconsin

  Mr. President, today I come to the floor to remember, to reflect, to 
try to somehow do justice to the memory of those lost to us on September 
11. The tremendous grief we felt then, and still feel so sharply today, 
makes this anniversary a painful one for all of us as a Nation, and as a 
people.
  The anguish of that day will always be with us, but those of us who 
witnessed those acts of terror on our television screens know that we 
cannot imagine the suffering of those who perished in the attacks, or 
those who survived them.
  The families and friends of those who died must live with terrible 
loss, and those who survived must live with searing memories.
  No passage of time can ever erase the emotions of that day. But 1 year 
later, we also know that no passage of time can diminish the legacy left 
behind by those who perished. They will always be with us, living on in 
the family and friends who loved them.
  No passage of time will allow us to regain what was so tragically lost 
on that morning. But 1 year later, with the passage of time, we see so 
clearly what was briefly obscured by smoke and fear and disbelief. We 
see the strength of the people around us--their everyday heroism, their 
generosity, and their humanity.
  No passage of time can change what happened on September 11. But the 
last year has shown us that when our Nation was tested by terror, we did 
not falter, and most of all we did not fail each other. We rose together 
to meet the challenges before us, and we found that together we were 
capable of more than we ever imagined.
  So today we find strength in each other. We find strength in the acts 
of heroism, and the acts of simple humanity, that took place on 
September 11 and in the aftermath of the attacks: the bravery of the 
first responders at the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, and the 
acts of kindness of Americans all over the country who donated blood, 
observed moments of silence, or flew the flag in a show of patriotism 
and support.
  Each of these acts, however large or small, contributed to our growing 
faith in the Nation's recovery, and in each other.
  I was deeply proud of the many Wisconsinites who reached out to the 
victims of September 11 and their families. Volunteers from around the 
State flocked to disaster relief organizations to donate money and 
donate their time to support the victims of the attacks.
  A number of Wisconsin volunteers also traveled to the World Trade 
Center to support the rescue workers. That desire prompted all of us to 
do something, anything we could to help the victims of the attacks ran 
deep in my State, as it did everywhere across the country.
  Just as the firefighters and police on 9/11 redefined bravery and 
heroism, in the uncertain days that followed, the Americans who reached 
out to help the victims and their families redefined generosity and 
patriotism.
  A number of companies in Wisconsin, as so many businesses nationwide, 
also donated to the rescue efforts. Fire truck manufacturers such as 
Pierce Manufacturing of Appleton, WI, and Marion Body Works of Marion, 
WI, donated critical replacement equipment to the New York City Fire 
Department. Seagrave Fire Apparatus of Clintonville, WI, rallied to 
complete previously ordered equipment for the New York City Fire 
Department in the wake of the attacks, and sent staff to New York to 
help the Department repair damaged equipment.
  These efforts reaffirmed our faith that Americans would rise to this 
challenge, as we have so many times throughout our Nation's history. And 
we are rising to that challenge.
  It has not been easy, and I frankly don't believe that all the choices 
we have made have been the right ones. But that has never affected the 
pride I feel to be an American during this extraordinary time in our 
history. I couldn't be more proud of the way Americans have come 
together in the wake of this tragedy, and I have been privileged to 
serve in the Senate during this last year.
  What we as a Nation have accomplished over the last year, and what we 
will accomplish in the years to come to meet the challenge of terrorism, 
will be our mark on history, not just as a Congress but as a generation.
  It is of course impossible to summarize what happened on 9/11 and what 
it means. There were so many moments--public and private, captured on 
film and also lost to history--that make up our collective memory of 
that day.
  The New York Times section ``Portraits of Grief,'' however, is one 
laudable effort to pay tribute to the victims as individuals by 
remembering and celebrating each of their lives. These brief stories of 
the victims' lives remind us that the people who died that day were from 
every walk of life, from all over the country, and from all over the 
world. They remind us of what America truly is--a sea of nationalities 
and ethnicities never before seen in human history. The bitter irony of 
Al Qaeda's desire to kill Americans is that people from every corner of 
the world have become citizens of this Nation. Like places all across 
America, the World Trade Center, the Pentagon, and the hijacked planes 
were filled with people with roots in Africa, Europe, the Middle East, 
Asia, and Central and South America.
  These people and their families came here for different reasons, and 
they likely lived vastly different lives. But all of them had the chance 
to be a part of this great and free Nation. And all of them were 
senselessly struck down on September 11.
  One such man was Ramzi Doany. I would like to read the story published 
in the ``Portraits of Grief'' section of the New York Times about this 
man, who lived for many years in my home State of Wisconsin.

  Ramzi Doany amassed friends. He amassed them with acts of kindness, 
like tutoring a woman with lupus, two children and no husband, to get 
her through college, or letting his college roommate and the roommate's 
wife live in his condo for 2 years so they could save money for a 
downpayment on a house.

  He amassed friends with his sense of humor, which filled a room and 
flourished at an early age. As a boy of 9 or 10, young Ramzi dug a hole 
in the backyard for a terrible report card and put a stone on top. ``He 
said it was dead and buried,'' said his sister, Dina Doany Azzam.

  Mr. Doany was born to Palestinian parents in Amman, Jordan, and lived 
for many years in Milwaukee. At 35, he devoured the novels of Dickens, 
cooked Thanksgiving turkeys with great pride (even if they were just a 
bit dry) and had just bought a Harley-Davidson motorcycle. He chose to 
work as a forensic accountant last March for Marsh & McLennan, the 
insurance brokerage company, because it would bring him to New York, a 
city he loved. The job also brought him to the World Trade Center.

  It was a funny sort of journey, his sister said.

  This man's journey, like so many others, was tragically cut short on 
September 11.
  On this day, the passage of time is bittersweet. Whatever the healing 
powers of time, no passage of years can change what happened on 
September 11. But the passage of time brings other gifts.
  This last year has brought us resolve--the firm resolve to stop 
terror, to preserve our liberty, and to do justice to the memory of 
those who died.
  It has also shown us our own resilience--how Americans, even in the 
initial moments of shock and horror of the attacks, showed so much 
bravery, so much compassion, and so much generosity.
  Finally, time has brought renewal. It has renewed our strength, our 
hope, and our faith in each other.
  So it is with this resolve, this resilience, and this sense of renewal 
that we move forward, in the name of those who perished, dedicated to 
fighting terror, and united by our faith in this great and free Nation.


                            Hon. Ted Stevens


                                of alaska

  Mr. President, in the morning hours of September 11 our Nation endured 
a terrible tragedy. Though thousands of miles from the crash sites, the 
response from our ``Last Frontier'' was overwhelming. Alaskans rushed to 
aid the victims of the terrorist attacks. They volunteered rescue dogs 
and handlers. They waited in line for 3 hours to donate blood. Some 
boarded planes and traveled to Ground Zero to aid in the search and 
rescue efforts. In December, those Alaskans were still there clearing 
debris.
  Alaskans who could not travel to the crash sites offered support in 
other ways. Over 10,000 Alaskans signed two 50-foot banners bearing the 
phrase ``Love and Prayers, from the People of Alaska.'' One banner was 
presented in New York City by Alaskan firefighters. The other now hangs 
in the Pentagon. Countless Alaskans donated funds to help victims 
through the economic hardships brought on by the attacks. In Kenai, the 
Firefighters Association petitioned our State to name a mountain after 
St. Florian, the patron saint of firefighters, as a tribute to 
firefighters killed in the World Trade Center.
  This year, Alaskans once again join the Nation in mourning and 
remembrance. Today, I attended the Pentagon's memorial service, but in 
my home State. Alaskans will pay tribute to our heroes in their own 
unique way. Anchorage residents will observe a moment of silence at 8:46 
a.m. Emergency responders from across Alaska will gather on Barrow 
Street in Anchorage and join firefighters and police in a procession. A 
memorial wall will be erected at Town Square. In Homer, Mozart's 
``Requiem'' will be performed as part of a worldwide sequence of 
performances beginning at the hour of the attack and moving from one 
time zone to the next. I hope all Alaskans who cannot participate in 
these events will attend a memorial and prominently display American 
flags.
  I am proud of Alaska's efforts to honor and remember the victims of 
this tragedy. On that fateful morning they gave what Lincoln called the 
``last full measure of devotion.'' We honor their memory and their 
sacrifice.


                            Hon. Craig Thomas


                               of Wyoming

  Mr. President, I appreciate the opportunity to share some thoughts 
about this day.
  We all have memories, of course, of a year ago. They are so clear 
after a year. Nothing like that has ever happened in this country. We 
remember it as we see it again on television today.
  We have had a year to react, to recognize and accept the fact that it 
did happen. The unbelievable thing, shocking as it was, did happen. But 
we have also had the time to change from the immediate anger that we 
had, and the disbelief, to a commitment and resolution to do all that is 
necessary to make certain that it does not happen again.
  We have had this year to increase our loyalty to our country and to 
our flag, to increase our understanding of the values of freedom and 
democracy, to commit our resolve to help and support those who have lost 
loved ones, family members, and friends, to accept the reality that here 
in the Congress we can disagree and have different views on normal, 
daily issues, but when it comes to protecting our country and to 
preserving freedom, we all come together.
  The events of September 11 have clearly changed the way Americans view 
the world. We watched the events unfold. No one will ever forget. 
Everyone around the world has been touched, and we see some of that now. 
We are embroiled in a struggle against people who do not care about 
their lives and have set out to ruin ours. Sadly, we lost lives, but we 
regained a strong commitment to preserving our freedom and our 
integrity.
  So it has been a year of shock, disbelief, anger, followed by 
commitment, caring, sharing, patriotism, and determination. I think we 
should be very proud of our fellow Americans for their commitment, their 
willingness to sacrifice and to give--whether it be on the battlegrounds 
overseas, whether it be in rescue missions or law enforcement, in 
charity to the needy, leadership in our country both at the community 
and national level, or just caring for our friends and neighbors and 
loving our families. This year has put an emphasis in all these values.
  The United States will survive and will strengthen. Freedom will 
endure, and we thank God for the opportunity to be able to ensure that 
for our future.


                             Hon. Trent Lott


                             of Mississippi

   I acknowledge the fine statement that was made by Senator Thomas and 
thank him for his efforts today to make sure that Senators are aware of 
the opportunity to come to the floor of the Senate and pay appropriate 
tribute and recognition, and express the condolences that are so 
appropriate for that occasion. I want to make sure he was aware of our 
appreciation.
  Mr. THOMAS. I thank the Republican leader.
  Mr. LOTT. Mr. President, this day, September 11, is its own memorial. 
A year ago I got a call from my daughter, expressing her horror and her 
sorrow on this, her birthday--and only 2 weeks after her new daughter 
was born. She talked about how ``I will just change my birth date. I 
will celebrate it a day earlier.'' She asked me, ``What exactly is this 
situation in this world I have brought my daughter into?''
  It struck me that she would have those questions and those concerns 
considering what she had seen that day. She worried about what it means 
for the future.
  I talked to her this morning on her birthday. She celebrates her 
birthday today, as she should--not just because it was the day she was 
born but because she now realizes that in some ways, in spite of her 
horror, this is an even more special day--this is Patriot Day.
  So my special pen from the Pentagon service will go to my daughter on 
this day because I think in a way how she felt a year ago and how she 
feels today reflects what we have all gone through and what we have 
experienced.
  The truth is that this day doesn't really require any speeches or 
ceremonies, though we certainly will have them all day long. We really 
need no monument to remind us of the suffering and sorrow that befell 
our country 1 year ago today.
  As we sat there next to the wall of the Pentagon, I kept thinking 
about the innocent men, women, and children who lost their lives so 
inexplicably and so mercilessly on that day. But I also think about 
those who tried so hard that day to save people's lives with danger to 
themselves. Some of them probably were injured, and some of them maybe 
were killed--and all that has gone into the work at that building to 
symbolize the importance of us showing that we are mending our wounds 
and we are going to be stronger from what we have experienced.
  The wound that we had last year hasn't healed, nor should we expect it 
to be healed so quickly, nor many of the scars. The scars will be there. 
As a Nation, we lost a great deal--not only these innocent lives in 
Virginia, Pennsylvania, and New York, but also that sense of security 
and perhaps even naivete that we have experienced thinking that this is 
America, we are free and we are accessible, and we go and do what we 
want without being better in any way.
  Well that has changed. I believe we have been hurt deeply--not just 
those who were directly involved, but all of us who watched it--all 
Americans and all freedom-loving people all over the world.
  I continue to be so pleased and, frankly, thrilled with the reaction I 
get when I meet with leaders from countries all over the world--and just 
average people on the streets of other countries. They come up and 
express their condolences and their support.
  Yesterday I met with the President of Bulgaria and the Prime Minister 
of Portugal. Their comments were so reassuring and satisfying. They have 
done their part. Bulgaria--yes. Bulgaria has had troops in Afghanistan 
and, fortunately, has stood with us and will stay with us in the future.
  We have been hurt deeply. But our observance of this day is about more 
than grief, it is about more than anger, and it is about more than 
appreciation. It is about valor and courage beyond words adequate to 
describe what has happened and how we feel. It is about compassion and 
it is about a unity of spirit.
  I have felt that I have seen it as I have gone across this country. I 
do not know how many States I have been in over the past year--but a lot 
of them, and there is a different feeling. When people sing ``God Bless 
America'' and start taking the Pledge of Allegiance to the flag, they 
sing and speak differently--with a little more gusto. But it is not 
about a flag, although that is what becomes so much a symbol of what we 
are experiencing internally. And it is not solely even about 
individuals. It is about ideas and principles--the values that have made 
this country what it is.
  In this body, we don't take an oath to people or an oath to a person. 
We take an oath to the Constitution. So that unity of spirit has really 
been so obvious since I have gone into States in New England and the 
South and the West and the Far West. It is about faith that looks 
through death and a consolation beyond all human assurance.
  This morning, when we joined President Bush at the Pentagon to 
formally reopen that section of the building destroyed in the terrorist 
attack, we all again felt those emotions of a year ago. I was sitting 
next to Senator Daschle, and we couldn't help but remember a year ago 
when we flew in a helicopter, along with Senator Reid and Senator 
Nickles, right over that area. We looked down and saw what was going 
on--the smoke, the confusion, and the activities in trying to save 
people's lives, put out the fire, and deal with all that was going on. 
It is a site that has been burned into my memory forever.
  Needless to say, there couldn't be a better symbol than the 
restoration of the Pentagon for the way America's Armed Forces have 
responded to the assault on our country. God bless them for what they 
have done and for what they are doing today.
  But those who were responsible for that horror--and all those who 
shelter them, finance them, abet them, encourage them, or reward them--
should understand this: America's most important rebuilding is not the 
shattered wall of the Pentagon, nor the scar in the Earth in New York 
City. For what we have restored in the past year cannot be measured in 
granite and steel, nor even grassy knolls, as in the case of 
Pennsylvania. We have rebuilt a wall of resolve, of determination, and 
of steady purpose.
  We have renewed trust in our leadership, and in one another, yes. We 
will disagree on this floor and we will argue about the best way to do 
the homeland security part and what should be the limitations on terror 
insurance. That is what democracy is all about. But in the end we have 
been able to find a way over the past year to come together and get a 
result. That is through determination and a steady purpose.
  We have renewed trust in ways that I hope will stay with us for a long 
time. We have rediscovered in our shared sorrow the power of a truly 
free society to overcome the enemies of freedom.
  These are our battlements and these are our armaments, and their might 
is going to be felt both here at home and in lands far away--until the 
hand of terror is crushed and the work of justice is done.
  Again, we extend our heartfelt condolences to those family members who 
lost loved ones last year. We remind ourselves of how heroes were born 
on that date out of that horror, and we rededicate ourselves to the 
purpose of preserving this great young Republic and all the freedoms for 
which it stands.


                         Hon. Thomas A. Daschle


                             of South Dakota

  Mr. President, I begin by complimenting the distinguished Republican 
leader on his eloquence and his message this morning.
  It was 1 year ago today that many of us turned on our television and 
saw what we could only imagine at the time was a horrible, horrible 
accident. Soon we realized that it was no accident. Instead, it was the 
worst terrorist attack on American soil.
  Later this morning the wing of the Pentagon that was destroyed is 
being rededicated. That field in Shanksville is once again green. The 
debris from the site of the World Trade Center has been removed. The 
heavy equipment and the workers are now engaged in the act of building--
not removing.
  Through the physical scars of that day, we see a Nation beginning to 
be healed. The emotional ones are still raw with our memory. Thousands 
of families are approaching their second Thanksgiving without a loved 
one. Children are approaching their second holiday season without a 
mother--or a father. Empty lockers in firehouses still bear witness to 
the brave men who are no longer there.
  And so, the Pentagon can be restored. New grass can cover the churned 
earth of a rural field. New towers can begin to rise where others fell. 
Seasons and years can pass. Through it all, we will never forget.
  This day will forever be a part of our national memory. Nine-eleven 
will forever be our national shorthand for all that we witnessed, all 
that we have experienced--on that day and the days following.
  That is what we remember all across America today.
  In my home State of South Dakota, there will be a number of small 
services, including a memorial ceremony at Mount Rushmore.
  In Seattle, WA, citizens will march to a downtown fountain that became 
the city's unofficial memorial after September 11. Thousands of flowers 
had been left there. Those flowers were gathered by the city and 
composted. Each marcher will receive a bulb, in mulch generated by the 
original memorial flowers, to plant.
  Birmingham, AL, is dedicating a new memorial walk. San Francisco is 
unfurling a 5-mile-long banner along the city's coastline.
  From Portland, ME, to Portland, OR, people are pausing, and paying 
tribute. All told, more than 200 communities are holding events of some 
kind. In one way or another, all Americans have the opportunity to 
commemorate our Nation's loss.
  And, of course, some people will simply go about their business--and 
that in itself is a powerful testimonial to our ability to go on.
  Today is also a day to remember that our national tragedy is the 
combination of thousands of individual tragedies.
  I think that sentiment was best stated by Janny Scott, a reporter on 
the Metro desk of the New York Times, who was responsible for assembling 
a number of the ``Portraits of Grief'' that sought to capture the 
essence of each of the victims.
  She wrote about ``the individual humanity swallowed up by the 
dehumanizing vastness of the toll,'' and what she called ``the 
preciousness of each life's path.''
  This morning, in New York, former Mayor Giuliani began the process of 
reading the names of everyone who perished on that day. If one name is 
read every 5 seconds, it will take over 4 hours to list every loss.
  We also remember the individual acts of heroism: firefighters who 
rushed up to help others get down; the passengers and flight attendants 
on flight 93 who showed us that we don't ever have to surrender to evil.
  Seeing their selflessness inspired something similar in all of us. In 
South Dakota, one ranch couple--themselves struggling--sold 40,000 
dollars' worth of cattle and donated the proceeds to the victims. 
Similar acts of selflessness took place all over the country. Millions 
of hands reached out to those who had lost so much, until, by the act of 
reaching out and grieving, and remembering, we all came shoulder to 
shoulder as we understood the extraordinary nature of the loss.
  The terrorists who brought down the World Trade Center thought they 
could shake the foundation of this country. They didn't understand that 
the foundation isn't concrete and steel; it is our people, it is our 
commitment--our commitment--to freedom and democracy, and to each other.
  So today, we remember those we lost, and we rededicate ourselves to 
preserving the memory of their lives, and to defeating the terror that 
took them.
  Our military men and women in Afghanistan and those fighting terror 
around the globe carry with them our pride, and our hopes.
  In the most fateful struggles in human history, freedom has triumphed 
over the worst forms of tyranny, and we will defeat the tyranny of 
terror as well.
  On March 11, 6 months after the attack, Valerie Webb, a 12 year old 
who had lost her only living parent in the World Trade Center, flipped a 
switch, sending two towers of light rising into the darkness over lower 
Manhattan.
  Someone compared that memorial to a national votive candle. Others 
compared it to the lives that were lost: beautiful, powerful, and 
fleeting. On April 14, as planned, that temporary memorial was 
extinguished.
  At sunset tonight, in Battery Park, New York's mayor will light a 
flame to commemorate the victims of that day. Unlike the towers of 
light, that flame will not be extinguished--it will be eternal.
  That flame will burn within sight of another eternal flame--the 
symbolic flame from the torch held by the Statue of Liberty.
  Those two eternal flames carry with them two eternal promises.
  The torch held by the Statue of Liberty is our Nation's promise that 
we will never yield in our determination to be a light to all those who 
seek freedom.
  And the flame that will be lit tonight is our promise that though we 
may be slowly, steadily walking the path from remembrance to recovery--
we will never forget.

  MOMENT OF SILENCE IN RECOGNITION OF THE EVENTS OF SEPTEMBER 11, 2001

  The ACTING PRESIDENT pro tempore. Under the previous order, the hour 
of 12 noon having arrived, the Senate will now observe a moment of 
silence in recognition of the events of September 11, 2001.
  (Thereupon, the Senate observed a moment of silence.)

                  IN REMEMBRANCE OF SEPTEMBER 11, 2001


                            Hon. Ted Stevens


                                of alaska

  Madam President, I was very proud of the efforts of Alaskans in 
response to the disaster on September 11 of last year. Although we are 
thousands of miles from New York, they immediately reacted.


                          Hon. Patrick J. Leahy


                               of Vermont

  Madam President, later this afternoon in my home State of Vermont, the 
chief judge of the Federal district court, Judge William Sessions, will 
have an immigration ceremony, and I might say that I can't think of 
anything more fitting. We will have memorials and other events 
throughout the State of Vermont today, just as we will in other States.
  Many of us had been at the Pentagon earlier this morning, heard the 
moving statements, and saw the resolve of the men and women who protect 
this Nation. We heard our President and Secretary of Defense and others.
  It is right that throughout the country we have different events to 
mark this occasion.
  I want to especially compliment Judge Sessions for what he is doing in 
Vermont. If there is anything that speaks to the resiliency of this 
Nation, the greatness of this Nation, it is welcoming immigrants, saying 
our borders are not sealed, our borders are open.
  We want to welcome people who will continue to make this country 
great, just as did my paternal great-grandparents and my maternal great-
grandparents who came to this country not speaking any English but who 
sought employment and a new life. My grandfathers were stonecutters in 
Vermont, immigrant stock. My wife was the first generation of her family 
to be born here in the United States. It is immigrants who have made 
this Nation strong.
  What Judge Sessions is doing is telling us that our borders and our 
country and our arms are still open to the mix of people from throughout 
the world who will continue to give us the diversity we need, just as 
our Constitution gives us diversity and guarantees that diversity in the 
First Amendment. We now have new Americans who will be here with the 
same rights and privileges the rest of us have, and the Nation will be a 
better place for it.


                           Hon. John W. Warner


                               of Virginia

  Madam President, we have just returned from a most historic and moving 
ceremony at the Department of Defense. That building will always occupy 
in my heart a very special place for I was privileged to serve there 
during 5 years and 4 months of the period of the war in Vietnam in the 
Navy Secretariat, including my service as Secretary of the Navy.
  On 9/11 I joined colleagues briefly here in the Chamber and then we 
exited and with other colleagues who were gathered in the park, we 
chatted a little bit about what we should do. I returned to my office 
and conducted a brief prayer meeting and recommended to my staff that 
they proceed to their homes and their loved ones.
  In about an hour or two, however, I decided I would like to go to the 
Department of Defense again because of my very special high regard for 
the men and women of the Armed Forces and that dastardly act committed 
by terrorists. I called the Secretary of Defense, whom I had known for 
many years. We both served in the administration of President Nixon and 
President Ford. He said: Come right over.
  I called my good friend and colleague, Carl Levin, at his home, and 
Carl immediately said, yes, he would join us, and the two of us then 
proceeded to the Department of Defense where we joined Secretary 
Rumsfeld and then-Chairman of the Joint Chiefs, General Shelton. It was 
a memorable afternoon there at the command post watching the 
magnificence of our command structure dealing with the many unknowns, 
and yet taking the proper actions.
  The President called in. Both Senator Levin and I spoke with him 
briefly. Then we went back with the Secretary to where the plane had 
struck the building and visited with all those who were performing 
heroic acts right before our eyes in hopes of saving other lives and 
doing what they could to comfort those wounded.
  We then returned with the Secretary. And Secretary Rumsfeld asked 
Senator Levin and I to accompany him to a press conference. We stood 
behind the Secretary and the Chairman while they spoke. And then 
unexpectedly, Secretary Rumsfeld turned to both of us and asked us to 
make a few remarks.
  I have here this morning the remarks I made, with no preparation, just 
speaking from the heart. And they are as true today, 1 year later, as 
they were at about 6:30 on the afternoon or the evening of 9/11 when 
Senator Levin and I joined the Secretary. I will just repeat these 
remarks.
  I stated that I was joined by my distinguished chairman, Carl Levin, 
and I said, speaking to the Nation:

  I can assure you that the Congress stands behind our President and the 
President speaks with one voice for this entire Nation. This is, indeed, 
the most tragic hour in America's history, and yet I think it can be its 
finest hour, as our President and those with him, most notably our 
Secretary of Defense, our Chairman [of the Joint Chiefs] and the men and 
women of the Armed Forces all over this world stand ready not only to 
defend this Nation and our allies against further attack, but to take 
such actions as are directed in the future in retaliation for this 
terrorist act--one of the most unprecedented in the history of the 
world.

  We call upon the entire world to step up and help, because terrorism 
is a common enemy to all, and we're in this together. The United States 
has borne the brunt, but [which nation] can be next? Step forward and 
let us hold accountable and punish those that have perpetrated this 
attack.

  Under the leadership of our President and the courage of the men and 
women of the Armed Forces and the strength of the citizens of this 
Nation, that has been done, is being done, and will be done.


                          Hon. Dianne Feinstein


                              of California

  Madam President, I rise today to share some of my thoughts on this 
very special day, a day that commemorates one of the darkest days in our 
Nation's history.
  Those of us who listened this morning to the recitation of the names 
of those killed in the World Trade Center and the Pentagon found in 
those names both a message of grief and one deep in sorrow. Also in 
those names was a profound message of how deeply the world is 
interwoven. The reading of these names was, for me, an unforgettable 
message of our diversity.
  My sorrow, my sympathy, my condolences go to those who have lost so 
much. For many, they have lost everything; yet they still have their 
spirit, their hope, and their determination, and they still have the 
love of a very sympathetic Nation.
  On September 11, we all felt as if the loss was too much to bear, as 
if it would be impossible to go on. But out of the ashes of the World 
Trade Center and the Pentagon, we in Congress returned to work. We tried 
in our legislative ways to address the terrorist threat. Within a week 
of the attack, we approved a resolution authorizing the President to use 
force against those who would perpetuate or harbor the terrorists.
  Within a month, we approved the USA Patriot Act, which authorized our 
law enforcement and intelligence agencies to take the necessary steps to 
root out the terrorist threat and to protect the Nation.
  In May of this year, we approved the border security and visa reform 
legislation, which overhauled the way this Nation allows immigrants and 
visitors into the country.
  In June, we approved a bioterrorism bill that included strict 
certification requirements for laboratories that handle anthrax, 
smallpox, and more than 30 other deadly pathogens.
  At the same time, the United States launched a war against terror. In 
Afghanistan, the U.S. forces, working with the Northern Alliance, ousted 
the Taliban, fought Al Qaeda troops, and made it possible for Hamid 
Karzai to be elected President--Afghanistan's first democratic election.
  U.S. Special Forces were also sent to the Philippines, to Yemen, and 
Georgia to train local troops on how to fight the war against terror. We 
have broken up Al Qaeda cells in Spain, France, Morocco, and Singapore, 
thereby preventing planned attacks.
  In the financial world, the Treasury Department began examining the 
financing of terrorist organizations, freezing more than $34 million in 
terrorist assets.
  Now the Senate is considering two additional steps to defend our 
Nation: a bill to create a new Department of Homeland Defense and a 
comprehensive review of the intelligence failures that led to 9/11.
  I would expect the Senate to approve the homeland defense bill in the 
coming weeks, and, hopefully, it will be signed into law by the end of 
the year.
  On September 17, the Intelligence Committees of both the House and the 
Senate will open their first hearings on our intelligence review, which 
has been going on now for 6 months.
  One year has now passed. The Nation has shown its resolve and 
resiliency. Now we must show our staying power.
  For me, what emerged from 9/11 were four specific points:
  First, we must stay the course on the war on terror. We must ferret 
out, bring to justice, one by one, group by group, those