[Congressional Bills 117th Congress]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]
[H.R. 1842 Enrolled Bill (ENR)]

        H.R.1842

                    One Hundred Seventeenth Congress

                                 of the

                        United States of America


                          AT THE SECOND SESSION

           Begun and held at the City of Washington on Monday,
          the third day of January, two thousand and twenty-two


                                 An Act


 
To require the Secretary of the Treasury to mint commemorative coins in 
       recognition of the Bicentennial of Harriet Tubman's birth.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
United States of America in Congress assembled,
SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.
    This Act may be cited as the ``Harriet Tubman Bicentennial 
Commemorative Coin Act''.
SEC. 2. FINDINGS.
    Congress finds the following:
        (1) Harriet Tubman was a formerly enslaved abolitionist who 
    guided about 70 people from slavery to freedom in 10 years.
        (2) Born in March 1822, Tubman was a notable abolitionist who 
    not only freed herself, but also freed others from slavery.
        (3) Harriet Ross Tubman, born Araminta ``Minty'' Ross, was born 
    enslaved on the plantation of Anthony Thompson in Dorchester 
    County, Maryland.
        (4) With the help of the Underground Railroad network, in the 
    fall of 1849, Tubman escaped from Poplar Neck in Caroline County, 
    Maryland, heading north to freedom in Pennsylvania.
        (5) With the passing of the Fugitive Slave Act as part of the 
    Compromise of 1850, the operations to help enslaved persons escape 
    became dangerous and she risked her life to rescue them from 
    slavery.
        (6) Despite passage of the Compromise of 1850 and the Fugitive 
    Slave Act, Tubman continued her work, escorting her refugees to 
    Canada instead.
        (7) It was during the 1850s that Tubman made 13 trips back to 
    Maryland, guiding approximately 70 enslaved persons to the North, 
    including family members, and providing instruction to about 70 
    more who found their way to freedom on their own.
        (8) Regardless of the arduous process of helping fugitive 
    enslaved persons escape through the Underground Railroad, not a 
    single person was recaptured under Tubman's supervision.
        (9) During 1859, Tubman aided abolitionist John Brown by 
    recruiting supporters for his raid on Harper's Ferry, a planned 
    insurrection against slaveholders in Virginia and Maryland.
        (10) In the beginning of the Civil War, Tubman served as a spy, 
    cook, and nurse in South Carolina and Florida.
        (11) Tubman also recruited newly freed African-American men to 
    join regiments of African-American soldiers called United States 
    Colored Troops.
        (12) In recognition of her abilities, Tubman served as an army 
    scout and spy for Major General David Hunter and Colonel James 
    Montgomery. Harriet Tubman was inducted into the Military 
    Intelligence Corps Hall of Fame.
        (13) Tubman distinguished herself as the first woman to lead an 
    armed expedition in the Civil War, the Combahee River Raid, 
    resulting in more than 700 enslaved persons in South Carolina being 
    freed.
        (14) After the Civil War, Tubman frequently sheltered and fed 
    newly freed enslaved persons at her home on South Street in Auburn, 
    New York, which she purchased from Secretary of State William Henry 
    Seward, even though she had little money herself. She found a means 
    to an end by working as a domestic, selling produce from her 
    garden, taking in donations of food, loans from friends, and 
    raising pigs on her farm.
        (15) Tubman became active in the women's movement as early as 
    1860. She attended meetings and gave speeches in her home State of 
    New York, as well as in Boston and Washington, D.C.
        (16) Tubman was an avid advocate for African-American women and 
    their civil rights. In 1896, she was invited as a speaker at the 
    first meeting of the National Association of Colored Women in 
    Washington, D.C.
        (17) Although living in financial insecurity, Tubman 
    transferred a 25-acre parcel of land to the African Methodist 
    Episcopal Zion Church in 1903, which eventually became The Harriet 
    Tubman Home for the Aged and Indigent Negroes. At the time, few 
    social services existed for elderly and ill people of color.
        (18) Escaping slavery, risking everything to save her family 
    and friends, aiding enslaved persons in escape from slavery, 
    leading a military raid, championing the cause of women's suffrage, 
    advocating for civil rights and access to health care, Harriet 
    Tubman is an individual that has performed achievements that have 
    had profound impacts on history and culture in the United States.
SEC. 3. COIN SPECIFICATIONS.
    (a) Denominations.--In commemoration of Harriet Tubman, the 
Secretary of the Treasury (hereafter referred to in this Act as the 
``Secretary'') shall mint and issue the following coins:
        (1) $5 gold coins.--Not more than 50,000 $5 coins, which 
    shall--
            (A) weigh 8.359 grams;
            (B) be struck on a planchet having a diameter of 0.850 
        inches; and
            (C) contain at least 90 percent gold.
        (2) $1 silver coins.--Not more than 400,000 $1 coins, which 
    shall--
            (A) weigh 26.73 grams;
            (B) be struck on a planchet having a diameter of 1.500 
        inches; and
            (C) contain at least 90 percent silver.
        (3) Half-dollar clad coins.--Not more than 750,000 half-dollar 
    coins which shall--
            (A) weigh 11.34 grams;
            (B) have a diameter of 1.205 inches; and
            (C) be minted to the specifications for half-dollar coins 
        contained in section 5112(b) of title 31, United States Code.
    (b) Legal Tender.--The coins minted under this Act shall be legal 
tender, as provided in section 5103 of title 31, United States Code.
    (c) Numismatic Items.--For purposes of sections 5134 and 5136 of 
title 31, United States Code, all coins minted under this Act shall be 
considered to be numismatic items.
SEC. 4. DESIGNS OF COINS.
    (a) Design Requirements.--
        (1) In general.--The designs of the coins minted under this Act 
    shall be emblematic of the legacy of Harriet Tubman as an 
    abolitionist. At least one obverse design shall bear the image of 
    Harriet Tubman.
        (2) Designation and inscriptions.--On each coin minted under 
    this Act, there shall be--
            (A) an inscription of Harriet Tubman;
            (B) a designation of the value of the coin;
            (C) an inscription of the year ``2024''; and
            (D) inscriptions of the words ``Liberty'', ``In God We 
        Trust'', ``United States of America'', and ``E Pluribus Unum''.
    (b) Selection.--The designs for the coins minted under this Act 
shall be--
        (1) selected by the Secretary, after consultation with the 
    National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
    The Harriet Tubman Home, Inc. in Auburn, New York, and the 
    Commission of the Fine Arts; and
        (2) reviewed by the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee.
SEC. 5. ISSUANCE OF COINS.
    (a) Quality of Coins.--Coins minted under this Act shall be issued 
in uncirculated and proof qualities.
    (b) Mint Facility.--Only 1 facility of the United States Mint may 
be used to strike any particular quality of the coins minted under this 
Act.
    (c) Period for Issuance.--The Secretary may issue coins under this 
Act only during the period beginning on January 1, 2024, and ending on 
December 31, 2024.
SEC. 6. SALE OF COINS.
    (a) Sale Price.--The coins issued under this Act shall be sold by 
the Secretary at a price equal to the sum of--
        (1) the face value of the coins;
        (2) the surcharge provided under section 7(a) with respect to 
    the coins; and
        (3) the cost of designing and issuing the coins (including 
    labor, materials, dies, use of machinery, overhead expenses, 
    marketing, and shipping).
    (b) Bulk Sales.--The Secretary shall make bulk sales of the coins 
issued under this Act at a reasonable discount.
    (c) Prepaid Orders.--
        (1) In general.--The Secretary shall accept prepaid orders for 
    the coins minted under this Act before the issuance of the coins.
        (2) Discount.--Sale prices with respect to prepaid orders under 
    paragraph (1) shall be at a reasonable discount.
SEC. 7. SURCHARGES.
    (a) In General.--All sales of coins issued under this Act shall 
include--
        (1) a surcharge of $35 per coin for the $5 coins;
        (2) a surcharge of $10 per coin for the $1 coins; and
        (3) a surcharge of $5 per coin for the half-dollar coin.
    (b) Distribution.--
        (1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph (2), subject 
    to section 5134(f) of title 31, United States Code, all surcharges 
    received by the Secretary from the sale of coins issued under this 
    Act shall be promptly paid by the Secretary equally to the National 
    Underground Railroad Freedom Center in Cincinnati, Ohio, and The 
    Harriet Tubman Home, Inc. in Auburn, New York, for the purpose of 
    accomplishing and advancing their missions.
        (2) Exception.--Notwithstanding section 5134(f)(1) of title 31, 
    United States Code, if an entity described in paragraph (1) of this 
    subsection raises funds from private sources in an amount that is 
    less than the total amount of the proceeds of the surcharge derived 
    from the sale of the coins issued under this Act, the Secretary 
    shall promptly pay to the other entity the proceeds of such 
    surcharge.
    (c) Audits.--The National Underground Railroad Freedom Center in 
Cincinnati, Ohio, and The Harriet Tubman Home, Inc. in Auburn, New 
York, shall be subject to the audit requirements of section 5134(f)(2) 
of title 31, United States Code, with regard to the amounts received 
under subsection (b).
    (d) Limitation.--Notwithstanding subsection (a), no surcharge may 
be included with respect to the issuance under this Act of any coin 
during a calendar year if, as of the time of such issuance, the 
issuance of such coin would result in the number of commemorative coin 
programs issued during such year to exceed the annual 2 commemorative 
coin program issuance limitation under section 5112(m)(1) of title 31, 
United States Code. The Secretary of the Treasury may issue guidance to 
carry out this subsection.
SEC. 8. FINANCIAL ASSURANCES.
    The Secretary shall take such actions as may be necessary to ensure 
that--
        (1) minting and issuing coins under this Act will not result in 
    any net cost to the United States Government; and
        (2) no funds, including applicable surcharges, are disbursed to 
    any recipient designated in section 7 until the total cost of 
    designing and issuing all of the coins authorized by this Act 
    (including labor, materials, dies, use of machinery, winning design 
    compensation, overhead expenses, marketing, and shipping) is 
    recovered by the United States Treasury, consistent with sections 
    5112(m) and 5134(f) of title 31, United States Code.

                               Speaker of the House of Representatives.

                            Vice President of the United States and    
                                               President of the Senate.